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CARRIE BEASLEY Senior Art Director CHRISTOPHER MYERS Advertising Art Director JEREMIAH MATTHEWS BRYAN ROLLINS Graphic Designers JUSTIN RUSHING Advertising Director CARRIE O’GUIN HOFFMAN Advertising Operations Manager JERRY D. SWIFT Advertising Director Emeritus KELLI DEWITT, CHIP GOOGE Senior Account Executives ALEX KENNER Account Executive ROXY MATTHEWS Sales Assistant DESHAUNE MCGHEE Classified Advertising Manager BRENDA FORD Classified Sales Administrator classifieds@memphisflyer.com LYNN SPARAGOWSKI Distribution Manager ROBBIE FRENCH Warehouse and Delivery Manager BRANDY BROWN, JANICE GRISSOM ELLISON, ZACH JOHNSON, KAREN MILAM, RANDY ROTZ, LEWIS TAYLOR, WILLIAM WIDEMAN Distribution THE MEMPHIS FLYER is published weekly by Contemporary Media, Inc., 460 Tennessee Street, Memphis, TN 38103 Phone: (901) 521-9000 Fax: (901) 521-0129 letters@memphisflyer.com www.memphisflyer.com CONTEMPORARY MEDIA, INC. KENNETH NEILL Publisher JENNIFER OSWALT Chief Executive Officer JEFFREY GOLDBERG Director of Business Development BRUCE VANWYNGARDEN Editorial Director MOLLY WILLMOTT Special Projects Director KEVIN LIPE Digital Manager LYNN SPARAGOWSKI Distribution Manager MATTHEW PRESTON Social Media Manager BRITT ERVIN Email Marketing Manager ASHLEY HAEGER Controller CELESTE DIXON Accounting Assistant JOSEPH CAREY IT Director KALENA MCKINNEY Receptionist

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1960s: Threat of nuclear war, civil rights protest marches, bloody clashes in the streets, riots. 2017: Hold my beer. Early last week, we were all concerned when the president of the United States offered the possibility of the U.S. taking military action against Venezuela in offthe-cuff remarks. A few days before that, most of us were appalled to find ourselves in a tweet-inspired nuclear stand-off with North Korea. Ho hum. How boring. So, last Friday, white supremacists upped the chaos ante in Charlottesville, Virginia, with a “unite the right” march in which they carried guns, waved Nazi and confederate flags, and chanted racist and anti-Semitic slogans. In the ensuing counter-march on Saturday, one of the alt-Nazis took it upon himself to drive a Dodge Charger at high speed into the crowd, injuring 19 people and killing a young woman named Heather Heyer. President Trump stepped off the golf course long enough to issue a de facto statement, reportedly written by his staff: “We condemn in the strongest possible terms this egregious display of hatred, bigotry, and violence” Trump said, then added, “on many sides, on many sides.” Did you hear about the Racist Asshole Cafe? Yeah, no entrees but many sides. Yes, I stole that from a wag on Facebook, but when your president is incapable of differentiating between murderous white supremacists carrying Nazi flags and people marching in support of equality and civil rights, dark humor is a logical response. These are dark times. And, as it was no doubt intended, Trump’s statement was seen by the Nazis as a wink in their direction, a message that the president was not going to call out those who were using his name to promote their sordid cause. Ku Klux Klanner David Duke said as much: “This represents a turning point for the people of this country. We are determined to take our country back; we’re going to fulfill the promises of Donald Trump … That’s what we believed in, that’s why we voted for Donald Trump, because he said he’s going to take our country back, and that’s what we gotta do.” Two days later, after mounting criticism over his initial remarks, even from members of his own party, Trump read another statement, this time specifically stating that “racism is evil” and denouncing “the KKK, neo-Nazis, white supremacists, and other hate groups that are repugnant to everything we hold dear as Americans.” He read carefully from prepared remarks and didn’t ad lib. But the message to the alt-Nazis had been received. Richard Spencer, the imminently punchable leader of the white nationalist movement said as much: “[Trump’s] statement today was more kumbaya nonsense. Only a dumb person would take those lines seriously.” The battle lines are drawn now, between those who want to reestablish white dominance of America and those who seek a country that offers equal opportunity and justice for all. And that battlefield has turned to the symbolic vestiges of the War Between the States — statues and monuments honoring the confederacy — many, if not most, of which were erected in response to the civil rights struggles of the 20th century, not the war itself. In Memphis on Saturday, several hundred people gathered at the foot of the city’s Nathan Bedford Forrest statue to hear speakers decry the fact that the founder of the Ku Klux Klan sits in the middle of one of our most prominent city parks. This week, the city filed suit against the state to enable it to remove that N E WS & O P I N I O N statue and another one of Jefferson THE FLY-BY - 4 Davis, which sits incongruously in a NY TIMES CROSSWORD - 5 downtown park, a purposeful thumb POLITICS - 8 in the eye of black Memphians that was EDITORIAL - 10 erected in the 1960s. VIEWPOINT - 11 But people are getting impatient COVER — “VERTICAL VILLAGE” and demanding quicker, more forceful BY MAYA SMITH action. The citizen-toppling of a statue & TOBY SELLS - 12 in Durham, North Carolina, this STE P P I N’ O UT week has gotten the attention of many WE RECOMMEND - 18 activists. No one wants the battle of MUSIC - 20 AFTER DARK - 22 Charlottesville to be re-enacted in CALENDAR OF EVENTS - 26 Memphis, but the city and the country BOOKS - 38 — thanks to the president’s dog whistles ART - 40 to the uglier elements of his base — is THEATER - 42 being forced to confront the deeply FOOD - 44 planted seeds of American racism. SPIRITS - 47 We’re all going to have to pick a side. FILM - 48 And there aren’t “many.” C L AS S I F I E D S - 52 Bruce VanWyngarden LAST WORD - 55 brucev@memphisflyer.com

CONTENTS

BRUCE VANWYNGARDEN Editor SUSAN ELLIS Managing Editor JACKSON BAKER, MICHAEL FINGER Senior Editors TOBY SELLS Associate Editor CHRIS MCCOY Film and TV Editor ALEX GREENE Music Editor CHRIS DAVIS, MICHAEL DONAHUE MAYA SMITH, JOSHUA CANNON Staff Writers JESSE DAVIS Copy Editor JULIE RAY Calendar Editor

m e m p h i s f l y e r. c o m

OUR 1486TH ISSUE 08.17.17

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THE

fly-by

f ly on the wall

August 17-23, 2017

VE R BATI M It’s starting to look like everybody is strenuously opposed to Sinclair Media’s impending takeover of Tribune Media properties including Memphis’ own WREG. Well, everybody except the FCC. Last week, the conservative media company NewsMax weighed in against the $3.9-billion deal; this week, Dish Network and the American Cable Association (ACA) piled on. The ACA issued a statement saying, “The combination of the two companies would create a broadcasting behemoth with unprecedented control over both the national and local television markets — inflicting tremendous harm to competition and consumers.” The Dish Network’s complaint took aim at Sinclair’s tendency to determine local content at the corporate level, describing the pending Tribune deal as part of “a systematic assault against local content.”

N EVE R E N D I N G E LVI S Billboard ran a story slugged “40 Years After His Death, Elvis Presley’s Jeweler [Lowell Hayes] Reveals Untold Stories of the King.” In a key passage, Hayes talks about Christmas Eve 1969, when Elvis escorted him into a stall in the men’s room of the Memphian theater (now Circuit Playhouse) to look at potential gifts for friends and family. The king took his place on the throne and said, according to Hayes, “You can put your briefcase right here on my lap.” He bought three rings. Oregonlive.com ran with the headline, “‘Don’t you feel him?’1979 Elvis Presley seance drew thousands in Portland, but faked-death theories live on,” which documented an attempt by a group of Portlanders to prove Elvis was really dead. Cue Twilight Zone theme music.

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By Chris Davis. Email him at davis@memphisflyer.com.

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Questions, Answers + Attitude Edited by Toby Sells

W E E K T H AT W A S By Flyer staff

“I Am A Man” Plaza, MLGW, Aquifer Plaza details revealed, MLGW saves a house, aquifer meeting set. P LA Z A J O B AWAR D E D A California sculptor and a Memphis landscape architect will create the “I Am A Man Plaza” to commemorate the 50th anniversary of the Memphis Sanitation Workers’ Strike and the legacy of Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. Officials with the city and the UrbanArt Commission (UAC) said last week that John Jackson of JPA, Inc., of Memphis, and Cliff Garten of Cliff Garten Studio, of California, will collaborate with Memphis spoken-word artist Steve Fox to create the plaza. The plaza is set to be built adjacent to downtown’s Clayborn Temple. It will cost more than $1.5 million and is expected to be completed by April 2018. The creative team was chosen by a selection committee comprised of community stakeholders, representatives from architecture and design firms, and artists. Committee members reviewed 78 applications and invited six teams to submit site-specific proposals. Garten’s winning proposal now includes a central sculpture of 15-foot-tall stainless steel letters forming the phrase “I Am A Man.” Quotes and speeches from civil rights leaders will be included in components around the sculpture. The team will also lead community workshops for citizens across the city to share the design and to review the text to be featured in the plaza. H I STO R I C H O M E SAVE D Amid its expansion plans, Memphis Light, Gas and Water (MLGW) will preserve a North Memphis home where the phrase “I Am A Man” was coined. MLGW is buying land in the area to expand its North Service Center. In June, the utility purchased the former home of Joe C. Warren at 968 Meagher. Warren was a member of the local American Federation of State, County and Municipal Employees (AFSCME) union and hosted organizational meetings at his home. It was there the term “I Am A Man” was coined, a phrase worn on signs by striking sanitation workers in Memphis. Warren was one of the 33 sanitation workers fired by the city in 1965 for “alleged employment violations,” according to MLGW. The phrase is now

an icon of the civil rights movement memorialized in countless photographs and murals. AQ U I F E R M E ETI N G P L AN N E D The public will get an update on the contamination found close to Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA) wells drilled into the aquifer later this month. The TVA drilled five wells into the Memphis Sand Aquifer, the source of the city’s drinking water, with permission granted last year by the Shelby County Groundwater Control Board (SCGCB). TVA wants to pump about 3.5 million gallons of water per day from those wells to cool a new energy plant. TVA recently discovered high levels of arsenic and lead in groundwater about a quarter mile from those wells. Memphis Light, Gas and Water said recent tests found no detectable traces of the toxins in water from nearby wells. However, in a July 20th letter, Tennessee state Sen. Lee Harris asked the chairman of the groundwater board to suspend TVA’s well permits and asked for a further, third-party investigation into the matter. Also, Harris asked chairman David McCray for a meeting to update the public on the matter. Harris also asked that the public be able to give the board feedback on the project. The meeting is scheduled for Thursday, August 24th at 3 p.m. in Room C of the Benjamin L. Hooks Central Library.


For Release Saturday, May 6, 2017

The New York Times Syndication Sales Corporation 620 Eighth Avenue, New York, N.Y. 10018 For Information Call: 1-800-972-3550 For Release Thursday, March 2, 2017

Crossword

Edited by Will Shortz

Edited by Will Shortz

No.

No. 0126

Crossword 37 Loose, now ACROSS DOWN 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 1 1 One of the Great 40 Powerful D.C. 1 Vase style 14 15 16 Lakes lobby 2 Compatriot of 5 Menacing cloud 41 Raiser of 17 18 19 Mao awareness, for 10 Sony offering short 3 Noted father-or20 21 22 14 Saint’s home, for son singer 44 Not accidental short 23 24 25 4 Ancient New 45 In opposition 15 Place for a Mexican barbecue 46 Guru, maybe 28 29 30 31 5 Part of a crib 16 Rich finish? 47 Straightens 32 33 34 17 “Don’t give up” 6 Living ___ 49 Firm parts: Abbr. 19 Rather powerful 35 36 50 Hockey team, 7 Major Asian ANSWER TO PREVIOUS PUZZLE engine e.g. carrier 37 38 39 40 4 20 Brown 51 Words on a 8 Attire 21 Some plants jacket 44 45 46 9 Like melancholy 23 Value 53 Risked a ticket musical keys 47 48 49 25 Spooky quality Online subscriptions: Today’s puzzle and more than 7,000 past 55 Construction puzzles, nytimes.com/crosswords ($39.95 a year). 10 The poor staples … onoreach puzzle: nytimes.com/wordplay. Read about and comment 28 Smoothie fruit Crosswords for young solvers: nytimes.com/studentcrosswords. 50 51 52 a hint to this 11 Not go along 29 Popular cookie puzzle’s theme 55 56 12 Prefix with lateral 53 54 31 Taking things for 59 Famous Amos granted on April 13 Bedevil 59 60 61 60 Rocker Steve Fools’ Day and 18 Girl’s name that others 61 “Don’t go!,” e.g. 62 63 64 may precede Ann 32 “Time ___ …” 62 Obnoxious one 33 Track, in a sense 63 Subject of some 22 One may be starting in sports PUZZLE BY HOWARD BARKIN codes 34 Not wait for Mr. RESTAURANT & BAR Right, say 36 Actress Wilson of 43 Features of 54 Autho 23 What’s shaken 64 Scandinavian wrote Boston accents “Mrs. Doubtfire” when you say capital 35 Huuuuuuuuge insan “Shake!” 45 Milieu of the 37 Sch. with the long ANSWER TO PREVIOUS PUZZLE FX series “The 24 Big letters in George W. Bush horrib Americans” electronics Presidential E P I C P O E M B R O W S E 46 Poetic stanza Library D E M O T A P E S H R E W S 25 Ones moving far 56 Burie 48 Like government from home 38 Corral K E P T A T I T C Y C L I C bonds O D E T S S H U S A L M A 26 Fifth in a group 39 Strips at 57 Pull ( 49 German of eight breakfast C E N A B O O Z E S I M P preposition H E D P U D D I N G N E A 27 Saginaw-to-Flint 41 Tough, tenacious 51 Oil qtys. 58 Noted S I Z E S Q U O T E D sorts dir. pseud 52 They burn J A C U Z Z I Q U I X O T E 29 Bit of beachwear 42 Wild blue in sh A L O N Z O G U I D O writin yonder 53 Racing letters 30 ___ way N A V A F F A I R E B F F I K E A F U Z Z Y W Y L E 33 It may be added Online subscriptions: Today’s puzzle and more than 7,0 to alcohol puzzles, nytimes.com/crosswords ($39.95 a year). T A R O S R E B C A G E S O Z 10:30am A R K- 3am S • Delivery: T O M A - T2:15pm O E/ 5pm S - 2:15am Open: 11am 34 Pitiful Read about and comment on each puzzle: nytimes.com 346 North Main, Memphis, TN 38103 (on the trolley line) R A G T O P T W O P E N C E 35 Hit the gas pedal Crosswords for young solvers: nytimes.com/studentc westysmemphis.com 5 S M E A R Y E L M T R E E S hard ACROSS 1 To wit 7 Weakness 13 One traveling in a basket 14 Place where people are rushing 15 Lively 16 Deadlock 17 Lively 18 White House pets for Reagan and both Bushes 20 Le Duc ___, decliner of the 1973 Nobel Peace Prize 21 “Huh! No kidding!” 22 Black ___ 25 End of some business names 27 Actress Benaderet 29 Prophet who anointed Saul 32 “Spit it out!” 35 ___ fries

S P A M

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J A B E M U A B I T E S T R O R S E H N A O S C A M S H A Z B Y N O I C C I A R N A C M O G U L O N J E R Y U R E N S K

F O L I O S

S N A P C H A O T R A B L E N E Z L I

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DOWN 1 Plato’s “tenth Muse” 2 Supervillain in a 2015 “Avengers” sequel 3 Rosemary, for one 4 That guy 5 Ancient symbols of sovereignty 6 Station 7 Forces 8 Common spot for a sunburn 9 Constant 10 Subject of an 1820 compromise 11 “___ alive!” 12 Word of support 13 Exceeds 21, in a way 14 Dandy 19 Aeschylus tragedy 23 Sports star with a signed jersey in the Vatican 24 Foxy 26 Not tip 27 Club alternative 28 “___ & Duke at the Côte D’Azur” (1966 jazz album) 30 1 chain x 1 furlong 31 Obfuscate

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PUZZLE BY HAL MOORE

33 Rock follower? 34 Fortune 500 company founded in 1995

36 Name of a family with a combined 7,228 hits 37 One may be exploited

38 Suffix with real

53 Bibliography 39 “The ___ of the abbr. moral universe is long, but it bends 54 Shabby toward justice”: M.L.K. 55 Cool people 42 All that is left? 56 Ice cream purchase 45 Feature of many a minion in “Despicable Me” 57 Ice cream ___ 46 Actor Culkin of “Igby Goes Down” 47 Boot

50 Give up

58 Scoreboard figure: Abbr.

59 Start to hesitate? 61 Afternoon hour in Italy

DELICIOUS!

m e m p h i s f l y e r. c o m

C H A P

D I A L

63 Whisky first produced for King George VI’s 1939 visit to Canada 64 Refines, in a way 65 Intensify

NEWS & OPINION

E N D S

36 Secret’s source … that can be found four times in this puzzle 39 Up 40 Bowled over 41 One whose business has a lot of overhead? 43 Dec. 31 44 It keeps a team together 48 Ice cream purchase 49 “The Name of the Rose” author 51 Reject 52 Greek 57 Percolate 58 Voting requirement in some states 60 “Let’s go someplace private” 62 Best Picture subject nine inches shorter than the actor who portrayed him


The Urban Child Institute starts new chapter with a new leader, new focus.

Major changes could be on the way for the Urban Child Institute (TUCI) as board members are set to soon vote on some new directions for the non-profit organization as it prepares a physical move into Crosstown Concourse. Much has already changed at TUCI since a 2015 shake-up saw the departure of the organization’s president and board chairman. The organization then downsized, shifted its to focus to interventions (rather than just research) to promote childhood wellness, and committed to giving away larger sums of its vast reserves. In February, former Methodist Healthcare CEO Gary Shorb was hired to helm TUCI and implement those new directions. Five months in, Shorb said TUCI runs lean, has a clear mission, and is ready to help make tangible changes for children in the Memphis community. Flyer: What was the state of TUCI when you got there? Gary Shorb: Meri Armour [a TUCI board member and Le Bonheur Children’s Hospital CEO] was interim executive director for a year. She did a terrific job of following the board direction of downsizing, and reshaping, and redirecting the organization. All of that was done, and a great foundation was in place. How is the organization redirecting? We’re working with the board now to define our focus. We are really proposing to have as our primary focus [initiatives that would get] four-year-olds ready for kin-

dergarten. Our secondary focus is third-grade literacy. One of the biggest indicators of success in school is: Are you ready for kindergarten? And: Can you read at third-grade level? Those two areas, it seems to us, have a pretty big payback in terms of economic development and educational goals attainment. Are other changes on the way? What we’re going to try to do is develop a project in collaboration with Pyramid Peak Foundation and other foundations that is more geographically specific and focused on one area, where we bring a number of organizations together to collaborate effectively and make a bigger impact. All of that is in the planning stages. What about research funding? Well, we’re moving more away from research, other than what [the University of Tennessee Health Science Center] has going on right now. We’re trying to move more into intervention and finding best practices for services. Porther Leath and Agape [Child and Family Services] have got their Powerlines work that’s going on [which connects needy families to resources] and is really focused on apartment complexes. We want to tie that in with the child-care centers that are around their apartment complexes. Then, we can bring together the

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Gary Shorb is Urban Child’s new leader.

THE URBAN CHILD INSTITUTE

Institute Changes {

CITY REPORTER B y To b y S e l l s

organizations that are already working in a geographic area and see if we can help them build capacity and follow more best practices to really have a bigger impact in a particular area. This sounds like a major shift. It is from a last few years of the TUCI focus where they had the [relationship with the] RAND Corp. and were doing a lot of research. What the board wanted to do and what Meri started was funding more of the outreach, funding more intervention work with families and with children. It’s a continuation of that. We’re trying to more specifically define the work into geographic and child-carecenter projects and in those two big goals: kindergarten readiness and third-grade literacy. Treat the condition- Transform your life! Are you dependent or addicted to •painkillers •opiates •methadone •heroin?

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Ridin’ Safely

DELTA FAIR AND MUSIC FESTIVAL

Delta Fair beefs up ride inspections.

