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AUGUST 2017

T H E B AC K TO S C H O O L I S S U E

in TIPS FOR TRANSITIONING YOUR GUIDE TO GET READY FOR THE BIG ECLIPSE

BACK TO THE CLASSROOM

AND

WAYS TO MINIMIZE DIGITAL DISTRACTIONS HOW TO BE A HELPFUL, NOT A HELICOPTER PARENT


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Say goodbye to grocery shopping.

Try 2 weeks of grocery delivery for free! shipt.com/Memphis

Make an eye exam your child’s first exam this year. If you’ve noticed a change in academic performance, an eye exam can help rule out undiagnosed problems with your child’s vision. Make an appointment today with the Pediatric Service at The Eye Center at Southern College of Optometry or learn more at eyecentermemphis.com.

Courtesy of the Pediatric Primary Care Service of

1225 Madison Ave., in the Midtown Medical District

901-722-3250 www.eyecentermemphis.com

M E M PH I S PA R ENT.COM

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memphisparent

THIS MONTH

memphisparent

memphis_parent

memphisparent

DEPARTMENTS

FEATURES

6 #901 Fun What’s happening around town 8 What’s Cookin’ Organic Meals

in

14 Goodbye Summer, Hello School! By Meagan Ruffing

10 Early Years Transitioning back to the workplace 12 Dear Teacher Preparing to go back to school 21 School Notes Making a community impact 22 Calendar & Events A month of family fun

18 Are you a Helpful or Helicopter Parent? By Christina Katz

OUR COVER KID

Chasney Vue, age 10 Pictured with her mom, Maya Vue Photography: Bryan Rollins

16 by Michelle McKissack

20 Put Down the Xbox, Pick Up a Book By Fredrick McKissack, Jr.

OUR STAFF Art Director Bryan Rollins

Production Operations Director Margie Neal

Advertising Art Director Christopher Myers

Calendar Editor Meena Viswanathan

Graphic Designer Jeremiah Matthews

Copy Editors Shara Clark, Michael Finger, Samuel Cicci

REGIONAL INTERVENTION PROGRAM OF MEMPHIS-PARENTING THAT WORKS

University of Memphis Park Avenue Campus 4111 S. MSU B Street Bldg. 48, Suite 110 Memphis, TN 38152-6173

REGIONAL INTERVENTION PROGRAM

Funded by:

Building 48-RIP

Phone: 901.678.5258 or 901.678.4173

Fax: 901.678.5230 www.memphis.edu/rip

A program for families with

Funded by the BY Tennessee Department of Mental Health and Substance Abuseyoung Service children who are DRIVEN DOING.

A Tennessee Board of Regents Institution • An Equal Opportunity/Affirmative Actionexperiencing University behavior problems

Funded by the Tennessee Department of Mental Health and Substance Abuse Services

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Send advertising queries to: sheryl@memphisparent.com Visit us online at memphisparent.com

8:00am-7:00pm

Saturday, August 26th

901.678.4173 Fax: 901.678.5230

Welcoming all families of preschool childrenmemphis.edu/rip who are willing to work hard and learn PARENTING THAT WORKS, the Regionaltn.gov/behavioral-health/section/rip Intervention Program at the University of Memphis serves families of children under the age of six who have mild to severe behavior problems.

Memphis, TN 38103 p: 901.521.9000 • f: 901.521.0129

Friday, August 25th

A program for families with young children 901.678.5258 who arePhone: experiencing behavior problems

Bldg. 48, Suite 110 Memphis, TN 38152

What she wants to be when she grows up: a supermodel!

CEO Jennifer K. Oswalt Publisher Kenneth Neill Director of New Business Development Jeffrey A. Goldberg Editorial Director Bruce VanWyngarden Special Projects Director Molly Willmott Email Marketing Manager Britt Ervin Distribution Manager Lynn Sparagowski Controller Ashley Haeger IT Director Joseph Carey Advertising Assistant Roxy Matthews

REGIONAL INTERVENTION PROGRAM

U of M Park Avenue Campus 4111 S. MSU B Street

Favorite activity: Swimming

Memphis Parent is published by Contemporary Media, Inc.

Advertising Manager Sheryl Butler

Editor Michelle McKissack

Favorite Food: Pepperoni Pizza

8:00am-12:00 noon Many items half price on Saturday

ACCEPTED

Gently Used Name Brand Fall Clothing Children’s Shoes - Baby Equipment & Furniture Infant/Toddler Toys & Outdoor Toys


EDITOR’S NOTE

SUCCESS

GROWS HERE

AMAZING AUGUST!

Woodland combines small class sizes, dedicated teachers, and personalized instruction to help grow your child’s success. Call 901-685-0976 to schedule a tour, or email admissions@woodlandschool.org.

A co-ed, 2-year-old – 8th grade independent school in the heart of East Memphis. | woodlandschool.org

MICHELLE McKISSACK

michelle@memphisparent.com

©2016 Woodland Presbyterian School. All rights reserved.

It’s amazing how just a couple of short months ago, my kids and I could not wait for school to let out to enjoy all the fun that summer has to offer. But here we are gearing up to head back to school, and I’m not sure who’s more excited – them or me. After fussing at my sons, Peter and Everett, to finish up their required summer reading, it was all about back-to-school shopping. Call me strange, but I love the mayhem of tax-free weekend and loading up on all the pens, pencils, and the cazillion glue sticks that my daughter, Bliss, needs from her 1st grade supply list. But sometimes a little anxiousness comes along with the excitement, especially if your child is beginning kindergarten, transitioning from elementary to middle school, or even starting out as a freshman in high school. That’s completely normal, but there are ways to assuage the jitters. Pick up some tips in our feature, “Goodbye Summer, Hello School!” (page 14). I really love this Back-to-School issue because I feel like a lot of the stories here are “preaching to the choir.” In other words, they really spoke to me and I learned a lot, namely with “Are you a Helpful or Helicopter Parent?” (page 18). I took the quiz and I think sometimes I have a foot in each category. Oops! Then there’s “Put Down the Xbox, Pick Up the Book” (page 20). Can I get an amen?! As I mentioned earlier about my boys, the struggle is real. But they did finally finish up those classics, which seem to have a difficult time competing with the gaming, but they told me they actually liked a couple of the books they had to read. Miracles never cease! Finally, I’m thrilled about how Memphis area parents and children can all get schooled on something really, really exciting that we have the rare opportunity to experience – an amazing total solar eclipse! I was 10 years old the last time a total solar eclipse occurred in America. I remember the joy and anticipation of it all. In my story, “Science in 3-D” (page 16), featuring our adorable cover kid, Chasney, find out fun facts and where and how to view the solar eclipse safely. Happy Parenting!

A customized day full of imaginative adventures for them. customizedparty day full imaginative A stress-free for of you, or in otheradventures words an for them. A stress-free party for you, or in other words an

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At a The Little Gym Awesome Birthday Bash, your child and their friends have theAwesome whole place to themselves forchild fun and activities At a Thewill Little Gym Birthday Bash, your their createdwill especially them. Plustowe’ll handle everything from friends have thefor whole place themselves for fun activities set-up clean-up, making birthdays at The Littleeverything Gym a big from wish createdtoespecially for them. Plus we’ll handle come for parents too. birthdays at The Little Gym a big wish set-uptrue to clean-up, making come true for parents too. Call or go online to schedule your child’s next birthday at Call or go online to schedule your child’s next birthday at The Little Gym The The Little LittleGym Gymof Germantown,TN www.tlggermantowntn.com The Little Gym of Germantown,TN 901.755.1323 www.tlggermantowntn.com 901.755.1323

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WHAT AGE SHOULD CHILDREN

FIRST SEE THEIR PEDIATRIC DENTIST? AGE 5 AGE 3 AGE 1 Yes, that’s right! Actually within 6 months of their first birthday!

901FUN

EXPLORE VARIOUS EVENTS THE GREATER MEMPHIS AREA HAS TO OFFER.

Mw! o A X rT E eEn Unde lue) E FRr Childr 2 Va w Patie7n. ts Fo $6or Detailpsir. eNse08/31e/1incurred a ( Call f nly. Ex s may b ases. c O e al fe ual ition divid Add in in

Pediatric Dentists

GET OUTSIDE! FITNESS: YOGA FOR KIDS.

Steven J. Fuson, D.D.S., M.S., John A. Acosta, D.D.S., Toddrick Smith, D.D.S., Dr. Nathaniel Denson, D.D.S., M.D.S.

Family Dentists

Clayton Floriani, D.D.S., Adam Fitzhugh, D.D.S.

Orthodontists

Bob Lorentz, D.D.S., M.S., Gregg Bouldien, D.D.S., M.S., Dr. Taylor Collazo, D.D.S., M.S.D.

Germantown

901.453.4382 Kirby

901.453.4383

www.pdg4kids.com

Class that Really Rocks

Olive Branch

662.985.6047

Shelby Farms Park is hosting yoga classes every Saturday in August from 11 a.m. until noon. It’s open to all ages and a perfect class for beginners or students who want to re-connect with their fundamentals. Free admission. For details call 222-7275.

