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09.07.17 1489TH Issue

FREE

PAA KOW P18 Greely Myatt P28

Stanley Bar-B-Que P30 Outflix P34

Tami Sawyer

JUSTIN FOX BURKS

The Battle of Memphis The many plots and subplots — legal (and extra-legal) — to determine the fate of the city�s confederate statues.


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September 7-13, 2017


CARRIE BEASLEY Senior Art Director CHRISTOPHER MYERS Advertising Art Director JEREMIAH MATTHEWS BRYAN ROLLINS Graphic Designers

DESHAUNE MCGHEE Classified Advertising Manager BRENDA FORD Classified Sales Administrator classifieds@memphisflyer.com LYNN SPARAGOWSKI Distribution Manager ROBBIE FRENCH Warehouse and Delivery Manager BRANDY BROWN, JANICE GRISSOM ELLISON, ZACH JOHNSON, KAREN MILAM, RANDY ROTZ, LEWIS TAYLOR, WILLIAM WIDEMAN Distribution THE MEMPHIS FLYER is published weekly by Contemporary Media, Inc., 460 Tennessee Street, Memphis, TN 38103 Phone: (901) 521-9000 Fax: (901) 521-0129 letters@memphisflyer.com www.memphisflyer.com CONTEMPORARY MEDIA, INC. KENNETH NEILL Publisher JENNIFER OSWALT Chief Executive Officer JEFFREY GOLDBERG Director of Business Development BRUCE VANWYNGARDEN Editorial Director MOLLY WILLMOTT Special Projects Director KEVIN LIPE Digital Manager LYNN SPARAGOWSKI Distribution Manager MATTHEW PRESTON Social Media Manager BRITT ERVIN Email Marketing Manager ASHLEY HAEGER Controller CELESTE DIXON Accounting Assistant JOSEPH CAREY IT Director KALENA MCKINNEY Receptionist

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JUSTIN RUSHING Advertising Director CARRIE O’GUIN HOFFMAN Advertising Operations Manager JERRY D. SWIFT Advertising Director Emeritus KELLI DEWITT, CHIP GOOGE Senior Account Executives ALEX KENNER Account Executive ROXY MATTHEWS Sales Assistant

Last week, Hurricane Harvey drowned the city of Houston in more than 50 inches of rain, killing 43 people, destroying 30,000 homes, and leading 233,000 people to file for federal assistaince. This week, Irma, another category 5 hurricane, is gathering strength in the Caribbean and threatens to wreak havoc in Florida and on the east coast. In California, Governor Jerry Brown issued a state of emergency, as the largest wildfire in Los Angeles history burned 6,000 acres, forced hundreds of residents to evacuate, shut down an interstate, and sent massive plumes of smoke into the air for several days. In San Francisco, the temperature reached an all-time record of 106 degrees over the weekend. The polar ice caps are melting. Our glaciers are shrinking. Our winters are getting warmer. These are irrefutable facts. It’s no secret that in the U.S. and all around the world, severe and unusual weather is leading to natural disasters — drought, floods, typhoons, tidal waves — at an unprecedented rate. What used to be categorized as 100- and even 500-year events are happening with alarming frequency. The world is undeniably and measurably warming, and the effects are becoming more apparent with each passing year. Almost without exception, the world’s leading industrialized countries — and most major international and national corporations — are making plans for the future that include adjusting for rising tide levels and increased flooding and other effects of climate change. In the U.S., much of the research on climate change is being done by NASA and the EPA. With his usual exquisite timing, President Trump has decided to name Oklahoma Congressman Jim Bridenstine as the new head of NASA. He would be the first political appointee to head the agency. He has no science background, and he is a climate-change denier. Of course. Over at the EPA, which has been gutted under Trump, employees are no longer allowed to even use the term “climate change” in official documents. What is the endgame here? For the life of me, I can’t figure it out. Why try to delegitimize science? What’s the purpose? Unless it’s to try to dumb down the American public to make them easier to manipulate. Or to make them believe that everything’s “in God’s hands,” so why bother to get educated about anything. Let me tell you a few things about religion: If your spiritual leader is a multi-millionaire who lives in a house bigger than most churches, he is a fraud and a hustler. If your spiritual leader is laying hands on President Trump and telling you that he represents a true manifestation of Christianity, he or she is a fraud and a craven political opportunist. If your spiritual leader has a television show and asks you for money and promises you prosperity if you follow his or her gospel, he or she is a damn crook. And if you send any of these people money, you are a fool. Trump went to Houston twice last week in the wake of Harvey, and his quotes while he was there were striking for their lack of human understanding and empathy. While visiting a shelter where families that had lost everything were staying, Trump told N E WS & O P I N I O N the press that the people he spoke with THE FLY-BY - 4 at the center seemed “happy,” adding, NY TIMES CROSSWORD - 5 “It’s been very nice. It’s been a wonderPOLITICS - 8 ful thing. As tough as this was, it’s been EDITORIAL - 10 a wonderful thing. I think even for the VIEWPOINT - 11 country to watch and for the world to COVER — “THE BATTLE OF watch. It’s been beautiful.” As he exited MEMPHIS” BY FLYER STAFF - 12 the shelter, Trump urged everyone to Visit mifa.org to volunteer. “have a good time.” STE P P I N’ O UT Yes, I’m sure they’re having a great WE RECOMMEND - 16 MUSIC - 18 time. And “beautiful”? Tell that to the AFTER DARK - 20 folks who lost loved ones or everything CALENDAR OF EVENTS - 23 they owned. Of course, beauty, like ART - 28 perceived godliness, is subjective, I FOOD - 30 suppose. And it looks like we’re in for a SPIRITS - 33 lot more “beauty” in coming days. God FILM - 34 help us. C L AS S I F I E D S - 36 Bruce VanWyngarden LAST WORD - 39 brucev@memphisflyer.com

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BRUCE VANWYNGARDEN Editor SUSAN ELLIS Managing Editor JACKSON BAKER, MICHAEL FINGER Senior Editors TOBY SELLS Associate Editor CHRIS MCCOY Film and TV Editor ALEX GREENE Music Editor CHRIS DAVIS, MICHAEL DONAHUE MAYA SMITH, JOSHUA CANNON Staff Writers JESSE DAVIS Copy Editor JULIE RAY Calendar Editor

PEOPLE REAL PEOPLE REAL PEOPLE NEEDS REAL NEEDS REAL NEEDS REAL SOLUTIONS REAL SOLUTIONS REAL SOLUTIONS

Visit mifa.org mifa.org to Visit mifa.org to volunteer. Visit tovolunteer. volunteer.

CONTENTS

OUR 1489TH ISSUE 09.07.17

3


fly-by

f ly on the wall

TN TR I F ECTA The results are inconclusive, but as of press time, your Fly-Team has reason to believe that this social media artifact is what’s known as the Tennessee Trifecta. For those who may have trouble reading the finer print, it’s Tennessee’s porn-busting Senator and gubernatorial hopeful Mae Beavers re-tweeting Sean Hannity, sharing a Charlie Daniels song. Although valueless, the Tennessee Trifectas are prized among Social Media collectors for their Zen-like perfection.

September 7-13, 2017

N OTAB LE Following a backlash that happened when it was announced that the Orpheum Theatre was dropping Gone With the Wind from its summer season, CEO Brett Batterson issued an upsetting statement: “These past five days have been the longest of my life. I hurt as a result of this experience. Our Orpheum team has personally been attacked and threatened to the point there are guards stationed to watch my home and the Orpheum facilities. This is irrational. It is four hours of programming at the Orpheum, out of the 8,760 in a year.” Q U OTAB LE When people ask why Gone With the Wind upsets some folks so much, you can clip the film’s opening quotation right out of Fly on the Wall and hand it to them: “There was a land of cavaliers and cotton fields called the Old South. Here in this pretty world, gallantry took its last bow. Here was the last ever to be seen of knights and their ladies fair, of master and of slave. Look for it only in books, for it is no more than a dream remembered, a civilization gone with the wind …”

4

By Chris Davis. Email him at davis@memphisflyer.com.

{

Edited by Toby Sells

W E E K T H AT W A S By Flyer staff

Harvey, Haslam, & Greensward Harvey “wreaks havoc,” Haslam pushes statue vote, & work started on zoo lot. HARVEY “HAVO C” A depressed Hurricane Harvey swept through Memphis late last week, bringing several inches of rain and pounding winds. Harvey arrived here Thursday afternoon and continued to pour rain and gust wind until early Friday morning. Tornado watches and warnings were issued, and alert sirens sounded all over the county. Drivers faced soggy commutes, many driving through floodwaters, which is not at all advised. (Turn around, people, don’t drown.) Fox13 reporter Jeremey Pierre rescued a woman from her flooded car in South Memphis live on air. However, public works officials inspected and cleared storm drains all over the city before the storm arrive. They also readied storm equipment and personnel to respond to storm-related emergencies. Memphis Light, Gas & Water (MLGW) CEO Jerry Collins said the storm “wreaked havoc” here, knocking down trees and power lines. By the time Harvey passed, MLGW said 40,000 customers were affected by the storm. As of Friday morning, 15,000 customers were still without power, but Collins predicted power would be fully restored by Sunday night. HAS LAM U R G ES FO R R EST VOTE In a letter issued last Monday, Tennessee Gov. Bill Haslam urged members of the Tennessee Historical Commission to act on Memphis’ request to remove the statue of Nathan Bedford Forrest from Health Sciences Park during the board’s next meeting in October. The 23-member commission has sole authority for the statue’s removal thanks to 2015’s Tennessee Heritage Protection Act, which was passed quickly by state lawmakers to prevent cities like Memphis from removing certain monuments. Haslam, who was once Knoxville’s mayor, said he supports “the principle of local governments deciding what to place on their own properties,” but knew state laws give the decision to the commission, of which he’s a voting board member. But he “strongly encouraged” the commission to act. “A refusal to act on the petition in October will only prolong the issue and result in criticism of both the

COURTESY: FOX 13

THE

Questions, Answers + Attitude

established process and the commission itself, as this process can work effectively only if the responsible entities act in a timely manner,” Haslam said. The commission is set to meet on October 13th in the East Tennessee city of Athens. Z O O LOT D ES I G N WO R K B EG I N S Designers will soon study the area around the Memphis Zoo parking lot to begin sketching out a plan for a new lot there that is promised to end parking on the Overton Park Greensward. The city said last week that employees of Powers Hill Design, the firm chosen to design the new lot, will soon “conduct initial reconnaissance (survey, tree survey, geotech, etc.) of the project site. Powers Hill will come up with three designs and present them first to the Advisory Team, which includes officials from the mayor’s office, project funders, community representatives, and representatives of key park anchors like the zoo and Overton Park. That team will share information throughout the process with the public and ensure public feedback is included throughout. After the designs are presented to that team, they’ll be posted online for public review and feedback. After that input is included in the design, Powers Hill will present a concept plan to the Advisory Group and to the public.


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45 Med. school subject 18 Got stuck in a rut 46 Maker of Mashed 20 Time before Potato Bites dinner for socializing 48 Colorado winter hrs. 22 Santaland worker 23 Where clouds are 50 Massage 24 Venerable 53 Ohio’s nickname London theater 57 Certain 28 Hero war pilots Hollywood stars … or an apt title 31 Source of most for this puzzle of Google’s revenue 60 Companion ship for the Niña and 32 2004 event for Santa Maria Google, for short 33 Polygraphs

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H J A A O P R H E H A N D A C H R H E A I N C A L R E F L Y I E E T W S B A E R E G R H E R R O B I

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CITY REPORTER B y To b y S e l l s Beale Street Music Festival

Locals, tourists invest in good times here.

Working for the weekend makes it easy to spend that hard-earned dollar, and that money stacks up here during Memphis in May, at arts events, and from all those tourists walking on Beale. Three organizations measured those stacks of cash recently, and their findings show Memphis is still a leisure-time powerhouse. Memphis in May, for example, said last week that, from open to close, the festival dropped about $111.9 million on the Memphis economy. That was about 22 percent more money than the 2016 festival, which produced about $88 million in economic impact. “It is widely recognized that the Memphis in May International Festival plays an important part in the culture of our city, but this study is a reminder of the significant positive economic impact it has on the hospitality and tourism industries, and on the tax coffers of Memphis and the surrounding areas,” said Kristen Wright, 2018 Memphis in May board chair and senior vice president and general counsel of AutoZone. Beale Street Music Festival was the biggest moneymaker this year. After its nearly 89,000 visitors arrived, partied, and left, the city was about $55.7 million richer, according to the study by Younger Associates. The World Championship Barbecue Cooking Contest came in second, bringing in just under 64,000 people who made a $37.7 million economic impact here. 901 Fest and the Great American River Run fol-

lowed. For 12 months straddling 2015 and 2016, more than $197 million were spent on the arts in Shelby County. This figure is a combination of the money audiences spent ($79.1 million) going to shows like the theater or art openings and the money ($118.1 million) arts organizations spent on programs. The figures were announced here last week and were part of the national Arts and Economic Prosperity V (AEP5) study by Americans for the Arts. In Tennessee, the study was overseen by the Tennessee Arts Commission. For West Tennessee, it was managed by ArtsMemphis. “This is a great example of what we mean when we talk about powering authentic assets in our community,” Elizabeth Rouse, ArtsMemphis president and CEO, said in a statement. “The arts really are an authentic asset — not only for our quality of life, but for our economy.” In Tennessee, the arts are a $1.2 billion industry, according to the study. That industry supported 38,482 jobs in that 2015 through 2016 time frame and sent $135 million to state and local coffers. In Shelby County, the arts created 6,138 jobs from groups as varied as the Beethoven Club to Beale Street

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As might be expected in a county that, despite its ostensible Democratic majority, consistently elects Republicans in local partisan races, the 2018 Shelby County mayor’s race is developing faster on the GOP side than on the Democratic one. Among Republicans, Shelby County Commissioner Terry Roland announced for mayor more than a year ago, Juvenile Court Clerk Joy Touliatos announced week before last, and County Trustee David Lenoir reports he will definitely be announcing for the office this month. (Lenoir also pointedly notes that there is no basis for recent rumors suggesting that he is interested in seeking the state Senate seat of Mark Norris, recently nominated for a federal judgeship.) No Democrat has yet made a formal announcement, though former commissioner and interim state Senator Sidney Chism has made it clear privately that he will run. County Commissioner Melvin Burgess has made broad hints that he would like to, and state Senator Lee Harris and former county Commissioner Steve Mulroy, both of whom are University of Memphis law school professors, are still in the flip-a-coin stage of deciding which one of them will run. (Mulroy was a candidate in the Democratic primary four years ago.) Democrats would seem to have some reason to be more optimistic about the race for sheriff after last week’s annoucement, before a huge and diverse crowd at the Racquet Club, by current Chief Deputy Floyd Bonner, an African American who, in the course of 37 years, has worked himself up from a jailor’s job. Bonner was introduced and endorsed by the current Sheriff, Bill Oldham (elected eight years ago as a Republican). Said Oldham: “I’m going to do something that my predecessor [then sheriff, now county Mayor Mark Luttrell] didn’t do for me. I’m going to fully endorse Floyd Bonner.” Though other candidates, Democratic and Republican, are expected to announce, Bonner is the clear favorite on his side. The Republican most likely to succeed is Dale Lane, the county’s current director of the Office of Preparedness. When local Republicans gathered two weeks ago at the Great Hall in Germantown for the Master Meal Banquet (sponsored annually by the East Shelby Republican Club), it was in the immedi-

ate wake of U.S. Senator Bob Corker’s much-publicized questioning of President Trump’s “stability” and “competence,” but, publicly at least, the local GOP gentry still seem inclined, left-handedly or otherwise, to toe the line of loyalty. State GOP chairman Scott Golden said this from the dais: “When Donald Trump was elected president, we knew that the media wasn’t going to cut him any slack. … Do not be sidetracked by the news of the day … because at the end of the day, Hillary Clinton is not president. And remember: The worst Republican on any given day is better than the best Democrat.” Eighth District U.S. Representative David Kustoff, in his turn as a follow-up speaker, was even more upfront in his support of the president. Denouncing what he said was nonstop “fake news,” Kustoff said, “You can’t get any other news. I am proud to stand behind this president. I am proud to stand behind Donald Trump.”

As might be expected, the 2018 Shelby County mayor’s race is developing faster on the GOP’s side than on the Democratic one. One of the revealing features of the annual banquet comes early on, when the M.C. of the event —in this year’s case, Golden — calls the roll of public officials present. It is always a revelation of sorts to be reminded just how numerous the GOP contingent is in Shelby County officialdom, and the process is prolonged further by the inclusion of nonpartisan attendees (judges, for instance), who feel obliged to show their flag at the event. Candidates in ongoing races get their names called, too. One of the intriguing GOP primary matchups for next year that surfaced at the event was that for county clerk between longtime party factotum Arnold Weiner and former Democratic mainstay Danny Kail, who at present is CAO at the Criminal Court clerk’s office. In a way suggestive of musical chairs, Wayne Mashburn the current county clerk, reportedly intends to run for register, while current Register Tom Leatherwood will be seeking the office of Circuit Court clerk to succeed Jimmy Moore, who will not be running for reelection. The move-alongs of Mashburn and Leatherwood are prompted by the termlimits provisions of the county charter.


