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Memphis • THE CITY MAGAZINE • W W W.MEMPHISMAGAZINE.COM

40 Y E A R S

THE GAME CHANGER: BILL TROUTT’S 901 HEALTH: KITCHEN BISTRO ST. JUDE’S DR. PINKEL RHODES LEGACY WOMEN CEOS AT SHELBY FARMS

THE CITY MAGAZINE

our third a nnua l

VOL XLI NO 8 | NOVEMBER 2016

Homegrown

Holiday

Gift Guide

USA $4.99

1 1 —1 6 DISPLAY UNTIL DECEMBER 10, 2016

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T:9” S:8”

BMW 5 Series

roadshowbmw.com 901-365-2584

S:9.875”

THE 2016 BMW 5 SERIES.

Every element of the 2016 BMW 5 Series is precision crafted to deliver the perfect balance of luxury and performance. Optional advanced innovations like Adaptive LED Headlights corner with you, while a Full Color Head-Up Display and Active Blind Spot Detection help keep you comfortably in control of its exhilarating performance. With up to 445 horsepower propelling you from 0–60 mph in 4.3 seconds*, power has never been so sophisticated. Visit your local BMW Center for a test drive today.

Special lease and finance offers will be available through BMW Financial Services.

Roadshow BMW | 405 N. Germantown Parkway | Memphis-Cordova, TN 38018 | 901-365-2584 | roadshowbmw.com *550i xDrive Sedan ©2016 BMW of North America, LLC. The BMW name, model names and logo are registered trademarks.

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T:10.875”

POISED TO OUTPERFORM.


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THE OYSTER PERPETUAL The incarnation of the original Oyster launched in 1926 is a distinctive symbol of universal style. It doesn’t just tell time. It tells history.

rolex

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oyster and perpetual are

®

trademarks.

10/17/16 8:59 AM


OYSTER PERPETUAL 34

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Come see us for a merry healthy holiday! There’s still time to get your physical before year’s end! We know you’re busy shopping and celebrating, but stop and get a gift for yourself. Schedule an appointment with your primary care physician. It’s a great time of year to check up on your health, and you’re bound to feel better all through the holidays. We’ll help you start next year on the right foot. Now, while you’re feeling generous, give your doctor a visit.

(Left to Right) Robert Kulinski, M.D., Michelle Wredling, N.P., Jeffery Hoover, M.D. Internal and Family Medicine

Call 888-677-SFMP to make an appointment today or visit sfmp.com for more information or to book online 24/7.

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10/7/16 10:56 AM


T:8”

T:9.875”

Hold onto your antlers. The Winter Event is going by fast. The Mercedes-Benz Winter Event. They’re magical. They’re legendary. And they really can fly. The Mercedes-Benz Winter Event is back with incredible offers on the sporty CLA; the exhilarating C-Class; the versatile GLA; the secure GLE; or the stunning E-Class — one of the most advanced vehicles on the road today. Hurry, don’t miss out on an opportunity that’s sure to go down in history. See your authorized dealer today. MBUSA.com/WinterEvent

THE 2017

GLA

STARTING AT

$

32,850*

Mercedes-Benz of Collierville 4651 S. Houston Levee Road, Collierville, TN (901) 316-3535 www.mbcollierville.com

Mercedes-Benz of Memphis 5389 Poplar Avenue, Memphis, TN (901) 345-6211 www.mbofmemphis.com

2017 GLA 250 shown in Polar Silver metallic paint, 2017 C300 Sport Sedan shown in Iridium Silver metallic paint and 2017 E 300 Sport Sedan shown in designo Cardinal Red metallic paint. Optional equipment shown. *MSRP excludes all options, taxes, title, registration, transportation charge and dealer prep. Options, model availability and actual dealer price may vary. See dealer for details. ©2016 Authorized Mercedes-Benz Dealers For more information, call 1-800-FOR-MERCEDES, or visit MBUSA.com.

HEADLINE: 26 pt. • BODY COPY: 9 pt

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200 Varick St. New York, NY 10014 : Phone 212-805-7500

10/17/16 9:02 AM


A gathering of family and friends will always be the cornerstone of a Celebration of Life.

Memphis Funeral Home offers its new Life Remembrance Center as the perfect choice for these gatherings. Unique? Indeed. The only one of its kind in the Mid-South.

MEMPHIS FUNERAL HOME Caring For a Lifetime. Since 1931.

5599 Poplar Avenue, Memphis, TN 38119 • (901) 725-0100

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our third annual

Homegrown

Holiday

Gift Guide

VOL XLI NO 8 | NOVEMBER 2016

32 AN IT AN VA U G H

50 Up Front 10 12 16 22

in the beginning out and about spotlight fine print

Memphis (ISSN 1622-820x) is published monthly for $15 per year by Contemporary Media, Inc., 460 Tennessee Street, P.O. Box 1738, Memphis, TN 38101 © 2016. Telephone: 901-521-9000. For subscription info, please call 901-521-9000. Subscription customer service mailing address is Memphis magazine, P.O. Box 1738, Memphis, TN 38101. All rights reserved. • Periodicals Postage Paid at Memphis, TN. Postmasters: send address changes to Memphis, P.O. Box 1738, Memphis, TN 38101.

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M ER I AR M O U R

K AT H Y HUN T

62

86

NA DON Y ABNE

Features

26 Homegrown Holiday Gift Guide

Can’t-miss items for your list that will support local businesses, too.

32 The Gamechanger

Nearly 50 years ago, Dr. Donald Pinkel made the major breakthrough that would put St. Jude Children’s Research Hospital on the road to curing one of the most devastating forms of childhood leukemia.

~ by hampton sides

50 A Love of Learning

The lasting legacy of Rhodes College president, Dr. William E. Troutt.

~ by richard j. alley

57 Back in the Saddle

Equine-therapy programs are designed to help people of all ages. ~ by lesley young

88

Columns/Departments 62 901 health

Shattering the Glass Ceiling Women leaders in healthcare share what it takes to make it to the top. ~ by jane schneider

84 ask vance

Miller School Mystery Our trivia expert solves local mysteries of who, what, when, where, why, and why not. ~ by vance lauderdale

86 dining out Sit a Spell

Colorado’s Kitchen Bistro brings seasonal American cooking and sunset views to Shelby Farms. ~ by pamela denney

88 city dining

Tidbits: Char Restaurant; plus, the city’s most extensive dining listings.

96 last stand

(In) Decision ’16 American history will take a dramatic turn this month. Which direction? ~ by frank murtaugh

NOV EMBER 20 16 • MEMPHISMAGA ZINE.COM • 7

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Memphis T H E CIT Y M AG AZIN E

General Excellence Grand Award Winner City and Regional Magazine Association 2007, 2008, 2010, 2014

&7

PUBLISHER/EDITOR kenneth neill EXECUTIVE EDITOR michael finger MANAGING EDITOR frank murtaugh ARTS & LIFESTYLE EDITOR anne cunningham o’neill FASHION EDITOR augusta campbell FOOD EDITOR pamela denney ASSOCIATE EDITOR shara clark CONTRIBUTING EDITORS richard j. alley,

jackson baker, john branston, vance lauderdale, jane schneider EDITORIAL OPERATIONS ASSOCIATE sam cicci

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CREATIVE DIRECTOR brian groppe PRODUCTION OPERATIONS DIRECTOR margie neal SENIOR ART DIRECTOR carrie beasley ADVERTISING ART DIRECTOR christopher myers GRAPHIC DESIGNERS jeremiah matthews,

bryan rollins PHOTOGRAPHY timothy archibald,

WWW.COOLEYDDS.COM

901.754.3117

7938 WOLF RIVER BLVD

justin fox burks, don perry

GERMANTOWN, TN 38138

4

SENIOR ACCOUNT EXECUTIVES joy bateman,

sloane patteson taylor ACCOUNT EXECUTIVE zach scott

4

Restore Your Intimacy MonaLisa Touch TM – a simple treatment for vaginal dryness and painful intercourse.

published by contemporary media, inc. 460 tennessee street, memphis, tn 38103 901-521-9000 p • 901-521-0129 f subscriptions: 901-521-9000

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CHIEF EXECUTIVE OFFICER kenneth neill CHIEF OPERATING OFFICER molly willmott CONTROLLER ashley haeger DIRECTOR OF BUSINESS DEVELOPMENT jeffrey a. goldberg EDITORIAL DIRECTOR bruce vanwyngarden DIGITAL MANAGER kevin lipe DISTRIBUTION MANAGER lynn sparagowski EVENTS MANAGER jackie sparks-davila MARKETING/COMMUNICATIONS MANAGER kendrea collins EMAIL MARKETING MANAGER britt ervin IT DIRECTOR joseph carey OFFICE MANAGER celeste dixon RECEPTIONIST kalena mckinney

&7

november 2016

For more information or to schedule a free consultation, call 901-767-3810.

A division of Women’s Care Center of Memphis, MPLLC

adamspatterson.com member: City and Regional Magazine Association member: Circulation Verification Council

8 • MEMPHISMAGA ZINE.COM • NOV EMBER 20 16

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10/20/16 3:21 PM


THE WESTIN MEMPHIS BEALE STREET & BLEU HAVE SOME EXCITING HOLIDAY NEWS! We are already celebrating the season with a sleigh full of incentives for holiday party planners. Book by November 25, 2016 and receive additional incentives! Holiday revelers are encouraged to book now to secure desired dates. For more information please call Lorraine Chatman at 901.334.5924 or email Lorraine.chatman@westinmemphis.com The Westin Memphis Beale Street • 170 Lt. George W. Lee Ave., Memphis, TN 38103 • www.westin.com/bealestreet

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10/19/16 10:11 AM


IN THE BEGINNING | by kenneth neill

Bartlett Performing Arts And Conference Center

Food for Thought

T

he holiday season is now upon us, even though we had to wait until almost Halloween this year for summer to release us from its steamy grip. Ironically, November also brings a merciful ending to another miserable season that went on too long: our endless presidential election campaign.

Good Lovelies Saturday, Nov. 12th @ 8pm

TheatreKids Dance Bootcamp Showcase II Nov. 18th & 19th @ 7pm

Emile Pandolfi w/ Dana Russell Saturday, Dec. 10th @ 8pm For Ticket Information Call 901.385.6440 www.bpacc.org 3663 Appling Rd., Bartlett, TN 38133

Earlier this year, some of you may recall that I which today’s amazingly diverse and highly prosuggested in this space that this country needed fessional food community is based. Today, Tom some kind of legislation/regulation that would Martin (now a business professor at The College forbid a presidential election from beginning of Charleston, btw) would have little trouble until the year of the actual election. Nothing titling his favorite list as “Dinner at Forty.” The readers of this magazine are among this has happened lately to make me change my city’s most knowledgeable and discriminating mind. And regardless of what you think about the November 8th result, I believe just about gourmets. That’s why, for decades now, local everybody would agree 18 excruciating months restaurateurs have viewed being a winner or is far too long. Enough already! finalist in one of the survey’s 44 That’s why I’ve got a bit of trepcategories — check them out on idation about the favor I’m about page 94 — as something very speto ask you. Yes, we want your cial. That’s because the Memphis vote. Not in anything remotely magazine Readers Restaurant Poll political, of course — after this has been something of a gold stanelection, I’m taking a sabbatical dard among such opinion surveys in this marketplace. myself from politics — but a vote delivered in much more pleasurNo similar survey, in fact, betable circumstances. ter reflects what the “foodies” of I’d be thrilled if you would take Memphis think of the people and January 2006 the time to participate in our anplaces that shape our culinary nual Memphis magazine Readers Restaurant scene. Participation is on-line only — again, at Poll, the results of which will be published in memphismagazine.com — and the polls open at our February 2017 issue. midnight on November 1st, closing at 11:59 pm Here at Memphis, we’ve been doing our on November 30th. Voting is strictly monitored Restaurant Poll for what seems like an eterto avoid ballot stuffing — for example, one must nity. Actually, that’s an exaggeration, but not fill out at least 50 percent of the ballot in order to be counted — and as always, no advertising by much; our first such mini-survey appeared in the July 1983 issue. Indeed, we re-ran our considerations are involved in the determinafirst-ever “Dinner at Eight” feature from that tion of category winners. There are drop-box issue this past February (you can check it out at listings for all categories; our staff meticulously memphismagazine.com), in which long-time dining includes the top ten winners from every category in the previous year’s poll, as well as newcritic Tom Martin made his very first picks of comers who have arrived on the scene in 2016. the best eight restaurants in town. To say that the Memphis culinary scene was And of course, you’re always free to write in any different 33 years ago is a considerable undercandidate you think we’ve missed. statement; that scene bore no resemblance to That’s about it. Now cure your national what today’s Memphis chefs have to offer, in election blues and vote for something that every part of the community. Quality restauwill actually make you feel good about casting your ballot. And while you’re at it, don’t rants were so few and far between during the 1980s that there were years when Tom Martin forget that Memphis magazine gift subscripcould only muster five or six decent establishtions make ideal holiday gifts; they are gifts that keep on giving, twelve times a year, for ments for his list, making the “Dinner at Eight” just $15, along with famous Dinstuhl’s choctitle a numerical non-sequitur. Only one of those eight 1983 best restaurants olate. Check all this out on line as well, or is still in business today: Chez Philippe in The check out the promotional offer on page 81 Peabody. The other seven — Swiss Manor, of this issue. Here’s to a Happy Thanksgiving for all! And Justine’s, Bradford House, Vieux Chalet, Palm Court, René’s, and River Terrace — are all long while food is front and center, don’t forget to vote! gone. But they’re not forgotten by those of us lucky enough to have dined there. More impor Kenneth Neill publisher/editor tantly, they helped build the foundation upon

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OUT AND ABOUT

11.2016

compiled by sam cicci

STANDARD OF EXCELLENCE SINCE 1950 Memphis Magazine’s

THE 2016

FACE

Pentatonix

OF

ORIENTAL RUGS

11.3

Pentatonix

Pentatonix (PTX), the five-person a cappella group from Arlington, Texas, first shot to fame when they won the third season of The Sing-Off on NBC. After initially being cut from their record label, they navigated the waters of internet and YouTube fame before getting back on track and releasing their first album in 2012. Now, the group – consisting of Avi Kaplan, Scott Hoying, Kirstin Maldonado, Kevin Olusola, and Mitch Grassi – is armed with a doubleplatinum album and two Grammy awards and is currently on the “PENTATONIX WORLD TOUR” with the folk pop group Us the Duo. FedExForum, 191 Beale St., fedexforum.com

11.11 appraisals handwash/cleaning sales reweaving repairs color run restoration pet and other stain removals moth damage odor removal and much more

Master Weaver Ali Taghavi Restoring a antique Persian Farahan rug.

HeartLight

Agape Child & Family Services will be hosting its annual fundraiser, HeartLight, and has a special guest attending the event this year. Award-winning actress and human rights advocate, Cicely Tyson, will be the keynote speaker. Best known for her roles in The Help, Sound, and Fried Green Tomatoes, Tyson has a long history of advocating for civil rights. Agape Child & Family Services is a Memphisbased nonprofit dedicated to providing both children and families with stable homes. New Direction Church, 6120 Winchester Rd., agapemeanslove.org

3554 Park Avenue, Memphis, TN • (901) 327-5033 • taghavirugs.com Memphis Crafts and Drafts

Lauren Harkins Wiuff (901) 682-1868 (901) 859-3565 www.laurenharkinswiuff.com

11.12

Memphis Crafts and Drafts

Come on out to the parking lot behind Crosstown Arts to enjoy Memphis’ newest (and free) curated exhibition of handmade arts and crafts. Behind on holiday shopping? Our craft vendors have all sorts of cool Memphis jewelry, clothing, and paraphernalia that are available for sale. On the other side of the spectrum, several local favorites will return as beer vendors, with selections from breweries such as High Cotton and Memphis Made. Finally, there will be plenty of food trucks to keep guests sustained throughout the day. Parking lot behind Crosstown Arts, 430 N. Cleveland, memphiscraftsanddrafts.com

contin u ed on page 1 4

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901.761.3580

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P O P L A R AV E N U E AT R I D G E WAY I N R E G A L I A

OAKHALL.COM

10/11/16 9:03 11:19 10/17/16 AMAM


OU T & ABOU T contin u ed from page 12

11.13

Memphis Symphony Orchestra Masterworks 2: Beethoven’s Fifth

Beethoven’s Fifth surely needs no introduction, but any aficionados of classical composition should clear their schedule and head to the Germantown Performing Arts Center for conductor Robert Moody’s second Masterworks performance. Featuring Sidney Outlaw Mary Boehlke Wilson as soprano and Sidney Outlaw as baritone, the performance will cover a series of classics including Beethoven’s “Symphony No. 5,” Forrest’s “In Paradisum,” and Vaughan Williams’ “Dona Nobis Pacem.” There will also be a performance at the Cannon Center on November 12. Germantown Performing Arts Center, 1801 Exeter Rd., memphissymphony.org

Mary Boehlke Wilson

Leland Gantt

11.18

Rhapsody in Black

Leland Gantt present Rhapsody in Black, a one-man show written and performed by Gantt and developed at NYC’s Actors Studio by Estelle Parsons. Rhapsody follows Leland on a personal journey as he struggles to understand racism in America and eventually transcend it. His life story begins in an underprivileged neighborhood in McKeesport, PA, and follows him into adult situations where he is the role African-American in the room. Leland’s journey aims to focus on coping with the psychological effects of always being marked as “The Other.” The Orpheum, 203 S. Main St., orpheum-memphis.com

11.22

Open Crit

kirbywines.com

Now carrying fl asks, cork screws, aprons, & other fun gifts. Korin break resistant wine glasses available for that person who can’t keep a wine glass!

2865 Kirby Pkwy (One Block North off of 385) · p901.756.1993 · f901.757.0275 Monday - Thursday · 9am-10pm · Friday - Saturday · 9am-11pm

As an artist, finding constructive criticism can be one of the most difficult parts of the creative journey. Crosstown Arts, in partnership with ArtsMemphis, aims to gather a community that provides a series of critiques dedicated to improving any art project. Open Crit is a monthly event where visual artists of any kind are encouraged to bring any new or in-progress work for feedback and group discussion focused specifically on the artist’s chosen field. Every session is free, and also open to the public. Crosstown Arts, 430 N. Cleveland., crosstownarts.org

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Doris McLendon’s F ine J ewelry “Expect to be Impressed”

9387 Poplar Avenue

(Next door to the Germantown Fresh Market)

901.758.8605 dorismclendon.com

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SPOTLIGHT | “Leather and Lace” | Bumpus Harley-Davidson | September 17, 2016 | Photography by Don Perry

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umpus Harley-Davidson hosted a Leather and Lace Fall MotorClothes Preview in support of Breast Cancer Awareness and the growing client base of women Harley-Davidson riders in our community. More than 200 people attended the event on a beautiful day in Memphis to show off the fall Harley-Davidson Women’s MotorClothes Collection. The line exudes the confidence of powerful women professionals who don’t take a back seat to anyone, riding the world’s premium brand of motorcycles, all while expressing their individuality and personalities on the custom bikes they own and ride, while looking amazing doing it.

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1   Richard and Kathy Holder, Tim Bumpus 2 Carla Glass and Marc Bonner 3 Andrea Phillips and Katie Bumpus 4 Michelle Demery 5 Mathilda and Peter Doorley 6 Mary Catherine Carver and Jeff Olchawa 7 Rodney Marra 8 Todd Conklin, Jennie Tummins, and Amanda Sanders 9 Jazmine and Floyd Morton

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November 11, 2016 – January 1, 2017 • More than 2 million lights and 9 acres of stunning décor

• Larry Gatlin & The Gatlin Brothers Christmas Dinner Show

• NEW – ICE! featuring Rudolph the Red-Nosed Reindeer in 2 million pounds of colorful, hand-carved ice sculptures and slides

• The Elf on the Shelf® Scavenger Hunt

• Dr. Seuss’ How the Grinch Stole Christmas! The Musical • NEW – Breakfast with the Grinch

• Gingerbread Decorating Corner • Build-A-Bear Workshop® • Carriage rides, snow tubing, outdoor ice skating and more!

Tickets and Packages on Sale Now!

ChristmasAtGaylordOpryland.com

NASHVILLE, TN | (888) 677-9872

ICE! PRESENTED BY

PRESENTED BY

PEPSI, PEPSI-COLA and the Pepsi Globe are registered trademarks of PepsiCo, Inc. FUJIFILM and INSTAX are trademarks of FUJIFILM Corporation and its affiliates. © 2016 FUJIFILM North America Corporation. All rights reserved. TM & © 1957, 2016 Dr. Seuss Enterprises, L.P. The Elf on the Shelf® and © CCA and B, LLC. All rights reserved. Rudolph the Red-Nosed Reindeer and all related elements © & TM under license to Character Arts, LLC. All rights reserved. © & ® Build-A-Bear Workshop, Inc. Used with permission. All rights reserved.

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SPOTLIGHT | Collierville Brewfest | The Shops of Carriage Crossing | September 24, 2016 | Photography by Don Perry

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n Saturday, September 24th, The Shops at Carriage Crossing hosted the inaugural Collierville BrewFest, Collierville’s first and only beer festival. More than 800 guests sampled more than 50 types of craft beer from local and regional breweries. Guests enjoyed food from the restaurants at Carriage Crossing, the Amurica photo booth, a game zone, live music, and more. The festival raised $23,000 for Le Bonheur Children’s Hospital.

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1  Frankie and Gisela Padilla, Rob Ortloff and Luke Pawlowski 2 Brian Kelly and Shante Norfolk 3 Andy Ashby 4 Fumi Ridley, Traci Beebe, and Paula Ebling 5 Rachel Stewart, Phillip and Rebecca Langsdon 6 Chad and Rosalie Rogers 7 Will Taylor, Loghan Smith, Keri and James Taylor 8 Shelby, Stone, Chad, and Brooke Powell 9 Juan Reyes and Gabby Perez 8

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10/19/16 3:22 PM


Laurelwood | 400 Grove Park Road | Memphis, Tennessee 901-767-4640 | jamesdavisstore.com

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10/7/16 11:01 AM


SPOTLIGHT | Memphis Food & Wine Festival | Memphis Botanic Garden | October 15, 2016 | Photography by Justin Fox Burks

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he first annual Memphis Food and Wine Festival, an idea started two years ago over a casual glass of wine, culminated October 15th at Memphis Botanic Garden with about 1,800 revelers sampling scrumptious small plates like Waygu steak with tomato panzanella and parfait foie gras from local and national chefs, including Michelin-star chef headliner Jean-Georges Vongerichten. The event to benefit Le Bonheur’s FedEx Family House also featured the Ghost Town Blues Band and the Royal Blues Band, local musicians who played spirited sets under a full moon rising. “The chefs and wineries are blown away by our festival,” said Colleen DePete, who spearheaded the event with River Oaks chef/ owner Jose Gutierrez. — Pamela Denney

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1  The all-star cast of gourmet chefs 2 Jaquila and Erling Jensen 3 Ben and Beth Brock 4 Cori McCullers and Dr. Jon McCullers 5 J.D. Gentry, Elizabeth Gilmore, and Dr. Barry Gilmore 6 Rip Walker, Emmye Walker, Della McCay, and Melissa Alford 7 Adrienne Bailey, Jim Walker, and Susan Walker 8 Megen Cunningham, Jessie Cunningham, Nina Thornton, Nancy Colleran, and Meagan Thornton 8

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10/19/16 3:23 PM


Multispecialty Practice provides

convenient

life for your

Through a person-centered approach to care, we’re changing the way we connect with our patients to provide the services you need in a convenient way. Our new East Campus Multispecialty Practice offers a one-stop shop for not only primary care, but specialty appointments too. Our UT Regional One Physicians care team offers cardiology, endocrinology, rheumatology, and urology services, as well as a pharmacy and imaging center onsite for a seamless experience. It’s not just our job to give our patients an easy care experience that gets them back to their lives faster, it’s what we love to do.

Schedule an appointment online at RegionalOneHealth.org

or call 901.515.EAST East Campus • 6555 Quince Road Memphis, TN 38119

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RegionalOneHealth.org/East

Your life. Our passion.

Client: Regional One Health

10/20/16 9:24 AM


FINE PRINT

Getting Physical Personal fitness is where you find it.

by john branston

T

the city or philanthropists a dime. The emphasis is on individual responsibility. The theme is “no judgment” about body type. Members pay just $10 a month plus $30 to join. Ever the skeptic, I thought this was a teaser rate that would go up after a few months, like my phone bill. It did not. “We’re opening the market, much larger than the competition, where they’re all going after the 20 percent [of people] who have gym memberships,” CEO Chris Rondeau has said. “We’re going after the 80 percent that doesn’t have a gym membership.” Finding a fitness routine that sticks is a tricky thing. In the house? No way. I never touch the barbells upstairs or the stationary bike in the garage. Going downtown or out east or over to the Kroc Center means getting in the car. To play tennis or team sports you need partners. For me, the perfect spot is not too close but not too his may sound like an infomercial, but Memphis has gotten far away so I can walk or bike to it. I hardly know anya boost in the health and welfare department recently from one there, which is a plus because if I did, I would talk Planet Fitness, a company that went public about a year ago. to them. Instead I nod at the staff and regulars, do my 30 minutes, and am back home in less than an hour. Gyms of all sizes and descriptions are nothing new, The place is obsessively clean and a cross-section of of course. What sets Planet Fitness apart, with its five Memphis, mostly black and some white, a few huge locations in greater Memphis, are three things: it’s guys that look like they could line up for the Tigers, cheap, at $10 a month; it’s aimed at people who don’t some women who look like bodybuilders, oldies like have a gym membership; and it’s the me, and a lot of fatties. Just a bunch right idea at the right time for a city of anonymous people minding their It’s the right idea at the that is always in the Top Ten in various own business. right time for a city that My membership costs $20 a month lists of America’s Fattest Cities and in is always in the Top weight-related health problems that because I can use it at clubs in other cost everyone big bucks, directly and cities. When you see one Planet FitTen in various lists of indirectly. ness you have pretty much seen them America’s Fattest Cities For my (not much) money, it meets all. Television monitors and music vidthe need better than government or eos if you want them, but not so obtruand in weight-related nonprofits or its hard-sell competitors. sive that they cannot be ignored. Lots health problems. Government is in the fitness business of windows and light. A “lunk alarm” that goes off if someone drops a weight. Employees althrough community centers, school gyms and playing ways wiping off this, vacuuming that. A few snacks for fields, “visionary” non-starters like the Fairgrounds Sportsplex, and trendy transportation alternatives such sale, and a bucket of free Tootsie Rolls at the front desk. as 200 miles of bike lanes. Planet Fitness is doing well and doing good. The Swimming pools, golf courses, and tennis courts are stock (PLNT) came public in 2015 at $16 and is now $19, expensive to build and maintain, so the city has been an 18 percent return. I don’t own it. closing them and/or farming them out to conservanI joined in January in a fit of New Year’s fever. Two cies and private operators. Nonprofits have tried to months earlier I had a small stroke, so my usual sports help, notably the YMCA and the Kroc Center at the Fairgrounds. Dues at those are at least $300 a year for were off limits. My goal was modest and specific — one an individual and more for a family. They offer somechin-up, which is harder than it sounds. Darned if that thing for everyone — a lap pool, play pool, snack bar, “20 days to make a habit” thing isn’t true. It took three months, steadily lowering the level of assistance from basketball courts, aerobics classes, meeting rooms. This is no knock on either of them. When I was a fiend for 70 pounds to 10 pounds on “my” adjustable machine off racquetball, basketball, and swimming, I joined both in the corner. Six months later I could do five. I don’t of them. have muscles — never have and never will — but I feel Planet Fitness moves into shopping centers with stronger. I have A Place To Go. And I almost always vacant space, is open around the clock, and hasn’t cost resist the Tootsie Rolls. 

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What’s Haute

VSA Designs exclusively in Germantown at More Than Words. Shown: San Benito Magdelana necklace handcrafted in San Miguel de Allende Mexico. $268. 2123 West St.; 901.755.4388; www.morethanwords.com.

Holloway Furs, Memphis magazine’s 2014, 2015 & 2016 Face of Furs, has the only on-site Master Furrier in Memphis. Whether you’re looking to buy new or update your older fur with a new look, Jim Holloway and the staff at Holloway Furs is here to assist you. 404 Perkins Ext., 901.685.FURS (3877).

Central BBQ was voted “Best Barbecue Sandwich” in Memphis magazine’s 2016 restaurant poll. Visit Central BBQ for competition-style ribs and BBQ. 4375 Summer Ave., 901.767.4672; 2249 Central Ave., 901.272.9377; 147 Butler Ave., 901.672.7760.

As seen in the Vesta Home Show Norwalk Custom Upholstery ready in 35 days. Main Street Décor at 1209 Ridgeway Road.

This magnificent vintage round brilliant cushion halo diamond engagement ring is available in any combination of size and shape diamonds in 18 karat and platinum. Shown with its matching flush fit wedding band. Jewelers’ Choice, Inc.; 5100 Wheelis Drive #211; 901.763.0195; jewelerschoiceinc.com.

Nest Fragrances Pumpkin Chai creates a cozy autumn ambiance with a blend of pumpkin, spicy masal chai, cardamom, ginger, and cinnamon. Gift sets available at Reverie Fine Linens & Down, Laurelwood Collection; 4615 Poplar Ave., Suite 16, Memphis, TN 38117; 901.767.4400.

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Plan your future with the brand new agenda from Hand-made English toffee, salted caramels and Karen Adams Design. It will keep you organized, give peanut brittle candy from Piece & Love Pie you words of wisdom . . . and it has stickers! Here’s to Co. is boxed for gifting. Shipping is available. a productive 2017! Ménage Fine Stationery & Gifts; Katie’s Kitchen in Germantown; 901.754.8444; 430 Perkins Extended; 901.683.6809. katieskitchengtown.com.

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Holiday Gift Guide 2016

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4530 POPLAR AVE — MEMPHIS • 2130 W POPLAR AVE — COLLIERVILLE @fleetfeetmemphs FLEETFEETMEMPHIS.COM /fleetfeetmemphis N O V E M B E R 2 0 1 6 • M E M P H I S M A G A Z I N E . C O M • 25

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our third a nnua l

Homegrown

Holiday Gift Guide

compiled by shar a clark and the memphis editorial staff

’Tis the season! If you haven’t yet found the perfect gifts for everyone on your list, now's the time. Here, we present to you a variety of options for the men, women, and children (and even pets!) in your life. The best part: The items in this list are all produced locally, from food and music to art and accessories — and everything in between. This truly “home grown” gift guide is sure to please the hard-to-buy-for people in your life while supporting our local makers, cooks, and creators.