The standard state inspection only requires operators to have their rides inspected prior to an event and pass an annual inspection. The Delta Fair will also provide certified safety inspectors on the site to perform random inspections of the ride operators, the grounds, and for “safety and security best practices.” In 2016, some Delta Fair visitors were injured when the Moonraker ride malfunctioned, according to The Commercial Appeal archive. Four visitors broke bones after they were jostled or fell from the ride after the ride operator released the safety harnesses before the ride came to a complete stop. SCSO deputies will also be on site during the fair’s run, and additional security will be provided by Class A Security. Tennessee has no amusement device inspectors. Instead, the state relies on third-party inspection agencies including NAARSO, the Amusement Industry Manufacturing and Suppliers, and the Association for Challenged Course Technology. Inspection requirements were raised in Tennessee after three children fell from a Ferris wheel at a Greene County fair last year. Their basket on the ride overturned and dumped the girls out, falling 35 to 40 feet. One of the victims, a six-year-old, suffered a traumatic brain injury. That incident prodded state lawmakers to strengthen regulations on ride inspectors, ensuring they come from third-party agencies. Also, operators are now required to post stickers on rides showing the date of their last inspections.

m e m p h i s f l y e r. c o m

The Delta Fair midway last year

NEWS & OPINION

You can’t ride the Fireball in Tennessee. That’s the amusement park ride that killed an 18-year-old and injured seven others last month at the Ohio State Fair. Video shows the shocking scene as one of the ride’s gondolas detached from a swinging arm and flung passengers to the ground. After the incident, the Tennessee state Amusement Device Unit, a segment of the Department of Labor & Workforce Development, grounded the ride here until the matter can be fully investigated. KMG, the company that makes the Fireball, also instructed owners to stop using the rides for now. To allay safety concerns after the incident, the Delta Fair & Music Festival is upping its safety and security measures for its event this September at Agricenter International. “We are taking a proactive stance to ensure the safety and security of our fair attendees,” said Matt Snyder, director of safety and emergency services for the Delta Fair. “We are hiring additional security staff to enhance the Shelby County Sheriff ’s Office (SCSO) efforts, and we are going above and beyond state requirements for ride inspections with an aggressive, unprecedented five-step protocol for the inspection and safety of the rides.” Reed Exposition Midway, the company that provides the rides for the Delta Fair, will ensure two officials from the National Association of Amusement Ride Safety Officials (NAARSO) are on site during the fair. They will inspect the rides throughout the fair and will also perform random inspections of the rides. Shelby County Code Enforcement will also inspect the rides and issue permits for them if they pass.

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POLITICS By Jackson Baker

The Prophet

August 17-23, 2017

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Jesse Jackson was in Memphis over the weekend, appearing at a number of venues. On Saturday, he was on a panel at the National Civil Rights Museum, where he condemned the ongoing events in Charlottesville, blaming them for an “incitement to violence [that] is very apparently coming from the White House,” and asserting that “the ignorance and hate and fear and violence in Virginia is being fed from the top down.” On Sunday, there were appearances at churches and a press conference at Mt. Pisgah C.M.E. Church, where he repeated such sentiments and deplored the idea of “neutrality in a time of crisis.” On Monday, Jackson met with Mayor Jim Strickland, where he made the case for more minority contracting and pronounced himself satisfied with “signs of progress” on the city’s part. At all these places, he maintained — almost dutifully, it seemed at times — the bearing of an icon. He has, after all, been one for most of the nearly 50 years since he first made his presence known in Memphis, as a young associate of Dr. Martin Luther King Jr., as the disciple who made the claim, questioned by numerous observers on the spot but converted into a kind of metaphorical truth by Jackson’s subsequent career, that he had cradled the bloody head of the martyr on that cruel April day in 1968 when King was assassinated at the Lorraine Motel. In 1991, when former Memphis schools superintendent Willie Herenton was in the stretch drive of his historic race for mayor, it was Jackson who appeared on his behalf at the rostrum of a climactic rally, and it was Jackson, too, who, in the aftermath of Herenton’s victory, would come to Clayborn Temple for a celebration, giving that edifice its last great moment before its collapse into a delapitude that is just now being answered by a faithful restoration (See Viewpoint, p. 11). Jackson is heavier now, the face rounder, the hair shorter, but still well-barbered and, one way or another, still dark, unstreaked with gray. His voice, at its low register, is softer and somewhat harder to grasp, but when he tunes up the decibels for a rhetorical flight or a show of passion, he is still the Jesse Jackson of old, the first African American to make a serious run at the presidency, the indispensable presence at every point of urban crisis, the oracle of civil rights who bridged the gap between the late Martin Luther King Jr. and … And whom? That Al Sharpton is the closest thing to an answer is merely a way of saying that Jackson has still not been entirely replaced as a spokesman for his people or as a conscience of their cause. Theirs and ours, for 20 years before Barack Obama turned up to intone, “Now is our time!” and “Yes, we can!” — words that exalted the historical struggle of black Americans for equality but somehow transcended the predicament of a single people to excite the hope for

change of an entire generation — there was Jesse Jackson on the first of April in 1988, having just won the Michigan, presidential caucuses over seven or eight other Democrats, standing alongside those beaten competitors on a stage of a Jefferson-Jackson Day affair in Milwaukee, telling an electrified crowd the simple truth: “If my competitors had my budget, they would surrender. If I had their budget, they could not compete.” Instead of the stereotypical address on civil rights that political observers might have expected, Jackson went on to deliver a blistering attack on the economic order of the time — already, that early, able to see the price high/pay low strategy of a name-checked Apple Computer for what it was, offering the kind of brass-tacks economic analysis of international commerce that could stir a lay crowd, that might have stirred those Trumpian voters in America’s rust-belt states if stated there by a Democratic presidential candidate in 2016: “There is no free trade anywhere, and no free lunch. … Slave labor will always undercut organized labor. …

Jesse Jackson in the pulpit at Mt. Pisgah Capital follows property, not conscience. … Cheap labor there, high prices here. … Taiwan is not taking jobs from us, GE is taking jobs to them. GE made billions, got a $100 million tax rebate and paid no taxes, while Americans on unemployment had to pay taxes. Reverse Robin Hood, it takes from the poor and gives to those who do not need it.” Jackson was just then at his zenith politically. In the end, however, he did not have the aforementioned “budget” nor the connections in high places that were already beginning to put the erstwhile populist Democratic Party in the same kind of dependency on corporate generosity as the rival Republicans. In that Milwaukee speech, he said, “In America, it’s not about money, it’s about authenticity.” A worthy sentiment, but not quite … on the money. He would lose Wisconsin, albeit narrowly, to Michael Dukakis, and end up finishing second in the primary season overall to the Massachusetts governor, who in turn would lose in November to the GOP’s George Herbert

Walker Bush. There have been many ups and downs since then for Jackson. He never lost standing with his AfricanAmerican base, but he would never again loom as the bridge-building presence that he came near to being in 1988, when he graced a Time magazine cover over the simple phrase “Jesse?” A generation later, Obama, a cooler property of an inspiring but less incendiary and ideological nature, would win the prize that Jackson had sought. Meanwhile, Jesse Jackson was relegated in the media and in most people’s minds to the role of civil rights veteran, an ombudsman of sorts for that cause, a testifier certifying to this or that transgression against the rights of black folks. And, indeed, he can and does speak to that need, as when he said, preaching to the congregation at Mt. Pisgah, that Willie Herenton or Bishop William H. Graves of the CME Church might have been governor of Tennessee but for the habits of racial prejudice. He does so when he says that the monuments to confederate luminaries should go because “if you lose the war, you lose the statue,” and “They fought for secession and slavery and sedition and segregation. They should be in a museum. At best.” But there is still room in Jackson’s preaching for the social gospel of a distinctly universal kind. Invited to deliver a sermon at Mt. Pisgah on Sunday, he began with a reading from Ephesians, that the “armor of God” is there that “you may be able to stand against the wiles of the devil, for we wrestle, not against flesh and blood, but against principalities, against powers, against the rulers of darkness in this world, against spiritual wickedness in high places.” There was room in his message for “the Appalachian coal miners who work two miles down in the dark, who provide the energy for our country … the poor whites who lack health care,” and who had been led to “fight against their own interests” by opposing what was branded as Obamacare. “Obamacare is a name; they tried to poison the book by poisoning the cover,” he said of the opponents of the Affordable Care Act. “The rich,” he said, “were going to take away 25 million people’s health care and give the money to the wealthy.” But that was foiled by John McCain, whom Jackson characterized as a rich man, too, “a millionaire with cancer who saved 25 million by turning his thumb down.” Proof, he said, that “there is nothing too hard for God.” Jackson disposed of Trump’s latest ploy to limit legal immigration by noting that Jesus was a “refugee” who spoke no English, and “had no job after 30,” and thus could not qualify under the new immigration plan. “You banish a refugee, you are trying to fight Jesus!” he thundered, and the congregation, delighted, recited the thought along with him. There was more, all of it relevant to the ongoing political dialogue, all of it a reproach to the more tempered and timid voices of the moment, all of it a reminder that Jesse Jackson, with or without honor in his own country, is still a prophet to his time.

JACKSON BAKER

Jesse Jackson was in Memphis this past weekend, rekindling memories of a mission — political as much as religious — still in need of fulfillment.


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NEWS & OPINION

m e m p h i s f l y e r. c o m


E D ITO R IAL

Article 1 Amendment I. Congress shall make no law respecting an establishment of religion, or prohibiting the free exercise thereof; or abridging the freedom of speech, or of the press; or the right of the people peaceably to assemble, and to petition the government for a redress of grievances. The foregoing words are those of the We Offer Degree and Certificate Programs in First Amendment to the United States Constitution, an afterthought, as it were, to the hard work, good intentions, and labored-over compromises of the delegates from 13 heretofore independent colonies that had presumed to be independent states of the European kind and had adhered up to that point to a looser compact, the so-called Articles of Confederation. It was taken for granted by the representatives in Philadelphia of these far-flung entities that the casual sort of association created by the Articles just WORKFORCE DEVELOPMENT AND wouldn’t do to protect the newly won independence of any or all of them. CONTINUING EDUCATION That is why they had agreed to meet in convention and why they availed themselves of guidance from the likes of George Washington, the military leader who had guided their revolt against British authority, and Jefferson, Madison, Adams, and the rest of those illustrious 7/25/17 8:41 AM sorts who, in our own time, go by the name of Founding Fathers. It was recognized that the 13 states so joined would have conflicting interests, the most obvious of which was slavery, an institution so glaringly in conflict with the ideals of a “more perfect union” that it would need, ultimately, to be abolished by the sword, at the cost of hundreds of thousands of lives, North and South, and of an economic devastation of the latter territory that would take a century or more to repair. Once that Civil War was ended and the union restored, virtually the first

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order of business was a series of new constitutional amendments, the 13th through 15th, all designed to safeguard the “new birth of freedom” that a martyred president had spoken of in the course of the war. Interpreting those new anti-slavery amendments has, all things considered, been the major focus of Supreme Court concern ever since, and resistance to them has, more or less successfully, been contained by the liberty of expression guaranteed in that very first amendment cited above. Differences of opinion on the subject of equality still do exist, unfortunately, and they are protected by that amendment. There are limits to free expression, however, and the Court’s 1919 decision in Schenck v. United States, spells them out succinctly as prohibiting dangerous speech, defined by Justice Oliver Wendell Holmes as “shouting ‘fire’ in a crowded theater.” Last weekend’s actions by the faux confederates and neo-Nazis who bore torches and arms to Charlottesville, Virginia, in a deranged last stand in defiance of both equality and free discourse, an un-peaceable assembly that began in violence and ended in murder, was clearly well beyond the limits prescribed by Justice Holmes, and it is likely to generate an updated definition of the limits of public expression. We do not have to guess at the consequences of such actions, after all. The legacy of the aforesaid Civil War and the ravages of the Second World War are testament enough to them.

August 17-23, 2017

C O M M E N TA R Y b y G r e g C r a v e n s

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VIEWPOINT By Arthur Oliver

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Joining With History

IN TUNICA

The Rotary Club of Memphis moves to historic Clayborn Temple to commemorate a noble era.

The 50th anniversary of the events of 1968 will be a hallmark time, and the Rotary Club has chosen to be at the right place to play our part in the commemoration. Despite its celebrated history, Clayborn Temple sat vacant, in dire need of repairs, after its congregation moved away and closed its doors almost 25 years ago. Endeavoring to save the building for posterity as a symbol of economic justice and civil rights, Frank, Smith, the owner of Wiseacre Brewery, joined with Thompson to form the aforementioned nonprofit, Clayborn Reborn, to see to the building’s restoration. Rotary’s move into the structure as a regular venue for our meetings is meant to assist as an active part of that restoration. This move is bigger than the citizens and community activists who make up Rotary. When we joined the club, we made a commitment to networking and community service, and this connection to Clayborn Temple gives us the opportunity to be a part of something majestic, and hopefully to help make an impact on our city and the nation. The 50th anniversary of the events of 1968 will be a hallmark time, and the Rotary Club has chosen to be at the right place to play our part in the commemoration of the past and the unity of the present. Arthur Oliver is president of the Rotary Club of Memphis, which is part of Rotary International, the world’s largest humanitarian service organization.

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action. It began to serve as an important central meeting place for the civil rights movement. It became the headquarters for the striking sanitation workers and their supporters and a starting point for the strikers to assemble before their solidarity marches. Dr. King visited the temple on multiple occasions during the strike, and it was at Clayborn that the famous “I Am a Man” signs were first distributed. As Thompson notes, “Its successful contribution to the legacy of Dr. King and to the Civil Rights movement has firmly established Clayborn Temple among Memphis’ three most important civil rights locations, along with the Lorraine Motel and the Mason Temple.”

NEWS & OPINION

Next month, the Rotary Club of Memphis, which was chartered in 1914 and has seen much local history, will embrace one of the most honored and venerable symbols of that history when it begins its regular weekly club meetings at the historic Clayborn Temple downtown. Our move, which was approved this month by an overwhelming vote of our membership, is meant to align the activities and aspirations of our club, which in the century-plus span of its existence has lived by the motto “Service Above Self,” to the temple, which, in the same time frame as our own, has itself represented that ideal, and heroically so. In particular, our intent is to honor and commemorate the historical importance that Clayborn Temple played in the civil rights movement as our city approaches the 50th anniversary of the fateful sanitation workers strike here and the participation in it of the great martyr Dr. Martin Luther King Jr., who gave his life in that struggle. At 124 years old, Clayborn Temple is already listed as a local architectural treasure on the National Register of Historic Places. Earlier this year, the temple received additional national recognition from the National Park Service for its historical importance as the central meeting place for the sanitation workers during those strike days of February through April of 1968. Located at the northeast corner of Hernando and Pontotoc, just south of the FedExForum, the temple began its life as the magnificent venue for the Second Presbyterian Church, which constructed the building in 1893. As Rob Thompson of Clayborn Reborn, the nonprofit group working on the temple’s restoration, has observed, “When it first opened, it was the largest church building in America south of the Ohio River.” And the building’s history has paralleled the history of the city. As the city limits of Memphis moved eastward in the 1930s and 1940s, so did the church’s congregation. When, in 1949, Second Presbyterian decided to move to its present location in East Memphis, it sold the building in 1949 to the African Methodist Episcopal (AME) Church. (The new congregation then renamed the building after its bishop at the time, the Rev. Jim Clayborn.) During the 1960s, Clayborn Temple not only continued as a house of worship for its congregation but entered history as a showcase for the gospel in

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8/11/17 1:52 PM


cover story by Maya Smith & Toby Sells / photographs by Justin fox burks

The Vertical Village

CROSSTOWN CONCOURSE OFFICIALLY OPENS, FULFILLING A SEEMINGLY IMPOSSIBLE DREAM.

August 17-23, 2017

S

aturday will be a crazy Memphis moment. At least, that’s how Todd Richardson sees it. Richardson is a co-founder of Crosstown Arts, the group that spurred the redevelopment of the massive, empty Sears Crosstown building. Since 2010, Richardson’s mind has been focused on recruiting partners, signing tenants, finding funding, construction schedules, paperwork, designs, plans, and meetings, meetings, meetings. But at its core, Richardson still calls Crosstown a “miracle.” “Yeah, at the end of the day, what a crazy Memphis moment?” Richardson says with a laugh. “It was the middle of the recession, and it couldn’t be done. It’s a completely unique redevelopment; there’s not another one like these in the country. So, we’re really celebrating the tenacity of the city for this miracle to happen. To me, that’s what August 19th is all about.” Saturday is the Crosstown Concourse Opening Celebration, a moment eight years (or, nearly 90) in the making. The celebration starts at 3 p.m. with a dedication ceremony in the Central Atrium. The day continues with tenant open houses, live music, and a screening of a feature-length documentary about the Crosstown project. Much of the building is already alive with residential and commercial tenants. But loose ends will be tied up as the year goes on — more apartments will be filled, programs will be started, and office workers will soon move into now-empty floors. At full tilt, nearly 3,000 people will come and go there each day, according to Crosstown officials. That impact (economic and otherwise) will hit the area like an “atom bomb,” at least, in the words of a city official years ago. That energy will flow from a longneglected “big empty” and revitalize a neighborhood that’s already feeling positive effects, with the potential for transforming a whole section of the city.

The (Way) Backstory

Company men from Sears, Roebuck & Co. quietly arrived in Memphis in the late 1920s, seeking sites for a retail center and catalog order plant. They knew if local property owners thought Sears was 12 interested in their property, their prices would skyrocket. So, the Sears officials

drove around town, pointing to sites from their car windows, while, behind them, real estate brokers followed in another car and took notes. The company eventually settled on Crosstown, a then-suburban neighborhood about two miles from downtown. One hundred and eighty days after construction began, on August 27, 1927, Memphis Mayor Rowlett Paine cut the ribbon on a 640,000 square-foot facility that would employ more than 1,000 people. That first day, almost 30,000 shoppers came to visit the 53,000-square-foot retail center. At its peak, nearly 45,000 catalog orders left Sears Crosstown each day. The building also had a small hospital, cafeteria, ladies recreation area, administrative offices, a credit union, board rooms, and “The Cypress Room,” for executive dining. Forty years later, Crosstown had grown to a mammoth 1.5 million square feet on 19 acres. Unfortunately, like the original mammoth, it had become outdated. Shoppers had headed east and elsewhere. Sears closed the Crosstown retail store in 1965. The site remained a regional distribution center for Sears. But less than 30 years later, due to the decline in the company’s mail-order business, Sears closed many of its warehouses across the country, including Crosstown. The building was left vacant in 1993 and remained an iconic emtpy tower for more than 20 years.

The (Recent) Backstory

Richardson can tell the story of Crosstown’s recent history in about a minute. He’s an art historian, a professor at the University of Memphis, but he knew the Crosstown property owner. Richardson asked about the building, and that started a “wouldn’t-it-be-cool


So, What Is It?

The Crosstown website now calls its facility a “vertical urban village,” and some variation of that term has been used to describe it from the beginning. The website also tries to invoke Crosstown’s spirit by calling it “a local heart for the cultivation of well-being, shifting focus from products to people, from commodity to quality of life,” adding that Crosstown will build “on three of Memphis’ strongest community assets — arts, education, and health care. Concourse is now a mixed-use vertical urban village with a purposeful collective of uses and partners.” So, what’s in the village? The building will include Crosstown Arts, Crosstown High School, and numerous health-care agencies. It’ll also be home to the Curb Market grocery store, numerous restaurants, a pharmacy, a nail shop, a FedEx Office store, apartments, and more. To anyone in commercial real estate, it looks like a classic mixed-use development, a mix of residential, commercial, and retail spaces. Many of the tenants, including Curb Market, FedEx, Farm Burger, Mama Gaia’s, and others, are already doing business in Crosstown. But Richardson says it’s more than that and that it “can’t be managed like any other building in Memphis.” He said the building and the tenants who fill it have a deliberate tone, personality, and a spirit of inclusivity. They all “are intimately related, interconnected, and interdependent and, as a result, better because they are together.” The building was designed for tenant interaction. Those tenants who have have chosen to locate in Crosstown did so because their individual missions will be lifted through those interactions, a Crosstown official says. All of the tenants, whether in arts, education, food, or health care, intersect at wellness, an idea that Ginger Spickler, Crosstown’s director of strategic partnerships and projects, said serves as an overall ethos for Crosstown Concourse. “We’ve all been to office parks, where you’ve got lots of people in different buildings, none of whom interact with each other,” Spickler says on a recent tour. “So we knew even if we put people in this building, they would not necessarily interact unless we create spaces and experience for them to share together.” So, Spickler says, the design of the building deliberately includes common spaces — a small open theater, large balconies, a massive central atrium — “where those unexpected connections and intersections can happen.” That’s precisely why Gary Shorb, the new executive director of the Urban Child Institute, says he wanted to move his organization there, noting they’ll “be right next door to Pyramid Peak Foundation and the Poplar Foundation.” “Geography always helps with collaboration,” Shorb says. “The closer you are, the better it will be.”

