Page 1

08.03.17 • 1484TH ISSUE

FREE

Dumb and Dumber P3 • Roland Rolls ’Em Easy P8 • A Return to Old Zinnie’s P30 • Memphis Film Prize P34

BUS TO THE

JUSTIN FOX BURKS

FUTURE

Changes lie ahead for the Memphis Area Transit Authority.


August 3-9, 2017

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LYNN SPARAGOWSKI Distribution Manager ROBBIE FRENCH Warehouse and Delivery Manager BRANDY BROWN, JANICE GRISSOM ELLISON, ZACH JOHNSON, KAREN MILAM, RANDY ROTZ, LEWIS TAYLOR, WILLIAM WIDEMAN Distribution THE MEMPHIS FLYER is published weekly by Contemporary Media, Inc., 460 Tennessee Street, Memphis, TN 38103 Phone: (901) 521-9000 Fax: (901) 521-0129 letters@memphisflyer.com www.memphisflyer.com CONTEMPORARY MEDIA, INC. KENNETH NEILL Publisher JENNIFER OSWALT Chief Executive Officer JEFFREY GOLDBERG Director of Business Development BRUCE VANWYNGARDEN Editorial Director MOLLY WILLMOTT Special Projects Director KEVIN LIPE Digital Manager LYNN SPARAGOWSKI Distribution Manager MATTHEW PRESTON Social Media Manager BRITT ERVIN Email Marketing Manager ASHLEY HAEGER Controller CELESTE DIXON Accounting Assistant JOSEPH CAREY IT Director KALENA MCKINNEY Receptionist

National Newspaper Association

Association of Alternative Newsmedia

memphisflyer.com

favorite local

business starting

August 9-25 on

m e m p h i s f l y e r. c o m

DESHAUNE MCGHEE Classified Advertising Manager BRENDA FORD Classified Sales Administrator classifieds@memphisflyer.com

CONTENTS

JUSTIN RUSHING Advertising Director CARRIE O’GUIN HOFFMAN Advertising Operations Manager JERRY D. SWIFT Advertising Director Emeritus KELLI DEWITT, CHIP GOOGE Senior Account Executives ALEX KENNER Account Executive ROXY MATTHEWS Sales Assistant

Now it's time to Cast your

CARRIE BEASLEY Senior Art Director CHRISTOPHER MYERS Advertising Art Director JEREMIAH MATTHEWS BRYAN ROLLINS Graphic Designers

Last week, Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE) agents knocked on a door in Southaven. They had a warrant for a Hispanic man who had a criminal record, and they found him. He was living in a house with six other men, all of whom worked at an area restaurant. The other men had no criminal records, and ICE had no warrants for their arrest — in fact, had no idea who they were. But they were brown, so they got taken into custody. Within 24 hours, all seven men were shipped to a federal prison in rural Louisiana. They didn’t get a bail hearing or access to a lawyer before being hauled off. They sit in cells in the middle of nowhere, hoping somehow their case will be taken up by an attorney, somewhere, before they are summarily deported. There have been thousands of cases like this since Attorney General Jeff Sessions unleashed ICE and gave them carte blanche to disrupt our Hispanic communities. Yeah, I get that there are some of you reading this who’ll say, “What part of ‘illegal’ don’t you understand?” To which I say, “What part of ‘innocent until proven guilty’ do you not understand?” This is not how the American justice system is supposed to work, even for non-citizens. But these raids — these stakeouts at schools and churches and restaurants, these overnight deportations — are doing what they’re designed to do. And that is to demonize and terrify men, women, and children of Hispanic descent. So, the restaurant where the men worked had to close. The owner is still seeking replacement workers but has had little luck. This, in microcosm, demonstrates a larger problem, one that may at first seem unrelated. In a new report on the impact of opioids in small town and rural areas, some employers stated that their biggest problem was finding “clean and sober” workers. One in 10 Mississippians is on opioids. Similar numbers abound in other mostly rural states. Nine rural hospitals have closed in Tennessee in the past couple of years, a number that leads the nation. A study by the Rural Health Reform Policy Research Center says 17 rural Tennessee counties rank in the bottom 10 percent of counties in the country in unemployment, poverty, and per capita income. In Tennessee, the legislature declined to take advantage of the billions of dollars in Medicaid and Medicare funding that were offered gratis via Obamacare, thereby putting the health of hundreds of thousands of the state’s residents — and many of its hospitals — in serious jeopardy, in the name of partisan politics. Meanwhile, in Washington, the Republicans have utterly failed to come up with a plan to fix health care. So, in sum: We have a huge opioid crisis that is crippling our potential work force, yet we’re not funding hospitals in the areas where they are most needed, ensuring more poverty, more addiction, and more unemployment. On the other hand, we’re rounding up and sending off thousands of willing workers with no due process, most N E WS & O P I N I O N of whom have lived here for years THE FLY-BY - 4 — building our homes, doing our NY TIMES CROSSWORD - 5 yardwork and housework, working POLITICS - 8 in our restaurants. It’s tough to be an EDITORIAL - 10 employer if most of your potential VIEWPOINT - 11 blue-collar workers are addicted or COVER — “BUS TO THE FUTURE” are being summarily deported. It’s BY MAYA SMITH - 12 dumb and dumber. STE P P I N’ O UT Our priorities and our politics WE RECOMMEND - 16 are terribly out of whack right now. MUSIC - 18 AFTER DARK - 20 Letting partisan politics drive actions CALENDAR OF EVENTS - 22 on issues such as health care and BAR REPORT - 30 immigration seldom benefits the SPIRITS - 33 general public’s welfare. Or much of FILM - 34 anything, for that matter. C L AS S I F I E D S - 36 Bruce VanWyngarden LAST WORD - 39 brucev@memphisflyer.com

vote on your

BRUCE VANWYNGARDEN Editor SUSAN ELLIS Managing Editor JACKSON BAKER, MICHAEL FINGER Senior Editors TOBY SELLS Associate Editor CHRIS MCCOY Film and TV Editor ALEX GREENE Music Editor CHRIS DAVIS, MICHAEL DONAHUE MAYA SMITH, JOSHUA CANNON Staff Writers JESSE DAVIS Copy Editor JULIE RAY Calendar Editor

The nominations are in.

OUR 1484TH ISSUE 08.03.17

3


THE

fly-by

f ly on the wall

August 3-9, 2017

GAN N ETT I S N OT TC B In the beginning, Fly on the Wall committed itself to Neverending Elvis, a recurring feature to document the posthumous global impact of Memphis’ biggest pop culture phenomenon. But the original rocker’s star has been fading fast in Las Vegas, another destination prized by Presley fans. Rare recordings and other artifacts have also lost value as older collectors died off, flooding an inflated market with tons of top-shelf Elvis paraphernalia. In these uncertain times, it’s enough to make your Fly on the Wall team wonder if “Disappearing Elvis” might not be a better title going forward. Now, to so much injury, the out-of-town editors for Gannett Co., have added insult by literally cropping Elvis out of the Commercial Appeal. Small but meaningful slights add up, and Gannett’s indifference is starting to feel personal.

4

S I N C LA I R WATC H File under Wow: According to advertising trade magazine AdAge, Christopher Ruddy (the CEO of NewsMax, a frankly conservative media company where TV hosts compare unflattering news reports about President Trump to “lynchings”) is petitioning the FCC to delay any decision allowing the Sinclair Broadcast Group (an overtly conservative company employing former Trump staffer Boris Epshteyn as its Senior Political Analyst) to own a total of 233 local TV-news stations including Memphis’ WREG. By Chris Davis. Email him at davis@memphisflyer.com.

{

Questions, Answers + Attitude Edited by Toby Sells

W E E K T H AT W A S By Flyer staff

ICE, airplanes & polluted water ICE raids condemned, MEM flights are up, Planned Parenthood sues, EPA finds water pollution. COH E N R ESPON DS TO ICE RAI DS Tennessee Congressman Steve Cohen sent a letter to the acting director of the U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE), Thomas Homan, last week expressing his concern and seeking more information about its recent raids in Shelby County. The letter specifically addresses the targets of the arrests, which according to a release by ICE, were immigrants with criminal histories. But this has not been the case. “As you know, ICE has limited resources, and it is vitally important that it prioritize the use of these resources in a manner designed to keep our communities safe,” Cohen said in the letter. Latino Memphis Director Mauricio Calvo says he believes that the way ICE has been conducting its raids is unacceptable. He says ICE has not been transparent about its arrests or the number of detainees. Calvo says their actions have been “unlawful,” as he knows of at least 12 people who currently are detained and were arrested without a warrant. President of the Mid-South Latino Chamber of Commerce Alex Matlock cited the adverse effects of ICE’s actions on the local economy, noting the spending power of the Latino community and its businesses, locally and nationally. PASSE NG E RS, FLIG HT N U M B E RS U P Over the last 12 months, passenger counts through Memphis International Airport reached levels not seen since 2012, and the airport also saw gains in air service, according to recently released figures. The numbers point to improvements at the airport, which saw major declines in both the number of people flying through the airport and the number of flights available to them after Delta axed Memphis as a hub in 2013. Since then, airport officials have been recruiting airlines to fly through Memphis and enticing existing airlines to create more flights to the city. In the last 12 months, the airport saw more than 2 million enplanements, which translates to 3.3 percent more people getting on or off airplanes at MEM than in 2016. Enplanements in June were 5.6 percent higher than they were in June 2016. Airport officials cited new flights, such as Air Canada’s nonstop flight to Toronto, and summer seasonal flights offered by Southwest and Allegiant, as drivers for the increases. PLAN N E D PAR E NTHOOD JOI NS FE DE RAL SU IT Planned Parenthood Greater Memphis Region (PPGMR) joined a federal lawsuit Thursday challenging the Tennessee state law that requires a woman seeking an abortion to wait 48 hours and see a doctor before the procedure. The new requirements became law in the state on July 1st. The state legislature passed it this year, and Gov. Bill Haslam signed the bill in May, even though Tennessee Attorney General Herbert Slattery called the move “constitutionally suspect.” PPGMR joined the lawsuit with Planned Parenthood of Middle and East Tennessee, and the American Civil Liberties Union of Tennessee (ACLUT), representing the Knoxville Center for Reproductive Health. The delay serves no medical purpose,