Southaven

662.985.6048

Music for Aardvarks, Memphis!

dren 6 months to 5 years and their parents/caregivers

er Classes

ging and dancing

Winne

r

A Kid’s Music Class that Really Rocks

or one FREE class

Come Jam with Music for Aardvarks, Memphis! An interactive music program for children 6 months to 5 years and their parents/caregivers

Fall Registration Now Open! • Great Music • Live guitar and storytelling, singing and dancing

ast Memphis, Collierville, and Cordova at www.memphisaardvarks.com 227 or info@memphisaardvarks.com

• Fun for parents too! • Great for special events, & school programs Newcomers welcome to drop in for one FREE class CLASSES IN MIDTOWN AND EAST MEMPHIS Visit us at www.memphisaardvarks.com or call 871-0227 for more info

CHOO! CHOO! CELEBRATE TRAIN HERITAGE DAY

Bring the kids to this family-friendly event to view model train displays, see inside historic train cars, and learn about other area railroad groups. This year's event will extend to Collierville's Visitor Center on Town Square, located inside the Train Depot. Enjoy music, food, and crafts. Admission is free. Saturday, August 12 from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. at the Morton Museum, 196 N. Main St. For more information visit colliervillemuseum.org or call 457-2650.

HIGH QUALITY EARLY EDUCATION & CARE Children’s Choice at the Memphis Service Center

Now Enrolling Programs for Infants through 5-Year-Olds

Learn More: brighthorizons.com/memphis 6 6

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MLK50 DROP THE MIC POETRY SLAM

The National Civil Rights Mueseum will host a two-day MLK50 Drop the Mic Poetry event on August 18-19. The poetry slam and symposium will feature poets performing original works and a workshop on using art as activism. It is free to participate and attend the poetry slam. To register and for more information visit civilrightsmuseum.org/drop-the-mic or call 521-9699.


AN ANCHOR FOR LIFE

Grace-St. Luke’s Episcopal School is a coed, independent school located in the heart of Midtown’s beautiful Central Gardens neighborhood. Since 1947, GSL has been preparing boys and girls to become creative problem solvers, confident lifelong learners, and responsible citizens in their communities and the world.

Preschool Open House Nov. 11 9 a.m.

Senior Kindergarten Open House Nov. 11 10:30 a.m.

Coed | Age 2 - Grade 8 | Midtown gslschool.org • 246 S. Belvedere, Memphis, TN 38104 901.278.0200 • learnmore@gslschool.org

Academics that inspire. Legacies that endure. Apply Today

PK - 5th • Germantown 6th - 12th • Cordova 901.754.7217 | www.ecseagles.com M E M PH I S PA R ENT.COM

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WHAT’S COOKIN?

ORGANIC FOOD AND CHILDHOOD DEVELOPMENT By MURRAY LACE

Without a doubt, you have seen organic foods while strolling through the grocery store. As a budget-conscious parent, you might have blown right past that section of the produce aisle, as organic foods tend to be a tad more expensive than conventionally-grown products. However, the positive impact organic foods can have on the health and well-being of your little ones, along with the money you’ll save by having them become healthier, are well worth it. The term “organic” refers to the way products are grown and processed. For example, livestock that produce goods like meat, eggs, and dairy must not be given any animal byproducts, antibiotics, or growth hormones to be considered organic. They also need ample access to the great outdoors. Think free-range chickens or grass-fed beef. For organic fruits and veggies, this means the crop has not been exposed to synthetic pesticides, herbicides, or fungicides. So, what is the ultimate benefit of all this to you and your family? ORGANIC FOODS ARE ‘CLEAN.’ Genetically modified foods are designed to withstand a higher intake of chemicals, meaning they are sprayed with a great deal of synthetic pesticides, herbicides, and fungicides. GMO ingredients that are ridden with these toxic chemicals are present in about 60 to 70 percent of supermarket foods! Harmful pesticides used to keep bugs away from crops are terrible for us all, but especially to vulnerable children whose bodies are working hard to grow big and strong. Besides affecting the bugs, pesticides also have a negative impact on things living near where they are sprayed—animals, humans, other plants, and more. Many of these pesticides have been linked to various types of cancers, as well as to autoimmune disorders, infertility, cardiac disease, and hypertension. Luckily, organic foods do not come in contact with pesticides, making food choices clean, healthy and easy to digest. Although the majority of health issues listed will not impact children in their youth, they could cause huge problems down the road. Laying the foundation of healthy, organic eating today can preserve your children’s health for years to come. ORGANIC FOODS ARE PACKED WITH ADDED NUTRIENTS. A study funded by the European Union found that organic fruits and veggies have up to 50 percent more antioxidants than those grown conventionally. They also contain more vitamins and minerals, like iron,

which ensures oxygen is in the blood, and zinc, which ensures the body’s immune system functions properly. With many children having picky palates, knowing that the foods they are willing to eat are giving them as many nutrients as possible is invaluable. Now that you’re armed with the facts, it’s time to hit the grocery store! But, what about those days when your child’s busy schedule simply does not allow for you to cook? Fortunately for Memphians, organic eating is no longer something that can only be enjoyed at home. Mama Gaia, the Bluff City’s first all-organic restaurant, recently opened in Crosstown Concourse, giving parents the opportunity to feel good about what their kids are eating while on the go. Owners Philipp and Cru von Holtzendorff-Fehling and their children have enjoyed the organic lifestyle and its benefits for years. In fact, after being diagnosed with Lyme disease, Cru self-prescribed an all-organic, plant-based diet and saw a remarkable change in her health. Their children also reap the benefits, as they love diving into foods that they know are good for their bodies and the environment. While you cannot limit all of your children’s exposure to toxins in the environment, the good news is that you do have a say in the types of foods they eat, so choose wisely. You’ll be glad you did!

BALSAMIC QUINOA BOWL WITH VEGGIES Recipe by Mama Gaia

INGREDIENTS Quinoa: 1/4 cup quinoa 1/4 cup vegetable stock 1/4 cup water 1/2 teaspoon salt (less if your vegetable stock is salty)

Balsamic Dressing 1/4 cup olive oil 2 tablespoons balsamic vinegar 1/2 teaspoon salt 1/2 teaspoon pepper 1/2 teaspoon agave syrup 2 basil leaves

Veggies: 1 zucchini 1/2 small eggplant 1 red bell pepper 2 cloves of garlic 3 twigs of thyme 3 twigs of rosemary Pinch of salt 1/4 cup olive oil

INSTRUCTIONS Quinoa: 1. Put 1/4 cup of quinoa into saucepan. 2. Add vegetable stock and water. 3. Add salt and put on stove over medium heat. 4. Cook covered until water is gone (About 15 minutes). Note: Don’t stir. Reduce heat if boiling too strong.

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Veggies: 1. Cut vegetables into ¼-inch slices lengthwise and lay on baking sheet. 2. Top with olive oil, herbs, salt, and garlic. 3. Place on top rack and broil on high until vegetables begin to brown (About 5 minutes). Balsamic dressing: 1. Mix all ingredients together in Mason jar or other container with lid. 2. Close with lid and shake well. Combining all ingredients: 1. Take 3 loose cups of greens of choice and place in bowl. 2. Add 1 cup of cooked quinoa to bowl 3. Top with dressing and vegetables.


Stand Out

Threshold

Montessori School 581 Ellsworth Memphis, TN 38111

901-327-4980

At Briarcrest, we believe every student is one of a kind. So, we focus on helping them find and develop themselves by providing more opportunities: Opportunities to discover their interests, talents, and strengths, and opportunities to strengthen their faith and values. In every aspect of our balanced education—academics, athletics, and arts in a distinctively Christian environment—our goal is to help every child stand out. To schedule a tour, call 901.765.4605 or visit briarcrest.com.

“Building the Joy of Learning” Opening time 6:30 a.m. Starting Students at 18 months. Close to U of M, Midtown and East Memphis.

Visit us at ThresholdMontessori.com

T utoring S uyecarcs heelpisngs for

Ove r 30 students learn TEST PREP

ACT • SAT • PSAT • GRE PRAXIS ... and more

School Subjects • Study Skills Test-Taking • Writing

Pamela Palmer M.S., M.A., Ed.D. 901.331.6082 / pam@pamelapalmer.com

OPEN HOUSE: Thursday, October 26 at 9:30am • East Memphis October 26 at 6:30pm • Houston Levee Elementary & Middle School M E M PH I S PA R ENT.COM

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EARLY YEARS

FROM STAY-AT-HOME-MOM TO BACK-TO-WORK-MOM How to market yourself and get the job that suits you. By MEAGAN RUFFING