Crosstown Now

Bowties and sport coats mingled easily with hard hats and work boots during an early afternoon last month. The smells of electrical work pierced the aroma of roasting vegetables close to Curb Market. The mid-tempo thump of chilled-out EDM at Mama Gaia was often overcome by the scraping whine of power tools. It

was easy to see how far the building had come — and that it still had a little way to go. Richardson says the building is mostly full: About 98 percent of the office space is leased. The apartments are around 80 percent occupied. Retail spaces were about 60 percent leased. The next step will be getting everyone moved in. The celebration will be gratifying, Richardson says, but Crosstown Concourse’s true success won’t be realized Saturday. “Success for us will be five or 10 years down the road,” he says, “when people are still here and enjoying it, and Crosstown is still the vibrant vertical village we all hoped and dreamed it would be.”

A Closer Look

SOME OF THE TENANTS THAT WILL BE BASED IN CROSSTOWN CONCOURSE

Church Health

One of the founding tenants of Crosstown, Church Health spans 150,000 square feet over three floors in the building’s West Atrium. According to its mission, Church Health strives to provide affordable health care to Memphis’ working, uninsured population and their families. It’s served some 70,000 people since its inception in 1987. But after the move to Crosstown, for the first time in those 30 years, all of Church Health’s services are in the same building. At its former location, 120,000 square feet of clinics, exam rooms, and offices were spread over 13 buildings on Peabody, Bellevue, and Union, says communications director for Church Health, Marvin Stockwell. The move to a space 30,000 square feet larger, yet still all under one roof, he says, will enable the center to “serve more people and serve them better.” Stockwell says Church Health now has 62 medical rooms, compared to 34 in its previous locations. This increase, as well as more than twice the number of dental, eye, and counseling rooms, Stockwell says will vastly increase the amount of patients Church Health is able to treat. In step with Crosstown’s “better together” vision of cross-organizational collaboration, Stockwell says the move has already paved the way for partnerships with other organizations, like the YMCA. Together they formed the Church Health YMCA for Church Health patients and others in the community to utilize. He says when leadership from both organizations discussed their programming and missions, much of it overlapped, like fitness and “creative movement” classes, such as Zumba, yoga, and pilates. “The organization has grown because of partnerships now that we’re tucked into an urban village,” Stockwell says. Church Health CEO Scott Morris says partnerships with more tenants such as Southern College of Optometry, Teach for America, Crosstown Arts, and others are also in the works. All of the partnerships, Morris says, will help Church Health be more effective at caring for its patients, adding, “We truly are better together for all of Memphis.” Morris says the move has also made it possible for expansions into “new, vibrant areas such as culinary medicine — or food as medicine,” which he says will enrich Church Health’s overall work. Church Health’s new teaching kitchen, located on the first floor, is more than twice the size of the former kitchen, says Stockwell. A larger, new, modern kitchen allows Church Health to offer coursework for a culinary medicine certificate from Tulane University, as well as community nutrition and cooking classes on how to prepare healthy food. A notable part of the new kitchen is the commercial section, where Stockwell says Church Health is ramping up its own bread line, Whole Heart Bread. He says after speaking with some local restaurant owners around the city, Church Health staff realized there was a need for locally-sourced bread in Memphis. Stockwell says the bread line will be a way for the kitchen to do mission-type work while bringing in revenue to fund Church Health’s efforts to serve the community. Another goal for the kitchen is continued on page 14

COVER STORY m e m p h i s f l y e r. c o m

conversation,” he says, which hasn’t stopped. “The biggest challenge we had was to get people to see beyond what they see,” Richardson says. “This was a building the size of the Empire State Building that had been empty for 20 years in Memphis. It was in the middle of the recession, so, where do you start and could [anything] ever happen?” Richardson and Christopher Miner formed Crosstown Arts in 2010 as a nonprofit arts organization that would serve as the building’s developer and would one day also be building tenant. Two years later, the two had commitments from eight local tenants willing to lease a total of 600,000 square feet, nearly half of the building. By the time Crosstown officials asked the Memphis City Council for $15 million (the project’s final piece of funding) a year later, the building’s tenants included Church Health, Methodist Healthcare, Gestalt Community Schools, St. Jude Children’s Research Hospital, ALSAC, Memphis Teacher Residency, Rhodes College, and, of course, Crosstown Arts.

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continued from page 13 to eventually partner with Memphis Tilth, which plans to hire someone to manage the kitchen full-time, and work with local food entrepreneurs who need access to commercial equipment. Other spaces of Church Health’s operation include a chapel, community meeting room, child-care center, and “control room,” which will eventually be a broadcast workspace, producing health- and faith-related podcasts, Stockwell says.

The Parcels at Concourse

Creating something new from something old — that’s how Laura Anna Hatchett, senior community manager for LEDIC, describes the process of the realty company’s newest project: The Parcels at Concourse. The Parcels are comprised of 265 apartments on floors seven through 10 at Crosstown. The unique interior of the building and the infrastructure of those top floors — once a Sears warehouse — shaped how the Parcels were designed, says Hatchett. In order to fit 265 units on the top four floors of the building, 38 unit layouts were created, which are available in studio and one-, two-, and three-bedroom apartments. Hatchett says the renovation focused on “maintaining the integrity of what the building used to be” by keeping the historical elements intact, such as the exposed brick walls and wood floors. “Better together,” the idea behind Crosstown, inspired the various gathering spaces and community seating areas throughout the Parcels, including the leasing office itself, which protrudes from the seventh floor of the central atrium and will serve as a “living room” for residents, Hatchett says. Another design element meant to foster community building, she says, are the indoor front porches that several of the units have and that residents are able to personalize. “It’s a true live, work, play environment,” Hatchett says. “Residents can participate in numerous activities that are only an elevator ride away.” The apartments — between 1,000 and 1,100 square feet per unit, run about $1.40 a square foot per month. Hatchett says an affordable housing grant allows 20 percent of the units to be rented at affordable market rate. Of the 265 units, about 103 will house Memphis Teacher Residency residents, families of St. Jude patients, along with scientists working at the hospital, Church Health Scholars, Crosstown Arts residents, and Iris Orchestra Artist fellows. Residents began moving into

August 17-23, 2017

continued on page 16

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continued from page 14 the units in January and, as of press time, the Parcels were 82 percent occupied.

Madison Pharmacy

Though Madison Pharmacy’s old location is less than two miles down the road from its new home at Crosstown, owner Rende Bechtel says, and the biggest challenge in relocating is the logistics of moving and setting up the new space. “It’s very scary,” Bechtel says, “But it’s a risk that could lead to a lot of opportunities.” The privately owned pharmacy has stood on Madison near Auburndale for about 13 years, and Bechtel says they were happy there. But when she heard that Crosstown was looking for a resident pharmacy, it was an opportunity she couldn’t pass up. “It was like fate,” she says, explaining that her parents both worked in the old Sears Tower and that that was where they first met. Bechtel, who’s owned the pharmacy since 2012, says they have about 300 regular customers now and after the move are hoping to expand by taking advantage of the other health-care services housed in Crosstown, perhaps partnering with Church Health to serve some of its patients. “Once we get there, I’m sure we’ll be right at home,” Bechtel says. The new pharmacy will not only be larger than the old one, it will also become a convenience store, offering an expanded dollar section, essential oils, dog food, household products, makeup, and “a little bit of everything you might need.” The hope, Bechtel says, is that “people who live and work here will come in on a regular basis and we’ll get to know them, while providing them with what they need.”

Area 51 Ice Cream

Area 51 Ice Cream, a family-owned ice cream shop out of Hernando, Mississippi, will make Crosstown its second location. Karin Cubbage, who owns Area 51 Ice Cream with her husband, says they have been looking for a second location in Memphis for a while now, but no location seemed just right — until they saw the Crosstown space. She says they knew immediately that Crosstown was a good fit for the company and it was a project they wanted to be a part of. Area 51 has been serving homemade ice cream along with fresh-baked goods at its location in Hernando for about three years. Cubbage says their foods are made with no artificial flavors — only fresh, locally-sourced ingredients.

“We try to do as much by hand as we can,” Cubbage says. “We even hand-make the chocolate chips that go into our mint chip ice cream.” Cubbage says she and her husband have good relationships with local farmers, like those at Cedar Health Farms, where they often buy seasonal berries. Like its mother shop, the new location at Crosstown, will offer 12 ice cream flavors, as well as a specialty cookie and brownie each day. Since the new space is significantly smaller than the shop in Hernando, Cubbage says the ice cream will be made daily in Mississippi and transported to Crosstown. After wrapping up the finishing touches on the new shop, including installing sidewalk-style cafe tables, Cubbage says the Crosstown location will open in late August. “We’re excited about exposing our product to another part of town that we haven’t been able to reach yet … and to be a part of the larger project in general.”

Crosstown High School

Around this time next year, 125 ninth-graders will walk through the doors of Crosstown as the inaugural class of Crosstown High School. Ultimately, it’s expected that 500 students will comprise the student body at the public charter school. Those students, who will be chosen through a lottery, will be part of a learning experience that’s never been tried in Memphis. Instead of a teacher lecturing in front of a class, students will learn with hands-on projects based on student interest or on challenges issued by other tenants inside the Concourse. Church Health, for example, may ask the students to help them design a wellness campaign for senior citizens in the Klondike neighborhood, says Spickler. “The students might then accomplish some of their math or English standards through creating different signage or something else by actually solving a community-based challenge.” Students’ interests, talents, and learning pace will be taken into consideration at Crosstown High, and each student will have a personal learning plan. Spickler says the school plans to have a diverse student body by reaching out to the community to recruit students to the school’s entrance lottery in hopes of making a school “that looks like Memphis.” All of this will be fueled with a $2.5 million grant from XQ: The Super School Project, an initiative that challenged education officials to rethink the high school model. For Crosstown’s model, school personnel talked with students, parents, teachers, and employers. Much of the school’s model is based on the design challenge, which Crosstown High began in November 2015.

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Dead On

By Chris Davis

Were I to write a Chris Ellis-style obituary for the one-and-only Mr. Chris Ellis (the Memphis ex-pat actor who’s alive and on his way to the Art Museum at the University of Memphis for an exhibit of his acerbic celebrity obituaries/caricatures), it would go something like this … I don’t know much about that motion picture industry mess, but I know enough to understand that Chris Ellis of Frayser, Tennessee, was either an uncommonly lucky actor or a brilliant extortionist who built a career — if you can call it that — around playing a slightly more Southern-fried version of himself. Ellis named his big-and-small-screen persona Sheriff Cracker Von Peckerwood, and he played the part across a number of not-entirely-terrible films like My Cousin Vinnie, Transformers, and Apollo 13. Unlike actual movie stars, he also took parts in TV shows such as Burn Notice and a 2008 Knight Rider reboot that Slate TV writer Troy Patterson described as being for, “boys who are too old for Hot Wheels and too young for learner’s permits with just enough eccentricity to avoid utterly craven stupidity.” Ellis also holds the distinction of playing Father Reilly, the only principle character nobody remembers from 2012’s Dark Knight Rises, which is exactly what he deserves for signing onto a Batman movie during the year of The Avengers. Thankfully for his poor embarrassed family, Ellis, who once performed a great service to humanity cracking beers behind the bar at the P&H Cafe, is so much more than his acting resume. In addition to being about as good a storyteller as you’ll ever meet, he is a sharp-eyed cartoonist with a gift for the finely tuned comic insult. When he’s on — and he’s always on — Ellis is to the obituary what Devil’s Dictionary author Ambrose Bierce was to definition. Don’t miss. “THE QUICK AND THE DEAD: DRAWINGS AND OBITUARIES BY CHRIS HONEYSUCKLE ELLIS,” ART MUSEUM AT THE UNIVERSITY OF MEMPHIS, AUGUST 18TH-SEPTEMBER 23RD. ARTIST RECEPTION SUN., AUG. 27TH, 3-6 P.M. ARTIST’S TALK: 4:30 P.M. FREE.

Ruined opens at the Hattiloo Theatre. Theater, p. 42

French Truck Coffee and I Love Juice Bar come to Crosstown Concourse. Food News, p. 44

August 17-23, 2017

FRIDAY August 18

18

MLK50 Drop the Mic Poetry Symposium & Slam National Civil Rights Museum, 3-8 p.m. Event with the theme “Where Do We Go from Here?” Includes a workshop by World Poetry Slam champion Ed Mabrey and a keynote speech by Propaganda.

Rock for Love 11 Hi-Tone, 8 p.m. Annual fund-raiser for Church Health. Tonight includes a Makeshift 6 release party with Jack Oblivian, HEELS, Al Kapone, and others. Saturday’s event moves to the Crosstown Concourse in conjunction with the building’s opening. Read more, p. 21. George Benson Levitt Shell, 8 p.m., $50 Performance by jazz guitarist George Benson with proceeds going to the Alzheimer’s and Dementia Services of Memphis scholarship fund.

“Home/Away from Home” and “Signals” Ross Gallery, Christian Brothers University, 5:30 p.m. Opening reception work by Terry Kenney and Chuck Johnson. Cemetery Cinema Elmwood Cemetery, 7 p.m., $15 Tonight’s screening will be the Hitchcock classic Vertigo. Food will be on sale from Fuel and MemPops. Science of Wine Pink Palace Museum, 6 p.m., $25-$85 Wine tasting and wine-related lectures.

Shrek the Musical Theatre Memphis, 8 p.m., $30 Stage adaptation of the hit animated film. Plunge to Expunge II Memphis Made Brewery, 5-8 p.m. Fund-raiser for the Clean Slate Fund, which includes a dunking booth with chances to dunk wellknown Memphis personalities.


Shelby Farms, the Brooks Museum, the Dixon, and the Pink Palace will host eclipse-viewing parties.

Total E

By Chris Davis

Monday’s total eclipse has caused an avalanche of media reports. We’ve seen stories about legit eyewear vs. glasses that’ll burn your retinas. We’ve been taught ways to observe the eclipse with no protective eyewear at all. We’ve been told about our primitive ancestors who thought solar eclipses foretold disaster and shown why the whole eclipse thing throws a wet blanket on the whole Flat Earther party. At this point, there are really only three questions that still need to be answered: Where are we gathering to watch the eclipse? What are we all going to shout collectively to frighten away the terrible skywolf Skoll when he finally catches and attempts to eat the sun? And, perhaps more importantly, where’s everybody going to party afterward? From lush lawns to tall buildings, Memphis has no shortage of viewing party opportunities. Both the Brooks Museum (11:30 a.m.-2:30 p.m.) and Dixon Gallery and Gardens (10 a.m.-4 p.m.) are hosting free parties on the grounds with limited supplies of viewing glasses. The Pink Palace is hosting a similar free event (noon-2 p.m.) with opportunities to check out a model of the solar system, view the event through eclipse-approved telescopes, and interact with astronomers and experts. There’s another viewing party at Shelby Farms (noon-2:30 p.m. on the Great Lawn), where meteorologist Ron Childers will talk about the eclipse. If you’d like to watch the sun go out from a slightly higher vantage point (and access to adult beverages), a $5 donation to St. Jude buys admission to the Peabody rooftop (11 a.m.-2 p.m.). Should you prefer a more down-to-earth option, the Wiseacre Taproom is hosting a watch party (noon-3 p.m.). Following the big blackout, Ghost River Brewing’s hosting an “I Survived the Solar Eclipse” after-party from 5 p.m.-till. Oh, and when Skoll attacks the sun, just yell, “Shoo, Skoll!” or something like that. He’s kind of a scaredy cat. TOTAL SOLAR ECLIPSE MONDAY, AUGUST 21ST. EVERYWHERE.

MadAir Decks Crosstown Arts, 4-9 p.m., $5 Auction of the skateboards with art by some 30 local artists. Bees: Our Pollinator Urban Earth, 1 p.m. Talk by the “Bartlett Bee Whisperer” David Glover.

Crosstown Concourse Opening Celebration Crosstown Concourse, 3 p.m. The massive former Sears Crosstown building officially opens its “vertical village.” Includes tours, music, and more. Read more about the Crosstown building’s rebirth on page 12. Stumbling Elvis Pub Crawl Flying Saucer, 5 p.m.-midnight Annual pub crawl in which participants are encouraged to dress as Elvises and Priscillas.

3rd Annual Mid-South Renaissance Faire USA Baseball Stadium, 10 a.m.-6 p.m., $10 Annual faire with mead and jousting and Elizabethan stuff like that. Eric Roberson The Orpheum, 8 p.m., $45-$100 Performance by neo-soul artist Eric Roberson in support of his albums Earth and Wind.

ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT

SATURDAY August 19

m e m p h i s f l y e r. c o m

Al Gore follows up his 2006 climate-change documentary with An Inconvenient Sequel: Truth to Power. Film, p. 48

19


M U S I C F E AT U R E B y A l e x G r e e n e

BÊNNÍ

The Dirty South’s analog auteur pays a visit to Memphis.

August 17-23, 2017

20

ALLISON GREEN

W

elcome to the most sonically fluid age in history; a gazillion sounds can be yours for the asking. The digital era has brought with it the triumph of the software simulacrum — sounds that once required a day’s labor from labcoated crews at Abbey Road can now be dialed up in seconds. But after the novelty wears off, you notice a distinct thinness to the sound. Perhaps it’s the sheer reliability of digital audio: Like a holographic dog, it always behaves. It rarely barks and never bites. Small wonder, then, that we’re seeing a renaissance of the creaky, old analog synths that first made electronic music possible. Using oscillators tuned or de-tuned with actual knobs, their very unpredictability gives them that rarest of qualities: character. None have taken up the analog torch more than the New Orleans-based BÊNNÍ. On the back of his new LP from Goner Records, I & II, he proclaims, “No softsynths were used in the making of this album.” As if we needed to be told. One listen to the thick warble and woof of his instrumental excursions is all you need. The minimalist arrangements, usually featuring the chugging rhythms of drum machine and synth bass, with a sprinkling of ethereal sounds over the top, help showcase the richness of the analog textures. Being a synth geek myself, I naturally quizzed him on his gear. “Everything was a Roland Juno 106, a Roland RS 09 String Synthesizer, and a Roland MC-505 groove box,” he says. All were mainstays of the ’80s and ’90s. And, as it turns out, he owes his love of all things Roland to a fortuitous discovery in the Bluff City. “I was recording with the band Natural Child,” he remembers. “We were at High/Low Studio, and they had a Juno 106 there that we were messing around with. I was like, ‘Oh, I really like this!’ I found a cheap one in Mississippi, later, so I bought it.” The composer is a fixture on the New Orleans indie scene, playing a pivotal role in several respected bands there. “I’m usually a drummer. But with Wizzard Sleeve and the Gary Wrong Group, I did drums and keyboards. Like I did the bass lines with the keyboards and played the drums. That was my little gimmick with that band. Now,

BÊNNÍ, master of analog synths I’m trying to maybe incorporate some live percussion into my solo thing, eventually.” In keeping with this dexterity, BÊNNÍ will be playing drums with the Heavy Lids on an upcoming European tour, while also showcasing his solo keyboard works as an opener. But despite his work as a drummer, keyboards have always been his first love. “I’ve been playing keys since I was five. I had a digital keyboard at my house when I was a kid. I took maybe one year of lessons when I was in fourth grade. But I play by ear pretty much.” Perhaps this background explains the spare minimalism of his record, distinguishing it from the famous retro-synth sounds of the Netflix original series, Stranger Things, created by Austin’s S U R V I V E. In contrast, BÊNNÍ’s work is marked by a distinctly DIY aesthetic. “I recorded it all on a Tascam Portastudio 07. A little four

track. One of the cassette ones from the ’90s.” Having recorded direct to cassette, it was appropriate that BÊNNÍ’s first release (now side one of his new record) was on a cassette-only label, Chicago’s AVRCRC. It was mixed by that hero of DIY analog audio, Mr. Quintron, who writes, “The thing to me that has always kinda set the Memphis/New Orleans punk scenes apart from other places is that music and musicianship always outweighs high concept or the typical sneering ‘f*ck you’ attitude of other places. BÊNNÍ is a Musician with a capital M, and it’s no accident that within a year of his coming to New Orleans (from less than an hour up the Gulf), he began to influence the local landscape as much as any of us who had been here and doing it for decades.” Now, thanks to Goner, BÊNNÍ is bringing that same ear for creative homespun sounds up the river. BÊNNÍ will perform Thursday, August 17th at Bar DKDC, starting at 9:30 p.m.