My Memphis Calendar by Martha Kelly Martha Kelly, the Varnell artist-in-residence at Memphis Theological Seminary for the 2015-2016 and 2016-2017 school years, creates paintings, block prints, watercolors, and illustrations. She’s turned a collection of urban sketches — watercolor images of iconic Memphis landmarks like AutoZone Park, Jerry’s Sno Cones, and Dixon Gallery & Gardens — into a wall calendar. Both beautiful and useful, the My Memphis calendar would make a great gift. $18. Order by December 10th for holiday delivery. marthakellyart.com. 278-1216. Available online at squareup.com/market/martha-kelly-art

Candied Nuts from Billie’s Pecans In the early 1960s, Billie Crenshaw was raising four boys on a family farm in Mississippi where cotton, soybeans, and pecan trees grew. With an abundance of pecans, Billie decided to make good use of them, seasoning batches of shelled nuts with cinnamon and sugar. Later, she began selling her candied pecans at the Market Basket in Memphis and giving out samples at Goldsmith’s, until her business grew out of the home kitchen and into a storefront. Today, Billie’s daughter-in-law, Stacy Crenshaw, continues her legacy. Chocolate praline, cinnamon spiced, and white chocolate are among the varieties offered. 1- or 2-pound boxes, $25.50-$36.25. Available at billiespecans.com 26 • M E M P H I S M A G A Z I N E . C O M • N O V E M B E R 2 0 1 6

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The Chubby Vegetarian by Justin Fox Burks and Amy Lawrence Husband-and-wife team Justin Fox Burks and Amy Lawrence started sharing creative recipes for the home cook via The Chubby Vegetarian blog in 2008. After focusing on regional favorites in their first cookbook, The Southern Vegetarian, Justin and Amy have now put their own unique spin on fare from all over the world with creative recipes for Carrot “Lox,” Shiitake Ramen, Beet and Goat Cheese Ravioli, and more surprising culinary translations. $24.99. Available at area bookstores and amazon.com chubbyvegetarian.blogspot.com

All My Heart by Alex da Ponte Alex da Ponte’s second album, All My Heart, is bright, fresh, and biting; as honest and brash as it is knowingly self-conscious. The singer/songwriter’s voice has earned comparisons to Jenny Lewis and Karen O, and her style (a blend of femininity and punk influenced by 1990s alternative) to Courtney Love. Recorded at Memphis’ Music+Arts Studio, the album features Rick Steff and Roy Berry (Lucero) on keys and drums, Geoff Smith (Star & Micey) on bass, Jonathan Kirkscey and Jessie Munson on cello and violin, and Robby Davis on guitar. $9.99. Available for download on iTunes or as an MP3 or CD at archer-records.com

Socks from Zeke’s Feet A few years ago, Zeke Lewis, a 12-year-old 7th-grader, decided to run. After being inspired by a commercial for St. Jude Children’s Research Hospital, he entered one of the kids’ races. He fell short of raising all of his pledge money, so he decided he was going to sell a product — socks. A portion of the proceeds go to St. Jude. There are socks with Pokemon and socks with candy and still others adorned with cheeseburgers and sports logos and abstract-art-like splotches and splats. The most popular design features cartoon fight words — wham! ka-pow! whap! — a nod to fighting for the kids of St. Jude. $25-$30. Available at etsy.com/shop/zekesfeet N O V E M B E R 2 0 1 6 • M E M P H I S M A G A Z I N E . C O M • 27

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Pottery from Nautilus Pottery

Bags by Texstyle

Rose Conway, a retired Naval officer, discovered her love of working with clay in 2004. Today, she handcrafts beautiful bowls, yard art, Memphisthemed ornaments, soap dishes, jewelry, mugs, and more. Her products can be found at The Woman’s Exchange, The Square Olive, Delta Groove Yoga, Southern Whimsy, the Bartlett Soap Company, and elsewhere. Each piece is individually hand-built or thrown on a wheel, hand-painted, and high-fired with food-safe glazes — from Rose’s hands to yours.

Memphis-based seamstress and designer Samilia Colar creates handcrafted purses that empower, embolden, and inspire. Available in a variety of styles — clutches, satchels, crossbody bags, and more — the handbags range from dramatic ethnic prints to solids and rich color combinations. The durable messenger-style Belize Bag ($172) can also function as a backpack, and a portion of its proceeds go to Hopewell, a safe haven for orphaned, neglected, or abused children in Belize, where Colar spent some time this summer teaching young girls how to sew.

Shown here is the 10-inch “IrresistaBowl.” $45. 297-3541. nautiluspottery.com

To see the full collection, visit texstylebags.com. Also available at K’PreSha (323 South Main) and Five in One Social Club (2535 Broad)

Memphis Coloring Book from Signet Sealed Coloring has been proven to be both fun and relaxing, and it’s not just for children anymore, though kids would also enjoy coloring these beautiful, Memphis-inspired illustrations. With 25 pages, including images of Overton Park, Shelby Farms, the Crosstown Concourse, and Broad Avenue, the book was designed by Sarah Baumann, a recent Rhodes College graduate, and printed at Memphis’ Peerless Printing Company. $20. Available at signetsealed.com

Beerings by AM Beerings The “Beerings” created by Memphian Angela Mazzanti are crafted using recycled beer cans. Available as single- or double-sided dangly earrings, stud earrings, rings, and more, each piece makes creative use of materials that would otherwise be thrown away. Know someone who loves Memphis Made, High Cotton, or Wiseacre craft beer? Buy them some Beerings so they can display their fandom in the form of jewelry. $10-$15.50. Available at Five in One Social Club (2535 Broad), Stone Soup (993 Cooper), Doc’s Wine and Liquor (6645 Poplar, #101), and Walking Pants Curiosities (109 G.E. Patterson). ambeering.com

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Spices of Life from Porcellino’s Looking to spice things up in the kitchen? The meat masters at Porcellino’s have created a tantalizing variety of spice blends and rubs, great for grilling or just for adding a bit a flavor to boring food. The Spices of Life include options like “Rub My Java,” a mix of sugar, espresso, sweet and hot pepper, and other herbs and spices; and “Lil’ Ray Ray,” a blend of salt, sugar, lemon zest, lime zest, thyme, and herbs. $10. Available at Porcellino’s Craf t Butcher. 711 West Brookhaven Circle. 726-6656. porcellinoscraf tbutcher.com

T-shirt from Sachë

Perhaps only a true Memphian would recognize this design, inspired by an iconic graffiti image that once adorned the historic Tennessee Brewery downtown. After standing empty for years, in 2014, the brewery reopened to the public for a special beer-related event — Untapped. The event was so popular, it was repeated in 2015. Memphians came out in droves to “invest in good times.” Today, the building is being transformed into “a trio of modern residences.” This shirt commemorates this special Memphis landmark. Available at Sachë. 525 South Main. 922-5549. sachedesign.com

Candles by Mary Claire White Local candlemaker and home-and-lifestyle boutique owner, Mary Claire White, handcrafts soy wax candles in small batches using high-quality, skinsafe fragrances infused with natural essential oils. Soothing aromas like Candied Ginger Saffron (ginger, cedarwood, geranium, and patchouli) and Mistletoe (a blend of citrus, blue spruce, and frosted cranberries) make these candles the gift that keeps on giving (with a 55-hour burn time). 7.5 oz. candles/$24. Available at Mary Claire White’s boutique, Falling Into Place (2613 Broad, 249-2843), Crazy Beautiful, Ryan Patrick Salon, Stock and Belle, and Miss Cordelia’s. fallingintoplace.net N O V E M B E R 2 0 1 6 • M E M P H I S M A G A Z I N E . C O M • 29

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Cookies from Sweet LaLa’s Bakery Sweet LaLa’s Bakery launched in 2002 with a social mission in mind. Through a partnership with JIFF (Juvenile Intervention & Faith-based Follow-up), a nonprofit organization committed to seeing kids flourish free from a life of crime, youth graduates of the 16-week program become bakers. Available in ChocoLaLa (made with Ghirardelli chocolate chips), Tropical LaLa (with a hint of piña colada oil), NuteLaLa (made with hazelnut spread), and more, these cookies are sure to satisfy your giftee’s sweet tooth, all while supporting a great cause. Small orders are available for pick-up at 254 S. Lauderdale. Also sold at the Booksellers at Laurelwood (387 Perkins Extended), City & State (2625 Broad), and sweetlalas.com

Quilt by Night Owl T-Shirt Quilts A few years ago, quilter Jennifer VanDyke’s daughter asked her for something special. “I saved all my T-shirts from elementary school through high school,” she said, “and I want you to make me a quilt to take to college.” That request transformed Jennifer’s hobby into a business. Today, Night Owl T-Shirt Quilts preserves your memories by turning old, treasured T-shirts of your favorite schools, bands, or sports teams into beautiful handmade quilts. One of her most popular products features Grizzlies growl towels. Prices start at $295 for a 48x48 lap quilt (approximately 15-20 T-shirts). Available at nightowltshirtquilts.com

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Pet bed from Hollywood Feed The pet experts at Hollywood Feed have the goods to keep your furry friends happy, from high-quality foods and treats to toys and snuggly sleep spaces. The Mississippi Made pet beds are handmade near Tupelo, Mississippi, exclusively for Hollywood Feed stores. Available in donuts, rectangles, day beds, and snoozepads, your pet will love cozying up in one of these for its many nap times. $24.99-$149.99, depending on size and style. Available in Hollywood Feed stores and at hollywoodfeed.com

Getaway at Fat Possum Hollow About two hours from Memphis is a 200-acre piece of paradise owned by former Memphian Maurice Lipsey, who’s built a number of time-share homes along the banks of the Little Red River. If you’re not ready to commit to a timeshare, there’s still a great way to experience all that FPH has to offer: the Bunkhouse. Perfect for groups or extended families, the spot can comfortably accommodate up to 14 adults and features four separate rooms, three full-size beds, four sets of large bunk beds, two fireplaces, two satellite televisions, two kitchenettes, and a private master bedroom with a whirlpool tub. Best of all, it goes for around $250 a night. For more info, visit fatpossumhollow.com or call 501-362-7738.

Take Me to the River featuring various artists From blues to soul and rock-and-roll, the city on the river has been home to the creation of some of the world’s most important and influential music. Take Me to the River, a documentary that celebrates the musical influence of Memphis, brings generations of musicians together, including Snoop Dogg, Mavis Staples, Otis Clay, Lil P-Nut, Charlie Musselwhite, Bobby “Blue” Bland, Yo Gotti, Bobby Rush, The North Mississippi All-Stars, and more. Priced around $20. available on blu-ray and DVD on amazon.com. The motion picture soundtrack is available at the Stax Museum of American Soul Music (926 E. McLemore) for $15.98. takemetotheriver.livingfilm.com

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“From the start, hope was always my dream,” says Dr. Donald Pinkel, shown here at his study in San Luis Obispo, California. 32 • M E M P H I S M A G A Z I N E . C O M • N O V E M B E R 2 0 1 6

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PHOTOGRAPH BY TIMOTHY ARCHIBALD

10/14/16 2:39 PM


The Gamechanger Nearly 50 years ago, Dr. Donald Pinkel made the major breakthrough that would put St. Jude Children’s Research Hospital on the road to curing one of the most devastating forms of childhood leukemia. Here’s how it all happened.

I

by hampton sides

editor’s note: This story originally appeared in the July-August 2016 issue of Smithsonian magazine. We are grateful to The Smithsonian Institution for permission to reprint this article. Its Memphis-born author (and

t began in the summer of 1968, the summer after her kindergarten year. Barbara Bowles was a 5-year-old girl growing up in the drowsy river town of Natchez, Mississippi. Happy and seemingly healthy, a fetching gap between her two front teeth, she was an introvert with brown hair, the

youngest of three. She took piano lessons and, with few neighborhood girls

her age, became a tomboy by default. But that summer, coming in from her romps, she began to collapse in exhaustion. Her dad, Robert Bowles, then a technician for

former Memphis magazine

International Paper, noticed it first: how tired she was, the lost weight, the peculiar

staffer), Hampton Sides,

pallor that washed over her face. She complained that her joints ached and seemed to

is the author of several national bestsellers, most recently In the Kingdom Of Ice: The Grand and Terrible Voyage of the U.S.S. Jeanette (2014).

be having a lot of nosebleeds. Robert took Barbara to the family pediatrician in Natchez, who examined her, ran some tests, drew some blood. And then, just like that, came the verdict: Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia (ALL).

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leukemia. Most experts scoffed then — and were still scoffing. But understandably, Eva and Robert were desperate enough to try anything. And so one hot, anxious day in the midsummer of 1968, with Barbara wan and spent on the back seat, they drove through cotton and soybean fields up the Mississippi Delta toward Memphis.

Barbara Bowles Extine, photographed in Vicksburg, says that “Dr. Pinkel and his people gave me life.”

Under a microscope, the culprit was plainly visible in the blood smear. Deep in the marrow of Barbara’s bones, white blood cells were proliferating out of control. They weren’t normal white cells — they were immature structures called lymphoblasts, primitive-looking globules that seemed to have no purpose other than to crowd out her healthy blood cells. Coursing through her body, these cancerous blobs began to accumulate and take over, literally causing her blood to grow pale. (The word “leukemia” is derived from the Greek for “white blood.”) Leukemia. The mere sound of it plunged Robert and his wife, Eva, into despair. Acute childhood leukemia was considered a nearly 100 percent fatal malady. Being a blood disease, it did not offer the solace of locality. There was no one place where it resided; it was everywhere, and always on the move. “A death sentence,” Robert said. “It left us in dread.” ALL was the most common form of childhood cancer. The Bowles’ doctor referred to it as “the Wasting Disease.” He told the couple that nothing could be done for their daughter in Natchez — that, really, nothing could be done for her anywhere. He knew of a few children’s hospitals around the country that could likely prolong her life by a year or so. But after a brief remission, the lymphoblasts would surely return and continue multiplying inside her. She would become dangerously anemic. Infections would begin to attack

PHOTOGRAPH BY TIMOTHY ARCHIBALD

I

her. She would suffer from internal bleeding. Eventually the disease would kill Barbara, just as it had in nearly every case of ALL the world had seen since 1827, when the French surgeon and anatomist Alfred Velpeau first described leukemia. But the Bowles’ family doctor had heard of one place that was experimenting with new drugs for ALL. St. Jude, it was called, named after St. Jude Thaddeus, the patron saint of hopeless causes. Decidedly outside the academic mainstream, this newfangled

In Memphis, everyone’s heard of Danny Thomas, and deservedly so. He’s buried in a mausoleum on the hospital grounds, with an important boulevard named after him. But Dr. Donald Pinkel is something of an unknown St. Jude hero. treatment center — St. Jude Children’s Research Hospital — founded by the comic entertainer Danny Thomas on the largesse of America’s Lebanese-Syrian Christian community, was located in Memphis, 300 miles upriver from Natchez. When it had opened in 1962, St. Jude had turned heads by announcing that its doctors hoped to “cure” childhood

was born in Memphis the same year that St. Jude hospital opened its doors. As I grew up, I wondered about the improbable rise of this extraordinary institution that so quickly came to occupy a central place in the lore of my hometown. There was something mysterious about St. Jude; it seemed a semi-secret enterprise, bathed in a halo-glow. St. Jude has always appeared to be firmly in control of its publicity and zealously protective of its image. In back of those tug-at-your-heartstrings television ads and celebrity testimonials, significant pioneering triumphs had indeed taken place there. But how those successes had come about was not generally known and seldom talked about — even within the Memphis medical community. Then, a few years ago, I was in Memphis visiting a friend whose son was being treated at St. Jude for an extremely rare and pernicious form of leukemia. Brennan Simkins, only 8 years old at the time, had undergone four bone marrow transplants. He would later enjoy complete remission with high prospects for a permanent cure (a success story chronicled in his father’s recent book, Possibilities). But when I visited Brennan in his hospital room that afternoon, he wasn’t out of the woods. With his resolute face, his thin smile, and his heartsick family gathered around, he looked much as Barbara must have on the day her parents had first brought her here. In one of the brightly painted hallways, I met Bill Evans, who was then St. Jude’s CEO and director. Evans gave me a brief tour of the billion-dollar campus, with its state-of-the-art labs, cheerful wards and vast research wings, where armies of be-smocked scientists — and at least one Nobel laureate — plumb the mysteries behind all manner of catastrophic childhood diseases. Nowadays, the hospital treats more than 6,000 patients a year. I asked Evans: How did this all . . . happen? Long before it became a fundraising juggernaut and one of the world’s most ubiquitous charities, St. Jude must have gone through a time of trial and worry and doubt, when its success was not inevitable. Who, or what, was responsible for turning the corner? Evans didn’t miss a beat. “The moment of breakthrough was 1968,” he said, “and a clinical trial called the Total Therapy V Study.” Then a note of awe crept into his voice. “It all came about because of one man: Don Pinkel.” This was news to me. In Memphis, everyone’s

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onald Pinkel, it seemed to me, was one of America’s great medical pioneers. He had won some of medicine’s highest accolades, including the Kettering Prize, the Lasker Award for Clinical Medical Research, and the American Cancer Society’s Award for Clinical Research. But outside of pediatric oncology and hematology, his accomplishments at St. Jude remained largely unknown — and unsung. So when I found out that he was alive and well and living in California, I had to meet the man. Pinkel lives with his wife, Cathryn Howarth, a British-born pediatric hematologist, in a booklined ranch-style house in San Luis Obispo, a college town surrounded by patchworks of orchards and vineyards. Now 89 years old and retired, Pinkel is an avuncular man with a gentle voice, kind eyes, and silver-gray hair. I could see in Pinkel the quality Simone was talking about: a clear and noble vision. Whatever it was, the magic was still there. Jesuit-educated, he still has a rigorous mind, a fierce work ethic and a zest for attacking problems. “I’m a

very stubborn person,” he says. “A coach once told me, ‘Never run from a fight — the farther you run, the harder it is to fight back.’” Yet at St. Jude, during those early years, hope went only so far. “There were times,” he says, “when I would go into real despair.” When a child died, the parents would often come to him and unload their anger and grief. Pinkel would listen for hours and try to put up a strong front, assuring them this was not a punishment from God. “Then, after they left,” he says, “I would fasten the door and cry my eyes out.”

W

hen B a r ba r a B ow le s arrived at St. Jude, they put her in a room with another girl about her age. Then they took her down the hall to PHOTOGRAPH COURTESY ST. JUDE CHILDREN’S RESEARCH HOSPITAL

heard of Danny Thomas — and deservedly so. He’s buried in a mausoleum on the hospital grounds, with an important boulevard named after him that cuts through downtown. But Don Pinkel? The Total Therapy V Study of 1968? I heard the same reverential tone a few months later, when I spoke with Joseph Simone, a prizewinning oncologist in Atlanta who worked closely with Pinkel. “It wouldn’t have happened without Don,” Simone said. “He had the courage and the charisma and the idealism, and he provided the intellectual infrastructure to make St. Jude work.” Pinkel recruited the staff. He devised the protocols. He forged the relationships. He coaxed the drugs from the pharmaceutical companies. He wheedled the grant monies from the federal agencies. In its first years, he kept St. Jude afloat, though it had few success stories and sometimes could barely make payroll. “Don had a clear and noble vision,” said Simone, “and he created a culture of daring.” Perhaps most important, it was Pinkel who decided, from the outset, to put the conquest of ALL at the heart of the enterprise. Said Simone, “Don’s the one who realized: It doesn’t do any good to extend the lives of those kids by a few months. You have to go for broke. You have to go for the total cure.” And he did. In 1970, just eight years into his tenure at St. Jude, Pinkel was able to make an extraordinary pronouncement: Childhood leukemia, he said, “can no longer be considered an incurable disease.” The hospital was seeing a 50 percent cure rate — and had the literature to prove it. Today, building on protocols he and his staff established at St. Jude, the survival rate for most forms of childhood ALL hovers around 85 percent.

One colleague warned Dr. Donald Pinkel, shown here in the 1980s with St. Jude founder Danny Thomas, that he would be “throwing away” his career by taking a job at a brand-new hospital run “by this Hollywood character.”

draw her blood and aspirate her marrow — inserting a thin, hollow needle deep into her hip to draw a sample. Her parents didn’t tell her what she had. “I knew it was serious,” Barbara said. “But that’s all I knew.” Barbara remembers the medicine room, where they dispensed the drugs by IV. One of them made her feel flushed, as though some hot electric barb were snagging through her. Another left such an acrid taste on her tongue that the nurses gave her candy to suck on. The drugs were potent. She couldn’t keep her food down. She was fuzzy and forgetful and irritable. She developed sores on her thumbs. Her muscles ached. She was so, so tired. “Leukemia completely tears you apart — not just the child but the whole family,” said Barbara’s dad, Robert Bowles, who passed away not long after this interview, at age 87, earlier this year. “It preoccupies you. It takes over everything. You start to have a fatalistic attitude. But the doctors and nurses were so

compassionate. They gave you hope.” Barbara continued sharing a room with another girl. One day, though, the girl wasn’t there anymore.

A

n irony: Donald Pinkel spent most of his career trying to vanquish one devastating children’s disease, but as a young man he was nearly killed by another. In 1954, then a 28-year-old pediatrician serving in the Army Medical Corps in Massachusetts, Pinkel contracted polio. One night, as the virus ravaged through him, he nearly stopped breathing. Through his fever haze, he thought to himself, “This is it. I’m not going to wake up.” For months, he was paralyzed. Having to rely on others to feed and care for him, he had good reason to believe his medical career was over. The Army retired him because he was unfit for duty and he spent the better part of a year in rehabilitation, learning how to walk again. Slowly, steadily, he graduated from a wheelchair to braces to crutches. Even while he was recovering, Jonas Salk and Albert Sabin were becoming household names around the world for their historic efforts to produce a safe polio vaccine. It was a heady time for an ambitious young doctor like Pinkel, a time when the public was pinning ever greater hopes on miracles of medical science to eradicate the world’s most terrible maladies. As he continued to improve, Pinkel took a position with Sidney Farber, a legendary pediatric pathologist in Boston, who then was experimenting with a promising new drug called aminopterin, which, he found, could induce temporary remissions in some children with leukemia. Though Farber was far from finding a cure, his groundbreaking work planted a seed in Pinkel and set him on his life’s course. In 1956, Pinkel accepted a job as the first chief of pediatrics at Roswell Park Cancer Institute, a prestigious research hospital in Buffalo, Pinkel’s native city. He loved his work there but found that Buffalo’s damp and freezing winter weather played havoc on his polio-compromised lungs, and he repeatedly contracted pneumonia. He knew he had to move to a milder climate; he didn’t think he could survive another Buffalo winter. And so, in 1961, when he met Danny Thomas and heard about the new hospital the entertainer was building down South, the young doctor was intrigued. Pinkel had doubts about Memphis, however. At that time, it was a mid-sized provincial city surrounded by cotton fields — a fertile ground for musical invention, perhaps, but decidedly not on the map for cutting-edge medical research. “People thought I’d be crazy to go down there,” Pinkel says. “It was a very chancy situation, led by this Hollywood character. One colleague told me I would be throwing away my career.” The state of race relations in Memphis also concerned Pinkel. “At first, I said I’d never

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move to the Deep South, because there was so much virulent prejudice down there.” But when he met with some of the hospital board members, they agreed with his insistence that St. Jude would treat all comers, including African-American children, and that the hospital would be integrated top to bottom — doctors, nurses, and staff. As if to underscore the point, Danny Thomas hired Paul Williams, a prominent black architect from Los Angeles, to design St. Jude. In addition, the hospital’s board planned to devote significant resources to treating and researching sickle cell anemia — long a scourge in the African-American community. Pinkel also expressed his concern that St. Jude should treat patients without regard to their family’s ability to pay. “I was sometimes called a communist,” Pinkel says, “because I didn’t think children should be charged for

“I was sometimes called a communist,” Pinkel says, “because I didn’t think children should be charged for anything. Money should not be involved at all. As a society, we should make sure they get first-class healthcare.” anything. Money should not be involved at all. As a society, we should make sure they get first-class healthcare. This, in fact, is the philosophy of most pediatricians.” A needblind policy was Danny Thomas’ notion as well — and the hospital’s stated goal. So Pinkel signed on: He would be St. Jude’s first medical director. He was hired on a handshake at the callow age of 34, with an annual salary (paltry, even then) set at $25,000. He drove his Volkswagen bug down to Memphis and arrived in the summer of 1961 to a curious, star-shaped edifice that was still under construction. Pinkel collaborated with the architects in revising the building’s interior spaces to create a workplace conducive to interdisciplinary exchange—one in which doctors and nurses would daily mingle with pathologists and researchers. Pinkel wanted everyone eating together in a central cafeteria, sharing findings, infusing each other’s work with a sense of urgency. He wanted a building that broke down boundaries between practice and theory, between the clinic and the lab. “The idea was to mishmash everyone up,” Pinkel says. “It was actually nothing new. This is what people like Louis Pasteur and Paul Ehr­lich did. The idea is to get everyone thinking together, debating — concentrating on the problem at hand.” “Pinkel wanted to create an environment

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of solidarity where everyone worked in the trenches together,” says Joseph Simone. “He wanted people to take risks and move ahead rapidly with bold new ideas. And he wanted to keep things small. Pinkel would be leading a few platoons, not an army.” St. Jude opened in February of 1962 and the work began in earnest. The hours were brutal — “ten days a week,” says Pinkel — but he was enthralled by the challenge of creating something entirely new. What Barbara Bowles remembers most vividly is the spinal taps, how much it hurt when they inserted the needle that dripped the chemicals directly into the base of her spine. “You got the sense the doctors were experimenting,” said her father, Robert. “They were very unsure about some of the side effects. They would change up the cocktail, trying to find something that

When Dr. Donald Pinkel first came to St. Jude Children’s Research Hospital, “the idea was to mishmash everyone up,” he says. “The idea is to get everyone thinking together, debating — concentrating on the problem at hand.”

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would suppress the disease.” After her therapy sessions, Barbara would return to her room and open her coloring book, but often found that she was too exhausted to work the crayons. “The routine just wore her out,” said Robert. All the same, Barbara remembers St. Jude as a cheerful place. Toys. Puppet shows. Television. Ice cream. Parents stayed for less than $10 a night at the nearby Claridge Hotel. The kids were from all over the South, all over the country. Her parents reassured her that she was in the best possible place for treatment. Still, Barbara did notice something odd: Her hair was falling out.

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t. Jude didn’t focus on just leukemia, of course. From the start, the hospital trained its resources on an array of devastating diseases — including cystic fibrosis, muscular dystrophy, sickle cell anemia, and brain tumors. But it was Pinkel’s ambition to “cure” ALL that caused consternation among his medical colleagues back

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East. Some thought it was irresponsible, the kind of quest that would give parents false hope. “At that time, with ALL, the idea was to try to prolong life in comfort — that was it,” Pinkel says. “We called it ‘palliation.’ No one thought you were going to ‘cure’ anybody. That was almost a forbidden word.” Still, there had been tantalizing developments. By the early 1960s, a number of agents had been found that could temporarily induce remission in ALL patients. They were highly toxic substances with draconian tongue-twister names like mercaptopurine, methotrexate, vincristine, and cyclophosphamide. Up to that point, doctors tended to give these chemotherapeutic drugs to their patients serially — that is, one at a time, a

It was Pinkel’s ambition to “cure” ALL that caused consternation among his medical colleagues back East. Some thought it was irresponsible, the kind of quest that would give parents false hope.

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regimen known as “monotherapy.” Each medication might work for a while, but invariably the doses proved insufficient and the patient would relapse. Within months or even weeks, the cancer would return. Doctors might move on to the next drug, achieving the same shortlived remission. But soon enough, another relapse would occur. The disease was so furtive, resilient, and adept at hiding in the body (especially the meninges — the membranes enveloping the brain and spinal cord) that no single drug could knock it out. Pinkel’s idea — drawing on pioneering work then under way at the National Cancer Institute — was to use what he called the “full armamentarium.” That is, combine all the drugs known to induce remission and administer them to the patient more or less concurrently, at maximum tolerable dosages, over a sustained period. In addition, he would employ radiation of the cranium and the spine to reach the disease’s final redoubts. Finally, he would continue to administer multi-drug chemotherapy for three years to “eradicate residual systemic leukemia.” It would be a regimen so relentless, multifarious, and prolonged that the disease would be permanently destroyed. He called it “Total Therapy.” “We said, ‘Let’s put it all together. Let’s attack the disease from different directions, all at once.’ My hypothesis was that there were some leukemia cells that were sensitive to one drug and other cells that were sensitive to another. But if we use all these drugs at once

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and hit them along different pathways, we would permanently inhibit the development of resistant cells.” This intensive approach of simultaneously using multiple agents had been tried, with hugely successful results, in the treatment of tuberculosis. Why not try it with leukemia? Pinkel realized, of course, that the Total Therapy protocol carried large risks. Each of these drugs, used alone, could have dangerous, even fatal side effects. In combination, who knew what they would do? “I really worried that we were going to push these youngsters to the very brink,” he says. “On the other hand, you had to weigh the bitter fact that they were going to die anyway.” Through the early pilot studies, he and his staff would constantly refine the dosages, improve the methods of delivery. Pinkel’s staff

In this eureka moment, one can only imagine the euphoria that surged through the corridors of St. Jude. “We were all excited,” says Pinkel. “This was better than winning a football game, I’ll tell you.”

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would closely follow their patients, checking their blood weekly, and sometimes daily, to determine how they were tolerating this witch’s brew of medicines. Pinkel recognized that he was quite literally experimenting on children — and this troubled him. But he saw little alternative. Says Pinkel, “We were tired of being undertakers.” For the first several years, with every new case admitted to the hospital, Pinkel sat down with the parents, explained to them his radical approach, and gave them a choice to participate. Not one parent declined. Many, in fact, looked at the situation altruistically. “They would tell me, ‘We know our child is not going to live. But if there’s something you can learn by treating our child that might one day lead to a cure of this terrible disease — please, please go ahead.’”

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y the end of the summer of 1968, Barbara’s leukemia had gone into remission. St. Jude released Barbara, and she went back home to Natchez just in time for first grade. “It raised our spirits,” said her dad. “But we were still so apprehensive.” Barbara’s mom gave her a wig to wear, and a variety of caps, but Barbara found it all so awkward. She didn’t know what to tell her friends. By then she knew she had some form of cancer — but cancer was widely misunderstood then; many kids thought it was a contagious disease, that you could “catch” it on the playground.