So you’re an empty nester? Sorta. The kids are back in school and it’s the first year since having children that you find yourself at home … alone … and you want to get a job. Getting back into the workforce after having kids can be intimidating. Add to that a business world that demands a laundry list of work history when all you feel like you have to contribute is the number of clothes you’ve washed and folded over the past 10 years multiplied by how many kids you have. It’s okay. You’ve got more to offer than you realize and your next gig will have you filling your confidence bucket faster than you can say, “I got the job!” Follow these six steps to help you get started. 1. Start by figuring out what you want to do. If you have a college degree, that’s a good place to start. If you have a business degree versus an English degree, your job searches will look much different. Narrow down your interests and do an initial search online to get a feel for what’s out there. Bookmark all the jobs that interest you so you can go back and weed through them. 2. Now that you’ve picked a few jobs to go through, see if you’re qualified to do them. If you need a degree for them and don’t have one but have always wanted to go back to school, maybe now’s your time? If you have

the degree and meet all of the basic qualifications, decide if this is something you could see yourself doing. If yes, then go ahead and start your resume. The resume can be nerve-wracking if you haven’t done one in a while. And in a while, I mean, years. 3. Type in your Google search bar, “How to write a resume” and you will be astounded at how many things pop up. The first couple of things listed are always the most popular so just click on one of those. You should get a template and be able to plug in your information when prompted. Most resume builders will give you examples of each action

item that makes it easier than ever to come up with words and phrases that will catch your employer’s attention. This is the part that will have you sitting back in your chair, sipping your cup of coffee and thinking, “I’m really glad I volunteered at that camp. Or, that mentoring program I was a part of is really going to come in handy here.” Think of all the things you’ve done over the past few years, big and small, and write them down. You can always edit them out later. 4. Once you have a rough draft of your resume, step away for a day and let things marinate. This is a great tip for making your editing go that much smoother when you return to your resume. Your eyes and mind need a break from what you’ve just written and sometimes it takes some time away from the material to see it with fresh eyes. Have someone you trust and respect look over your resume and give you both positive and negative feedback. You want to put your best foot forward when applying for a job so it’s important to have more than one set of eyes look over your resume before hitting send. 5. Most companies will ask for a cover letter to accompany your resume. A cover letter is basically a formal note explaining who you are, what job you are applying for, how you heard about it, and why you are the best person for the job. Think of it as selling yourself. 6. If the job you’re applying for asks for referrals, think of three to five people who know your character and who you trust to share their opinions of you with others. Always ask your potential referrals for permission before you include them on your application. There’s nothing worse than putting someone’s name down, not telling them, and then they get called and are caught off-guard.

Applying for a job when you’ve been out of the market for a while is nothing short of scary. But hang on, give yourself credit where credit’s due, and make all of those volunteer hours, contributions and trainings work for you by making sure you put them all down for your future employer to see. Take one last look over your application, hit send, and get busy applying for another job. With all three of her children in school this fall, Meagan Ruffing finds herself in a new season of life. She is learning to embrace it, love it, and go with the flow. 0 11 0

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CURIOUS. CREATIVE. BRIGHT. SHE’S ST. MARY’S. Discover your daughter’s full potential. Our community cultivates creativity, celebrates individuality, and challenges girls to accomplish exceptional results. Set up a tour: www.stmarysschool.org or call 901-537-1405 ©2017 St. Mary’s Episcopal School. All rights reserved.

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4674 MERCHANTS PARK CIRCLE | COLLIERVILLE, TN | ShopCarriageCrossing.com

CCR-7224-A05A AD1 Mempjhis Parent Back To School .indd 1

MEMPHISPAREN T.CO M AM1 1 6/26/17 10:34


DEAR TEACHER ADVERTORIAL

Should my daughter receive the HPV vaccine?

WHAT CAN I DO TO GET MY CHILD READY FOR THE NEW SCHOOL YEAR? By EMILY GARRONE JAMERSON

As summer winds down, teachers, parents, and children all prepare to make the big switch. The big switch is, of course, the change from lazy summer days to classwork, clubs, and car lines. Each summer I make sure to take a break from work and spend a few weeks in the quiet space that exists between the experiences of last year and the onset of a new one. This relaxation time is vital for teachers and students alike, but it can be difficult to make the switch. My husband read me a quote from Peyton Manning this week that aptly applies to starting a new school year: “You feel pressure when you’re in a situation where you don’t know what you’re doing.” Here are some ways to help prevent the pressure of a new school year. PREPARE EMOTIONALLY Parents can help their children prepare for the emotional and physical changes to come. When beginning a new school year, there may be feelings of nervousness and fear. Talk to your child and give them a chance to voice their feelings, and reassure them with helpful anecdotes from your school days. Help students physically make the change by adjusting bedtimes and setting the alarm earlier and earlier each day. PREPARE MENTALLY Prepare mentally for extended focus times and challenging school work with brain games, puzzles, and writing exercises. Spend time with your kids working on jigsaw puzzles or discussing their summer reading. Make up challenging word activities to generate creativity and improve writing skills. For example, write out the name of your child’s school and have your child find as many different words within the name of their school. PREPARE BY ORGANIZING Finally, organize all the materials you will need for the upcoming year, and, when possible, think of those who may need extra help getting supplies they need. Schools usually post supply lists online, which can make backto-school shopping more convenient for your schedule. Many stores and online markets offer deals when you buy in bulk, so think of donating extra supplies to the school bookstore or a classroom at your school. The change of seasons can be like a mini “new year.” Set family “New School Year” resolutions and see the benefits of planning pay off with peace of mind and a fresh start. Emily Garrone Jamerson is a freelance writer and is enjoying the last few days of summer before returning as a CLUE teacher at Snowden School in Memphis. 12

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As a local OBGYN known for using natural remedies and bio-identical hormone therapies, I get questions like this one all of the time. Most pediatricians in the area recommend starting the HPV vaccination series around age 9-12, long before young girls are exposed to the virus. Many mothers are disturbed to think that their very young daughters could be candidates for this vaccine at such a young age. Many turn to friends, family, the internet, and other doctors they trust for advice — I guess that’s where I come in. HPV vaccines are marketed as a preventative medication for cervical cancer — a marketing strategy that makes them hard to say no to. After all, who would want their daughter to get a preventable cancer? What HPV vaccines really do is increase immunity to between two and nine different types of human papilloma virus (HPV), some of which are known to cause cervical cancers. There are actually more than forty types of HPV that infect the genital tract, fifteen of which are considered “high-risk” for cervical cancer. The most common types are prevented by the HPV vaccines, and the goal is to prevent the majority of cervical cancers by stopping the spread of HPV. The reason that pediatricians want to start the vaccine so young is simple — the young are the most likely to get the virus. Many experts estimate that 75% of sexually active adolescents and young adults are infected with at least one strain of HPV. Condoms are not as useful in the prevention of the spread of HPV because the virus is spread primarily by contact and not by body fluid exchange. This makes all sexually active young people highly susceptible to infection and therefore good candidates for vaccination.

So what advice do I give to my patients who are wondering whether to vaccinate? My response is simple: HPV vaccines are no different than any other vaccine. All vaccines have very slight risks of side effects — most of which are mild. Vaccines also have benefits to both the individual and society at large by preventing the spread of infection. As an OBGYN, though, I have particular concerns when it comes to HPV vaccination. My biggest concern is that women who have gotten the vaccine will feel overprotected. What do I mean by that? One example is that I have personally heard two different health care professionals say to large groups of physicians that if HPV vaccination were mandatory, we could virtually eliminate the need for pap smears. Nothing could be further from the truth. Women who are vaccinated against some strains of HPV are still susceptible to other strains, and no vaccine is 100% effective. Women who go to their OBGYN annually for exams are much less likely to get cervical cancer because there are effective treatments for HPV if it is found early. Women who skip annual exams because they feel protected by the HPV vaccine may end up being more likely to get invasive cervical cancer. There can be no doubt that vaccines have been a very positive development for our world, but marketing a vaccine as a cure for cervical cancer can be dangerous. I encourage my patients to know the risks and never to tell their daughters that they don’t have to worry about cervical cancer just because they got the vaccine! Dr. Michael Podraza

Dr. Michael Podraza is originally from South Dakota. He graduated from South Dakota School of Mines and Technology with a degree in Chemistry. He attended Medical School at the University of Texas in Houston. Dr. Podraza went on to complete his residency in Obstetrics and Gynecology in Buffalo, NY. He received training in NaPro Technology at the Pope Paul IV Institute; after which he moved to Memphis with his wife and children to become Medical Director of Saint Francis Women’s Health & Fertility. Dr. Podraza is Board Certified in Obstetrics & Gynecology.


Score extra points with a sports physical now. No Appointment Necessary - $25 With the school year winding down, it’s the perfect time for your child’s sports physical. You’ll beat the back-to-school rush and know your child is ready to play. So gather your forms, make an appointment, and put yourself ahead of the game.