L O C A L B E AT B y C h r i s M c C o y

Movin’ On Up Rock for Love offers a weekend’s worth of music at its new home in Crosstown. Edgar Stuart’s tight singer/songwriter compositions to Glorious Abhor’s noise punk. Select-O-Hits donated their services, helping make the album a reality, and all of the artists donated tracks to the compilation. “When I listen to this broad swath of Memphis music, I think of how proud I am to be a part of this Memphis music scene,” says Stockwell. The album will get its official release this Friday, August 18th, the first night of Rock for Love. Artists include Jack Oblivian, Cassette Set, Yesse Yavis, Moon Glimmers, Sweaters Together, the Rough Hearts, and Indeed, We Digress. Al Kapone will be deejaying between sets. “Friday is the Makeshift release show,” says Stockwell, “so we wanted to have as many of those bands as humanly possible.” Saturday, August 19th, amid all of the other Crosstown opening festivities, Rock for Love acts will be providing

music all across the site. The main stage is one of the most diverse lineups in recent memory, beginning with beatbox soulsters Artistik Approach, the Rising Star Drum and Fife Band, Latin big band Melina Almodavar, singer Susan Marshall, and finally Memphis hip-hop superstars 8-Ball and MJG, backed up by Winchester and the Ammunition. Reager says drummer and bandleader Graham Winchester is “very excited about backing up both 8-Ball and Susan Marshall.” In the atrium at Crosstown will be quieter, acoustic sets, led by Reager and featuring Crockett Hall, Juju Bushman, Mystic Light Casino, and Faith Evans Ruch, among others. That night, the party moves back to the Hi-Tone where Chinese Connection Dub Embassy leads an all-star jam party including Kapone, Tonya Dyson, and Lisa Mac. Stockwell says the new Church Health facility has energized the whole staff. “There’s so much potential here that we have only started to scratch the surface of.”

m e m p h i s f l y e r. c o m

Near Reaches

ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT

Church Health is unique among Memphis institutions. It was founded three decades ago by Scott Morris as a place to provide help for the working poor who fall through the cracks of our broken health insurance system. Some of those people are Memphis musicians. “A lot of musicians and artists don’t have access to health care,” says Church Health Communications Director Marvin Stockwell. “This is the music scene itself backing a cause that helps so many of them. That’s been the message of the show for 11 years.” Stockwell, a founding member of the legendary Memphis punk band Pezz, was one of the driving forces behind starting the Rock for Love benefit concerts. The annual weekend of live music has raised tens of thousands of dollars to help pay for the care of poor Memphians. Three months ago, Church Health moved to an expanded new home in the Crosstown Concourse building. Stockwell says scheduling Rock for Love for the same weekend as the Concourse’s gala grand opening was a no-brainer. “Why take a weekend-long event, built over a decade, and have it come three weeks after the big hurrah? This is the inaugural, celebratory moment of our brand-new home. It made every sense in the world.” This year’s event comes with an added bonus. In the early 2000s, Makeshift Records regularly showcased new Memphis music with a series of sprawling compilation albums. Earlier this year, Memphis musician Crockett Hall found a copy of one of the Makeshift compilations in a used bin at a record store. When he asked his friends on Facebook about it, a discussion ensued in which people told fond stories of the acts they had discovered from Makeshift. J.D. Reager, an organizer of Rock for Love (and a Flyer contributor) had been involved in the grassroots label. Since a Rock for Love compilation album had been successful a couple of years ago, and since the last Makeshift compilation release had coincided with the first Rock for Love, maybe it would be a good idea to, as Stockwell says, “gin up the old machine.” The new Makeshift 6 compilation includes 34 songs by contemporary Memphis artists, ranging from Mark

21


BOBBY RUSH LANDERS CENTER SATURDAY, AUGUST 19TH

ERIC ROBERSON ORPHEUM THEATRE SATURDAY, AUGUST 19TH

After Dark: Live Music Schedule August 17 - 23 Blues City Cafe 138 BEALE 526-3637

Alfred’s 197 BEALE 525-3711

Gary Hardy & Memphis 2 Thursdays-Saturdays, 6-9 p.m.; Karaoke Thursdays, TuesdaysWednesdays, 9 p.m.-1 a.m., and Sundays-Mondays, 10 p.m.-2 a.m.; Mandi Thomas Fridays, Saturdays, 6-9 p.m.; The 901 Heavy Hitters Fridays, Saturdays, 10 p.m.-2 a.m.; Flyin’ Ryan Fridays, Saturdays, 2:30 a.m.; Memphis Jazz Orchestra Sundays, 6-9 p.m.

B.B. King’s Blues Club 143 BEALE 524-KING

The King Beez Thursdays, 5:30 p.m.; B.B. King’s All Stars Thursdays, Fridays, 8 p.m.; Will Tucker Band Fridays, Saturdays, 5 p.m.; Lisa G and Flic’s Pic’s Band Saturdays, Sundays, 12:30 p.m.; Blind Mississippi Morris Sundays, 5 p.m.; Memphis Jones Sundays, Wednesdays 5:30 p.m.; Doc Fangaz and the Remedy Tuesdays, 5:30 p.m.

Blue Note Bar & Grill 341-345 BEALE 577-1089

Queen Ann and the Memphis Blues Masters Fridays, Saturdays, 8 p.m.-midnight.

Blind Mississippi Morris Fridays, 5 p.m., and Saturdays, 5:30 p.m.; Brad Birkedahl Band Thursdays, Wednesdays, 8 p.m.; Earl “The Pearl” Banks Saturdays, 12:30 p.m., and Tuesdays, 7 p.m.; Brandon Cunning Band Sundays, 6 p.m., and Mondays, 7 p.m.; FreeWorld Sundays, 9:30 p.m.

Club 152 152 BEALE 544-7011

Live Music WednesdaysSundays, 7-11 p.m.; Live DJ Wednesdays-Sundays, 11 p.m.; Third Floor: DJ Tubbz Fridays, Saturdays, 10 p.m.; The Rusty Pieces play Bike Night on Beale Wednesdays, 6-9 p.m.

Handy Bar 200 BEALE 527-2687

The Amazing Rhythmatics Tuesdays, Thursdays-Sundays, 7 p.m.-1 a.m.

Hard Rock Cafe 126 BEALE 529-0007

Cassette Set Thursday, Aug. 17, 6:30-9:30 p.m.; The Skitch Friday, Aug. 18, 9 p.m.-midnight; CÆZAR Sunday, Aug. 20, 7-10 p.m.; Memphis Music Monday Third Monday of every month, 6-9 p.m.

Itta Bena 145 BEALE 578-3031

Nat “King” Kerr Fridays, Saturdays, 9-10 p.m.

King Jerry Lawler’s Hall of Fame Bar & Grille 159 BEALE

Chris Gales Solo Acoustic Show Mondays-Saturdays, 12-4 p.m.; Eric Hughes Thursdays, 5-8 p.m.; Karaoke Mondays-Thursdays, Sundays, 8 p.m.; Live Bands Fridays, Saturdays, 8 p.m.

King’s Palace Cafe 162 BEALE 521-1851

David Bowen Thursdays, 5:309:30 p.m., Fridays, Saturdays, 6:30-10:30 p.m., and Sundays, 5:30-9:30 p.m.

Rum Boogie Cafe

Paulette’s

182 BEALE 528-0150

RIVER INN, 50 HARBOR TOWN SQUARE 260-3300

Young Petty Thieves Thursdays, 8 p.m.-midnight; Pam and Terry Friday, Aug. 18, 5:30-8:30 p.m.; Preston Shannon Friday, Aug. 18, 9 p.m.-1 a.m., and Saturday, Aug. 19, 9 p.m.-1 a.m.; Jeff Crosslin Saturday, Aug. 19, 5:30-8:30 p.m.; Sensation Band Sunday, Aug. 20, 7-11 p.m.; Eric Hughes Band Mondays, 8 p.m.-midnight; Gracie Curran Tuesdays, 8 p.m.-midnight; Plantation Allstars Wednesdays, 8 p.m.-midnight.

162 BEALE 521-1851

Rum Boogie Cafe Blues Hall

King’s Palace Cafe Tap Room

Memphis Bluesmasters Thursdays, Sundays, 8 p.m.midnight; Vince Johnson and the Plantation Allstars Fridays, Saturdays, 4-8 p.m., and Sundays, 3-7 p.m.; Juke Joint Allstar Friday, Aug. 18, 9 p.m.-1 a.m.; Little Boy Blues Saturday, Aug. 19, 9 p.m.-1 a.m.; Brian Hawkins Blues Party Mondays, 8 p.m.midnight; Chris McDaniel Tuesdays, Wednesdays, 8 p.m.midnight.

King’s Palace Cafe Patio Sonny Mack Mondays-Fridays, 2-6 p.m.; Cowboy Neil Mondays, Thursdays, 7-11 p.m., and Saturdays, Sundays, 2-6 p.m.; Sensation Band Tuesdays, Fridays, 7-11 p.m.; Fuzzy and the Kings of Memphis Saturdays, 7-11 p.m.; Chic Jones and the Blues Express Sundays, 7-11 p.m.; North and South Band Wednesdays, 7-11 p.m.

182 BEALE 528-0150

168 BEALE 576-2220

Big Don Valentine’s Three Piece Chicken and a Biscuit Blues Band Thursdays, Tuesdays, 8 p.m.-midnight; Cowboy Neil Band Friday, Aug. 18, 9 p.m.-1 a.m.; Juke Joint Allstars Saturday, Aug. 19, 9 p.m.-1 a.m.

Silky O’Sullivan’s 183 BEALE 522-9596

Dueling Pianos Thursdays, Wednesdays, 9 p.m.-1 a.m., Fridays, Saturdays, 9 p.m.-3 a.m., and Sundays, Tuesdays, 8 p.m.midnight.

Belle Tavern 117 BARBORO ALLEY 249-6580

The Rusty Pieces Sunday, Aug. 20, 6:30-9:30 p.m.

Center for Southern Folklore 123 S. MAIN AT PEABODY TROLLEY STOP 525-3655

J. Train Blues Band Saturday, Aug. 19, 8-11 p.m.

Dirty Crow Inn 855 KENTUCKY

Nancy Apple Thursdays, 8 p.m.; The Po Boys Friday, Aug. 18; Savannah Long Saturday, Aug. 19; Bobbie & Tasha Wednesdays, 8-11 p.m.

Earnestine & Hazel’s 531 S. MAIN 523-9754

330 BEALE 525-8981

140 LT. GEORGE W. LEE 577-1139

DJ Dance Music MondaysSundays, 10 p.m.

Rumba Room 303 S. MAIN 523-0020

Salsa Night Saturdays, 8:30 p.m.-3 a.m.

The Silly Goose 100 PEABODY PLACE 435-6915

DJ Cody Fridays, Saturdays, 10 p.m.

The Peabody Hotel Graceland Ninjaz Thursday, Aug. 17, 6-10 p.m.

Flying Saucer Draught Emporium

The View Rooftop Bar @ Residence Inn

130 PEABODY PLACE 523-8536

149 UNION 529-4000

110 MADISON

The Rusty Pieces Friday, Aug. 18, 6-9 p.m.; Songwriters with Roland and Friends Mondays, 7-10 p.m.

The Rusty Pieces Saturday, Aug. 19, 6-9 p.m.

Huey’s Downtown

Ghost River Brewing

Eddie Harrison and the Shortcuts Sunday, Aug. 20, 8:30 p.m.-midnight.

Images of the King Thursday, Aug. 17.

Purple Haze Nightclub

Amber Rae Dunn Hosts: Earnestine & Hazel’s Open Mic Wednesdays, 8-11 p.m.

77 S. SECOND 527-2700

New Daisy Theatre

Live Pianist Thursdays, 5:30-8:30 p.m., Fridays and Saturdays, 5:30-9 p.m., Sundays, 11 a.m.-2 p.m., and Mondays-Wednesdays, 5:30-8 p.m.

South Main 827 S. MAIN 278-0087

Sunday Evening Slowdown with Chris Curtis Sunday, Aug. 20, 5-7:30 p.m.

Orpheum Theatre 203 S. MAIN 525-3000

August 17-23, 2017

Eric Roberson Saturday, Aug. 19, 8 p.m.

22

WWE RAW MONDAY, AUGUST 28

DISNEY ON ICE OCTOBER 6–8

FOO FIGHTERS TUESDAY, OCTOBER 24

JANET JACKSON WEDNESDAY, DECEMBER 6

WWE returns for the final time in 2017. Featuring the return of Brock Lesnar & John Cena, plus a huge double main event street fight. Tickets available!

Join eight Disney Princesses as they embark on an adventure as Disney On Ice presents Dream Big. Tickets On Sale Tuesday, August 29 at 10AM!

Eleven-time Grammy Award winning rock band is bringing the Concret and Gold Tour to FedExForum. Tickets available!

Global music icon and six-time Grammy Award winner is bringing her State Of The World tour to FedExForum. Tickets available!

Get tickets at FedExForum Box Office | Ticketmaster locations | 1.800.745.3000 | ticketmaster.com | fedexforum.com

CORY BRANAN BY JOSHUA BLACK WILKINS; ERIC ROBERSON BY SIGNAL MEDIA

CORY BRANAN LAFAYETTE’S MUSIC ROOM THURSDAY, AUGUST 17TH


After Dark: Live Music Schedule August 17-23 Loflin Yard

Boscos

Hi-Tone

7 W. CAROLINA

2120 MADISON 432-2222

412-414 N. CLEVELAND 278-TONE

Electric Church Sundays, 2-4 p.m.

LYFE Kitchen 272 S. MAIN 526-0254

Live Music on the Patio Thursdays, 6-8 p.m.

South Main Sounds 550 S. MAIN 494-6543

Abby Frances, Rice Drewry, Coyote and Thompson Springs Friday, Aug. 18, 7-9 p.m.

Sunday Brunch with Joyce Cobb Sundays, 11:30 a.m.2:30 p.m.

Canvas 1737 MADISON 443-5232

Karaoke Thursdays, 9:30 p.m.; Kyle Pruzina Live Mondays, 10 p.m.-midnight.

Celtic Crossing 903 S. COOPER 274-5151

Jeremy Stanfill and Joshua Cosby Sundays, 6-9 p.m.; Candy Company Mondays.

The Cove 2559 BROAD 730-0719

Bar DKDC 964 S. COOPER 272-0830

BÊNNÍ Record Release Thursday, Aug. 17; Mighty Souls Brass Band Friday, Aug. 18; Steve Selvidge Saturday, Aug. 19; Harlan T Bobo Sunday, Aug. 20; Devil Train Monday, Aug. 21; Dave Cousar Tuesday, Aug. 22; Coco Hames Wednesday, Aug. 23.

Blue Monkey 2012 MADISON 272-BLUE

Karaoke Thursdays, 9 p.m.midnight; Dantones Band Saturday, Aug. 19, 10:30 p.m.1:30 a.m.

Ed Finney and the U of M Jazz Quartet Thursdays, 8 p.m.; Unit 901 Friday, Aug. 18, 10 p.m.; The Bluff City Backsliders Saturday, Aug. 19, 10 p.m.; David Collins & Frog Squad Sunday, Aug. 20, 6-9 p.m.; David Holguin Monday, Aug. 21, 6-8 p.m.; Don and Wayde Tuesdays, 7-10 p.m.; Karaoke Wednesdays, 9 p.m.

Dru’s Place 1474 MADISON 275-8082

Karaoke Fridays-Sundays.

Growlers 1911 POPLAR 244-7904

WHORES. Saturday, Aug. 19, 8 p.m.; Crockett Hall with the Midtown Rhythm Section Tuesdays, 9 p.m.

Rock For Love 11 Friday, Aug. 18, 8 p.m. and Saturday, Aug. 19, 8 p.m.

MOONSHINE

BALL

Huey’s Midtown 1927 MADISON 726-4372

Juliet and the Lonesome Romeos Sunday, Aug. 20, 47 p.m.; John Paul Keith Trio Sunday, Aug. 20, 8:30 p.m.midnight.

Lafayette’s Music Room 2119 MADISON 207-5097

McKenna Bray & Richard Ford Thursday, Aug. 17, 6 p.m.; Cory Branan Thursday, Aug. 17, 9 p.m.; Chris Johnson Friday, Aug. 18, 6:30 p.m.; Nick Black Friday, Aug. 18, 10 p.m.; 3RD Man Saturday, Aug. 19, 11:30 a.m.; Pam & Terry Saturday, Aug. 19, 3 p.m.; Joe Restivo 4 Sunday, Aug. 20, 11 a.m.; Jeffrey & the Pacemakers Sunday, Aug. 20, 4 p.m.; Marcella and Her Lovers Sunday, Aug. 20, 8 p.m.; Scott & Vanessa Sudbury Monday, Aug. 21, 6 p.m.; Boss Trio Tuesday, Aug. 22, 5:30 p.m.; Scott Thompson’s Doghorse Rescue Animals Tuesday, Aug. 22, 8 p.m.; Breeze Cayolle & New Orleans Wednesday, Aug. 23, 5:30 p.m.; Josh Threlkeld Wednesday, Aug. 23, 8 p.m.

continued on page 25

TICKETS AVAILABLE AT TICKETMASTER.COM OR BY CALLING 1-800-745-3000.

ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT

SEPTEMBER 23

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August 17-23, 2017

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After Dark: Live Music Schedule August 17 - 23 Huey’s Poplar 4872 POPLAR 682-7729 394 N. WATKINS 443-0502

Natalie James and the Professor Saturdays, Sundays, 11 a.m.-3 p.m.; “The Happening” Open Songwriter Showcase Tuesdays, 6:30-9:30 p.m.

Minglewood Hall 1555 MADISON 866-609-1744

Burn’n Love, Kattawar Brothers Friday, Aug. 18, 6 p.m.; Drop the Mic Poetry Slam Saturday, Aug. 19, 3 p.m.; Turnpike Troubadours, Shane Smith & the Saints Wednesday, Aug. 23, 7 p.m.

Vintage Sunday, Aug. 20, 8:30 p.m.-midnight.

Memphis Nites Club 3297 KIRBY 797-8599

Chick Rogers Sundays, 5 p.m.3 a.m.

Mortimer’s

Owen Brennan’s THE REGALIA, 6150 POPLAR 761-0990

Lannie McMillan Jazz Trio Sundays, 10 a.m.-2 p.m.

590 N. PERKINS 761-9321

Van Duren Solo Thursdays, 6:30-8:30 p.m.

Shelby Forest General Store 7729 BENJESTOWN 876-5770

Arlington/Eads/ Oakland/Lakeland Rizzi’s/Paradiso Pub 6230 GREENLEE 592-0344

Live Music Thursdays, Wednesdays, 7-10 p.m.; Karaoke and Dance Music with DJ Funn Fridays, 9 p.m.

Steak Night with Tony Butler and the Shelby Forest Pioneers Fridays, 6-8 p.m.; Robert Hull Sundays, 12:30-3:30 p.m.

Collierville Huey’s Collierville 2130 W. POPLAR 854-4455

No More Drama Sunday, Aug. 20, 8-11:30 p.m.

LIMITED EDITION

“ELVIS

Earl “The Pearl” Thursday, Aug. 17, 6-9 p.m.; The Fast Mothers Saturday, Aug. 19.

P&H Cafe

ISSUE”

1532 MADISON 726-0906

Rock Starkaraoke Fridays; Open Mic Music with Tiffany Harmon Mondays, 9 p.m.midnight; White Gregg Tuesday, Aug. 22.

FROM THE SEPTEMBER 1977

“CITY OF MEMPHIS” MAGAZINE ON SALE

The Phoenix 1015 S. COOPER 338-5223

The Phoenix Blues Jam Tuesdays, 8-11 p.m.

FOR $24.95.

Senses Nightclub 2866 POPLAR 249-3739

Unique Saturday Saturdays, 10 p.m.-3 a.m.

GREAT GIFT

Stanley BBQ

for the true Elvis fan!

2110 MADISON

Tony Manard Thursday, Aug. 17; Faith Ruch Friday, Aug. 18; Brad Birkedahl Saturday, Aug. 19; Rock and Roll Falcons Sunday, Aug. 20.

Wild Bill’s 1580 VOLLINTINE 207-3975

To order please call 901-575-9470 or go to https://tinyurl.com/ybxou98t.

Young Avenue Deli 2119 YOUNG 278-0034

Sleeping Seasons Saturday, Aug. 19, 10 p.m.