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“Calling, Courage and Commitment in a Decade of Disease: The Martyrs of Memphis,” with Molly Crosby, author of The American Plague, 10 am Martyrs Hall

NEWS & OPINION

Letters & Music, 7 pm, St. Mary’s Episcopal Cathedral, reception following

9


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In fairness to the president, he was up against a Tuesday legal deadline of sorts promulgated by 10 states threatening to double down on legal action to end DACA. And, to be sure, Trump had campaigned last year on a pledge to terminate DACA (as well as every other Obama initiative he could think of). But, as recently as last week, in the course of one of his Texas photo ops, the president proclaimed, “We love the Dreamers,” giving rise to hopes that he might take another course of action. Not so. As is so often the case, Memphis’ Democratic congressman Steve Cohen has aptly summed up the moment: “President Trump’s decision to end the DACA program is heartless, illogical, and un-American. DACA is a common-sense, compassionate program that helps protect from deportation young people who were brought to the United States by no choice of their own. According to the Center for American Progress, 95 percent of these DREAMers are currently either working or in school. The decision is not only harmful for the DREAMers, but also for America which relies on them for a more effective and productive workforce. I urge Congress to move quickly to protect these bright and talented young people who have significantly contributed to what makes America great.” We agree. Congress should proceed at once to pass the Dream Act or some equivalent thereof. The benefits would accrue not just to the Dreamers but to the much-vaunted American Dream itself.

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threats against both the United States and staunch American ally South Korea, the president chose to unjustly accuse the South Koreans, who are in the Pyongyang regime’s direct line of fire, of “appeasement,” and to browbeat them for what he said was their unfair trade deal with the U.S. Then there was Hurricane Harvey, the monster hurricane that savaged Texas, causing billions of dollars in damages, destroying countless thousands of homes, and dislocating the lives of the state’s citizens. If there was a high side to this catastrophe, it was the visible coming together of the people of Texas, across all class and ethnic lines, in heroic efforts to confront the emergency. It was a time when human fellow-feeling was the order of the day. Not, evidently, for the current inhabitant of the White House, who, despite two showy visits to Texas, to suggest his concern, has once again flunked the test of compassion in his callous decision this week to phase out the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals program (DACA), a 2012 initiative by President Barack Obama that has granted work permits to nearly 800,000 young people, the children of undocumented immigrants. Huge numbers of these “Dreamers” (a term deriving from  the Development, Relief, and Education for Alien Minors Act, proposed — and still pending — legislation that would accomplish the same goals as DACA) were caught up in Harvey’s depredations, both as victims and as rescue workers.

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V I E W P O I N T B y E d We a t h e r s

Battling Big Pharma Ten ways to lower American drug costs.

Americans pay, by far, the highest prices for necessary prescription drugs in the world. 8) Set prices based on the effectiveness of drugs. Compel drug companies to reveal, more transparently than they do now, just how well their drugs work compared to their cheaper competitors. 9) Control the “orphan drug” designation more tightly. An orphan drug is a drug used by very few patients. To get a pharmaceutical company to make and sell the drug, the government gives it a monopoly on the drug, and then allows it to charge whatever it wants — sometimes thousands of times what the drug costs to make. Many Big Pharma companies have found ways — too complex to go into here — to earn the “orphan” designation by skirting regulations. 10) Stop issuing patent monopolies on essential drugs, and have the government determine those drug prices. This has worked in other developed countries, but it won’t soon happen here — too many Big Pharma lobbyists. No sense tilting at windmills, so better to focus on items 1 through 9. Ed Weathers is a former editor of Memphis magazine, now retired from the faculty of Virginia Tech. He lives in Blacksburg, Virginia. Read about Ed’s personal battle with Big Pharma in the September 2017 issue of Memphis or at www.memphismagazine.com.

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Canada. Canadian drugs are just as safe as drugs made and sold in the U.S., and they are cheaper. But current Food and Drug Administration (FDA) rules, sometimes written by Big Pharma lobbyists, put big obstacles in the way of importing Canadian drugs. 5) Let more drugs be sold over the counter. In other countries, safe, wellresearched drugs like statins and birthcontrol pills are sold over the counter, thereby eliminating the prescriber and pharmacy middlemen for many drugs. 6) Give automatic approval to drugs approved by the European Medicines Agency (EMA). Like Canadian drugs, these are as safe as FDA-approved drugs. The EMA’s approval process is at least at tough as that of the FDA, and the drugs are far cheaper, in most cases, than their American equivalents. 7) End direct-to-consumer advertising of prescription drugs. These are those TV ads you see during the nightly news. They often encourage the public to buy more expensive drugs than they need.

NEWS & OPINION

Fifty-five percent of Americans take at least one prescription medication. Americans spend more than $325 billion per year on prescription drugs. We pay, by far, the highest prices for necessary prescription drugs in the world. We spend 50 percent more per capita on drugs than, say, Canada and Germany, and two to six times as much for specialty pharmaceuticals such as cancer and diabetes drugs. The pharmaceutical industry wants to keep it that way. That’s why today it has 1,100 lobbyists in Washington, D.C. In the 2016 elections, it spent $58 million to support the campaigns of congressional and presidential candidates. This year, it will spend about $300 million on congressional lobbying. No wonder Congress is, shall we say, a bit shy about passing legislation that might lower the profits of U.S. drug companies. But if Congress did want to lower drug prices, here are 10 things it could do. Some of these proposals are conservative (fewer drug regulations), some liberal (more government involvement in pricing). Nearly all are supported by a majority of voters in both parties: 1) Let Medicare negotiate drug prices. Nearly a third of all prescription-drug spending in the U.S. is done by Medicare, meaning it could have tremendous leverage to lower drug prices. Yet Medicare is, by law, forbidden from negotiating with pharmaceutical companies over the prices of the drugs it pays for. If Medicare negotiates, drug prices will drop. 2) Give generics a fighting chance. In theory, when the patent on a brand-name drug lapses, similarly effective, similarly designed generic drugs can enter the market to provide price competition. But FDA rules place huge obstacles in the way of creating generics; approval of a generic can take many years and cost millions of dollars. And Big Pharma often games the system: For example, a Big Pharma company can make a small, medically meaningless tweak in a patentexpired drug and then claim it is a “new” drug that is not duplicated by generics. Big brand-name companies are also known to pay smaller generic companies to keep their generics off the market, thereby avoiding generic competition. 3) Make drug companies justify their pricing. Require drug makers to be transparent about their manufacturing, research, development, advertising, and lobbying costs, and about how much profit is built into the price of each drug. Profiteering companies would be publicly shamed into moderating costs. 4) Allow drugs to be imported from

11

8/17/17 2:27 PM


COVER STORY BY FLYER STAFF / PHOTOGRAPH BY JUSTIN FOX BURKS

The statue of Jefferson Davis in a downtown park (left); Tami Sawyer, #takeemdown organizer and activist

The Battle of Memphis

The many plots and subplots — legal (and extra-legal) — to determine the fate of the city’s confederate statues.

September 7-13, 2017

Next month, the Tennessee Historical Commission, a group of 28 people from all over the state, most of them white, will tell Memphians whether or not they can remove a huge statue of Nathan Bedford Forrest, a man who was once Grand Wizard of the Ku Klux Klan and made a fortune trading slaves, from a public place in this majority African-American city. After Dylann Roof, a self-confessed white supremacist, shot and killed nine African-American churchgoers in Charleston, South Carolina, in 2015, Memphis leaders rushed to remove the statue. But state lawmakers tightened rules on the removal of such monuments, requiring a super-majority approval of the Tennessee Historical Commission (THC) instead of a simple majority vote. Allan Wade, the Memphis City Council’s attorney, and others continued to work on the issue. 12 Then came the tiki-torch-bearing white supremacists to Charlottesville, Virginia,

in August. By the time the Unite the Right rally weekend was over, dozens of counterprotestors were injured and one woman, Heather Heyer, was murdered as James Alex Fields, a Nazi-loving 20 year old from Ohio, rammed his Dodge Challenger into the crowd. In Memphis, hundreds gathered in protest around the Forrest statue and the Jefferson Davis statue downtown. They demanded immediate action, but Mayor Jim Strickland, who has also called for the statues’ removal, said his administration would follow the rule of law on the matter. That means waiting on the October vote of THC members, who voted Friday to leave a bust of Forrest in the Tennessee State Capitol building. But even if the commission denies the city the right to remove the statue, city leaders have been working on other plans. What follows is a look at how we got here — and where we might be headed. — Toby Sells

“THE RIGHT THING”

As this Flyer goes to press, the Memphis City Council is set to vote on resolutions to remove or board up the city’s two confederate statues. Council Chairman Berlin Boyd says council members are “united and [have] unequivocally expressed the will of a vast majority of the citizenry that these reminders of hatred and bigotry have no place in our community. “We renamed Confederate, Jefferson Davis, and Nathan Bedford Forrest Parks over four years ago, and we have been trying for two years to do the right thing for this community by removing these two statues,” Boyd continues. “The only thing standing in our way has been the people who have created obstacles that have prevented us from exercising what is in the best interest of our citizens.” The resolutions are based on four concepts presented to the council’s executive committee in late August by

council attorney Wade. Of the options, Wade says the first — immediately removing the statues, followed by destruction or storage — would be the most “drastic” and by law requires a waiver from the THC. But Wade says this action could be taken if the statues are declared a “public nuisance,” similar to the case made for the confederate statues in New Orleans. Citing a provision of the Civil Rights Act, Wade says an additional argument could be made that the existence of the statues in public parks is discriminatory and prevents African Americans from fully enjoying those public spaces. But, Wade says, this is not an action the city should pursue without first alerting the state’s attorney general. “I don’t think we should just go and yank them down tomorrow without some due process occurring,” he says. The second option he presented is the sale of the monuments at an auction or


SMOOTH AGITATOR

Tami Sawyer’s smart as hell, and she’s not going to take it anymore. “But what about the black guys?” The question sounds awkward when asked like that, but smoother variations appear in practically every online argument against the removal of Memphis’ public memorials to Nathan Bedford Forrest and Jefferson Davis. Memphis Mayor W.W. Herenton didn’t remove the offending monuments when he was in office eight years ago, and he’s black. His successor, A C Wharton, didn’t

take them down either, and he’s black, too. So, why is a diverse group of activists, led by #takeemdown organizer Sawyer, being so hard on the white guy in the mayor’s office who says he’s doing everything he can within the framework of the law to remove Forrest and Davis from undeserved places of honor in public memory? For starters, Sawyer — an uncommonly cool-headed firebrand — doesn’t buy Mayor Strickland’s narrative. “The law is unjust,” she states, flatly criticizing a Tennessee ordinance preventing the removal of confederate statues in Tennessee. “No other statues in the state have that kind of protection.” Sawyer recognizes earlier, failed attempts to remove Forrest and Davis, but says, “we’re trying to do this now.” She’s got no issues with criticizing Herenton and Wharton “when we’re talking about the historic achievements of our former mayors.” But, she says, it has “nothing to do with right now. It has no bearing on what the current

confederate memorials is as good a place to start as any. “If we can’t even get these statues down, how are we going to get something done about the big issues?” she says. “The conversations we have are about how black people, poor white people, and brown people are uneducated and reckless. They don’t care about their kids and have too much sex, so they have too many kids. And they’re killing each other and stealing from each other, and they don’t care about anything. We don’t talk about what it means to spend more money on cops than education or to build more prisons than schools.” Sawyer doesn’t think statue removal is merely symbolic. “You’re in a 65-percent black city with [a statue of] the Grand Wizard, or whatever big man [Forrest] was in the early days of the Ku Klux Klan,” she says. “I can tell you all the stories about what [he] said or did, but the bottom line is, [Forrest and Davis] felt they were superior to black people and their treatment of black people was odious

administration chooses to do.” Sawyer is a Memphis native, a St. Mary’s grad, and the director of diversity and cultural competence for Teach for America. She jumped into activism with Black Lives Matter three years ago, and into politics in 2016, when she gave House District 90 incumbent John DeBerry a run for his money. Steeped in history and cultural literacy, Sawyer’s activism, like her campaign, was born of frustration. “I guess it makes sense,” says Sawyer, who practically grew up backstage at the National Civil Rights Museum, where her father once served as chief financial officer. “Martin Luther King died here, and it feels like a lot of hope and a lot of gumption died here, too. We’re really stuck on history, not progress, and I think that’s what makes me sad.” “There’s a lot of old white money making a lot of decisions in a majorityblack city, and there’s no such thing as old black money,” Sawyer continues. That’s a situation she wants to change, and she believes removal of the

Crowds gathered in Health Sciences park to advocate for the removal of the statue of Nathan Bedford Forrest. at best. I can’t think, outside of Native Americans, of another group of people that are told to just take it.” When asked why she’s not satisfied with the mayor’s plan to work inside the law, Sawyer cites city council attorney Wade, who’s on record as saying the state law exists to ensure no confederate statue in Tennessee will ever be removed. “[Stricklend] could have let us cover the statue,” Sawyer says, recalling a recent protest and fishing for some evidence of good faith. “Instead [he] sent [his] soldiers in, like we were on a battlefield.” Sawyer’s activism comes at a cost to her and her family. “My parents always know where I am,” she says, describing an informal check-in ritual the Sawyers adopted when things got weird. “To get a text from your child saying, ‘Hey here’s my new number because I was woken up this morning by white supremacist

on my cell phone.’ That’s tough.” “It creates stress in the family,” Sawyer admits. “They’re supportive, but it’s hard not to sometimes say, ‘Oh, I wish you’d just have a seat.’” What keeps her going? Last June, a student from Memphis’ Grad Academy discussed the monument in Health Sciences Park. “All my life, I’ve passed that statue,” she [the student] said. “And all my life, I thought that must be somebody important.” That, Sawyer says, cannot stand. “No, it doesn’t oppress you everyday,” she says, “but any time it comes into your awareness, it’s like, that’s awful. And it’s in my city.” — Chris Davis (For the full Q&A with Tami Sawyer visit memphisflyer.com.)

THE SAGA OF MEMPHISʼ FORREST STATUE

All things considered, it’s a wonder that it’s taken this long for a truly serious effort to be launched to remove the Nathan Bedford Forrest statue from a prominent downtown park. There are few things more apt to give confederate nostalgia a bad name than a swarm of militant neo-Nazis, marching with torches, shouting anti-Semitic slogans, and thrusting out stiff-arm salutes. And if that vicarious tarnish, famously enacted in Charlottesville, Virginia, was enough to finish off a statue of Robert E. Lee, a respected military commander hitherto given a pass on the strength of a claim that he had only taken up arms during the Civil War to defend his native state of Virginia, consider the actual deeds attributed to the erstwhile “Wizard of the Saddle,” Nathan Bedford Forrest — a slave trader before the Civil War; the supposed author of a massacre of surrendering black troops at Fort Pillow, Tennessee, during the war; and the first Grand Dragon of the Ku Klux Klan after the war. That’s a hat trick of infamy. Though, to be sure, the general, a certified tactical genius, has had apologists eager to deny or soft-pedal those accusations, none more active and prominent than the N.B. Forrest Camp 215 of the Sons of Confederate Veterans, which raised some $10,000 to erect a large granite sign bearing large black letters saying “FORREST PARK” in late 2012. The erection of the sign was an act of hubris, the breach of an unofficial truce between supporters and detractors of the Forrest statue that had held since the last previous dustup in 2005. Tempers were ultimately cooled back then, at least partly due to the attitude of then-Mayor W.W. Herenton, who opposed “outside agitators” like Al Sharpton, who had joined local officials and clergy to demand a change in the status of the park, a removal of the monument, and a relocation of the graves of Forrest and his wife, which lay underneath the memorial and had continued on page 14

COVER STORY m e m p h i s f l y e r. c o m

private sale, which Wade says also cannot be done without a waiver. But he says designating a resting place for the statues could aid in the waiver process. Wade told the council that it’s “probably easier to have someone executed by lethal injection in Tennessee than to receive a waiver from the state’s historical commission,” and that the waiver process would take at least a year. Though the pending waiver for the removal of the Forrest statue will only require a simple majority to be approved, Wade says the process includes a laundry list of actions that must be taken leading up to the hearing. Wade told the council committee that the third option — requesting that Governor Bill Haslam seek a special session of the THC — would expedite the waiver process, but Haslam, although an expressed supporter of having the statues removed, has said he will not ask for a special session. The last option is boarding up the statues. Wade says this temporary option does not require a waiver and could be done in the interim waiting period. Wade says by law, the city is allowed to board up the statues for their “preservation” or “protection.” He says there is a foundation for this action because the city has already had to invest tens of thousands of dollars to protect and maintain the statues. However, city attorney Bruce McMullen says the city is seeking a permanent solution and is “not in the business of protecting the statues.” Mayor Strickland says the city will only seek to remove them legally. If the waiver is not granted by the THC in October, city officials say there are still other viable lawful actions. “For some time now, the mayor has been working on building consensus to make our goal a reality,” said Ursula Madden, the mayor’s chief communications officer. “If our waiver request is not successful, our pursuit does not end. We have other lawful options to turn to.” One of those options might be going around the law stating that a waiver is needed to modify or move historic property. The parks could be sold to a proxy, who would then have the statues removed before selling the parks back to the city. — Maya Smith