according to Hedy Weinberg, executive director of ACLUT. She called it “invasive political interference in private health-care decisions.” The lawsuit was first filed in 2015 and is still pending in the U.S. District Court for the Middle District of Tennessee. The lawsuit — Adams & Boyle, P.C. et al. v. Slatery, et al. — asks the court to strike down the 48-hour delay requirement as unconstitutional. U N IVE RSITY-AR EA LOT SU PE R FU N D SITE? The Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) said that while a contaminated site close to the University of Memphis has not yet impacted surrounding sites, it could pose a threat to the city’s drinking water. In 2013, the EPA found that perchloroethylene (PCE), a harmful chemical, was used at Custom Cleaners, a dry cleaner that operated at 3517 Southern from 1945 to the mid-1990s. Extensive testing found the toxin in soil and groundwater samples on the site. Last year, the EPA removed the Custom Cleaners building, the slab it sat upon, and the highest concentrations of the toxin, which were about 18 feet below the the land’s surface. The EPA also proposed the site be listed on the National Priorities List, hazardous waste sites in the United States eligible for long-term clean-up paid for by the federal Superfund program. The EPA expects the site to be listed this month. The EPA expects the initial field work around the contaminated site to be finished in September.


For Release Saturday, May 6, 2017

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Crossword

Crossword ACROSS 1 One of the Great Lakes 5 Menacing cloud 10 Sony offering 14 Saint’s home, for short 15 Place for a barbecue 16 Rich finish? 17 “Don’t give up” 19 Rather powerful ANSWER TO PREVIOUS PUZZLE engine 20 Brown 21 Some plants 23 Value 25 Spooky quality 28 Smoothie fruit 29 Popular cookie 31 Taking things for granted on April Fools’ Day and others 32 “Time ___ …” 33 Track, in a sense 34 Not wait for Mr. Right, say 35 Huuuuuuuuge M I S C A S T

O C U L A R

O N M I K E

A S K A W A Y

S T R I N G U P

H M E O P R O T O O T A I R E N A T I L H A E L N G A R O E E L T O S

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35 Something that might be thrown behind a teacher’s back 40 Bowling venue 41 Input for fivethirtyeight .com 42 Like Baroque architecture 44 Purchase payment plan 49 In all probability 52 Add punch to, as the punch 53 ___ pro nobis 54 Cardinal’s insignia 55 Florida senator Rubio 56 “O death, where is thy ___?”: I Corinthians 58 Masterpiece waiting to be found … or a hint to the words in the circled letters 61 Right-hand page of an open book

A I S L E

A C T T W O I M E A R F A A S N E

H T A O O H T L A E A D L D O R S O F A C A L K E P A L S B Y U S T O S Z A I R Y T T O E S T R

ANSWER E D K O C H

P E E D E E

I M P E N D

C O T T A

J A N I T O R S

S A C U L O N A V K E A A R O Z A R A G T M E A

No. 0124

37 Loose, now DOWN 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 1 40 Powerful D.C. 1 Vase style 14 15 16 lobby 2 Compatriot of 41 Raiser of 17 18 19 Mao awareness, for short 3 Noted father-or20 21 22 son singer 44 Not accidental 23 24 25 4 Ancient New 45 In opposition Mexican 46 Guru, maybe 28 29 30 31 5 Part of a crib 47 Straightens 32 33 34 6 Living ___ 49 Firm parts: Abbr. 35 36 50 Hockey team, 7 Major Asian e.g. carrier 37 38 39 40 4 51 Words on a 8 Attire jacket 44 45 46 9 Like melancholy 53 Risked a ticket musical keys 47 48 49 Online subscriptions: Today’s puzzle and more than 7,000 past 55 Construction puzzles, nytimes.com/crosswords ($39.95 a year). 10 The poor staples … onoreach puzzle: nytimes.com/wordplay. Read about and comment Crosswords for young solvers: nytimes.com/studentcrosswords. 50 51 52 a hint to this 11 Not go along puzzle’s theme 55 56 12 Prefix with lateral 53 54 59 Famous Amos 13 Bedevil 59 60 61 60 Rocker Steve 18 Girl’s name that 61 “Don’t go!,” e.g. 62 63 64 may precede Ann 62 Obnoxious one 63 Subject of some 22 One may be starting in sports PUZZLE BY HOWARD BARKIN codes 36 Actress Wilson of 43 Features of 54 Autho 23 What’s shaken 64 Scandinavian wrote Boston accents “Mrs. Doubtfire” when you say capital insan “Shake!” 45 Milieu of the 37 Sch. with the long TO PREVIOUS PUZZLE FX series “The 24 Big letters in George W. Bush horrib Americans” electronics Presidential P O E M B R O W S E 46 Poetic stanza Library T A P E S H R E W S 25 Ones moving far 56 Burie 48 Like government from home 38 Corral A T I T C Y C L I C bonds S S H U S A L M A 26 Fifth in a group 39 Strips at 57 Pull ( 49 German of eight breakfast B O O Z E S I M P preposition P U D D I N G N E A 27 Saginaw-to-Flint 41 Tough, tenacious 51 Oil qtys. 58 Noted I Z E S Q U O T E D sorts dir. pseud 52 They burn Z Z I Q U I X O T E 29 Bit of beachwear 42 Wild blue in sh Z O G U I D O writin yonder 53 Racing letters 30 ___ way A F F A I R E B F F F U Z Z Y W Y L E 33 It may be added Online subscriptions: Today’s puzzle and more than 7,0 to alcohol puzzles, nytimes.com/crosswords ($39.95 a year). S R E B C A G E S K S T O M A T O E S 34 Pitiful Read about and comment on each puzzle: nytimes.com O P T W O P E N C E 35 Hit the gas pedal Crosswords for young solvers: nytimes.com/studentc 5 R Y E L M T R E E S hard P A S T A B A R

E R E A D E R

D A D B O D S

O N L A T E

W E E L A D

E D S E L S

62 People eaters, maybe

1

63 Work of Horace

14

64 Namely, in Latin

17

65 “Toodles”

66 Room with an easy chair

2

3

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5 “Silent” prez 6 ___ Maria

7 W.W. II Allied landing site in Italy

8 Philatelist’s buy 9 Polaroid, e.g.

10 Part of the brain believed to control emotion

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PUZZLE BY JOHN R. O’BRIEN

30 1974 top 10 foreign-language hit

12 Big name in car parts

35 Repeated word for word

13 Capts.’ inferiors

36 “The Vampire Chronicles” author

25 Taunt

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33 Double-___ recession

22 Rocket launch site

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11 Neptune’s Greek counterpart

18 Booty

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4 iPad downloads

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DOWN

3 ___ Globes

6

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1 “Oh, goody!”

2 Peter with eight Academy Award nominations (and, sadly, zero wins)

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37 The “them” in “Let them eat cake”

38 Restaurant freebie 39 The “thing,” to Hamlet 40 Cut (off) 43 Letters on many ambulances 45 King of comedy 46 Mars, for example 47 Give in (to) 48 Guards at Buckingham Palace

50 One of the Three Musketeers 51 Singer Mary J. ___ 55 ___ Verde National Park 56 Guru’s title

57 Tricked but good

59 “Dr.” who co-founded Beats Electronics 60 Actress Susan

26 “On the Waterfront” director Kazan

27 “I’m not kidding!” 28 Cincinnati-toPhiladelphia dir.

m e m p h i s f l y e r. c o m

P A R A D E

No.

NEWS & OPINION

ACROSS 1 Harley-Davidson bike, in slang 4 Assume the role of 9 Like Vatican affairs 14 Plains tribe name 15 Emulate Picasso or Pollock 16 “Too rich for my blood” 17 Place to pay the going rate? 19 Skin abnormalities 20 Dummies 21 Dennis the Menace, for one 23 Former G.M. compact 24 Margarine 25 Put at risk 29 Affectedly polite 31 Exactly right 32 Former Nevada senator Harry 34 How Lindbergh crossed the Atlantic

Edited by Will Shortz

Edited by Will Shortz


Dog Days {

CITY REPORTER By Maya Smith

Memphis Animal Services sees rise in intake and adoptions. Most summers, the Memphis Animal Services (MAS) experiences an increase in intake, and this summer has been no different. This is true even after MAS launched its Safety Net Program in May, which includes two initiatives meant to curb the number of shelter intakes and keep pets at home. One of those is the owner-surrender prevention program, which follows a similar model used nationwide by many progressive shelters. At MAS, the program requires owners who wish to surrender their pets to undergo a counseling session via phone with staff which provides the owner with possible alternatives to giving up their pet. If owners still wish to surrender their pet, they must make an appointment during certain allotted time periods. By offering food and spay/neuter services, MAS helps owners who decide to keep their pet but might be facing circumstances that hinder providing for it. Another piece of the Safety Net program is the NextDoor Proactive Reclaim program, one MAS officials say might be the only formal lost-and-found shelter program around.

MAS launched its Safety Net Program in May.

The program uses volunteers who review lists of lost pets in order to post information about each pet in that neighborhood’s NextDoor, along with instructions for potential owners to reclaim their pet from MAS. Even with the Safety Net in place, MAS officials say they took in just under 800 animals in June, about 2 percent more than they did last June. Officials say it was a tough time, with as many as 25 to 35 new animals entering the shelter each day. Of that monthly total, a little more than 600 animals were stray or at-large; 92 were relinquished by their owners. Despite the large intake numbers, MAS was able to maintain an 80 percent save rate in June for the eighth month in a row. This could be due in part to the uptick in adoptions, MAS officials say. The increase comes partly as a result of the shelter’s partnership with Best Friends Animal Society, which allowed MAS to provide discounted pet adoptions during June and July. About 265 pets were adopted, a 182 percent increase from the 94 adoptions during those months last year.