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the hospital was sitting on a giant secret that now needed to get out into the world; lives depended on it. “I sent my best people in different directions,” Pinkel recalls, “and we gave papers all over the place saying it was now possible to cure this disease.” They penned articles for the Journal of the American Medical Association, the New England Journal of Medicine, and other important periodicals. Yet to Pinkel’s dismay, he was met with sharp skepticism. Many experts simply refused to accept St. Jude’s findings. Some went further than that. Alvin Mauer, the highly reputed director of hematology/ oncology at Cincinnati Children’s Hospital, all but called Pinkel a fraud. “He wrote me a letter saying I have no business telling people leukemia was curable, that I was foolhardy, and deceiving everyone. He really laid into

y 1968, Pinkel and his staff had completed the first four studies of the Total Therapy protocol. These trials offered a glimmer of hope: Between 1962 and 1967, a total of seven patients had enjoyed long-term remissions and seemed well on their way to full recoveries. Seven was by no means a definitive number, Pinkel conceded. “But it said to me, it’s not necessarily so that they’re all going to die.” It also suggested that the underlying concept of Total Therapy was working; it just needed fine-tuning. And so in early 1968, he and his staff started afresh with a new cohort of 35 patients — one of whom was Barbara Bowles. Who could have predicted that that year of national convulsions, the year when Martin Luther King Jr. was murdered on a motel balcony just a few miles from the hospital, would prove the watershed year in the history of this disease? In the Total Therapy V Study, Pinkel placed greater emphasis on attacking the disease’s last holdouts, those drug-resistant leukemia cells that secreted themselves within the membranes of the central nervous system. Dr. Donald Pinkel, shown here at St. Jude in His new protocol would retain certain el- 1986, recognized that he was quite literally experimenting on children. This enormously ements from the first four studies, but he would carefully revise the dosages while add- troubled him, but what choice did he have? “We were tired of being undertakers,” he says. ing a few entirely new elements, including the use of methotrexate injected “intrathecally” — that is, directly into the spinal canal — to me.” So Pinkel invited Mauer to come to St. head off meningeal relapse. Pinkel and his Jude and see for himself. “I said to him, ‘You’re staff began to administer the new protocols like Doubting Thomas, in the New Testament. and waited for the results — which, given Why don’t you come down here and feel the wounds?’” Mauer accepted. He met with the the time-lagged nature of both the disease and its treatment stages, took many months patients, examined the charts and histories, to trickle in. toured the wards and labs. And he was sold. But when the data finally arrived — bingo. “Mauer became one of our biggest advocates,” Something in this new iteration of therapies Pinkel recalls with a chuckle. By 1973, the Total Therapy V results had genworked. Thirty-two of the 35 patients attained remission. After five months, not one had erally become accepted. “It was pretty gutsy relapsed. And after three years, half the pa- what Pinkel had done,” says Stephen Sallan, a tients were still in remission. By 1970, they leukemia expert at Boston’s Dana-Farber Canwere considered long-term survivors, all but cer Institute and a Harvard pediatrics professor. declared cured. Pinkel could scarcely believe “He had found a way to treat ALL in the central his own numbers. A 50 percent cure rate? This nervous system, and he was sitting in the catbird was beyond astonishing; it was historic. seat. We were all paying attention.” Suddenly, it In this eureka moment, one can only imag- seemed, everyone was knocking on the hospiine the euphoria that surged through the tal’s door. Joseph Simone remembers “a tsunacorridors of St. Jude. “We were all excited,” mi of doctors” coming to St. Jude to learn the says Pinkel. “This was better than winning a protocol. Soon other U.S. hospitals were using football game, I’ll tell you.” He realized that the Total V methodology — and achieving the

PHOTOGRAPH COURTESY DR. PINKEL

Every Tuesday, Barbara would report to her pediatrician’s office in Natchez to continue with her intravenous chemo treatments as prescribed by St. Jude. And several times a week, she and her family would go to the Lovely Lane United Methodist Church. Congregants held regular prayer meetings there, and would single out Barbara for special attention. In the fall, when she went back to St. Jude for a checkup, the news was promising: Her remission was holding.

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same extraordinary results. Pinkel traveled internationally to spread the news; he even made a trip to the Soviet Union to share his findings with Russian doctors. “What bothered me more than anything,” says Pinkel, “was that Total Therapy required tremendous amounts of manpower and expensive technologies that weren’t available outside the United States. I thought children all over the world should have the same opportunities as American children.” One of Pinkel’s other great regrets was that the Total V protocol exposed children to radiation and noxious chemicals that he feared could cause lifelong complications, growth problems, even other forms of cancer. In subsequent studies, Pinkel sought to dial down the most toxic dosages. Pediatric cancer researchers eventually dispensed with the use of radiation altogether, but there was no avoiding the fact that the zealous treatments pursued at St. Jude — like cancer treatments everywhere — carried real hazards. It was Pinkel’s fervent hope that science would someday find a vaccine that would prevent ALL, so that none of the Total V treatments would even be necessary. For a time, he and his staff worked on a vaccine, to no avail. Pinkel has long had a hunch that ALL may be caused by a virus (as is true of some forms of leukemia found in cats and rodents). If science could isolate that virus, and develop a vaccine from it, then children could be immunized against ALL, just as they’re immunized against diphtheria, mumps, polio, and measles. “That’s what I always hoped for,” Pinkel says. “Prevention is always the better way.” So far, that dream is unrealized. But over the past half century, the 50 percent cure rate established by the Total Therapy Study has not only held — it’s steadily, emphatically improved. The key components of ALL treatment remain just as Pinkel designed them. To combat the disease, physicians use many of the same drugs — vincristine, methotrexate, and mercaptopurine, agents that were approved by the FDA in the 1950s and 1960s, then combined into treatment protocols by Pinkel’s team. These subsequent leaps toward an overall cure rate approaching 90 percent were made possible, in part, by the development of better antibiotics and antifungals for fighting infections, by the advent of better diagnostic tests for detecting residual leukemia cells, and by the use of genomics to select the optimal drugs and doses for individual patients. Although these and other new techniques and medications have been added to the ALL arsenal, they have in no way replaced the basic protocol that Pinkel established all those years ago. Today, childhood ALL is frequently cited as one of the great triumphs in the war on cancer. After publishing his findings and consolicontin u ed on page 8 0

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A LOV E OF THE LASTING LEGACY OF DR. WILLIAM E. TROUTT

left: Dr. Troutt at his 2000 inauguration as the 19th president of Rhodes College. center: The Paul Barret Jr. Library, a result of the largest single gift in the school’s history. PHOTOGRAPHS COURTESY OF RHODES COLLEGE

I

by richard j. alley

n his inaugural address of April 14, 2000, Dr. William E. Troutt told the crowd gathered at Idlewild Presbyterian Church about another president, Charles Diehl, who brought a college called Southwestern to Memphis in 1925. “He would bring to Memphis all the physical property of the college, but more important, he would bring a clear and compelling vision of the type of quality education a liberal arts college ought to provide,” Troutt said that day. He then invited those gathered to join him on another journey: “Not from one locale to another, but a venture into a new set of possibilities for this college.” With the close of this school year, Troutt will stand in Fisher Gardens and preside over the Class of 2017, his last graduating class as president of Rhodes College. It’s been 16 years of textbooks and backpacks, of sororities and fraternities and football games and midterms. There have been commencements and convocations. But what Troutt will miss the most is the day-to-day

connection with students. “A student calling me to share that he’d been named a Rhodes Scholar, a student sharing with me that he got his dream medical school, Harvard — these are magic moments and moments that are so hard to replicate outside the world of higher education,” he says. While many of us have gazed at the campus on North Parkway in Midtown and wondered

at its architecture, its old-growth trees, its other-worldly look, it’s the world outside the gates of Rhodes, outside the setting of academia, that might seem a strange, Narnia-like existence for Troutt in the future. The universe of academia is one he’s lived in since 1982 when he was named president of Belmont College in Nashville at the age of 32. He was the youngest college president in America.

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routt’s ever-present bowtie emphasizes a face that could be described as “professorial-yet-boyish” and he reaches up occasionally to smooth his thick, brown hair across his forehead. It’s not the look one would expect from someone who’d begun his life as a boy on a cotton farm outside of Bolivar, Tennessee. Though only 60 miles away, the books, ornate oak furniture, and original artwork adorning his office seem

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LEAR NING right: With graduation in the spring of 2017, Troutt says goodbye to Rhodes and three decades as a college president. PHOTOGRAPH BY ALLISON RODGERS

a world apart from that dusty homestead. His father was one of eight children and dropped out of school in the eighth grade to help with the family farm. It wasn’t his only job; to make ends meet he also worked as a night watchman at a nearby factory and then, in his later years, as an engineer in the boiler room of the Western State Mental Hospital. His mother was a stay-at-home mom, devoted to young Bill and his sister. Education and the pursuit of knowledge would become a constant throughout his life with the seed planted at Bolivar elementary and high schools. “I was so fortunate, I had wonderful teachers,” he says. “I got lots of affirmation — Miss Rainey, my fifth-grade teacher, singled me out as a student of promise, so I loved school, loved learning.” It was a visit by the school’s principal, though, that would help influence his parents and give

the student a reprieve from the more grueling aspects of farm life. “Early in my schooling, we took these tests and I did well,” he says. “My elementary school principal, Mr. Ross, came out and visited with my parents and said that I had potential and that they should be sure I had plenty of time to work on my studies. So I didn’t grow up as a typical farm boy with a lot of chores; my primary chores were to be a good student. That just came self-reinforcing as a young person.” Because of his father’s lack of schooling and because of the subsequent years of labor both on the farm and in the factory and boiler room, his parents wanted more for their children. “They wanted me to have a better life economically than they’d had,” he says. “Life had been fairly hard for them, so my primary job was to be a good student. They sacrificed for that. They did everything so that I could hopefully

be a diligent and successful student and have more opportunity than they’d had. Of course that proved to be the case.” Influences abounded for Troutt as a child and his character was shaped by school, band, and the church. He looked forward to traveling west and tasting what the “big city” had to offer. “When you’re in a small town like Bolivar, you look to Memphis for special things,” he says, “whether it’s visiting relatives, coming to the Memphis Zoo as a kid, going to the MidSouth Fair, and, as you get a little older, for entertainment and memories of the Mid-South Coliseum and Ellis Auditorium.” Another draw may have been the Overton Park Shell where music and theater acts regularly took to the stage in an outdoor venue. Many of you may have seen Troutt at the Levitt Shell last September, playing his saxophone on “Amsterdam After Dark” with the Rhodes N O V E M B E R 2 0 1 6 • M E M P H I S M A G A Z I N E . C O M • 51

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“My senior year in college, I decided I wanted to be a college president,” Troutt says. “That was my dream.” PHOTOGRAPH BY JUSTIN FOX BURKS

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College Jazz Orchestra and NEA Jazz Master, wouldn’t be in the business if it weren’t. Young George Coleman, who composed the number. minds are shaped and expanded, dreams are His first taste of what music could do for him realized and plans made. As a student, he was came when his school band, the Bolivar Brass open to self-realization and change, and his (think of the Tennessee version of Herb Alpdreams proved to be malleable. “It became ert and the Tijuana Brass), won the Hardeman clear to me during college that I could be a County talent show and came to Memphis to good person, I could be a faithful person, and play at the Mid-South Fair. It was there that not necessarily be a minister, which just didn’t a talent scout for American Idol precursor, the seem to align with my strengths and what I Ted Mack Amateur Hour, spotted them and should be doing,” he says. “So my senior year booked them to play on CBS television, filmed in college, I decided I wanted to be a college in New York City. president. That was my dream.” “One of the things “You can imagine what that College also transforms us that we’ve done through the people we meet was for a boy from Bolivar,” he says. “I was 17 and got to be on that’s been extremely and Troutt met a very importtelevision, got to fly in an airant person in his life while at successful is plane. It was the same stage school. Carole Pearson was that Ed Sullivan was on and from Bells, Tennessee, and had we’ve built a lot of the Beatles had been there a preferred Southwestern but partnerships with the few months earlier, so we got was offered a nice scholarship to tell everybody that we got to city, partnerships with from Union. After their courtplay on the same stage as the ship, the two were married in great institutions.” Beatles.” his senior year on November 26, And then there was the church. If the door 1970. “It was the best decision I ever made in to First Baptist Church was open, he says, he my life,” he says. was there. So profound was the pull that when Troutt says that, though he sought a life Mr. Chumney, his high school science teacher, in academia, he didn’t have the call to be a gave him a catalogue to MIT and encouraged professor, but that his strengths lie in leaderhim to apply and to major in physics or engiship. He received his master’s from the Unineering, he had misgivings. “My pastor called versity of Louisville, a Ph.D. from Vanderbilt, and worked in college admissions and for the me into his study and said, ‘Bill, I know God has called you to the ministry,’” he recalls. “Of Tennessee Higher Education Commission, course, that makes a powerful impression on the coordinating body for all the public higher a young person, so I declared when I was a education in the state. There, he got to meet senior in high school that I was going into chancellors and deans, and he was later given the ministry. I shifted gears in terms of my the opportunity to go to Washington, D.C., and college choice and went to Union [University] work for McManus & Associates consulting in Jackson [Tennessee], which was the Baptist firm. It would be a fruitful time of learning, college nearby, with the intention of preparing where he was able to travel to institutions to be a Baptist minister.” around the country, those with real issues and College is a transformational time; Troutt challenges, to help come up with strategies

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and recommendations to strengthen them. It was valuable training that would help him on his next adventure when a college in Nashville came courting. “I got a call from Belmont,” he says. “I’d been recommended as a candidate to be executive vice president, a job that could wind up leading to the presidency.” Taking the job wasn’t a difficult decision. Not only would it potentially lead to him realizing his dream, but he’d been traveling, often for weeks at a time, with a young family of two children back at home. Belmont would offer him the opportunity to lay a foundation. He was 30 years old. Not long after his tenure began at Belmont, the president, Dr. Herbert C. Gabhart, announced his intention to retire, and Troutt’s name quickly rose to the top as a replacement. “I’ll never forget the board meeting that was scheduled to select a new president,” he says. “Carole and I were sitting outside the boardroom and we were waiting and waiting and waiting, and finally the door opened and I was congratulated as being elected the third president of Belmont.” The meeting had been extended and the conversation, he would learn later, centered around his age — 32. One of the trustees had finally risen during the discourse to say, “Two things are sure: He will not get any younger and the job will age him.” A boy from a cotton farm rising to college president is the stuff of inspiration. For Troutt, who had scant leadership experience, he called on what he’d seen of his father’s ways — the hard work, setting an example, and setting a pace. His parents were proud to see their son in this new position and he was eager to take on the formidable challenges. “It was a wonderful opportunity but it was, at that time, struggling financially,” he says. “We would borrow money in June for payroll for the summer months, and then when the fall came and tuition collected, you were able to pay the bank back. The early days of Belmont were struggling; it was a very young institution.” Belmont began as Ward-Belmont College, a finishing school for women. It had little connections and almost no resources when it was purchased by the Tennessee Baptist Convention in 1951. It sat in the shadow of Vanderbilt University, a University of Tennessee campus, and Lipscomb University. In his 17 years at the school, Troutt turned the tide and made the connections that would see it to success. “We benefited from being in a dynamic city and as we established ourselves, began to attract some financial support,” he says. “The school changed fundamentally in character during my tenure and so many good things happened — we went from around 1,400 students to about 3,000 students — but, more importantly, we went from being an open admission

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school where the ACT average was about 16, to a more competitive place where the ACT average was 25. So, very satisfying work there at Belmont. I loved it. The college and I kind of grew up together.” But growing up so often means moving on and in 1997 Troutt was tapped to chair a congressional committee, the National Commission on the Cost of Higher Education, whose findings would serve as a blueprint for the Higher Education Reauthorization Act of 1998. From his exposure and contacts made with the commission, people began contacting him with other opportunities. One of those consultants asked if he’d be interested in a leadership job in the public sector — he was not — and then suggested a role at a liberal arts college. “Well, maybe,” Troutt said at the time. In 1998, that headhunter called back saying he’d been hired to provide professional help in the search for the next Rhodes College president to succeed Dr. James H. Daughdrill, Jr. “I didn’t take that terribly seriously,” Troutt says. “When you’re 200 miles away, you’re hardly an expert, and I was enjoying my work.” But persistence pays off and in early 1999, he was persuaded to take a trip to Memphis, spend the weekend at The Peabody, and visit with his parents, while also meeting with the search committee. “That was really a defining moment — a January morning with that committee and I became so impressed with what was in their hearts, what they hoped to achieve,” he says, adding, “There was just a passion for excellence, a passion for making Rhodes an even stronger college. . . . By the end of that long interview, I was really excited about this opportunity. In fact, I called Carole on my way to Bolivar and she was certainly surprised. We were in the middle of renovating our home in Nashville to the point where it did not have a roof; it had a blue tarp over it. We were not planning to move anywhere, so that got her attention. But we had another conversation and in March I was named 19th president of Rhodes College.”

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hodes was in far better shape than Belmont had been in when Troutt took the reins there. In his inauguration speech, when he spoke of Diehl moving the campus to Memphis, he said, “It was a chance to start afresh in every way — a new campus and a new approach to education.” And certainly that’s how Troutt felt that spring day he took over as president. You had a college that already produced a lot of remarkable people, a lot of leaders for the world, and had some values that I resonated with very much from the long-standing, student-run honor code to a tradition of service that was really pretty remarkable,” he says. “So I inherited a place with a remarkable

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story and remarkable people and a passion to be an even stronger college.” To sit back in that comfortable leather chair and rest on his laurels, spend mornings strolling the bucolic campus and eating at the well-appointed dining hall would be the easy way out. Not for this one-time farm boy. He talked with and listened to the students, faculty, alumni, and other stakeholders and, by the day of his inauguration, had outlined 10 steps with attached task forces to see the college into the twenty-first century. Those steps included an emphasis on undergraduate research, augmenting the way students are mentored, rethinking the curriculum, and

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Homecoming/Reunion Weekend is alway a festive time for Dr. William E. Troutt and his wife, Carole. PHOTOGRAPH BY JUSTIN FOX BURKS

enhancing the residential experience. Two others — connecting students with Memphis and expanding opportunities for study beyond Memphis — have been dear to him and are some of the greatest things Rhodes has accomplished during his tenure. “One of the things that we’ve done that’s been extremely successful is we’ve built a lot of partnerships with the city, partnerships with great institutions — St. Jude has been just a remarkable academic partner,” he says. “We will have 59 students enter medical school this fall — 33 from the class that just graduated and another 26 who’ve had some kind of experience after Rhodes. The partnerships we’ve created with other healthcare providers, starting with St. Jude, have created so much opportunity.” He gestures across the street to the Memphis Zoo, as well, where students are doing large animal research. Students work around the world with the U.S. Department of Commerce and in embassies thanks to FedEx’s relationship with the DOC. contin u ed on page 82

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Back in the Saddle Equine-therapy programs are designed to help people of all ages. by lesley young

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iper perked up when he heard his new friend Detra Gardner approaching. Max gently let Ned Lauderdale know that he was annoyed. The carriage had been moved and therefore was unacceptably out of place. Hector coolly enjoyed having his hair brushed. These were just a few of the many subtle exchanges that took place during a session at Warhorses for Heroes, one of several equine-therapy programs (also known as hippotherapy) in this area that lets combat veterans and others with various levels of disability work with horses. “Somehow we bonded,” says Detra Gardner, an Air Force veteran who served in Operation Desert Storm and a former New York City police officer. “When he heard me today, he turned his head.” Gardner is one of seven veterans who showed up for the Thursday morning session, all of them referrals through the U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs. She returned for a second time after she developed that inexplicable bond with Piper, a 20-yearold quarterhorse, the week before. “I had to wait almost 60 years to ride a horse,” Gardner says. “I thank God for this program. It’s just awesome.” Warhorses for Heroes aids in healing and assists in veterans’ transitioning back into civilian life. The program has been in operation just over a year and was developed by

longtime friends Trey Lawson, a lifetime horse enthusiast and professional trainer and rider, and Pearson Allen, a local English teacher. “I’ve known Trey since first grade, and we’ve always wanted to do something together,” Allen says. “Then we saw the effect interacting with horses had on our friend Sean, who had gone through some terrible things in Iraq, and it stuck in our minds.” When Lawson’s grandfather, a World War II veteran, passed away, the two set up the therapy program at Lawson’s family stables. Located outside Olive Branch, Oak View boards more than 60 horses on its 60 acres and offers instruction to riders in the area. “We all have veterans in our lives,” Allen says. “My grandfather was a World War II N O V E M B E R 2 0 1 6 • M E M P H I S M A G A Z I N E . C O M • 57

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Horses react and respond to a person’s emotional state. If a participant changes her behavior and reduces her anxiety, the horse also reacts, providing information and skill-building opportunities. vet. I have college friends who were veterans. You can’t not do something for veterans because they’ve done so much for us.” A 2014 study published in JAMA Psychiatry reported that one in four veterans shows signs of mental illness, meaning that there are 5 million veterans living with mental illness in the U.S. Veterans who participate in the Warhorses for Heroes program interact with the horses in a variety of ways, including grooming, riding, and horse care. Sessions are flexible depending on each veteran’s comfort level. Some show up and never put their hands on a horse. Others swear they won’t get near the animals, and by the end of the session they’re on their 10th ride around the barn. Each session opens with an overview on safety, grooming, and riding, and every horse partnered with the session has been vetted. “A therapy horse has to be very calm,” Warhorses volunteer instructor Sue Enright says. “They have to not resent people being around them, not be spooky, and be willing to have a rider on top of them who does not know what they are doing. They have to be what we call ‘bomb proof.’” According to the Professional Association of Therapeutic Horsemanship International, horses are particularly healing to people struggling with mental health issues because, as domesticated prey animals, they are extremely sensitive to changes in humans, who are predatory creatures. Horses react and respond to a person’s emotional state. If a participant changes her behavior and reduces her anxiety, the horse also reacts, providing information and skill-building opportunities. “A horse is intuitive and nonjudgmental, providing a trusting and open environment for processing and healing,” Allen says. “Veterans with histories of depression or PTSD who participate in equine-assisted therapy experience consistent improvement in depression symptoms and increased sociability.”

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ennifer Dr abowicz offers equine-facilitated psychotherapy through her counseling business in partnership with fellow LPC-MHSP therapist Shilo Satran, both of whom are certified by the Equine Assisted Growth and Learning Association. The benefits are more than just psychological. “In animal-assisted therapy, there is a hormone change that happens,” Satran says. “Your oxytocin goes up. There is a shift just being in the vicinity of the animal.” Through their equine-assisted therapy business in Moscow, Tennessee, Drabowicz and Satran offer sessions in which partici-

pants present a goal or problem they would like to work on using various tools and toys provided in the barn, and interact with the horse and the tools, looking to the horse’s actions as a metaphor for personal insights or change. “The horses keep people in the present moment, and change can only happen in the present moment,” Satran says. There is no riding involved in their therapy. “This way it’s more effective because it allows the client to have a fuller picture of how the horses are reacting,” Drabowicz says.

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inna R auls and Courtney Vlahos Smith have seen participants take their first steps and speak their first words through Southern Reins Center for Equine Therapy in Nesbit, Mississippi. “We had a boy who was 4 with Down syndrome and wasn’t walking yet,” says Rauls, the program’s volunteer and community outreach director. “He took some of his first steps here. It’s just awesome to see.” Southern Reins serves people with physical, cognitive, and emotional disabilities and hardships through equine activities and therapeutic riding. “Horses treat everyone equally,” says Sara Bryant, Southern Reins’ head instructor and equine director. “They don’t see that a rider is disabled. They almost cater to the person.” At Southern Reins, riders with cerebral palsy experience natural muscle relaxation from riding. Those who are verbally challenged learn how to ask the horse to stop. Riders learn counting, sequencing, colors, and other skills through working simple obstacle courses such as placing colored rings on a set of poles. The previous week, one rider, who is on the

autism spectrum, stayed on the horse for only three steps. This week he rode for 50 minutes. “His mother was speechless,” Rauls says. “Horses help me understand people,” says Kelsey Ashe, a 16-year-old student at the Madonna Learning Center. Her goal is to become a barrel racer. “My aunt was a champion,” says Ashe, who has an intellectual disability and issues with depth perception. “Wednesday mornings are the one day she’s most excited to get up and go to school,” says Kelsey’s mother, Holly Ashe. “She knows she’s going to come ride horses afterward.” Southern Reins serves 38 participants of all ages and disabilities. They work with hippo therapists, who specifically offer physical therapy through riding, and hope to eventually offer services to veterans, as well as psychotherapy. “We’ve seen it work on our volunteers,” Rauls says. One of them “had lost her significant other, and was on her couch for two years,” Rauls continues. “Now she comes as often as we let her.” “It’s hard to explain without saying it’s magic,” Bryant says. “It’s brought me to tears, and I’ve been around horses my whole life.”

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nright witnesses the magic almost weekly with each group of veterans that comes for a session at Warhorses for Heroes. “Horses are in tune with us emotionally,” Enright, a longtime rider, says. “They can pick up on a person’s needs.” “PTSD is similar to ADD, in that you get distracted by what’s going on inside,” says Nancy Frideres, a U.S. Army veteran who was diagnosed with PTSD. “When you focus on the horses, you get outside of yourself. Horses sense anxiety and they don’t let you get close. In order to touch them and groom them, you have to be able to center yourself. “This is a wonderful program with a wonderful mission.” Patients from the inpatient program at the VA center must be screened and approved by a psychologist, a recreational therapist, and an addiction therapist to come each week for a session. Others, such as Frideres and Gardner, come with a doctor’s recommendation. “You see their confidence get better, their relationships get better,” says Kadarah Hardaway, a recreational therapist with the Memphis VA Center. “They’re more relaxed and at ease and calm. They’re not as fidgety and just themselves. It’s the best thing to see.” Detra Gardner, the veteran who has bonded with her horse, Piper, has a simpler explanation for the program’s effectiveness: “This

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10/21/16 1:45 PM


THIS IS WHAT A MULTI-ASSET PORTFOLIO LOOKS LIKE IN REAL LIFE...

program is sent from God.” Warhorses for Heroes plans to participate in the Memphis Veteran’s Day celebration downtown on Friday, November 11th, with horses and some of their veterans. “We tr y to give something back,” says Lawson, “peace of mind, hopefully some happiness and enjoyment in their lives, and do our part to contribute to their recovery and success in life. Warhorses for Heroes is a nonprofit that relies on volunteers and donations. For more information, call (901) 409-8954 or visit warhorsesforheroes.org. Southern Reins is also a nonprofit that relies on volunteers and donations. For more information, call (901) 290-1011 or visit southernreins. org.

Waddell and Associates exists to improve life by providing clarity to remove fear. We understand the fear and confusion that plague the big life decisions of building families, educating children, starting and divesting businesses, transitioning into retirement, processing divorce, designing estates, and more. We have faced them ourselves. We built this firm to help. We built this firm to provide you comfort. We do a lot of calculations at W&A, but everything we do starts with the heart... At W&A, we care for our clients and associates as family, and we hold ourselves accountable by practicing the planning and investment advice we implement for our clients.

MEMPHIS

NASHVILLE

www.waddellandassociates.com | phone 901.767.9187 | toll 800.527.7263

CNBC RANKS W&A 29 IN TOP 100 WEALTH MANAGEMENT FIRMS FOR 2015 * * Disclaimer: Waddell & Associates (“Waddell”) is an SEC-registered investment adviser. The “Top 100 Fee-Only Wealth Managers” is granted by CNBC, an independent association unaffiliated with Waddell. The CNBC Digital Team, along with Meridian-IQ created the Top 100 Fee-Only Wealth Management ranking based on scores for the following measures weighted according to a proprietary formula to arrive at a final total rank: AUM, staff with professional designations, average account size, client segmentation, growth of assets, years in business and other key factors. Additional information on the factors involved for inclusion in this ranking can be found at the following location: http://www.cnbc.com/id/102605785.

For more information on equine-facilitated psychotherapy and learning, call Drabowicz at (901) 262-7950 or Satran at (316) 213-9162, or visit jenniferdrabowicz.com and shilosatran.com. Memphis is published monthly. Annual subscription $15. Publisher/Editor Kenneth Neill. Managing Editor: Frank Murtaugh. Memphis is owned by Contemporary Media, Inc., P.O. Box 1738 Memphis, TN 38101. Stockholders: Ward Archer Jr., 1902 Nelson, Memphis, TN 38114; Jack Belz, 100 Peabody Pl. #1400, Memphis, TN 38103; Kate Gooch, 2900 Garden Lane, Memphis, TN 38111; Ira Lipman, P.O. Box 45, Memphis, TN 38101; Kenneth Neill, P.O. Box 1738, Memphis, TN 38101; Henry Turley Jr., 65 Union Ave. 12th Floor, Memphis, TN 38103. AVERAGE NUMBER COPIES EACH ISSUE DURING PRECEDING 12 MONTHS: Net press run- 21,780. Paid outside county mail subscriptions- 3,577. Paid inside county mail subscriptions- 12,754. Sales through dealers, carriers, street vendors, counter sales and other Non-USPS paid distribution- 963. Other classes mailed through the USPS- 0. Total paid distribution- 17,294 Free or Nominal rate outside-county copies- 155. Free or Nominal rate inside-county copies- 1,560. Free or Nominal rate copies mailed at other classes through the USPS- 0. Free or Nominal rate distribution outside the mail-1,297. Total Free or Nominal distribution- 3,012. Total distribution- 20,306. Copies not distributed- 1,474. ACTUAL NUMBER COPIES SINGLE ISSUE NEAREST TO FILING DATE: Net press run- 21,360. Paid outside county mail subscriptions- 3,583. Paid inside county mail subscriptions- 12,798. Sales through dealers, carriers, street vendors, counter sales and other Non-USPS paid distribution- 859. Other classes mailed through the USPS- 0. Total paid distribution- 17,240. Free or Nominal rate outside-county copies- 155. Free or Nominal rate inside-county copies- 1,560. Free or Nominal rate copies mailed at other classes through the USPS- 0. Free or Nominal rate distribution outside the mail- 1,314. Total Free or Nominal distribution- 3,029. Total distribution- 20,269. Copies not distributed- 1,091.

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10/24/16 9:30 AM


It’s always the season of giving.

suggested donation

$10

2016 Church Health Christmas Card Art by Mary Sims

churchhealth.org/give Memphis.Mag.Christmas.Card.Ad.resize.indd 1

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10/6/2016 4:21:44 PM

10/17/16 9:07 AM


A

S P E C I A L

S U P P L E M E N T

T O

M E M P H I S

M A G A Z I N E

Shattering THE GL ASS CEILING &7

WOMEN LEADERS IN HEALTHCARE SHARE W HAT IT TAKES TO MAKE IT TO THE TOP .

&7

by jane schneider

W

ith the end of the 2016 election cycle in sight, presidential nominee Hillary Clinton stands poised to shatter the “highest and hardest glass ceiling” in the land. Should she be elected to the Oval Office on November 7th, it will be a resounding first for our nation, the news of a woman as president reverberating with the same kind of anticipation and resolve as the election of Obama in 2008. Yet we needn’t look to Washington, D.C., to find stories of women who have shattered the glass ceiling, for they exist right here among us in Memphis. Women, who through hard work, tenacity, and determination, have climbed to the top of their particular fields. Nowhere has the ceiling been shattered so dramatically than in the healthcare industry. Several years ago, while editor of Memphis Parent, I did a behind-the-scenes walk-through of the pediatric emergency wing being built at Baptist Women’s Hospital and met then-CEO Anita Vaughn. Then 64, Vaughn exuded energy and expertise. During our conversation, we talked about her journey as a healthcare executive, coming up as she had at a time when administrative leaders at Baptist were almost exclusively male.

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10/19/16 3:16 PM


901 HE A LTH

A N I T AN V A UG H

MERI ARMOU R

NA DON Y ABNE

K AT H H U N TY FI V E WAYS TO PREPARE FOR

LEADERSHIP ◗ Say yes to new assignments that stretch you and expand your skills. Advancing your career takes planned preparation and focused action. ◗ Find a mentor. Seek out an administrator or higher-up who is willing to share what he or she knows. Don’t be afraid to ask for their guidance. You may boost your visibility within the organization by working closely with a wellplaced associate. ◗ Shine when the spotlight is on you. Own your knowledge and expertise; by doing this you’ll gradually build your self-confidence. ◗ Set an example and use your skills to lead by teaching others how to

How did she rise to the top, I found myself asking. What challenges did she and women of her generation encounter, and how were these overcome? Who were their mentors? And what have they done to help other women move forward into leadership roles in their respective organizations? In reporting on this feature heard some interesting stories. I interviewed former Baptist Memorial Hospital for Women CEO Anita Vaughn; Le Bonheur Children’s Hospital president and CEO Meri Armour; Kathy Hunt, West Cancer Center’s regional director of business development and physician services, and former Methodist Le Bonner Healthcare executive vice president Donna Abney, listening closely as each woman shared the insights gained from a lifetime of leadership.

improve on the job. ◗ Go back to school. Advance your career by obtaining a graduate degree or additional certification. If your training is clinical, consider a master’s in healthcare administration to round out your background, thus providing additional career growth opportunities.