13


continued from page 13 been transplanted there from Elmwood Cemetery in 1905. It was a turn-of-the-century era characterized by the Supreme Court decision Plessy v. Ferguson, which sanctioned Southern segregation measures or at least acquiesced in them. The tide of history, including a full-fledged civil rights revolution, had conspicuously turned by the time of the 2005 controversy, which ended in a sort of stand-off — one that was accepted, though reluctantly, even by Walter Bailey, the venerable Shelby County commissioner and civil rights activist. But the provocative appearance in 2012 of that that new sign upped the ante in what had become a simmering conflict over the very meaning and symbolism of the confederacy. Bailey and others cried foul over the new sign, and in the resulting uproar, both the city council and then-mayor Wharton publicly called for the relocation of the Forrest statue and graves. Action on that front was stymied by legislation in Nashville, but the council did succeed in changing the names of the three downtown city parks associated with the confederacy. Forrest Park became Health Sciences Park; Jefferson Davis Park became Mississippi River Park; and Memphis Park became the new name of Confederate Park,

where a statue of rebel president Davis had been erected in 1964 as an antidote to the civil rights activism of the time. A renewed burst of activism followed from the murder in 2015 of nine black churchgoers in Charleston, South Carolina, by an unregenerate racist with an obvious fetish for the confederate battle flag. That once ubiquitous standard began coming down from flagpoles everywhere, and simultaneously the fig-leaf of states’ rights as a cloak for the confederacy was becoming more and more transparent. There was new agitation locally for action on the monuments to both Forrest and Davis, but a formal request by the city of Memphis to the state Historical Commission for a waiver permitting relocation of the statues was denied. And in 2016, the legislature further hardened the state’s ad hoc Heritage Protection Act, which already forbade removal of war monuments, extending that protection now to statues of individuals. This year, with the shadow of Charlottesville looming large, a consensus toward turning the historical page seemed inevitable. Momentum was gathering to force the issue, with even Governor Bill Haslam siding with the city in its desire to remove the offending statuaries. Whether the governor’s wishes carry any weight will be determined at the forthcoming October meeting of the Historical Commission. — Jackson Baker

WE’RE HISTORY

The Tennessee Historical Commission is a varied bunch. The 29-member board includes 24 governor-appointees, split equally among the state’s three Grand Divisions. The other five are ex-officio members: the state historian, state archeologist, the Tennessee Commissioner of Environment and Conservation, the state librarian and archivist, and the governor. Whites outnumber African Americans and other racial minorities on the board. One seat on the commission — one of the eight from West Tennessee — is vacant. The board typically votes on whether or not a site should be listed on the Federal Register of Historic Places or whether or not to place one of the state’s historic markers. Voting whether to allow Memphis to remove its Forrest statue during a time of national protest over confederate monuments puts the commission in an unaccustomed hot seat. “[The decision] juxtaposes the valid historic inquiry of how the Civil War was remembered and memorialized at the time the monuments were erected with the modern sensitivities of a significant portion of the local citizenry, which is itself divided ideologically and racially on the propriety of their location and indeed their existence,” says THC board member Sam D. Elliott, a Chattanooga attorney who says local input on the Forrest removal waiver is one of 13 factors the commission will

consider when they vote. Elliott is a board member of the Tennessee Civil War Preservation Association (TCWPA), a group dedicated to protecting Tennessee’s Civil War battlefields. Also on that board are Lee Millar, the outspoken leader of the Memphis chapter of the Sons of Confederate Veterans and Curt Fields, a well-known Ulysses S. Grant impersonator from Collierville. One of the West Tennessee seats is filled by local history professor, Doug Cupples, who was one of the members of a board created in 2015 to consider renaming three Memphis parks. Cupples was against it, saying the confederacy was “a significant part of the city’s history,” and noting that Forrest was one of the city’s top historical figures. Cupples’ suggestion at the time of the re-naming vote was to add monuments to the park to include African-American citizens. The commission includes, among others, Earnie Bacon, another TCWPA member; Ray Smith, an Oak Ridge historian, Kent Dollar, a Tennessee Technological University history professor who wrote Soldiers of the Cross, Confederate Soldier-Christians and the Impact of the War on their Faith; and Toye Heape, a member of the Native History Association who once sued the state over a road to be built over sacred burial grounds. — TS

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steppin’ out

We Recommend: Culture, News + Reviews By Chris Davis

It’s not easy to hush the Ostrander’s crowd. Accustomed to being on stage, rather than in the audience, the actors, dancers, singers, and musicians gathered for Memphis’ annual theater awards barely know how to act when the spotlight’s on somebody else. But Ruby O’Gray brought the whole house — drag queens and all — to total pin-drop silence when determination spread across her face and she rose from her wheelchair in the middle of the Orpheum stage. “I think everybody thought I was going to go back to the microphone and say something,” O’Gray says, recalling the moment. She should have taken a bow, at least. But instead she defiantly yanked a bit of her gown from under the front wheel of the chair, and sat back down again to be taken off stage. To nobody’s surprise, it was the evening’s most compelling performance. O’Gray is an actor with an enviable resume, a resourceful director, and a playwright with more than 70 scripts under her belt. She’s also an independent producer who’s seen to it that most of those scripts have been given the chance to get up on their feet and walk around. She saw her first show at Memphis’ storied Front St. Theatre when she was only 7 years old and has worked with Beale Street Repertory Theatre, Playhouse on the Square, and other regional institutions. But she’s always taken less-traveled roads, making a home just outside the mainstream, bridging gaps, and building community. For her work as an independent producer with Bluff City Tri-Art Theatre Company and the bi-annual Women’s Theatre Festival, O’Gray was honored with the Janie McCrary Putting It Together award — an award that might as well have been created with Ruby O’Gray in mind. This week, O’Gray’s children’s play The Strange Case of Mr. Wolf opens at the Evergreen Theatre. The inverted fairy tale asks why the big bad wolf was so big and bad, making a case for not taking everything you hear at face value. BLUFF CITY TRI-ART THEATRE COMPANY PRESENTS “THE STRANGE CASE OF MR. WOLF” AT THE EVERGREEN THEATRE, SEPTEMBER 9TH, 5 P.M. AND 7:30 P.M. SEPTEMBER 10TH, 3 P.M. 901-946-6140. $12. UNDER 13, $5

September 7-13, 2017

Stanley Bar-B-Que and Red Fish — makeovers to make your mouth water Food News, p. 30

16

THURSDAY September 7

FRIDAY September 8

Booksigning by Susan Cushman Burke’s Book Store, 6 p.m. Susan Cushman will sign and discuss Cherry Bomb, her debut novel following a young artist who deals with trauma through street art.

Ten-Minute Plays TheatreWorks, 8 p.m., $15 This series returns with a theme of “That’s So Gay,” featuring vignettes 10 minutes in length written by playwrights from across the country.

Sumits Yoga + Beer Benefit Ghost River Brewing, 5:30 p.m., $15 An hour-long, all-levels yoga class with beer to follow, benefiting Grizzlies Prep Academy. Meanwhile at 6 p.m., there will be the weekly cornhole tournament at Ghost River.

MLK Soul Concert Series National Civil Rights Museum, 6-8 p.m. A concert series as part of MLK50 through September. Tonight’s artist is Courtney Little, and there will be spoken word, speeches, and a sip & shop at the museum store.

Planning for disaster in the wake of Hurricane Harvey The Last Word, p. 39

Little Big Town Memphis Botanic Garden, 8:30 p.m. The rescheduled concert by these country superstars. Bill Burr Horseshoe Casino, 8 p.m., $52 Comedy from Bill Burr, a comedyspecial veteran and creator of the animated series F Is for Family with Laura Dern and Justin Long.

“Four Knowledge II” Crosstown Arts, 6-8 p.m. Group show with works by Beth Barnes Winterburn, Kat Gore, Janet Stuart Smith, and Lisa Williamson. “Score: A Twenty Year Retrospective” WKNO Studio, 5-9 p.m. Opening reception for paintings by Garen Shrader on canvas, advertising signs, album covers, and the female body.

DON PERRY

Howl

Ruby O’Gray (right) at the Ostrander Awards


The Break-Up Club

Summer Lovin’ By Chris Davis Summer is winding down, and Memphis’ popular Break-Up Show is back with a brand new set of sketches, jokes, and tales of lovin’ gone wrong! “No, this is literally the same show we did in February,” Break-Up Show founder Savannah Bearden corrects. “I’ve been joking it’s a one-night-only performance of our previously one-night-only performance. We were only going to do it once, but decided to do it again because when we did the show in February, the entire house band had the worst flu ever, and so did Bruce Bui, our lead drag queen. It was a great show and super fun, but all the people who were in it were like, ‘I would really like to do this show again when I can enjoy it and not have a puke bucket by the drum kit.’ So we’re doing it again.” Only this time the recuperated Break-Up crew’s doing it for a charity. “I’m really involved in Planned Parenthood,” Bearden says. “Their biggest problem right now is their monthly donors are low. For as little as $5-a-month, you can make a huge difference, so for any recurring donation of $5 or more a month you get into the show free.” In February, Bearden described the latest Break-Up experience like this: “Most of the show is about sex — lewd proposals over text message, emails, and Facebook. One of our big slideshows is a friend’s recollection of all the dudes she banged in the summer of ’94, which was the summer of the O.J. Simpson trial. It’s a brilliant, wonderful story about what a complete slut she was and how she slept with an ex-boyfriend to get back at another boyfriend.” “So, yeah,” Bearden says. “This one’s going to be just like the last one. Only with 100 percent less vomit.” THE BREAK-UP SHOW AT THE NEW DAISY THEATRE. SEPTEMBER 8TH, 7 P.M. $25 FOR TICKETS OR A $5 OR MORE MONTHLY DONATION TO PLANNED PARENTHOOD. 525-8981

“Crosstown: Outside-In” ANF Architects, 5:30 p.m. Opening reception of paintings by Tom Stern and photographs by Jamie Harmon on the Crosstown Concourse’s rebirth. Art on Tap Dixon Gallery & Gardens, 6-9 p.m., $45 Annual beer-tasting festival, including local beers and food from Gus’s, Frost, and more, and music from Airside.

Wings of Jubilee Hot Wing Festival and Cook-off Memphis Catholic High School, 11 a.m.-6 p.m., $5 Lots of food and games, plus music by South Side Supper Club, Risky Whiskey Boys, and Charvey Mac.

Yellow Fever: A Tour of the Plague Elmwood Cemetery, 10:30 a.m., $20 A walking tour tracing the history of the Yellow Fever epidemics of 1873, 1878, and 1879. Reservations required: 774-3212 or elmwoodcemetery.org.

Zoo Rendezvous: A Night at the R.I.T.Z. Memphis Zoo, 7 p.m., $200 Huge annual fund-raiser for the zoo. Includes food from more than 80 area restaurants.

Southern Heritage Classic Liberty Bowl Memorial Stadium, 6 p.m. Annual game of Jackson State vs. Tennessee State with tons of satellite events, including a parade, tailgating party, fashion show, and music festival with Fantasia and Babyface.

ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT

SATURDAY September 10

m e m p h i s f l y e r. c o m

The 20th year of Outflix brings the best of LGBTQ film programming to Memphis. Film, p. 34

17


M U S I C F E AT U R E B y A l e x G r e e n e

Echoes of Africa

Paa Kow - Echoes of Africa

Afro Fusion pioneer Paa Kow just wants everyone to be happy.

September 7-13, 2017

SEPTEMBER 15

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liveatthegarden.COM 18

C

ountless scholars write of the African traditions behind the blues, music that defines the Mid-South. Samuel Charters’ The Roots of the Blues: An African Search is just the tip of the iceberg, exploring in depth what has become a cliché of music history. While few would dispute the truth of this, it’s rare that we in the home of the blues can experience the sounds of Africa. Aside from occasional recording projects that bring the two worlds together, like Otha Turner and the Afrossippi Allstars or Taj Mahal and Toumani Diabate, what can we hear of the continent that is mother to us all? This is beginning to change, with the Memphis-based African Jazz Ensemble gaining notoriety and the ongoing presence of African drumming and dance in performances by the New Ballet Ensemble. And soon we’ll have a chance to hear more of it, with the return of Paa Kow, a trap set master from Ghana who has

ELLIOT SIFF

Paa Kow

assembled a unique ensemble appearing next Wednesday at the Hi-Tone. Kow grew up in a small village in Ghana, making his first drum set from assembled odds and ends, including a drum pedal made with a sandal and a door hinge. “I started when I was, like, 5,” Kow says. “I played with my uncles, and was in a band with my mom. From there, it just took off. I moved to the city — all the best artists were in Accra.” Under the wing of Ghanaian pop star Amakye Dede, Kow quickly made a name for himself and was touring in other parts of Africa and in Europe. By 2007, after befriending a traveling student from the University of Colorado, Kow was invited to teach there as a guest artist. Ultimately, he ended up settling in the Denver area, assembling a band of Nigerian and American players to perform his unique hybrid compositions. “I call it Afro Fusion, because I’m not really doing traditional highlife music. I’m an explorer — so it’s pretty original, you know?”


ECHOES OF AFRICA

Kow’s band now typically includes organ, multiple percussionists, guitar, bass, and several horn players, but this wasn’t always the case. For a time, he and a much smaller ensemble relocated to Memphis. “I moved my band I started in Colorado, and it was only a four-piece then. It was just drum set, trumpet, percussion, and bass. That’s what I had at that time. But we made a good thing out of it.” The group was a notable presence on the local scene. “We played at the Cooper-Young Festival. I played a night at the Levitt Shell, and at the Hi-Tone, I played a couple times, before I moved back to Colorado. So I know Memphis. Yeah, I lived there before, I love Memphis.” It’s notable that the Levitt Shell hosted one of his shows at the time: They have become perhaps the most reliable curator of world music artists in the Mid-South. Many recall an electric (and controversial) show there in 2015 by Seun Kuti, son of the outspoken pioneer of Afrobeat, Fela Kuti. With this in mind, I asked Kow if his songwriting reflected the same combination of politics and jazz as Kuti’s music. “No,” he said. “I’m not trying to do political at all. I just wanna be happy. I want everybody to be happy. And it’s not really spiritual, no. When the music comes, I give it out. It’s a personal thing. The music always comes, and then I give it out, you know?” Paa Kow performs with the Obruni Dance Band Wednesday, September 13th at the Hi-Tone, $10 cover.

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m e m p h i s f l y e r. c o m

“I just wanna be happy. I want everyone to be happy. … When the music comes, I give it out.”

MOONSHINE

ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT

Kow is also prolific: His 2012 debut, Hand Go Hand Come, was a double CD. Since then, he’s released 2014’s Ask, and next Wednesday, he’ll be promoting a new album, Cookpot. Over the past 10 years, with these releases under his belt, he’s built up a fan base in unexpected places. “I have a good foundation in Lincoln, Nebraksa. Omaha, it’s great. Iowa. It keeps getting better and better. I’ve been here a while, and people start realizing what I do. The fan base is getting better.” His eclecticism may be a key to that. While Ghanaian highlife, with its extended jams over polyrhythmic grooves, underpins much of the music, there are more diverse flavors in the mix. “I like Weather Report; Earth, Wind and Fire; Herbie Hancock; Buddy Rich. So, it’s a lot of influences,” he notes. Such musical touchstones demand excellent players. “I like the jazz background of the musicians. Because it’s very complicated stuff, you know? When they know what they’re doing already, it makes it easier.”

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19


BRIAN OWENS & THE DEACONS OF SOUL LEVITT SHELL SATURDAY, SEPTEMBER 9TH

VANEESE THOMAS HALLORAN CENTRE AT THE ORPHEUM THEATRE FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 8TH

LITTLE BIG TOWN LIVE AT THE GARDEN FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 8TH

After Dark: Live Music Schedule September 7 - 13 Alfred’s 197 BEALE 525-3711

Gary Hardy & Memphis 2 Thursdays-Saturdays, 6-9 p.m.; Karaoke Thursdays, TuesdaysWednesdays, 9 p.m.-1 a.m., and Sundays-Mondays, 10 p.m.-2 a.m.; Mandi Thomas Fridays, Saturdays, 6-9 p.m.; The 901 Heavy Hitters Fridays, Saturdays, 10 p.m.-2 a.m.; Flyin’ Ryan Fridays, Saturdays, 2:30 a.m.; Memphis Jazz Orchestra Sundays, 6-9 p.m.

B.B. King’s Blues Club 143 BEALE 524-KING

The King Beez Thursdays, 5:30 p.m.; B.B. King’s All Stars Thursdays, Fridays, 8 p.m.; Will Tucker Band Fridays, Saturdays, 5 p.m.; Lisa G and Flic’s Pic’s Band Saturdays, Sundays, 12:30 p.m.; Blind Mississippi Morris Sundays, 5 p.m.; Memphis Jones Sundays, Wednesdays 5:30 p.m.; Doc Fangaz and the Remedy Tuesdays, 5:30 p.m.