Sailaja Raju, M.D. Family Medicine

John Engbretson, M.D. Family Medicine

Call 888-812-3672 to make an appointment today. memphisdocs.com/stayhealthy

MEMP 06.00.16 MemPar PCSP

M E M PH I S PA R ENT.COM

13


FEATURE

GOODBYE SUMMER. HELLO SCHOOL! Simple Tips to Make the Transition Easier By MEAGAN RUFFING

Blink. Where did summer go? Iced tea makers and emoji popsicle molds have been replaced with pens, pencils and reams of paper in what feels like a matter of weeks. Just when my kids figured out how to play upstairs by themselves for longer than 10 minutes, it’s now time for them to get back on a schedule where play time has to be penciled in before and after homework hour. Changing routines is difficult for anyone. Add to that multiple children and multiple ages and you have got yourself a recipe for stress. There really is no right answer. There is no one-size-fits-all when it comes to transitioning your kids from summer to fall; you just kind of have to get through it. I’ve had enough summers under my belt to know what works and does not work and from one mother to another, let me share what I’ve gleamed from my experiences. FIRST, GET A CALENDAR. Actually, buy a couple. Buy one to put on the fridge for the whole family to see, one cute one just for you, one for each of your kids’ rooms, and if that isn’t enough, buy one more just because. Start with the family calendar and map out the month of August or September (whichever month your kids go back to school) and be intentional about writing down every single event in that month. When your kids know the plan, everyone wins. Have fun with this and buy some cute stickers to stick on special days – this is a great way to include your kids and get them excited about going back to school. Let your kids decorate their own calendars by marking special days with crayons or markers. START TALKING ABOUT SCHOOL COMING UP. Use dinner time to ask your kids if they have questions about what grade they are going into and what they are most excited about or scared about. Talk to them about what it was like when you started a new grade. Kids feel so much better when they hear, “Me too.” Help ease new school jitters and social anxiety by role playing. I do this with my son sometimes when I need him to work through a situation where he

might get overwhelmed when someone either intentionally or unintentionally hurts his feelings. As his mom, I know that when his feelings are hurt he lashes out verbally. To try and avoid future situations like this, we often role play about what could happen or might happen and we walk through different scenarios. You can do this too with situations that are relative to your child.

time you have decided and tell him he can read in his bedroom up until that time. Set a timer, set his watch, give him that independence to have the feeling that he is the one who is in charge of when he closes his eyes when in reality, your child is upstairs in bed at the time you wanted him to be. He will eventually learn the new routine and setting the timer will be replaced with him falling asleep on his own.

MAKE A SPECIAL DAY ABOUT YOUR CHILD’S UPCOMING FIRST DAY OF SCHOOL. If you have multiple children, take each one out individually and plan on getting at least one new outfit to get them excited about their first day. Be sure to add this shopping day to your calendar. Now that you’ve got the schedule, role playing, and shopping day nailed down, the hard part is actually getting your children to understand that staying up late is a thing of the past. There are a few simple things you can do to help with this transition. For some people, simply putting their kids to bed 15 minutes earlier each night the week before school starts works for them. For others, their kids catch on to this and fight tooth and nail to stay up. To avoid the fight, try this: tell your child he can stay up until the

A N OTH E R TI P FO R H E LPI N G YO U R CHILDREN WITH THE TRANSITION FROM SUMMER TO FALL IS BY KEEPING THINGS SIMPLE. This means not scheduling a million things all in one day for your child. Pick one extracurricular activity and let your daughter have lots of free time before bed. Maybe sign her up for soccer and save dance for next season. It’s okay to have blank space on your calendar. Trust me. This is called letting your child use her imagination and allowing yourself time to fit in those unexpected things that come up in life. A busy schedule isn’t always better. Keeping things simple and low-key for your kids can be exactly what they need to start the new school year off right.

Try these tips to help you and your family ease into a new schedule this fall and you will be pleasantly surprised at how well your kids will adjust. Tweak these suggestions to fit your family’s needs and remember, keep it simple. Meagan Ruffing has already started her kids’ back-to-school routine and is soaking up every memory before her daughter starts kindergarten this month. You can see more of Meagan’s work at www.meaganruffing.com or read about her story in her new book, I See You: Helping Moms Go from Overwhelmed to In Control, sold on Amazon. 4 11 4

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Du Bois Arts & Technology Middle/High School (6-12) Mr. LaVaughn Bridges, Administrator 817 Brownlee Road Memphis, TN 38116 Office: 901-801-6171

Du Bois Elementary School of Entrepreneurship (K-5) Ms. Audrey Hudson, Principal 4443 South Germantown Road Memphis, TN 38125 Office: 901-509-6190

Du Bois Leadership & Public Policy Middle/High School (6-12) Mrs. Angela Rowe Jackson, Principal 8146 East Shelby Drive Memphis, TN 38125 Office: 901-334-1252

Du Bois Arts & Technology Elementary School (K-5) Mrs. Angela Holloway, Principal 817 Brownlee Road Memphis, TN 38116 Office: 901-801-6164

Du Bois Consortium of Charter Schools Dr. Willie W. Herenton, CEO 1980 Nonconnah Blvd, Suite 400 Memphis, TN 38132 Office: 901-505-6833

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Getting ready for the big solar eclipse. By MICHELLE MCKISSACK

On August 21, 2017, something will happen in the United States that hasn’t happened in a very long time. On that date will be the first total solar eclipse to occur in the U.S. since 1979, and the first eclipse in almost 100 years to cross the entire country from the Pacific Ocean to the Atlantic Ocean. But only 12 states will be in the 67-mile-wide path of the total solar eclipse, and that includes Tennessee. School children in this region will literally experience science in 3-D thanks to a local company. 6 11 6

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PHOTO COURTESY OF ORION FEDERAL CREDIT UNION

American Paper Optics, located in Bartlett, Tennessee, is one of just five companies that the American Astronomical Society has certified as safe for use. It is the largest manufacturer of 3-D glasses in the world. “I remember experiencing the last (partial) solar eclipse 26 years ago. I kept my viewing glasses for years,” says Jason Lee, CFO of Orion Federal Credit Union. It is that profound effect, and the desire to give back to the community, that has prompted Orion to donate 10,000 solar eclipse sunglasses from American Paper Optics to students at the 13 schools the company has adopted in the greater Memphis area, from Downtown Elementary to Collierville Elementary. Schools and teachers are preparing to get ready for the big solar eclipse, and many will be starting with the simple question of, “What is a solar eclipse?” The Memphis Pink Palace Museum has set up a page on its website to educate the public. It defines a solar eclipse as when the moon blocks the light of the sun to the Earth. When the moon blocks part of the sun, it is a partial eclipse. When the moon blocks all of the sun, it is called a total eclipse. The eclipse will begin in Memphis around 11:52 a.m. It will reach its peak in this area at 1:22 p.m. However, people in this part of Tennessee are not likely to see a full eclipse, even though it will come close. The Pink Palace predicts that about 94 percent of the sun will be covered in this viewing area. The eclipse will end around 2:50 p.m. The other states in the path of the solar eclipse are Oregon, Idaho, Wyoming, Nebraska, Kansas, Missouri, Illinois, Kentucky, Georgia, North Carolina, and South Carolina. “During Memphis’ partial eclipse, we’ll see the bottom curve of the sun so the sun will be smiling down on Memphis but those north of the path of totality will see the upper curve of the sun or a frowny face!” says Dave Maness, Pink Palace planetarium manager. But full eclipse or not, it is very important to never look directly into the sun. It is never safe to look at the sun with the naked eye. You can permanently damage your eye and suffer “eclipse blindness,” according to the American Optometric Association. That’s why Randy Thompson, principal of Idlewild Elementary, is happy to receive the solar eclipse sunglasses so this once-in-a-lifetime phenomenon of viewing the solar eclipse is safe for his students, because it “will expand the science curriculum and offer experiential learning.” But you don’t have to be a student or in a classroom to encounter what’s being called “the Great American Eclipse.” Grab a pair of proper solar sunglasses and just look up. Visit the Memphis Pink Palace Museum website at memphismuseums.org for more solar eclipse information and activities for all ages. You can also purchase certified solar sunglasses from the American Paper Optics website at eclipsesunglasses.com. A portion of the proceeds will benefit St. Jude Children’s Research Hospital.

PLACES TO GATHER AND GAZE AT THE ECLIPSE ECLIPSE PARTY AT THE MEMPHIS BOTANIC GARDEN 11:30 a.m. – 3 p.m. Watch as the moon covers nearly the entire sun on this day of astronomical proportions! Certified viewing glasses will be for sale, an astronomer will be onsite for questions, and a craft for the kids. Concessions available. Free with MBG admission. TOTAL ECLIPSE AT THE PARK 12 p.m. – 2:30 p.m. Safely view the solar eclipse in the wide-open acres at Shelby Farms Park. Gather at the First Tennessee Foundation Visitor Center. Free and all ages are welcome. Visit shelbyfarmspark.org or call (901) 222-7275 for details. SOLAR ECLIPSE DAY AT THE PINK PALACE 12 p.m. – 2 p.m. The Memphis Pink Palace of Museum will host an eclipse observation on its front lawn. Eclipse educators and astronomers will supervise safe viewing through telescopes. Check out a scale model solar system walk; enjoy eclipse activity tables; and view a NASA live feed of the Solar Eclipse on Planetarium lobby monitors. Free. The Pink Palace also has exhibits leading up to the solar eclipse including a display of the world’s largest pair of solar eclipse glasses; and the planetarium show, Sunstruck, which explores the Sun. Visit memphismuseums.org for details. ME EM MP PH H II S SP EN M PA AR RE NT T .. C CO OM M

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FEATURE 1. AVAILABLE TO LISTEN. Kids don’t always need parents to fix everything for them. More often, they just need to be listened to and heard. Parents are older and wiser and will usually be able to discern solutions to problems more swiftly than kids. But if parents always assert their advantage in problem solving, kids won’t get the opportunity to figure things out for themselves. The solution is to listen to kids and ask questions. Help your child discover that she has good instincts and can use your family values to deduct possible solutions to challenging situations. 2. EMOTIONALLY DETACHED. Above all, parents need to

refrain from swooping in and taking over whenever a problem presents itself. The more parents intervene, the more they deprive kids of valuable learning experiences. I have just as strong mama bear instincts as the next mom, and if I perceive that my daughter is being treated poorly, my blood pressure can surge. The instinct to protect is a natural one and must be regulated. The more often you react emotionally to information your child shares, the less likely your kids will want to share with you in the future. So get in the habit of saying things like, “I am sorry to hear that you were treated that way. How did that make you feel?” It’s helpful for kids to be able to name and own their feelings, and this can buy you a bit of time to calm down.