T

Women who excel

hough the glass ceiling is slowly but surely being shattered, the reality is that women continue to be underrepresented in top executive roles, particularly given their numbers in the field of healthcare. Women have made strides, cer-

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901 HE A LTH

tainly, as surveys spanning the last several decades suggest. But today, only 18 percent of hospital CEOs nationally are female. Memphis has had the good fortune of having several early female leaders: Lucy Shaw, who headed The MED (now Regional One Health) from 1989 to 1995; Anita Vaughn, who oversaw the planning and building of Baptist Women’s from 2001 to 2015; and Peggy Troy, former Methodist LeBonheur COO and CEO of Le Bonheur Children’s Hospital from 2003 to 2007. Methodist Le Bonheur Healthcare CEO Gary Shorb, who has announced his retirement at the end of 2016, points to Lucy Shaw’s success, in particular, as an example of how that vision of diversity, in both gender and color, must start from the top down. “It was quite unusual for an African American to take over a hospital [at that time], but Lucy was talented and had the support of her board. You must have a board that embraces that attitude and sees the strength in diversity,” he says. “Eighty percent of the workforce [at Methodist] is female, so having women in leadership roles is critical.”

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n the 1970s, when these executives were beginning their careers, employment opportunities for women were still fairly narrow in scope. Le Bonheur’s CEO Meri Armour, who recently has led the hospital through a major fund-raising campaign and a $340 million build-out, says, “I graduated from an academically rigorous Catholic high school in Ohio in 1968 and my guidance counselor told me, ‘You have three choices: You can become a nun, a nurse, or a secretary.’ So I picked nursing.” While women were hugely present in hospitals, their roles had been traditionally relegated to the nursing ranks. Just a handful of women were present on the business side of the aisle, recalls Donna Abney, who retired in April 2016 as executive vice president of Methodist Le Bonheur Healthcare. The few who were in the public accounting office where she worked in the mid-1970s did their best to blend in, dressing in conservative suits accented with prim bow ties at the neck. “There weren’t a lot of women who were older than me who were successful and someone to look up to,” she recalls. “And it was tough being a mom. It wasn’t a gracious and embracing time for women those first 13 years of my career.” Anita Vaughn echoes that sentiment. The 43-year veteran of the Baptist healthcare system started out as a newly minted registered nurse — a title she still reveres — in the mid-1970s, joining the hospital during a nursing shortage. She did bedside nursing in the intensive care unit, learning how to tend

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10/20/16 2:49 PM


DR. ANTON DIAS PERERA

Cardiovascular Surgery Clinic, PLLC 6029 Walnut Grove Rd, Suite 401 Medical Plaza Building 3, Memphis, TN 38120 901-747-3066 / antondiaspereramd.com Dr. Anton Dias Perera is a vascular and endovascular surgeon who specializes in treating complex vascular disease. He is board-certified in vascular surgery and general surgery by the American Board of Surgery. Dr. Dias Perera specializes in peripheral arterial disease, thoracic and abdominal aortic aneurysm repair, treatment of carotid stenosis, mesenteric artery disease and venous insufficiency. Complex vascular procedures are performed using both open and endovascular techniques. He is one of few select surgeons in the region certified to perform fenestrated endovascular repair (FEVAR) of aortic aneurysms. Cardiovascular Surgery Clinic also provides a broad range of outpatient services including vascular laboratory testing, same day angiography and endovascular intervention procedures, and prosthetics (Memphis Prosthetic Clinic).

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10/21/16 1:36 PM


901 HE A LTH

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to patients and manage doctors. But she also quietly cheered when a few women would arrive as part of the new resident rotation. “When I first started, I would get a composite of the incoming residents and out of 50 U.T. residents, maybe two or three would be women. Being a young nurse, it would thrill me to see the female residents,” she says. “I loved medicine and sometimes thought maybe I should have gone down that path.” But becoming a doctor wasn’t a path women were typically encouraged to consider. Nursing was the traditional route. Yet while nurses did most of the day-to-day patient care at hospitals, they lacked decision-making authority. Armour, who started out in pediatric-oncology nursing, says the guidelines they had to adhere to were clear-cut. “When you called a physician to make a request, you didn’t call between the hours of 12 and 6 a.m. And you couldn’t make independent decisions,” she says.

“Eighty percent of the workforce [at Methodist] is female, so having women in leadership roles is critical.” “We weren’t part of a team. We weren’t considered thoughtful enough or smart enough to contribute. You couldn’t be heard in those days. We took care of patients and the [doctors] told us, ‘We’ll call you if we need something.’ That’s why I wanted to go to law school. I hated that.” The challenge, if you wanted to lead, was to find your way out of that box. “I think I performed well clinically and was well respected by the staff and doctors. That was a big thing, especially in the intensive care unit,” says Vaughn. Head nurses, particularly once they began to manage a unit and personnel, would mix with doctors and staff more routinely, learning how the organization functioned. “We’d have monthly ICU meetings with the medical director, physicians, and administrative staff, so that gave me the opportunity to be in front of those administrators and to show I could prepare for meetings and report how we were doing.” Having access to those decision-makers eventually led to a place at the table.

The importance of mentoring

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nce they had begun to gain more expertise in their jobs, these female executives looked for opportunities to grow and prepare for the next phases of their careers. That meant finding someone who would mentor them, leaders who recognized their abilities and gave them additional growth opportunities. “You need mentoring to build your own

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When looking for the best, Dr. Kathryn Sneed is surely to be found. Dr. Kathryn Sneed is more than a dentist — she is among the Elite of the Elite, and has been awarded 2016 Fellowship in the Midwest Implant Institute. She is one of 50 dentists to receive this recognition since 1980, and is the second female EVER. From dental implants to Botox, to orthodontics and sedation, Kathryn Sneed DMD, MBA is committed to exceeding your expectations — in comfort, care, quality, and compassion — for your ENTIRE family. With newly expanded hours, Sneed Dental Arts is more convenient than ever (Open Monday-Friday 7 a.m.7 p.m., and Saturday 8 a.m.-12 p.m.). Visit Sneed Dental Arts and see why she and her team are known as Best of the Best in Memphis and beyond.

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10/20/16 3:02 PM


901 HE A LTH

The BAILEY LAW FIRM A Professional Corporation

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confidence,” Donna Abney says. She found several leaders, including Gary Shorb and Maurice Elliot, former CEO of Methodist Le Bonheur Healthcare, who would “put themselves in the backseat and let you take credit and run with the ball. They would challenge me by saying, ‘Take this, you can handle it.’ This was early in my career when I was still finding out what I could do.” But such acts were confidence builders and enabled Abney to begin believing in own her abilities. “So many women were smart and capable but intimidated by the spotlight shining on you. Tell what you know. If you know it, own it,” she says. “The first time I thought I was an effective leader was when I was heading the Case Comprehensive Cancer Center,” says Armour. “The director of the center was remarkable in his qualities: nurturing, supportive, self-effacing, humble. I learned more from him than any woman I worked with. What he taught was how to be selfless and vulnerable to those around you, and not to worry about your own success because when you give it away it comes back tenfold.”

“The great thing about the women’s revolution is that men got to be whole people too. ”

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Vaughn remembers a nurse administrator, Elizabeth Farnell, who routinely took her into her confidence. “She would often call me into her office — that was an honor right there — and she’d pull out a project from her ‘incubator drawer’ and say, ‘Think this through with me, Anita,’ and I’d get to brainstorm with her.” Having an administrator she could problem-solve with helped strengthen Vaughn’s leadership skills and, with Farrell’s advice and coaching, Vaughn eventually became the chief nursing officer at Baptist Memphis. Similarly, West Clinic’s Kathy Hunt credits a marketing executive at East Jefferson General Hospital in New Orleans, where she worked in business development for a decade, for believing in her. “He could be a sounding board, yet, looking back, he gave me complete autonomy to grow and develop. He saw something in me and gave me the opportunity,” she says. “That was the catalyst for everything that came after.” Says Gary Shorb: “You have to be deliberate about mentoring. Unless you are really very conscious of opening doors and mentoring, it just won’t happen. The same can be said about encouraging minority-owned businesses. You must make those strategies a priority to have a diverse environment. If the CEO and C-suite don’t have that intentionality, then it’s difficult to make significant progress.”

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1948 Vanderhorn Dr., Memphis, TN 38134 | 901-384-0070 | www.bishophome.com

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10/20/16 3:03 PM


901 HE A LTH

T

Broadway Pizza House Legendary Pizza Since 1977

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Memphis Magazine’s

THE 2016

FACE OF

PIZZA

Paying it forward

hese women will also tell you that furthering their educations and saying yes to bigger assignments ultimately enabled them to move up, making choices that helped them develop a broader knowledge base. Armour says she climbed the nursing ladder, and eventually moved to Cleveland Clinic to start their cancer center and children’s hospital. “That was really the start of my transition from traditional nursing to hospital administration.” That position would lead to University Hospitals of Cleveland Case Medical Center in 1995, a senior-level position that required more executive thinking and decision-making, responsibilities, Armour says, that went beyond nursing to include cancer services, pediatrics, and women’s health. That would prime her to be recruited to take the helm at Le Bonheur, which would go on to receive national acclaim as a premier children’s hospital. “I would often encourage women to take more assignments, to grab those projects, to be assertive,” explains Abney. “Those major stepping stones were when I did that and ultimately became part of my work . . . It shines a light on you and gives you the opportunity to be heard and seen in a different way.” Finally, as more women ascend to leadership roles in healthcare, they can bring with them a softening of the corporate culture, an acknowledgment that work/life balance is an important part of business today. Employers must recognize and try to accommodate the demands their staff face beyond the workplace. “The great thing about the women’s revolution is that men got to be whole people too,” notes Abney. “Executive women began to look at their male colleagues and ask, ‘Why aren’t you going to the kids’ soccer game?’ “I have always told every executive mom, ‘You won’t remember that much about your work life and why you missed those soccer games, but you’ll remember that you missed them. Don’t let your kids down, don’t make decisions you’ll regret; that will haunt you.’ I don’t have any regrets. I was going to work hard and give 110 percent, but I wasn’t going to forfeit something of my kids’ lives.” Finally, sharing knowledge with others is integral to creating future leaders. Hunt does that through her involvement with professional organizations. Currently, she’s the president of the Mid-South Medical Group Management Association and writes a regular column for Memphis Medical News. And Vaughn passes along the lessons she received from her mentors. “I’ve had many women come and say, ‘I want your job,’ and I’d say, ‘That’s a great goal; I want you to have my job. So let’s talk about your path to get there.’ ” 

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10/19/16 3:16 PM


SPECIAL ADVERTISING SECTION

2016 Memphis

Five Star Wealth Managers

A Select

Award

Finding a wealth manager who suits your needs can be a daunting task. In fact, many consumers have a hard time figuring out where to even begin.

Sometimes, a few simple questions can set one off on the right path. Asking a wealth manager what makes working with him or her a unique experience can help you understand how they work and if their style meshes with your own. Further, asking a financial adviser to talk about any specialties they might have can help uncover skills you might find useful. Ultimately, how do you find an experienced wealth manager who you feel comfortable working with? One who has high retention rates? One who has undergone a thorough complaint and regulatory review? One who has tenure in the industry? Memphis magazine and Five Star Professional partnered to find wealth managers who satisfy 10 objective eligibility and evaluation criteria. Among many distinguishing attributes, the average one-year client retention rate for this year’s award winners is more than 96 percent. Although this list is a useful tool for anyone looking for help in managing their financial world or implementing aspects of their financial strategies, it should not be considered exhaustive. Undoubtedly, there are many excellent wealth managers who, for one reason or another, are not on this year’s list. In order to consider a broad population of high-quality wealth managers, award candidates are identified by one of three sources: firm nomination, peer nomination or prequalification based on industry standing. Self-nominations are not accepted. Memphis award candidates were identified using internal and external research data.

Research

Disclosures

• Wealth managers do not pay a fee to be considered or placed on the final list of Five Star Wealth Managers. • The Five Star award is not indicative of the wealth manager’s future performance.

• Wealth managers may or may not use discretion in their practice and therefore may not manage their clients’ assets. • The inclusion of a wealth manager on the Five Star Wealth Manager list should not be construed as an endorsement of the wealth manager by Five Star Professional or Memphis magazine. • Working with a Five Star Wealth Manager or any wealth manager is no guarantee as to future investment success, nor is there any guarantee that the selected wealth managers will be awarded this accomplishment by Five Star Professional in the future. • Five Star Professional is not an advisery firm, and the content of this article should not be considered financial advice. For more information on the Five Star award and the research/selection methodology, go to www.fivestarprofessional.com. • 447 award candidates in the Memphis area were considered for the Five Star Wealth Manager award. 105 (approximately 24 percent of the award candidates) were named 2016 Five Star Wealth Managers.

Determination

of Award Winners

Award candidates who satisfied 10 objective eligibility and evaluation criteria were named 2016 Five Star Wealth Managers.

Eligibility Criteria – Required

Evaluation Criteria – Considered

1. Credentialed as a registered investment adviser or a registered investment adviser representative.

6. One-year client retention rate.

2. Actively employed as a credentialed professional in the financial services industry for a minimum of five years.

8. Non-institutional discretionary and/or non-discretionary client assets administered.

3. Favorable regulatory and complaint history review.

9. Number of client households served.

4. Fulfilled their firm review based on internal firm standards.

10. Education and professional designations.

7. Five-year client retention rate.

5. Accepting new clients.

Regulatory Review As defined by Five Star Professional, the wealth manager has not: • Been subject to a regulatory action that resulted in a license being suspended or revoked, or payment of a fine. • Had more than a total of three customer complaints filed against them (settled or pending) with any regulatory authority or Five Star Professional’s consumer complaint process. • Individually contributed to a financial settlement of a customer complaint filed with a regulatory authority. • Filed for personal bankruptcy. • Been convicted of a felony.

Five Star Professional conducts a regulatory review of each nominated wealth manager using the Investment Adviser Public Disclosure (IAPD) website. Five Star Professional also uses multiple supporting processes to help ensure that a favorable regulatory and complaint history exists. Data submitted through these processes was applied per the above criteria: • Each wealth manager who passes the Five Star Professional regulatory review must attest that they meet the definition of favorable regulatory history, based upon the criteria listed above. • Five Star Professional promotes via local advertising the opportunity for consumers to confidentially submit complaints regarding a wealth manager. • Five Star Professional contacted approximately 1 in 12 households identified as having a high propensity to use the services of wealth managers in order to provide consumers the opportunity to submit complaints regarding a wealth manager.

For more information on the program, go to www.fivestarprofessional.com/wm_program.

www.fivestarprofessional.com — FS

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10/7/16 11:26 AM


SPECIAL ADVERTISING SECTION WEALTH MANAGER

McAdams Tax Advisory Group

THREE-YEAR WINNER Left to right: Standing: Lisa Stage; Tearesa Claiborne; Linda Booth; Gretchen Troyan; Lenita Virdure; Wendy Beard; Peggy Mitchell; Rhonda Presley Seated: Richard Burt; Three-year winner David McAdams; Gary Osing

FS • 2 — www.fivestarprofessional.com The Five Star Wealth Manager award, administered by Crescendo Business Services, LLC (dba Five Star Professional), is based on 10 objective criteria. Eligibility criteria – required: 1. Credentialed as a registered investment adviser or a registered investment adviser representative; 2. Active as a credentialed professional in the financial services industry for a minimum of 5 years; 3. Favorable regulatory and complaint history review (As defined by Five Star Professional, the wealth manager has not: A. Been subject to a regulatory action that resulted in a license being suspended or revoked, or payment of a fine; B. Had more than a total of three customer complaints filed against them [settled or pending] with any regulatory authority or Five Star Professional’s consumer complaint process. Unfavorable feedback may have been discovered through a check of complaints registered with a regulatory authority or complaints registered through Five Star Professional’s consumer complaint process; feedback may not be representative of any one client’s experience; C. Individually contributed to a financial settlement of a customer complaint filed with a regulatory authority; D. Filed for personal bankruptcy; E. Been convicted of a felony); 4. Fulfilled their firm review based on internal standards; 5. Accepting new clients. Evaluation criteria – considered: 6. One-year client retention rate; 7. Five-year client retention rate; 8. Non-institutional discretionary and/or non-discretionary client assets administered; 9. Number of client households served; 10. Education and professional designations. Wealth managers do not pay a fee to be considered or placed on the final list of Five Star Wealth Managers. Award does not evaluate quality of services provided to clients. Once awarded, wealth managers may purchase additional profile ad space or promotional products. The Five Star award is not indicative of the wealth manager’s future performance. Wealth managers may or may not use discretion in their practice and therefore may not manage their client’s assets. The inclusion of a wealth manager on the Five Star Wealth Manager list should not be construed as an endorsement of the wealth manager by Five Star Professional or this publication. Working with a Five Star Wealth Manager or any wealth manager is no guarantee as to future investment success, nor is there any guarantee that the selected wealth managers will be awarded this accomplishment by Five Star Professional in the future. For more information on the Five Star award and the research/selection methodology, go to fivestarprofessional.com. 447 Memphis wealth managers were considered for the award; 105 (24 percent of candidates) were named 2016 Five Star Wealth Managers.

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10/7/16 11:27 AM


SPECIAL ADVERTISING SECTION WEALTH MANAGER

THREE-YEAR WINNER

Richard Burt Vice President

David McAdams President

Gary Osing Vice President

McAdams Tax Advisory Group, LLC is an independent advisory group specializing in issues concerning retirees; with a primary focus on people, family, and community. We provide clients with a wealth of knowledge on everything from investment decisions to planning for retirement income, estate planning, maximizing Social Security benefits, and LTC and life insurance. We offer clients a wide range of professional services all under one roof. At McAdams Tax Advisory Group, LLC, we strive to work with each client tactically to determine which categories are best suited for their needs. We are not married to any companies, products or particular investment strategies, so we can offer a wide range of investment options. David McAdams believes an educated investor is more likely to be a successful investor. He and his team take the time to educate each new client on how the markets work, and on the many categories available to them. With the market recently hitting an all-time high and numerous global economic forces suggesting concern, David, Gary and Richard feel strongly that many people around the country may be taking too much risk in the current environment. With the old standby approach of using bonds and mutual funds having concern with interest rates risk, many of the approaches to reducing risk may be problematic today. Our unique process in working with our clients helps them reach their new goals without the old school approach of just buying mutual funds and hoping for the best. Hope is not a strategy. We help our clients develop a strategy and execute that strategy. McAdams continues to maintain an A+ rating with the Better Business Bureau. Our professional credentials include a Series 7, Series 63 and Series 65, securities and insurance licenses. We also have relationships with local attorneys and CPA’s to better assist our clients in every aspect of their personal planning.

98 Timber Creek Drive | Cordova, TN 38018 Phone: 901-737-3883 | Fax: 901-755-0420 www.mcadamstaxadvisory.com Securities offered through WFG Investments, Inc., Member of FINRA and SIPC. Investment advisory services offered through WFG Advisors, LP. Tax services offered through McAdams Tax Advisory Group, LLC. WFG Investments, Inc. does not provide tax advice. The Five Star Wealth Manager award is based on 10 objective criteria. The award is not indicative of the award winner’s future performance. For more information on the Five Star program and the research and selection methodology, visit http://fivestarprofessional.com/awards/wm_programs.php.

We Believe the Best Client Is a Knowledgeable Client www.fivestarprofessional.com — FS

•3

The Five Star Wealth Manager award, administered by Crescendo Business Services, LLC (dba Five Star Professional), is based on 10 objective criteria. Eligibility criteria – required: 1. Credentialed as a registered investment adviser or a registered investment adviser representative; 2. Active as a credentialed professional in the financial services industry for a minimum of 5 years; 3. Favorable regulatory and complaint history review (As defined by Five Star Professional, the wealth manager has not: A. Been subject to a regulatory action that resulted in a license being suspended or revoked, or payment of a fine; B. Had more than a total of three customer complaints filed against them [settled or pending] with any regulatory authority or Five Star Professional’s consumer complaint process. Unfavorable feedback may have been discovered through a check of complaints registered with a regulatory authority or complaints registered through Five Star Professional’s consumer complaint process; feedback may not be representative of any one client’s experience; C. Individually contributed to a financial settlement of a customer complaint filed with a regulatory authority; D. Filed for personal bankruptcy; E. Been convicted of a felony); 4. Fulfilled their firm review based on internal standards; 5. Accepting new clients. Evaluation criteria – considered: 6. One-year client retention rate; 7. Five-year client retention rate; 8. Non-institutional discretionary and/or non-discretionary client assets administered; 9. Number of client households served; 10. Education and professional designations. Wealth managers do not pay a fee to be considered or placed on the final list of Five Star Wealth Managers. Award does not evaluate quality of services provided to clients. Once awarded, wealth managers may purchase additional profile ad space or promotional products. The Five Star award is not indicative of the wealth manager’s future performance. Wealth managers may or may not use discretion in their practice and therefore may not manage their client’s assets. The inclusion of a wealth manager on the Five Star Wealth Manager list should not be construed as an endorsement of the wealth manager by Five Star Professional or this publication. Working with a Five Star Wealth Manager or any wealth manager is no guarantee as to future investment success, nor is there any guarantee that the selected wealth managers will be awarded this accomplishment by Five Star Professional in the future. For more information on the Five Star award and the research/selection methodology, go to fivestarprofessional.com. 447 Memphis wealth managers were considered for the award; 105 (24 percent of candidates) were named 2016 Five Star Wealth Managers.

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10/7/16 11:27 AM


SPECIAL ADVERTISING SECTION WEALTH MANAGER

Guidingpoint Financial Group

Left to right: Front row: 2012 – 2016 winner Michael Turner, CFP®, Financial Advisor; 2012 – 2016 winner Julie Terry, CFP®, Financial Advisor; 2012 – 2016 winner Madeline Simonetti, CFP®, Financial Advisor; 2013 – 2016 winner Susan Babina, CFP®, Financial Advisor Back row: 2013 – 2016 winner Brian Douglas, CFP®, CRPC®, ADPA®, Financial Advisor; 2012 – 2016 winner Darrell Douglas, CFP®, Private Wealth Advisor; 2012, 2013, 2015 and 2016 winner Jimmy Shamoun, Financial Advisor; 2012, 2013, 2015 and 2016 winner Christopher Kauker, CFP®, Financial Advisor

No matter the road you travel, we will be there to help you.

a home, assessing your employer-sponsored retirement plan, or At Guidingpoint Financial Group we understand that you want an old retirement account, saving for education or planning an knowledgeable and talented financial advisors to work with you. Our investment strategy. We are here to help with these and many other team is here for you when you need us with answers to the questions of life’s everyday financial situations. As your financial advisors, we are available to you when you need us, in person, on the phone, via a that are important to you. virtual meeting, online or via email. For some, retirement is the most important issue that they want to tackle and develop answers around. For you, it may be purchasing No matter the road you travel, we want to make it easier. The advisors of Guidingpoint Financial Group will be with you every step of the way.

Guidingpoint Financial Group, a financial advisory practice of Ameriprise Financial Services, Inc. 138 Timber Creek Drive | Memphis, TN 38018 465 South Main Street | Memphis, TN 38103 Phone: 901-312-5099 guidingpointgroup.com Investors should conduct their own evaluation of a financial professional as working with a financial advisor is not a guarantee of future financial success. Certified Financial Planner Board of Standards Inc. owns the certification marks CFP®, CERTIFIED FINANCIAL PLANNER™ and federally registered CFP (with flame design) in the U.S., which it awards to individuals who successfully complete CFP Board’s initial and ongoing certification requirements. Ameriprise Financial Services, Inc., Member FINRA and SIPC. ©2016 Ameriprise Financial, Inc., All rights reserved.

A financial advisory practice of Ameriprise Financial Services, Inc. FS • 4 — www.fivestarprofessional.com The Five Star Wealth Manager award, administered by Crescendo Business Services, LLC (dba Five Star Professional), is based on 10 objective criteria. Eligibility criteria – required: 1. Credentialed as a registered investment adviser or a registered investment adviser representative; 2. Active as a credentialed professional in the financial services industry for a minimum of 5 years; 3. Favorable regulatory and complaint history review (As defined by Five Star Professional, the wealth manager has not: A. Been subject to a regulatory action that resulted in a license being suspended or revoked, or payment of a fine; B. Had more than a total of three customer complaints filed against them [settled or pending] with any regulatory authority or Five Star Professional’s consumer complaint process. Unfavorable feedback may have been discovered through a check of complaints registered with a regulatory authority or complaints registered through Five Star Professional’s consumer complaint process; feedback may not be representative of any one client’s experience; C. Individually contributed to a financial settlement of a customer complaint filed with a regulatory authority; D. Filed for personal bankruptcy; E. Been convicted of a felony); 4. Fulfilled their firm review based on internal standards; 5. Accepting new clients. Evaluation criteria – considered: 6. One-year client retention rate; 7. Five-year client retention rate; 8. Non-institutional discretionary and/or non-discretionary client assets administered; 9. Number of client households served; 10. Education and professional designations. Wealth managers do not pay a fee to be considered or placed on the final list of Five Star Wealth Managers. Award does not evaluate quality of services provided to clients. Once awarded, wealth managers may purchase additional profile ad space or promotional products. The Five Star award is not indicative of the wealth manager’s future performance. Wealth managers may or may not use discretion in their practice and therefore may not manage their client’s assets. The inclusion of a wealth manager on the Five Star Wealth Manager list should not be construed as an endorsement of the wealth manager by Five Star Professional or this publication. Working with a Five Star Wealth Manager or any wealth manager is no guarantee as to future investment success, nor is there any guarantee that the selected wealth managers will be awarded this accomplishment by Five Star Professional in the future. For more information on the Five Star award and the research/selection methodology, go to fivestarprofessional.com. 447 Memphis wealth managers were considered for the award; 105 (24 percent of candidates) were named 2016 Five Star Wealth Managers.

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10/7/16 11:29 AM


SPECIAL ADVERTISING SECTION WEALTH MANAGER

Independent Wealth Management, LLC Independent Wealth Management is more than a name — it’s a commitment. We help you establish the foundation for your financial independence — as uniquely defined by your dreams and goals. Our core values guide us as we guide you: We treat you as we wish to be treated; we know you and your goals; we treat you as a person, not a portfolio balance; and we empower you to feel confident about your decisions and your financial future.

FIVE-YEAR WINNER Left to right: Five-year winner Hugh “Hank” Parks, CFP®; Three-year winner Hulon O. Warlick, CRC®; Five-year winner Stacey S. Hyde, CPA, CFA, CFP®; Clayton Chapman

• We start with your goals • We develop a plan for your success • We implement your plan and suggest changes when needed

5050 Poplar Avenue, Suite 2200 Memphis, TN 38157 Phone: 901-844-0382 info@i-wmonline.com www.i-wmonline.com

Securities and Advisory Services offered through Commonwealth Financial Network®, Member FINRA/SIPC, a Registered Investment Adviser. Not FDIC Insured, No Bank Guarantee, May Lose Value.

Planning for Your Financial Independence

J. Barry Jenkins Senior Vice President – Investments

• Thirty-plus years of experience in the financial services industry • Individual and corporate advisor • Comprehensive wealth management and estate planning strategies

FIVE-YEAR WINNER Left to right: Five-year winner J. Barry Jenkins, Sr. Vice President – Investments; Jessica Neal, Registered Client Associate

I believe investing should be simple and straightforward. I believe the most important factors in a successful investing strategy are allocation, correlation and rebalancing. I believe in minimizing risk and paying as little tax as necessary. Finally, I believe in doing business honestly and with integrity.

6075 Poplar Avenue, Suite 650 Memphis, TN 38119 Phone: 901-761-6340

Wells Fargo Advisors, LLC, Member SIPC. [CAR 0916-00074].

www.fivestarprofessional.com — FS

•5

The Five Star Wealth Manager award, administered by Crescendo Business Services, LLC (dba Five Star Professional), is based on 10 objective criteria. Eligibility criteria – required: 1. Credentialed as a registered investment adviser or a registered investment adviser representative; 2. Active as a credentialed professional in the financial services industry for a minimum of 5 years; 3. Favorable regulatory and complaint history review (As defined by Five Star Professional, the wealth manager has not: A. Been subject to a regulatory action that resulted in a license being suspended or revoked, or payment of a fine; B. Had more than a total of three customer complaints filed against them [settled or pending] with any regulatory authority or Five Star Professional’s consumer complaint process. Unfavorable feedback may have been discovered through a check of complaints registered with a regulatory authority or complaints registered through Five Star Professional’s consumer complaint process; feedback may not be representative of any one client’s experience; C. Individually contributed to a financial settlement of a customer complaint filed with a regulatory authority; D. Filed for personal bankruptcy; E. Been convicted of a felony); 4. Fulfilled their firm review based on internal standards; 5. Accepting new clients. Evaluation criteria – considered: 6. One-year client retention rate; 7. Five-year client retention rate; 8. Non-institutional discretionary and/or non-discretionary client assets administered; 9. Number of client households served; 10. Education and professional designations. Wealth managers do not pay a fee to be considered or placed on the final list of Five Star Wealth Managers. Award does not evaluate quality of services provided to clients. Once awarded, wealth managers may purchase additional profile ad space or promotional products. The Five Star award is not indicative of the wealth manager’s future performance. Wealth managers may or may not use discretion in their practice and therefore may not manage their client’s assets. The inclusion of a wealth manager on the Five Star Wealth Manager list should not be construed as an endorsement of the wealth manager by Five Star Professional or this publication. Working with a Five Star Wealth Manager or any wealth manager is no guarantee as to future investment success, nor is there any guarantee that the selected wealth managers will be awarded this accomplishment by Five Star Professional in the future. For more information on the Five Star award and the research/selection methodology, go to fivestarprofessional.com. 447 Memphis wealth managers were considered for the award; 105 (24 percent of candidates) were named 2016 Five Star Wealth Managers.

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10/7/16 11:30 AM


SPECIAL ADVERTISING SECTION WEALTH MANAGER

The Bilsky Bridgmon Group at Morgan Stanley • Results-driven, not product-driven • Investing for your life and your legacy • Aiming to protect what you worked hard to earn Over the years, you will make many financial decisions. One, in particular, is likely to have a lasting impact on your well-being and that of your family: the choice of your financial advisor. Let us be yours. Becky Bridgmon, 2012 – 2016 Five Star Wealth Manager award winner, and Stanley Bilsky, 2012 – 2016 Five Star Wealth Manager award winner.

The Bilsky Bridgmon Group at Morgan Stanley 6410 Poplar Avenue, Suite 600 | Memphis, TN 38119 Office: 901-766-6129 becky.bridgmon@morganstanley.com | stanley.bilsky@morganstanley.com www.morganstanleyfa.com/thebilskybridgmongroup

FIVE-YEAR WINNER Left to right: Five-year winners Becky Bridgmon, CFP®, Vice President, Financial Advisor, and Stanley Bilsky, CIMA®, Senior Vice President, Wealth Advisor

©2016 Morgan Stanley Smith Barney LLC. Member SIPC. Certified Financial Planner Board of Standards Inc. owns the certification marks CFP®, CERTIFIED FINANCIAL PLANNER™ and federally registered CFP® (with flame design) in the U.S. Investment Management consultants Association, Inc. owns the marks CIMA® and Certified Investment Management AnalystSM (with graph element).