MAS is aiming for a 90 percent save rate, says MAS administrator Alexis Pugh. But funding is an obstacle to that goal. Pugh says MAS is beginning to explore other ways to secure more funding in order to “provide service and care above the baseline.” MAS has applied for more than $1 million in grants for service improvements. Pugh says in order to reach the long-term goal of ending euthanasia at MAS, there must be constant support. For the month of August, adoption fees will be reduced to $20, as part of another Best Friends Network Partner’s adoption special.

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UPCOMING SHOWS August 12 October 14 October 21 November 17

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m e m p h i s f l y e r. c o m

38 SPECIAL OCTOBER 6

SAWYER BROWN SEPTEMBER 29

NEWS & OPINION

AD-2.indd 1

7

7/27/17 4:23 PM


POLITICS By Jackson Baker

Rolling Easy Terry Roland, an early entry in the Shelby County Mayor’s race, keeps his tour going, picking pockets and heartstrings.

True Story:

form planks, including a boast on behalf of the commission’s recent two-cent property tax decrease, a recommendation of de-annexation as a way for Memphis to conserve its resources and pay for more police (and to avoid having to borrow deputies from the Sheriff’s Department), a ringing endorsement of TIF (tax-increment-financing) projects as an alternative to PILOT (payment-in-lieu-oftax) arrangements, a pledge that his would be a “blue collar vs. blue blood” campaign, and finally some Lowell George. Roland, a onetime country/rock singer himself, quoted some lines from “Roll Um Easy,” a favorite lyric by the Little Feat lead singer: “I have dined in palaces, drunk wine with kings and queens, But darlin’, oh darlin’, you’re the best thing I ever seen. …” Except that Roland, to accommodate the plurality of his audience, made that “y’all are” rather than “you’re.” At the moment, Roland remains the only formally announced mayoral candidate, though County Trustee David Lenoir is known to be planning a county mayor’s race on the Republican side, and former commissioner Sidney Chism has informally touted his own candidacy as a Democrat. Roland has wasted no time in gigging Lenoir. He made an effort during the recent budget season to defund part of the trustee’s budget,

Terry Roland campaigns in Cordova.

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August 3-9, 2017

• To no one’s surprise, GOP Commissioner Heidi Shafer, the past year’s vice chair, was elected county commission chair for 2017-18. The vote was by acclamation, and the sense of unity was underscored by the fact that her nominator was fellow Republican Steve Basar, with whom Shafer has often been an odds. The vote for vice chair went to Democrat Willie Brooks, also by acclamation after the withdrawal from contention of fellow Democrat Eddie Jones. Brooks’ victory owed something to his bridge-building endorsement of a formal resolution by Republican David Reaves opposing a proposed charter school in Bartlett.

Love one another. It’s that simple.

They’d forgotten how much fun church could be. Good music. Great art. Fun people. Connection. Inspiration.

8

and on Monday afternoon — in a session called to discuss a draft of a “Strategic Agenda 2017-20” — he complained about what he said was the trustee’s laxity in selling off taxdefaulted property. The Strategic Agenda project was overseen by the 2016-17 commission chair, Democrat Melvin Burgess Jr., who has let it be known that he, too, is likely to become a candidate for county mayor. “We’ve got to have a plan,” he said over and over on Monday, both in his public remarks and in private conversation.

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JACKSON BAKER

The county mayor’s race is still some distance down the calendar, but at least one candidate — Republican Terry Roland, a Millington store-owner and Shelby County commissioner — has been running in public for a year or more. On Saturday, he brought his campaign to the newly renovated Houston Levee Community Center in North Cordova, where he gave a fair-sized crowd his patented mix of country vernacular, governmental shop-talk, class-action rhetoric, and, where need be, a little topical pop talk. Before he got started, he and his helpers fired up a grill and laid out a generous supply of hot dogs, hamburgers, and what Roland described as some “great Italian sausage.” Campaign associate Cary Vaughn — who would follow up Roland’s remarks later on by likening him to Joe Montana and calling him “the only candidate who understands urban and suburban” — jested on the front end that “we’re picking pockets all over Shelby County.” That was an apparent tongue-in-cheek reference to the fact that the late-morning rally, fifth in an ongoing series across the county, would double as a fund-raiser, but there would, in fact, not be much of a hard sell to the attendees, most of whom seemed to be Roland loyalists already. In his talk, Roland ran through a miscellany of his plat-


9

NEWS & OPINION

m e m p h i s f l y e r. c o m


MEMPHIS farmers market wEDESDAY, AUGUST 9 · COURT SQUARE PARK · 5 - 8 PM live music: CHArles STREETer & THE PEOPLE food trucks · LIVE PAINTING · beer MFM2 FARMERS MARKET VENDORS OPEN 4-7 PM

E D ITO R IAL

Two Parties, One Goal The Memphis City Council and the Shelby County Commission are 13-member bodies that meet with regularity, both in full session and in committee meetings. The way in which they both have come to operate might constitute a lesson of sorts to other legislative bodies supposedly higher up the chain of government. By that, of course, we mean the Tennessee General Assembly and the Congress of the United States. The most direct contrast to those more rarefied legislative entities can probably be supplied by the county commission, because it, like the Tennessee legislature and the U.S. House and U.S. Senate, is elected according to the dictates of the two-party system, which pits Democrats against Republicans in electoral contests and thereafter requires the representatives of either party to sit in common assembly. Increasingly, the commission provides a textbook example of how the two-party system is supposed to work. There are conflicts, sometimes ferocious ones, but these develop more often according to personality than to party lines. Differences that arise from the ideological divide of the two parties occur, of course, but they are usually resolved by the simple arithmetic of a vote-count (abetted in no few cases by some artful vote-trading). After a stutter or two a few years back, the commission has resumed its “gentlemen’s agreement” tradition of rotating its chairmanship back and forth by party. This year’s chair, elected on Monday, is a Republican, Heidi Shafer, who succeeded Democrat Melvin Burgess. During this past year, the members of the commission concurred across party lines on matters ranging from minority contracting to taxing philosophy to the essentials of a long-

term “strategic agenda.” It is hard to make direct comparisons to the General Assembly, where the ratio of majority Republicans to minority Democrats is wildly disproportional, but the two houses of Congress are balanced enough between the two parties to allow for instructive contrasts. Rather infamously, the two-party system there is totally dysfunctional, and “gridlock” is too kind a name for it. The nation has just witnessed the spectacle of one party in the Senate trying to abolish the nation’s prevailing health-care insurance system — and recklessly, without a real alternative. The scheme failed only because three members of the majority party were conscientious enough to scuttle it, calling instead for bipartisan action and consultative reform efforts. What made the shabby repeal effort doubly ironic was that the Affordable Care Act, so tenuously rescued from Republicans acting in neartotal lockstep, had been inspired by a Republican think tank and a Republican governor, Massachusett’s Mitt Romney, in the first place. The congressional GOP’s fanatic resistance to the act had been based on nothing more, ultimately, than a nakedly partisan pledge made eight years ago to oppose anything and everything offered by Democratic President, Barack Obama. Now that Obama is out of office, that sordid motive is obsolete. Going forward, two parties, like two heads, can be better than one. But only if they genuinely take heed of each other.

August 3-9, 2017

C O M M E N TA R Y b y G r e g C r a v e n s

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T:4.575”

VIEWPOINT By Raumesh Akbari

“Fed Up” Falls Short Enhanced punishment by itself defeats the purpose of both rehabilitation and crime control. this affect? And do the funds expended for this possession show “best use” of the money? Then there is another factor: societal re-entry, the process of putting able-bodied, formerly incarcerated persons back to work. My assistant at the legislature tells me that more than half of the calls we receive at our office deal with persons wanting to clear their records so that they can work to feed their families, support themselves, and re-enter their communities as contributing citizens. One of the bills I passed during the first half of this Assembly reduced the amount of money needed to expunge criminal records of qualified individuals. Putting people back to work is a solid move toward crime reduction. But it cannot work unless we also focus on creating more full-employment opportunities for our citizens, not the temporary, minimum-wage jobs many employers offer.

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I represent much of South Memphis and parts of East Memphis and Midtown. I want to see my district with safer ★ 1-8OO-871-O711 ★ streets and neighborhoods. I want to see children be able to grow up in their comHOLLYWOODCASINOTUNICA.COM munities without the fear of gunshots and violence due to the proliferation of guns and other deadly weapons. ©2017 Hollywood Casino Tunica. Must be 21 years or older. To make this happen, we cannot rely Gambling problem? Call 1-888-777-9696. merely on the prison system to solve the problem. Certainly, there are those for whom incarceration is the only justifiable answer, but we must also work hard to reduce the numbers of weapons on the streets, weapons that are too easily Prepared by: LUNCTo HM acquired and accessible. work ENU this NEWHWCT_20170803_MemphisFlyerEnt_102751.indd Southfield, MI • 248.354.9700 G equation Tfrom to finish, we must IN startSaved Printed At at: 7-28-2017 10:34 AM From: gzale-imac-09692 by Jeremy Copeck / Heidi Kempisty understand that it must also take policies Approvals Job info Fonts Client: PENN NATIONAL and GAMING Fonts: Producers: Hayman, Becky / Frey, Karen of education, training, employment, Job #: 171157700029 : 022 Zapf Dingbats (Regular), Helvetica Neue (77 Account: McPhee, Meg / N/A social programs to Prefix: make 102751 this work. Bold Condensed, 57 Condensed, 67 Medium Creative: Schaeffer, Laura / N/A Trim: 4.575” x 9.25” Condensed) Scale: None The equation that will work is this Bleed: 4.575” x 9.25” Asset Type: Print, Magazine FREE PARKING • ON THE TROLLEY LINE one: Early Intervention + Employment + Live: 4.575” x 9.25” Link Name: Page #(s): 1 , Proof #: 2 WALKING(100%), DISTANCE TO FEDEX FORUM & BEALE ST. Line Screen: 300 dpi SignOff_out_K.eps HWCT_BkdVigilance + Gun Reduction = Decrease gArt_102751.tif (CMYK; 300 ppi; 100%) Project Name: None Ad Code: See Below in Crime. Used Swatches: FRESH PRIVATE We must make this happen. Cyan, Magenta, 299Yellow, S. MAINBlack ST. PARTY FISH Raumesh Akbari is a state Representative OPEN DAILY AT 11AM SPECIALISTS DAILY from District 91 in Memphis and a 901-522-9070 11 member of the General Assembly’s PEARLSOYSTERHOUSE.COM Criminal Justice Committee.