3. WILLING TO DISCUSS. Sometimes, when you are talking

ARE YOU A HELPFUL, HELICOPTER, OR HANDS-OFF PARENT?

Seven qualities of helpful parents: The middle ground between helicopter parenting and absentee parenting By CHRISTINA KATZ

Reports in the media about helicopter parents have been skyrocketing over the past decade. The consensus from college counselors and entrylevel employers is that parents are going too far making sure their kids get ahead in high school, college, and beyond. Instead of being helpful, parents are hovering. Rather than supporting tweens and teens, parents are swooping in and negotiating outcomes for them. But when kids don’t learn to trust their ability to navigate their own experiences, they become more helpless, which leads to shirking responsibilities and assuming mom and dad will pick up the slack on their behalf. On the opposite end of the parenting spectrum is a type of parent who is not discussed as much in the media as the helicopter parent — the absentee parent. These parents are too busy, distracted, and pre-occupied to meet the physical, mental, emotional, and spiritual needs of their children. Absentee parents may be physically present but struggle to pay enough attention to their children for many reasons, which may include job demands, marital distress, divorce, addiction, mental illness, financial problems, domestic violence, or unhealed wounds from childhood. As the name implies, absentee parents may either be elsewhere permanently or frequently away from home. Despite suggestions in the media that parents should back off, checking out is not the antidote to helicopter parenting. Kids need parents to be present, engaged, and involved in their lives. In the middle of the two parenting extremes (helicopter and absentee) is the happy medium kids crave — the present, self-aware parent who possesses healthy boundaries and wants children to learn them, too. Helpful parents practice benign neglect, where they step out of the way on purpose to give a child chances to stretch and grow. Most parents want the best for their kids and are doing as well as they can, but helpful parenting skills may require a little extra study and practice because they are not always instinctive. Let’s take a closer look at the qualities of helpful parents.

to your kids about challenging situations in their lives, they may ask you if you had a similar experience when you were their age. If you are the kind of parent who can come up with personal anecdotes on the fly, your kids will appreciate knowing they are not the only ones to struggle. If, like me, you are not as quick to scan your memory files and come up with a relatable story, that’s okay, too. Even if you think of something two hours after the conversation is over, chime in the next time the opportunity arises. Our children need to see us as the fallible people we were and not just as the all-knowing adults we seem to have become. Let your kids connect to a younger, less savvy version of you and you’ll feel more connected.

4. PREPARED TO HELP. Once you are done listening and discussing a situation with a degree of emotional detachment, it may be time to offer assistance. But if your child rebuffs your offer, try not to take it personally. The key is to communicate that your door is always open. “Just let me know if you want to

FINDING THE HELPFUL MIDDLE When you are a parent, your actions — or lack of actions — speak louder than your words. Which of these columns best describes your attitude as a parent? Helicopter, Helpful, or Absentee?

HELICOPTER Hovers Overly involved Preoccupied with child’s affairs Fearful about child’s future Always vigilant Doing too much Solves problems Avoids mistakes Shepherds too closely Takes credit Perfectionism in parent and child Embarrassing interference Frequently invasive Distrusts authority figures

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talk about this more,” is a good way to let kids know that help is available if they decide they want it. Or you can simply ask, “Do you want to discuss this with anyone else or do some research on the topic?” Don’t be afraid to bring more people into the discussion. You might say, “You know who might have some insights on this topic? Dad.” Pushing for immediate solutions may make kids feel more anxious. You don’t have to have all of the answers, every time. Children need to process information in their own way and at their own pace.

5. SUPPORTIVE FROM THE BACK SEAT. Kids need to learn how to advocate for themselves and parents can assist with this process without taking over. At the end of my daughter’s first year of middle school, she wanted to try out for the talent show. She had sung a song in the elementary school talent show and the experience had been empowering. So when she auditioned in middle school and didn’t make the cut, she was disappointed, but trying hard to pretend she wasn’t. I encouraged her to go speak to her choir teacher about it. “Why not ask her what you might do differently next time?” I suggested. My daughter said she would talk to her, and then dragged her feet, while continuing to feel bad. After a few days, I sent the teacher a quick email asking her to initiate a conversation, which she did. As my daughter relayed their discussion to me in the car after school, she burst into tears, finally releasing the sadness underneath the disappointment. The next year, she picked a more upbeat song, and happily made the cut.

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6. CONSCIOUS OF BOUNDARIES. Sometimes it’s hard for parents to relinquish

control when they can envision a perfect future for their kids. But their vision may interfere with their teen’s ability to imagine a life they are excited to lead. The goal of helpful parenting is healthy boundaries. You are not your child and your child is not you. If you don’t have appropriate limits as a parent, you won’t be able to model them for your child. Parents who habitually overstep teach their kids that their own opinions are not important. Cultivating solid boundaries are everything when it comes to raising kids who can think and act for themselves. Kids with poor boundaries will likely have difficulty forming and maintaining healthy relationships in the future. See the sidebar for recommended reading on positive parenting with healthy boundaries.

Music Director JEFFREY B. BREWER • Choreographers TRAVIS BRADLEY & JORDAN NICHOLS

Sponsored by DR. THOMAS RATLIFF, THE WORLD CATARACT FOUNDATION and DINA & BRAD MARTIN • Media Sponsors MEMPHIS PARENT MAGAZINE, JABBERBLABBER MAGAZINE, WKNO 91.1FM and CLIPPER MAGAZINE

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7. ACCESSIBLE IN A CRISIS. If you want to be the first person your child calls

in a genuine crisis, you have to earn that role by being cool, calm, and considerate unrivaled performance. unending applause. in the face of whatever goes down. If your kids don’t believe you can hold it TICKETS 901.682.8323 ONLINE theatrememphis.org together, they will look elsewhere for help. If you are not your child’s go-to person in a crisis, don’t be mad at them. Look at your parenting history, and consider what adjustments you need to make to become a caring, supportive space for your Shrek.MemphisParentAd.indd 1 7/13/17 children. Make sure your children know you are not perfect, and remember they are not perfect, either. When you let your kids be imperfect, you encourage them to take risks, make mistakes, and figure things out as they mature, just like you.

St. Francis of Assisi Catholic School Learn. Serve. Lead. Succeed.

ABSENTEE

Stays mindfully detached

Not available even when present

Present on an ongoing basis

Distracted

Aware of not overstepping

Resists getting involved as much as possible

Open-minded and experimental

Unaware

Doing things with

Not contributing

Holds space for problem-solving to emerge

Dismissive of problems

Bounces back from mistakes

Expects failure

Let’s child make choices and have consequences

Unconcerned about child development

Child gets ownership

Child relies on self alone

Imperfection in parent and child

Low self-esteem in parent and child

Relaxed involvement

Occasional cool pal

Supportive and caring

Overly permissive

Trusts and respects authority figures

Disrespects authority figures

Grades PreK-8, Part-time Program Ages 2-4 Challenging classes and programs for advanced students.Specialized programs to support students with learning differences.

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2100 N. Germantown Pkwy. Cordova, TN 38016 901-388-7321 • www.sfawolves.org ME EM MP PH H II S SP EN M PA AR RE NT T .. C CO OM M

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FEATURE

PUT DOWN THE XBOX, PICK UP THE BOOK A father’s essay on understanding his son’s reading journey. By FREDRICK L. McKISSACK, JR.

He bought the Odyssey, Lisa told me. She was excited. “Really?” I said. My wife and 13-year-old son had just come back from a used bookshop, and came home with a few goodies. I was intrigued by Mark’s purchase of the Odyssey. Could this be something we could read together, like the old days? I got kind of giddy and nostalgic. “Hey, maybe we could read it together?” I asked him. “You know, maybe a chapter a night.” He sensed my sheepishness. “Maybe,” he said. I’m a journalist and Lisa is an academic. There’s no reading gene. I attribute his literacy to us reading as a family. From the start I read Goodnight Moon and Guess How Much I Love You to him nearly every night in the womb — even when we called him Zoë, before the ultrasound showed he was a Mark. So many nights, so many bedtime books: There’s a Monster at the End of this Book, Messy Bessey, Mirandy and Brother Wind, Sally Ann Thunder Ann Whirlwind Crockett, Little Bears Adventures, Thomas the Tank Engine, Cam Jansen, even some revised Hardy Boys. Yet, it was Rick Riordan’s series of reimagined mythologies of Greece, Rome, Egypt, and Scandinavia that catapulted Mark from listener to reader. We’d go from me reading aloud, to him reading aloud for a few pages, to him skipping ahead during the day, to, finally, me not in the picture.