A Culture of Excellence With a Local Address

Richard L. Carman President, CERTIFIED FINANCIAL PLANNER™, LPL Registered Principal • Bringing all of the pieces of your financial life together • Adherence to rigorous ethical standards • Helping you design a confident financial future • Building lasting relationships for over 28 years

FIVE-YEAR WINNER Five-year winner Richard L. Carman

Early on, I was told: “People do not really care how much you know until they know how much you really care!” After almost three decades in the financial services industry I have learned one very important truth: Since God gave me two ears and one mouth, I am to listen twice as much as I speak! We are in the age of “Information Overload” and people are stuck in a perpetual “Paralysis of Analysis”. My goal is to educate my clients so they make informed decisions and take ownership of their own financial future!

6800 Poplar Avenue, Suite 105 Memphis, TN 38138 Office: 901-680-0448 Fax: 901-680-0473 richard.carman@lpl.com

Securities offered through LPL Financial, Member FINRA/SIPC.

Motivating Clients From: “I Wish I Had” to “I’m Glad I Did”!

FS • 6 — www.fivestarprofessional.com The Five Star Wealth Manager award, administered by Crescendo Business Services, LLC (dba Five Star Professional), is based on 10 objective criteria. Eligibility criteria – required: 1. Credentialed as a registered investment adviser or a registered investment adviser representative; 2. Active as a credentialed professional in the financial services industry for a minimum of 5 years; 3. Favorable regulatory and complaint history review (As defined by Five Star Professional, the wealth manager has not: A. Been subject to a regulatory action that resulted in a license being suspended or revoked, or payment of a fine; B. Had more than a total of three customer complaints filed against them [settled or pending] with any regulatory authority or Five Star Professional’s consumer complaint process. Unfavorable feedback may have been discovered through a check of complaints registered with a regulatory authority or complaints registered through Five Star Professional’s consumer complaint process; feedback may not be representative of any one client’s experience; C. Individually contributed to a financial settlement of a customer complaint filed with a regulatory authority; D. Filed for personal bankruptcy; E. Been convicted of a felony); 4. Fulfilled their firm review based on internal standards; 5. Accepting new clients. Evaluation criteria – considered: 6. One-year client retention rate; 7. Five-year client retention rate; 8. Non-institutional discretionary and/or non-discretionary client assets administered; 9. Number of client households served; 10. Education and professional designations. Wealth managers do not pay a fee to be considered or placed on the final list of Five Star Wealth Managers. Award does not evaluate quality of services provided to clients. Once awarded, wealth managers may purchase additional profile ad space or promotional products. The Five Star award is not indicative of the wealth manager’s future performance. Wealth managers may or may not use discretion in their practice and therefore may not manage their client’s assets. The inclusion of a wealth manager on the Five Star Wealth Manager list should not be construed as an endorsement of the wealth manager by Five Star Professional or this publication. Working with a Five Star Wealth Manager or any wealth manager is no guarantee as to future investment success, nor is there any guarantee that the selected wealth managers will be awarded this accomplishment by Five Star Professional in the future. For more information on the Five Star award and the research/selection methodology, go to fivestarprofessional.com. 447 Memphis wealth managers were considered for the award; 105 (24 percent of candidates) were named 2016 Five Star Wealth Managers.

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10/7/16 11:31 AM


SPECIAL ADVERTISING SECTION WEALTH MANAGER

William B. Howard, Jr.

John Paul “J.P.” Webber

ChFC®, CFP®, President

Accredited Investment Fiduciary®

William Howard & Co. Financial Advisors, Inc.

The Associated Agency

6410 Poplar Ave., Ste. 330 Memphis, TN 38119 Office: 901-761-5068 whoward@whcfa.com www.whcfa.com

5050 Poplar Ave., Ste. 1200 Memphis, TN 38157 Phone: 901-682-3301 Toll-free: 877-843-2776 jpwebber@associatedagency.com

FIVE-YEAR WINNER

• • • •

FIVE-YEAR WINNER

Comprehensive financial planning Focus on client goals and objectives Long-term advisory relationships built on trust and integrity Over 37 years of delivering sound financial advice

William Howard & Co. is an independent, fee-only financial planning and investment advisory firm. We are committed to providing excellent service to our clients by listening to them, working with them and crafting solutions that work for their future. Please contact us for more information.

• Integrated life planning for individuals and families • Business benefit and succession planning • Comprehensive investment and risk management consulting As an independent financial advisor, I believe success is both a function of your present financial well-being as well as your confidence in the future. My mission is to help you pursue your vision through a collaborative planning process that provides an objective, actionable framework seeking financial independence. This dynamic approach helps you to maintain a confident outlook regardless of what the future holds. Advisory services offered through Capital Analysts or Lincoln Investment, Registered Investment Advisors. Securities offered through Lincoln Investment, Broker Dealer, Member FINRA/SIPC. www.lincolninvestment.com. The Associated Agency and the above firms are independent and non-affiliated. 9/16.

Your Vision Forms Our Mission Sudhir K. Agrawal CPA, CDFA™, CFP®

3085 FountainSide Dr., Ste. 204 Germantown, TN 38138 Office: 901-312-7805 Fax: 901-758-8717 Sudhir.K.Agrawal@ampf.com FIVE-YEAR WINNER

ameripriseadvisors.com/sudhir.k.agrawal

• Custom financial, estate and retirement planning strategies • Tax-efficient portfolio management strategies • Practical advice from experience and integrity As a financial advisor for more than 17 years, I have dedicated myself to serving my clients and putting their goals and needs first. Having my certified public accountant and a CERTIFIED FINANCIAL PLANNER™ professional certifications, I approach planning with your dreams and goals in mind. I am committed to providing personalized solutions for your financial needs. 2012 – 2016 Five Star Wealth Manager. Certified Financial Planner Board of Standards Inc. owns the certification marks CFP®, CERTIFIED FINANCIAL PLANNER™ and federally registered CFP (with flame design) in the U.S. Investors should conduct their own evaluation of a financial professional as working with a financial advisor is not a guarantee of future financial success. Investment advisory services and products are made available through Ameriprise Financial Services, Inc., a registered investment adviser. Ameriprise Financial Services, Inc., Member FINRA and SIPC. ©2016 Ameriprise Financial, Inc., All rights reserved.

“Don’t listen to other people. Investigate for yourself. Be wary of wealth managers who say they never had a down year.” — Five Star award winner

Balance Needs of the Future With Wants of Today www.fivestarprofessional.com — FS

•7

The Five Star Wealth Manager award, administered by Crescendo Business Services, LLC (dba Five Star Professional), is based on 10 objective criteria. Eligibility criteria – required: 1. Credentialed as a registered investment adviser or a registered investment adviser representative; 2. Active as a credentialed professional in the financial services industry for a minimum of 5 years; 3. Favorable regulatory and complaint history review (As defined by Five Star Professional, the wealth manager has not: A. Been subject to a regulatory action that resulted in a license being suspended or revoked, or payment of a fine; B. Had more than a total of three customer complaints filed against them [settled or pending] with any regulatory authority or Five Star Professional’s consumer complaint process. Unfavorable feedback may have been discovered through a check of complaints registered with a regulatory authority or complaints registered through Five Star Professional’s consumer complaint process; feedback may not be representative of any one client’s experience; C. Individually contributed to a financial settlement of a customer complaint filed with a regulatory authority; D. Filed for personal bankruptcy; E. Been convicted of a felony); 4. Fulfilled their firm review based on internal standards; 5. Accepting new clients. Evaluation criteria – considered: 6. One-year client retention rate; 7. Five-year client retention rate; 8. Non-institutional discretionary and/or non-discretionary client assets administered; 9. Number of client households served; 10. Education and professional designations. Wealth managers do not pay a fee to be considered or placed on the final list of Five Star Wealth Managers. Award does not evaluate quality of services provided to clients. Once awarded, wealth managers may purchase additional profile ad space or promotional products. The Five Star award is not indicative of the wealth manager’s future performance. Wealth managers may or may not use discretion in their practice and therefore may not manage their client’s assets. The inclusion of a wealth manager on the Five Star Wealth Manager list should not be construed as an endorsement of the wealth manager by Five Star Professional or this publication. Working with a Five Star Wealth Manager or any wealth manager is no guarantee as to future investment success, nor is there any guarantee that the selected wealth managers will be awarded this accomplishment by Five Star Professional in the future. For more information on the Five Star award and the research/selection methodology, go to fivestarprofessional.com. 447 Memphis wealth managers were considered for the award; 105 (24 percent of candidates) were named 2016 Five Star Wealth Managers.

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10/7/16 11:31 AM


SPECIAL ADVERTISING SECTION WEALTH MANAGER Jay Healy

Robert T. Buckley

President

Managing Sales Director, Financial Advisor, AR Ins. Lic. 11700701

Century Wealth Management LLC 1770 Kirby Pkwy., Ste. 117 Memphis, TN 38138 Phone: 901-850-5532 Direct: 901-292-8470 jay@centurywealth.com FIVE-YEAR WINNER www.centurywealth.com Everything we do is driven by the question: “What would I want if I were the client?” We specialize in working with entrepreneurs and professionals looking for a single-source solution to managing their family wealth. We take on the role of the “family CFO” and manage investments, implement advanced planning strategies and perform a variety of administrative functions to simplify our clients’ lives.

TWO-YEAR WINNER

795 Ridge Lake Blvd., Ste. 200 Memphis, TN 38120 Phone: 901-758-1321 rtbuckley@ strategicfinancialpartners.com

My goal is to provide families and business owners with assistance in building their financial freedom. I have the skills, knowledge and experience required to help meet my client’s established goals. My personal goal to is to become a lifelong resource for each and every client.

If you’re in this business for money alone, you will never make it. You have to genuinely want to make a difference in your clients’ lives.

Registered Representative of, and offers securities and investment advisory services through, MSI Financial Services, Inc. Member SIPC. Strategic Financial Partners is not a subsidiary or affiliate of MSI Financial Services, Inc., or its affiliated companies. L0916478204[exp0417][TN].

— Five Star award winner

Award winners are listed by primary service and then alphabetically by last name. Estate Planning

Brienne Jackson · Legacy Wealth Management

John Webber · The Associated Agency Page 7

E. Charles Jalenak · Legacy Wealth Management

Julius Flatt · MassMutual

Kevin Johnston · Financial Resource Management

Insurance

J. Barry Jenkins · Wells Fargo Advisors, LLC Page 5

Financial Planning

Christopher Kauker · Ameriprise Financial Services, Inc. Page 4

Robert Buckley · Strategic Financial Partners Page 8

Martavius Jones · Jones Wealth Management Group

Owen Keith · FSG Investment Management

Stephen Harris · AXA Advisors

Larry Karban · Wells Fargo Financial Network, LLC

Gary Kieffner · Brandon Financial Planning

Milton Knowlton · MassMutual

Kevin D. Kimery · Morgan Stanley

Lindsey Bell Mazzola · Legacy Wealth Management

Investments

Brian Patrick Kinney · Dominion Partners

David McAdams · McAdams Tax Advisory Group Page 2 & 3

Mark Alexander · Morgan Stanley

John Norfleet Laughlin · Summit Asset Management

Robert McAdams · Charles Schwab & Company

John Barrios · Barrios Financial Services

David Lee · Summit Wealth Group

Mark Billions · Wells Fargo Advisors, LLC

Hal Lewis · Stephens

William Bizot · Wells Fargo Advisors, LLC

Jerry McEwen · Wells Fargo Advisors, LLC

Becky Bridgmon · Morgan Stanley Page 6

Duncan L. Miller · Legacy Wealth Management

Guy Britton · Wunderlich Securities

John Miller · Edward Jones

Larry Clayton · Anchor Point Financial

Garry Parrish · Centaurus Financial

John Michael Clowers · Legacy Wealth Management

Jeffrey Phillips · Raymond James Financial Services

Nancy Coe · Dominion Partners

Conrad Richards · Wells Fargo Advisors, LLC Ivan Rodriguez · New Southern Advisory Services Julia San Roman · Edward Jones

Sudhir Agrawal · Ameriprise Financial Services, Inc. Page 7 Charles Auerbach · Wealth Strategies Group Susan Babina · Ameriprise Financial Services, Inc. Page 4 Teresa Bailey · Pickler Wealth Advisors Stanley L. Bilsky · Morgan Stanley Page 6 Elvis Brandon · Brandon Financial Planning Ray Brandon · Brandon Financial Planning Celia Brugge · Dogwood Financial Planning Richard Carman · LPL Financial Page 6

David Landon Mills · Shoemaker Financial George Moore · Chartwell Financial Group William Overcast · Legacy Wealth Management

Joseph Crain · Wunderlich Securities

Hugh Parks · Independent Wealth Management Page 5

Robert Dingler · FSG Investment Management

Vincent Perry · Ameriprise Financial Services, Inc.

Richard Ditter · The Mutual Fund Store of Memphis

Hallie Peyton · Legacy Wealth Management

Brian Douglas · Guidingpoint Financial Group/ Ameriprise Financial Services, Inc. Page 4

David Pickler · Pickler Wealth Advisors

Robert Cremerius · Cremerius Wealth Management

Richard Pittman · Diversified Financial Advisors

Mark Cronin · Highland Capital Management

Rebecca Rawlinson · Legacy Wealth Management

Lindsey Donovan · Wells Fargo Financial Network, LLC

James Shamoun · Ameriprise Financial Services, Inc. Page 4

Jerome Franklin · Wells Fargo Advisors, LLC

Cathy Ann Simmons · Legacy Wealth Management

Walter Grant · Aegis Retirement Group

Darrell Douglas · Ameriprise Financial Services, Inc. Page 4 Charles Emerson · Independent Planning Group Jason Fair · Wunderlich Securities Vera Feldman · Ameriprise Financial Services, Inc. Kathy Fish · Fish and Associates Paul Fowler · Revolution Partners

John Phillips · Red Door Wealth Management

Scott Giles · Ameriprise Financial Services, Inc.

Madeline Simonetti · Ameriprise Financial Services, Inc. Page 4

Ronald Goldner · Wealth Strategies Group

Nick Sowell · Legacy Wealth Management

Jerry Greene · Financial Resource Management

Robert Stokes · Wunderlich Securities

William Howard, Jr. · William Howard & Company Financial Advisors Page 7

Julie Terry · Ameriprise Financial Services, Inc. Page 4

Charles C. Hudson, Jr. · Ameriprise Financial Services, Inc.

William Bowe Travis · Legacy Wealth Management

Stacey Hyde · Independent Wealth Management Page 5

Michael Turner · Ameriprise Financial Services, Inc. Page 4

Lowell Friend · Wells Fargo Advisors, LLC Sarah Russell Haizlip · Summit Asset Management Montie Hart · Wells Fargo Advisors, LLC Jay Healy · Century Wealth Management Page 8 Lance Wayne Hollingsworth · Summit Asset Management

Randall Roper · Wells Fargo Advisors, LLC Robin K. Sievers · Legacy Wealth Management Sara Stevens · Kaiser Financial Group Weldon Stewart · Wells Fargo Advisors, LLC Edward T. Taylor II · Delta Asset Management Samuel Alexander Thompson III · Summit Asset Management Hulon Warlick · Independent Wealth Management Page 5 Kevin Wells · Ameriprise Financial Services, Inc. James Whitehead · Shoemaker Financial Steven Wishnia · Highland Capital Management

Wallace Spencer Hope · Legacy Wealth Management

Trust Services

James Isaacs · Legacy Wealth Management

Daniel Eric Kimbrough · Legacy Wealth Management

FS • 8 — www.fivestarprofessional.com The Five Star Wealth Manager award, administered by Crescendo Business Services, LLC (dba Five Star Professional), is based on 10 objective criteria. Eligibility criteria – required: 1. Credentialed as a registered investment adviser or a registered investment adviser representative; 2. Active as a credentialed professional in the financial services industry for a minimum of 5 years; 3. Favorable regulatory and complaint history review (As defined by Five Star Professional, the wealth manager has not: A. Been subject to a regulatory action that resulted in a license being suspended or revoked, or payment of a fine; B. Had more than a total of three customer complaints filed against them [settled or pending] with any regulatory authority or Five Star Professional’s consumer complaint process. Unfavorable feedback may have been discovered through a check of complaints registered with a regulatory authority or complaints registered through Five Star Professional’s consumer complaint process; feedback may not be representative of any one client’s experience; C. Individually contributed to a financial settlement of a customer complaint filed with a regulatory authority; D. Filed for personal bankruptcy; E. Been convicted of a felony); 4. Fulfilled their firm review based on internal standards; 5. Accepting new clients. Evaluation criteria – considered: 6. One-year client retention rate; 7. Five-year client retention rate; 8. Non-institutional discretionary and/or non-discretionary client assets administered; 9. Number of client households served; 10. Education and professional designations. Wealth managers do not pay a fee to be considered or placed on the final list of Five Star Wealth Managers. Award does not evaluate quality of services provided to clients. Once awarded, wealth managers may purchase additional profile ad space or promotional products. The Five Star award is not indicative of the wealth manager’s future performance. Wealth managers may or may not use discretion in their practice and therefore may not manage their client’s assets. The inclusion of a wealth manager on the Five Star Wealth Manager list should not be construed as an endorsement of the wealth manager by Five Star Professional or this publication. Working with a Five Star Wealth Manager or any wealth manager is no guarantee as to future investment success, nor is there any guarantee that the selected wealth managers will be awarded this accomplishment by Five Star Professional in the future. For more information on the Five Star award and the research/selection methodology, go to fivestarprofessional.com. 447 Memphis wealth managers were considered for the award; 105 (24 percent of candidates) were named 2016 Five Star Wealth Managers.

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10/7/16 11:33 AM


Dickens on the Square Historic Court Square Saturday, December 10TH 10AM-5PM and Sunday, December 11TH 1PM-5PM

Join us for a unique and magical Christmas celebration on Covington’s Historic Court Square as we bring Charles Dickens’ “A Christmas Carol” to life. Colorful characters such as Tiny Tim, Scrooge, and Marley’s ghost can be found mingling with merchants and vendors dressed in historical attire around the Square. Delight your senses with carolers, storytellers, puppet shows, carriage rides, performers and visits with Father Christmas as you explore the shops all decked out in their Christmas finery. There will be activities for the entire family and the event is free to all.

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DR . PI N K E L c on tin u e d from page 4 8

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dating his breakthroughs at St. Jude, Pinkel soon considered a change. In 1974, he resigned as the hospital’s director and took a series of eminent hospital and faculty posts—in Milwaukee, Los Angeles, Houston, Corpus Christi. He was a builder, he realized, not a stayer. “I would set things up and get things rolling,” he says. “Then I would move on.” While enjoying his retirement in San Luis Obispo, he has found that his polio symptoms have returned with a vengeance. He walks with a cane now, and often has to use braces. He stays busy swimming, reading medical journals, and keeping track of his 10 children and 16 grandchildren. From time to time he hears from his Total Therapy patients — they’re scattered around the world now, with their own families and careers, and grateful to be alive after all these years. He has reportedly been considered for the Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine, and still occasionally lectures on medical subjects, at nearby California Polytechnic State University (Cal Poly). “Medicine isn’t a job,” he says. “It’s a life. You’re always on call.”

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or two years, then three, Barbara Bowles’ remission held. Although she continued her chemotherapy sessions in Natchez and did regular follow-ups at St. Jude, she remained in school without interruption. “My parents would drive me up there every year,” she says. “It was so scary — the whole time, I’d be saying to myself, ‘Are they going to find something?’” When she was 12, her hair grew back in an entirely new color: A brilliant silver-gray. In 1980, 12 years after her ordeal began, doctors at St. Jude brought her in for yet another checkup. Only this time, they said, “You’re cured. You don’t have to come back.” Today she is Barbara Extine. She is a calm, stoic woman with rosy cheeks and a beautiful nimbus of silver-gray hair. She lives in Vicksburg, with her husband, Roy. She has a degree in geology, has finished her coursework for her master’s, and has done contract work for years as an environmental scientist for the Army Corps of Engineers. She’s active in her church and is an avid gardener. Barbara hasn’t been able to have children, and has had health problems that are likely related to her leukemia treatments — including a malignant tumor that led to the removal of her bladder. But she knows she’s one of the lucky ones. Lucky enough to be connected with a piece of history, one of the kids who just happened to show up in exactly the right place at exactly the right time, under the watch of a kindly doctor on the cusp of a breakthrough. “I’m so happy to be here,” she says. “Cured. That was the word they used. You can’t imagine the relief. You just can’t imagine it.”

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he work Rhodes students do in the community is good for the student and college, but good for Memphis as well as is seen in retention rates. “Three years in a row we’ve had alumni surveys where our young graduates are one year out, and over 40 percent of them have stayed here in Memphis,” he says. “I think what makes that remarkable is that over 90 percent of them come from somewhere else.” Student population growth is necessary (1,450 in 1999; more than 2,000 today), as is that of the faculty, and both have been accomplished during Troutt’s time as president. But oftentimes the real proof is in the pocketbook, and it’s here that he excels with improvements to the campus seen in the new construction of the Robertson Hall science building, the Bryan Campus Life Center, and — the largest single gift in Rhodes history — the $35 million Paul Barret Jr. Library. But the crowning achievement may be the successful conclusion in 2015 of a $314 million capital campaign. “It has enabled us to take Rhodes to another level in terms of support for our students and I’m grateful for that,” he says. Once he passes through the iron gates for the last time, it will be into a new life, one without the concerns and pressures he’s known since he became a college president over three decades ago. What he’ll do with the time remains to be seen, and he isn’t making any plans just yet. “I’ve been encouraged by some very wise friends and trustees to take a gap year, to take some time and think about what I really want to do,” he says. Regardless of what he decides, you can be certain that it will be filled with family — daughter Carole Ann Schmidt is in Kenilworth, Illinois, with his 12-year-old grandson; and son Jack is in New Orleans — and certainly with Carole, whom he calls, unabashedly, “the love of my life and one of the most remarkable women you’d ever want to meet,” adding, “I could not have been a college president without her support, her good counsel, her full engagement in her role as the first lady of Rhodes College.” As the new school year began a few months ago, there was a buzz on campus, as there is every year. “There’s an energy that comes when a residential college begins its fall term that’s indescribable,” Troutt says. It’s on the list of things he’ll miss in retirement. Somewhere else on that list is something he’ll experience for the final time in spring of 2017, and something that must take him back to his own humble beginnings: “There’s a satisfaction at commencement, and a pride, and you see these students and their families that are so appropriately proud.” 

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SUCCESS

GROWS HERE Woodland combines small class sizes, dedicated teachers, and personalized instruction to help grow your child’s success. Call 901-685-0976 to schedule a tour, or email admissions@woodlandschool.org. Open House: Thursday, November 10 and Sunday, November 13 Middle School Preview Day: December 6 A co-ed, 2-year-old – 8th grade independent school in the heart of East Memphis. | woodlandschool.org

©2016 Woodland Presbyterian School. All rights reserved.

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10/21/16 1:47 PM


ASK VANCE

Miller School Mystery Our trivia expert solves local mysteries of who, what, when, where, why, and why not. Well, sometimes.

by vance lauderdale DEAR VANCE: What was

the original use of the property at 1870 Madison, which today houses the local chapter of the International Brotherhood of Electrical Workers? Has it always been a union hall? – a.t., memphis.

below: A neon sign covers the words “MILLER SCHOOL” carved over the entrance of the old building on Madison. Photograph by Anna Traverse.

DEAR A.T.: Every time I stagger out of the liquor store at Madison and Barksdale, hauling cases of Kentucky Nip to the Lauderdale limousine, I pause long enough to catch my breath and admire the nice details of this old building, with its steeply pitched roof, its imposing entrance, and especially its rows of fine (and very tall) windows. Everything about the overall “look” of 1870 Madison suggests it was originally built as a schoolhouse, so I knew it was a simple matter of checking old city directories and finding just what school it was. The Shelby County Assessor’s page shows this property was constructed in 1890, which makes it older than I expected. And that presented quite a problem — one that required the assistance of two separate government agencies, friends at various libraries, a Memphis historian now living in California, and even a nice woman from Virginia — to solve. I won’t give away my patented research skills, but I quickly determined that the IBEW had moved into the building in 1943, moving from smaller facilities they had previously occupied on Beale Street, so I let A.T. know that the building wasn’t originally built as a union hall. But that was only half of her question. What was its first use? Inexplicably, city directories before 1943 didn’t always list this address. The few times it showed up over the years, the books identified a variety of small businesses, including a Mr. Bowers Grocery Store, but surely such an imposing structure had been constructed for a grander purpose.

That half-century gap in its history, from 1890 to 1943, was perplexing. So I turned to my pals at the Shelby County Register of Deeds and the Shelby County Archives, hoping they could explain “The Mystery of the Missing Schoolhouse.” At this point, you see, I was still convinced 1870 Madison had been a school, but I had no proof. Archives managers Fred Beckham and Derrick Mink looked through their records and found that in 1926, a business called Hatley Manufacturing Company was located there. Years earlier, in 1920, the Woodruff-Powell Lumber Company was listed. And that’s when Derrick turned up a tiny listing for the Miller School in a 1915 city directory. Not at 1870 Madison, inexplicably, but at 1880. And then Derrick, hot on the trail, searched the internet for “Miller School” and put me in touch with Gene Gill. Now living in Pasadena, California, Gene is an administrator of the very fine Historic Memphis website (historic-memphis.com). He not only has devoted an entire page to the Miller School, but told me that he recently obtained a 1912-1913 Miller School catalog that included photos of the school and described its staff and curriculum. So finally, thanks entirely to the hard work of others (which is the way I prefer it), here’s what I know: The Miller School opened on Madison in 1910, started by Professor Phipps Miller, who had originally taught at Memphis University School when it was located on South Manassas. Phipps and his wife, a woman with the lovely name of Hannabelle, originally opened their school in a smaller wooden building several doors to the east — possibly while the larger facility was under construction. Much like MUS, the Miller School was a preparatory school for boys. According to Gene’s old catalog, students “were taught to grow in knowledge, build character, and strive for a high standard of Christian leadership.” The class offerings were impressive; Gene says the curriculum included such basics as mathematics, English, history, geography, science, and spelling, along with French, German, Greek, and Latin. Of all those subjects, spelling was considered the most important: “Believing that no branch of education is more necessary than correct spelling, no pupil is excused from the study of orthography, and daily recitations are required from the entire enrollment. A gold medal will be awarded to the pupil who makes the highest average grade in orthography on the work of the year.” (I absolutely agree, and I certainly hope my computer’s spell-check program finds any mistakes in this column.) The catalog describes the facilities in some detail: “The basement floor will contain the heating plant, also a large playroom, 40 by 60 feet, equipped with showers, lockers, and gymnasium apparatus. This room will have air and sun from north, east, and west. On the main floor will be the study hall, 40 by 60 feet, and connected will be seven commodious rooms for library, office, and recitation rooms.” Including Phipps Miller, the school had four instructors and five special lecturers, who spoke on “The Sound Body in Youth as a Basis for Health in Age,” “The

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Boy: His Friends, His Enemies,” and even “The Schools of China Compared with American Schools.” Another instructor, identified as Mrs. E.W. Hughes of New York, was an expert on the rather general topic of “Safety.” I guess she traveled around the country delivering that fascinating lecture. The catalog claims almost 100 students attended during 1912-1913. Good grief, the school that I had never heard of had its own literary society and even organized football, baseball, and basketball teams. North of the campus was “a beautiful field for athletics bounded by McLean, Court, and stretching eastward toward Tucker, affording ample facilities for football, baseball, and track.” Especially interesting was a page in the catalog listing sample questions Miller School students might encounter on their final exam. Here’s just one of them: “Given (a) a right cylinder whose radius is 6 inches, altitude 8 inches; (b) a right cone, radius base equal 6 inches, altitude 8 inches; (c) a sphere, radius 6 inches; (d) frustum of right cone, radius of lower base, 16 inches; radius upper base, 10 inches; altitude, 8 inches. Find cost of gilding the total area of these four solids at 18 cents per square inch.” Uhhh, could you repeat the question? (The correct answer is, of course: South Dakota.) Obviously, this school wasn’t for just anybody: “Only boys of good moral character will be enrolled, and the principal reserves the right to request the immediate withdrawal of any pupil who may prove unworthy of trust, who will not conform his conduct to the honor system, or who may seek to obstruct the work of the school by persistent violation of the rules.” Hmmm. Even though the catalog named all the students that year, I found not a single Lauderdale among them. Surely an oversight. So who was Phipps Miller, and what happened to him? According to Gene Gill’s research, Miller was born in Hawkins County, Tennessee, in 1866. At the age of 8 his family moved to Virginia, and he graduated from the University of Virginia in 1893. It’s not clear where he met Hannabelle, but they moved to Memphis in 1899, when Miller took a job as chairman of the MUS mathematics department. While Phipps and Hannabelle taught at the school, they lived in an apartment at the rear of the building. Unfortunately, they didn’t stay there very long. Years earlier, Miller had contracted typhoid fever, which impaired his health, and only 10 years after opening his impressive new school on Madison, he was forced to retire and close it. After that, the imposing building did indeed house a number of smaller businesses, seemingly out of keeping with the relative grandeur of their surroundings. Now, have you been paying attention? What about the woman in Virginia I mentioned earlier? Well, Patricia J. Treadwell, the great-niece of Phipps Miller, contacted

Gene Gill with this information: “After Phipps became ill, he and Hannabelle went to live with my grandparents near Rogersville, Tennessee. He died October 13, 1923. Hannabelle then went back to Marion, Virginia (where she was born) and died there October 25, 1925. Both Phipps and Hannabelle are buried at Round Hill Cemetery in Marion, Virginia.” Patricia provided the old photographs you see here of Phipps and Hannabelle, along with an image of the school as it looked in 1910, and A.T. provided the first-rate color photograph showing the building today, along with others that are so fine I will post them on my blog. The old school has remained remarkably unchanged throughout the years. I’m glad the IBEW members have taken care of such an important part of our city’s past. But wait a minute. If the building was constructed in 1890, and Phipps opened his school here in 1910, A.T. — who just won’t let this go — points out that it doesn’t take a mathematical genius, or a Miller School graduate, to see I haven’t fully solved this mystery. What was there in those intervening years? Now look, these bottles of Kentucky Nip can’t wait forever. Haven’t I done enough for my two-hour workday? 

above: In 1910, the Miller School was an imposing structure on Madison. The building and even the steps have remained remarkably unchanged over the years. left: Hannabelle Miller is shown here outside the temporary school building. The inset photo is of Phipps, both taken sometime in the early 1900s. All old photographs are courtesy of Patricia Treadwell.

Got a question for vance? EMAIL: askvance@memphismagazine.com

MAIL: Vance Lauderdale, Memphis magazine,

460 Tennessee Street #200, Memphis, TN 38103 ONLINE: memphismagazine.com/ask-vance

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DINING OUT

Sit a Spell Colorado’s Kitchen Bistro brings seasonal American cooking and sunset views to a front porch in Shelby Farms.