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The issue of violent crime here in Memphis, particularly that of gun crime, has once again given birth to another “approach” aimed at reducing the numbers of Memphians killed on our city’s streets. The “Fed Up” campaign, with its message of intense investigations and tough prosecution, as well as its promise of longer and stiffer sentences, has been introduced as a way to curtail violence and to put into place measures that will let the world know we are “anti-crime” here in the Bluff City. Mayor Jim Strickland, District Attorney General Amy Weirich, and the Crime Commission here in Shelby County are supporting this campaign and have plans to promote it heavily in weeks to come. Will it work? This campaign follows a bill passed by the General Assembly that, among other things, calls for enhanced punishment with longer sentencing. Will the infusion of $15 million of taxpayers’ money (the legislation’s fiscal note) in order to put people behind bars for longer periods of time actually bring about the anticipated decrease in crime? Does this equation — Increased Incarceration = Decrease in Crime — reflect the result we’re looking to get in the interest of public safety?   I believe our leaders are being responsible in their efforts to rid our communities of guns and the carnage that results from the violent use of these weapons. I believe that if you commit a crime with a weapon, that should mean jail time. Definitely. However, I see two fallacies in this latest approach. One, it does nothing for the underlying issues that cause criminal behavior — issues based on social deviances, a lack of conflict-resolution skills, a resistance to education and training, and familial problems. Data has shown that honing reasoning skills among children at an early age, especially when those skills are reinforced as they grow older, has a lasting effect throughout their lives. Many crimes occur when people know each other, from arguments and retaliatory moves. Training in social skills, through education and programs, could get at the problem early in life, helping to stifle the violent reactions displayed by many of our young people today. Two, under the Fed-Up approach, the nonviolent offense of possession of a weapon by a person with a previous felony conviction could qualify that person for a longer, extended sentence. Mere possession, not perpetration of a crime in these cases, could land a person behind bars for years. How many people will

None

Fin


COVER STORY BY MAYA SMITH / PHOTOGRAPHS BY JUSTIN FOX BURKS

BUS TO THE

FUTURE

Changes lie ahead for the Memphis Area Transit Authority.

August 3-9, 2017

If you catch the 19 Vollintine at Breedlove on a weekday morning, you might run into Cynthia Bailey. She’ll be waiting at the stop about 15 minutes before the bus comes with her backpack — full of what she calls her tools to educate citizens — over her shoulder. As she rides the 19 to the Hudson Transit Center downtown, she starts conversations with fellow passengers and passes out the flyers. After staying at the bus station for about an hour, Bailey then packs up her materials, boards the 50 Poplar, and heads to her next destination: Cleveland and Poplar, where she sets up shop again. Bailey, the co-chair of the Memphis Bus Riders Union (MBRU), says this is her routine most days. She spends her time educating other bus riders and non-bus riders on all things Memphis-transit-related. She considers herself an expert on riding public transit in Memphis because, as she says, she’s been using the buses here for 26 years. Back in the ’90s, she rode a Memphis city bus to Raleigh-Egypt High School. Bailey has continued to use Memphis public transit ever since — even during periods when she owned a car. She called herself a “choice-rider” then. Bailey now spends her time riding the bus around town and advocating for a better public

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transit system in Memphis — “like it used to be,” she says. Bailey says she remembers the buses being more timely and more frequent, and they operated for longer hours. This, as well as better timing with route connections, is something she and other MBRU members have set as goals for the current system. Still, Bailey says her “biggest issue” with the Memphis Area Transit Authority (MATA) is its lack of penetration into some residential areas. One of those is North Memphis, which for some time has had no bus service on streets such as Breedlove, Decatur, Manassas, and Firestone. But, in June, the MATA board


NEW ROUTES AND ROUTE CHANGES The Firestone 31 route is a demonstration route, which will run on a trial basis until December. Interim CEO of MATA Gary Rosenfeld says MATA ordinarily introduces new routes and makes changes to its routes and schedules in December and April. He adds, that after extra funding was made available for three new routes, the August 6th changes will be an exception. The extra funding comes through the federal Congestion Mitigation and Air Quality (CMAQ) program, which pays for air-improving transportation projects in

areas that the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency determined have poor air quality. The grants will fund the three routes for three years, but Rosenfeld says the hope is that in the future these routes will be able to support themselves. Two of three routes will be express routes, including one meant to “beef up service” near the Airways Transit Center, creating more efficient transfers, according to MATA’s director of planning and scheduling, John Lancaster. The other express route — 340 Walnut Grove — will go from the Agricenter International to the Hudson Transit Center downtown and will offer a “park and ride” option, in which riders can park their cars at the Agricenter free of charge, catch the bus downtown, and return to their car at the end of the day. In June, the MATA board also approved changes to 24 existing routes and their schedules. Routes that will be modified include 44 Goodlett IKEA Way, as well as two of MATA’s most used routes, 42 Crosstown and 50 Poplar. All of the changes are designed to improve MATA’s on-time performance (OTP), which was at 76 percent as of June. Rosenfeld says he expects the latest route changes to raise OTP by at least another 5 percent. Lancaster says there is a “whole process” that goes into determining where new routes should be placed and how often the buses on that route should run. He says the authority uses a strategic planning document called the Short Range Transit Plan, which helps staff consider a particular area’s demographic makeup and land use, as well as the amount of jobs and residences in the area. Because of a funding shortage, MATA must make revenue neutral service improvements. These are, as the name suggests, improvements that do not affect MATAs bottom line. With the exception of the 31 Firestone route, all of the new routes and improvements to the current routes are revenue neutral.

Interim CEO of MATA Gary Rosenfeld

THE TROLLEYS’ RETURN After a three-year absence, Rosenfeld says he’s hopeful the steel-wheel trolleys will be resurrected by year’s end, returning first to Main Street. Before the trolleys were discontinued in 2014, after fires and other safety and inspection issues, MATA officials say about 1.5 million passengers used them annually. Half of the passengers were tourists. It was important to bring back the trolleys, says Rosenfeld, not only because of their positive impact on downtown’s economy, but also because of their “rich history in the city. … It’s something the community wanted.” Rosenfeld says restoring the trolleys has been an “extensive ongoing process that never ends.” One of the biggest challenges in restoring the trolleys, he says, was figuring out how to apply modern technology to 100-year-old trolley cars. Rosenfeld says the trolleys were modernized by re-engineering

everything inside of them. Before the trolleys are ready for passengers — after multiple levels of testing by engineers and safety committees and a review by the Tennessee Department of Transportation and the Federal Transit Authority — the trolleys must operate on a test basis for about four to six weeks without passengers. If all goes as planned and the vehicles are deemed safe, steel-wheel trolleys will begin carrying passengers on Main Street late this year, followed by trolleys on Riverside and Madison sometime in 2018. FUNDING OBSTACLES One obstacle that keeps MATA from being the transit system that Memphis deserves, says Rosenfeld, is a lack of funding. Currently, MATA’s operating budget is about $62 million per year, but Rosenfeld continued on page 14

COVER STORY m e m p h i s f l y e r. c o m

voted for a new route to bring service to those areas and others that were once served by the 31 Crosstown — a route that was eliminated in 2013 due to funding issues and that has been described as a “lifeline” by many in the community. MATA will introduce 31 Firestone, along with three other new routes, for a trial period beginning this Sunday. Bailey says she is pleased with the way MATA responded to the union and community’s pleas for a restored service to North Memphis. MATA officials say that in order for the 31 Firestone route to continue after December, it needs to maintain at least five boards per hour throughout the course of the trial. Chief communications officer for MATA, Nicole Lacey, says the Firestone 31 route comes as a result of the community’s feedback and expressed needs. With limited funding, the route will only operate 10 hours a day, though, running for four hours in the morning, breaking in the middle of the day, and resuming for six hours in the afternoon through the evening. Bailey says the MBRU, along with other organizations across the city, put in a lot of hard work to bring awareness to the missing service in areas like New Chicago in North Memphis, by holding town hall meetings, creating petitions, going door to door to pass out flyers, and educating members of the community. A key piece of the education was informing citizens on the reasons MATA elected to discontinue the 31 Crosstown route. She says the union understands it was because of funding issues, rather than a matter of discrimination, and it was important for the community to know that in order to properly petition for the service’s return. Many of the residents in the New Chicago neighborhood are seniors who have been living in the community since the 1950s and ’60s, Bailey says. “They need a way to get to doctor’s appointments and everywhere else without having to pay for a ride or bother a family member,” she says. “It’s a victory for everyone.” The new route, 31 Firestone, set to launch Sunday, August 6th, will run every 60 minutes, with stops including Manassas High School, Crosstown Concourse, North Public Library, and Christ Community Health Services. Members of the MBRU believe it will provide those living in North Memphis communities better connections to groceries, jobs, and health care. MBRU secretary Justin Davis says there is still a large population of people in South Memphis — once served by 31 Crosstown— who currently are not “necessarily well-served” by MATA. Some of those residents include individuals living in the Riverside community who, Davis says, have expressed their need for a route that will connect them to major corridors, economic centers, and other essential spots in North Memphis. The next step for the union, he says, is to campaign for a fully funded route that directly connects South and North Memphis. “Our goal is really to make sure MATA does not have groups that are significantly underserved,” Davis says. For now, though, Davis says the union is pausing to celebrate the service coming to the New Chicago area by throwing a block party at the New Chicago CDC Saturday beginning at noon. The party is meant to “raise the energy” around the new service, as well as provide an opportunity to make sure the members of the community know about the new route.