535 S. HIGHLAND

East Memphis Folk’s Folly Prime Steak House 551 S. MENDENHALL 762-8200

Intimate Piano Lounge featuring Charlotte Hurt Mondays-Thursdays, 5-9:30 p.m.; Larry Cunningham Fridays, Saturdays, 6-10 p.m.

6365 NAVY 872-0353

Possum Daddy or DJ Turtle Thursdays, 5-9 p.m.; CeCee Fridays, 8 p.m.-1 a.m.; Possum Daddy Karaoke Wednesdays, 6-10 p.m. and Saturdays, 7-11 p.m.

Germantown The King Beez Sunday, Aug. 20, 8:30 p.m.-midnight.

Huey’s Germantown 7677 FARMINGTON 318-3034

Gary Escoe’s Atomic Dance Machine Sunday, Aug. 20, 8-11:30 p.m.

Russo’s New York Pizzeria & Wine Bar 9087 POPLAR 755-0092

Live Music on the patio Thursdays-Saturdays, 7-10 p.m.

North Mississippi/ Tunica The Crossing Bar & Grill 7281 HACKS CROSS, OLIVE BRANCH, MS 662-893-6242

Karaoke with Buddha Tuesdays, Thursdays, 8 p.m.-midnight.

Dan McGuinness 3964 GOODMAN, SOUTHAVEN, MS 662-890-7611

Acoustic Music Tuesdays.

Hollywood Casino 1150 CASINO STRIP RESORT, TUNICA, MS 662-357-7700

Live Entertainment Fridays, Saturdays, 9 p.m.-1 a.m.

Huey’s Southaven

The Wild Bill’s Band Fridays, Saturdays, 11 p.m.-3 a.m.

DJ Ben Murray Thursdays, 10 p.m.; The Wages Friday, Aug. 18, 10 p.m.; Pearl Saturday, Aug. 19, 6 p.m.; Bluegrass Brunch with the River Bluff Clan Sundays, 11 a.m.

Pop’s Bar & Grill

Huey’s Southwind

Murphy’s

The Bluff

8570 US 51 NORTH,

Young Petty Thieves Sunday, Aug. 20, 8-11:30 p.m.

7825 WINCHESTER 624-8911

1589 MADISON 726-4193

University of Memphis

Huey’s Millington

7090 MALCO, SOUTHAVEN, MS 662-349-7097

Hillbilly Mojo Sunday, Aug. 20, 8:30 p.m.-midnight.

Landers Center 4560 VENTURE DR., SOUTHAVEN, MS 662-280-9120

T.J. Mulligan’s 1817 KIRBY 755-2481

Slap Junior Band Friday, Aug. 18, 9:30 p.m.-1:30 a.m.; Karaoke Tuesdays, 8 p.m.

Poplar/I-240 East Tapas and Drinks

Summer/Berclair

Bartlett

Cheffie’s Cafe

Hadley’s Pub

483 HIGH POINT TERRACE 202-4157

Songwriter Night hosted by Leigh Ann Wilmot and Dave “The Rave” Saturdays, 5-8 p.m.

6069 PARK 767-6002

Eddie Harris Thursdays, Fridays, 6:30-9:30 p.m.; Van Duren Solo Tuesdays, 6-8 p.m.

Neil’s Music Room 5727 QUINCE 682-2300

Jack Rowell’s Celebrity Jam Thursdays, 8 p.m.; Eddie Smith Fridays, 8 p.m.; Lost in the Shuffle Saturday, Aug. 19, 4-7 p.m.; Reba Russell Band Saturday, Aug. 19, 8 p.m.; Chuck Jones Sunday, Aug. 20, 6-10 p.m.; Eddie Harrison Mondays, 6-10

2779 WHITTEN 266-5006

Almost Famous Friday, Aug. 18, 9 p.m.; Thump Daddy Saturday, Aug. 19, 9 p.m.; The Brian Johnson Band Sunday, Aug. 20, 5:30 p.m.; Juno Marrs Wednesday, Aug. 23, 8 p.m.

Old Whitten Tavern

South Memphis FireHouse Community Arts Center 985 S. BELLEVUE 948-9522

Voices Open Mic Variety Show Third Friday of every month, 7 p.m.

Cordova Fox and Hound Sports Tavern 819 EXOCET 624-9060

Karaoke Tuesdays, 9 p.m.

Huey’s Cordova 1771 N. GERMANTOWN PKWY. 754-3885

Live Music Fridays, 9 p.m.-1 a.m.

2465 WHITTEN 379-1965

2 Mule Plow Sunday, Aug. 20, 4-7 p.m.; The Chaulkies Sunday, Aug. 20, 8:30 p.m.-midnight.

RockHouse Live

T.J. Mulligan’s Cordova

5709 RALEIGH-LAGRANGE 386-7222

8071 TRINITY 756-4480

Live Bands Fridays, Saturdays, 8 p.m.; Open Mic Mondays Mondays, 8 p.m.-midnight; Live Music Tuesdays, Wednesdays, 8 p.m.-midnight.

The Southern Edition Band Tuesdays.

Frayser/Millington

Bobby Rush Saturday, Aug. 19, 6:30 p.m.

Thirsty Lizard 6541 U.S. 51 662-536-6054

Dantones Band Friday, Aug. 18, 9 p.m.-1 a.m.

Tunica Roadhouse 1107 CASINO CENTER, TUNICA, MS 662-363-4900

Live Music Fridays, Saturdays.

Raleigh Stage Stop 2951 CELA 382-1576

Blues Jam hosted by Brad Webb Thursdays, 7-11 p.m.; Open Mic Night and Steak Night Tuesdays, 6 p.m.-midnight.

m e m p h i s f l y e r. c o m

Midtown Crossing Grill

p.m.; Debbie Jamison & Friends Tuesdays, 6-10 p.m.; Elmo and the Shades Wednesdays, 8 p.m.midnight.

ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT

continued from page 23

Harpo’s Hogpin 4212 HWY 51 N. 530-0414

Live Music Saturdays, 9 p.m.

25


PINK PALACE BEST MUSEUM

CALENDAR of EVENTS:

August 17 - 23

Send the date, time, place, cost, info, phone number, a brief description, and photos — two weeks in advance — to calendar@memphisflyer. com or P.O. Box 1738, Memphis, TN 38101. DUE TO SPACE LIMITATIONS, ONGOING WEEKLY EVENTS WILL APPEAR IN THE FLYER’S ONLINE CALENDAR ONLY.

TH EAT E R

Hattiloo Theatre

Ruined, inspired by interviews conducted in Africa with Congo refugees, this play is an engrossing and uncommonly human story with humor and song. www. hattiloo.org. $26-$30. Fridays, Saturdays, 7:30 p.m., Saturdays, 2 & 7:30 p.m., and Sundays, 3 p.m. Through Sept. 3. 37 S. COOPER (502-3486).

New Discovery Christian Church

SEE IT IN 3D AT THE

PINK PALACE

Auditions/workshop for School of Rock, see website for more information including characters, show dates, audition form, and role requirements. www.kudzuplayers. com. Sat., Aug. 19, 10 a.m. & 2 p.m. 961 VINSON.

Playhouse 51

The Fox on the Fairway, the annual inter-club tournament between Henry Bingham’s Quail Valley and Dickie Bell’s Crouching Squirrel is about to get underway. Bingham has a secret weapon golfer to win the trophy. www.playhouse51. com. $12. Fridays, Saturdays, 7:30 p.m., and Sundays, 2 p.m. Through Aug. 27. 8077 WILKINSVILLE (872-7170).

Playhouse on the Square

June 24 November 17, 2017

9 to 5, pushed to their boiling points, coworkers Violet, Judy, and Doralee concoct a plan to get even with their sexist, egotistical, and bigoted boss. www.playhouseonthesquare.org. $25-$45. Thursdays-Saturdays, 8 p.m., and Sundays, 2 p.m. Through Sept. 3. 66 S. COOPER (726-4656).

Theatre Memphis

Shrek the Musical, www.theatrememphis.org. $30. Sundays, 2 p.m., and Fridays, Saturdays, 8 p.m. Through Sept. 10. 630 PERKINS EXT. (682-8323). R

Universal Parenting Place

A Boeing Company

3050 Central Ave / Memphis 38111

August 17-23, 2017

901.636.2362

PlayBack Memphis, bringing stories to life in a safe space to unlock healing, transformation, and joy. Families welcome. (207-3694), Free. Third Thursday of every month, 4:30-6 p.m. LEMOYNE-OWEN COLLEGE, 990 COLLEGE PARK.

A R TI ST R E C E PT I O N S

Ross Gallery

Featuring handmade cachapas, arepas, empanadas, Venezuelan soup, and more

Try our delicious made-from-scratch baked good and fresh coffee, too!

CHRISTIAN BROTHERS UNIVERSITY, PLOUGH LIBRARY, 650 E. PARKWAY S. (321-3000).

OTH E R A R T HA P P E N I N G S

VENEZUELA’S NATIONAL DISH

Pabellon Criollo

Art After Dark

Galleries and gardens will be open late. Featuring light refreshments, entertainment, and a cash bar. Free with admission. Every third Thursday, 6-8 p.m.

26 4509 Summer Ave. / 746-6666 /

Opening reception for “Home/ Away From Home” and “Signals,” exhibition of work by Terry Kenney and Chuck Johnson. www.cbu. edu. Fri., Aug. 18, 5:30-7:30 p.m.

@caimanvzla

THE DIXON GALLERY & GARDENS, 4339 PARK (761-5250), WWW.DIXON.ORG.

“Price Is Right” at David Lusk Gallery, through August 24th Call to Artists for MCA Holiday Bazaar & Fund-raiser

Open call, any local artist may submit, no cost to apply. See website for more information and submission form. Through Oct. 2.

Belz Museum of Asian and Judaic Art

“Chinese Symbols in Art,” ancient Chinese pottery and bronze. www. belzmuseum.org. Ongoing. 119 S. MAIN, IN THE PEMBROKE SQUARE BUILDING (523-ARTS).

Bingham and Broad

“My Kin Is Not Like Yours,” exhibition of works by Debra Edge. Ongoing.

WWW.MCA.EDU.

2563 BROAD (323-3008).

Casting Demonstration

Buckman Arts Center at St. Mary’s School

Saturdays, Sundays, 3 p.m.

METAL MUSEUM, 374 METAL MUSEUM DR. (774-6380), WWW.METALMUSEUM. ORG.

Crosstown Arts Digital Lab

Six-station computer lab supports Memphis’ creative community by providing artists and musicians full access to industry-standard art- and music-making technology. Tuesdays-Thursdays, 10 a.m.-9 p.m., and Fridays, Saturdays, 10 a.m.-6 p.m. CROSSTOWN ARTS, 430 N. CLEVELAND (507-8030), WWW.CROSSTOWNARTS.ORG.

MadAir Decks

Over 50 new MadAir decks skateboard art for auction designed by over 30 local Memphis artists and over 100 total decks on display and for sale. #getmadair $5. Sat., Aug. 19, 4-9 p.m. CROSSTOWN ARTS, 430 N. CLEVELAND (507-8030), WWW.CROSSTOWNARTS.ORG.

ONGOI NG ART

Art Museum at the University of Memphis (AMUM)

“Stopping in Memphis” and “The Quick & the Dead.” Aug. 18-Sept. 23. 142 COMMUNICATION & FINE ARTS BUILDING (678-2224).

“Memphis Stories,” exhibition of new works by Meghean Warner. www.buckmanartscenter.com. Through Sept. 18. 60 N. PERKINS EXT. (537-1483).

The Calliope

“Transmissions,” exhibition of new abstract works by Amy Hutcheson. www.amyhutcheson.com. Through Aug. 26. 456 TENNESSEE ST.

David Lusk Gallery

“The Price Is Right,” exhibition of work by 20 artists priced at $1000 or less. www.davidluskgallery.com. Through Aug. 24. 97 TILLMAN (767-3800).

The Dixon Gallery & Gardens

“Fidencio Fifield-Perez and Vanessa González: Location, Location, Location,” exhibition of work utilizing maps to open up discussions on migration and ceramic and installation work processing the challenges of immigration. www. dixon.org. Through Sept. 24. “Edward Giobbi: An Artist Comes to Memphis,” exhibition of works influenced by Italian Renaissance masterpieces by one of the founding trustees of the Hugo Dixon Foundation (which formed

the Dixon Gallery and Gardens). www.dixon.org. Through Sept. 24. “Power and Piety: Spanish Colonial Art,” exhibition of paintings, sculptures, religious objects, and decorative art from the 17th through 19th centuries influenced by Spanish Colonial Caribbean. www.dixon.org. Through Sept. 24. “Made in Dixon,” exhibition showcasing the colorful and joy-filled artwork created by artists of all ages in the Dixon’s educational programs. www.dixon.org. Ongoing. 4339 PARK (761-5250).

Eclectic Eye

“Seeing Things My Way,” exhibition of photographs transposed onto metal and canvas by Bob Pierce. www.eclectic-eye.com. Through Sept. 20. 242 S. COOPER (276-3937).

FireHouse Community Arts Center

Mosal Morszart, exhibition of works by Black Arts Alliance artist. www.memphisblackartsalliance.org. Ongoing. 985 S. BELLEVUE (948-9522).

Fratelli’s

“Memphis Series,” exhibition of pen-and-ink works by David Tankersley. www.memphisbotanicgarden.com. Through Aug. 28. 750 CHERRY (766-9900).

Jay Etkin Gallery

New paintings by Juan Rojo, www. jayetkingallery.com. Through Aug. 30. 942 COOPER (550-0064).

The Salvation Army Kroc Center

Photos by Carla McDonald and Karen Golightly. Through Aug. 31. 800 E. PARKWAY S. (729-8007).

continued on page 30


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ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT

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27 8/1/17 1:31 PM


Chef Breakfast Brunch Lunch Date-Night Restaurant Shared/Small Plates Menu Wine List Steak Barbecue Ribs Burger Hot Wings Fried Chicken Restaurant for Dessert

August 17-23, 2017

Grocery Store Specialty Food Shop Butcher Liquor Store Shopping Center Gift Shop Farmers Market Bookstore Local Bank Local Store for Women’s Clothing Local Store for Men’s Clothing

28

Place to See Standup Karaoke Hole-in-the-Wall College Hangout After-Hours Club Craft Cocktails

Date Bar Place to Shoot Pool Happy Hour Dance Club Jukebox Sports Bar Strip Club

Gay Bar Bartender Beer Selection (in a bar) Best New Bar Best Bar

Hair Salon Hair Stylist Day Spa Place to Get a Facial Nail Salon Place to Get Waxed Health/Fitness Club Crossfit Studio Barre Studio Yoga Studio Tanning Salon

The voting period is 6 a.m. Wednesday, August 9th, through 11:59 .p.m Friday, August 25th. On ballot we deem fraudulent. Ballots must include your name and email address to be valid. We problem voting? Call us Monday through Friday, 9 a.m.-5 p.m., at 901.521.9000 or email us a d


Calling all cool cats and swell Dollys

it’s time to take care of business and cast your vote in the 2017 Best of Memphis. Do not leave the building before you do this! Thankyaverymuch. VOTE TODAY AT MEMPHISFLYER.COM. CHECK OUT THE WINNERS IN THE SEPTEMBER 28, 2017 ISSUE! Dessert Shop Frozen Treat Shop Smoothies/Juices Italian Middle Eastern New American Mexican Cajun/Creole Chinese Thai Vietnamese Ethiopian Sushi Indian Home Cooking/Soul Place to Get Vintage/ Used Clothing Local Store for Women’s Shoes Lingerie Local Store for Men’s Shoes Home Furnishings Pet Store Local Fine Jewelry Store Tattoo Parlor Tattoo Artist

Food Vegetarian Seafood Pizza Sandwiches Hangover Food Service Server Kid-Friendly Restaurant Dog-Friendly Restaurant Late-Night Dining Place for PeopleWatching Patio Antiques Store Tobacco Shop Alternative Smoke Shop Florist Garden Center Local Athletic-Goods Store Bicycle Shop Record Store (new) Record Store (used) Music-Equipment Store New Car Dealer

Food Truck Bakery Donut Shop Local Coffeehouse Coffee Roaster Local Brewery Beer Selection (in a store) Bar Food Margarita Bloody Mary Taco Hibachi Best Restaurant Best New Restaurant Used Car Dealer Auto Repair Place to Buy a Motorcycle Event Rental Venue Realtor Creative Agency Hotel Sex Shop

Local Comedian Live Theater Performing Arts Venue Festival Park Dog Park

Movie Theater Casino Family Entertainment

YOUR FIRST WAX IS FREE* COLLIERVILLE | OPENING SOON CORDOVA | 901 746 8687 EAST MEMPHIS | 901 417 8444 VOTE FOR US: BEST PLACE TO GET WAXED WAXCENTER.COM I europeanwax

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ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT

Museum Gallery College Gallery Place to See Live Music Local Band Local Singer

m e m p h i s f l y e r. c o m

I ONLY GO PLACES WHERE LEGS ARE IN SEASON.

29

7/21/17 10:29 AM


CALENDAR: AUGUST 17 - 23

from Memphis 115 SWEET YEARS

Please vote for us in the

BEST DESSERT SHOP and BEST SPECIALTY FOOD SHOP

continued from page 26 L Ross Gallery

categories through 8/25 at memphisflyer.com!

“Elvis Has Left the Building,” exhibition in celebration of all things Elvis, featuring work by contemporary Southern artists. www.lrossgallery.com. Through Aug. 31. 5040 SANDERLIN (767-2200).

Marshall Arts Gallery

Memphis, TN | 800.355.0358 | dinstuhls.com 436 Grove Park Memphis

7730 Poplar Avenue Germantown

5280 Pleasant View Rd Memphis

of the

River

PRESENTED BY THE STONE COMMUNITY DEVELOPMENT CORPORATION

August 17-23, 2017

A South Memphis Reunion

AUGUST 26, 2017

Rev. Sam Teitel Find out what makes us different:

www.churchoftheriver.org

10AM-4PM

Multi Stage Line-Up Featuring t DJ Chuuuch, Billy Rivers & The Angelic Voices of Faith, Will Graves & Soul, Artist by Made in Memphis (David Porter), Zakeya Stewart, and Memphis Baptist Ministerial Association Male Chorus FOR MORE INFORMATION

www.thestonecdc.org OR CALL, 901-774-3326

Free Admission! FAMILY | FOOD | FUN | ENTERTAINMENT

30

Next to the Big River Crossing

Memphis Botanic Garden

750 CHERRY (636-4100).

Fest Be part of a new beginning with our new preacher,

639 MARSHALL (679-6837).

“Gardens: Indoor/Outdoor,” exhibition of garden themed works by Libby Anderson. www.memphisbotanicgarden. com. Through Aug. 31.

A New Reason to Check Out

Church

“Love of Art” and “Memphis,” exhibition of work by Nikki Gardner and Debra Edge, by appointment only. (647-9242) Ongoing.

Memphis Brooks Museum of Art

“By the Book: A Tribute to Dolph Smith,” exhibit focusing on Dolph Smith’s artist notebooks, featuring six on display. Also includes the work of 11 artists who have worked with Smith. Through Nov. 26. Rotunda Projects: Nnenna Okore, exhibition of works with burlap to fashion abstract objects inspired by textures, colors, and landscapes. www.brooksmuseum. org. Through Sept. 10. “Unwrapped! 100 Gifts for 100 Years,” exhibition of more than 100 works of art gifted to the museum ranging from ancient coins to contemporary glass and paintings to quilts. www.brooksmuseum. org. Through Aug. 27. “About Face,” exhibition located in the Education Gallery highlighting the different ways artists interpret the connection between emotion and expression. www.brooksmuseum.org. Ongoing. “Drawing Memory: Essence of Memphis,” exhibition of works inspired by nsibidi, a sacred means of communication among male secret societies in southeastern Nigeria by Victor Ekpuk. www.brooksmuseum.org. Ongoing. 1934 POPLAR (544-6209).

Bowling for Balls VI at Billy Hardwick Lanes, Sunday, August 20th

by Jeff and Shaakira Edison. Ongoing.

Memphis College of Art

“Through Grandmother’s Eyes,” exhibition of oil paintings, sketches, and frames by Amy and Chuck Carlisle. www.stgchurch.org. Through Aug. 27.

“Horn Island 33,” exhibition of artwork as part of the outcome of an 11-day annual trip by MCA students, faculty, and alumni to Horn Island, a barrier island off the coast of Pascagoula, MS. mca. edu/event/horn-island-33/. Through Sept. 29. 1930 POPLAR (272-5100).