Outdoor heaters on the Kitchen Bistro’s sprawling covered porch will extend al fresco dining into the cooler months.

by pamela denney | photographs by justin fox burks

already at ease with its natural setting on the newly expanded Hyde Lake Park. Open since Labor Day t the Kitchen Bistro, an immensely popular new restau- weekend, the restaurant’s design by Arkansas architect rant in Shelby Farms, the wood-roasted okra arrives with my Marlon Blackwell blends mid-century modern aesthetics with retro materials like glass walls, aqua subway drink, a bewitching Vesper with a lemon twist. Certainly, I rec- tiles, heart of pine paneling, and over-sized ceiling fans ognize the tenacious Southern beauties, plated with fresh lemon and on the restaurant’s front porch. sauce gribiche, a French-style aioli made with chopped egg, tarragon, Simply put, the restaurant is beautiful, and the accoand parsley. But the okra’s robust makeover in a wood-burning oven lades have come quickly. On a recent Sunday, the Kitchis a surprise, and when I take a bite, the charred and woody taste — en’s staff served brunch and dinner to 600 guests. “It’s both familiar and mysterious — delights me like a vintage locket with pretty wild,” acknowledged Phelps. “But I am grateful to be here and grateful to have this kind of community a tiny photo tucked inside. support.” Phelps, who is a native of Colorado, first cooked for Hesitant to share, I linger instead over each delicious pod and start to wonder: Can the personality of a single the Kitchen at the company’s original location in Bouldish lead me straight to the heart der, advancing to executive chef de cuisine as the company grew. From of a chef’s new American table? the start, the Kitchen championed Intrigued, I study the dinner menu Flavor from a woodfor other ingredient-driven dishes fresh food, local purveyors, and burning oven, the responsible farming practices, a with bold flavors and indigenous roots. And yes, they are here. Devcommitment that continues today centerpiece of the iled eggs with cumin and a cozy at six restaurants in three different restaurant’s open cap of olive tapenade, country ham states. For Phelps, a self-taught chef, with melon, dried chili, and bourthe potential to build relationships kitchen, shows up bon marinated baby figs, and pork with Midsouth farmers lured him to across the menu, chops, anchored by escarole herb Tennessee. “Some of the people I’ve turning simple and crema and roasted corn salad, sunmet here are changing how their kissed and cheerful. family farms have been run for five seasonal ingredients The menu at the Kitchen Bisgenerations, converting to organinto culinary gold. tro, steered by the cooking style ics or moving from feed lot hogs to Chef Dennis Phelps pasture hogs,” he said. “I’m excited of head Chef Dennis Phelps, is

A

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about that because it aligns so well with a more modern approach to food.” At the Kitchen, Phelps sources meat from Home Place Pastures in Como, Mississippi, for dinner entrees and for house-made lamb sausage, a product so good that chefs make 150 pounds a week. Like much of the Kitchen’s menu, the sausage tastes flavorful but uncomplicated and demands multiple steps to make. Chefs marinate lamb shoulder overnight in a Middle Eastern harissa sauce before seasoning the sausage with cumin, garlic, and the earthy anise flavor of caraway seeds. On the plate, sliced sausage settles effortlessly into cool tahini dressing and chopped tomato relish. The sausage appears again for brunch, where it builds a spicy tomato sauce for Moroccan poached eggs, a dish Phelps calls his current favorite. Flavor from a wood-burning oven, the centerpiece of the restaurant’s open kitchen, shows up across the menu, turning simple and seasonal ingredients into culinary gold. Vegetables like peppers, broccoli, and baby turnips — blistery on the outside but al dente inside — escort pan roasted rib eye to the dinner table. At lunch, wood-roasted artichokes in a rustic ceramic bowl mingle with farro, wild mushrooms, and pickled onions. Marjoram yogurt dressing pools on top, like springtime moss in a carefree woodland garden. Stoked with hickory and cherry wood, the oven burns all day, reaching 850 degrees during busy service and baking the Kitchen’s flatbread —house-made with freshly milled Carolina wheat — in less than two minutes. Overnight, the oven is still hard at work, making intoxicating elixirs from onions buried deep in the coals. Phelps explained the magic like this: “When you pull out the onions in the morning, they are black and knobby, but squeeze them, and there are super sweet onions inside.” PAM’S PICS

THE KITCHEN BISTRO AT SHELBY FARMS 415 Great View Drive East (901) 729-9009 STARS: ★★★1/2

★★★★ ★★★ ★★ ★

Exceptional Very good Satisfactory Skip it!

FOOD: Southern sensibilities (pan fried catfish! biscuits

with honey butter!), seasonal ingredients, and local sourcing complement rustic classics like roast chicken and pasta Bolognese. DRINKS: Cokes in glass bottles join wine, beer, and craft cocktails. Try the La Rosada, a tequila-driven drink the color of pink summer sunsets. ATMOSPHERE: The Kitchen’s casual contemporary setting with lakeside views is upbeat and family-friendly. A good-looking bar also stays lively, especially for happy hour every day from 3 to 6 p.m. SERVICE: Six weeks after the restaurant’s opening, servers are friendly and well-meaning, but their inexperience shows. EXTRAS: Notice the heavy flatware, striped cotton kitchen towels that double as napkins, and shelved cookbooks, a compendium of great American cooking selected by the Kitchen’s head chef. THE KITCHENETTE: A sister cafe in the new Shelby Farms visitor center, the Kitchenette serves graband-go snacks like fresh fruit, egg salad, and Nikki’s spicy potato chips. RESERVATIONS: The coaches and chairs on the porch are first-come first-serve, but make reservations well ahead for restaurant tables, inside and out. PRICES: Snacks: $3 to $9: Starters: $7 to $13; Sides: $4 to $6; Pastas and Mains: $16 to $35; Desserts: $3 to $9. OPEN: Monday-Friday for lunch from 11 a.m. to 3 p.m.; Saturday-Sunday for brunch from 10 a.m. to 3 p.m.; and dinner seven nights a week starting at 5 p.m.

THREE TO TRY

SWEET CORN RAVIOLI ($18) Consider the steps: Pasta filled with house-made ricotta and corn puree; broth made with butter, bay leaves, and corn-cob stock; and a sautéed wild mushroom garnish. Incredible!

STICKY TOFFEE PUDDING ($8) Trust me. You need the wide-rimmed bowl to grab back this British classic (ice cream, steamed date cake, and toffee sauce) from tablemates who didn’t order their own dessert.

WOOD-ROASTED HALF CHICKEN ($29) Don’t flinch at the price. The Kitchen’s wood roasted chicken with cornbread panzanella and basil anchovy pesto could be the best bowl of food you will ever eat. N O V E M B E R 2 0 1 6 • M E M P H I S M A G A Z I N E . C O M • 87

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PHOTOGRAPHS BY JUSTIN FOX BURKS

CITY DINING OUR IN-DEPTH GUIDE TO MEMPHIS-AREA RESTAURANTS

TIDBITS

Char Restaurant

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by pamela denney

or your first visit to Char Restaurant, a new steakhouse near the University of Memphis, order the Char Wedge, a magnificent salad with roots in the 1960s. A classic prelude for the surf and turf to come, the salad — served on a dinner plate — drapes Maytag blue cheese dressing over half a head of Iceberg, cool and crunchy. Slice a chunk (you will need a knife and fork) and bacon, scallion, tomato, and egg tumble into lettuce layers stacked like a piece of puffed pastry. Yes, the Wedge rekindles nostalgia for Baby-boomers like me, but Char is not your parent’s special-occasion steakhouse in mood or menu. Instead, the restaurant presents a retro chic personality with high ceilings, a piano bar, and black-and-white photos of Memphis personalities like the late Billy “Spook” Murphy, a popular head football coach for the Memphis State Tigers. “I feel like Char has more soul than a typical steakhouse,” says owner Ben Brock, who also operates Amerigo in East Memphis. “We wanted a more welcoming environment, cozy and female friendly.” Open since early October, Char’s 6,900 square feet bring lunch, brunch, and dinner to a neighborhood where food and drink typically target college students. Restaurant entrees are opulent (20-ounce cowboy rib-eye), comforting (chicken piccata with white wine lemon butter), and sourced from the sea (scallops, seafood carbonara, or cornbread-dusted redfish plated with garlic cheddar grits). Robust small plates layered with flavor also are shareable, and they cost much less. Try chili-fried oysters with cumin cream sauce or jumbo lump crab cakes, served as a jubilant duo with tomato shallot relish on top. At lunch, $13 daily specials for meat and veggie plates (meatloaf! short ribs! country-fried steak!) join burgers and entrées. Up next: a Char location in Nashville’s Green Hills suburb sometime next fall. 431 S. Highland Street (901-249-3533) $-$$$ The food and drink menus at Char Restaurant include (clockwise from left): Henry McKenna bourbon cocktail with curaçao and lemon juice; 12-ounce filet with maitre d’butter; fried crab claws; Tres Agaves Blanco tequila cocktail with lime juice and cilantro syrup; custard-fried French toast, and 20-ounce chili-rubbed cowboy prime ribeye. We celebrate our city’s community table and the people who grow, cook, and eat the best Memphis food at

MEMPHISMAGAZINE.COM/FOOD-DINING

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emphis magazine offers this restaurant listing as a service to its readers. The directory is not intended as a recommendation of the establishments included, nor does it list every restaurant in town. It does, however, include most of the city’s finer restaurants, many specialty restaurants, and a representative sampling of other Bluff City eating establishments. No fast-food facilities or cafeterias are listed, nor have we included establishments that rely heavily on take-out business. Restaurants are included regardless of whether they advertise in Memphis magazine. The guide is updated regularly, but we recommend that you call ahead to check on hours, prices, and other details. Suggestions from readers are welcome; please contact us. Email dining@memphismagazine.com. BAR LOUIE—Serves small plates, flatbreads, sandwiches, burgers, ABUELO’S MEXICAN FOOD EMBASSY—Mejores de la salads, and such large plate entrees as blackened fish tacos and baked casa — beef and stuffed shrimp — is a specialty here, along with tilapia Veracruz, quesadillas, chili rellenos, and chicken medallions. mac-and-cheese. 2125 Madison. 207-1436. L, D, WB, X, $-$$ 8274 Highway 64 (Bartlett). 672-0769. L, D, X, $-$$ BAR-B-Q SHOP—Dishes up barbecued ribs, spaghetti, bologna; also pulled pork shoulder, Texas toast barbecue sandwich, chicken ABYSSINIA RESTAURANT—Ethiopian/Mediterranean menu includes beef, chicken, lamb, fish entrees, and vegetarian sandwich, and salads. Closed Sun. 1782 Madison. 272-1277. L, D, dishes; also a lunch buffet. 2600 Poplar. 321-0082. L, D, X, $-$$ X, MRA, $-$$ ACRE—Features seasonal modern American cuisine in a stylish BARDOG TAVERN—Classic American grill with Italian influence, setting using locally sourced products; also small-plates/bar. Closed Bardog offers pasta specialties such as Grandma’s NJ Meatballs, as well as salads, sliders, sandwiches, and daily specials. 73 Monroe. 275-8752. for lunch Sat. and all day Sun. 690 S. Perkins. 818-2273. L, D, X, $$-$$$ B (Mon.-Fri.), L, D, WB, X, $-$$ AGAVE MARIA—Menu items at this Mexican eatery include BARI RISTORANTE ENOTECA—Authentic Southeastern duck confit arepas, poached lobster enchiladas, and grilled lamb Italian cuisine (Puglia) emphasizes lighter entrees. Serves fresh fish chops; also tortas and small plate selections. 83 Union. 341-2096. L, and beef dishes and a homemade soup of the day. 22 S. Cooper. D, X, $-$$ 722-2244. D, SB, X, MRA, $-$$$ ALCHEMY—Southern fusion, locally grown cuisine features small BARKSDALE RESTAURANT—Old-school diner serving and large plates; among the offerings is the pan-seared hanger steak breakfast and Southern plate lunches. 237 Cooper. 722-2193. B, L, with duck-fat-roasted fingerling potatoes; also handcrafted cocktails D, X, MRA, $ and local craft beers. Closed for dinner Sun. 940 S. Cooper. BAYOU BAR & GRILL—New Orleans fare at this Overton 726-4444. D, SB, X, $-$$ Square eatery includes jambalaya, gumbo, catfish Acadian, shrimp ALDO’S PIZZA PIES—Serving gourmet pizzas — including Mr. dishes, red beans and rice, and muffalettas; also serves some favorites T Rex — salads, and more. Also 30 beers, bottled or on tap. 100 S. from the former Le Chardonnay. 2094 Madison. 278-8626. L, D, Main. 577-7743; 752 S. Cooper. 725-7437. L, D, X, $-$$ WB, X, MRA, $-$$ AMERIGO—Traditional and contemporary Italian cuisine includes BEAUTY SHOP—Modern American cuisine with international pasta, wood-fired pizza, steaks, and cedarwood-roasted fish. 1239 flair served in a former beauty shop. Serves steaks salads, pasta, and seafood, including pecan-crusted golden sea bass. Closed for dinner Ridgeway, Park Place Mall. 761-4000. L, D, SB, X, MRA, $-$$$ Sunday. 966 S. Cooper. 272-7111. L, D, SB, X, $-$$$ ANDREW MICHAEL ITALIAN KITCHEN—Traditional Italian cuisine with a menu that changes seasonally with such entrees BEDROCK EATS & SWEETS—Memphis’ only Paleo-centric as Maw Maw’s ravioli. Closed Sun.-Mon. 712 restaurant offering such dishes as pot roast, D I N I N G S Y MBOLS waffles, enchiladas, chicken salad, omelets, W. Brookhaven Cl. 347-3569. D, X, MRA, and more. Closed Sun. 327 S. Main. 409$$-$$$ B — breakfast 6433. B, L, D, X, $-$$ ANOTHER BROKEN EGG CAFE—Offering several varieties of eggs BELLE: A SOUTHERN BISTRO— L — lunch benedict, waffles, omelets, pancakes, Brisket in a bourbon brown sugar glaze, D — dinner beignets, and other breakfast fare; also and chicken with basmati rice are among SB — Sunday brunch burgers,sandwiches, and salads. 6063 Park the specialties; also seafood entrees and WB — weekend brunch Ave. 729-7020; 65 S. Highland. 623-7122. such vegetables as blackened green tomatoes. Closed for dinner Sun. and all day B, L, WB, X, $ X — wheelchair accessible Mon. 117 Union Ave. 433-9851. L, D, THE ARCADE—Possibly Memphis’ MRA — member, Memphis WB, X, $-$$$ oldest cafe. Specialties include sweet Restaurant Association potato pancakes, a fried peanut butter and BENIHANA—This Japanese steakhouse $ — under $15 per person without banana sandwich, and breakfast served all serves beef, chicken, and seafood grilled at day. 540 S. Main. 526-5757. B, L, D the table; some menu items change drinks or desserts monthly; sushi bar also featured. 912 Ridge (Thurs.-Sat.), X, MRA, $ $$ — under $25 Lake. 767-8980. L, D, X, $$-$$$ ASIAN PALACE—Chinese eatery serves $$$ — $26-$50 seafood, vegetarian items, dim sum, and BHAN THAI—Authentic Thai cuisine $$$$ — over $50 includes curries, pad Thai noodles, and more. 5266 Summer Ave. 766-0831. L, D, X, SHADED — new listing vegetarian dishes, as well as seafood, pork, $-$$ and duck entrees. Closed for lunch Sat.-Sun. A-TAN—Serves Chinese and Japanese and all day Mon. 1324 Peabody. 272-1538. L, D, X, MRA, $-$$ hibachi cuisine, complete with sushi bar. A specialty is Four Treasures with garlic sauce. 3445 Poplar, Suite 17, University Center. BLEU—This eclectic restaurant features American food with global influences and local ingredients. Among the specialties are a 14-oz. 452-4477. L, D, X, $-$$$ bone-in rib-eye and several seafood dishes. 221 S. Third, in the AUTOMATIC SLIM’S—Longtime downtown favorite specializes Westin Memphis Beale St. Hotel. 334-5950. B, L, D, WB, X, in contemporary American cuisine emphasizing local ingredients; also $$-$$$ extensive martini list. 83 S. Second. 525-7948. L, D, WB, X, MRA, BLUE NILE ETHIOPIAN—Kabobs, flavorful chicken and lamb $-$$$ stew, and injera (flatbread) are traditional items on the menu, along BABALU TACOS & TAPAS—This Overton Square eatery with vegetarian options. 1788 Madison. 474-7214. L, D, X, $-$$ dishes up Spanish-style tapas with Southern flair; also taco and enchilada of the day; specials change daily. 2115 Madison. 274BLUEFIN RESTAURANT & SUSHI LOUNGE—Serves Japanese fusion cuisine featuring seafood, duck, and steaks, with 0100. L, D, SB, X, $-$$ seasonally changing menu; also, a sushi bar and flatbread pizza. BAHAMA BREEZE—Baby back ribs, Jamaican chicken wings, Closed for lunch Sat.-Sun. 135 S. Main. 528-1010. L, D, X, MRA, and coconut shrimp are among the entrees at this Caribbean-fusion $-$$ restaurant. 2830 N. Germantown Pkwy. (Cordova). 385-8744. L, BOMBAY HOUSE—Indian fare includes lamb korma and D, X, MRA, $-$$ chicken tikka; also, a daily luncheon buffet. 1727 N. Germantown BANGKOK ALLEY—Thai fusion cuisine includes noodle and Pkwy. (Cordova). 755-4114. L, D, X, $-$$ curry dishes, chef-specialty sushi rolls, coconut soup, and duck and seafood entrees. Closed for lunch Sat. and all day Sun. at Brookhaven BONEFISH GRILL—Serves wood-grilled fish,as well as steaks, location; call for hours. 121 Union Ave. 522-2010; 2150 W. Poplar chicken and pork entrees. 1250 N. Germantown Pkwy. (Cordova). at Houston Levee (Collierville). 854-8748; 715 W. Brookhaven 753-2220; 4680 Merchants Park Circle, Carriage Crossing Cl. 590-2585. L, D, X, MRA, $-$$ (Collierville). 854-5822. L (Fri.-Sat.), D, SB, X, MRA, $-$$$ BONNE TERRE—This inn’s cafe features American cuisine with a BAR DKDC—Features an ever-changing menu of international Southern flair, and a seasonal menu that changes monthly. Offers “street food,” from Thai to Mexican, Israeli to Indian, along with specialty cocktails. Closed Sun.-Mon. 964 S. Cooper. 272-0830. D, X, $

CIT Y DINING LIST Angus steaks, duck, pasta, and seafood. Closed Sun.-Wed. 4715 Church Rd. W. (Nesbit, MS). 662-781-5100. D, X, $-$$$ BOOKSELLERS BISTRO—Serves soups, sandwiches, quiche, salads, pasta, and seafood, including shrimp polenta; a specialty is pesto pasta. The Booksellers at Laurelwood, 387 Perkins Extd. 3740881. B, L, D, WB, X, $-$$ BOSCOS—Tennessee’s first craft brewery serves a variety of freshly brewed beers as well as wood-fired oven pizzas, pasta, seafood, steaks, and sandwiches. 2120 Madison. 432-2222. L, D, SB (with live jazz), X, MRA, $-$$ BOUNTY ON BROAD—Offering family-style dining, Bounty serves small plates and family-sized platters, with such specialties as grilled pork loin and stuffed quail. Closed Mon. 2519 Broad. 4108131. D (Tues.-Sat.), SB, X, $-$$ BOZO’S HOT PIT BAR-B-Q—Barbecue, burgers, sandwiches, and subs. 342 Hwy 70, Mason, TN. 901-294-3400. L, D, $-$$ BRASS DOOR IRISH PUB—Irish and New-American cuisine includes such entrees as fish and chips burgers, sandwiches, salads, and daily specials. 152 Madison. 572-1813. L, D, SB, MRA, $ BROADWAY PIZZA—Serving a variety of pizzas,including the Broadway Special, as well as sandwiches, salads, wings, and “soulfood specials.” 2581 Broad. 454-7930; 627 S. Mendenhall. 2071546. L, D, X, $-$$ BROOKLYN BRIDGE ITALIAN RESTAURANT— Specializing in such homemade entrees as spinach lasagna and lobster ravioli; a seafood specialty is horseradish-crusted salmon. Closed Sun. 1779 Kirby Pkwy. 755-7413. D, X, MRA, $-$$$ BROTHER JUNIPER’S—Breakfast is the focus here, with specialty omelets, including the open-faced San Diegan omelet; also daily specials, and homemade breads and pastries. Closed Mon. 3519 Walker. 324-0144. B, X, MRA, $ BRYANT’S BREAKFAST—Three-egg omelets, pancakes, and The Sampler Platter are among the popular entrees here. Closed Tuesday. 3965 Summer. 324-7494. B, L, X, $ BUCKLEY’S FINE FILET GRILL—Specializes in steaks, seafood, and pasta. (Lunchbox serves entree salads, burgers, and more.) 5355 Poplar. 683-4538; 919 S. Yates (Buckley’s Lunchbox), 682-0570. L (Yates only, M-F), D, X, MRA, $-$$ BUNTYN CORNER CAFE—Serving favorites from Buntyn Restaurant, including chicken and dressing, cobbler, and yeast rolls. 5050 Poplar, Suite 107. 424-3286. B, L, X, $ THE BUTCHER SHOP—Serves steaks ranging from 8-oz. fillets to a 20-oz. porterhouse; also chicken, pork chops, fresh seafood. 107 S. Germantown Rd. (Cordova). 757-4244. L (Fri. and Sun.), D, X, MRA, $$-$$$ CAFE 1912—French/American bistro serving such seafood entrees as grouper and steamed mussels: also crepes, salads, and French onion soup, 243 S. Cooper. 722-2700. D, SB, X, MRA, $-$$ CAFE ECLECTIC—Spanish omelets, and chicken and waffles are among menu items, along with sandwiches, wraps, and burgers. 603 N. McLean. 725-1718; 111 Harbor Town Square. 590-4645; 510 S. Highland. 410-0765. B, L, D, SB, X, MRA, $ CAFE KEOUGH—European-style cafe serving quiche, paninis, salads, and more. 12 S. Main. 509-2469. B, L, D, X, $ CAFE OLE—This eatery specializes in authentic Mexican cuisine; one specialty is the build-your-own quesadilla. 959 S. Cooper. 343-0103. L, D, WB, X, MRA, $-$$ CAFE PALLADIO—Serves gourmet salads, soups, sandwiches, and desserts in a tea room inside the antiques shop. Closed Sun. 2169 Central. 278-0129. L, X, $ CAFE PIAZZA BY PAT LUCCHESI—Specializes in gourmet pizzas (including create-your-own), panini sandwiches, and pasta. Closed Sun. 139 S. Rowlett St. (Collierville). 861-1999. L, D, X, $-$$ CAFE PONTOTOC—Serves a variety of internationally inspired small plates, as well as salads and sandwiches. Closed Mon. 314 S. Main. 249-7955. L, D, WB, X, $-$$ CAFE SOCIETY—With Belgian and classic French influences, serves Wagyu beef, chicken, and seafood dishes, including baconwrapped shrimp, along with daily specials and vegetarian entrees. Closed for lunch Sat.-Sun. 212 N. Evergreen. 722-2177. L, D, X, MRA, $$-$$$ CANVAS—An “interactive art bar” serving salads, sandwiches, and flatbreads. 1737 Madison. 619-5303. L, D, $ CAPITAL GRILLE—Known for its dry-aged, hand-carved steaks; among the specialties are bone-in sirloin, and porcini-rubbed Delmonico; also seafood entrees and seasonal lunch plates. Closed for lunch Sat.-Sun. Crescent Center, 6065 Poplar. 683-9291. L, D, X, $$$-$$$$ CAPRICCIO GRILL ITALIAN STEAKHOUSE—Offers prime steaks, fresh seafood (lobster tails, grouper, mahi mahi), pasta, and several northern Italian specialties. 149 Union, The Peabody. 529-4199. B, L, D, SB, X, MRA, $-$$$$ CARRABBA’S ITALIAN GRILL—Serves chicken Bryan, calamari, various pastas, and other “old-world” Italian entrees. 4600 Merchants Park Cl., Carriage Crossing

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CIT Y DINING LIST (Collierville). 854-0200; 5110 Poplar. 685-9900. L (Sat.-Sun.), D, X, $-$$$ CASABLANCA—Lamb shawarma is one of the fresh, homemade specialties served at this Mediterranean/Moroccan restaurant; fish entrees and vegetarian options also available. 1707 Madison. 4216949; 5030 Poplar. 725-8557. L, D, X, MRA, $-$$ CATFISH BLUES—Serving Delta-raised catfish and Cajun- and Southern-inspired dishes, including gumbo and fried green tomatoes. 210 E. Commerce (Hernando). 662-298-3814. L, D, $ CATHERINE & MARY’S—A variety of pastas, grilled quail, pâté, razor clams, and monkfish are among the dishes served at this Italian restaurant in the Chisca. 272 S. Main. 254-8600. D, X, $-$$$ CELTIC CROSSING—Specializes in Irish and American pub fare. Entrees include shepherd’s pie, shrimp and sausage coddle, and fish and chips. 903 S. Cooper. 274-5151. L, D, WB, X, MRA, $-$$ CENTRAL BBQ—Serves ribs, smoked hot wings, pulled pork sandwiches, chicken, turkey, nachos, and portobello sandwiches. Offers both pork and beef barbecue. 2249 Central Ave. 272-9377; 4375 Summer Ave. 767-4672; 147 E. Butler. 672-7760. L, D, X, MRA, $-$$ CHAR—Specializing in modern Southern cuisine, this eatery offers homestyle sides, char-broiled steaks, and fresh seafood. 431 S. Highland, #120. 249-3533. L, D, WB, X, $-$$$ CHEZ PHILIPPE—Classical/contemporary French cuisine presented in a luxurious atmosphere with a seasonal menu focused on local/regional cuisine. Afternoon tea served Wed.-Sat., 1-3 p.m. (reservations required). Closed Sun.-Tues. T he Peabody, 149 Union. 529-4188. D, X, MRA, $$$$ CIAO BABY—Specializing in Neapolitan-style pizza made in a wood-fired oven. Also serves house-made mozzarella, pasta, appetizers, and salads. 890 W. Poplar, Suite 1. 457-7457. L, D, X, $ CIAO BELLA—Among the Italian and Greek specialties are lasagna, seafood pasta, eggplant rolotini, gourmet pizzas, and vegetarian options. Closed for lunch Sat.-Sun. 565 Erin Dr., Erin Way Shopping Center. 205-2500. L, D, X, MRA, $-$$$ CITY GROCERY—Southern eclectic cuisine; shrimp and grits is a specialty. Closed for dinner Sunday. 152 Courthouse Square (Oxford, MS). 662-232-8080. L, D, SB, X, $$-$$$ COLETTA’S—Longtime eatery serves such specialties as homemade ravioli, lasagna, and pizza with barbecue or traditional toppings. 2850 Appling Rd. (Bartlett). 383-1122; 1063 S. Parkway E. 948-7652. L, D, X, MRA, $-$$ CORKY’S—Popular barbecue emporium offers both wet and dry ribs, plus a full menu of other barbecue entrees. Wed. lunch buffets, Cordova and Collierville. 5259 Poplar. 685-9744; 1740 N. Germantown Pkwy. (Cordova). 737-1911; 743 W. Poplar (Collierville). 405-4999; 6434 Goodman Rd., Olive Branch. 662-893-3663. L, D, X, MRA, $-$$ COZY CORNER—Serving up ribs, pork sandwiches, chicken, spaghetti, and more; also homemade banana pudding. Closed Sun.Mon. 745 N. Parkway. 527-9158. L, D, $ THE CRAZY NOODLE—Korean noodle dishes range from bibam beef noodle with cabbage, carrots, and other vegetables, to curry chicken noodle; also rice cakes served in a flavorful sauce. Closed for lunch Sat.-Sun. 2015 Madison. 272-0928. L, D, X, $ CURRY BOWL— Specializes in Southern Indian cuisine, serving Tandoori chicken, biryani, tikka masala, and more. Weekend buffet. 4141 Hacks Cross. 207-6051. L, D, $ DEJAVU—Serves Creole, soul, and vegetarian cuisine, including po-boys, jambalaya, and shrimp and grits. 51 S. Main. 505-0212. L, D, X, MRA, $-$$ DERAE RESTAURANT—Ethiopian and Mediterranean fare includes fuul, or fava beans in spices and yoghurt, goat meat and rice, and garlic chicken over basmati rice with cilantro chutney; also salmon and tilapia. Closed Monday. 923 S. Highland. 552-3992. B, L, D, $-$$ DIRTY CROW INN—Serving elevated bar food, including poutine fries, fried catfish, and the Chicken Debris, a sandwich with smoked chicken, melted cheddar, and gravy. 855 Kentucky. 2075111. L, D, $ DWJ KOREAN BARBECUE—This authentic Korean eatery serves kimbap, barbecued beef short ribs, rice and noodles dishes, and hot pots and stews. 3750 Hacks Cross, Suite 101. 746-8057; 2156 Young. 207-6204. L, D, $-$$ ECCO—Mediterranean-inspired specialties range from rib-eye steak to seared scallops to housemade pastas and a grilled vegetable plate; also a Saturday brunch. Closed Sun.-Mon.  1585 Overton Park. 410-8200. L, D, X, $-$$ EIGHTY3—Contemporary menu of steaks and seafood offers a variety of eclectic specialties; also weekly specials, small plates, appetizers, and patio dining. 83 Madison Ave. 333-1224. B, L, D, WB, X, MRA, $-$$$ EL MEZCAL—Serves burritos, chimichangas, fajitas, and other Mexican cuisine, as well as shrimp dinners and steak. 402 Perkins Extd. 761-7710; 694 N. Germantown Pkwy. (Cordova). 755-1447; 1492 Union. 274-4264; 11615 Airline Rd. (Arlington). 867-1883; 9045 Highway 64 (Lakeland). 383-4219; 7164 Hacks Cross Rd.