Blue Note Bar & Grill 341-345 BEALE 577-1089

Queen Ann and the Memphis Blues Masters Fridays, Saturdays, 8 p.m.-midnight.

Blues City Cafe

September 7-13, 2017

138 BEALE 526-3637

20

Ghost Town Blues Band Thursday, Sept. 7, 8 p.m.; Blind Mississippi Morris Fridays, 5 p.m., and Saturdays, 5:30 p.m.; Preston Shannon Friday, Sept. 8, 9:30 p.m., and Saturday, Sept. 9, 9:30 p.m.; Brad Birkedahl Band Thursdays, Wednesdays, 8 p.m.; Earl “The Pearl” Banks

Saturdays, 12:30 p.m. and Tuesdays, 7 p.m.; Brandon Cunning Band Sundays, 6 p.m., and Mondays, 7 p.m.; FreeWorld Sundays, 9:30 p.m.

Club 152 152 BEALE 544-7011

Live Music WednesdaysSundays, 7-11 p.m.; Live DJ Wednesdays-Sundays, 11 p.m.; Third Floor: DJ Tubbz Fridays, Saturdays, 10 p.m.; The Rusty Pieces play Bike Night on Beale Wednesdays, 6-9 p.m.

Handy Bar 200 BEALE 527-2687

The Amazing Rhythmatics Tuesdays, Thursdays-Sundays, 7 p.m.-1 a.m.

King’s Palace Cafe 162 BEALE 521-1851

David Bowen Thursdays, 5:309:30 p.m., Fridays, Saturdays, 6:30-10:30 p.m., and Sundays, 5:30-9:30 p.m.

King’s Palace Cafe Patio 162 BEALE 521-1851

Sonny Mack Mondays-Fridays, 2-6 p.m.; Cowboy Neil Mondays, Thursdays, 7-11 p.m. and Saturdays, Sundays, 2-6 p.m.; Sensation Band Tuesdays, Fridays, 7-11 p.m.; Fuzzy and the Kings of Memphis Saturdays, 7-11 p.m.; Chic Jones and the Blues Express Sundays, 7-11 p.m.; North and South Band Wednesdays, 7-11 p.m.

Hard Rock Cafe

King’s Palace Cafe Tap Room

126 BEALE 529-0007

168 BEALE 576-2220

Adam McClelland Thursday, Sept. 7, 7-10 p.m.; Jarred Price Friday, Sept. 8, 9-11 p.m.; Chris Johnson Band (on the patio) Saturday, Sept. 9, 8 p.m.-midnight; Almost Elton John Saturday, Sept. 9, 9-11 p.m.; Charlotte Fletcher & Soigne Sunday, Sept. 10, 11 a.m.-2 p.m.; Hood Smoke Sunday, Sept. 10, 7-10 p.m.

New Daisy Theatre 330 BEALE 525-8981

Southern Heritage Classic After Party feat. Juvenile Saturday, Sept. 9, 10 p.m.; Nothing More Tuesday, Sept. 12, 6 p.m.

Itta Bena 145 BEALE 578-3031

Nat “King” Kerr Fridays, Saturdays, 9-10 p.m.

King Jerry Lawler’s Hall of Fame Bar & Grille 159 BEALE

Big Don Valentine’s Three Piece Chicken and a Biscuit Blues Band Thursdays, Tuesdays, 8 p.m.-midnight; Juke Joint Allstars Friday, Sept. 8, 9 p.m.-1 a.m.; Delta Project Saturday, Sept. 9, 9 p.m.-1 a.m.

Chris Gales Solo Acoustic Show Mondays-Saturdays, noon-4 p.m.; Eric Hughes Thursdays, 5-8 p.m.; Karaoke MondaysThursdays, Sundays, 8 p.m.; Live Bands Fridays, Saturdays, 8 p.m.

Rum Boogie Cafe

p.m.-midnight; Gracie Curran Tuesdays, 8 p.m.-midnight; Plantation Allstars Wednesdays, 8 p.m.-midnight.

Rum Boogie Cafe Blues Hall 182 BEALE 528-0150

Memphis Bluesmasters Thursdays, Sundays, 8 p.m.-midnight; Vince Johnson and the Plantation Allstars Fridays, Saturdays, 4-8 p.m., and Sundays, 3-7 p.m.; Myra Hall Band Friday, Sept. 8, 9 p.m.-1 a.m.; Cowboy Neil Saturday, Sept. 9, 9 p.m.-1 a.m.; Brian Hawkins Blues Party Mondays, 8 p.m.-midnight; Chris McDaniel Tuesdays, Wednesdays, 8 p.m.-midnight.

Silky O’Sullivan’s 183 BEALE 522-9596

Dueling Pianos Thursdays, Wednesdays, 9 p.m.-1 a.m., Fridays, Saturdays, 9 p.m.-3 a.m., and Sundays, Tuesdays, 8 p.m.midnight.

The Silly Goose

531 S. MAIN 523-9754

100 PEABODY PLACE 435-6915

Amber Rae Dunn Hosts: Earnestine & Hazel’s Open Mic Wednesdays, 8-11 p.m.

Flying Saucer Draught Emporium 130 PEABODY PLACE 523-8536

Songwriters with Roland and Friends Mondays, 7-10 p.m.

Blind Bear Speakeasy 119 S. MAIN, PEMBROKE SQUARE 417-8435

Live Music Thursdays-Saturdays, 10 p.m.; The Rusty Pieces Friday, Sept. 8, 10 p.m.-1 a.m.

Dirty Crow Inn 855 KENTUCKY

Nancy Apple Thursdays, 8 p.m.; Bobbie & Tasha Wednesdays, 8-11 p.m.

DJ Cody Fridays, Saturdays, 10 p.m.

South Main Loflin Yard 7 W. CAROLINA

Electric Church Sundays, 2-4 p.m.

The Front Porch at Beale Street Landing 251 RIVERSIDE

The Rusty Pieces Saturday, Sept. 9, 6:30-8:30 p.m.

The Halloran Centre 225 S. MAIN 529-4299

Vaneese Thomas Friday, Sept. 8, 7:30 p.m.

Huey’s Downtown 77 S. SECOND 527-2700

The Heart Memphis Band Sunday, Sept. 10, 8:30 p.m.-midnight.

Paulette’s

182 BEALE 528-0150

Young Petty Thieves Thursdays, 8 p.m.-midnight; Pam and Terry Friday, Sept. 8, 5:30-8:30 p.m.; Sensation Band Friday, Sept. 8, 9 p.m.-1 a.m., Saturday, Sept. 9, 9 p.m.-1 a.m., and Sunday, Sept. 10, 7-11 p.m.; Jeff Crosslin Saturday, Sept. 9, 5:30-8:30 p.m.; Eric Hughes Band Mondays, 8

Earnestine & Hazel’s

RIVER INN, 50 HARBOR TOWN SQUARE 260-3300

Live Pianist Thursdays, 5:30-8:30 p.m., Fridays and Saturdays, 5:30-9 p.m., Sundays, 11 a.m.-2 p.m., and Mondays-Wednesdays, 5:30-8 p.m.

Purple Haze Nightclub 140 LT. GEORGE W. LEE 577-1139

DJ Dance Music MondaysSundays, 10 p.m.

Rumba Room 303 S. MAIN 523-0020

Bar DKDC 964 S. COOPER 272-0830

Brandon Taylor Thursday, Sept. 7; Mike Doughty’s Spooky Party Friday, Sept. 8; Marcella & Her Lovers Saturday, Sept. 9; Los Cantadores with Ohn & On Sunday, Sept. 10; The Pickin Pear Monday, Sept. 11; Dave Cousar Tuesday, Sept. 12; Blackwater Trio Wednesday, Sept. 13.

Boscos 2120 MADISON 432-2222

Sunday Brunch with Joyce Cobb Sundays, 11:30 a.m.-2:30 p.m.

Canvas 1737 MADISON 443-5232

Karaoke Thursdays, 9:30 p.m.; Kyle Pruzina Live Mondays, 10 p.m.-midnight.

Celtic Crossing 903 S. COOPER 274-5151

Jeremy Stanfill and Joshua Cosby Sundays, 6-9 p.m.; Candy Company Mondays.

Salsa Night Saturdays, 8:30 p.m.-3 a.m.

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After Dark: Live Music Schedule September 7 - 13 The Cove

Murphy’s

2559 BROAD 730-0719

1589 MADISON 726-4193

1911 POPLAR 244-7904

Pyramid $cheme presents: Zackey Force Funk, XL Middleton, Moniquea, Brian Ellis, and more Thursday, Sept. 7, 9 p.m.-3 a.m.; Crockett Hall with the Midtown Rhythm Section Tuesdays, 9 p.m.

P&H Cafe 1532 MADISON 726-0906

Rock Starkaraoke Fridays; Zigadoo Money Clips Saturday, Sept. 9; Open Mic Music with Tiffany Harmon Mondays, 9 p.m.-midnight; Fresh Flesh, Sir Coyler, the Suits Tuesday, Sept. 12.

East Memphis Folk’s Folly Prime Steak House 551 S. MENDENHALL 762-8200

Intimate Piano Lounge featuring Charlotte Hurt MondaysThursdays, 5-9:30 p.m.; Larry Cunningham Fridays, Saturdays, 6-10 p.m.

Collierville

East Tapas and Drinks

Bumpus Harley Davidson Collierville

6069 PARK 767-6002

Eddie Harris Thursdays, Fridays, 6:30-9:30 p.m.; Van Duren Solo Tuesdays, 6-8 p.m.

Neil’s Music Room 5727 QUINCE 682-2300

Jack Rowell’s Celebrity Jam Thursdays, 8 p.m.; Eddie Smith Fridays, 8 p.m.; Down 2 Five Saturday, Sept. 9, 8 p.m.; Memphis All Stars Sunday, Sept. 10, 7-11

Arlington/Eads/ Oakland/Lakeland Rizzi’s/Paradiso Pub 6230 GREENLEE 592-0344

Live Music Thursdays, Wednesdays, 7-10 p.m.; Karaoke and Dance Music with DJ Funn Fridays, 9 p.m.

T.J. Mulligan’s Cordova 8071 TRINITY 756-4480

The Southern Edition Band Tuesdays.

Frayser/Millington Huey’s Millington 8570 U.S. 51 N.

Young Petty Thieves Sunday, Sept. 10, 8-11:30 p.m.

Old Millington Winery 6748 OLD MILLINGTON 873-4114

Winestock VII feat. Jack Rowell and His Band and 12-String Tom Sunday, Sept. 10.

Huey’s Midtown 1927 MADISON 726-4372

Sam Pace Sunday, Sept. 10, 4-7 p.m.; Bluff City Soul Collective Sunday, Sept. 10, 8:30 p.m.midnight.

Germantown Huey’s Germantown 7677 FARMINGTON 318-3034

Lafayette’s Music Room 2119 MADISON 207-5097

Fearless First Friday, Sept. 8, 7-10 p.m.; Brian Owens and the Deacons of Soul Saturday, Sept. 9, 7 p.m.

Midtown Crossing Grill

Gary Escoe’s Atomic Dance Machine Sunday, Sept. 10, 8-11:30 p.m.; Gerry Finney Wednesday, Sept. 13, 6-9 p.m.

Shops of Saddle Creek 7509 POPLAR, SUITE 1 753-4264

Concert at the Creek Saturday, Sept. 9, 6-9 p.m.

North Mississippi/ Tunica Horseshoe Casino & Hotel The Phoenix 1015 S. COOPER 338-5223

Minglewood Hall 1555 MADISON 866-609-1744

Starlito & Friends Friday, Sept. 8, 8 p.m.; Southern Heritage Classic Afterparty with TI and DJ Envy Saturday, Sept. 9, 10 p.m.; Kyle Kinane Monday, Sept. 11, 7 p.m.

Huey’s Poplar 4872 POPLAR 682-7729

The Phoenix Blues Jam Tuesdays, 8-11 p.m.

The Natchez Brothers Sunday, Sept. 10, 8:30 p.m.-midnight.

Wild Bill’s

Memphis Botanic Garden

1580 VOLLINTINE 207-3975

The Wild Bill’s Band Fridays, Saturdays, 11 p.m.-3 a.m.

394 N. WATKINS 443-0502

Natalie James and the Professor Saturdays, Sundays, 11 a.m.-3 p.m.; “The Happening” Open Songwriter Showcase Tuesdays, 6:30-9:30 p.m.

Cordova

Five O’Clock Shadow Sunday, Sept. 10, 8:30 p.m.-midnight; Carson & Brewer Tuesday, Sept. 12, 6-9 p.m.

Vesper teen, PHANGS, the Band CAMINO Thursday, Sept. 7, 8 p.m.; Playa Fly, Slick Sid and The Gangsterbillies, No Soda, Taco and Da Mofos Friday, Sept. 8, 8 p.m.; Accidental Hootenanny Saturday, Sept. 9, 6 p.m.; Wild Animal, Josh Benitez Band, the Outcry, Movie Night Sunday, Sept. 10, 8 p.m.; CASTLE, Precursive Monday, Sept. 11, 9 p.m.; Today Is the Day, Dawn Patrol, Autolith Pressed Tuesday, Sept. 12, 7:30 p.m.; PAA KOW, Obruni Dance Band Wednesday, Sept. 13, 9 p.m.

OVERTON PARK 272-2722

Prime Cut Sunday, Sept. 10, 8-11:30 p.m.

Huey’s Cordova

412-414 N. CLEVELAND 278-TONE

Levitt Shell

Huey’s Collierville 2130 W. POPLAR 854-4455

1771 N. GERMANTOWN PKWY. 754-3885

Hi-Tone

Scott & Vanessa Sudbury Thursday, Sept. 7, 6 p.m.; The Spazmatics Thursday, Sept. 7, 9 p.m.; Brennan Villines Friday, Sept. 8, 6:30 p.m., and Sunday, Sept. 10, 4 p.m.; Forever Abbey Road Friday, Sept. 8, 10 p.m.; Susan Marshall & Friends Saturday, Sept. 9, 11:30 a.m.; Pam & Terry Saturday, Sept. 9, 3 p.m.; Walrus Saturday, Sept. 9, 9 p.m.; Joe Restivo 4 Sunday, Sept. 10, 11 a.m.; Ladies of Seeing Red Sunday, Sept. 10, 8 p.m.; Boss Trio Tuesday, Sept. 12, 5:30 p.m.; Ashton Riker Tuesday, Sept. 12, 8 p.m.; 3RD Man Wednesday, Sept. 13, 5:30 p.m.; No More Drama Wednesday, Sept. 13, 8 p.m.

325 S. BYHAILIA 316-1121

Dantones Band Saturday, Sept. 9, 11 a.m.-3 p.m.

750 CHERRY 636-4100

Little Big Town Friday, Sept. 8, 6:30 p.m.

Mortimer’s 590 N. PERKINS 761-9321

Van Duren Solo Thursdays, 6:30-8:30 p.m.

University of Memphis

Shops of Saddle Creek

The Bluff

Dantones Band Saturday, Sept. 9, 6-10 p.m.

535 S. HIGHLAND

DJ Ben Murray Thursdays, 10 p.m.; Kenneth Whalum Friday, Sept. 8, 8 p.m.; URI Friday, Sept. 8, 10 p.m.; Vintage Pistol Saturday, Sept. 9, 10 p.m.; Bluegrass Brunch with the River Bluff

2055 WEST

Various locations SEE WEBSITE FOR MORE INFORMATION

30 Days of Opera.

p.m.; Eddie Harrison Mondays, 6-10 p.m.; Debbie Jamison & Friends Tuesdays, 6-10 p.m.; Elmo and the Shades Wednesdays, 8 p.m.-midnight.

Owen Brennan’s THE REGALIA, 6150 POPLAR 761-0990

Lannie McMillan Jazz Trio Sundays, 10 a.m.-2 p.m.

Summer/Berclair Cheffie’s Cafe 483 HIGH POINT TERRACE 202-4157

Songwriter Night hosted by Leigh Ann Wilmot and Dave “The Rave” Saturdays, 5-8 p.m.

Bartlett Hadley’s Pub 2779 WHITTEN 266-5006

The Souled Out Band Friday, Sept. 8, 9 p.m.; Full Circle Saturday, Sept. 9, 9 p.m.; Nuttin’ Fancy Band Wednesday, Sept. 13, 8 p.m.

Shelby Forest General Store 7729 BENJESTOWN 876-5770

Steak Night with Tony Butler and The Shelby Forest Pioneers Fridays, 6-8 p.m.; Tony Butler and the Shelby Forest Pioneers Friday, Sept. 8, 6-8 p.m.; Possum Drifters Saturday, Sept. 9, 12-3 p.m.; Robert Hull Sundays, 12:30-3:30 p.m.; Cecil Yancy Sunday, Sept. 10, 12:30-3:30 p.m.

AT CASINO CENTER, SOUTH OF MEMPHIS, NEAR TUNICA, MS 1-800-303-SHOE

Bill Burr Friday, Sept. 8.

Raleigh Stage Stop 2951 CELA 382-1576

Blues Jam hosted by Brad Webb Thursdays, 7-11 p.m.; Twin Soul Friday, Sept. 8, 9 p.m.-1 a.m.; No More Drama Saturday, Sept. 9, 9 p.m.-1 a.m.; Open Mic Night and Steak Night Tuesdays, 6 p.m.-midnight.