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continued from page 13

August 3-9, 2017

says in order to provide a good, quality service to the community, MATA needs an additional $30 million a year. “Quality of service suffers when you’re operating on a shoestring budget,” Rosenfeld says. Because of low funding, he acknowledges that buses don’t run frequently enough for many passengers to rely on public transit to get them to school, work, the doctor’s office, etc. “If you look at our peer cities, like Nashville or Charlotte, either they have better funding or a denser population,” he says. “But they provide transit that allows people to really be mobile.” About 35 percent of the MATA operating budget is allocated to wages. Without much discretionary funding, Rosenfeld says MATA is unable to make certain improvements and investments, including renovations to its 4,500 bus stops, newer buses, and equipment that would make it easier for the public to use the transit system, such as a MATA app for smartphones. Rosenfeld says with more funding, the authority could also invest in better training for bus operators, which would improve the overall efficiency of the system. More secure funding, he says, would allow MATA to improve the “quality and the quantity of service in the city.” There is some good news on that front. On July 1st, when the IMPROVE Act took effect in Tennessee, avenues opened for MATA to secure additional funding. The legislation gives the city council the opportunity to authorize a public vote on extra funding initiatives, such as a sales tax surcharge, vehicle registration fees, or occupancy taxes in hotels. Rosenfeld says in the fall, MATA will begin putting together a proposal package to present to the city council early next year. Under the stipulations of IMPROVE, the presentation must include a stakeholder-sourced document detailing the

14

community’s vision and goals for the future of MATA. Rosenfeld says there will be a lot of “information sharing” among organizations like Innovate Memphis to create this document, beginning in the fall. As MATA begins to gather community feedback from stakeholders, Davis of the MBRU says he hopes this will be something that will include his union members. “We have always held that bus riders have the real expertise when it comes to transit systems and how they work,” Davis says. “They are the people riding the buses every day.” BUS TO THE FUTURE Rosenfeld says he believes electric buses are the future of public transportation in the nation and, he hopes, for MATA as well. At the end of June, MATA applied South Main trolleys under repair to the Federal Transit Administration (left); trolley tracks on South Main to receive 16 electric buses. Rosenfeld on the mall (right) expects to hear back by the end of the year, anticipating that MATA will receive at least four of the buses, allowing for an entirely electric vehicle route to be created. MATA is testing out one new electric bus that it has already received. As for MATA ridership, Rosenfeld says it has been decreasing over recent years, following the national trend which, depending on the region of the country, has dropped 5 to 10 percent in the last two years. Most attribute the national decline to the recent uptick in ride-sharing app users, such as Uber and Lyft. MATA officials say more than 22,000 riders are using its near 50 routes each weekday. Moving forward, Rosenfeld hopes to make MATA’s services easier to use, closer to necessities, and more responsive, while creating more equity for riders. MATA’s goal, eventually, he says, is to provide a transit system that “gets anyone to anywhere in the city of Memphis in no more than an hour.”


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15


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We Recommend: Culture, News + Reviews

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Psychic Privates

By Susan Ellis

Next Friday, Kim Vodicka will be stopping by Found Studio on Broad for a poetry reading. It will not be family-friendly. How do you describe what you do? Erotic poet seems too polite. Polite?(!) Haha. I’ve actually often considered the term “erotic poet” to be an insult, historically. I much prefer “Spokesbitch of a Degeneration,” if they’ll let you print that. “Erotic” is also pretty limiting. My work is just as concerned, if not more so, with love as it is with sex. I consider everything I’ve ever written to be a love poem, really, even the pieces that cut off your balls and feed them to you! “Poet,” too, seems limiting, since what I’m doing is very much a hybrid project, a symbiosis of words and music. It’s interesting to me that people often focus on the erotic elements of my work to the exclusion of all else. It’s interesting to me that, in 2017, people still have the ability to be shocked by sexuality. That’s why the Psychic Privates album cover is covered in genitalia. … I look forward to a day when sexuality is normalized in that respect, when people can see something like that and find it not shocking, but human. I look forward to a day when human sexuality shamelessly blends in with everything else. The event is described as being “performed over psychedelic sonic architecture; a sui Southern freak show poetry reading.” What is psychedelic sonic architecture? And what does sui Southern mean? Psychedelic sonic architecture is what happens when you gloriously stop making sense and surrender yourself to the moodiness of sound (shoutouts here to my musical collaborators on this project — Josh Stevens, Jack Alberson, and Randy Faucheux), when you build entire sonic structures out of emotional whims, when you ride the wave of that trip. Sui Southern refers to being born and raised in the Deep South and feeling like you’ll never get out and feeling so frustrated that you regularly want to die because of it. So, yeah … you’re seeing all of those elements in the work, and in the live performance … the sea changes, the frustration between fleeting moments of acceptance, the freak-outs, the soft whispers, the utter psychosis … the performance really functions as its own creative omniverse.

JUSTIN FOX BURKS

“PSYCHIC PRIVATES” READING BY KIM VODICKA AT FOUND STUDIO, FRIDAY, AUGUST 4TH, 5-8 P.M.

August 3-9, 2017

Thinking outside the Bloody Mary box with summer tomato drinks. Spirits, p. 33

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THURSDAY August 3

FRIDAY August 4

Continuum Music Festival story booth, 7:30 p.m., $25 This three-day festival, blending classical music with rock and hip-hop, kicks off tonight with a performance of contemporary chamber music by Nief-Norf. Later that evening, there is a “secret show” (!) at Crosstown Arts. Others performing throughout the weekend are Luna Nova, chatterbird, Rob Jungklas, Blueshift Ensemble, and Don Lifted.

“Price Is Right” David Lusk Gallery, 6-8 p.m. Popular annual show featuring works under $1,000. Among the artists: Beth Edwards, Greely Myatt, Dwayne Butcher, Veda Reed, and Carlyle Wolfe. Bring It! The Orpheum, 8 p.m., $32 Live version of the Lifetime series Bring It!, with Miss D and the Dancing Dolls.

Return to Old Zinnie’s to toast old friends and ghosts. Bar Report, p. 30

“Floating Light” Playhouse on the Square, Playhouse hours Exhibit of photography by Katherine Dean and Joseph Moseley, which “explor[es] the weight of light and darkness over a span of undocumented time.” Yellow Jack! Woodruff-Fontaine House, 5-8 p.m., $15 The yellow fever epidemic is remembered tonight with tales of martyrs and fever-cooling refreshments.

Firefly Glow Party Memphis Botanic Garden, 7-9 p.m., $15 Family-friendly event with an Illumination Station, a Glow Lab, and a dance party. Reservations required: 636-4100 Scavenger Hunt Broad Avenue Arts District, 5-8 p.m. Participants gather clue cards from various businesses on the street to complete the hunt and win prizes. The Kebab Food Truck will be onsite as well.


Danielle Sierra’s The Unseen World: Journey

Me & JC

By Susan Ellis

Danielle Sierra is a California girl with a fine arts degree. She moved to Memphis after a visit here, inspired by all the green. Sierra was raised Catholic, but then became Baptist. She liked the faith’s focus on Jesus Christ. Last year, with other faithful artists, she put together the show “An (Art)form of Worship.” This Friday, from 4 to 9 p.m., there will be an opening for its sequel “An (Art)form of Worship 2: Di(e)chotomy” at the Crosstown Arts 430 gallery. Along with mixed-media works by Sierra, there will be sculpture by Heidi Walter and oil-and-acrylic paintings by Andrea King. Sierra says that the dichotomy of the show’s title that the artists are addressing involves salvation through Jesus Christ and “the spiritual battle within us all.” Sierra says she prays before she begins painting, and then she paints what she sees, with her work exploring the often fraught path to eternity. Walter’s sculptures are figures that are neither male or female, allowing the viewer to find themselves in the work. King’s work deals in duality — those who are passionate about God and those who are the opposite. One aspect of “(Art)form” that Sierra stresses is that it’s about conversation. To that end, there will be an artist’s talk on Saturday, August 5th, from 1 to 4 p.m. And the closing on Sunday, August 6th, from 1 to 3 p.m., will feature a community discussion, with local churches invited. Sierra says the thing about art is its ability to bridge gaps — from the super faithful to the heathen and all walks in between. “Every piece of art has something to say,” she says. “AN (ART)FORM OF WORSHIP 2: DI(E)CHOTOMY” AT CROSSTOWN ARTS 430 GALLERY, AUGUST 4-6. OPENING AUGUST 4TH, 4-9 P.M.

Skinny & Gangsta Boo’s Birthday Bash Hi-Tone, 9 p.m., $12 A two-day celebration featuring Memphis Redd, Hope Clayborn, Lord T. & Eloise, and Dead Soldiers. The Generous Pour Capital Grille, dinner hours, $28 (in addition to dinner) Wine pairing featuring seven acclaimed wines from California and Oregon, including Mt. Brave Cabernet Sauvignon.

“Harry Potter’s World: Renaissance Science, Magic, and Medicine” Collierville Public Library, library hours Traveling exhibit exploring one of Harry Potter’s great inspirations, the development of Western science. Jus’ Blues Music Awards Horseshoe Casino, 8 p.m. Full weekend celebrating blues heritage. Tonight, it’s the Jus’ Blues Music Awards show, and tomorrow there will be a juke joint party and fish fry. More info: jusblues.org.

James Taylor & His All Star Band FedExForum, 7:30 p.m., $66-$100 An evening of great, classic hits from James Taylor and Bonnie Raitt. Back to the Future Great Lawn, Shelby Farms, 8 p.m., $10 per car Why are things so heavy in the future? An outdoor movie screening of Back to the Future. Picnics are allowed, and food trucks will be on site. Plus, popcorn and beer!

ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT

SATURDAY August 5

m e m p h i s f l y e r. c o m

Rosalyn Ross (above) gets another shot at stardom in Grace, one of the 10 finalists for the Memphis Film Prize. Film, p. 34

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Continuum

A groundbreaking festival offers new music, new forms.

AUGUST 24

AUG 5

MUSIC By Alex Greene

1726 Poplar Avenue Memphis, TN 38104 901/274-3550 www.memphischoices.org

his weekend, Crosstown Arts will echo with the work of several Tennessee demolition experts in search of new space. Concertgoers, be advised: Wear protective headgear. There will be genre-busting, but tearing down generic walls is the whole point of the Continuum Music Festival. “It’s different from what you think of as classical chamber music,” says festival organizer Jenny Davis. Several ensembles will be performing, at times collaborating with local songwriters or hip-hop artists, and all with a regional provenance. “They’re all based in Tennessee,” says Davis, director of Memphis’ own Blueshift Ensemble, who will close the festival. “Which is kind of surprising, because you think of all this stuff happening in New York, and L.A., and Chicago. But actually it’s doing really great here as well.” Many heard Blueshift’s recent collaborations with the New Yorkbased ICEBERG composers collective, with several shows in and around the Crosstown Concourse in June. “Nief-Norf are more of an experimental ensemble, based in Knoxville,” Davis notes. “This weekend, they’ll just have cello and electric guitar, a small subset of the ensemble. They’re doing a Steve Reich piece, “Electric Counterpoint,” for electric guitar and recorded tape. “There are two other pieces on the program for cello and electric guitar. Those are both world premieres, actually. One is by [California Institute of the Arts’] Nicholas Deyoe. And the other, “Sequenza for cello,” is by Luciano Berio.” Nief-Norf ’s opening set will be followed by a “secret show” by one of the more exciting new music ventures in the city. Hint: their shows last year, recorded for an LP released this January, had the whole city raving. The following night keeps things local with the Luna Nova ensemble, major supporters of new composers via their long-running Belvedere Chamber Music Festival.

They’ll be followed by a new kind of Nashville sound, chatterbird. “So, chatterbird have been around since 2014,” says Davis. “They are directed by a flutist, Celine Thackston. They’re really all about inventive experiences, using flute, soprano, bassoon, piano, and percussion.” The festival culminates with two Saturday shows that take the genrebusting to new heights, including collaborations with local recording artists. Rob Jungklas, whose Blackbirds album arrived earlier this year, will be reinterpreting his new songs in duets with Blueshift cellist Jonathan Kirkscey. Then Blueshift will take center stage. The grand finale will be Blueshift’s performance with local hip-hop auteur and visual artist Lawrence Matthews, also known as Don Lifted. “I don’t do shows unless I can do a self-curated event in an alternative space. And I try to completely transform the

Don Lifted

space. So, you might come into a space and see three projections, all in sync with the music. I’m just trying to curate a whole experience,” Matthews says. Expect the same multi-media aesthetic to permeate Saturday’s show, where Blueshift will add new musical elements to Don Lifted tracks. “I’m excited to hear what it sounds like and excited to play with it — to the point where I kinda want Jenny and Jonathan to put strings on the album that I’m working on.” Davis is also excited by the possibilities. “I always thought new music was like, very experimental, no melody, maybe kind of hard to listen to sometimes. But that’s just not the case. There’s really something for everybody in the world of new music now.” The Continuum Music Festival happens in the story booth and Crosstown Art Gallery spaces; 7 p.m., Thursday, August 3rd through Saturday, August 5th.


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19


GANGSTA BOO’S BIRTHDAY BASH HI-TONE CAFE FRIDAY, AUGUST 4TH

JAMES TAYLOR WITH BONNIE RAITT FEDEXFORUM SATURDAY, AUGUST 5TH

THE MIGHTY SOULS BRASS BAND THE FRONT PORCH SATURDAY, AUGUST 5TH

After Dark: Live Music Schedule August 3 - 9 Alfred’s 197 BEALE 525-3711

Gary Hardy & Memphis 2 Thursdays-Saturdays, 6-9 p.m.; Karaoke Thursdays, TuesdaysWednesdays, 9 p.m.-1 a.m., and Sundays-Mondays, 10 p.m.-2 a.m.; Mandi Thomas Fridays, Saturdays, 6-9 p.m.; The 901 Heavy Hitters Fridays, Saturdays, 10 p.m.-2 a.m.; Flyin’ Ryan Fridays, Saturdays, 2:30 a.m.; Memphis Jazz Orchestra Sundays, 6-9 p.m.

B.B. King’s Blues Club 143 BEALE 524-KING

The King Beez Thursdays, 5:30 p.m.; B.B. King’s All Stars Thursdays, Fridays, 8 p.m.; Will Tucker Band Fridays, Saturdays, 5 p.m.; Lisa G and Flic’s Pic’s Band Saturdays, Sundays, 12:30 p.m.; Blind Mississippi Morris Sundays, 5 p.m.; Memphis Jones Sundays, Wednesdays 5:30 p.m.; Doc Fangaz and the Remedy Tuesdays, 5:30 p.m.

Blue Note Bar & Grill 341-345 BEALE 577-1089

Queen Ann and the Memphis Blues Masters Fridays, Saturdays, 8 p.m.-midnight.

Blues City Cafe 138 BEALE 526-3637

King’s Palace Cafe 162 BEALE 521-1851

Live Music WednesdaysSundays, 7-11 p.m.; Live DJ Wednesdays-Sundays, 11 p.m.; Third Floor: DJ Tubbz Fridays, Saturdays, 10 p.m.; The Rusty Pieces play Bike Night on Beale Wednesdays Wednesdays, 6-9 p.m.

FedExForum 191 BEALE

James Taylor with Bonnie Raitt Saturday, Aug. 5, 7:30 p.m.

Handy Bar 200 BEALE 527-2687

The Amazing Rhythmatics Tuesdays, Thursdays-Sundays, 7 p.m.-1 a.m.

Hard Rock Cafe

King’s Palace Cafe Patio 162 BEALE 521-1851

Sonny Mack Mondays-Fridays, 2-6 p.m.; Cowboy Neil Mondays, Thursdays, 7-11 p.m. and Saturdays, Sundays, 2-6 p.m.; Sensation Band Tuesdays, Fridays, 7-11 p.m.; Fuzzy and the Kings of Memphis Saturdays, 7-11 p.m.; Chic Jones and the Blues Express Sundays, 7-11 p.m.; North and South Band Wednesdays, 7-11 p.m.

King’s Palace Cafe Tap Room 168 BEALE 576-2220

126 BEALE 529-0007

Jerred Price Friday, Aug. 4, 9-11 p.m., and Saturday, Aug. 5, 9-11 p.m.; The Skitch Sunday, Aug. 6, 8-11 p.m.

Itta Bena 145 BEALE 578-3031

Gerald Stephens Thursday, Aug. 3, 6-9 p.m.; Joe Restivo Friday, Aug. 4, and Saturday, Aug. 5, 6-9 p.m.; Nat “King” Kerr Fridays, Saturdays, 9-10 p.m.; Kayla Walker Tuesday, Aug. 8, 6-8 p.m.; Susan Marshall Wednesday, Aug. 9, 6-8 p.m.

King Jerry Lawler’s Hall of Fame Bar & Grille 159 BEALE

David Bowen Thursdays, 5:309:30 p.m., Fridays, Saturdays, 6:30-10:30 p.m., and Sundays, 5:30-9:30 p.m.

Chris Gales Solo Acoustic Show Mondays-Saturdays, noon-4 p.m.; Eric Hughes Thursdays, 5-8 p.m.; Karaoke MondaysThursdays, Sundays, 8 p.m.; Live Bands Fridays, Saturdays, 8 p.m.

Big Don Valentine’s Three Piece Chicken and a Biscuit Blues Band Thursdays, Tuesdays, 8 p.m.-midnight; Juke Joint Allstars Friday, Aug. 4, 9 p.m.-1 a.m.; Myra Hall Band Saturday, Aug. 5, 8 p.m.-midnight.

Mondays, 8 p.m.-midnight; Gracie Curran Tuesdays, 8 p.m.midnight; Plantation Allstars Wednesdays, 8 p.m.-midnight.

Rum Boogie Cafe Blues Hall 182 BEALE 528-0150

Memphis Bluesmasters Thursdays, Sundays, 8 p.m.-midnight; Vince Johnson and the Plantation Allstars Fridays, Saturdays, 4-8 p.m., and Sundays, 3-7 p.m.; Little Boy Blues Friday, Aug. 4, 9 p.m.-1 a.m.; Delta Project Saturday, Aug. 5, 9 p.m.-1 a.m.; Brian Hawkins Blues Party Mondays, 8 p.m.-midnight; Chris McDaniel Tuesdays, Wednesdays, 8 p.m.-midnight.

Silky O’Sullivan’s 183 BEALE 522-9596

Dueling Pianos Thursdays, Wednesdays, 9 p.m.-1 a.m., Fridays, Saturdays, 9 p.m.-3 a.m., and Sundays, Tuesdays, 8 p.m.midnight.

Center for Southern Folklore Hall

330 BEALE 525-8981

Rum Boogie Cafe

119 S. MAIN AT PEMBROKE SQUARE 525-3655

Delta Cats, Billy Gibson & Linear Smith First Friday of every month, 11:30 a.m.-1:30 p.m.

182 BEALE 528-0150

Young Petty Thieves Thursdays, 8 p.m.-midnight; Pam and Terry Friday, Aug. 4, 5:30-8:30 p.m.; Preston Shannon Friday, Aug. 4, 9 p.m.-1 a.m., and Saturday, Aug. 5, 9 p.m.-1 a.m.; Jeff Crosslin Saturday, Aug. 5, 5:30-8:30 p.m.; Sensation Band Sunday, Aug. 6, 7-11 p.m.; Eric Hughes Band

531 S. MAIN 523-9754

Amber Rae Dunn Hosts: Earnestine & Hazel’s Open Mic Wednesdays, 8-11 p.m.