Metal Museum

“Cascadian Lines,” exhibition of works by Christopher Gerber in the Museum Store. www.metalmuseum.org. Through Nov. 12. “Metal in Motion,” exhibition and group show of work involving moving parts including hand operated or run on a motor inviting the viewer to interact with the art. Through Aug. 27. “With Love, From Brent,” exhibition of nearly 200 pieces of jewelry created over the course of his life as gifts for his wife, mother, daughter, and sister-in-law alongside cards and letters drawn and written by L. Brent Kington. www.metalmuseum.org. Through Oct. 15. 374 METAL MUSEUM DR. (774-6380).

Playhouse on the Square

“Floating Light,” exhibition of photographs exploring the weight of light and darkness over a span of undocumented time by local photographers Katherine Dean and Joseph Moseley. mca.edu. Through Sept. 10. 66 S. COOPER (726-4656).

Ross Gallery

“Home/Away From Home” and “Signals,” exhibition of work by Terry Kenney and Chuck Johnson. www.cbu. edu. Aug. 18-Oct. 5. CHRISTIAN BROTHERS UNIVERSITY, PLOUGH LIBRARY, 650 E. PARKWAY S. (321-3000).

Slavehaven Underground Railroad Museum

“Images of Africa Before & After the Middle Passage,” exhibition of photography

826 N. SECOND (527-3427).

St. George’s Episcopal Church

2425 S. GERMANTOWN (754-7282).

Talbot Heirs

Debra Edge Art. Ongoing. 99 S. SECOND (527-9772).

Tops Gallery: Madison Avenue Park

“Sad Men on Bad Afternoons,” exhibition curated by Daniel Fuller featuring the work of Natalie Labriola, Joseriberto Perez, Lauren Taylor, and Kandis Williams. www.topsgallery.com. Through Sept. 17. 151 MADISON (340-0134).

Village Frame & Art

Gallery artists, exhibition of work by Charlie Ivey, Virginia Schoenster, Lou Ann Dattilo, and Matthew Hasty. Ongoing. 540 S. MENDENHALL (767-8882).

West Memorials

Artist Commons Group Exhibition. Through Sept. 1. 2481 BROAD (767-0026).

WKNO Studio

2017 MGAL Member Showcase and Sale, exhibition by local artists who are members of the Memphis Germantown Art League. www.wkno.org. Through Aug. 29. 7151 CHERRY FARMS (458-2521).

DAN C E

Dance Open House

Discover Ballet on Wheels’ unique dance program. Thurs., Aug. 17, 6:30-8:30 p.m. BALLET ON WHEELS DANCE SCHOOL & COMPANY, 2085 MONROE, WWW.BALLETONWHEELS.ORG.

C O M E DY

Dru’s Place

Ian Aber, Mon., Aug. 21, 9:30 p.m. 1474 MADISON (275-8082).

continued on page 32


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31


CALENDAR: AUGUST 17 - 23 continued from page 30

The Women’s Connection Luncheon & Expo

Gold Strike Casino

Women will share insights on finding success and balance. Amy Speropoulos, host of Local Memphis Live with Local 24 News, will emcee day of inspiration, shopping, networking, and more. $25. Fri., Aug. 18, 10 a.m.-3 p.m.

Terry Fator, Las Vegas Strip headliner and America’s Got Talent winner captures audience’s hearts and funny bones. (1-888-747-7711), goldstrike.com. $45$75. Fri., Aug. 18, 9-10:30 p.m. 1010 CASINO CENTER IN TUNICA, MS (1-888-245-7829).

RACQUET CLUB OF MEMPHIS, 5111 SANDERLIN (765-4400), WWW.BARTLETTCHAMBER.ORG.

P O ET RY/S PO K E N W O R D F EST IVA LS

Amurica World Headquarters

Spillit Story Slam: Risk, opportunity to share five minutes of you with a room full of kind folks who appreciate stories. www.spillitmemphis.org. $10. Sun., Aug. 20, 7 p.m.

15th Annual Memphis Tri-State Blues Festival $35. Sat., Aug. 19, 6:30-9:30 p.m.

LANDERS CENTER, 4660 VENTURE, SOUTHAVEN, MS (662280-9120), WWW.LANDERSCENTER.COM.

410 CLEVELAND.

Epiphany Lutheran Church

Centering Prayer, opportunity for silent contemplation, followed by inspirational poetry and readings. www.epiphanylu.org. Wednesdays, noon. 7887 POPLAR (861-6227).

National Civil Rights Museum

MLK50 Drop the Mic Poetry Symposium & Slam, for ages 14 and up, the symposium offers a platform for expression. Qualifying poets and spoken word artists participate in the Slam at Minglewood Hall, 1555 Madison. Cash prizes. www.civilrightsmuseum.org. Fri., Aug. 18, 3-8 p.m., and Sat., Aug. 19, 5-8:30 p.m.

“Peace Is Possible”

Professor Gershon Shafir will sign books and examine the current status the West Bank and Gaza and suggest a way forward toward a two-state solution. Free. Wed., Aug. 23, 5:30-7 p.m. BENJAMIN L. HOOKS CENTRAL LIBRARY, 3030 POPLAR (310-756-3294).

C O N F E R E N C E S/ C O N VE N T I O N S

Modern Day Woman’s Conference

450 MULBERRY (521-9699).

L ECT U R E /S P EA K E R

Bees: Our Pollinator

3rd Annual Mid-South Renaissance Faire

David Glover, the Bartlett Bee Whisper, is a local bee expert and quite the personality. He will enthrall you about bees and his exploits with them. Refreshments provided. Free. Sat., Aug. 19, 1 p.m.

Enlighten young women to utilize their incredible education, resources, and strengths to have a greater effect on the world. $50. Sat., Aug. 19, 8 a.m.-4 p.m. SOUTHERN COLLEGE OF OPTOMETRY, 1245 MADISON (578-9346), WWW.MDWC2017.EVENTBRITE.COM.

Centering Prayer at Epiphany Lutheran Church, Wednesdays at noon E X PO S/ SA L E S

Back-to-School Community Health Fair

Featuring free onsite screenings, free school supplies, free food, fun, and prize giveaways. Sat., Aug. 19, 10 a.m.-2 p.m. MEMPHIS HEALTH CENTER, 360 CRUMP (261-2042).

Sunday Vintage Pop-Up Market + Brunch

Multi-vendor vintage clothing market in the back room of High Cotton Brewing Co. Fuel Cafe food truck will be out front serving brunch. Sun., Aug. 20, 11 a.m.-4 p.m. HIGH COTTON BREWING CO., 598 MONROE (896-9977).

THE URBAN EARTH, 80 FLICKER (323-0031), WWW.URBANEARTHMEMPHIS.COM.

Travel back in time to the realm of Queen Elizabeth I. $10. Saturdays, Sundays, 10 a.m.-6 p.m. Through Aug. 27. USA BASEBALL STADIUM, 4351 BABE HOWARD BLVD. IN MILLINGTON (508-3360), MIDSOUTHRENFAIRE.COM.

S PO R TS / F IT N ES S

Bowling For Balls VI

Four-person teams will do battle on the lanes to raise awareness for testicular cancer. Featuring free beer from Memphis Made Brewing, pizza, soda, and great prize giveaway. $120. Sun., Aug. 20, 2-5 p.m. BILLY HARDWICK ALLSTAR LANES, 1576 S. WHITE STATION (336-7700), WWW.BOWLINGFORBALLS.COM.

Fight Night 2017

Come see these Memphians fight for the Boys and Girls Clubs of Greater Memphis. $25-$75. Sat., Aug. 19, 7-10:30 p.m. UNIVERSITY CLUB OF MEMPHIS, 1346 CENTRAL (722-3700), WWW.PHOENIXCLUB.ORG.

August 17-23, 2017

continued on page 34

auditions august 28 - 6:00 to 8:00pm Entertaining musical featuring 25 bluegrasscountry Gospel songs, filled with a few tears & lots of laughs! • 3 Actresses, 4 Actors • Musicians: Guitar, Banjo, Bass, Fiddle, Piano • Crew

32

Audition Info: 901-385-6440 • bpacc.org 3663 Appling Road, Bartlett, TN

CATERING AVAILABLE | NO CORKING FEE

BUY ONE CLASSIC GYRO & TWO DRINKS

GET ONE CLASSIC GYRO

2 CLASSIC GYRO DINNERS FOR

$15

FREE! Expires 8/31/17

AFTER 5PM GYRO DINNER INCLUDES A CLASSIC GYRO WITH ½ GREEK SALAD Expires 8/31/17

VALID ONLY AT THIS LOCATION:

547 S. HIGHLAND (ON THE HIGHLAND STRIP) • 901-323-3050


WANT RINGSIDE SEATS WITHOUT LEAVING MEMPHIS?

MASSIVE PROJECTION SCREENS SO YOU’RE NEXT TO THE ACTION. THREE HIP VENUES ACROSS THE CITY. OLD DOMINICK DISTILLERY DRINK SPECIALS AND ONSITE REPS DOLING OUT SWAG.

2166 CENTRAL AVE.

3000 BROAD AVE.

• BIG SCREENS IN THE COACH HOUSE • CORNHOLE IN THE YARD

• BIG SCREENS AND PONG • MASSIVE SCREEN IN THE YARD

• SIX 20-FOOT SCREENS • TONS OF ARCADE & VIDEO GAMES

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railgarten.com

recroommemphis.com

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901-213-9343

BEST LINGERIE SHOP IN MEMPHIS

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7 W. CAROLINA AVE.

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FOOD FOR EVERYONE - FROM PIZZA TO POUTINE.

408 Perkins Ext | Memphis, TN 38117 | 901-682-7575 | trousseau.com Monday – Saturday: 10:00am – 5:30pm |

33


CALENDAR: AUGUST 17 - 23

Congrats to Shelby & Terri Nominated for BEST STYLIST!!! grats to

ated

BEST H BEST AIR SALO DAY N BEST SPA PLAC E TO HAV A FA E C IAL BEST NAIL SALO N

Shelby & Terri for BEST STYLIST

That's the way they became...

continued from page 32 HP’s 7th Annual 3-on-3 Basketball Tournament Featuring special guest, former Memphis Tiger Andre Turner, benefiting Life Choices of Memphis. Sat., Aug. 19, 10 a.m.-3 p.m.

BELLEVUE BAPTIST CHURCH, 2000 APPLING (347-2000).

Memphis Roller Derby Boot Camp Info Session

memphissalonspa.com

Terry Fator at Gold Strike Casino, Friday, August 18th Thursday of every month, 6-7:30 p.m. THE DIXON GALLERY & GARDENS, 4339 PARK (761-5250), WWW. DIXON.ORG.

Lupus Support Group

nity Center. Hawaiian attire recommended. $5. Sun., Aug. 20, 6-10 p.m. SOUTHERN BLUES EQUESTRIAN CENTER, 1707 QUINN (219-7878).

The Crosstown Concourse Opening Celebration

Showcasing the organizations and businesses that believed in and dedicated themselves to this project. Sat., Aug. 19, 3 p.m.

Our mission is to ensure that patients in Memphis with Memphis Roller Derby seekCROSSTOWN CONCOURSE (FORlupus, as well as their caregiving adults of all genders aged MERLY SEARS CROSSTOWN), N. ers, family, and friends, have 18 and over to play. Training CLEVELAND AT NORTH PARKWAY, a safe and supportive place to program is two days per week main CROSSTOWNMEMPHIS.COM. 10 n st     9 connect. Free. Third Saturday over six weeks, including how info@memphissalonspa. of every month, 1-3 p.m. Eclipse Party to skate, how to hit and be hit, NESHOBA COMMUNITY RESOURCE Certified viewing glasses for and rules/strategy. $25. Thurs., CENTER, sale, onsite astronomer for Aug. 17, 7-9 p.m. 7715 E. HOLMES (755-2250). questions, and a craft for PIPKIN BUILDING, MID-SOUTH the kids. Free with Garden FAIRGROUNDS (355-2002), WWW. admission. Mon., Aug. 21, MEMPHISROLLERDERBY.COM. KIDS 11:30 a.m.-3 p.m.

10 n main st     901-527-7511       info@memphissalonspa.com   @aveda_memphis

memphissal

The nominations are in.

Now it's time to

Cast Your

Live independent wrestling action benefiting Horn Lake Parks & Recreation for improvements to the park and their youth programs. $10. Sat., Aug. 19, 1:30-4 p.m. LATIMER LAKE PARK, 5633 TULANE (483-3926), WWW.SOUTHERNREVOLUTIONPROMOTIONS.WEBS.COM.

Memphis Redbirds Home Games

For more information, visit website. Through Aug. 27.

August 17-23, 2017

AUTOZONE PARK, THIRD AND UNION (721-6000), WWW.MEMPHISREDBIRDS.COM.

Tee Up for Alzheimer’s

Charity Golf Scramble to benefit the Alzheimer’s Association of the Mid-South. Fri., Aug. 18, 11:30 a.m.-2:30 p.m. QUAIL RIDGE GOLF COURSE, 4055 ALTRURIA (386-6951), WWW.ALZ. ORG/ALTN.

vote on your favorite local business from August 9-25 34

Mid-South Wrestling Revolution

on memphisflyer.com

M E ETI NGS

The Dixon Book Club

Learn about gardens, the arts, Memphis, and France through reading fiction and non-fiction. August 17: Love in the Time of Cholera; September 21: The Sisterhood. To request a copy of a book, email lschmidt@dixon.org Free with admission. Third

Jurassic Journeys on Land, Sea, and Air

Featuring animated dinosaurs and other animals from Kokoro. Featuring some new and old friends. Through Sept. 10. MEMPHIS PINK PALACE MUSEUM, 3050 CENTRAL (636-2362), WWW.MEMPHISMUSEUMS.ORG.

Magic Carpet: On Your Toes with the Sugar Plum Fairy and Roudnev Youth Ballet

MEMPHIS BOTANIC GARDEN, 750 CHERRY (636-4100), WWW.MEMPHISBOTANICGARDEN.COM.

Great American Solar Eclipse

Meteorologist Ron Childers will be on hand to share information about this special event. Eclipse viewing glasses will be available for purchase in the Lake’s Edge Gift Shop and Great Lawn at noon. Mon., Aug. 21, 12-2:30 p.m. SHELBY FARMS, 500 N. PINE LAKE (767-PARK), WWW.SHELBYFARMSPARK.ORG.

Children ages two to eight are invited to grab their tutus and magic carpet for a dancing adventure across the globe with Clara and her Nutcracker. $5. Sat., Aug. 19, 10 a.m.

Memphis Fighting Game Community

BUCKMAN ARTS CENTER AT ST. MARY’S SCHOOL, 60 N. PERKINS EXT. (537-1483), WWW.BUCKMANARTSCENTER.ORG.

GREATER MEMPHIS MAGIC ARENA, 7505 HWY 64, WWW.MEMPHISFGC. COM.

S P EC IA L EVE NTS

Aloha from Hawaii, Mahalo from Memphis

Family-friendly fun including food trucks, cash bars, and live entertainment featuring Elvis and hula dancers benefitting Urban Equestrian Program for kids at the Whitehaven Commu-

Equipment player provided, extra set-ups welcome. BYO controller. $5. Third Sunday of every month, 1-5 p.m. Through Sept. 30.

Nominations for Memphis Flyer Best of Memphis

Vote now for the Best of Memphis. Through Aug. 25. WWW.MEMPHISFLYER.COM.

Peabody Rooftop Party

Meet on the roof for music

continued on page 37


community

celebration PA R T Y

P M

ROOFTOP

12 – 4

AUG 26

season finale

Graceland Ninjaz Thursday, August 17 6pm-10pm $15 • LADIES FREE ‘TIL 7pm

ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT

m e m p h i s f l y e r. c o m

#PBodyRoof peabodymemphis.com

35


August 17-23, 2017

— ONLY AT — LYFE KITCHEN + CHISCA BAR

CHOICE OF SHAREABLE

turkey meatball martini cucumber bites

CHOICE OF SALAD

half seasonal market salad half power greens salad

CHOICE OF ENTRÉE

parmesan crusted chicken herb roasted salmon curried rice noodles

CHOICE OF ENTRÉE

parmesan crusted chicken herb roasted salmon curried rice noodles

SWEET SURPRISE

special eclipse-inspired dessert

OTHER GOODIES

solar eclipse viewing glasses special champagne toast at peak contests & candlelit tables

MON, AUG 21, 2017 12:00 - 2:00PM

36

272 South Main Street Memphis, TN 38103 901-526-0254 | lyfekitchen.com


CALENDAR: AUGUST 17 - 23 continued from page 34 and fun. $10-$15. Thurs., 6-10 p.m. Through Aug. 17. THE PEABODY HOTEL, 149 UNION (529-4000), WWW. PEABODYHOTEL.COM.

Plunge to Expunge

Night full of brews and dunk tanks where you will have the opportunity to dunk 901 personalities like Geoff Calkins, Katrina Coleman, and more, benefitting Just City’s Clean Slate Fund. Fri., Aug. 18, 5-8 p.m. MEMPHIS MADE BREWING COMPANY, 768 S. COOPER (207-5343), WWW.JUSTCITY.ORG.

School Supply Drive for Foster Kids

All Mattress Firm will accept school supplies and monetary contributions during normal business hours benefiting local foster youth and families at Youth Villages. See website for locations. Through Aug. 27.

Stumblin’ Elvis Pub Crawl 2017

Throw on your Elvis or Priscilla gear with us to participate in a costume contest and big wheel race featuring big prizes. Sat., Aug. 19, 5 p.m.midnight. FLYING SAUCER DRAUGHT EMPORIUM, 130 PEABODY PLACE (481-4066), WWW.BEERKNURD.COM/LOCATIONS/ MEMPHIS-FLYING-SAUCER.

Twilight Luncheon

Solar eclipse watch and luncheon. Advance reservations only. Mon., Aug. 21, 12-2 p.m. LYFE KITCHEN, 272 S. MAIN (526-0254), WWW.LYFECHISCABAR.COM.

Underground Dinner

Unique event in an obscure location where Chef Jimmy Gentry, along with his Paradox team, serve five masterfully created courses that are paired with the perfect libations. $150. Sat., Aug.

19, 7-11 p.m.

Cemetery Cinema: Vertigo

WWW.PARADOXCUISINE.COM.

FI LM

The 15 Film Series

Films in the series will engage with three themes: Memphis history, art, and spatial justice. Free. Thursdays, 6 p.m. Through Sept. 30. CLAYBORN TEMPLE, 294 HERNANDO, WWW.ONLOCATIONMEMPHIS.ORG.

Aircraft Carrier Guardians of the Sea

Find yourself aboard a carrier alongside 6,000 highly skilled sea and air personnel, in the midst of a giant war simulation. Through Nov. 17. CTI 3D GIANT THEATER, IN THE MEMPHIS PINK PALACE MUSEUM, 3050 CENTRAL (636-2362), WWW.MEMPHISMUSEUMS.ORG.

Evening of outdoor film. Pre-sales only. Bring a chair and cooler or enjoy food for sale by Fuel and MemPops. 18+ event. Proceeds support the maintenance of Elmwood Cemetery. $15. Fri., Aug. 18, 7 p.m. ELMWOOD CEMETERY, 824 S. DUDLEY (774-3212), WWW. ELMWOODCEMETERY.ORG.

Doctor Who: The Five Doctors Thurs., Aug. 17, 7 p.m.

MALCO PARADISO CINEMA, 584 S. MENDENHALL (682-1754), WWW.MALCO.COM.

Time Warp Drive-In

Movies start at dusk. See website for theme and movie line-up. Sat., Aug. 19. MALCO SUMMER 4 DRIVE-IN, 5310 SUMMER (681-2020), WWW.MALCO.COM.

WWW.MATTRESSFIRMFOSTERKIDS.ORG/.

Survive the Solar Eclipse

Survive this year’s solar eclipse, featuring custommade viewing glasses, food trucks, music, Tshirts, and more. Mon., Aug. 21, 11 a.m.-9 p.m. GHOST RIVER BREWING, 827 S. MAIN (278-0087).

Tiki Thursday

Polynesian fun featuring Tiki bar menu, hula hooping with Co-Motion, live music, and more. Thursdays. RAILGARTEN, 2160 CENTRAL, WWW.RAILGARTEN.COM.

Urban Bicycle Food Ministry’s 5th Anniversary Party & Auction

Featuring auction, live music, free beer tastings, food truck, and more. Free. Sat., Aug. 19, 7-10 p.m. THE BIKESMITH, 509 N HOLLYWOOD (871-2453), WWW. UBFM.NET.