West Memphis/ Eastern Arkansas Downtown Helena, AR CHERRY STREET

Cherry Street Fair Saturday, Sept. 9, 5-8 p.m.

m e m p h i s f l y e r. c o m

Growlers

Will Sexton and Lew Card Sunday, Sept. 10; No Fu with No Comply Monday, Sept. 11.

Poplar/I-240

ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT

Ed Finney and the U of M Jazz Quartet Thursdays, 8 p.m.; Fairbanks & the Lonesome Light Friday, Sept. 8, 9 p.m.; The Burners Saturday, Sept. 9, 9 p.m.; Don and Wayde Tuesdays, 7-10 p.m.; Karaoke Wednesdays, 9 p.m.

Clan Sundays, 11 a.m.; Josh Turner, Easton Corbin, and Granger Smith Wednesday, Sept. 13, 10 p.m.

21


September 7-13, 2017

Jim Messina SEPTEMBER 20 / 7:30pm

Talented singer-songwriter, played with artists like NEIL YOUNG. Member of Buffalo Springfield, co-founder of bands – POCO – LOGGINS & MESSINA. Hits include YOUR MAMMA DON’T DANCE and CRAZY LOVE. 22

Tickets & Info – BPACC.ORG

BOX OFFICE HOURS / 10AM TO 2PM / M – F / 901.385.5588


CALENDAR of EVENTS:

September 7 - 13

Send the date, time, place, cost, info, phone number, a brief description, and photos — two weeks in advance — to calendar@memphisflyer. com or P.O. Box 1738, Memphis, TN 38101. DUE TO SPACE LIMITATIONS, ONGOING WEEKLY EVENTS WILL APPEAR IN THE FLYER’S ONLINE CALENDAR ONLY.

Artist Talk & Demonstration by Dolph Smith

TH EAT E R

Circuit Playhouse

The Flick takes place in a run-down movie theater in central Massachusetts, where three underpaid employees mop the floors and attend to one of the last 35-millimeter film theaters in the state. www.playhouseonthesquare.org. $30-$40. Thurs.-Sat., 8 p.m., and Sun., 2 p.m. Through Sept. 10.

Exhibition artist will bring in examples to demonstrate the various techniques and format he employs during this special membership event. Sun., Sept. 10, 2 p.m. MEMPHIS BROOKS MUSEUM OF ART, 1934 POPLAR (544-6209), WWW. BROOKSMUSEUM.ORG.

Landers Center (DeSoto Civic Center)

Call to Artists for MCA Holiday Bazaar & Fundraiser

4560 VENTURE, SOUTHAVEN, MS (662-280-9120).

WWW.MCA.EDU.

51 S. COOPER (725-0776).

Open call, any local artist may submit, no cost to apply. See website for more information and submission form. Through Oct. 2.

Barefoot in the Park, www.dftonline.org. $22. Sun., 2 p.m., and Fri., Sat., 7 p.m. Through Sept. 10.

Six-station computer lab supports Memphis’ creative community by providing artists and musicians full access to industry-standard art- and music-making technology. Tuesdays-Thursdays, 10 a.m.-9 p.m., and Fridays, Saturdays, 10 a.m.-6 p.m.

The Strange Case of Mr. Wolf, a town takes the menacing Big Bad Wolf to court for his misdeeds. Adults and children are the townspeople who tell the story in the courtroom of Fairytale Land. (9466140), www.bluffcitytriarttheatre. com. $12. Sat., Sept. 9, 5-6:30 & 7:30-9 p.m., and Sun., Sept. 10, 3-4:30 p.m.

New Daisy Theatre

The Break-Up Show, true stories of heartbreak, rejection, and insanity transforming the indignities of break-up drama into comedy that makes it worth the pain. Benefiting Planned Parenthood Greater Memphis Region. $5-$60. Fri., Sept. 8, 7 p.m. 330 BEALE (525-8981).

St. Mary’s Cathedral

Letters and Music: Story of the 1870’s Yellow Fever Epidemic, the story of Sr. Constance first-person accounts of suffering, sorrow, hope, and healing as told in the written word of those the epidemic affected, interspersed with musical reflections. (527-3361), www.stmarysmemphis.org. Free. Fri., Sept. 8, 7-8 p.m. 700 POPLAR (527-3361).

ES DELICIOSO!

Theatre Memphis

Shrek the Musical, www. theatrememphis.org. $30. Fri., Sat., 8 p.m., Sun., 2 p.m., Thurs., 7:30 p.m., and Sat., 2 p.m. Through Sept. 9. 630 PERKINS EXT. (682-8323).

TheatreWorks

PlayFest: Ten-Minute Plays, premier performances of original 10-minute plays. www.etcmemphistheater.com. $15. Fri., Sept. 8, 8 p.m., Sat., Sept. 9, 8 p.m., and Sun., Sept. 10, 2 p.m. 2085 MONROE (274-7139).

A R TI S T R EC E P TI O N S

ANF Architects

Opening reception for “Rebirth of Crosstown,” exhibition of paintings by Tom Stem and photographs by Jamie Harmon depicting Crosstown’s construction and rebirth. www.anfa.com. Fri., Sept. 8, 5:30-7:30 p.m. 1500 UNION (278-6868).

DeSoto Arts Center

Artist reception for “A Cast of Blues,” exhibition of resin face casts of blues musicians who have shaped the musical heritage of our South by artist Sharon McConnellDickerson. (662-404-3361), desotoarts.com/events.html. $10. Fri., Sept. 8, 6-8 p.m. 660 W. COMMERCE, HERNANDO, MS.

Memphis Botanic Garden

Artist reception for “Rustic Memories,” exhibition of Exhibition of folksy style paintings by Nancy JF Woods. www.memphisbotanicgarden.com. Sun., Sept. 10, 3-5 p.m. 750 CHERRY (636-4100).

“Surfaces” by Rebekah Laurenzi at Overton Park Gallery St. George’s Episcopal Church

Opening reception for Artists’ Link Exhibit, (754-7282), www.stgchurch.org. Sat., Sept. 9, 6-8 p.m. 2425 SOUTH GERMANTOWN (754-7282).

WKNO Studio

Artist reception for “Score: A Twenty Year Retrospective,” exhibition of paintings on everything from canvas, advertising signs, record album covers, to the female body by Garen Shrader. www. wkno.org. Fri., Sept. 8, 5-9 p.m. 7151 CHERRY FARMS (458-2521).

OT H E R A R T HAPPE N I NGS

Agnes Stark Pottery Show

Summer kiln opening show and sale. Fri., Sept. 8, 10 a.m.-5 p.m., Sat., Sept. 9, 10 a.m.-5 p.m., and Sun., Sept. 10, 12-5 p.m. STARK COUNTRY STUDIO AND GALLERY, 12675 DONELSON, ARLINGTON, TN (8679240), WWW.STARKPOTTERY.COM.

Art After Dark

Galleries and gardens will be open late. Featuring light refreshments, entertainment, and a cash bar. Free with admission. Every third Thursday, 6-8 p.m. THE DIXON GALLERY & GARDENS, 4339 PARK (761-5250), WWW.DIXON.ORG.

Apply to be a part of the runway shows with our Emerging Memphis Designer Project. For more information, visit website. Through Sept. 15. WWW.MEMPHISFASHIONWEEK.ORG.

First Thursdays Friends of the Library Social

Evening of art, social dance, music, and culinary delight celebrating the exotic intrigues of the Spanish Caribbean. Thurs., Sept. 7, 6-8 p.m. BENJAMIN L. HOOKS CENTRAL LIBRARY, 3030 POPLAR (415-2700), WWW.MEMPHISLIBRARY.ORG.

“Four Knowledge II”

Pop-up show featuring work by Beth Winterburn, Kat Gore, Janet Smith, and Lisa Williamson. Fri., Sept. 8, 6-8 p.m., and Sat., Sept. 9, 10 a.m.-noon.

m e m p h i s f l y e r. c o m

225 S. MAIN (529-4299).

MENU

CROSSTOWN ARTS, 430 N. CLEVELAND (507-8030), WWW.CROSSTOWNARTS.ORG.

“I Am A Man” Plaza Design Add your voice to the design. For more information, visit website. Thurs., Sept. 7, 5:30 p.m.

VARIOUS LOCATIONS, SEE WEBSITE FOR MORE INFORMATION, WWW.URBANARTCOMMISSION..ORG.

Open Crit

Monthly critique event where visual artists are invited to bring new and/or in-progress studio work for critical feedback and group discussion particular to each artist’s practice. Tues., Sept. 12, 6-8 p.m. CROSSTOWN ARTS, 430 N. CLEVELAND (507-8030), WWW.CROSSTOWNARTS.ORG.

“Stargazer Garden” Flower-Folding

Stop by and fold a paper flower for collaborative art installation. Mondays-Fridays, 9:30 a.m.-

continued on page 24

MEXICAN RESTAURANT 2006 Madison Ave.•726-1873 Open Daily @ 11am

ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT

A Tribute to the Women of Soul, musical, historical, and social presentation of pioneering women in R&B that swings from the ’50s into the Southern soul of the ’60s and ’70s with rural influences and gritty urban instrumentation. www.orpheum-memphis.com. $30. Fri., Sept. 8, 7:30 p.m.

NEW

Emerging Memphis Designer Project Applications

Germantown Community Theatre

The Halloran Centre

OUT OUR

CROSSTOWN ARTS, 430 N. CLEVELAND (507-8030), WWW.CROSSTOWNARTS.ORG.

1705 POPLAR (274-7139).

3037 FOREST HILL-IRENE (453-7447).

CHECK

Crosstown Arts Digital Lab

The Evergreen Theatre

Lost in Yonkers, heartfelt comingof-age story set in 1942 about a family coping with the challenges of staying together during World War II and the struggles to balance love with tough times. www. gctcomeplay.org. $24. Fridays, Saturdays, 8 p.m., and Sundays, 2:30 p.m. Through Sept. 17.

COME

23


CALENDAR: SEPTEMBER 7 - 13 continued from page 23 5:30 p.m. CROSSTOWN CONCOURSE (FORMERLY SEARS CROSSTOWN), N. CLEVELAND AT NORTH PARKWAY, WWW.CROSSTOWNARTS.ORG.

O N G O I N G ART

Art Museum at the University of Memphis (AMUM)

“The Quick and the Dead,” exhibition of drawings and obituaries by Chris Honeysuckle Ellis. www.memphis.edu/ amum. Through Sept. 23. “Stopping in Memphis,” exhibition of work by Justin Bowles, Alan Duckworth, Meredith Olinger, Alex Paulus, Esther Ruiz, Jared Small, and Jill Wissmiller. www.memphis.edu/ amum. Through Sept. 23. “Africa: Art of a Continent,” permanent exhibition of African art from the Martha and Robert Fogelman collection. Ongoing. 142 COMMUNICATION & FINE ARTS BUILDING (678-2224).

ANF Architects

“Rebirth of Crosstown,” exhibition of paintings by Tom Stem and photographs by Jamie Harmon depicting Crosstown’s construction and rebirth. www. anfa.com. Sept. 8-Oct. 5.

September 7-13, 2017

1500 UNION (278-6868).

24

Belz Museum of Asian and Judaic Art

Memphis Brooks Museum of Art

“Chinese Symbols in Art,” ancient Chinese pottery and bronze. www.belzmuseum.org. Ongoing. 119 S. MAIN, IN THE PEMBROKE SQUARE BUILDING (523-ARTS).

Bingham and Broad

“My Kin Is Not Like Yours,” exhibition of works by Debra Edge. Ongoing. 2563 BROAD (323-3008).

Buckman Arts Center at St. Mary’s School

Bill Burr at Horseshoe Casino & Hotel, Friday, September 8th

“Memphis Stories,” exhibition of new works by Meghean Warner. www.buckmanartscenter. com. Through Sept. 18. 60 N. PERKINS EXT. (537-1483).

Circuitous Succession Gallery

“Stream of Consciousness,” exhibition of paintings by Brian Bundren. www.curcuitoussuccession.com. Through Sept. 25. 1789 KIRBY PARKWAY.

David Lusk Gallery

“Making Marks,” exhibition of works by Greely Myatt. www. davidluskgallery.com. Through Sept. 30. 97 TILLMAN (767-3800).

DeSoto Arts Center

“A Cast of Blues,” exhibition of of face casts in resin of blues musicians who have helped shape the face of the Blues heritage world wide by Sharon McConnell-Dickerson. (662404-3361), desotoarts.com/

events.html. Sept. 9-Oct. 7. 660 W. COMMERCE, HERNANDO, MS.

The Dixon Gallery & Gardens

“Fidencio Fifield-Perez and Vanessa González: Location, Location, Location,” exhibition of work utilizing maps to open up discussions on migration and ceramic and installation work processing the challenges of immigration. www.dixon. org. Through Sept. 24. “Edward Giobbi: An Artist Comes to Memphis,” exhibition of works influenced by Italian Renaissance masterpieces by one of the founding trustees of the Hugo Dixon Foundation (which formed the Dixon Gal-

lery and Gardens). www.dixon. org. Through Sept. 24. “Power and Piety: Spanish Colonial Art,” exhibition of paintings, sculptures, religious objects, and decorative art from the 17th through 19th centuries influenced by Spanish Colonial Caribbean. www.dixon.org. Through Sept. 24. “Made in Dixon,” exhibition showcasing the colorful and joy-filled artwork created by artists of all ages in the Dixon’s educational programs. www. dixon.org. Ongoing. 4339 PARK (761-5250).

Eclectic Eye

“Seeing Things My Way,” exhibition of photographs trans-

posed onto metal and canvas by Bob Pierce. www.eclectic-eye. com. Through Sept. 20. 242 S. COOPER (276-3937).

Fratelli’s

“Painters at the Garden,” exhibition of original paintings by students from garden art classes. www.memphisbotanicgarden.com. Through Sept. 30. 750 CHERRY (766-9900).

Memphis Botanic Garden “Rustic Memories,” exhibition of folksy style paintings by Nancy JF Woods. www. memphisbotanicgarden.com. Through Sept. 30. 750 CHERRY (636-4100).

“By the Book: A Tribute to Dolph Smith,” exhibit focusing on Dolph Smith’s artist notebooks, featuring six on display. Also includes the work of 11 artists who have worked with Smith. Through Nov. 26. Rotunda Projects: Nnenna Okore, exhibition of works with burlap to fashion abstract objects inspired by textures, colors, and landscapes. www. brooksmuseum.org. Through Sept. 10. “About Face,” exhibition located in the Education Gallery highlighting the different ways artists interpret the connection between emotion and expression. www.brooksmuseum.org. Ongoing. “Drawing Memory: Essence of Memphis,” exhibition of works inspired by nsibidi, a sacred means of communication among male secret societies in southeastern Nigeria by Victor Ekpuk. www.brooksmuseum. org. Ongoing. 1934 POPLAR (544-6209).

Metal Museum

Master Metalsmith: David Secrest. www.metalmuseum. org. Through Dec. 31. “Cascadian Lines,” through Nov. 12. “With Love, From Brent,” through Oct. 15. 374 METAL MUSEUM DR. (774-6380).


CALENDAR: SEPTEMBER 7 - 13 Overton Park Gallery

“The Voices of Yellow Fever”

“Surfaces,” exhibition of ink, pencil, and mixedmedia work by Rebekah Laurenzi. Sept. 8-Oct. 6.

Luncheon and presentation. Elmwood Players present a first-person narrative account of what life was like during the yellow fever as costumed characters in the Chapel. Registration required. $20. Wed., Sept. 13, noon.

1581 OVERTON PARK (229-2967).

Playhouse on the Square

“Floating Light,” exhibition of photographs exploring the weight of light and darkness over a span of undocumented time by local photographers Katherine Dean and Joseph Moseley. mca.edu. Through Sept. 10.

ELMWOOD CEMETERY, 824 S. DUDLEY (774-3212), WWW.ELMWOODCEMETERY.ORG.

Ross Gallery

CHRISTIAN BROTHERS UNIVERSITY, PLOUGH LIBRARY, 650 E. PARKWAY S. (321-3000).

“Score: A Twenty Year Retrospective” by Garen Shrader at WKNO Studio

Featuring one of the first homes built in the area, the Rozelle House at 1737 Harbert and six other historic homes, Central Christian Church, and the Beethoven Club, music, food trucks, and antique car show. Sun., Sept. 10, 1-6 p.m.

Old Forest Hike

Dr. Jason Hoeksema, University of Mississippi presents the world of mushrooms. Explore an entirely new kingdom — the fungi. Hoeksema’s research centers on plant-fungi interactions. Free for members, $4 nonmembers. Mon., Sept. 11, 6:30 p.m. MEMPHIS BOTANIC GARDEN, 750 CHERRY (636-4100), WWW.MEMPHISBOTANICGARDEN.COM.

Talbot Heirs

41st Annual Central Gardens Home & Garden Tour

CENTRAL GARDENS, ALONG CARR AVE.