Dirty Crow Inn 855 KENTUCKY

Nancy Apple Thursdays, 8 p.m.; Bobbie & Tasha Wednesdays, 8-11 p.m.

P.T.A. Meeting Sunday, Aug. 6, 6-9 p.m.

The Silly Goose 100 PEABODY PLACE 435-6915

Flying Saucer Draught Emporium

DJ Cody Fridays, Saturdays, 10 p.m.

130 PEABODY PLACE 523-8536

The Peabody Hotel

Songwriters with Roland and Friends Mondays, 7-10 p.m.

The Front Porch 251 RIVERSIDE 524-0817

149 UNION 529-4000

Walrus Thursday, Aug. 3, 6-10 p.m.

South Main

The Mighty Souls Brass Band Saturday, Aug. 5, 6:30 p.m.

Ghost River Brewing

Huey’s Downtown

The Michael Brothers Saturday, Aug. 5, 6-9 p.m.

77 S. SECOND 527-2700

Steve Smith and the Meteors Sunday, Aug. 6, 8:30 p.m.midnight.

Mollie Fontaine Lounge 679 ADAMS 524-1886

Dim the Lights featuring live music and DJs First Saturday of every month, 10 p.m.

Paulette’s

New Daisy Theatre HELL YEAH Sunday, Aug. 6, 8 p.m.; Lalah Hathaway Tuesday, Aug. 8, 7 p.m.; Jidenna Wednesday, Aug. 9, 7 p.m.

Earnestine & Hazel’s

827 S. MAIN 278-0087

Loflin Yard 7 W. CAROLINA

Electric Church Sundays, 2-4 p.m.

LYFE Kitchen 272 S. MAIN 526-0254

Live Music on the Patio Thursdays, 6-8 p.m.

RIVER INN, 50 HARBOR TOWN SQUARE 260-3300

Live Pianist Thursdays, 5:30-8:30 p.m., Fridays and Saturdays, 5:30-9 p.m., Sundays, 11 a.m.-2 p.m., and Mondays-Wednesdays, 5:30-8 p.m.

Purple Haze Nightclub 140 LT. GEORGE W. LEE 577-1139

DJ Dance Music MondaysSundays, 10 p.m.

Rumba Room

Bar DKDC 964 S. COOPER 272-0830

Stevan’s Birthday with NOTS and Haus of Azengraber Saturday, Aug. 5.

Boscos 2120 MADISON 432-2222

Sunday Brunch with Joyce Cobb Sundays, 11:30 a.m.2:30 p.m.

303 S. MAIN 523-0020

Salsa Night Saturdays, 8:30 p.m.3 a.m.; Black Love Live 4 the

August 3-9, 2017

Blind Mississippi Morris Fridays, 5 p.m., and Saturdays, 5:30 p.m.; Brad Birkedahl Band Thursdays, Wednesdays, 8 p.m.; Earl “The Pearl” Banks Saturdays, 12:30 p.m., and Tuesdays, 7 p.m.; Brandon Cunning Band Sundays, 6 p.m., and Mondays, 7 p.m.; FreeWorld Sundays, 9:30 p.m.

Club 152 152 BEALE 544-7011

20

JAMES TAYLOR SATURDAY, AUGUST 5

ELVIS: THE WONDER OF YOU WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 16

R. KELLY SUNDAY, AUGUST 27

WWE RAW MONDAY, AUGUST 28

Rock and Roll Hall of Famer, and five-time Grammy Award winner is performing, with special guest Bonnie Raitt. Tickets available!

The critically-acclaimed concert event celebrating the life and music of Elvis Presley during the 40th anniversary. Tickets available!

Returning to FedExForum for a night of R&B, with speacials guests Tyrese and Monica. Tickets available!

WWE returns for the final time in 2017. Featuring the return of Brock Lesnar & John Cena, plus a huge double main event street fight. Tickets available!

Get tickets at FedExForum Box Office | Ticketmaster locations | 1.800.745.3000 | ticketmaster.com | fedexforum.com


After Dark: Live Music Schedule August 3 - 9 Canvas

Levitt Shell

Wild Bill’s

1737 MADISON 443-5232

OVERTON PARK 272-2722

1580 VOLLINTINE 207-3975

Jeremy Stanfill and Joshua Cosby Sundays, 6-9 p.m.; Candy Company Mondays.

The Cove 2559 BROAD 730-0719

Ed Finney and the U of M Jazz Quartet Thursdays, 8 p.m.; Big Barton Friday, Aug. 4, 9 p.m.; Invincible Universe Saturday, Aug. 5, 10 p.m.; Don and Wayde Tuesdays, 7-10 p.m.; Karaoke Wednesdays, 9 p.m.

Growlers

Midtown Crossing Grill

Hi-Tone 412-414 N. CLEVELAND 278-TONE

Old Salt Union, John Stickley Trio Thursday, Aug. 3, 9 p.m.; Skinny & Gangsta Boo’s Birthday Bash! Friday, Aug. 4, 9 p.m., and Saturday, Aug. 5, 9 p.m.; Faux Killas Sunday, Aug. 6, 9 p.m.; Daphne Willis Monday, Aug. 7, 8 p.m.; My Heart to Fear, the Order of Elijah, Upon a Broken Throne Tuesday, Aug. 8, 8 p.m.; Dog Party Sneeze Attack Wednesday, Aug. 9, 9 p.m.

Howard Vance Guitar Academy 978 REDDOCH 767-6940

394 N. WATKINS 443-0502

“The Happening” Open Songwriter Showcase Tuesdays, 6:30-9:30 p.m.

Minglewood Hall 1555 MADISON 866-609-1744

Whiskey Myers Friday, Aug. 4, 8 p.m.

University of Memphis The Bluff 535 S. HIGHLAND

First Friday at Five Coffee House Concert First Friday of every month, 5 p.m.

Huey’s Poplar 4872 POPLAR 682-7729

The Dantones Sunday, Aug. 6, 8:30 p.m.-midnight.

DJ Ben Murray Thursdays, 10 p.m.; Tall Tall Trees Friday, Aug.

Neil’s Music Room 5727 QUINCE 682-2300

Jack Rowell’s Celebrity Jam Thursdays, 8 p.m.; Eddie Smith Fridays, 8 p.m.; David Kurtz Band with the Shotgun Billys Saturday, Aug. 5, 8 p.m.; Benefit for the West Tennessee Veteran’s Home Sunday, Aug. 6, 3-9 p.m.; Eddie Harrison Mondays, 6-10 p.m.; Debbie Jamison & Friends Tuesdays, 6-10 p.m.; Elmo and the Shades Wednesdays, 8 p.m.midnight.

Lamplighter Lounge 1702 MADISON 726-9916

Lincka, Louise Page, Ricky & Aimee pre-party Saturday, Aug. 5, 7-11 p.m.

Collierville Huey’s Collierville

Huey’s Cordova

Now it's time to

Cast Your

1771 N. GERMANTOWN PKWY. 754-3885

Gary Escoe’s Atomic Dance Machine Sunday, Aug. 6, 8:30 p.m.-midnight.

T.J. Mulligan’s Cordova 8071 TRINITY 756-4480

The Southern Edition Band Tuesdays.

Frayser/Millington Haystack Bar & Grill 6560 HWY. 51 N. 872-0567

Dantones Saturday, Aug. 5, 9 p.m.-1 a.m.

Huey’s Millington 8570 U.S. 51 N.

The Heart Memphis Band Sunday, Aug. 6, 8-11:30 p.m.

Pop’s Bar & Grill 6365 NAVY 872-0353

Possum Daddy or DJ Turtle Thursdays, 5-9 p.m.; CeCee Fridays, 8 p.m.-1 a.m.; Possum Daddy Karaoke Wednesdays, 6-10 p.m., and Saturdays, 7-11 p.m.; DJ Turtle or CeCee Sundays, 5-9 p.m.

The Tumblin’ Wheels Sunday, Aug. 6, 4-7 p.m.; Dikki Du and The Zydeco Krewe Sunday, Aug. 6, 8:30 p.m.-midnight. 2119 MADISON 207-5097

Steak Night with Tony Butler and the Shelby Forest Pioneers Fridays, 6-8 p.m.; Robert Hull Sundays, 12:30-3:30 p.m.

Cordova

Huey’s Midtown

Brennan Villines Duo Thursday, Aug. 3, 6 p.m.; Brad Birkedahl Thursday, Aug. 3, 9 p.m.Ryan Peel Friday, Aug. 4, 6:30 p.m.; Almost Famous Friday, Aug. 4, 10 p.m.; 3RD Man Saturday, Aug. 5, 11:30 a.m.; Chris Johnson & Landon Moore Saturday, Aug. 5, 3 p.m.; Young Petty Thieves Trio Saturday, Aug. 5, 6:30 p.m.; Graham Winchester and the Ammunition Saturday, Aug. 5, 10 p.m.; Joe Restivo 4 Sunday, Aug. 6, 11 a.m.; Blackwater Trio CD Release Party Sunday, Aug. 6, 4 p.m.; Sarah Rector Trio Sunday, Aug. 6, 8 p.m.; Michael Brothers Monday, Aug. 7, 6 p.m.; Boss Trio Tuesday, Aug. 8, 5:30 p.m.; Motel Mirrors Tuesday, Aug. 8, 8 p.m.; Breeze Cayolle & New Orleans Wednesday, Aug. 9, 5:30 p.m.; FreeWorld Wednesday, Aug. 9, 8 p.m.

7729 BENJESTOWN 876-5770

Soul Shockers Sunday, Aug. 6, 8-11:30 p.m.

1927 MADISON 726-4372

Lafayette’s Music Room

Shelby Forest General Store

2130 W. POPLAR 854-4455

The nominations are in.