LOCALITY GUIDE BARTLETT

Huey’s Spaghetti Warehouse J. Alexander’s Spindini Abuelo’s Jerry Lee Lewis’ Cafe & Honky Tonk The Terrace Applebee’s Jim N Nick’s Bar-B-Q Texas de Brazil Cajun Catfish Company Joe’s Crab Shack Tug’s Coletta’s Logan’s Roadhouse Tuscany Italian Eatery Colton’s Steakhouse Moe’s Southwest Grill Twilight Sky Terrace Dixie Cafe T.J. Mulligan’s Uncle Buck’s Fishbowl & Grill El Porton O’Charley’s Westy’s Exlines’ Best Pizza Olive Garden Firebirds EAST MEMPHIS On the Border Gridley’s Acre Osaka Japanese Hadley’s Pub Andrew Michael Italian Kitchen Outback Steakhouse La Playita Mexicana Asian Palace Pei Wei Asian Diner O’Charley’s Bangkok Alley The Presentation Room Ruby Tuesday Belmont Grill Pyro’s Fire Fresh Pizza Sekisui Blue Plate Cafe Rafferty’s Side Car Cafe Booksellers Bistro Red Lobster Side Porch Steakhouse Broadway Pizza Romano’s Macaroni Grill Tops Bar-B-Q Brookhaven Pub & Grill Sekisui Buckley’s Fine Filet Grill CHICKASAW GARDENS/ Shogun Buntyn Corner Cafe UNIV. OF MEMPHIS Skimo’s Carrabba’s Italian Grill Another Broken Egg Cafe Tannoor Grill Casablanca A-Tan DOWNTOWN Central B B Q Brother Juniper’s Agave Maria Chili’s Camy’s Aldo’s Pizza Pies Ciao Bella Char Alfred’s City East Cheffie’s The Arcade Corky’s Derae Automatic Slim’s Dixie Cafe El Porton Bangkok Alley El Mezcal The Farmer Bardog Tavern El Porton La Baguette B.B. King’s Blues Club Fino’s from the Hill Los Compadres Bedrock Eats & Sweets Folk’s Folly Lost Pizza Belle — A Southern Bistro Fox & Hound Medallion Bleu Fratelli’s Newby’s Blind Bear Speakeasy The Grove Grill Osaka Japanese Blue Monkey Half Shell Pete & Sam’s Bluefin Hog & Hominy Rock’n Dough Pizza Blues City Cafe Houston’s R.P. Tracks Brass Door Irish Pub Huey’s Woman’s Exchange Cafe Eclectic Interim COLLIERVILLE/WEST Cafe Keough Erling Jensen TN. Cafe Pontotoc Jim’s Place (ARLINGTON, COVINGTON, Capriccio The Kitchen Bistro MILLINGTON, OAKLAND) Catherine & Mary’s Las Delicias Bangkok Alley Central BBQ Lisa’s Lunchbox Bonefish Grill Chez Philippe LYFE Kitchen Bozo’s Hot Pit Bar-B-Q City Market Lynchburg Legends Cafe Piazza Cozy Corner Marciano Cajun Catfish Company DeJaVu Mayuri Indian Cuisine Carrabba’s Italian Grill Dirty Crow Inn Dan McGuinness Pub Chili’s Double J Smokehouse & Saloon Mellow Mushroom Ciao Baby Earnestine & Hazel’s Memphis Pizza Cafe Corky’s Eighty3 Mempops Crepe Maker Felicia Suzanne’s Mortimer’s El Mezcal Ferraro’s Pizzeria Mosa Asian Bistro El Porton Five Spot Napa Cafe Emerald Thai Flight Neil’s Firebirds Flying Fish New Hunan Ronnie Grisanti’s Italian Flying Saucer Old Venice Restaurant T.G.I. Friday’s One & Only BBQ Gus’s Fried Chicken Green Beetle Park + Cherry Hickory Tavern Gus’s Patrick’s Huey’s Happy Mexican Porcellino’s Craft Butcher Jim’s Place Grille Hard Rock Cafe Rafferty’s Manila Filipino Havana’s Pilon Sekisui Pacific Rim Mulan Huey’s Soul Fish Cafe Osaka Japanese Itta Bena Staks Memphis Pizza Cafe King’s Palace Cafe Taziki’s Mediterranean Cafe Pig-N-Whistle Kooky Canuck Three Little Pigs The Sear Shack Little Tea Shop Wasabi Sekisui Local Whole Foods Market Silver Caboose Loflin Yard Zaka Bowl Stix Lookout at the Pyramid GERMANTOWN Vinegar Jim’s LYFE Kitchen Belmont Grill Wolf River Cafe Maciel’s Tortas & Tacos The Cheesecake Factory Max’s Sports Bar Chili’s CORDOVA McEwen’s on Monroe City East Bahama Breeze The Majestic El Porton Bombay House Memphis Lighthouse Exlines’ Best Pizza Bonefish Grill Mesquite Chop House Germantown Comm. Butcher Shop Mollie Fontaine Lounge Mellow Mushroom Cheddar’s The Office@Uptown Memphis Pizza Cafe Chili’s Onix Mesquite Chop House Corky’s Oshi Burger Bar New Asia Crazy Italians Paulette’s The Pasta Maker East End Grill Pearl’s Oyster House Petra Cafe El Mezcal Pig on Beale Rock’n Dough Pizza El Porton Ray’z World Famous Dr. BarRoyal Panda T.G.I. Friday’s B-Que Russo’s New York Pizzeria & Flying Saucer Rendezvous, Charles Vergos’ Wine Bar Fox Ridge Pizza Rizzo’s Diner Sakura Green Bamboo Rum Boogie Cafe Soul Fish Cafe Gus’s Silky O’Sullivan’s Stoney River Steakhouse and Happy Mexican South of Beale Grill Hunan Palace South Main Sushi & Grill West Street Diner

MEDICAL CENTER The Cupboard Evelyn & Olive Sabor Caribe Sabrosura Tops Bar-B-Q Trolley Stop Market

MIDTOWN

Abyssinia Alchemy Aldo’s Pizza Pies Alex’s Applebee’s Babalu Tacos and Tapas Bar DKDC Bar Louie Bar-B-Q Shop Bari Barksdale Restaurant Bayou Bar & Grill Beauty Shop Belly Acres Bhan Thai Blue Nile Ethiopian Boscos Bounty on Broad Broadway Pizza House Cafe 1912 Cafe Eclectic Cafe Ole Cafe Palladio Cafe Society Canvas Celtic Crossing Central B B Q The Cove Cozy Corner The Crazy Noodle The Cupboard Dino’s DWJ Korean Barbecue Ecco El Mezcal Fino’s from the Hill Frida’s Fuel Cafe Golden India HM Dessert Lounge Huey’s I Love Juice Bar Imagine Vegan Cafe India Palace Jasmine Thai Java Cabana Lafayette’s Music Room Little Italy Local Mardi Gras Memphis Maximo’s on Broad Memphis Pizza Cafe Midtown Crossing Grille Molly’s La Casita Mulan Chinese Bistro Murphy’s Old Zinnie’s Otherlands Outback Steakhouse P & H Cafe Pei Wei Asian Diner Pho Binh Pho Saigon Restaurant Iris Robata Ramen & Yakitori Bar Schweinehaus The Second Line Sekisui Side Street Grill The Slider Inn Soul Fish Cafe Stone Soup Strano Sicilian Kitchen Sweet Grass Tart Tsunami Young Avenue Deli

NORTH MISSISSIPPI Ajax Diner Applebee’s Blue and White Bonne Terre Catfish Blues Chili’s City Grocery Colton’s Steakhouse Como Steakhouse Corky’s

Fox & Hound Huey’s Lee’s Family Restaurant Logan’s Roadhouse Lost Pizza McEwen’s Dan McGuinness Pub Memphis Barbecue Company Memphis Pizza Cafe Mesquite Chop House Nagoya O’Charley’s Olive Garden Osaka Japanese Cuisine Outback Steakhouse Ravine

PARKWAY VILLAGE/ FOX MEADOWS Blue Shoe Bar & Grill Leonard’s Jack Pirtle’s Chicken Three Little Pigs Bar-B-Q

POPLAR/I-240

Amerigo Benihana Blue Plate Cafe Brooklyn Bridge Capital Grille, The P.F. Chang’s Chipotle Exlines’ Best Pizza Fleming’s Frank Grisanti’s Happy Mexican Heritage Tavern & Kitchen Julles Posh Food Co. Mister B’s Olive Garden One & Only BBQ Owen Brennan’s Pyro’s Fire-Fresh Pizza Red Koi River Oaks Ruth’s Chris Salsa Seasons 52 Sekisui Wang’s Mandarin House

RALEIGH

Exline’s Best Pizza

SOUTH MEMPHIS Coletta’s The Four Way Interstate Bar-B-Q Jack Pirtle’s Chicken

SUMMER/BERCLAIR Bryant’s The Cottage Elwood’s Shack High Point Pizza La Taqueria Guadalupana Lotus Nagasaki Inn Orr Restaurant Pancho’s Panda Garden Queen of Sheba Tops Bar-B-Q

WEST MEMPHIS/ EASTERN ARK.

The Cupboard Pancho’s Sammy Hagar’s Red Rocker Bar & Grill

WHITEHAVEN Hong Kong Marlowe’s

WINCHESTER

Curry Bowl DWJ Korean Barbecue East End Grill Formosa Half Shell Happy Mexican Huey’s Logan’s Roadhouse Olive Garden Red Lobster Ruby Tuesday T.G.I. Friday’s Tops Bar-B-Q Tycoon

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CIT Y DINING LIST COFFEEHOUSES/BOOKSTORE CAFES

In addition to gourmet coffees and drinks, these eateries generally serve pastries, sandwiches, soups, and salads, and some have a wider range of menu items. AVENUE COFFEE—786 Echles. 454-3348. BARNES & NOBLE BOOKSELLERS— 2774 N. Germantown Pkwy. 386-2468; 4610 Merchants Park Cl., #521 (Collierville). 853-3264. BELLA CAFFE—Pink Palace Museum, 3050 Central. 3206320; 50 N. Front, #200. 466-6455. BLUFF CITY COFFEE—505 S. Main. 405-4399. THE BOOKSELLERS AT LAURELWOOD— 387 Perkins Extd. 683-9801. CARITAS VILLAGE COFFEE SHOP— 2509 Harvard. 327-5246. CITY AND STATE—2625 Broad. 249-2406. JAVA CABANA—2170 Young. 272-7210. (Olive Branch). 662-890-3337; 8834 Hwy. 51 N. (Millington). 872-3220; 7424 Highway 64 (Bartlett). 417-6026; 9947 Wolf River (Collierville) 853-7922. L, D, X, $ EL PORTON—Fajitas, quesadillas, and steak ranchero are just a few of the menu items. 2095 Merchants Row (Germantown). 754-4268; 8361 Highway 64. 380-7877; 3448 Poplar, Poplar Plaza. 452-7330; 1805 N. Germantown Parkway (Cordova). 624-9358; 1016 W. Poplar (Collierville). 854-5770. L, D, X, MRA, $-$$ EMERALD THAI RESTAURANT—Spicy shrimp, pad khing, lemon grass chicken, and several noodle, rice, and vegetarian dishes are offered at this family restaurant. Closed Sunday.  8950 Highway 64 (Lakeland). 384-0540. L, D X, $-$$ ERLING JENSEN—Presents “globally inspired” cuisine: specialties are rack of lamb, big game entrees,and fresh fish dishes. 1044 S. Yates. 763-3700. D, X, MRA, $$-$$$ EVELYN & OLIVE—Jamaican/Southern fusion cuisine includes such dishes as Kingston stew fish, Rasta Pasta, and jerk rib-eye. Closed for lunch Sat. and all day Sun.-Mon. 630 Madison. 7485422. L, D, X, $ EXLINES’ BEST PIZZA—Serves pizza, Italian dinners, sandwiches, and salads.  2935 Austin Peay. 388-4711; 6250 Stage Rd. (Bartlett). 382-3433; 2801 Kirby Parkway. 754-0202; 7730 Wolf River Blvd. (Germantown). 753-4545; 531 W. Stateline Rd. 662-342-4544 (check online for additional locations). L, D, X, MRA, $ THE FARMER—Serving upscale Southern cuisine, with a focus on locally grown ingredients. Among the specialties are smoked beef tenderloin and shrimp and grits. Closed for dinner Sun.-Mon. 3092 Poplar #11. 324-2221. L, D, X, $-$$ FELICIA SUZANNE’S—Southern cuisine with low-country, Creole, and Delta influences, using regional fresh seafood, local beef, and locally grown foods. Entrees include shrimp and grits. Closed Sun. and Mon. Brinkley Plaza, 80 Monroe, Suite L1. 523-0877. L (Fri. only), D, X, MRA, $$-$$$ FERRARO’S PIZZERIA & PUB—Rigatoni and tortellini are among the pasta entrees here, along with pizzas (whole or by the slice), with a variety of toppings. 111 Jackson. 522-2033. L, D, X, $ FIREBIRDS—Specialties are hand-cut steaks, slow-roasted prime rib, and wood-grilled salmon and other seafood, as well as seasonal entrees. 8470 Highway 64 (Bartlett). 379-1300; 4600 Merchants Circle, Carriage Crossing (Collierville). 850-1637. L, D, X, $-$$$ THE FIVE SPOT—Tucked behind Earnestine & Hazel’s, this popular eatery features innovative bar food by chef Kelly English.  531 S. Main. 523-9754. D, X, $-$$ FLEMING’S PRIME STEAKHOUSE—Serves wet-aged and dry-aged steaks, prime beef, chops, and seafood, including salmon, Australian lobster tails, and a catch of the day. 6245 Poplar. 7616200. D, X, MRA, $$$-$$$$ FLIGHT RESTAURANT & WINE BAR—Serves steaks and seafood, along with such specialties as pork ribeye and roasted duck, all matched with appropriate wines; also gourmet plate lunches. Closed for lunch Sat.-Sun. 39 S. Main. 521-8005. L, D, X, MRA, $-$$$ FLYING FISH—Serves up fried and grilled versions of shrimp, crab, oysters, fish tacos, and catfish; also chicken and burgers. 105 S. Second. 522-8228. L, D, X, MRA, $-$$ FOLK’S FOLLY ORIGINAL PRIME STEAK HOUSE— Specializes in prime steaks, as well as lobster, grilled Scottish salmon, Alaskan king crab legs, rack of lamb, and weekly specials. 551 S. Mendenhall. 762-8200. D, X, MRA, $$$-$$$$ FORMOSA—Offers Mandarin cuisine, including broccoli beef, hot-and-sour soup, and spring rolls. Closed Monday. 6685 Quince. 753-9898. L, D, X, $-$$ THE FOUR WAY—Legendary soul-food establishment dishing up such entrees as fried and baked catfish, chicken, and turkey and

MUDDY’S GRIND HOUSE—585 S. Cooper. 683-8844. OTHERLANDS—641 S. Cooper. 278-4994. MRA. QAHWA COFFEE BAR—Claridge House, 109 N. Main. 800-2227. SQUARE BEANS ESPRESSO + GELATO— 103 N. Center St. (Collierville). 854-8855. STARBUCKS—1850 Union Ave. 729-4288; 3388 Poplar. 320-1021; 5201 Poplar. 818-9954; 2955 Kirby Whitten (Bartlett), 266-2497; 180 Goodman Rd. E. (Southaven). 662-349-0342; 8140 Goodman Rd. (Olive Branch). 662-890-9507. For more listings, check online. SWEET CAKE SHOP—45 S. Main (upstairs from Maciel’s Tacos & Tortas). 526-0037. TAMP & TAP—122 Gayoso. 207-1053; 6070 Poplar, Suite 110. 421-5336. THE UGLY MUG—4610 Poplar. 552-3165. dressing, along with a host of vegetables and desserts. Closed Monday.  998 Mississippi Blvd. 507-1519. L, D (call to check hours.), $ FOX RIDGE PIZZA—Pizzas, calzones, subs, burgers, and meatand-two plate lunches are among the dishes served at this eatery. 1769 N. Germantown Pkwy. 758-6500. L, D, X, $ FRATELLI’S—Serves hot and cold sandwiches, salads, soups, and desserts, all with an Italian/Mediterranean flair. Closed Sunday.  750 Cherry Rd., Memphis Botanic Garden. 766-9900. L, X, $ FRIDA’S—Mexican cuisine and Tex-Mex standards, including chimichangas, enchiladas, and fajitas; seafood includes shrimp and tilapia.  1718 Madison. 244-6196. L, D, X, $-$$ FUEL CAFE—Focus is on natural dishes with such specialties as bison burgers, quinoa chili, and tacos; also vegan and gluten-free options. Closed Sun.-Mon. 1761 Madison. 725-9025. L, D, X, $-$$ GERMANTOWN COMMISSARY—Serves barbecue sandwiches, sliders, ribs, shrimp, and nachos, as well as smoked barbecued bologna sandwiches; Mon.-night all-you-can-eat ribs. 2290 S. Germantown Rd. S. (Germantown). 754-5540. L, D, X, MRA, $-$$ GOLDEN INDIA—Northern Indian specialties include tandoori chicken as well as lamb, beef, shrimp, and vegetarian dishes. 2097 Madison. 728-5111. L, D, X, $-$$ GREEN BAMBOO—Pineapple tilapia, pork vermicelli, and the soft egg noodle combo are Vietnamese specialties here.  990 N. Germantown Parkway, #104 (Cordova). 753-5488. L, D, $-$$ GRIDLEY’S—Offers barbecued ribs, shrimp, pork plate, chicken, and hot tamales; also daily lunch specials. Closed Tues. 6842 Stage Rd. (Bartlett). 377-8055. L, D, X, $-$$ FRANK GRISANTI’S ITALIAN RESTAURANT— Northern Italian favorites include pasta with jumbo shrimp and mushrooms; also seafood, fillet mignon, and daily lunch specials. Closed for lunch Sunday. Embassy Suites Hotel, 1022 S. Shady Grove. 761-9462. L, D, X, MRA, $-$$$ RONNIE GRISANTI’S ITALIAN RESTAURANT—This Memphis institution serves some family classics such as Elfo’s Special and chicken ravioli, along with lighter fare and changing daily chef selection. Closed Sun.  Sheffield Antiques Mall, 684 W. Poplar (Collierville). 850-0191. L (Mon.-Sat.), D (Thurs.-Sat.), X, $-$$$ THE GROVE GRILL—Offers steaks, chops, seafood, and other American cuisine with Southern and global influences; entrees include crab cakes, and shrimp and grits, also dinner specials. 4550 Poplar. 818-9951. L, D, SB, X, MRA, $$-$$$ GUS’S WORLD FAMOUS FRIED CHICKEN—Serves chicken with signature spicy batter, along with homemade beans, slaw, and pies. 310 S. Front. 527-4877; 215 S. Center St. (Collierville). 853-6005; 2965 N. Germantown Pkwy. (Cordova). 373-9111; 730 S. Mendenhall. 767-2323; 505 Highway 70 W., Mason, TN. 901-294-2028. L, D, X, MRA, $ HALF SHELL—Specializes in seafood, such as King crab legs; also serves steaks, chicken, pastas, salads, sandwiches, a ”voodoo menu”; oyster bar at Winchester location. 688 S. Mendenhall. 682-3966; 7825 Winchester. 737-6755. L, D, WB, X, MRA, $-$$$ HAPPY MEXICAN—Serves quesadillas, burritos, chimichangas, vegetable and seafood dishes, and more. 385 S. Second. 529-9991; 6080 Primacy Pkwy. 683-0000; 7935 Winchester. 751-5353. L, D, X, $ HAVANA’S PILON—Tiny eatery serving Cuban cuisine, including fried plantains in a pilon topped with shrimp, ropa vieja (shredded beef in tomato sauce), roasted pork, and a Cuban sandwich. Closed Sunday.  143 Madison. 527-2878; 3135 KirbyWhitten, Suite 108 (Bartlett). 512-6359. L, D, X, $ HERITAGE TAVERN & KITCHEN—Featuring classic cuisine from the country’s five regions, including lobster rolls, fried chicken, smoked tamales, Green Goddess shrimp, and more.  6150 Poplar, Regalia. 761-8855.L, D, WB, X, $-$$$

DELI DISH

Serving sandwiches and salads, burgers and bagels, wings and chicken, these are popular spots. BOGIE’S—715 S. Mendenhall. 761-5846. MRA; 2098 LaSalle Place. 272-0022. MRA; 80 Monroe. 525-6764; 2028 W. Poplar (Collierville). 854-8555.Cheffie’s—483 High Point Terrace. 3430488. CAMY’S—2886 Walnut Grove. 725-1667. MRA. CHEFFIE’S—483 High Point Terrace. 343-0488. MRA. CHING’S HOT WINGS—1264 Getwell. 743-5545. CITY EAST BAGEL & GRILLE—6698 Poplar at Kirby. 754-2660. CITY MARKET—66 S. Main. 729-6152. CORDELIA’S TABLE—737 Harbor Bend Rd. 526-4772. FINO’S FROM THE HILL—1853 Madison. 272-3466; 703 W. Brookhaven Cir. 334-4454. MRA. HOLIDAY HAM—2087 Union. 881-6433; 585 Erin Dr. 7634499; 7652 Poplar (Germantown). 869-6650; 3750 Hacks Cross Rd., #112. 624-4848. MRA. JASON’S DELI—1213 Ridgeway. 685-3333; 1585 Chickering (Cordova). 844-1840; 3473 Poplar. 324-3181. KWIK CHEK—2013 Madison. 274-9293. LENNY’S SUB SHOP—2893 Poplar. 320-0022; 7424 Stage Rd. 937-0800; 22 N. Front. 543-9230; 521 S. Highland. 454-7077; 2095 Exeter, Suite 30 (Germantown). 755-0750; 4970 Raleigh-LaGrange. 371-9979; 1016 W. Poplar (Collierville). 8548299; 4726 Spottswood. 202-4800; 4740 Showcase. 368-4215; 8950 Hwy. 64 (Lakeland). 12 S. Cooper. 276-5775; 6300 Poplar, #111. 761-2403. MRA. LETTUCE EAT SALAD COMPANY—6641 Poplar, Suite 106 (Germantown), 552-5604. LUCCHESI’S BEER GARDEN—84 S. Reese. 452-3002. LUCCHESI’S RAVIOLI—540 S. Mendenhall, #3. 7669922. MRA. LUNCHBOX EATS—288 S. Fourth. 526-0820. MCALISTER’S DELI—3482 Plaza Ave. 452-6009; 7990 Trinity Rd. (Cordova). 737-7282; 7710 Poplar (Germantown). 753-1507; 975 580 S. Mendenhall. 763-2711; 3855 Hacks Cross. 881-6068; 6600 Stage Rd. (Bartlett). 213-3311. 9091 Poplar (Germantown) 756-5292. MRA. NEWK’S EATERY—3680 S. Houston Levee (Collierville). 861-1221; 2200 Germantown Pkwy. (Cordova). 377-8796; 5336 Poplar. 820-0415. PANERA BREAD—714 N. Germantown Pkwy. (Cordova). 754-5813; 4530 Poplar. 767-3116; 5865 Poplar, Ridgeway Trace. 683-9384; 7850 Poplar. 759-1439; 7501 Goodman Rd. (Olive Branch). 662-890-1985. MRA. PARADISE CAFE—6150 Poplar, Suite 120. 821-9600. JACK PIRTLE’S FRIED CHICKEN—3571 Lamar. 7941254; 2520 Mt. Moriah. 565-0203. MRA. RAFFE’S DELI—3358 Poplar. 458-5110. SCHLOTZSKY’S DELI—4758 Poplar. 763-0741. UNCLE LOU’S FRIED CHICKEN—3633 Millbranch. 332-2367. MRA. WHOLE FOODS MARKET—5014 Poplar. 685-2293. YOUNG AVENUE DELI—2119 Young. 278-0034. HIGH POINT PIZZA—Serves variety of pizzas, subs, salads, and sides. Closed Monday.  477 High Point Terrace. 452-3339. L, D, X, $-$$ HM DESSERT LOUNGE—Serving cake, pie, and other desserts, as well as a selection of savory dishes, including meatloaf and mashed potato “cupcakes.” Closed Sunday and Monday. 1586 Madison. 290-2099. L, D, X, $ HOG & HOMINY—The casual sister to Andrew Michael Italian Kitchen serves brick-oven-baked pizzas, including the Red-Eye with pork belly, and small plates with everything from meatballs to beef and cheddar hot dogs; and local veggies. Closed for lunch Mon. 707 W. Brookhaven Cl. 207-7396. L, D, SB, X, $-$$$ HONG KONG—Cantonese and Mandarin standards are sweetand-sour chicken, and pepper beef. Closed Sunday. 3966 Elvis Presley. 396-0801. L, D, X, $ HOUSTON’S—Serves steaks, seafood, pork chops, chicken dishes, sandwiches, salads, and Chicago-style spinach dip.  5000 Poplar. 683-0915. L, D, X $-$$$  I LOVE JUICE BAR—Serving an extensive line of juices and grab-and-go lunch items. 553 S. Cooper. 612-2720. L, D, X, $ IMAGINE VEGAN CAFE—Dishes range from salads and sandwiches to full dinners, breakfast items served all day. 2299 Young. 654-3455. L, D, SB, X, $ INDIA PALACE—Tandoori chicken, lamb shish kabobs, chicken tikka masala are among the entrees; also, vegetarian options and a daily lunch buffet. 1720 Poplar. 278-1199. L, D, X, $-$$ N O V E M B E R 2 0 1 6 • M E M P H I S M A G A Z I N E . C O M • 91

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CIT Y DINING LIST

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INTERIM—Offers American-seasonal cuisine with emphasis on local foods and fresh fish; macaroni and cheese is a house specialty. Closed for lunch Sat. 5040 Sanderlin, Suite 105. 818-0821. L, D, SB, X, MRA, $-$$$ INTERSTATE BAR-B-Q—Specialties include chopped porkshoulder sandwiches, ribs, hot wings, spaghetti, chicken, and turkey. 2265 S. Third. 775-2304; 150 W. Stateline Rd. (Southaven). 662-393-5699. L, D, X, MRA, $-$$ ITTA BENA—Southern and Cajun-American cuisine served here; specialties are filet Oscar and shrimp and grits, along with steaks, chops, seafood, and pasta. 145 Beale St. 578-3031. D,X, MRA, $$-$$$ JASMINE THAI AND VEGETARIAN RESTAURANT—Entrees include panang chicken, green curry shrimp,and pad thai (noodles, shrimp, and peanuts); also vegetarian dishes. Closed Mon.-Tues. 916 S. Cooper. 725-0223. L, D, X, $ JIM ’N NICK’S BAR-B-Q—Serves barbecued pork, ribs, chicken, brisket, and fish, along with other homemade Southern specialties. 2359 N. Germantown Pkwy. 388-0998. L, D, X, $-$$ JIM’S PLACE/JIM’S PLACE GRILLE—Features American, Greek, and Continental cuisine with such entrees as pork tenderloin, several seafood specialties, and hand-cut charcoal-grilled steaks. Closed for lunch Sat. and all day Sun. 518 Perkins Extd. 766-2030; 3660 Houston Levee (Collierville). 861-5000. L, D, X, MRA, $-$$$ JOE’S CRAB SHACK—Serves a variety of seafood, along with chicken, steak, and pasta. 7990 Horizon Center Blvd. 384-7478. L, D, X, $-$$$ JULLES POSH FOOD CO.—The changing menu features seasonal “cooking light” dishes such as salmon-shrimp cakes with green salad and roasted sweet potato wedges; also cold-pressed juices, to-go dishes, and desserts. 6300 Poplar. 509-8675. B, L, D, X, $-$$ THE KITCHEN BISTRO—Tomato soup, grilled fish, sticky toffee pudding, and dishes made using in-season fruits and veggies are served at this establishment at Shelby Farms Park. 415 Great View Drive E., Suite 101. 729-9009. L, D, X, $-$$ KOOKY CANUCK—Offers prime rib, catfish, and burgers, including the 4-lb. “Kookamonga”; also late-night menu. 97 S. Second. 578-9800; 1250 N. Germantown Pkwy. 1-8002453 L, D, X, MRA, $-$$$ LA BAGUETTE—An almond croissant and chicken salad are among specialties at this French-style bistro. Closed for dinner Sun. 3088 Poplar. 458-0900. B, L, D (closes at 7), X, MRA, $ LA PLAYITA MEXICANA—Specializes in seafood and Mexican entrees, including red snapper, tilapia, oysters, chimichangas, tostadas, and taco salad. 6194 Macon (Bartlett). 377-2282. L, D, X, $-$$ LA TAQUERIA GUADALUPANA—Fajitas and quesadillas are just a few of the authentic Mexican entrees offered here. 4818 Summer. 685-6857; 5848 Winchester. 365-4992. L, D, $ LAFAYETTE’S MUSIC ROOM—Serves such Southern cuisine as po boys and shrimp and grits, and wood-fired pizzas; also live music. 2119 Madison. 207-5097. L, D, WB, X, MRA, $-$$ LAS DELICIAS—Popular for its guacamole, house-made tortilla chips, and margaritas, this restaurant draws diners with its chicken enchiladas, meat-stuffed flautas, and Cuban torta with spicy pork. Closed Sunday. 4002 Park Ave. 458-9264; 5689 Quince. 8002873. L, D, X, $ LAS TORTUGAS DELI MEXICANA—Authentic Mexican food prepared from local food sources; specializes in tortugas — grilled bread scooped out to hold such fillings as brisket, pork, and shrimp; also tingas tostados and such sides as steamed corn. Closed Sunday. 1215 S. Germantown Rd. 751-1200. L, D, X, $-$$ LEONARD’S—Serves wet and dry ribs, barbecue sandwiches, spaghetti, catfish, homemade onion rings. and lemon icebox pie; also a lunch buffet. 5465 Fox Plaza. 360-1963. L, X, MRA, $-$$ LISA’S LUNCHBOX—Serving bagels, sandwiches, salads, and wraps. 5030 Poplar, 761-4044; 5885 Ridgeway Center Pkwy., Suite 101. 767-6465; 2659 Thousand Oaks Blvd., Suite 1200; 2525 Central (Children’s Museum). B, L, $ LITTLE ITALY—Serving New York-style pizza as well as subs and pasta dishes. 1495 Union. 725-0280, L, D, X, $-$$ THE LITTLE TEA SHOP—Downtown institution serves up Southern comfort cooking, including meatloaf and such veggies as turnip greens, yams, okra, and tomatoes. Closed Sat.-Sun. 69 Monroe. 525-6000, L, X, $ LOCAL GASTROPUB—Entrees with a focus on locally grown products include lobster mac-and-cheese and pork osso bucco. 95 S. Main. 473-9573; 2126 Madison. 725-1845. L, D, WB, X, MRA, $-$$ LOFLIN YARD—Beer garden and barbecue restaurant with barbecue and vegetarian fare cooked on a custom-made grill. 7 W. Carolina. 249-3046. L (Sat. and Sun.), D, $-$$ THE LOOKOUT AT THE PYRAMID—Serves Southern fare, including catfish tacos and crawfish tails. 1 Bass Pro Dr. 6204600/291-8200. L, D, X $-$$$

T UNICA TA BLES CHICAGO STEAKHOUSE AT THE GOLDSTRIKE—1010 Casino Center Dr., Robinsonville, MS, 1-888-24KSTAY /662-357-1225. FAIRBANKS AT THE HOLLYWOOD—1150 Casino Strip Blvd., Robinsonville, MS, 1-800-871-0711 JACK BINION’S STEAK HOUSE AT HORSESHOE—1021 Casino Center Drive, Robinsonville, MS, 1-800-303-SHOE. LUCKY 8 ASIAN BISTRO AT HORSESHOE—1021 Casino Center Drive, Robinsonville, MS, 1-800-303-SHOE. THE STEAKHOUSE AT THE FITZ —711 Lucky Ln., Robinsonville, MS, 1-888-766-LUCK, ext 8213. LOS COMPADRES—Serves enchiladas, burritos, tamales, tacos, and vegetarian dishes; also Cuban entrees. 3295 Poplar. 458-5731. L, D, X, $-$$ LOST PIZZA—Offering pizzas (with dough made from scratch), pasta, salads, sandwiches, tamales, and more. 2855 Poplar. 5721803; 5960 Getwell, Southaven. 662-892-8684. L, D, X, $-$$ LOTUS—Authentic Vietnamese-Asian fare, including lemon-grass chicken and shrimp, egg rolls, Pho soup, and spicy Vietnamese vermicelli. 4970 Summer. 682-1151. D, X, $ LYFE KITCHEN—Serving healthy, affordable wraps, bowls, sandwiches, and more; entrees include roasted salmon and “unfried” chicken. 6201 Poplar. 684-5333; 272 S. Main. 526-0254. B, L, D, WB, X, $ LYNCHBURG LEGENDS—This restaurant with a Jack Daniels’ theme and Southern cuisine serves such entrees as Bourbon Street salmon, buttermilk-fried chicken, and grilled steak and wild mushroom salad. DoubleTree Hotel, 5069 Sanderlin. 969-7777. B, L, D, X, MRA, $- $$$ MACIEL’S TORTAS & TACOS—Entrees include tortas, hefty Mexican sandwiches filled with choice of chicken, pork, or steak. Also serving fried taco plates, quesadillas, chorizo and pastor soft tacos, salads, and more. Closed Sun. 45 S. Main. 526-0037. L, D, X, $ THE MAJESTIC GRILLE—Housed in a former silent-picture house, features aged steaks, fresh seafood, and such specialties as roasted chicken and grilled pork tenderloin; offers a pre-theatre menu and classic cocktails. 145 S. Main. 522-8555. L, D, WB, X, MRA, $-$$$ MANILA FILIPINO RESTAURANT—Entrees include pork belly cutlet with lechon sauce, and shrimp and vegetables in tamarind broth; also daily combos, rice dishes, and chef specials. 7849 Rockford (Millington). 209-8525. L, D, X, $ MARCIANO MEDITERRANEAN AND ITALIAN CUISINE—Rack of lamb with roasted potatoes and demi-glace is among the entrees; also steaks, seafood, and gourmet pizza. 780 Brookhaven Cl. 682-1660. D, X, $-$$ MARDI GRAS MEMPHIS—Serving Cajun fare, including an etouffee-stuffed po’boy. 496 Watkins. 530-6767. L, D, X, $-$$ MARLOWE’S—In addition to its signature barbecue and ribs, Marlowe’s serves Southern-style steaks, chops, lasagne, and more. 4381 Elvis Presley Blvd. 332-4159. D, X, MRA, $-$$ MAXIMO’S ON BROAD—Serving a tapas menu that features creative fusion cuisine. Closed Mon. and Tues. 2617 Broad Ave. 452-1111. L, D, SB, X, $-$$ MAYURI INDIAN CUISINE—Serves tandoori chicken, masala dosa, tikka masala, as well as lamb and shrimp entrees; also a daily lunch buffet, and dinner buffet on Fri.-Sat. 6524 Quince Rd. 753-8755. L, D, X, $-$$ MCEWEN’S ON MONROE—Southern/American cuisine with international flavors; specialties include steak and seafood, sweet potato-crusted catfish with macaroni and cheese, and more. Closed Sun., Monroe location. 120 Monroe. 527-7085; 1110 Van Buren (Oxford). 662-234-7003. L, D, SB (Oxford only), X, MRA, $$-$$$ DAN MCGUINNESS PUB—Serves fish and chips, shepherd’s pie, burgers, and other Irish and American fare; also lunch and dinner specials. 4694 Spottswood. 761-3711; 3964 Goodman Rd. 662890-7611. L, D, X, $ MEDALLION—Offers steaks, seafood, chicken, and pasta entrees. Closed for dinner Sunday. 3700 Central, Holiday Inn (Kemmons Wilson School of Hospitality). 678-1030. B, L, D, SB, X, MRA, $-$$$ MELLOW MUSHROOM—Large menu includes assortment of pizzas, salads, calzones, hoagies, vegetarian options, and 50 beers on tap. 9155 Poplar, Shops of Forest Hill (Germantown). 907-0243; 5138 Park Ave. 562-1211. L, D, X, $-$$ MEMPHIS BARBECUE COMPANY—Offers spare ribs, baby backs, and pulled pork and brisket, along with such sides as mac and cheese, grits, and red beans. 709 Desoto Cove (Horn Lake, MS). 662-536-3762. L, D, X, $-$$