H O L I DAY EVE N TS

Elvis Week 2017

40th anniversary of Elvis’ passing. Celebrate the life and legacy of Elvis Presley. See website for schedule of events. Through Aug. 18. WWW.GRACELAND.COM.

FO O D & D R I N K EVE N TS

19th Annual Sparkling Nights Auction, Wine, and Food Tasting

Featuring Joey Evangelisti, a Memphis artist with autism, silent and live auction, international wines, musical entertainment, and dancing to benefit SRVS and as a legacy tribute to Dorothy Wilson. $110. Sat., Aug. 19, 7-11:30 p.m.

Friday, September 29 & Saturday, September 30 • 8pm TICKETS START AT $25

Tickets available at Fitz Gift Shop or call at 800-745-3000 or ticketmaster.com

HOTEL CONCERT PACKAGE $179

Includes a Deluxe Room and Two Reserved Show Tickets. Call 1-662-363-LUCK (5825) and mention code: CPSTAR

CASINO PROMOTIONS

UNIVERSITY OF MEMPHIS HOLIDAY INN, 3700 CENTRAL (312-6801), WWW.SRVS.ORG.

AMURICA WORLD HEADQUARTERS, 410 CLEVELAND, WWW. PPGMR.ORG.

Drinks, Diversity + Dialogue

Join PRSA Memphis as we celebrate PRSA Diversity Month with drinks, music, and networking. Free. Tues., Aug. 22, 5:30 p.m.

P L AY

JACK ROBINSON PHOTOGRAPHY GALLERY, 44 HULING (576-0708), WWW.PRSAMEMPHIS.ORG.

CAPITAL GRILLE, THE, 6065 POPLAR (683-9291), WWW. THECAPITALGRILLE.COM.

Lowcountry Seafood Boil

S U N D AYS I N A U G U ST H O T E L L O B B Y, 2 P M - 6 P M

THURSDAYS, AUG. 17 & 31 AND MONDAYS, SEPT. 4 & 18 • 3PM Earn only 50 points or earn 100 points and play twice!

Earn 200 points and choose from Kenneth Cole or US POLO. If Versace is more your style, earn 400 points.

Join family and friends, reconnect with old friends, and meet new ones as we learn and share tastings of wine and lowcountry cuisine on a private farm. $50-$75. Sat., Aug. 19, 6-10 p.m. WWW.VINTAGE901.COM.

Science of Wine

Featuring the best Memphis has to offer in wine, food, and fun. Fri., Aug. 18, 6-9:30 p.m. MEMPHIS PINK PALACE MUSEUM, 3050 CENTRAL (901.636.2437), WWW.MEMPHISMUSEUMS.ORG.

E A R N

HANDBAG EVENT

The Generous Pour

Experience seven acclaimed wines from California and Oregon paired with the restaurant’s signature menu items. $28. Through Sept. 3.

&

FitzgeraldsTunica.com • 1-662-363-LUCK (5825) • Must be 21 and a Key Rewards member. See Cashier•Players Club for rules. Tax and resort fee not included in listed price. Advance hotel reservations required and subject to availability. $50 credit or debit card is required upon hotel check-in. Arrivals after 6pm must be guaranteed with a credit card. Management reserves the right to cancel, change and modify the event or promotion. Gaming restricted patrons prohibited. Gambling Problem? Call 1-800-522-4700.

ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT

Happy hour event featuring individuals who are pioneers in their fields, each taking an intersectional approach to reproductive health and justice. Thurs., Aug. 17, 6-8 p.m.

m e m p h i s f l y e r. c o m

Beers with Pioneers 3

37


BOOKS By Corey Mesler

Less Is More On Andrew Sean Greer’s funny new novel.

August 17-23, 2017

H

38

ow amiable and witty this is, its wit as dry as the clicking of a clock. Insert joke here: Blank is easy; comedy is hard. One may be able to quickly compile a list of great books, but great comedic books would take more time. Wodehouse, yes. Russo’s Straight Man, yes. Peter De Vries, yes. Heller’s Catch-22, of course. Sterne’s Tristram Shandy, definitely yes. Add Andrew Sean Greer’s newest novel, Less, to this august group. I love funny; it’s a rare commodity, even in the works of our best writers. Furthermore, I love novels about writers — John Updike’s Bech books, Anthony Burgess’ Enderby series, Philip Roth’s Zuckerman novels, Powell’s monumental A Dance to the Music of Time — so this little tale hits me right in the heart. Of the aforementioned, this slim, delightful novel feels most like one of Updike’s Bech books, its gay, peripatetic novelist-hero, Arthur Less globe-hopping for months to escape having to attend an ex-lover’s wedding. There is much humorous expatiation about airports and planes, escorts and awards, foreigners and fans. And the self-deprecating Less is at his best describing his feeling of outsiderness wherever he goes and whomever he goes with. It is said that most writers feel a fraud, especially around other writers, and Less has this malady in spades. “What does one ever ask an author except: ‘How?’ And the answer, as Less knows, is obvious: ‘Beats me’!” From Mexico to Italy to Germany to France to Morocco he goes, here a reading, here a literary prize, here a trip by camel, and as Arthur Less travels in space he correspondingly travels in time, each stop initiating memories, good and bad, of love and lust, won and lost. He’s also approaching 50, a milestone he dreads like the Day of Doom’s tick. He thinks he will die alone. He thinks he is un-mateable, like a wild animal in captivity. And he is fighting becoming a bitter, cynical, oldish man. He thinks, “Sicilians talk about being struck by lightning. We know there’s

no love of your life. Love isn’t terrifying like that. It’s walking the fucking dog so the other can sleep in, it’s doing taxes, it’s cleaning the bathroom without hard feelings. It’s having an ally in life. It’s not fire, it’s not lightning.” Arthur Less feels the way many writers feel about being a public person as a “reward” for writing novels. His readings are sparsely attended. His assignments, one after another, seem designed only to make him feel ridiculous, rather than celebrated. “How has it come to this? What god has enough free time to arrange this very special humiliation, to fly a minor novelist across the world so that he can feel, in some seventh sense, the minusculitude of his own worth?” And, like many writers, Arthur is trapped inside his own head. He overthinks everything. “The brain is so wrong, all the time … Wrong about what time it is, and who people are, and where home is: wrong wrong wrong. The lying brain.” Following Arthur around the world is like living inside his Jiffy Pop brain. He is droll and affable, while inside he seethes with self-hatred, self-doubt, and a desire to know what it’s all about. Is 50 really such a liminal signpost that he keeps moving across international time lines to avoid what catches us all up eventually? We age. If age is only loss, how much less life can Less tolerate? His name is well chosen, of course, symbolic, ironic, useful in many of the book’s best jokes. Along the way the reader will learn much about the writing life and about gay life and about capital “L” Life. The book’s first line, spoken by a narrator who remains hidden until it’s time for the big reveal, is “From where I sit, the story of Arthur Less is not so bad.” So, reader, is it? Is Arthur’s life better than he thinks it is? It’s an instructive way to read Arthur Less’s chronicle, and, I won’t be spoiling anything by saying, the trip is worth it. Greer is as entertaining as a riddle and as funny as a flood in a Fizzies factory. Oh, plus you learn the correct way to pronounce “Pulitzer.”


Friday

is Memph

Oct13

E D PRE S E NT

6-9pm Overton Square Courtyard

B Y

Kick off The Halloween

party season in one

spirited evening! Sample 15 variations of tequila and chat with distillers while you enjoy tasty food options, fun party activities, and our DJ’s rock the block. It’s our first annual Tequila Festival!

on sale now Bird Tickets

Visit memphistequilafestival.com to find out more!

so every sip counts! FEATURED TEQUIL AS INCLUDE

We Saw You.

with MICHAEL DONAHUE MemphisFlyer.com

$70

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CHO CES

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Interested in participating? Reach out to Molly at 901.832.2085 or molly@memphisflyer.com

1726 Poplar Avenue Memphis, TN 38104 901/274-3550 www.memphischoices.org

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STD TEST

Proceeds benefit

ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT

$34

Early

39


ART By Michael Donahue

Good Books

“By the Book: A Tribute to Dolph Smith” at the Brooks.

5off

$

a full price adult ticket with promo code

MPARENT (Limit four)

THEATRE MEMPHIS presents “SHREK THE MUSICAL” • Music by JEANINE TESORI Lyrics and Book by DAVID LINDSAY-ABAIRE • Director CECELIA WINGATE Music Director JEFFREY B. BREWER • Choreographers TRAVIS BRADLEY & JORDAN NICHOLS

Sponsored by DR. THOMAS RATLIFF, THE WORLD CATARACT FOUNDATION and DINA & BRAD MARTIN • Media Sponsors MEMPHIS PARENT MAGAZINE, JABBERBLABBER MAGAZINE, WKNO 91.1FM and CLIPPER MAGAZINE

AUG 18-SEPT 10

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eteran artist Dolph Smith constructs books from scratch. His son, Ben Smith, chef/owner of Tsunami restaurant, constructs unrivaled performance. unending applause. culinary dishes from scratch. TICKETS 901.682.8323 ONLINE theatrememphis.org Their creations are similar. “He can make the most elaborate scallop dish and present it beautifully and all,” Dolph says. “But it’s not done. Shrek.MemphisParentAd.indd 1 7/13/17 12:23 PM It’s not complete until you devour it.” The pages in most of Dolph’s books are blank. “I hope whoever would get them would finish them for me by using them. In any way.” Examples of Dolph’s oneof-a-kind artists books are featured in “By the Book: A Tribute to Dolph Smith,” which is on view through November 26th at Memphis Brooks Museum of Art. Also included in the show curated by Marina Pacini are books made by 11 artists Dolph has worked with. Dolph, 84, who taught drawing and painting for 30 years at Memphis College of Art, has made at least 100 books. “I started out on watercolor on paper. And then I learned to make paper. And then paper becomes books. So, it’s all tied together.” Central Ave Constructing books is “moving away from that craft cloud that hangs York Ave N over things like that,” Dolph says. “It’s moving away from it being a craft to Elzy Ave Gourmet On THE Go! really being an art form. And I support that. It’s an object. It’s interactive. 40 800 S. Cooper Street Memphis, TN 38104 • (901) 871-6879 • cooperstreet2020.com You’re drawn to use it rather than just Generous support provided by

Smith’s Buoyk (above); Jessie and Dolph Smith (below); Smith’s ladder-themed Highques (opposite)

stare at it. And it has moving parts. You pick up a book with 30 pages. I see that as 30 moving parts.” Dolph has used paper he’s made to construct his books, but he usually buys “archival” (designed not to deteriorate or yellow over time) paper

Take out • Heat in • Eat Well Cooper St

August 17-23, 2017

Prepare a five-star meal while you walk the dog.

from a German mill. He never knows what size or shape the book will be until he begins folding the paper. “You fold it until it tells you what size to make the book. You don’t tell it what to do.” Dolph makes several sections or “signatures” of pages, which he then sews onto cloth tapes before adding the book cover. He uses archival thread. “It’s waxed


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ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT

so you can sew and it moves nicely through the pages. The sewing is a perfect example of that old saw we have about form meeting function. Because it’s a beautiful pattern of thread, and yet it holds the book together. So, that’s beauty holding the book together.” Dolph constantly makes books. “I finish one, and I start another. Some of them take up to a week ’cause I have to think it out. You know, making a book is like reading a book. You begin with the paper telling you what size it’s to be. And then you improvise out of that. And you begin a conversation with the book.” He taught himself how to make books. “If I had gone to England to learn to be a professional book binder I would have been there seven years, and I would have learned to build a book completely.” Dolph makes all types of books, including some he uses. “I make my date book. I make my to-do list book. I always carry a handmade book.” And, he says, “I make crazy books. Ladders are uplifting to me, so I have a book in there that’s lifted up on ladders. It’s an uplifting book.’” Inside the book are haikus, but, in keeping with the ladder theme, Dolph calls them “highques.” Dolph also makes books for friends. Describing one of those gifts, he says, “I did a glass cover in the shape of a bottle. And I etched three marks on it to show it was liquor.” He collected “a lot of hair from our dog,” which he added to the book. He titled it Hair of the Dog.

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41


T H E AT E R B y C h r i s D a v i s

Mama Courage

Hattiloo opens Ruined, welcomes artistic director Hall.

K

EACH CONCERT FEATURES: Musical Performances • DJ Swagg • Food Trucks Spoken Word Artists • MUSEUM Merchandise Booth MLK Speeches • Sip & Shop @ Main ST. MUSEUM STORE

n so dy a ny to

ka ren bro wn

de vin cr utc he r

F r i d ay s i n s e p t e m b e r , 6 - 8 P m

carmen hicks

co ur tn ey lit tl e

* ThE concerts are FREE. Bring your own blankets, chairs, etc. to lounge on. NO OUTSIDE FOOD. Support Local food trucks.

In commemoration of

# M L KS o u l @NCRMuseum

August 17-23, 2017

450 MULBERRY ST. • MEMPHIS, TN 38103 • civilrightsmuseum.org

MLK50 Concert Series8-5x11.indd 1

True Story:

Love one another. It’s that simple.

“It takes a village” became very real when the kids came along. They found a circle of caring that embraced all of them.

Together. 42

8/15/17

First Congregational Church

www.firstcongo.com Phone: 901.278.6786 1000 South Cooper Memphis, TN 38104 Sunday Worship 10:30 am

atori Hall has good lines. Hall’s the playwright behind Hurt Village and Hoodoo Love. She won an Olivier for The Mountaintop, which ran on Broadway with Samuel L. Jackson and Angela Bassett in leading roles. She’s also the newly appointed artistic director for the Hattiloo Theatre. “I bleed barbecue sauce,” she said last Friday, stressing her Memphis bona fides and enchanting a near-capacity crowd of invited guests come to welcome her to the new gig. It was a homecoming of sorts for the Craigmont grad (and Columbia, and Harvard) who regards Lynn Nottage as her mentor and whose latest play Pussy Valley is being developed as a streaming series for STARZ. Friday’s opening night performance of Nottage’s Pulitzer-winning drama Ruined was preceded by a reception celebrating Hall’s arrival and the announcement of a new vision for the Hattiloo. Together with the company’s founder, Ekundayo Bandele, Hall wants to transform the Overton Square playhouse into a small professional company with a national reputation for developing actors and fostering emerging writers. Ruined is a strong opener and evidence of what the ambitious but inconsistent Hattiloo is capable of. Under the direction of Shondrika Moss-Bouldin, it’s the most satisfying, fully realized thing the company’s done since Tony Horne’s 12:39 PM vividly imagined production of Marcus Gardley’s The House That Will Not Stand last season. When Nottage’s Congolese Civil War drama is on, it’s on fire. Set in Mama Nadi’s bar in a bleeding and brutalized mining town in the Democratic Republic of Congo, Ruined borrows knowingly and well from shows like Cabaret and Mother Courage and Her Children. Mama is a businesswoman selling cigarettes, whiskey, and other goods and comforts to the soldiers, militiamen, miners, and dealers on all sides of a shapeshifting conflict. She buys other kinds of merchandise, too — rescuing two women, Sophie and Salima, from

sexual torture that scars them physically and wrecks them socially. She rescues them and puts them to work entertaining soldiers indistinguishable from the ones who ruined them. Mama’s protection is a mixed blessing that comes at a price for women still coping with sexual trauma, particularly for Sophie, who becomes a popular singer at the bar, with a head for business and petty larceny. But touchy, insistent soldiers cause panic and paralysis, putting her on a collision course with Mama’s business side. She will ultimately fare better than Salima who arrives with a secret she knows she can’t keep hidden. Ruined starkly considers the rape and the sexual mutilation of women as weapons and tactics of war. These nightmares are brought to vivid life by 2017 Ostrander nominee Jessica “Jai” Johnson and Kiah Clements as Salima and Sophie. As Mama, Maya Robinson leans heavily on strong comedy chops. The humor softens Mama’s hard edges but not too much. It’s a rich performance, and her scenes with Bertram Williams Jr. — a supplier and would-be romantic interest — keep hope alive in a violent place. Williams, it should be noted, has been performing with Hattiloo since the beginning and has transitioned from serviceable leading man to commanding presence who gets better with each new role. Americans are isolated, largely untraveled, and tend to think of foreign conflicts as somebody else’s problem. But globalism means the violence is usually closer than you think. When you watch a production of Ruined, you’ve got to know that the modern technology everybody enjoys has funded war in the Congo. Cell phones funded it. Laptop computers funded it. Video game consoles funded it. That’s not what the show is about, but the brutality has context. Coltan, the rare mineral found in abundance in the Congo and used as currency in Ruined, is that context. Recommended. Ruined continues at the Hattiloo Theatre through September 3rd. $26-$30 502-3486. www.hattiloo.org


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F O O D N E W S B y L e s l e y Yo u n g

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or a while there, the running joke was that Geoffrey Meeker’s laundry smelled like coffee. That’s because the former chef was determined to roast the perfect coffee bean with a five-pound roaster that he operated in his laundry room. And that is how French Truck Coffee was born. Based out of New Orleans, the coffee roaster and shop holds itself to high standards — sourcing its beans directly from farmers around the world, delivering the freshest roast possible, and pulling the perfect espresso every time. “The highest standard for Geoff is Blue Bottle Coffee,” says Memphis French Truck partner Jimmy Lewis. Ah, Blue Bottle Coffee. I have stood in line in Williamsburg. It was pretty darn good, even if there was a dizzying amount of beards and tattoos and scarves. Lewis came into the picture just over a year ago once he saw the potential for growth of his coffee roasting business, Relevant Roasters. After several conversations with Geoff, the two created a partnership, and a Memphis French Truck Coffee was born. “I recognized I needed help and that I wouldn’t, couldn’t, and shouldn’t do this alone,” Lewis says. Recently Lewis and Meeker have expanded from their original location on Tillman, the former Relevant Roasters shop and roastery, into the Crosstown Concourse building. Situated in the central atrium of Concourse, the shop offers one of the most interesting people-watching opportunities in the city. They also offer a tasty menu. The Waffle Sandwich with egg, prosciutto, and goat

cheese is sensational ($9), and their avocado toast rivals any in the city, with red pepper and pickled red onion (one $6/ two $9). They have a variety of toasts, actually, including B.N.B. — that would be bacon, Nutella, and basil (what?!), bacon date — bacon, date, ricotta, and pistachio crumbles, and other savory and sweet choices. They import their pastries from Porcellino’s and have some specialty fizzy teas they can whip up for you. For now, food is offered until 2 p.m. Hours will expand, but first they hope to remodel their Tillman location from a roastery and cafe into just a cafe where they will offer a similar menu, making the Concourse location the primary Memphis roaster. So far, there are six French Truck Coffee locations — two in Memphis, three in New Orleans, and one in Baton Rouge. Look out, Blue Bottle. French Truck Coffee, 1350 Concourse, 878-3383. Open Mon.-Fri. 7 a.m. to 6 p.m., and Sat.-Sun. 8 a.m. to 6 p.m. 584 Tillman, 458-5599. Open Mon.-Thurs., 7 a.m. to 1 p.m., Fri. 7 a.m. to 4 p.m., Sat. 8 a.m. to 4 p.m., and Sun. 9 a.m. to 2 p.m. frenchtruckcoffee.com.

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C R OS S TOWN Part of the core mission of the Crosstown Concourse concept is to provide an environment of health to its residents and visitors, with gyms and many medical businesses setting up shop in the monolithic structure on Cleveland. So it makes sense for I Love Juice Bar to join the party. “I talked to them a long time ago, before the whole project here got started,” says Memphis I Love Juice Bar owner Scott Tashie. “I’ve always liked the old buildings here, and I took notice and interest in the building.” The juice, smoothie, and wellness shop will host the opening of its second location in the Concourse building, along with the block party the project is hosting for its grand debut to the community, this Saturday, August 19th. The first Memphis I Love Juice Bar opened in September 2015, bringing a menu of fresh and organic juices, wellness shots, smoothies, and clean grab-and-go foods to Midtown on Cooper. Tashie also ran Cosmic Coconut, a similar concept on Sanderlin by the Racquet Club, which he recently reimagined as City Silo Table and Pantry, a restaurant concept offering most of the same smoothies and juices, but with an expanded menu of tasty breakfast, lunch, and dinner dishes. “This location will be like the Midtown one, but with a few different grab-and-go items and some new, really neat products like bars and snacks,” Tashie says. “We will have a fully stocked grab-and-go section with quick juices you can grab, spring rolls, sandwiches, our Pad Thai bowls, and we make it all here.” The 800-plus square-foot space will offer some indoor seating as well as open onto the block-long “patio” of Crosstown Concourse. “It’s been a lot of fun working with the concept here with the columns inside the space, and we designed these special wooden doors to slide in when we are closed,” Tashie says. Folks can enter either from outdoors via the patio or from inside the building. Tashie says he’s excited to be a part of the Crosstown Concourse vision. “It has been cool to watch this take place, and it will be interesting to watch everyone come in and out,” Tashie says. He also thinks his product has something to offer the space. “We have a community feel at our shop in Midtown, and it will carry over here,” Tashie says. I Love Juice Bar, 1350 Concourse. Open 7 a.m. to 7 p.m., seven days a week. ilovejuicebar.com.