COMMON SENSE adequate sleep, physical activity, and other Have we forgotten the distractions from our behaviors essential to health.” youth: arcades, TVs, Gameboys? Yes. MIMICKING BEHAVIOR Do we worry too much about distractions with Recent studies on interactive gaming undermine a the fear our children will grow up to be dullards? 2014 French survey that posits gaming offers little Probably. But that’s OK. Time to suss out a few or no positive correlations to school performance, facts. “whilst reading did, particularly in memory and First, children do need downtime from school, comprehension.” which, if we were honest, is now even more of a “It seems then despite lack of a causal link … grind with a skill-and-drill, teach-to-the-test reading may be more likely to enhance academic mindset and little time for recess and play. performance,” the authors note. “[The] results of Second, research shows that interactive this survey fully justify the educational role of gaming, including the more violent ones, can have parents and teachers in promoting reading.” positive effects, from promoting memory to I know: Duh! improving motor skills. But how do we foster a love of reading in “The Brain-Boosting Power of Video Games,” children with so many distractions, and for whom the July 2016 cover story for Scientific American, reading is often a challenging chore rather than touted that fast-paced “shooter” games “enhance cherished pastime? certain cognitive functions, including bettering I was a reluctant reader as a child, although I attention, reaction times, and switching from one read everything around me with great fluency,

MY PARENTS, HOWEVER, LET ME FORGE MY OWN READING PATH: ENCYCLOPEDIAS AND COMIC BOOKS; THE SPORTS PAGE GAVE WAY TO OTHER SECTIONS OF THE NEWSPAPER.

task to another.” particularly cereal boxes. My parents, however, let This doesn’t mean science has turned on the me forge my own reading path: encyclopedias and “Continuous Gaming” sign. Moderation and comic books; the sports page gave way to other DIGITAL DISTRACTION investigation are key. sections of the newspaper. And this isn’t to say that Mark’s love of reading isn’t The American Academy of Pediatrics As a high school freshman, I read Robert tempered by an awful lot of what I find to be digital recommends that there be no media for children Cormier’s The Chocolate War, I was taken by how nonsense – playing first-person games of carnage under 18 months, save for the occasional video accurate it felt. I was hooked after that. on his recently purchased phone. chat (We screwed that one up). Mark, too, was a reluctant reader. But we found Mark and his friends watch YouTubers play For children ages 2 to 5 years, limit screen use a way to make reading fun, by reading together games, as well as watch other YouTubers comment to one hour per day of high-quality programs, the and making observations about characters and about YouTubers playing games. And they laugh. academy suggests. plots, and finding real world examples. Out loud. No, seriously. “Parents should co-view media with children to Mark, for example, recently heard the phrase It’s distraction. Noise. Nonsense. help them understand what they are seeing and “herculean task” on a news story, and exclaimed, And yet I can still hear the Pac-Man death apply it to the world around them,” the organization “Oh, I get it!” (Thank you, Rick Riordan). sound effect when I goof something up. How many says. There’s no high score for that, but it was quite coins were shoved into machines for the hope and For children ages 6 and older, the academy a victory. honor of placing one’s name among the high- suggests that parents “place consistent limits on Reading is an odyssey, a journey we sometimes scorers on Frogger? I could’ve owned a share of the time spent using media, and the types of media, make together, and other times alone. Google. and make sure media does not take the place of 20 0 2

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SCHOOL NOTES

active learning

agile teaching

to build disciplined minds, adventurous spirits, and brave hearts

KALEIDOSCOPE SCHOOL OF MEMPHIS

Downtown Memphis is about to get more creative. Kaleidoscope School of Memphis will open its doors with an inaugural sixth-grade class in August on Court Square. The middle school will add a grade each year until it reaches capacity with the eighth grade. Kaleidoscope will weave all forms of the arts (dance, visual art, drama, and music) and Artful Thinking routines through a rigorous academic curriculum, the school culture, and social and emotional development. Administrators plan to embrace how children learn by including gaming stations to facilitate creativity. Kaleidoscope is accepting applications. For more information visit ksmemphis.org

ADMISSION OPEN HOUSES Lower School (grades PK-5) Germantown Campus | October 26 @ 9 am Memphis Campus | November 9 @ 8-10 am (drop-in)

Middle School and Upper School (grades 6-12) Collierville Campus l November 2 @ 6 pm

ST. GEORGE’S ST. GEORGE’S INDEPENDENT SCHOOL

Congratulations to St. George’s Independent School’s Modern Music Ensemble! It has placed itself on the musical map with a nod from the 2017 DownBeat Magazine Student Music Awards. Recordings submitted by the St. George’s Modern Music Ensemble recently received an Outstanding Performance Award from the magazine. DownBeat is one of the world’s leading jazz and contemporary music publications. “Being recognized by DownBeat Magazine is like winning a Grammy award,” said Tom Link, Artist-in-Residence for Middle and Upper School at St. George’s. “It’s a remarkable achievement for a program to have reached this level in three short years, which is a testament to the determination of our students and the willingness of St. George’s to allow us to be creative, innovative, and pursue our passions.” To learn more about their award visit sgis.org

INDEPENDENT SCHOOL

sgis.org

COLLIERVILLE EDUCATION FOUNDATION

The Collierville Education Foundation is now accepting 2017 grant applications. Collierville teachers are encouraged to submit proposals for educational tools not covered by the school district. On average, CEF awards $70,000 to $80,000 annually to Collierville public school teachers with more than $1 million in grants awarded since its inceptionin 1996. For more information visit colliervilleeducationfoundation.org ME EM MP PH H II S SP EN M PA AR RE NT T .. C CO OM M

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AUGUST CALENDAR by MEENA VISWANATHAN

Eclipse Party at the Memphis Botanic Garden 11:30 a.m. – 3 p.m.

Watch as the moon covers nearly the entire sun on this day of astronomical proportions! Certified viewing glasses will be for sale, an astronomer will be onsite for questions, and a craft for the kids. Concessions available. Free with MBG admission.

Total Eclipse at the Park 12 p.m. – 2:30 p.m.

Safely view the solar eclipse in the wide-open acres at Shelby Farms Park. Gather at the First Tennessee Foundation Visitor Center. Free and all ages are welcome. Visit shelbyfarmspark.org or call (901) 222-7275 for details.

Solar Eclipse Day at the Pink Palace 12 p.m. – 2 p.m.

The Memphis Pink Palace of Museum will host an eclipse observation at the museum on its front lawn. Staff and volunteers will supervise viewing through telescopes with safe solar filters. Free with admission. The Pink Palace also has programs and exhibits taking place leading up to the big solar eclipse, including the world’s largest pair of functioning solar eclipse glasses on display for photo ops. The planetarium is also showing Sunstruck, which explores our nearest star in all its glory. Check the website for dates, times, and admission prices. memphismuseums.org.

1 ∙ TUESDAY

Mini Masters. Dixon Gallery and Gardens. Tuesdays, 10:30-11:15 a.m. Parent-child workshop designed for toddlers features story time, art activity, and snack. $8/child. Call 761-5250 to pre-register and pre-pay by Monday noon before the class. Wild Lunch at Lichterman. Lichterman Nature Center. Tuesday through Saturday at noon. Watch the Backyard Wildlife Center’s animal keepers feed the animals. Tuesday, Thursday & Saturday: Box Turtle. Wednesday: Hawk. Friday: Snakes. Free with admission. 636-2210.

2 ∙ WEDNESDAY

Toddler Time. Baptist Memorial Hospital for Women. Meets Wednesdays, 10:30 a.m.-noon. Geared for parents and children ages 1-3 years. Toddler Time is a time for parents and children to meet & greet, experience play & activities with their children, and discuss the joys and challenges of parenting toddlers. Free. 2279558. Memphis Farmers Market Squared (MFM2). Court Square Park in Downtown Memphis. Wednesdays, 4-7 p.m. Through September 27.

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MFM2 features live music, fresh produce from local farms, handmade pottery, artisan products, floral arrangements, meat and eggs, baked goods, soaps, vendors, and food trucks. Go to memphisfarmersmarket.org for details.

An interactive music program for children 6 months to 5 years and their parents. Features live guitar and storytelling, singing, dancing, and instrumental play. Free. Reservations required. 227-9558.

3 ∙ THURSDAY

Firefly Glow Party. MBG. 7-9 p.m. Make yourself glow at the Illumination Station, create a firefly friend, visit the Glow Lab, bring your light-up toys for dance party featuring performances by Bridging Souls and an LED hoop-show. $15. Concessions available. Glow photos at additional charge. Buy tickets online at ticketmaster.com or call 636-4131 for reservations.

Farm Park Farmers Market. Bobby Lanier Farm Park. Thursdays, 4-7:30 p.m. Shop for local produce, watch chef demos, listen to live music, and enjoy arts & crafts. Free. 757-7378.

Whet Thursday. Metal Museum. 5-8 p.m. Families are invited to tour the museum and grounds, enjoy live music, sample food truck favorites, watch metalsmithing demo, listen to a gallery talk, or simply take in the sunset from along the Mississippi River. Free. 774-6380.

4 ∙ FRIDAY

Adventure Fridays. Memphis Botanic Garden (MBG). Fridays, 10 a.m.-noon. Families are invited to meet a naturalist and uncover the mysteries of nature. Drop-in activity, free with admission. 636-4100. Music for Aardvarks. Baptist Memorial Hospital for Women. Mondays & Fridays,10:30-11:30 a.m.