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CIT Y DINING LIST MEMPHIS LIGHTHOUSE—Chicken and waffles, shrimp and grits, and oxtails are among the dishes served at this soul food/Cajun restaurant in Court Square. Closed Sat. and Sun.  60 N. Main. 3105711. L, D, X, $-$$ MEMPHIS PIZZA CAFE—Homemade pizzas are specialties; also serves sandwiches, calzones, and salads. 2087 Madison. 7265343; 5061 Park Ave. 684-1306; 7604 W. Farmington (Germantown). 753-2218; 797 W. Poplar (Collierville). 861-7800; 5627 Getwell (Southaven). 662-536-1364. L, D, X, MRA, $-$$ MEMPOPS—Specializes in handcrafted popsicles. Cream and fruit pop flavors include Mexican Chocolate and Hibiscus Lemonade; menu changes. 1243 Ridgeway. 421-5985. L, D, X, $ MESQUITE CHOP HOUSE—The focus here is on steaks, including prime fillet, rib eyes, and prime-aged New York strip; also, some seafood options. 5960 Getwell (Southaven). 662-890-2467; 88 Union. 527-5337; 3165 Forest Hill-Irene (Germantown). 249-5661. D, SB (Germantown), X, $$-$$$ MISTER B’S—Features New Orleans-style seafood and steaks. Closed for lunch Sat. and all day Sun. and Mon. 6655 Poplar, #107. 751-5262. L, D, X, MRA, $-$$$ MOLLIE FONTAINE LOUNGE—Specializes in tapas (small plates) featuring global cuisine. Closed Sun.-Tues. 679 Adams Ave. 524-1886. D, X, $ MOLLY’S LA CASITA—Homemade tamales, fish tacos, a vegetarian combo, and bacon-wrapped shrimp are a few of the specialties. 2006 Madison. 726-1873. L, D, X, MRA, $-$$ MORTIMER’S—Contemporary American entrees include trout almondine, several chicken dishes, and hand-cut steaks; also sandwiches, salads, and daily/nightly specials. Closed for lunch Sat.Sun. 590 N. Perkins. 761-9321. L, D, X, $-$$ MOSA ASIAN BISTRO—Specialties include sesame chicken, Thai calamari, rainbow panang curry with grouper fish, and other Pan Asian/fusion entrees.  850 S. White Station Rd. 683-8889. L, D, X, MRA, $ MULAN—Hunan Chicken, tofu dishes, and orange beef served here; some sushi, too. 2059 Houston Levee (Collierville). 8505288; 2149 Young. 347-3965. L, D, X, $-$$ NAGASAKI INN—Chicken, steak, and lobster are among the main courses; meal is cooked at your table. 3951 Summer. 4540320. D, X, $$ NAGOYA—Offers traditional Japanese cuisine and sushi bar; specialties are teriyaki and tempura dishes. 7075 Malco Blvd., Suite 101 (Southaven). 662-349-8788. L, D, X, $-$$$
 NAM KING—Offers luncheon and dinner buffets, dim sum, and such specialties as fried dumplings, pepper steak, and orange chicken.  4594 Yale. 373-4411. L, D, X, $
 NAPA CAFE—Among the specialties is miso-marinated salmon over black rice with garlic spinach and shiitake mushrooms. Closed for lunch Sat. and all day Sun. 5101 Sanderlin, Suite 122. 683-0441. L, D, X, MRA, $$-$$$ NEW ASIA—Specializing in authentic Chinese food, including roast Peking duck. 2075 Exeter, Suite 90. 758-8388. L, D, X, $ NEW HUNAN—Chinese eatery with more than 80 entrees;also lunch/dinner buffets. 5052 Park. 766-1622. L, D, X, $ THE OFFICE@UPTOWN—Offering sandwiches, wraps, pizza, soups, salads, and several vegetarian options. Closed Sunday. 594 N. Second St. 522-1905. B, L, D, X, $ OLD VENICE PIZZA CO.—Specializes in “eclectic Italian,” from pastas, including the “Godfather,” to hand-tossed pizzas, including the “John Wayne”; choose from 60 toppings. 368 Perkins Ext. 767-6872. L, D, SB, X, MRA, $-$$ ON THE BORDER—Dishes out such Tex-Mex specialties as fajitas and Southwest chicken tacos; also fresh grilled seafood specials. 8101 Giacosa Pl. (Cordova).881-0808; 6572 Airways (Southaven). 662655-4750. L, D, WB, X, MRA, $ ONE & ONLY BBQ—On the menu are pork barbecue sandwiches, platters, wet and dry ribs, smoked chicken and turkey platters, a smoked meat salad, barbecue quesadillas, and more. 1779 Kirby Pkwy. 751-3615; 567 Perkins Extd. 249-4227. L, D, X, MRA, $ ONIX RESTAURANT—Serves American seafood and pasta dishes. Closed for lunch Sat., all day Sun., and for dinner Mon. 412 S. Main. 552-4609. L, D, X, $-$$ ORR RESTAURANT—Serves Mediterranean/African cuisine, such as lamb Kowzi flavored with raisins and roasted nuts and served with white bean soup. 6 61 N. Mendenhall, Suite 101. 275-8692. L, D, X, $-$$ OSAKA JAPANESE CUISINE—Featuring an extensive sushi menu as well as traditional Japanese and hibachi dining. Hours vary for lunch; call.  3670 Houston Levee (Collierville). 861-4309; 3402 Poplar. 249-4690; 7164 Hacks Cross. 662-890-9312; 2200 N. Germantown Pkwy. 425-4901. L, D, X, $-$$$   OWEN BRENNAN’S—New Orleans-style menu of beef, chicken, pasta, and seafood; jambalaya, shrimp and grits, and crawfish etouffee are specialties. Closed for dinner Sunday. The Regalia, 6150 Poplar. 761-0990. L, D, SB, X, MRA, $-$$$ PANCHO’S—Serves up a variety of Mexican standards, including tacos, enchiladas, and mix-and-match platters; also lunch

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THE RULES

CATEGORIES

1 The voting period is 12:01am Tuesday, November 1st, through 11:59pm Wednesday, November 30th.

2 Your ballot must have at least 50 percent of the categories completed to be counted. Write-ins encouraged.

3 One ballot per reader, please. We reserve the right to discard any ballot we deem fraudulent.

Best Pizza (non-fast food) Best Mexican Best Italian Best Mediterranean Best Chinese Best Japanese Best Indian Best Vietnamese Best Thai Best Food Truck Best Cajun/Creole Best Small Plates Best Deli Best Burger (non-fast food) Best Steak Best Seafood (non-fast food) Best Oysters

Best Barbecue Sandwich Best Barbecue Ribs Best Fried Chicken Best Brunch Best Breakfast Best Coffeehouse (non-chain) Best Dessert Best People-Watching Worth the Drive Best Late-Night Dining (after 10 p.m.) Best Patio Dining Best Place to Impress Out-of-Towners Best Ambience Restaurant We Miss The Most

Best Chain Restaurant Best Memphis Chef Best New Restaurant (must have opened since November 2015) Best Restaurant Hippest Bar Setting Best Happy Hour Best Place to Watch The Game Best Dive Bar Best Craft Cocktails Best Wine List Best Beer Selection Best Local Brewery Best Category We Left Out

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CIT Y DINING LIST specials. 3600 E. Broadway (West Memphis). 870-735-6466. 717 N. White Station. 685-5404. L, D, X, MRA, $ PANDA GARDEN—Sesame chicken and broccoli beef are among the Mandarin and Cantonese entrees; also seafood specials and fried rice. Closed for lunch Saturday. 3735 Summer. 323-4819. L, D, X, $-$$ PARK + CHERRY—Partnering with chefs Wally Joe and Andrew Adams of Acre Restaurant, the Dixon offers casual dining within the museum. Menu features sandwiches, like truffled pimento cheese, as well as salads, snacks, and sweets. Closed Monday. 4 339 Park (Dixon Gallery). 761-5250. L, X, $ THE PASTA MAKER—This Italian eatery specializes in artisanal pasta. Entrees include Spaghetti allo scoglio, Penne Boscaiola, and Fusilli Primavera. Gluten-free options available. Restaurant closed Sunday (cooking classes by reservation). 2095 Exeter, Suite 30 (Germantown). 779-3928. L, D, X, $-$$ PAULETTE’S—Presents fine dining with a Continental flair, including such entrees as filet Paulette with butter-pepper cream sauce and popovers with strawberry butter; also changing daily specials. R iver Inn. 50 Harbor Town Square. 260-3300. B, L, D, WB, X, MRA, $-$$$ PEARL’S OYSTER HOUSE—Downtown eatery serving seafood, including oysters, crawfish, and stuffed butterfly shrimp, as well as beef, chicken, and pasta dishes. 299 S. Main. 522-9070. L, D, SB, X, MRA, $-$$$ PEI WEI ASIAN DINER—Serves a variety of Pan-Asian cuisine, including Japanese, Vietnamese, Korean, and Thai. Noodle and rice bowls are specialties; a small plates menu also offered.���1680 Union Ave., #109. 722-3780; 2257 N. Germantown Pkwy. 3821822. L, D, X, $-$$
 PETE & SAM’S—Serving Memphis for 60-plus years; offers steaks, seafood, and traditional Italian dishes, including homemade ravioli, lasagna, and chicken marsala. 3886 Park. 458-0694. D, X, $-$$$ PETRA CAFÉ—Serves Greek, Italian, and Middle Eastern sandwiches, gyros, and entrees. Hours vary; call. 6641 Poplar (Germantown). 754-4440; 9155 Poplar (Germantown). 7555440. L, D, X, $-$$ PF CHANG’S CHINA BISTRO—Specialties are orange peel shrimp, Mongolian beef, and chicken in lettuce wraps; also vegetarian dishes, including spicy eggplant. 1181 Ridgeway Rd., Park Place Centre. 818-3889. L, D, X, MRA, $-$$ PHO BINH—Vietnamese, vegetarian, and Cantonese specialties include lemon tofu and spring rolls. Closed Sunday. 1615 Madison. 276-0006. L, D, $ PHO SAIGON—Vietnamese fare includes beef teriyaki, roasted quail, curry ginger chicken, vegetarian options, and a variety of soups. 2946 Poplar. 458-1644. L, D, $ PIG-N-WHISTLE—Offers pork shoulder sandwiches, wet and dry ribs, catfish, nachos, and stuffed barbecue potatoes.  6084 Kerr-Rosemark Rd. (Millington). 872-2455. L, D, X, $ PORCELLINO’S CRAFT BUTCHER—Small plates, charcuterie selections, specialty steaks, house-made pastries, and innovative teas and coffees are offered at this combination butcher shop and restaurant featuring locally sourced menu items.  711 W. Brookhaven Cl. 762-6656. B, L, D, X $-$$ PRESENTATION ROOM, THE—American bistro run by the students of L’Ecole Culinaire. Menu changes regularly; specialties may include such items as a filet with truffle mushroom ragu. Closed Fri.-Sun. 1 245 N. Germantown Pkwy. (Cordova). 754-7115. L, D, X, MRA, $-$$ PYRO’S FIRE-FRESH PIZZA—Serving gourmet pizzas cooked in an open-fire oven; wide choice of toppings; large local and craft beer selection. 1 199 Ridgeway. 379-8294; 2035 Union Ave. 208-8857; 2286 N. Germantown Pkwy. 207-1198. B, L, D, X, MRA, $ QUEEN OF SHEBA—Featuring Middle Eastern favorites and Yemeni dishes such as lamb haneeth and saltah. 4792 Summer. 207-4174. L, D, $ RAVINE—Serves contemporary Southern cuisine with an emphasis on fresh, locally grown foods and a menu that changes weekly. Closed Mon.-Tues. 5 3 Pea Ridge/County Rd. 321 (Oxford, MS). 662-2344555. D, SB, X, $$-$$$ RAY’Z WORLD FAMOUS DR. BAR-B-QUE—Serves dry-roasted barbecue, pulled or chopped pork, beef brisket, ribs, salads, and more. Closed Mon. 302 S. Main. 527-9026. L, D, X, $ RED KOI—Classic Japanese cuisine offered at this family-run restaurant; hibachi steaks, sushi, seafood, chicken, and vegetables.  5847 Poplar. 767-3456. L, D, X $-$$ RED LOBSTER—Specializes in crab legs, lobster, and shrimp dishes; also pastas, salads, steaks, and chicken. 8161 Highway 64 (Cordova). 387-0056; 6535 Airways (Southaven). 662-536-1960; 7750 Winchester. 759-9045. L, D, X, $-$$ RENDEZVOUS, CHARLES VERGOS’—Menu items include barbecued ribs, cheese plates, skillet shrimp, red beans and rice, and Greek salads. Closed Sun.-Mon. 52 S. Second. 523-2746. L (Fri.-Sat.), D, X, MRA, $-$$

RESTAURANT IRIS—French Creole cuisine includes shrimp and delta-grind grits, and New York strip stuffed with fried oysters and blue cheese. Closed Sun. 2146 Monroe. 590-2828. D, X, MRA, $$-$$$ RIVER OAKS—A French-style bistro serving seafood and steaks, with an emphasis on fresh local ingredients. Closed for lunch Sat. and all day Sun. 5871 Poplar Ave. 683-9305. L, D, X, MRA, $$$ RIVERFRONT BAR & GRILL—Beale Street Landing eatery serves Southern American specialties, including Tom Lee Catfish, and Tennessee Caviar, a fresh veggie salsa of black-eyed peas and cilantro with pimento cheese and toast points; also sausage-cheese appetizer. Closed Monday.  251 Riverside Dr. 524-0817. L, D, X, $ RIZZO’S DINER—Chorizo meatloaf, lobster pronto puff, and brisket are menu items at this upscale diner, Closed for dinner Sun. and all day Mon.  492 S. Main. 304-6985. L, D, WB, X, MRA, $-$$ ROBATA RAMEN & YAKITORI BAR—Serves ramen noodle bowls and Yakitori skewers as well as rice and noodle dishes, and sake.  2116 Madison. 410-8290. D, WB, X, $ ROCK’N DOUGH PIZZA CO.—Specialty and custom pizzas made from fresh ingredients; wide variety of toppings. 3445 Poplar Ave., Ste. 1. 512-6760; 7850 Poplar, #6 (Germantown). 7792008. L, D, SB, X, $$ ROMANO’S MACARONI GRILL—Serves MediterraneanItalian cuisine, including hand-crafted pasta Milano and penne rustica, and create-your-own pasta; also steaks, seafood, and salads.  2859 N. Germantown Pk wy. (Cordova). 266-4565. L, D, X, $-$$ ROYAL PANDA—Hunan fish, Peking duck, Royal Panda chicken and shrimp, and a seafood combo are among the specialties.  3120 Village Shops Dr. (Germantown). 756-9697. L, D, X, $-$$ RUSSO’S NEW YORK PIZZERIA AND WINE BAR— Serves gourmet pizzas, calzones, and pasta, including lasagna, fettuccine Alfredo, scampi, and more. 9087 Poplar, Suite 111. 7550092. L, D, WB, X, MRA, $-$$ RUTH’S CHRIS STEAK HOUSE—Offers prime steaks cut and aged in-house, as well as lamb, chicken, and fresh seafood, including lobster. 6120 Poplar. 761-0055. D, X, MRA, $$$-$$$$ SABOR CARIBE—Serving up “Caribbean flavors” with dishes from Colombia, Venezuela, Puerto Rico, and Cuba. Closed Sunday. 662 Madison. 949-8100. L, D, X, $ SABROSURA—Serves Mexican and Cuban fare, including arroz tapada de pollo and steak Mexican.  782 Washington. 421-8180. B, L, D, X, $-$$ SAKURA—Sushi, tempura, and teriyaki are Japanese specialties here. 2060 West St. (Germantown). 758-8181. 4840 Poplar. 572-1002. L, D, X, $-$$ SALSA—Mexican-Southern California specialties include carnitas, enchiladas verde, and fajitas; also Southwestern seafood dishes such as snapper verde. Closed Sun. Regalia Shopping Center, 6150 Poplar, Suite 129. 683-6325. L, D, X, $-$$ SCHWEINEHAUS—Serving Bavarian-influenced fare with a Southern twist; includes wurst platters, pork schnitzel, sauerbraten, and more; also a wide variety of beers. 2 110 Madison. 347-3060. L, D, X, MRA, $-$$ THE SEAR SHACK BURGERS & FRIES—Serving Angus burgers, fries, and hand-spun milkshakes. Closed Mon. 875 W. Poplar, Suite 6 (Collierville). 861-4100. L, D, X, $ SEASONS 52—This elegant fresh grill and wine bar offers a seasonally changing menu using fresh ingredients, wood-fire grilling, and brick-oven cooking; also a large international wine list and nightly piano bar. Crescent Center, 6085 Poplar. 682-9952. L, D, X, $$-$$$ THE SECOND LINE—Kelly English brings “relaxed Creole cuisine” to his new eatery; serves a variety of po-boys and such specialties as barbecue shrimp, and andouille, shrimp, and pimento cheese fries.  2144 Monroe. 590-2829. L, D, WB, X, $-$$ SEKISUI—Japanese fusion cuisine, fresh sushi bar, grilled meats and seafood, California rolls, and vegetarian entrees. Poplar/Perkins location’s emphasis is on Pacific Rim cuisine. Menu and hours vary at each location. 2 5 Belvedere. 725-0005; 1884 N. Germantown Pkwy. (Cordova). 309-8800; 4724 Poplar (between Perkins & Colonial). 767-7770; 2130 W. Poplar (Collierville). 854-0622; 2990 Kirby-Whitten (Bartlett). 377-2727; 6696 Poplar. 747-0001. L, D, X, MRA, $-$$$ SHOGUN JAPANESE RESTAURANT—Entrees include tempura, teriyaki, and sushi, as well as grilled fish and chicken entrees. 2324 N. Germantown Pkwy. (Cordova). 384-4122. L, D, X, $-$$ SIDE PORCH STEAK HOUSE—In addition to steak, the menu includes chicken, pork chops, and fish entrees; homemade rolls are a specialty. Closed Sun.-Mon. 5689 Stage Rd. (Bartlett). 3772484. D, X, $-$$ SOUTH MAIN SUSHI & GRILL—Serving sushi, nigiri, and more.  520 S. Main. 249-2194. L, D, X, $ SPINDINI—Italian fusion cuisine with such entrees as wood-fired pizzas, gorgonzola stuffed filet, and fresh seafood; pizza specials on Mon.; large domestic whiskey selection.  383 S. Main. 578-2767. D, X, $$-$$$

STAKS— Offering pancakes, including Birthday Cake and lemon ricotta. Menu includes other breakfast items such as beignets and French toast, as well as soups and sandwiches for lunch. 4615 Poplar. 509-2367. B, L, WB, X, $ STIX—Hibachi steakhouse with Asian cuisine features steak, chicken, and a fillet and lobster combination, also sushi. A specialty is Dynamite Chicken with fried rice.  4680 Merchants Park Circle, Avenue Carriage Crossing (Collierville). 854-3399. L, D, X, $-$$ STONE SOUP CAFE—Cooper-Young eatery serving soups, salads, quiche, meat-and-two specials; and daily specials such as Italian roast beef. Closed Monday. 993 S. Cooper. 922-5314. B, L, SB, X, $ STRANO SICILIAN KITCHEN & BAR—Presenting a Sicilian/Mediterranean mix of Arab, Spanish, Greek, and North African fare, Strano serves small plates, wood-grilled fish, and hand-tossed pizzas such as the King Alaska, with salmon and chevre. Closed Mon.  948 S. Cooper. 275-8986. L, D, SB, X, $$-$$$ SWEET GRASS—Low-country coastal cuisine includes such specialties as shrimp and grits. Closed Mon. The restaurant’s “sister,” Sweet Grass Next Door, open nightly, serves lunch Sat.-Sun. 937 S. Cooper. 278-0278. D, SB, X, MRA, $-$$$ TANNOOR GRILL—Brazilian-style steakhouse with skewers served tableside, along with Middle Eastern specialties; vegetarian options also available.  830 N. Germantown Pkwy. 443-5222. L, D, X, $-$$$ TART—Combination patisserie, coffeehouse, and restaurant serving rustic French specialties, including baked eggs in brioche, topped with Gruyere, and french breads and pastries.  820 S. Cooper. 725-0091. B, L, WB, X, $-$$ TERRACE—Creative American and Continental cuisine includes such entrees as filet mignon, beef or lamb sliders, five-spice salmon, and grilled vegetarian eggplant; also small plates. Rooftop, River Inn of Harbor Town, 50 Harbor Town Square. 260-3366. D, X, $$ TEXAS DE BRAZIL—Serves beef, pork, lamb, and chicken dishes, and Brazilian sausage; also a salad bar with extensive toppings. 150 Peabody Place, Suite 103. 526-7600. L (Wed.-Fri.), D, SB, X, $$-$$$ THREE LITTLE PIGS—Pork-shoulder-style barbecue with tangy mild or hot sauce, freshly made coleslaw, and baked beans.  5145 Quince Rd. 685-7094. B, L, D, X, MRA, $ TOPS BAR-B-Q—Specializes in pork barbecue sandwiches and sandwich plates with beans and slaw; also serves ribs, beef brisket, and burgers. 1286 Union. 725-7527. 4183 Summer. 324-4325; 5391 Winchester. 794-7936; 3970 Rhodes. 323-9865; 6130 Macon. 371-0580. For more locations, go online. L, D, X, MRA, $ TROLLEY STOP MARKET—Serves plate lunches/dinners as well as pizzas, salads, and vegan/vegetarian entrees; a specialty is the locally raised beef burger. Also sells fresh produce and goods from local farmers; delivery available. Saturday brunch; closed Sunday.   704 Madison. 526-1361. L, D, X, $ TSUNAMI—Features Pacific Rim cuisine (Asia, Australia, South Pacific, etc.); also a changing “small plate” menu. Specialties include Asian nachos and roasted sea bass. Closed Sunday.  928 S. Cooper. 274-2556. D, X, MRA, $$-$$$ TUSCANY ITALIAN EATERY—Serves classic Italian dishes. Menu includes paninis, deli subs and wraps, pasta, soups, and more. Closed Sunday. 116 S. Front. 626-8848. L, D, X, $ TWILIGHT SKY TERRACE—Offers small plates of tostados, nachos, flatbreads, paninis; also hand-crafted cocktails and sweeping rooftop views of the downtown Memphis skyline. Open, weather permitting.  The Madison Hotel, 79 Madison. 333-1224. L (Sat.Sun.), D, WB.X, $ TYCOON—Among the Asian entrees are spicy garlic shrimp, Thai gumbo, and special house noodle soup. 3307 Kirby Parkway. 362-8788. B, L, D, X, $ UNCLE BUCK’S FISHBOWL & GRILL—Burgers, pizza, fish dishes, sandwiches, and more served in a unique “underwater” setting.  Bass Pro, Bass Pro Drive, 291-8200. L, D, X, $-$$ WANG’S MANDARIN HOUSE—Offers Mandarin, Cantonese, Szechuan, and spicy Hunan entrees, including the goldensesame chicken; next door is East Tapas, serving small plates with an Asian twist.  6065 Park Ave, Park Place Mall. 763-0676. L, D, X, MRA, $-$$ WASABI—Serving traditional Japanese offerings, hibachi, sashimi, and sushi. The Sweet Heart roll, wrapped — in the shape of a heart — with tuna and filled with spicy salmon, yellowtail, and avocado, is a specialty.  5101 Sanderlin Road, Suite 105. 421-6399. L, D, X, $-$$ WEST STREET DINER—This home-style eatery offers breakfast, burgers, po’boys, and more. 2076 West St. (Germantown). 757-2191. B, L, D (Mon.-Fri.), X, MRA, $ WOMAN’S EXCHANGE TEA ROOM—Chicken-salad plate, beef tenderloin, soups-and-sandwiches, and vegetable plates are specialties; meal includes drink and dessert. Closed Sat.Sun. 88 Racine. 327-5681. L, X, $ ZAKA BOWL—This vegan restaurant serves build-your-own vegetable bowls featuring ingredients such as agave Brussels sprouts and roasted beets. 575 Erin. 509-3105. L, D, $ N O V E M B E R 2 0 1 6 • M E M P H I S M A G A Z I N E . C O M • 95

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(In)Decision ’16 American history will take a dramatic turn this month. Which direction?

by frank murtaugh

Y

All politics is local. — tip o’neill

our world changes on November 8th. By that I mean our world, of course. The election of a new American president is always a game-changer, but in this year’s case, it’s become harder and harder to identify what game, exactly, Americans are playing. By the early morning hours of November 9th, we will have elected either this country’s first female president or its first Donald J. Trump. Discussion will turn to how exactly we identify a male “First Lady” or how precise the plans are for a border wall dividing the U.S. from Mexico. Say what you will about the 45th American president, this election will enter the books as one of the most tumultuous in our 240-year history. There’s some irony to the often-twisted nature of the Clinton-Trump, “who-do-you-loathe-less” campaign for the White House. You have to go back more than half a century (1933-61) to find the end of a period as long as our current 24 years when only three men occupied the presidency. You have to go back much further, actually, to find three consecutive twice-elected presidents: Thomas Jefferson, James Madison, and James Monroe (1801-25). As vastly different as Bill Clinton, George W. Bush, and Barack Obama may be, there has been a stability at the top — at least as measured by length of service — unseen for generations. “Stability” will not be a word associated with the

person sworn into office on January 20, 2017. Our 45th president will enter the White House with surely the lowest popularity figures since Abraham Lincoln (who horrified the American South) in 1861. Here’s hoping the emotional and philosophical divide that separated our new commander-in-chief from his/her opponent doesn’t lead to the kind of crisis Lincoln had to address over his four years and one month in office. With the level of vitriol that has followed each candidate for well over a year now, it’s hard to judge how deep, and how severe, the country’s collective wound measures. And our new president’s to-do list? Where to start? To begin with, our judiciary branch remains a man (or woman) short. The Affordable Care Act (will it still be called Obamacare?) is in a difficult place, if not in its actual death throes. Gun violence vies with terrorism to capture the fears and anxieties of Americans (and what is gun violence but a domestic form of terrorism?). The job market is strong, but wages are weak. America has the finest colleges in the world, but they’re too expensive for most who might attend. These worrisome challenges are all here, right at home. Internationally, Clinton or Trump will have to coordinate relationships with European countries splitting in the aftermath of Brexit; a Middle East region unsettled (to say the least) by civil war in Syria; and China. Since I visited in 1994, I’ve considered China the sleeping dragon when it comes to worldwide harmony in the twenty-first century. Well, the dragon is stirring, both economically and militarily. Let’s keep it comfortable. Stable. Where will Memphis land on the new president’s agenda? The cost — in human terms — of substandard primary education is an unyielding weight on the shoulders of our community’s future workforce. A president can lead the conversation on how we might begin to remove that weight. U.S. business relations with China will shape worldwide industries, from manufacturing to energy to transportation. (FedEx is paying attention.) A president can steer this ship toward smooth seas, and the Memphis economy will benefit. Perhaps closest to home, our next president will determine where, when, and how often American troops are deployed in the world’s hot spots, be it Afghanistan (where we’ve fought the longest continuous war in U.S. history), North Korea, Russia, or closer to home. (If we can build a wall on the Mexican border . . . .) Memphis has suffered its share of wartime casualties this century. Here’s hoping our next commander-in-chief reduces such a number as close to zero as possible. History doesn’t wait to be made. But it is malleable, and tends to be shaped by human hands. It can unfold with immediacy or over the course of several presidential terms. Hillary Clinton or Donald Trump will help shape at least the next four years, perhaps in spite of majority opinion across the country in which one of them is elected. Such would be perfectly American, would it not? There’s no obligation to like — or even respect — the American president. We, in fact, can actively loathe the leader of the free world. But he (or she) is entirely ours. We get what we vote for.

PHOTOGRAPH BY PKLIMENKO | DREAMSTIME

LAST STAND

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Let’s Beauty Together Experience the best in makeup, skin care, fragrance, hair, and more. Discover innovative products from exclusive brands, and meet us at the Beauty Studio for a Free Mini Makeover.

The Shops of Saddle Creek

Now Open #BEAUTYTOGETHER

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10/17/16 9:00 AM


“The most beautiful jewelry�

Fall and Holiday Trunk Shows Jude Frances Trunk Show | November 10-11

Holiday Designer Show | November 18-19 with Mattia Cielo, Federica Rettore, Arman Sarkisyan, Sloane Street, Katherine Jetter and Royal India (Meet designer Katherine Jetter Friday, November 18)

Coomi Trunk Show | December 1-2

Federica Rettore

Katherine Jetter

Katherine Jetter

Arman Sarkisyan

Coomi

474 Perkins Extended, Memphis | 2160 Bandywood Drive, Nashville | 3384 Peachtree Road N.E., Atlanta 901-767-2100 615-933-7000 404-364-9900

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10/20/16 2:55 PM


Memphis magazine, November 2016