Wild Mushrooms

66 S. COOPER (726-4656).

“Home/Away From Home” and “Signals,” exhibition of work by Terry Kenney and Chuck Johnson. www.cbu.edu. Through Oct. 5.

TO U R S

Walking tour of the region’s only urban old-growth forest. Second Saturday of every month, 10 a.m. OVERTON PARK, OFF POPLAR (276-1387).

continued on page 26

Debra Edge Art, ongoing. 99 S. SECOND (527-9772).

Tops Gallery: Madison Avenue Park

“Sad Men on Bad Afternoons,” exhibition curated by Daniel Fuller featuring the work of Natalie Labriola, Joseriberto Perez, Lauren Taylor, and Kandis Williams. www.topsgallery.com. Through Sept. 17. 151 MADISON (340-0134).

WKNO Studio

“Score: A Twenty Year Retrospective,” exhibition of paintings on everything from canvas, advertising signs, record album covers, to the female body by Garen Shrader. (458-2521), www.wkno. org. Free. Through Sept. 29. 7151 CHERRY FARMS (458-2521).

OPERA

Don’t miss the craziness of Party Like a Pirate Day at the Fitz!

30 Days of Opera

Check Opera Memphis website for pop-up opera events in Memphis and the Mid-South. Through Sept. 30. VARIOUS LOCATIONS, SEE WEBSITE FOR MORE INFORMATION, WWW.OPERAMEMPHIS.ORG.

HOT PIRATES & WENCHES FREE PARTY FAVORS LIVE ENTERTAINMENT FREE PIRATE DRINKS LIVE RADIO REMOTES & PRIZES

C O M E DY

Gold Strike Casino

CASINO PROMOTIONS

NOW - DEC 31

1010 CASINO CENTER IN TUNICA, MS (1-888-245-7829).

Horseshoe Casino & Hotel

AT CASINO CENTER, SOUTH OF MEMPHIS, NEAR TUNICA, MS (1-800-303-SHOE).

Rhodes College

Brent Pella Comedy Show, www.rhodes.edu. Thurs., Sept. 7, 7:30 p.m.

OVER 700 PRIZES WILL BE AWARDED. 4 WAYS TO WIN!

2000 N. PARKWAY (843-3000).

P O E T RY/S PO K E N WO R D

Amurica World Headquarters

Spillit Story Slam: Pride, an evening of your stories. www.spillitmemphis.org. $10. Sat., Sept. 9, 7 p.m. 410 CLEVELAND.

PROMO CASH $75,000 SWEEPSTAKES EVERY FRIDAY & SATURDAY IN SEPTEMBER 6PM – 10PM

Twenty winners of $250 in Promo Cash between 6pm - 9pm. Five winners of $500 in Promo Cash at 10pm.

B O O KS I G N I N G S

5X ENTRIES ON SUNDAYS • 10X ENTRIES ON MONDAYS • 20X ENTRIES ON TUESDAYS

Booksigning by Susan Cushman

Author reads and signs Cherry Bomb. Thurs., Sept. 7, 5:30 p.m.

Friday, September 29 & Saturday, September 30 • 8pm TICKETS START AT $25

BURKE’S BOOK STORE, 936 S. COOPER (278-7484), WWW. BURKESBOOKS.COM.

Tickets available at Fitz Gift Shop or call

L ECT U R E /S P EAK E R

Marketing to the Latino Community: AMA Memphis September Luncheon

Evelyn Homs Medero, Executive Director of Multicultural Marketing & Business Development at St. Jude speaks on topic. $25. Thurs., Sept. 7, 11:30 a.m. MEMPHIS BOTANIC GARDEN, 750 CHERRY (636-4100), WWW.AMAMEMPHIS.ORG.

FitzgeraldsTunica.com • 1-662-363-LUCK (5825) • Must be 21 and a Key Rewards member. See Cashier*Players Club for rules. Tax and resort fee not included in listed price. Advance hotel reservations required and subject to availability. $50 credit or debit card is required upon hotel check-in. Arrivals after 6pm must be guaranteed with a credit card. Management reserves the right to cancel, change and modify the event or promotion. Gaming restricted patrons prohibited. Gambling Problem? Call 1-800-522-4700.

at 800-745-3000 or ticketmaster.com

m e m p h i s f l y e r. c o m

PICK THE MOST PRO FOOTBALL WINNERS AND SCORE BIG!

Bill Burr, www.caesars.com. $52. Fri., Sept. 8, 8 p.m.

ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT

Wayne Brady, entertainer with more than a decade of singing, acting, and improvisational skills. (1-888-747-7711), goldstrike.com. $35-$60. Sat., Sept. 9, 8-9:30 p.m.

25


CALENDAR: SEPTEMBER 7 - 13 continued from page 25 Yellow Fever: A Tour of the Plague

Join Assistant Director Bob Barnett for an all-walking tour through the cemetery grounds and learn the history of the Yellow Fever epidemics of 1873, 1878, and 1879. Registration is required. $20. Sat., Sept. 9, 10:30 a.m. ELMWOOD CEMETERY, 824 S. DUDLEY (774-3212), WWW.ELMWOODCEMETERY.ORG.

E X POS/SALES

Ohm Memphis

30-day pop-up record shop and micro lounge. Closed on Monday. Through Sept. 18, 11 a.m.-7 p.m. THE EDGE DISTRICT, MADISON, MARSHALL, AND MONROE, WWW.FACEBOOK.COM/OMMEMPHISMUSIC.

F EST IVALS

Delta Fair & Music Festival

Featuring music, rides, and more. See website for scheduled events. $10. Through Sept. 10.

Enjoy the sites and sounds of the Arkansas Delta at this family-friendly event featuring Southern Avenue band, classic car and motorcycle show, food, shopping, and crazy kids’ contests. Free. Second Saturday of every month, 5-8 p.m. DOWNTOWN HELENA, AR, CHERRY STREET (870-338-3300), WWW.FACEBOOK.COM/CHERRYSTREETFAIR.

Food Truck Garden Party: Astronomy Night

$5 members, $10 nonmembers. Wed., Sept. 13, 5-8 p.m.

AGRICENTER INTERNATIONAL, 7777 WALNUT GROVE (757-7777), WWW.DELTAFEST.COM.

MEMPHIS BOTANIC GARDEN, 750 CHERRY (636-4100), WWW.MEMPHISBOTANICGARDEN.COM.

Wings of Jubilee Hotwing Festival & Cook-Off

Featuring live music by South Side Supper Club, Risky Whiskey Boys & Charvey Mac, games, food, and fun for the entire family. Kids 11 & under free. $5. Sat., Sept. 9, 11 a.m.-6 p.m. MEMPHIS CATHOLIC HIGH SCHOOL, 61 N. MCLEAN (901.373.1211), WWW. JUBILEESCHOOLS.ORG.

F I LM

The 15 Film Series Sat., Sept. 7-9. WWW.SOUTHERNHERITAGECLASSIC. COM.

KIDS S P O R TS / F I TN ES S

Broad Avenue 5K

Run, enter raffles, and get free beer. Fri., Sept. 8, 7 p.m. WISEACRE BREWERY, 2783 BROAD, WWW.MEMPHISHEALTHANDFITNESS. COM.

Redbirds Playoff Games

Cherry Street Fair

4339 PARK (761-5250), WWW.DIXON.ORG.

Thurs., Sept. 7, 7 p.m., Tues., Sept. 12, 7 p.m., and Wed., Sept. 13, 7 p.m. AUTOZONE PARK, THIRD AND UNION (721-6000), WWW.MEMPHISREDBIRDS.COM.

Southern Heritage Classic Join in the fun leading up to the game between Tennessee State and Jackson State. For more information on parade, concerts, VIP Party, tailgating, and more, visit website. Thur.-

Jurassic Journeys on Land, Sea, and Air

Featuring animated dinosaurs and other animals from Kokoro. Featuring some new and old friends. Through Sept. 10. MEMPHIS PINK PALACE MUSEUM, 3050 CENTRAL (901.636.2362), WWW.MEMPHISMUSEUMS.ORG.

“Pictures Tell the Story”

Students can reenact the historic “I Am A Man” photograph as part of MLK50 Campaign. School representatives must call the museum to schedule sessions. Through Dec. 31. ERNEST WITHERS COLLECTION GALLERY & MUSEUM, 333 BEALE (523-2344), WWW.THEWITHERSCOLLECTION.COM.

“Rebirth of Crosstown” by Tom Stem and Jamie Harmon at ANF Architects

RIGHTS MUSEUM, WWW.CIVILRIGHTSMUSEUM.ORG.

Russell George Memorial Benefit 2017

S P E C IA L E V E N TS

Benefiting Church Health Center. $10 donation. Sat., Sept. 9, 7 p.m.

901 Day Celebration

EARNESTINE & HAZEL’S, 531 S. MAIN (523-9754).

Fri., Sept. 8, noon-midnight. RAILGARTEN, 2160 CENTRAL.

Fearless First

Celebrate first responders with OR Nurses Nationwide during a free dedication concert honoring Mid-South nurses, police, firefighters, and EMTs. Free. Fri., Sept. 8, 7-10 p.m. LEVITT SHELL, OVERTON PARK (2722722).

MLK50 Concert Series and Community Event

Featured artists include Courtney Little 9/8, Carmen Hicks 9/15, Devin Crutcher 9/22, and Karen Brown 9/29.Free. Fridays, 6-8 p.m. Through Sept. 30. NATIONAL CIVIL RIGHTS MUSEUM PLAZA, BETWEEN MAIN AND CIVIL

Zoo Rendezvous: A Night at the R.I.T.Z. Features fare from more than 80 Mid-South restaurants and bars, as well as entertainment on four stages. 21-plus. $200. Sat., Sept. 9, 7 p.m.

MEMPHIS ZOO, 2000 PRENTISS PLACE IN OVERTON PARK (333-6500), WWW.MEMPHISZOO.ORG.

FO O D & D R I N K EVE NTS

Films in the series will engage with three themes: Memphis history, art, and spatial justice. Free. Thursdays, 6 p.m. Through Sept. 30. CLAYBORN TEMPLE, 294 HERNANDO, WWW.ONLOCATIONMEMPHIS.ORG.

Aircraft Carrier Guardians of the Sea Through Nov. 17.

CTI 3D GIANT THEATER, IN THE MEMPHIS PINK PALACE MUSEUM, 3050 CENTRAL (636-2362), WWW. MEMPHISMUSEUMS.ORG.

Outflix 2017

Featuring 14 features, six documentaries, and 26 shorts. $8-$150. Sept. 8-14. OUTMEMPHIS: THE LGBTQ CENTER OF THE MID-SOUTH, 892 S. COOPER (278-6422), WWW.OUTFLIXFESTIVAL. ORG.

Wider Angle Film Series: Blush

Art on Tap

Annual beer tasting festival. 21-plus. Free for Young At Art members. $30 members, $45 nonmembers. Fri., Sept. 8, 6-9 p.m. THE DIXON GALLERY & GARDENS,

In Hebrew and Arabic with English subtitles. Free. Wed., Sept. 13, 6 p.m. BENJAMIN L. HOOKS CENTRAL LIBRARY, 3030 POPLAR (415-2726).

Blood Donors Needed Platelll

If you are between the ages of 18 and 50 and in good health, you may be eligible to donate blood products for support of research that could lead to the development of new therapies for treatment of cancer and other diseases. Financial compensation is provided. Walk-in donations are not accepted. For more information or to make an appointment contact:

September 7-13, 2017

901-252-3434 info@keybiologics.com www.keybiologics.com

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Talk the Talk

Greely Myatt on trees and conversation bubbles.

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rtist Greely Myatt doesn’t let his past life events go to waste. Take the pine tree he planted decades ago in his mother’s yard. “When I was in the third grade, my teacher — Mrs. Davis — gave all the kids in the class a little pine sapling, and we were supposed to take it home and plant it,” says Myatt, who is 65 and a professor of art at the University of Memphis. “Well, I was a reasonably good student, and I did. Fifty-five years later, my sister called me up and said, ‘Hey, I cut your tree. Do you want any of it?’” Their mother had the pine tree cut down because she was afraid it would fall on her house. Myatt said he wanted all 60 feet of it. Part of that tree is included in some of Myatt’s works in “Making Marks,” his new show at David Lusk Gallery. Indicating his giant Saul Steinberg-looking steel piece depicting a man contemplating a question mark, Myatt said the man’s cuff links, the block he’s sitting on, and the question mark as well as the ball on his exclamation mark sculpture and the shelf holding building blocks are “all wood I grew.” The aluminum quilts in Tablecloths are another story. “I guess some of that’s kind of trying to purge a guilt. When I went to college, my grandmother gave me this beautiful quilt. And I was a kid. I didn’t have respect for anything. Not that I didn’t like the quilt. I was appreciative.” But he used the quilt to wrap up some sharp plaster pieces he had made. “These worthless things. To protect them. And tore the quilt up.” Cartoon or speaking balloons, which show up in his piece, Remarks, made of colorful steel gas cylinder caps, often reappear in his work. “The balloons started when I was making this piece for the old Memphis Center for Contemporary Art years and years ago.” Gathering wood in a dump, Myatt found “this title page of a little novel. And it was called The Lady. On the other side was a handwritten note that said, ‘Grandpa’s sick. I’ll see you at the hospital.’ I thought, ‘Wow. This is really powerful. What do you do with it?’” He made a steel speaking balloon and stuck the page sideways into it, so the viewer could read both sides of the page. Later, he placed wooden quilt-pattern speaking balloons next to some old box spring mattresses. “It was kind of like trying to give inanimate objects a voice, in a way.” Myatt currently is using speak-

ing balloons in his UrbanArts project, “Everybody’s Talking,” a series of five steel sculptures that “increasingly get larger” in Audubon Park. The first segment is an empty speaking balloon and a platform, the second is two balloons and two chairs, and so on. The final segment has a small 15-foot stage with five balloons. “It was an opportunity to give the viewer the chance to say something.” A native of Aberdeen, Mississippi, Myatt read Beetle Bailey and other comic strips. “I tried to draw a few cartoons for our little school paper, and I wasn’t very good at it.”’ He grew up “in the South away from art, but in a big visual culture. We put stuff in our yards, and we’ll call it art because if you don’t, you get beat up or something.” He remembered the tree stump made to look like a bear in a yard down the street from him when he was a kid. “It’s got two branches coming up that are his arms. And he’s holding two mailboxes. That’s the kind of thing I grew up around. Not only was it art, I knew what it was. It did something.”

Myatt Greely’s “Making Marks” is on display at David Lusk Gallery.

So, later when he was shown a box made out of steel in art class at Delta State and told, “This is art,” he was confused. But not for long. Myatt, who wants viewers to come up with their own take on his art work, considers his pieces to be “about talking, which is not communication necessarily. It’s more about confusion and misleading and double reads and all those things than it is about clarity. My job is to confuse.” “Making Marks” is on view through September 30th at David Lusk Gallery.


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F O O D N E W S B y L e s l e y Yo u n g

BIANCA PHILLIPS; JUSTIN FOX BURKS; STANLEY BAR-B-QUE: FACEBOOK

Makeover On taking a new approach: Stanley Bar-B-Que and Red Fish.