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S P I R ITS By Andria Lisle

Eclipse Drinks

New Orleans musician Quintron has some suggestions. your thinking, whether you’re writing lyrics or creating new stuff. Do you have any recommendations for drinking during the solar eclipse? I think it’s silly for me to recommend what other people drink, honestly. It’s such a personal choice — it’s related to where you are in life and where you are in your head. I’ll probably be drinking something memorable — something aged, maybe wine. I always feel like beer is for fun and barbecues and birthdays, and wine is for those contemplative events that are more time imbued. So, perhaps I’ll be drinking wine or a fancy old bourbon. Wouldn’t it be nice to drink an old Scotch from as many years ago as when the last full solar eclipse in Tennessee was? Quintron

From your music to your inventions, which include the Drum Buddy and Weather Warlock, you’re an incredibly creative person. Does drinking help when you have a creative block? Well, everybody’s different, but I definitely think it does. The main benefit of drinking alcohol during the creative process is that it’s almost like getting a free second opinion, but a second opinion from yourself through the goggles of drunkenness. Drinking can eliminate that certain fear that exists in

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Uh, according to Google, the last time that a total solar eclipse was visible from Nashville would’ve been in 1478. Let’s drink a bourbon from the 1500s! Any thoughts on other weather-themed cocktails? All of that stuff seems trite, although actually I’ve always liked a Dark and Stormy. It’s that ginger flavor. I didn’t know of their existence until craft cocktails got popular again and they popped up in New Orleans, where we have weather-themed everything. Like Hurricanes? Fuck that shit. Hurricanes are sweet, gross, headachy bullshit. Look, I’m sure some pretentious bartenders are going to invent some ridiculous eclipsethemed cocktails this weekend. If you want to drink during the solar eclipse, go for quality. Splurge, people! This is a once-in-a-lifetime thing!

m e m p h i s f l y e r. c o m

What’s in your cup when you’re onstage? I never drink before I play, ever. I always start drinking at the eighth song of the night, and I always drink whiskey. Because I play organ, I’m sitting and bouncing around, and beer is too foamy. I drink good American bourbon that’s slightly watered down, on the rocks with maybe a splash of soda water.

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uring these trying times, it’s tempting to look at next Monday’s solar eclipse — the first to be visible on U.S. mainland in 38 years — as a scary omen: the dragon devouring the sun, as the ancient Chinese imagined. When the sky darkens and the sun’s corona can be seen shining from all directions around the moon, it’s easy to think of the phenomenon of “totality” as a harbinger of the end of the world. And there’s no one better to talk about doomsday drinking with than New Orleans-based musician and inventor Quintron, who is headed to Nashville, the largest American city in the eclipse’s path, to perform at Third Man Records on Monday at exactly 11:58 a.m. There, Quintron and his weathercontrolled drone synthesizer Weather Warlock, which last made a Memphis appearance at Gonerfest 11, will create a special soundtrack for the eclipse at an event billed as “Occulting the Sunn.”

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47


FILM REVIEW By Chris McCoy

Al Gore in the Wilderness

An Inconvenient Sequel: Truth to Power pulls no punches.

A

bout a third of the way into An Inconvenient Sequel: Truth to Power, something remarkable happens: Al Gore gets mad. The moment comes during a training session for climate activists, where Gore is passing on the knowledge in his persuasive and ever-evolving Keynote presentation describing the problem of global warming and proposing solutions. For a moment, the famously low-key vice president gets caught up while describing the efforts of the fossil fuel industry to sew doubt about the reality of what he calls the climate crisis. His voice coarsens into a shout, his eyes narrow, and he pumps his fist into the air. Then, he catches himself, stops, and takes a deep breath. The crowd of 300 or so progressives burst into applause and shouts. But Gore doesn’t take the bait and start ranting. Instead, he apologizes, quiets the crowd, and gets back down to business. It’s a small moment that reveals much about Gore’s character. He kept his cool as the presidency

was stolen from him, but he finally loses it when he allows himself to think about the sheer magnitude of the petty, greedy, self-serving, willfully ignorant jackholes who would risk the complete collapse of human civilization just to keep their companies’ stock prices up. If I were Al Gore, I would be frothing with rage all the time. And maybe, down deep, he is. But he’s too disciplined and too focused to let it slip out, and that’s why he’s the one with the Nobel Peace Prize. When it premiered at Sundance in 2006, An Inconvenient Truth was the right movie at the right time. Climate change denier George W. Bush had won re-election, but his inept handling of Hurricane Katrina in late 2005 had caused the blinders to fall away for a large part of the electorate. The core of the film was just the same slideshow Gore had been polishing since he walked away from a two-decadelong political career in the wake of the 2000 election debacle. But the information was so well presented and so alarming, and Gore’s presence so comfortingly

Al Gore (above) keeps his cool — even while he warns of a global meltdown. professorial, that the movie became the 10th highest grossing documentary of all time and earned two Academy Awards. For a time, An Inconvenient Truth seemed to turn the tide against climate denial. Much progress has been made over the ensuing decade. Gore spends a considerable amount of time in An Inconvenient Sequel talking about the advances in wind and solar power generation. The climax of the film follows Gore as he is part of the team of negotiators trying to close the deal in the 2016 Paris Climate Accords, where he helps negotiate a solar technology transfer to India. But for a 2017 viewer, what was supposed to be the triumphal moment of the film — the signing continued on page 50

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FILM REVIEW By Chris McCoy continued from page 48

August 17-23, 2017

of the Paris Climate Agreement by 196 countries — comes across as a harbinger of doom. We know the delicate progress was undercut by the election of Donald Trump, a dedicated climate change denier who promises to withdraw the United States from the agreement. In the words of The Big Lebowski, the plane has crashed into the mountain. The consequences of continuing to burn fossil fuels are not left to the viewer’s imagination. The film’s most incredible footage — some of the most incredible footage in any film ever — comes from a helicopter pilot flying over Greenland during the hottest day ever recorded on the Arctic island. We see a glacier not so much collapsing

An Inconvenient Sequel: Truth to Power Opens Friday Studio on the Square

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as exploding. Thousand-foot spires of ancient ice collapse into clouds of steam. It’s like the buildings exploding in a city-destroying climax of an Avengers movie, only it’s real. Later, Gore is taken on a tour of Miami Beach by the city’s mayor. High tides now routinely flood the city. A city engineer tells Gore of a plan to raise an eroding roadbed by a foot. Gore tells him the sea is expected to rise by at least seven feet. It’s moments like that when you think maybe it would be a good idea if Gore got mad in public more often.

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NOW HIRING SALES REP/ACCOUNT REP NOW HIRINGMedia SALESInc., REP/ACCOUNT Contemporary locally owned REP and operated publisher of Memphis magazine, Contemporary Media Inc., locally owned and The Memphis Flyer, Memphismagazine, Parent, and operated publisher of Memphis Inside Memphis Business is looking for aand The Memphis Flyer, Memphis Parent, full-timeMemphis salesperson to join our team. Must Inside Business is looking for ahave proven sales experience, excellent communication full-time salesperson to join our team. Must have skills and oral) and becommunication a self-starter. proven(both saleswritten experience, excellent Candidate must be highly organized able to skills (both written and oral) and be aand self-starter. thrive in a high volume, fast-paced and teamCandidate must be highly organized and able to oriented theteamlocal thrive in aenvironment. high volume,Knowledge fast-pacedofand market aenvironment. plus. oriented Knowledge of the local market a plus. Preferred Qualifications: ·Preferred Print, digital, event sponsorship, and mobile Qualifications: selling · Print, experience digital, event sponsorship, and mobile ·selling High-level cold calling experience · Negotiation skills High-level cold calling High competency · Negotiation skills in MS Office or Google ·Drive Highproducts competency in MS Office or Google · Ability to communicate effectively to a Drive products large group · Ability to communicate effectively to a large group Compensation package commensurate with experience, pluspackage paid company benefits with Compensation commensurate experience, plus paid company benefits

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COPELAND SERVICES, L.L.C. Hiring Armed State Licensed Officers/ Unarmed Officers. Three Shifts Available. Same Day Interview. 1661 International Place. 901-258-5872 or 901-818-3187. Interview in Professional Attire

MAINTENANCE TECH Immediate opening for an experienced Maintenance Tech. Position requires an exceptional knowledge of HVAC Maintenance. Must have excellent interpersonal, organizational, and communication skills. Detail-oriented, team player that takes direction well, but can work with limited supervision at times, and has a professional demeanor. Must have reliable transportation, valid driver license, and auto liability insurance, as well as HVAC certification all tools. Attractive compensation and benefits package that includes health care benefits, 401k, and paid time off. Must be able to successfully pass a pre-employment background screening as well as a drug test. Applications accepted in person at 5140 Wheelis Drive, Memphis, TN 38117. Resume’ may be submitted via email at resume@hmheckle.com or by fax at 901-761-5800 No phone calls please.

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BELMONT GRILL Now Hiring Cooks. Must be able to work days. Apply in person Mon-Fri, 2-4pm. 4970 Poplar @ Mendenhall. No phone calls please.

MOLLY’S LA CASITA accepting applications for EXPERIENCED LINE/PREP COOK with good references and steady work history. This is a full-time position. If you are interested and are qualified, come in between 2:00 pm to 5:00 pm and complete application. Applications also accepted for EXPERIENCED dishwasher/busser, hostess and server. Molly’s La Casita Restaurant 2006 Madison Ave Memphis, TN 38104

Amerigo Italian Restaurant is NOW HIRING!

Experienced servers for full and part time positions, fine dining experience is a plus but not required, applicants can apply Mon-Thurs from 2-4, flexible hours, insurance options available. 1239 Ridgeway Rd. Memphis, TN | 901-761-4000

ACCEPTING APPLICATIONS FOR

EXPERIENCED LINE/PREP COOK with good references and steady work history. This is a full-time position. If you are interested and are qualified, come in between 2:00 pm to 5:00 pm and complete application. Applications also accepted for EXPERIENCED dishwasher/busser, hostess and server. M O L LY ’ S L A C A S I TA R E S TAU R A N T

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is now hiring all positions Servers/Bartenders. Kitchen Staff. Contact John-Paul Gagliano for further details at johnpauldgagliano@gmail.com or (901)410-8200


EMPLOYMENT • REAL ESTATE • SERVICES VOLUNTEER OPPORTUNITIES RAFFERTY’S We are looking for service minded individuals, that don’t mind working hard. We work hard, but make $. Apply in the store. 505 N Gtown Pkwy

SALES/MARKETING D&T CONNECTION INC. Jobs Jobs Jobs!! If you’re free to travel state to state selling books & magazines going door to door this is an opportunity of a lifetime for you. Commission, bonuses, cash advances & lodging provided by company. Call Mrs Carroll @ 678-571-0896.

IF YOU’RE A GOOD READER and can volunteer to do so please call 901-832-4530

DOWNTOWN APTS MINUTES FROM DOWNTOWN Come visit the brand new Cleaborn Pointe at Heritage Landing. Located just minutes from historic Downtown Memphis. 2 bedroom $7443 bedroom $860 Community Room, Computer Room, Fitness Room. A smoke free community. 440 South Lauderdale Memphis, TN 38126 | 901-254-7670.

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ROOMS FOR RENT Large or small. Midtown, Quiet neighborhood, near bus line. North of Poplar. Call 901.356.9794

1025 JUNE ROAD #4 Great E. Memphis 1 BR, 1 BTH, 2nd flr. rental in gated Poplar East Apartments 1Min from Starbucks & I-240. Pool & Clubroom included. $800/mo. Call 508-0639.

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MIDTOWN ROOMS FOR RENT Central Heat/Air, utls included, furnished. 901.650.4400 NICE ROOMS FOR RENT S. Pkwy & Wilson. Utilities and Cable included. Fridge in your room. Cooking and free laundry privileges. Some locations w/sec. sys. Starting at $435/mo. + dep. 901.922.9089

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THE LAST WORD by Randy Haspel

Many Sides President Trump’s moral equivalency encourages white supremacists.

We’re now all contestants in a reality show that we never asked to be part of. And it gets more real every day. The shameful and deadly episode that occurred in Charlottesville, Virginia, last week was a gathering of white nationalists, ostensibly to protest the removal of a statue of Robert E. Lee from a city park. But the torchlight parade, the attacks on clergy, the Nazi regalia, the Klan robes, and the Stars and Bars carried alongside swastika flags revealed the assembly for what it was: a collection of hate groups with various agendas and a new alliance between neo-Nazis and neo-Confederates. The Southern Poverty Law Center said, “It was the largest hate-gathering of its kind in decades.” The “Unite the Right” rally quickly descended into chants of anti-black, anti-Semitic, and anti-LGBT slogans that were as vile as your imagination will allow you to conjure. The eruption of violence between the so-called “alt-right” and counter protesters caused 19 injuries, the deaths of two state troopers in a helicopter crash monitoring the scene, and a young woman crossing the street when a crazed true-believer rammed his car into a group of pedestrians. Whether this type of vehicular homicide occurs in Paris, London, or Charlottesville, it’s known by the same name: terrorism. In the ensuing chaos, the forgotten man was Robert E. Lee. There is free speech, and then there is hate speech. Only one is protected by the Constitution. Yes, you can mount a platform and say, “Mexicans are rapists,” or “Criminal aliens … take a young, beautiful girl … and slice them and dice them.” You can even urge your supporters to punch someone in the face if you say it was just a humorous aside. But when your words initiate violence, you are responsible for the consequences. From his New Jersey golf resort, Donald Trump read from a card, “We condemn, in the strongest possible terms, this egregious display of hatred, bigotry, and violence on many sides. On many sides.” You know someone else wrote it because Trump doesn’t know the meaning of the word “egregious.” Before moving on to tout his achievements, (“We have companies pouring into our country.”), Trump brought Obama into the controversy, claiming there were also hate groups and hate speech during the previous administration. By doing so, Trump is, in effect, saying, “Don’t blame me.” Since his rise to political prominence began by accusing Obama of being a foreigner and a secret Muslim, he has fed “his base” a constant barrage of inflammatory screeds against immigrants, the press, affirmative action, his predecessor, and particularly Hillary Clinton. On many sides? He forgets who the instigators are. Only one side chanted Nazi slogans like “Blood and soil.” Only one side chanted “Fuck you, faggot,” and the ever-popular, “Go back to Africa.” If this assembly was about preserving Confederate monuments, there were similar far-right demonstrations in Portland and Seattle, where there are no statues of Confederate generals. Trump’s remarks drew criticism from all sides for his refusal to condemn the perpetrators of the violence, except from the white supremacists themselves. They loved it. Their popular web site, The Daily Stormer, posted that the president “refused to answer questions about White Nationalists supporting him. No condemnation at all. When asked to condemn, he just walked out of the room. Really, really good. God bless him.” There’s something grating about neo-Nazis invoking God. Why can’t the president say the words, “Radical, right-wing terrorism”? In his own admonition, you can’t fight a problem if you won’t name it. The “problem” was encapsulated by the words of former Klan Imperial Wizard and rally attendee, David Duke, who said to the cameras, “This represents a turning point for the people of this country. We are determined to take our country back. We’re going to fulfill the promises of Donald Trump, and that’s what we believed in. That’s why we voted for Donald Trump, because he said he’s going to take our country back.” After blistering remarks from members of his own party, Trump issued a lukewarm tweet condemning “all that hate stands for,” which, in turn, provoked a tweet from David Duke saying menacingly, “I would recommend you take a good look in the mirror and remember it was White Americans [sic] who put you in the presidency, not radical leftists.” The Charlottesville rally was disgusting, but this clash between the emboldened neo-Nazis and those whose fathers and grandfathers lost their lives fighting the real Nazis is far from over. It has been suggested that if the counter-protesters just stayed away and ignored these racist rallies, there would be no violence, since that is the sort of narrative the alt-right seeks. Consequently, there would have been no press coverage, and no one would have died. I’m sure some German Jews said the same thing in 1929. Fascism must be confronted or it metastasizes. On a personal note: My grandfather was the only member of his family to escape Eastern Europe. His parents, two brothers, a sister, their spouses, and nieces and nephews, some small children, were annihilated by the Nazis despite his desperate efforts to free them. I inherited his letters. They are heartbreaking.  While in Israel some years ago, I visited Yad Vashem, the museum of the Holocaust. There is a register of names of Jews murdered by the Nazis, but there isn’t the slightest trace of my grandfather’s family. They just vanished. So, if some neo-Nazi yuppie in a Trump inspired uniform of khaki pants, white polo shirt, and a red “Make America Great Again” cap comes goosestepping down my street waving a swastika, I’ll do my very best to hit him in the head with a tire iron. Then, the Teflon Don can once again talk about violence “from many sides.” Randy Haspel writes the blog “Recycled Hippies.”

m e m p h i s f l y e r. c o m

Donald Trump and David Duke

THE LAST WORD

“The only thing necessary for the triumph of evil is for good men to do nothing.” — Edmund Burke

55


MINGLEWOOD HALL

JUST ANNOUNCED: 112 & Avant [11/11] Backup Planet [11/9] 8/18: Elvis Burnin’ Love 8/19: Drop the Mic Poetry Slam 8/23: Turnpike Troubadours w/ Shane Smith & The Saints 9/2: V3Fights MMA 9/9: TI w/ DJ Envy 9/28: Marshall Tucker Band Methodist Healthcare Fundraiser 10/3: Portugal. The Man 10/4: Lecrae

Est. 1942

Celebrating 75 Years UPCOMING: Fri Aug 25 - Daisyland w/ Ganja White Night Sun Aug 27 - A Drag Salute To Divas Thu Aug 31 - Smash Mouth Tue Sept 12 - Nothing More Thu Sept 14 - Toadies w/ Local H Fri Sept 15 - Daisyland w/ Valentino Khan Sun Sept 17 - Will Hoge Tue Sept 19 - Lettuce Sat Sept 23- Andy Mineo Sun Sept 24 - Tank Tue Sept 26 - ZZ Ward Mon Oct 2 - Falling in Reverse & All That Remains Tue Oct 3 - Morgan James Wed Oct 4 - Blue October I Want It Tour Sat Oct 7 - WellRED Comedy Tour Sat Oct 7 - Daisyland w/ Riot Ten Fri Oct 13 - Daisyland w/ Space Jesus Sat Oct 21 - Yngwie Malmsteen Thu Oct 26 - Highly Suspect Fri Nov 3 - Daisyland w/ Borgore Sat Nov 4 - Issues Headspace Tour Mon Nov 6 - Cannibal Corpse Sun Nov 26 - Poptone Wed Nov 29 - Hollywood Undead w/ Butcher Babies Mon Dec 11 - Kamasi Washington Sat Dec 16 - Daisyland w/ Figure and Midnight Tyrannosaurus NEW DAISY THEATRE | 330 Beale St Memphis 901.525.8981 • Advance Tickets available at NewDaisy.com and Box Office

MURPHY’S Pool Table • Darts • WI-FI • Digital Jukebox Visit our website for live music listings or check the AfterDark section of this Memphis Flyer KITCHEN OPEN LATE, OPEN FOR LUNCH! 1589 Madison • 726-4193 www.murphysmemphis.com

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GONER RECORDS New/ Used LPs, 45s & CDs. We Buy Records! 2152 Young Ave 901-722-0095

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JESSE & THE TWO SHOTS OF TEQUILA BAND Five Piece Band available for weddings, corporate events, parties etc... in Memphis and Nashville. Song list on website. More information including song lists and booking information at www.rick.business or call 407.608.8015. Calendar will fill up fast so act now. Special discounts for veterans.

TAX PREPARER NEEDED Established firm seeks experienced Tax preparer for forms 1120 & 1065. CPA/EA NOT required. All work performed at our location Email resume & wage requirements to admin@taxmidsouth.com

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Memphis Flyer 8.17.17  

This week: after years of vacancy, Crosstown Concourse officially opens this week! Also: Jesse Jackson's most recent visit to Memphis, eclip...

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