5 ∙ SATURDAY

Memphis Farmers Market (MFM) 2017 Season. MFM @ Central Train Station Pavilion. Saturdays, 7 a.m.-1 p.m. Shop for fresh produce, enjoy a children’s activity, listen to live music, and more! Free. Go to memphisfarmersmarket. org for details.

Chucalissa Family Day. C.H. Nash Museum at Chucalissa. Saturdays at 10 a.m. & 1:30 p.m. Family Day activities include museum tour, throwing darts with an atlatl, scavenger hunt,


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CALENDAR

Building a foundation that lasts a lifetime

Coed Pre-K3 – 8th grade

Open House

Sunday, October 15, 2017 1:00 – 3:00 pm

the hands-on lab tour, an educational program, and creating a keepsake craft to take home. Family programs and craft activities change weekly. Aug. 5: Trash Talks/Snake Painting. Aug. 12: Stone Tools & Weapons/Talking Sticks. Aug. 19: Prehistoric Art/ Pottery. Aug. 25: Mystery Box/ Beading. $6/adult. $4/child ages 4-11. Free for children 3 and under. 785-3160. Family Studio. Dixon Gallery and Gardens. 10:30 a.m.-12:30 p.m. Families are invited to drop in at the Dixon to create works of art open-studio style. Free. 761-5250. Star Wars: Rogue One (2D repertory film). CTI Giant Theater @ Pink Palace Museum. Weekends at 4 p.m. Watch your favorite movie on the big screen at the Pink Palace Museum. $9/adult. $7/child. 636-2362.

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Park After Dark Outdoor Movie Night. Shelby Farms Park. Select Saturdays at 8 p.m. August 5: Back to the Future. August 12: The Secret Life of Pets. Bring your blankets or lawn chairs and enjoy a movie on the big screen. $10/car. 222-7275.

extends to Collierville’s Visitor Center on Town Square, located inside the Train Depot. Families can enjoy music, crafts, and food. Free. 457-2650. Scarecrow Building Seminar. Lichterman Nature Center. 10 a.m. Geared for teens and adults. Learn scarecrow lore and helpful hints to give your team a head start on the Lichterman’s Annual Fall Scarecrow Contest. Free. 636-2210.

18 ∙ FRIDAY

MLK50 Drop the Mic Poetry Symposium. National Civil Rights Museum. 3-7:30 p.m. Recommended for ages 14 and above. Register through August 15. Open to anyone interested in enhancing their creativity and engagement as a poet, spoken word artist, or community activist. Poetry Symposium kicks off the two-day MLK 50 Drop the Mic Poetry events. Features workshops on key components on mechanics, expression, branding, and art as activism. Free. 521-9699.

Shrek The Musical. Lohrey Stage @ Theatre Memphis. August 18 through September 10. Thursday at 7:30 p.m.; Friday & Saturday at 8 7 ∙ MONDAY p.m.; Sunday at 2 p.m. Families are Mudpie Mondays. MBG. Mondays, invited to enjoy this musical 10 a.m.-noon. Join on the Little comedy featuring a gang of Garden Patio and use dishes, fairytale misfits. $30/adult. $15/ spoons, and nature’s decorations to child. 682-8323. “bake” your own pie creations. Drop-in activity, free with 19 ∙ SATURDAY admission. 636-4100. Magic Carpet: On Your Toes with Sugar Plum Fairy and Roudnev 11 ∙ FRIDAY Youth Ballet. Buckman Arts Center Park after Dark: Park + Pajamas at St. Mary’s School. 10 a.m. Family Sleepover. Shelby Farms Children ages 2 to 8 are invited to Park. 6 p.m.- 9 a.m. This overnight grab their tutus and join for a adventure includes a guided dancing adventure across the globe nocturnal nature hike, campfire with Clara and her Nutcracker. $5/ cooking, breakfast with the buffalo, child. Free for adults. 537-1483. and more. $10/person. Reservations required. 222-7275. Chill Out Family Night. Dixon Gallery and Gardens. 5-8 p.m. Movie Mania. Carriage Crossing. Families are invited to beat the On select Fridays, 6:30-10 p.m. heat and join for games and Enjoy free, family-friendly movies activities that cool you off. Also in Central Park, with pre-movie fun enjoy performances and including music and giveaways. refreshments. Free. 761-5250. August 11: Storks. August 25: Sing. Free. 854-8240. MLK50 Drop the Mic Poetry Slam. Minglewood Hall. 5-8 p.m. Orpheum 2017 Summer Movie Recommended for ages 14 and Series: Gone with the Wind (G). above. Poetry Slam features poets The Orpheum. 7 p.m. Pre-movie performing original works before activities begin at 6 p.m. Event an audience and a judging panel. includes testing your movie trivia Judges pick winners from three age knowledge, taking pictures at the categories for a chance to win cash photo booth, and enjoying music prizes. A few non-competing poets from Mighty Wurlitzer organ. and musical artists will also Costumes are encouraged. $8/ perform. Free. 521-9699. adult. $6/child age 12 and under. Group discounts available. 52521 ∙ MONDAY 3000. Eclipse Party. MBG. 11 a.m.-3 p.m. Watch the moon cover nearly the 12 ∙ SATURDAY entire sun on this day of Train Heritage Day. Morton astronomical importance. Certified Museum of Collierville History. 10 viewing glasses on sale, astronomer a.m.-4 p.m. Explore model train on site to answer questions, and a displays, view inside historic train craft for kids to enjoy. Free with cars, and learn about other area admission. Concessions available. railroad groups. This year’s event 636-4100.


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CALENDAR

GREAT TODAY. EVEN BETTER THIS FALL.

Lausanne’s Early Childhood classes have always been the best choice for your PK, JK and SK explorers. This summer at Lausanne, we’re making our PK even better by remodeling our classrooms for more collaborative learning.

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Total Eclipse at the Park. Noon2:30 p.m. First Tennessee Foundation Visitor Center @ Shelby Farms Park. Here’s your chance to safely view the solar eclipse at the park. Free. 222-7275.

2017, the show explores our nearest star. Summer Seasonal Stargazing. Through September 22. Life: A Cosmic Story. Through November 17. One World, One Sky: Big Bird’s Adventure. Through September 2. 636-2362.

Solar Eclipse Day at the Pink Palace Museum. Noon-2 p.m. OTHER PROGRAMS Celebrate, learn, and experience Parent Informational Session. this once-in-a-lifetime event at the Baptist Memorial Hospital for Pink Palace Museum. Safe, viewing Women. Tuesdays, 9-9:30 a.m. & telescopes; Scale model solar p.m., and Fridays, 9-9:30 system walk; Eclipse activity tables; 2-2:30 a.m. At the Universal Parenting Eclipse educators and Planetarium Place (UPP), parents share their astronomers; NASA live feed of own parenting joys and challenges the Solar Eclipse. Free. 3050 finding much-needed Central Ave. For more information while support. Free. Reservations visit memphismuseums.org or call required. 227-9558. 636-2362. World Breastfeeding Week. 26 ∙ SATURDAY Methodist Le Bonheur Healthcare. 10th Annual Forrest Spence 5K. August 1-7. This year’s theme is MBG. 8 a.m. Features a 5K, 1-mile ‘“Sustaining Breastfeeding fun run, 100-yard dash, children’s Together.” International Lactation area, music, door prizes, and food. Association joins hands Strollers are welcome. Raises funds Consultant several world organizations to for non-medical needs of critically with promote the role that or chronically ill children and their breastfeeding plays in valuing our families. Visit forrestspencefund. well being. Visit methodisthealth. org to register online. org for details. Repticon Memphis Reptile & Mallory-Neely House Tour. Exotic Animal Show. The Landers Mallory-Neely House, 652 Adams Center. 10 a.m.-5 p.m. Also on Avenue. Fridays & Saturdays, 10 Sunday, 10 a.m.-4 p.m. Repticon a.m.-4 p.m. Step back in time to Memphis is a reptile event the Victorian Era touring this featuring vendors offering reptile mansion built in 1852 that pets, supplies, feeders, cages, and showcases original furniture and merchandise, as well as live animal interior decorations. $7/adult. $5/ seminars and frequent free raffles child (ages 3 and up). Reservations for coveted prizes. Exciting, required. 523-1484. educational, family-oriented fun for everyone! $10/adult. $5/child New Family Brunch. Church of the ages 5-12. Visit repticon.com/ Holy Communion. Saturday, August tennessee/memphis-southaven-ms 12, 9-11 a.m. Learn therapy for special offers on 2-day and VIP techniques from Bright Steps tickets. Program at this brunch for families of children with Down Syndrome under the age of 6. Free. To RSVP, email admin@dsamemphis.org or call 547-7588.

ONGOING EVENTS

MUSEUMS AND EXHIBITS

CLASSES & WORKSHOPS

Morton Museum of Collierville History. Making a Town: Collierville Railroad History. August 1 through October 20. Exhibit looks back at the impact of the railroad in Collierville and how trains became an icon of the town. Free. 4572650.

Kaleidoscope Club. Dixon Gallery and Gardens. Wednesdays, 4-5 p.m. Ages 5-9. Children participate in projects that spark interest in horticulture, art, or literature. $8. Snack provided. Call 761-5250 to register.