I

t’s never too late to find your passion, and for career bartender Andy Walker, that passion has turned out to be smoking meats. “For the first 20 years of my career, I stayed as far away from the kitchen as possible,” Andy says. “Now, barbecue is a real passion for me. You’d be surprised what you’re really good at.” Andy is one of the brothers and sons, behind Stanley Bar-B-Que, formerly Schweinehaus, in Overton Square. He owns and runs the eatery with his brother, David, who is not new to the restaurant business nor to barbecue — he was on a barbecue-cooking team for Memphis in May for years, studied at the French Culinary Institute, and was an executive chef in New York before returning to Memphis to be with his family. Andy and David opened Schweinehaus with their parents, Stanley and Martha, in 2014 once David returned to the Mid-

South to be with his family while his father was being treated for congestive heart failure. Stanley passed away just after Christmas last year. The brothers had already been adding more and more barbecue items to the menu in response to the demand they heard for it in the Overton Square area. They fully transitioned from a German beer hall to a barbecue restaurant in November, and officially changed the name to Stanley Bar-B-Que earlier this summer to not only match the name with the product but to also honor their dad. “Dad always loved barbecue,” Andy says. “He would treat himself to ribs at the Rendezvous once or twice a year.” They offer the full monty — ribs, pulled pork, chicken, turkey, and brisket. They can do Picnic Packs, ranging anywhere from a four-pack for $22 to a 12-pack for $59, with quarts and pans of sides that can feed from 50 to 300-plus. They have barbecue nachos, smoked whole wings,

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Stanley Bar-B-Que’s ribs (top); Cashew Tofu from Red Fish Texas chili, and homemade pies made by Mom. “We have people who come in and buy whole pies,” Andy says. “They might be our best-seller.” They kept some of the Schweinehaus favorites, more for survival instinct than anything else. “We kept the things we would get murdered for taking off the menu,” Andy says. That includes Beer Fries, with shoestring fries, beer cheese, chili, sour cream, and pico de gallo ($7);

their popular pretzel, with beer cheese and Schweinehaus Mustard ($8); Sauerkraut Balls, with apple butter ($9); and Fried Brussels, with bacon, citrus vinaigrette, candied almonds, and balsamic onions ($9). Lately they’ve been giving the space a makeover, giving it a “softer” look than the heavy wood tables and iron chandeliers. “We’re painting, adding more chairs, finishing out the stage, and adding more


MAKEOVER TVs,” David says. “I like to say we’re a work in progress all the time. In the restaurant business, you have to constantly be your own worst critic.” Stanley Bar-B-Que, 2110 Madison, 3473060. stanleybbq.net, Facebook, UberEATS, Bite Squad. Hours Sun.-Thurs., 11-1 a.m., Fri. and Sat., 11-2 a.m. After a short-term dance with high-end dining, restaurateurs Dana Chen and Shon Lin decided to refocus their efforts on what they know. The couple opened Izakaya on New Year’s Day to much fanfare. Memphians clamored to get a look at the historic Nineteenth Century Club, which the couple restored for a $4 million price tag, but changeovers and other difficulties led them to shut the doors just four and a half months later. They own three other restaurants, including two Red Fish Sushi Asian Bistros in Olive Branch and Lakeland and Kublai Khan in Southaven, and felt that a Memphis-based Red Fish would be a good fit. On July 1st, the well-appointed mansion on Union reopened its doors as Red Fish, recently complete with a new sign and sculpture designed by local artist Yvonne Bobo. “We felt like a lot more people in

the area can experience the Nineteenth Century Club,” Chen says. “We have a new price point that everybody can afford.” They offer a wide range of sushi options, hibachi dishes, bento boxes, stir fry, and a section of the menu dedicated to “Deep Fried Chicken” options. Chen says sushi and chicken are their top sellers. “We have the best sushi in town,” she says. “That’s what all of our customers tell us.” Other top sellers include General Tso’s Chicken and Golden Sesame Chicken ($9.95 lunch/$12.95 dinner). Things expand quite a bit for dinner, with an appetizer menu that offers crab puffs and beef tataki and chef specialities like Chilean sea bass, served with roasted corn, jumbo lump crabmeat, onion, garlic, asparagus, and seafood sauce ($34.95) and yuzu filet mignon, served with julienned vegetables and Yuzu wasabi sauce ($31.95). These days Shon is running the kitchen, and they’re waiting for the right time to open the upstairs again. “It’s a beautiful building, and everybody can come in and experience it while eating some really excellent food,” Chen says. Red Fish Sushi Asian Bistro, 1433 Union, 454-3926. redfishbistro.com, Facebook. Hours Sun.-Thurs., 11 a.m. to 9:30 p.m., Fri.-Sat., 11 a.m. to 10:30 p.m.

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S P I R ITS By Richard Murff

It’s Barleywine Not a wine, not a beer, but mighty tasty.

To say the style took off like a rocket might be a stretch, but not much of one. Barleywine brewers pack in extra malt to increase the amount of fermentable sugars, which makes barleywine high in alcohol, but also very sweet. To counteract the sweetness, they then go heavier on the hops. The logic is something akin to chain-smoking cigarettes to get the taste of tequila out of your mouth. Somehow, here it actually works. The end result is — words fail me — a “complex” beer. Being the first American barleywine out of the gate, Old Foghorn was, and still is, closer to the English style, which tends to be more restrained as far as hops and barley. Since then, however, a lot of differ-

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ent interpretations of the old No. 1 have cropped up, and a uniquely American style has developed — more hoppy and bitter. For a bigger bang, Sierra Nevada Big Foot Barleywine is considered the first — and one of the best of the American style. It is a tricky beer, and brewers like to show off, so as far as taste profiles, barleywines have a lot of wiggle room from light and hazy in color to almost stout. They are, however, often hard to find. What’s easy to find is the Wiseacre Taproom on Broad. Waltz on in and grab a 22-ounce bottle of their Snowbeard Barleywine to go. It’s Wiseacre, so it’s a good-looking bottle (but unavailable on tap, and you can’t consume on premises), and inside it’s a big boom of malt and caramel and weighs in at 10.1 percent ABV. Pairing it with a food truck caravan that gathers behind the Wiseacre taproom is probably not the best way to go. Snowbeard wants some good red meat or a stinky blue cheese.

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— or possibly an early exercise in riskmanagement. Barleywine traditionally has an ABV running anywhere from 8 to 16 percent. Before the era of “big beers,” that was the sort of alcohol content more often found in wine. Yet here the Brits were, drinking it out of those big glasses. Bass No. 1 has been the recipe from which all modern barley wines are derived. Yet it would be another century before the style came to American shores. In 1965, Fritz Maytag liked the beer at Anchor Brewing so much that he bought it, just on the eve of the company shutting its doors. Maytag probably didn’t intend to change the American beer scene the way he did; he just liked the beer. But 10 years later, Anchor Brewing was booming and introduced Old Foghorn Barleywine. The term “barley wine” became one word, not for any technical reason, but because the word “wine” chapped the distributors. Having gone and bought the place, Maytag thought he’d like to keep the doors open.

ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT

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o you like those big, bouncy beers — something a little different, hard to find, an ale that fights back? May I suggest barleywine? What’s barleywine? It’s beer, only more so. It’s … it’s … well, that’s kind of a long story. The Greeks made a fermented drink out of grain which they called Krithinos Oinos — or barley wine. Since you can’t really juice a grain, this stuff wasn’t really wine, but it wasn’t ale either. It was just barley wine, and that was that. The name crops up there and again throughout our drunken history, particularly in the 18th century, when brewers attempted to crosssell between “beer” and “wine” cultures. Where our story picks up is 1870, when the good people at the Bass Brewery produced their No. 1 Barley Wine-style ale. Whatever the earlier stuff was, this was a proper ale. It was a marketing gimmick

Wiseacre’s Snowbeard Barleywine

33


FILM By Chris McCoy

Outflix Film Festival Celebrates a Milestone The homegrown festival marks 20 years of bringing LGBTQ films to the Mid-South.

September 7-13, 2017

T

34

his year, the Outflix Film Festival is celebrating its 20th year of bringing LGBTQ films to the Memphis. To say the festival flew under the radar for the first few years is an understatement, but producer Mark Jones, an Outflix board member, says one factor shows how far they’ve come. “This is the first time we have had a letter from both the city mayor, Jim Strickland, and the county mayor, Mark Luttrell, in our program.” It sounds like a little thing, but it’s the kind of symbolic gesture that means a lot in terms of acceptance of Memphis’ gay community by the larger culture. It certainly wasn’t like this back in April 1997 when filmmaker Brian Pera founded the Twinkie Museum Gay and Lesbian Video Festival. “I liked Twinkie Museum, because like a lot of queer lingo, it had refracted meanings, sort of a code logic,” Pera says. “I knew the name was provocative, but hoped that it would create the possibility for conversation. To me, the most important thing was the title’s reference to Harvey Milk and the story of the Twinkie Defense used by lawyers for Dan White, Harvey Milk’s assassin.” White’s lawyers had argued that he killed Milk, the most prominent, openly gay elected official in the country, not because of homophobia, but because he was having mood swings from eating too much sugar. The jury’s acceptance of the argument, which led to a paltry five-year sentence for a double political assassination, was perceived by many in the LGBTQ community as a slap in the face. Pera’s reclamation of the word echoed the way the former slur “queer” has now become an acceptable, even preferred, term of address among those who do not

The Outflix Film Festival is at Ridgeway Cinema Grill through September 14th.

conform to binary gender stereotypes. Jones was a volunteer the first year, when a few-dozen people gathered to watch gay-themed films in the University of Memphis’ psych auditorium.“I think the first year was scheduled over Easter weekend, so there weren’t very many people on campus. Plus, it was the first ever gay film festival in the history of our city,” says Jones. “Back then, it was really hard to get gay films. … It was just sort of word of mouth. … We got a few submissions, but just the availability of high-quality films, it didn’t really exist that much.” The next year, a screening of Ira Sachs’ The Delta put the festival on the map. In 2002, after relocating to the Digital Media Co-Op at First Congo Church, the committee decided on a new name. “The Twinkie Museum, not everyone got the joke,” says Jones. “So we changed it to Outflix.” Still, the festival led a precarious existence. In 2004, it was not held at all, due to lack of funds. Will Batts, now the executive director of OUTMemphis, stepped up to take the reins, and by 2008, when the festival moved to its current home at Malco Ridgeway Cinema Grill, attendance had more than tripled. Outflix 2017 is the most ambitious program in the festival’s history. “Will Batts and I think this might be the strongest lineup we’ve ever had,” says Jones, who helped put together a program of 46 narrative features, documentaries, and short films out of hundreds of entries from all over the world. The opening night film is Forbidden: Undocumented and Queer in Rural America. “It is as timely as today’s headlines. It is a documentary about a


FILM REVIEW By Chris McCoy young man who came to America undocumented when he was 2 years old. He tells his story of growing up and finding out he was queer in rural North Carolina. … Sadly, it’s horrific, as the president is looking to do away with the DREAM Act.” Other documentary highlights include Jewel’s Catch One, the story of pioneering California nightclub owner Jewel Thais-Williams and her four-decade quest to provide a safe space for all orientations and races; The Lavender Scare, a documentary about the Eisenhower administration’s campaign to purge homosexuals from the federal government; and Untold Tales of Armistead Maupin, a portrait of the beloved author of Tales of the City. The festival’s most significant local offering is “He Could’ve Gone Pro,” the short film by McGhee Monteith that, in 2016, took home the first Memphis Film

Prize. “I could watch a close up of Cecilia Wingate smoking and talking on the phone for 15 minutes,” says Jones. “She is great, and the entire film is incredible.” Outflix 2017 will run from September 8th through 14th at the Malco Ridgeway Cinema Grill. For tickets and a full schedule, go to Outflxmemphis.org. The Memphis Flyer will be bringing more in-depth coverage of selected films throughout the festival on our website, memphisflyer.com. “Of all the features over 19 years, I can count on one hand — probably using two fingers — the number of feature films that have come back and played Memphis on the big screen,” says Jones. “No one else is bringing these films to Memphis but us.” Outflix September 8th through 14th Ridgeway Cinema Grill

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LEGAL NOTICE • EMPLOYMENT • REAL ESTATE LEGAL NOTICES

GENERAL

AUTO AUCTION White’s Wrecker will auction the following cars on 9/8/17. 2007 Chevy 1G1AK55F277255672 1999 Ford 1FAFP42X3XF102865 2006 Ford 1FAFP24196G126836 1986 Chevy 1G1GZ37H6GR191178 2006 Porsche WP0AB29886U780589 2009 Ford 3FAHP07Z99R159654 2013 Chevy 1G11E5SA4DF271129

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CLEAN AND PINK Is a upscale residential cleaning company that takes pride in their employees & the clients they serve. Providing exceptional service to all. The application process is extensive to include a detailed drug test, physical exam, and background check. The training hours are 8am-6pm Mon-Thur. 12$-19$hr. Full time hours are Mon-Thu & rotating Fridays. Transportation to job sites during the work day is company provided. Body cameras are a part of the work uniform. Uniform shirts provided. Only serious candidates need apply. Those only looking for long term employment need apply. Cleaning is a physical job but all tools are company provided. Send Resume to cleannpink@msn.com COPELAND SERVICES, L.L.C. Hiring Armed State Licensed Officers/ Unarmed Officers. Three Shifts Available. Same Day Interview. 1661 International Place 901-258-5872 or 901-818-3187 Interview in Professional Attire.

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IT/COMPUTER TANGOE located at 6410 Poplar Ave., Suite 200, Memphis TN 38119 seeks Software Engineer to support Tangoe customers through support and enhancement of Tangoe’s software solutions, participate in product development and debugging of Tangoe’s software applications, implement product improvements with performance tuning, usability and automation enhancements, and support and assist with Tangoe’s applications. Position requires a Bachelor Degree in Computer Engineering or Computer Science plus three years experience in Java, Spring Framework, Oracle or PostgreSQL technology, TCP/IP Technology and Linux or Unix Shell Scripting. Send resume to Tammy Owens, 6410 Poplar Ave., Suite 200, Memphis TN 38119.

VOLUNTEER OPPORTUNITIES IF YOU’RE A GOOD READER and can volunteer to do so please call 901-832-4530

BELMONT GRILL Now Hiring Servers. Must be able to work days. Apply in person Mon-Fri, 2-4pm. 4970 Poplar @ Mendenhall. No phone calls please.

ON BEALE RAFFERTY’S We are looking for service minded individuals, that don’t mind working hard. We work hard, but make $. Apply in the store. 505 N Gtown Pkwy

Overton Place Communities Overton Place Communities Studios,1 1& & 2 bedroom Studios, 2 BR apartments, apartments, duplexes, and duplexes, and houses are homes are Now Available NOW AVAILABLE for occupancy! for occupancy!

is looking for

Servers Food Runners

Come in and fill out an application!

DOWNTOWN APTS

MIDTOWN APT

MINUTES FROM DOWNTOWN Come visit the brand new Cleaborn Pointe at Heritage Landing. Located just minutes from historic Downtown Memphis. 2 bedroom $7443 bedroom $860 Community Room, Computer Room, Fitness Room. A smoke free community. 440 South LauderdaleMemphis, TN 38126 | 901-254-7670.

CENTRAL GARDENS 2BR/1BA, hdwd floors, ceiling fans, french doors, all appls incl. W/D, 9ft ceil, crown molding, off str pking. $720/mo. Also 1BR, $650/mo. 8336483. OVERTON SQUARE 1BR $545 or XLG 1BR $650, W/D, remodeled, porch, pet friendly. $25 credit ck fee. 452-3945

NOW HIRING SALES REP/ACCOUNT REP Contemporary Media Inc., locally owned and operated publisher of Memphis magazine, The Memphis Flyer, Memphis Parent, and Inside Memphis Business is looking for a full-time salesperson to join our team. Must have proven sales experience, excellent communication skills (both written and oral) and be a self-starter. Candidate must be highly organized and able to thrive in a high volume, fast-paced and teamoriented environment. Knowledge of the local market a plus. Preferred Qualifications: · Print, digital, event sponsorship, and mobile selling experience · High-level cold calling · Negotiation skills · High competency in MS Office or Google Drive products · Ability to communicate effectively to a large group Compensation package commensurate with experience, plus paid company benefits

Please send cover letter and resume to: HR@contemporary-media.com No phone calls please.

183 Beale St

1214 Overton 1214 Overton ParkPark 901/276-3603 (901)276-3603 Office hours – Monday – Friday 9 A.M. – 6 P.M. Office Hours: Saturday – 10 A.M. – 5 P.M. Monday-Friday Saturday: 9 a.m. - 6 p.m. 10 a.m. - 5 p.m.

Cost - $120.00/week

LOOKING FOR

THAT CAN GET THE JOB DONE!

36

OFFICE ASST. NEEDED to provide general office assistance; prepare correspondence; greet visitors, sales and provide information; process forms and requisitions; maintain database information; organize and file information. Send resume to jbranch@spikner.com or fax 901-725-1572

SAM’S TOWN HOTEL & Gambling Hall in Tunica, MS is looking for the next Direct Marketing Pro, is it you? We need someone who has excellent organizational skills, knows Direct Mail and Database Marketing, previous Casino Marketing experience preferred. Must have strong written and oral communication skills and the ability to meet deadlines in the fast paced casino environment, proficient in Microsoft Office, CMS and LMS. Must be able to obtain and maintain a MS Gaming Commission Work Permit, pass a prescreening including but not limited to background and drug screen. To apply, log on to boydcareers.com and follow the prompts to Tunica. Boyd Gaming Corp is a drug free workplace and equal opportunity employer. Must be at least 21 to apply.

SILKY O’SULLIVAN’S On Beale is looking for servers & food runners. Come in and fill out an application. 183 Beale St

Amerigo Italian Restaurant is NOW HIRING!

No Canada or Mexico No Loading/Unloading No HazMat Great Benefits

Experienced servers for full and part time positions, fine dining experience is a plus but not required, applicants can apply Mon-Thurs from 2-4, flexible hours, insurance options available.

mcexpressinc.com 800-872-8548

1239 Ridgeway Rd. Memphis, TN | 901-761-4000

is now hiring all positions Servers/Bartenders. Kitchen Staff. Contact John-Paul Gagliano for further details at johnpauldgagliano@gmail.com or (901)410-8200


REAL ESTATE • SERVICES SHARED HOUSING ALL AREAS Free Roommate Service @ RentMates. com. Find the perfect roommate to complement your personality and lifestyle at RentMates.com! (AAN CAN) FURNISHED ROOMS Bellevue/McLemore, Airways/Park, Stage Rd./Covington Pike, W/D, Cable TV/Phone. 901-485-0897

HOUSE SHARING Bartlett Area. 2 private bedrooms and full bath, big back yard, quiet area, $350/mo. Call 901-314-9734 MIDTOWN ROOMS FOR RENT Central Heat/Air, utls included, furnished. 901.650.4400 MIDTOWN ROOM XL room for rent near medical district. Very safe, private entrance. Fully furnished. Wifi. $120/wk + dep. Utilities included. 901-725-0895.

TAXES

901-575-9400 classifieds@memphisflyer.com NICE ROOMS FOR RENT S. Pkwy & Wilson. Utilities and Cable included. Fridge in your room. Cooking and free laundry privileges. Some locations w/sec. sys. Starting at $435/ mo. + dep. 901.922.9089

BUY, SELL, TRADE ADULT DVD’S FOR SALE $3 each. Over 200 movies. All types. Will negotiate. Call 901.237.0560 LOT FOR SALE Memorial Park Cemetery lot for sale. Garden K, Lot 21, Space 3. Reduced price - $7,500. Call 901-327-1318.

ANNOUNCEMENTS NEW AUTHORS WANTED! Page Publishing will help you selfpublish your own book. FREE author submission kit! Limited offer! Why wait? Call now: 888-231-5904 (AAN CAN) PREGNANT? CONSIDERING ADOPTION? Call us first. Living expenses, housing, medical, and continued support afterwards. Choose adoptive family of your choice. Call 24/7. 877-362-2401 (AAN CAN)

MASSAGE TOM PITMAN, LMT Massage The Way You Like It. Swedish/Deep Tissue - Relaxation, Hot Stones. Credit Cards. Call 761-7977. tompitmanmassage.com, tom@tompitmanmassage.com

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Personal/Business + Legal Work By a CPA-Attorney Practicing in Midtown & Memphis Since 1989

(901) 272-9471 1726 Madison Ave Bruce Newman newmandecoster.com

Midtown Friendly!

APARTMENT FOR RENT • MIDTOWN•

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I am only 6 mos old and I’m a sweet, playful, beautiful female Pointer/ Whippet mix. I love people and other dogs. I’m very smart and like to learn new things. I also love to play with my ball. I am kennel-trained and have had NO accidents in the house. I am ready to go to my forever home. I just need YOU!

WILLIAM BREWER Massage Therapist (Health & Wellness offer) 377-6864

NUTRITION/HEALTH MAKE THE CALL TO START GETTING CLEAN TODAY. Free 24/7 Helpline for alcohol & drug addiction treatment. Get help! It is time to take your life back! Call Now: 855-732-4139 (AAN CAN) MALE ENLARGEMENT PUMP Get Stronger & Harder Erections Immediately. Gain 1-3 Inches Permanently & Safely. Guaranteed Results. FDA Licensed. Free Brochure: 1-800-354-3944 www.DrJoelKaplan.com (AAN CAN) OXYGEN - ANYTIME! Anywhere. No tanks to refill. No deliveries. The All-New Inogen One G4 is only 2.8 pounds! FAA approved! FREE info kit: 877-673-2864 (AAN CAN)

M.E SEEKING BLUES GUITARIST Available for lessons or day gig. Also available for parties. Memphis James 901-219-5733

MUSICIAN’S EXCHANGE JESSE & THE TWO SHOTS OF TEQUILA BAND Five Piece Bandavailable for weddings, corporate events, parties etc... in Memphis and Nashville. Song list on website. More information including song lists and booking information at www.rick.business or call 407.608.8015. Calendar will fill up fast so act now. Special discounts for veterans.

AUTO 2002 BMW 525I 4 door, 5 speed/stick, 150k highway miles. Immaculate inside & out! All power. Maintenance records. $5500 cash. Call 901.487.0174

DATING SERVIES LIVELINKS - CHAT LINES Flirt, chat and date! Talk to sexy real singles in your area. Call now! 844-359-5773 (AAN CAN)

To adopt me, please go to dogs2ndchance.org or call 901-485-3450.

VW • AUDI MINI•PORSCHE

German Car Experts

Specializing in VW & Audi Automobiles

Also Servicing

Mini • Porsche

129 Stonewall #7 2 Bedroom 1.5 Bath Apartments $750 Rent $400 Deposit

Mid-South Home Rentals  a division of

For an appointment call 239-1332 For an appointment call 239-1332 | rentmsh.com

Factory Trained Experience Independent Prices

4907 Old Summer Rd.

(Corner of Summer & Mendenhall)

(901) 761-3443 www.WolfsburgAuto.com

Call today for an appointment!

The Edison The Edison Premier retailers, chic eateries, fresh markets & live entertainment venues • Townhouse, garden or high-rise units areto trolley justlineminutes away! • Adjacent • Located near historic Beale Street and AutoZone Park Call • Beautiful park-like setting today!

Classic apartment community featuring 1 & 2-bedroom high-rise units; 1, 2 & 3-bedroom garden units, & 2 and 3-bedroom townhomes. Conveniently located: Easy access to premier retailers, chic eateries, fresh markets & live entertainment venues that are just minutes away.

• Close to UTHSC

Small •••• 1BR $575-$615 1Petsdiscounts &welcome 2-br high-riseReduced units Student Great views of$635-$685 downtown deposit of •••• 2BR 1, 2 Covered parking& 3-br garden units $100 ••3BR $755-$785 2 and 3-br townhomes

567 Jefferson Ave Phone: (901) 523-8112 567 Jefferson Ave | Memphis, TN 38105-5228 Email: edison@mrgmemphis.com Phone: (901) 523-8112 | Email: edison@mrgmemphis.com

Kimbrough Towers

3707 Macon Rd. • 272-9028 lecorealty.com Visit us online, call, or office for free list.

Unique Community Features Include • Historic Central Gardens District • Controlled access building • Garage parking available • Parquet wood flooring • 9 foot ceilings • 24 hour Fitness & Laundry Centers • Private park with picnic & grilling • Central heat and air

Reserve your new home today at the historic Kimbrough Towers

888-446-4954

Monday-Friday 8-5 www.KimbroughTowers.com

MERTON MANOR APARTMENTS

2bedroom/1 bath $595 3bedroom/2 bath $750 Laundry facility on-site. Gated community. Call 272-8658 or cell 281-4446 Kismet Property

Houses & Duplexes for Rent ALL AREAS Visit us @ www.lecorealty.com come in, or call Leco Realty, Inc. @ 3707 Macon Rd. 272-9028

CLASSIFIEDS memphisflyer.com

A Northland Community

37


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THE LAST WORD by Jen Clarke

Planning for Disaster My house has been burglarized twice since we moved in nine years ago. Both times, someone came home and foiled the wouldbe thieves, so all they stole was our time. The first time, a bike was left behind, resulting in a net gain for us. But I still felt violated. Home is supposed to be a safe place. Someone had entered that place without my permission. But, in his search for “stuff ” — electronics, cash, jewelry, and weapons — he tossed aside and stepped over everything that was irreplaceable. We cleaned up the mess, got a security system, and carried on with our lives. Imagine that feeling of vulnerability and trespass multiplied by a thousand. Because a natural disaster is not so scrupulous. Trees fall where the wind directs them. Water doesn’t use your pillowcase as a trick-or-treat bag to fill with jewelry or stack your laptops and televisions at the door. Fire doesn’t seek out the stuff it can pawn, leaving your record collection and your kid’s kindergarten artwork untouched. Nature’s furies rush in, often without warning, taking everything right down to the drywall and leaving a pile of trash where all your stuff used to be. Hurricane Harvey’s victims prepared the best they could, but the storm was stronger. Some grabbed what they could carry and hurried to dry shelter. Others were rescued by kind strangers in boats. They didn’t have enough medicine or food. They left their pets behind, praying that instincts and an open bag of kibble on the kitchen counter would be enough. As I watched the destruction unfold on the news, all I could think about was the smell. As the water recedes, people will be able to return to their homes, to be greeted by a smell that will never leave. In New Orleans, it was a potion of mold and dust bonded by Lake Pontchartrain funk and late-August Gulf Coast humidity. I imagine it’s not much different in Houston; maybe swap rainwater for lakewater. They tell you to wear a respirator, the kind that looks like a gas mask. It doesn’t help. The stink implants itself in the follicles of your nostrils, so for the rest of your life the faintest whiff of mildew takes you right back to that place, that moment. Just a little souvenir from Mother Nature to remind you she’s not screwing around. A “storm door” won’t keep her out but it’s so adorable that you tried. Water and air, elements we need to survive, can be used against us in cruel and spiteful ways. Harvey, Katrina, Sandy, and others inevitably exposed infrastructural flaws that reveal our hubris and failure to plan for the worst-case scenario. How often do we hear “unprecedented” or “more than anticipated” in the context of these tragedies? The breach of the levees, not the hurricane, were the primary cause of damage in New Orleans. During Superstorm Sandy, flooding rendered New York City’s subways inoperable. One station just reopened this summer, five years later. When (not if) it comes time for the nation to #prayformemphis, how ready will we be? Memphis isn’t a coastal city, so hurricane season brings little more than a few days’ worth of relentless downpours and wind. However, there is the matter of the New Madrid seismic zone, which apparently has remained quiet long enough for people to forget about it. In 1990, as an elementary schooler, I was reassured that despite what I’d heard, earthquakes were unpredictable and I would be going to school on December 3rd. Nothing puts a child’s mind at ease like explaining that the movement of tectonic plates can cause the ground to shake without warning, am I right? Mercifully, Iben Browning turned out to be a nutjob, but we still practiced cowering under our desks just in case. Maybe I’m paranoid, but the fact remains: There is no “earthquake season.” Tornadoes can happen year-round too, as long as the conditions are right. So as we offer our support to the people in Texas, it’s also a good time to take inventory. Do you know where you would go if you were forced to evacuate? Do you remember what you’re supposed to do during a tornado (hide in a bathtub) or an earthquake (drop, cover, and hold)? Do you know important phone numbers by heart? Where are your (and your children’s) birth certificate, social security card, passport, immigration papers, insurance cards? Do you have pet carriers? Do you know your neighbors? Because nature isn’t going to wait around while you get your stuff together, and these disasters of socalled “biblical proportions” seem to happen more and more frequently. Jen Clarke is a digital marketing specialist and an unapologetic Memphian.

m e m p h i s f l y e r. c o m

Hurricane Harvey

THE LAST WORD

AFPPHOTOGRAPHY | DREAMSTIME

When (not if) it comes time for the nation to #prayformemphis, how ready will we be?

39


MINGLEWOOD HALL

9/9: TI w/ DJ Envy - Southern Heritage Classic Afterparty 9/28: Marshall Tucker Band Methodist Healthcare Fundraiser 10/3: Portugal. The Man w/ Lido & Maybird 10/4: Lecrae 10/7: Judah & The Lion w/ The Academic 10/13: Maren Morris w/ Ryan Hurd 10/18: Spoon w/ Mondo Cozmo 11/11: 112 & Avant

Est. 1942

Celebrating 75 Years

UPCOMING: Tue Sept 12 - Nothing More Thu Sept 14 - Toadies w/ Local H Fri Sept 15 - Daisyland w/ Valentino Khan Sun Sept 17 - Will Hoge w/ Dan Layus (Of Augustana) Tue Sept 19 - Lettuce Fri Sept 22 - Daisyland 2nd Anniversary w/ Adventure Club Sat Sept 23 - Andy Mineo w/ Social Club Misfits, Wordsplayed Sun Sept 24 - Tank Tues Sept 26 - ZZ Ward Mon Oct 2 - Falling In Reverse / All That Remains Tue Oct 3 - Morgan James Wed Oct 4 - Blue October Sat Oct 7- WellRED Comedy Tour Sat Oct 7 (11pm)-Daisyland w/ Riot Ten Fri Oct 13 - Daisyland w/ Space Jesus Sat Oct 21- Yngwie Malmsteen Thu Oct 26 - Highly Suspect Fri Oct 27 - Daley Sat Oct 28 - Alice in Daisyland: Halloween w/ The Crystal Method Fri Nov 3 - Daisyland w/ Borgore Sat Nov 4 - Issues Mon Nov 6 - Cannibal Corpse Sat Nov 18 - Daisyland w/ Slander Sun Nov 26 - Poptone Wed Nov 29 - Hollywood Undead Tues Dec 5 - Daisyland w/ Snails Mon Dec 11 - Kamasi Washington Sat Dec 16 - Daisyland w/ Figure and Midnight Tyrannosaurus

1884 LOUNGE

9/8: Starlito & Friends 9/11: Kyle Kinane w/ Josh McLane & Ross Turner (Comedy) 9/14: Paul Cauthen w/ Kelsey Waldon 10/1: Rainbow Kitten Surprise w/ Elliot Root 10/5: Perfume Genius 10/13: Com Truise & Nosaj Thing w/ Cleopold

MORE EVENTS AT MINGLEWOODHALL.COM

I Buy Old Windup Phonographs & Records

Esp. on labels: Gennett, Paramount, Vocalion, QRS, Superior, Supertone, Champion, OKeh, Perfect, Romeo, Sun, Meteor, Flip; many others. Also large quantities of older 45’s. Paul. 901-435-6668

TUT-UNCOMMON ANTIQUES 421 N. Watkins St. 278-8965 1500 sq. ft. of Vintage & Antique Jewelry. Retro Furniture and Accessories. Original Paintings, Sculpture, Pottery, Art & Antiques. We are the only store in the Mid-South that replaces stones in costume jewelry.

JESSE & THE TWO SHOTS OF TEQUILA BAND

NEW DAISY THEATRE | 330 Beale St Memphis 901.525.8981 • Advance Tickets available at NewDaisy.com and Box Office

MURPHY’S Pool Table • Darts • WI-FI • Digital Jukebox Visit our website for live music listings or check the AfterDark section of this Memphis Flyer KITCHEN OPEN LATE, OPEN FOR LUNCH! 1589 Madison • 726-4193 www.murphysmemphis.com

THREE MEMPHIS LOCATIONS HIGHLAND

CORDOVA

MIDTOWN

555 S HIGHLAND 901 452 4731

981 N GERMANTOWN PKWY 901 654 3678

2027 MADISON AVE 901 590 0048

whatevershops.com

Join our texting club and get 10% off your next purchase! Text WHATEVER to 51660 . Message & data rates may apply*

YOUNGAVENUEDELI.COM 2119 Young Ave • 278-0034

9/6: $3 Pint Night! 9/7: Memphis Trivia League! 9/23: Grandpa Grew Trees 9/30: Dedsa Kitchen Open Late! Now Delivering All Day! 278-0034 (limited delivery area)

Five Piece Band available for weddings, corporate events, parties etc... in Memphis and Nashville. Song list on website. More information including song lists and booking information at www.rick.business or call 407.608.8015. Calendar will fill up fast so act now. Special discounts for veterans.

#SLIMHOUSE PRESENTS... LIVE FROM MELVIN’S BACKYARD FALL MUSIC SERIES Sept 9: Movie Night “The Wiz” Sing-A-Long Sept 16: The Outcry Sept 23: Cherisse Scott Sept 30: Nick Black FREE ADMISSION. 7-9PM. 1130 COLLEGE ST, SOULSVILLE USA MEMPHISSLIMHOUSE.COM

GONER RECORDS New/ Used LPs, 45s & CDs. We Buy Records! 2152 Young Ave 901-722-0095

The Treasures In The Ozarks Arts N Craft Show MEMPHIS MADE BREWING Taproom hours:

Mon 4 - 7 p.m., Thurs & Fri 4 - 10 p.m., Sat 1 - 10 p.m., Sun 1 - 7 p.m.

768 S. Cooper • 901.207.5343 FREE BREWERY TOURS 4 P.M. SATURDAY & SUNDAY

Coco & Lola’s

MidTown Lingerie

Check out our FOXSTERS !! www.cocoandlolas.com

Finest lace - Coolest place 710 S. Cox|901-425-5912|Mon-Sat 11:30-7:00

NOW HIRING

Private Adult Models/Entertainers. No experience necessary. Ca11 901-527-2460

The Coach House @ Loflin Yard

loflinyard.com • 7 W. Carolina Ave • 249-3046

Interim R E S TA U R A N T & B A R

Lunch Service: Mon-Fri | 11:00-2:30 Dinner Service: Nightly | 5:30, Bar opens at 4:30 PM Mon-Fri, Sunday Brunch: 10:30-2:00 5040 Sanderlin Ave. Memphis, TN 38117

901.818.0821

@interimmemphis | interimrestaurant.com

will be held within the foothills of the beautiful Ozark Mountains beside the famous Spring River in Hardy, AR on September 23,24. Saturday hours are 9am-5pm, Sunday 10am-4pm. Our show features handcrafting artisans only from a variety of art & craft genres. A fabulous show in a gorgeous setting, it’s a perfect weekend getaway! Come join us!! facebook.com/treasuresintheozarks

PIERCER WANTED at NO REGRETS TATTOO.

Must have minimum 2 years experience, portfolio, and Tennessee piercing license or a current license in good standing from another state. Please send all resumes to:

NOREGRETSMEMPHIS@GMAIL.COM

MORGAN AC & HEATING Floor Furnace, Wall & Central Heat. Call 901-774-COOL

FABULOUS CARPET CARE Steam Clean 3 Rooms For $99. “It’s Thorough, Dries Quickly & Stays Clean Longer - Or It’s Free.” Call 901.282.5306

CHIP N’ DALE’S ANTIQUES 3457 Summer Avenue Memphis, TN 38122 EVERYTHING ON SALE! Open Tues-Sat | 901-452-5620

Memphis Flyer 9.7.17  

This week: the whole Flyer staff chips in to cover Memphis' attempts to remove its Confederate monuments, and the activists behind #takeemdo...

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