The Pink Palace Museum. Jurassic Journeys on Land, Sea, & Air. Through September 10. LeMoyneOwen College: A Beacon of Hope. Through February 24. 636-2362.

Yoga Thursdays. Memphis Brooks Museum of Art. Thursdays, 1-2 p.m. Join Misti Rae Holton for a vinyasa yoga class. Bring your own mat and a towel or small blanket. Pay what it’s worth. 544-6200.

CTI 3D Giant Theater. Aircraft Carrier 3D. Through November 10. Extreme Weather 3D. Through November 10. 636-2362.

Breastfeeding Class. Baptist Women’s Hospital. Thursday, August 3, 6:30-8:30 p.m. $30. Call 226-5764 to register.

AutoZone Dome at the Sharpe Planetarium. World’s Largest Solar Eclipse Glasses. Through August 21. World’s largest pair of functioning solar eclipse glasses on display for photo opportunities. Sunstruck. Through December 31. With the solar eclipse coming up August 21,

Saturday Childbirth Class. Baptist Women’s Hospital. On select Saturdays, August 5 & 19, 9 a.m.-4 p.m. $75. Call 226-5764 to register. Saturday Morning Unwind Session. Church Health’s Meditation Chapel. Saturday, August 5, at 9:30 a.m.


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CALENDAR

Eric Stanley. The Orpheum. Saturday, August 12 8 p.m. Unwind and refocus with mindfulness expert Greg Graber. Free. Go to churchhealth.org/ events for details.

at the pyramid Bass Pro Shops at the Pyramid is more than just a store; it’s an adventure. The massive destination experience offers something for everyone, from the serious outdoor enthusiast to families looking to have fun. There’s nothing else like it anywhere in the world.

Get Outside! Fitness: Yoga for Kids. Shelby Farms Park. Saturdays Drama Free Discipline. Baptist in August, 11 a.m.-noon. Perfect Memorial Hospital for Women. class for beginners or students who Tuesday, August 29. Two sessions want to reconnect with their offered, noon-1 p.m. and 4-5 p.m. fundamentals. Free. 222-7275. Geared for parents, guardians, and caregivers. Each session addresses Mindful Motion. Baptist Memorial the topics: How to Resolve Hospital for Women. On select Conflicts, Goals of Discipline, Mondays (August 14 & 28), 6-7 p.m. Whole Brain Integration: Discipline Children ages 8 and up Strategies, and the 4 S’ of accompanied by an adult are Attachment. Free. Refreshments invited to relax and de-stress served. RSVP at SignUpGenius. through intentional stretching, com/go/5080948A5AA2FA4FF2breathing, and meditation. Free. drama or by calling 227-9558. Reservations required. 227-9558. Dance FiT. Baptist Memorial Hospital for Women. On select Mondays (August 14 & 28),6-7 p.m. Children ages 8 and up are invited to learn different dance styles including Zumba, Line Dance, Urban Dance, and Hip Hop. Free. Reservations required. 227-9558. Grandparent Connection Class. Women’s & Children’s Pavilion @ Methodist Le Bonheur Healthcare. Saturday, August 26, 9-11 a.m. Call 516-6645 to register. Expectant Parents Class. Baptist Women’s Hospital. Saturday, August 26, 9 a.m.-noon. $30. Call 226-5764 to register.

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invitations to our STEP UP Walk. Light meal provided. Free. Call 547-7588 or email admin@ dsamemphis.org to RSVP by August 25.

Self-advocate Letter Writing Get Together. Country Club Tower. Sunday, August 27, 1-4 p.m. For all down syndrome self-advocates. Join for an afternoon writing

FUND-RAISERS

The Art of Dinner. Church Health Teaching Kitchen @ Crosstown Concourse. Friday, August 4, at 6 p.m. Church Health partners with UT Health Science Center and Le Bonheur to present this interactive cooking class. $50. Benefits community nutrition programming at the Church Health Nutrition Hub. Go to churchhealth.org/ events for details. 11th Annual Rock for Love. Crosstown Concourse. August 18 & 19. Church Health holds this summer music event in collaboration with the grand opening of Crosstown Concourse. All events free with a suggested donation of $10. Benefits Church Health. Go to churchhealth.org/ events for details.


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WHAT WE DO Students at Kaleidoscope School of Memphis develop the global competencies that will enable them to make better lives for themselves, their families and their communities. The strategies we use nurture transformational learning to produce an empowering and lasting imprint on our community.

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CALENDAR THEATRE PERFORMANCES

Bring It! Live. The Orpheum. Friday, August 4, at 8 p.m. Lifetime hit series is all set to take the stage with Miss D and her Dancing Dolls in this 2017 summer tour. $35.75$59.75. VIP tickets: $102.75 For tickets, call 525-3000.

Orpheum 2017 Summer Movie Series. The Orpheum. August 12 at 7 p.m.: Coming to America (R) hosted in partnership with The TakeOver. August 25 at 8 p.m.: The Rocky Horror Picture Show (R). Join for pre-movie activities that begin an hour before show time. Costumes are encouraged. $8/ adult. $6/child age 12 and under. Group discounts available. 5253000. Eric Stanley. The Orpheum. Saturday, August 12, at 8 p.m. Eric Stanley known for remixing popular songs on his violin and fusing classical, pop, jazz, country, EDM, and hip hop elements, is coming to entertain Memphis audiences. $25-$45. For tickets, call 5253000.

STORY TIME AT AREA BOOKSTORES AND MUSEUMS

Barnes & Noble Booksellers The Avenue Carriage Crossing Mall, 853-3264 Saturdays at 11 a.m. Ages 1-6.

THIS 901 DAY, JOIN US FOR A FREE CELEBRATION OF ALL THINGS MEMPHIS!

Barnes & Noble Booksellers 2774 N. Germantown Pkwy., 386-2468 Tuesdays and Saturdays at 11 a.m. Ages PreK-6. Character Story Time: Curious George. Sunday, August 20, 3-3:30 p.m. Join for a special story time and meet Curious George. Free. How to Get Your Teacher Ready. Saturday August 26 & Tuesday, August 29, 11-11:30 a.m. A heartwarming celebration of teachers and students preparing to head back to school. Join for this back-to-school story time and activities.

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MEMPHIS LIBRARY EVENTS For a complete listing of library events, go to memphislibrary.org or stop by your local branch and pick up “Infodates,” the library’s monthly calendar.

CENTRAL 3030 Poplar Ave., 415-2700 CLOUD901 Classes & Events: CLOUD901 is the library’s state-ofthe-art Teen Learning Lab that includes a music studio, a video production lab, an art studio, Makerspace, gaming zone, and a performance stage. Open to teens ages 13-18 with a Memphis library card. Go to memphislibrary.org/ cloud901 for a class list. • Gadget Lab for Kids. Tuesdays, 4-6 p.m. Join Ms. Luna and learn about cool apps and games for kids available on the library’s Kindle Fires. • International Story Time: Israel. Saturday, August 12, 11 a.m.-noon. Celebrate the country of Israel with stories, music, crafts, games, and snacks. • Read with Me, Sign with Me. Saturday, August 26, 11 a.m.-noon. Enjoy a family story time program incorporating American Sign Language, stories, activities, and crafts.

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• Musical Story Time. Mondays, 4-4:45 p.m. The presenter plays the guitar or ukulele in this interactive story time full of music, stories, and dance. • Family Fun on Picnic Day. Saturday, August 12, 11 a.m.-1 p.m. Celebrate National Picnic Month at the library. Bring your picnic gear and enjoy watermelon and popsicles. • Family Movie Madness. Saturday, August 19, 11 a.m.-12:30 p.m. Enjoy a family film and share snacks while making tile mosaic pictures. • Family Fun with Zumba. Saturday, August 26, 11 a.m.-noon. Join for a free Zumba class and cool off with fruit-sicles.

Story Time at Morton Museum of Collierville History On Fridays, 10:30-11 a.m. Ages 8 and under. Join for a new story theme each week with songs, related craft, and snack. Free. 457-2650.

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Teen Movie. Wednesday, August 9, 5-7 p.m. Come watch The Goblet of Fire at the library. Free. Reservations required.

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Royal Tea Party. Saturday, August 12, at 2 p.m. in the Story Time Room. Children ages 5-12 are welcome to wear costumes and enjoy crafts and snacks. Free.

• Back-to-School Story Time and Crafts. Friday, August 11, 3:30-4:30 p.m. Children ages 5-11 are invited to participate in a back-to-school celebration.

• Kids on the Block. On select Wednesdays (August 9 & 23), 10:30-11:30 a.m. Families are invited to enjoy a puppet show.


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The heart of Le Bonheur is closer than you may think. For more than 60 years, Le Bonheur Children’s Hospital has provided exceptional care for children. They are our passion, and it is our privilege to care for them. We’ve expanded our services at Methodist Le Bonheur Germantown Hospital to include a pediatric emergency room – fully staffed by Le Bonheur physicians, nurses and therapists. The best in pediatrics is in your neighborhood.

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Memphis Parent, August 2017  

This issue: it's back to school time! Science in 3D, tips for transitioning back into the classroom, minimizing digital distractions, not be...

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