1911 POPLAR 244-7904

Holy Gallows album release Friday, Aug. 4, 8 p.m.; Diarrhea Planet, Admiral Longtooth, and Volk Saturday, Aug. 5, 8 p.m.; Tea Dance Sunday, Aug. 6, 1 p.m.; Wing Night! Monday, Aug. 7, Crockett Hall Tuesdays with the Midtown Rhythm Section Tuesdays, 9 p.m.; Omni, Red Mouth Wednesday, Aug. 9, 10 p.m.

The Wild Bill’s Band Fridays, Saturdays, 11 p.m.-3 a.m.

day, Aug. 6, 5:30 p.m.; Charlie & Juno All Star Experience Wednesday, Aug. 9, 8 p.m.

Germantown

vote on your favorite local business starting August 9-25 on memphisflyer.com

Mulan Asian Bistro 2149 YOUNG AVE 347-3965

Chris Gales Sunday Brunch First Sunday of every month, noon-3 p.m.

Murphy’s 1589 MADISON 726-4193

Die Fabulous Saturday, Aug. 5; Hardcore Sex Sunday, Aug. 6.

P&H Cafe 1532 MADISON 726-0906

Rock Starkaraoke Fridays; V-8 Death Car, Drake Talbot Saturday, Aug. 5; Open Mic Music with Tiffany Harmon Mondays, 9 p.m.-midnight.

The Phoenix 1015 S. COOPER 338-5223

The Phoenix Blues Jam Tuesdays, 8-11 p.m.

4, 10 p.m.; Summerween Saturday, Aug. 5, 10 p.m.; Bluegrass Brunch with the River Bluff Clan Sundays, 11 a.m.

Memphis Nites Club

Triple S

Mortimer’s

1747 WALKER 421-6239

590 N. PERKINS 761-9321

Fun-Filled Fridays First Friday of every month, 8 p.m.-midnight.

East Memphis Brookhaven Pub & Grill 695 BROOKHAVEN CIRCLE 680-8118

Dantones Friday, Aug. 4, 9 p.m.-1 a.m.

Folk’s Folly Prime Steak House 551 S. MENDENHALL 762-8200

Intimate Piano Lounge featuring Charlotte Hurt MondaysThursdays, 5-9:30 p.m.; Larry

3297 KIRBY 797-8599

Chick Rogers Sundays, 5 p.m.-3 a.m.

Van Duren Solo Thursdays, 6:30-8:30 p.m.

Various Locations SEE WEBSITE FOR MORE INFORMATION

Jus’ Blues Music Award Week: Juke Joint Part Jam & Fish Fry Wed.-Sat., Aug. 2-5.

Owen Brennan’s THE REGALIA, 6150 POPLAR 761-0990

Lannie McMillan Jazz Trio Sundays, 10 a.m.-2 p.m.

Summer/Berclair Cheffie’s Cafe 483 HIGH POINT TERRACE 202-4157

Songwriter Night hosted by Leigh Ann Wilmot and Dave “The Rave” Saturdays, 5-8 p.m.

6069 PARK 767-6002

Eddie Harris Thursdays, Fridays, 6:30-9:30 p.m.; Van Duren Solo New Time! Tuesdays, 6-8 p.m.; Van Duren Solo Tuesdays,

7901 POPLAR PIKE

Davy Ray Bennett Thursday, Aug. 3, 5-7:30 p.m.

Huey’s Germantown 7677 FARMINGTON 318-3034

The Natchez Brothers Sunday, Aug. 6, 8-11:30 p.m.

North Mississippi/ Tunica Huey’s Southaven 7090 MALCO, SOUTHAVEN, MS 662-349-7097

Terry and the Wallbangers Sunday, Aug. 6, 8:30 p.m.-midnight; Karaoke Night Mondays, 9-11 p.m.

Raleigh

Poplar/I-240 East Tapas and Drinks

Bobby Lanier Farm Park

Stage Stop

Bartlett Hadley’s Pub 2779 WHITTEN 266-5006

The Souled Out Band Friday, Aug. 4, 9 p.m.; Full Circle Sun-

2951 CELA 382-1576

Blues Jam hosted by Brad Webb Thursdays, 7-11 p.m.; Open Mic Night and Steak Night Tuesdays, 6 p.m.-midnight.

m e m p h i s f l y e r. c o m

Celtic Crossing 903 S. COOPER 274-5151

Susto Wednesday, Aug. 9, 7:30-9 p.m.

7-9 p.m.

ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT

Karaoke Thursdays, 9:30 p.m.; Kyle Pruzina Live Mondays, 10 p.m.-midnight.

Cunningham Fridays, Saturdays, 6-10 p.m.

21


DINOSAURS CALENDAR of EVENTS: AT THE August 3 - 9

PINK PALACE

MAY 27 - SEPT. 10, 2017

Send the date, time, place, cost, info, phone number, a brief description, and photos — two weeks in advance — to calendar@memphisflyer. com or P.O. Box 1738, Memphis, TN 38101. DUE TO SPACE LIMITATIONS, ONGOING WEEKLY EVENTS WILL APPEAR IN THE FLYER’S ONLINE CALENDAR ONLY. through 19th centuries influenced by Spanish Colonial Caribbean. www.dixon.org. Through Sept. 24. “Made in Dixon,” exhibition showcasing the colorful and joy-filled artwork created by artists of all ages in the Dixon’s educational programs. www.dixon.org. Ongoing.

TH EAT E R

Germantown Community Theatre

The Sound of Music, www. gctcomeplay.org. $9-$13. Sun., 2:30 p.m., and Thurs.-Sat., 7 p.m. Through Aug. 6. 3037 FOREST HILL-IRENE (453-7447).

4339 PARK (761-5250).

TheatreWorks

Eclectic Eye

Willie & Esther, two middle-aged lovers fantasize about robbing a bank in Los Angeles. This hilarious and emotional daydream triggers unexpected examination into the nature of commitment. www. theatreworksmemphis.org. $20. Sundays, 3 p.m., and Fridays, Saturdays, 8 p.m. Through Aug. 13. Weightless: The Musical, Act II, circus meets theater in this wickedly wild, loosely scripted show, featuring sky-high aerial acrobatics and comedy, hosted by Katrina Coleman. www.theatreworksmemphis.org. $10. Fri.-Sat., Aug. 4-5, 11:45 p.m.

“Seeing Things My Way,” exhibition of photographs transposed onto metal and canvas by Bob Pierce. www.eclectic-eye.com. Through Sept. 20. 242 S. COOPER (276-3937).

FireHouse Community Arts Center

Mosal Morszart, exhibition of works by Black Arts Alliance artist. www.memphisblackartsalliance.org. Ongoing. 985 S. BELLEVUE (948-9522).

Fratelli’s

“Memphis Series,” exhibition of pen-and-ink works by David Tankersley. www.memphisbotanicgarden.com. Through Aug. 28.

2085 MONROE (274-7139).

A R TI ST R E C E PT I O N S

750 CHERRY (766-9900).

Jay Etkin Gallery

David Lusk Gallery

Opening reception for “The Price Is Right,” exhibition of work by 20 artists priced at $1,000 or less. www.davidluskgallery.com. Fri., Aug. 4, 6-8 p.m. 97 TILLMAN (767-3800).

Jay Etkin Gallery

Opening reception for “New Paintings by Juan Rojo.” www. jayetkingallery.com. Fri., Aug. 4, 6-9 p.m. 942 COOPER (550-0064).

L Ross Gallery

Sponsored by:

3050 Central Ave / Memphis 38111

August 3-9, 2017

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Opening reception for “Elvis Has Left the Building,” exhibition in celebration of all things Elvis, featuring work by contemporary Southern artists and music by Memphis’ DJ Leroy. Tribute artists welcome. www.lrossgallery.com. Fri., Aug. 4, 6-9 p.m. 5040 SANDERLIN (767-2200).

Memphis Botanic Garden

Opening reception for “Gardens: Indoor/Outdoor,” exhibition of garden-themed works by Libby Anderson. www.memphisbotanicgarden.com. Sun., Aug. 6, 3-5 p.m.

New Paintings by Juan Rojo, www. jayetkinsgallery.com. Aug. 4-30. 942 COOPER (550-0064).

“New Paintings by Juan Rojo” at Jay Etkin Gallery, Friday, August 4th, 6 p.m. Call to Artists for MCA Holiday Bazaar & Fundraiser

Open call — any local artist may submit, no cost to apply. See website for more information and submission form. Through Oct. 2. WWW.MCA.EDU.

Casting Demonstration Saturdays, Sundays, 3 p.m.

METAL MUSEUM, 374 METAL MUSEUM DR. (774-6380), WWW.METALMUSEUM.ORG.

Cooper-Young Art Tours

For more information, featured artists, and pop-up performances, visit website. First Friday of every month, 6-9 p.m.

750 CHERRY (636-4100).

COOPER-YOUNG DISTRICT, CORNER OF COOPER AND YOUNG, WWW.COOPERYOUNG.COM.

WKNO Studio

Crosstown Arts Digital Lab

Artists reception for MGAL MemShowcase and Sale, exhibition life! ber by local artists who are members of the Memphis Germantown Art League. www.wkno.org. Sun., Aug. 6, 2-4 p.m. 7151 CHERRY FARMS (458-2521).

OTH E R A R T HA P P E N I N G S

An (Art)form of Worship 2: Di(e)chotomy Fri.-Sat., Aug. 4-6.

CROSSTOWN ARTS, 430 N. CLEVELAND (507-8030), WWW.CROSSTOWNARTS.ORG.

Six-station computer lab supports Memphis’ creative community by providing artists and musicians full access to industry-standard art- and music-making technology. Tuesdays-Thursdays, 10 a.m.-9 p.m., and Fridays, Saturdays, 10 a.m.-6 p.m. CROSSTOWN ARTS, 430 N. CLEVELAND (507-8030), WWW.CROSSTOWNARTS.ORG.

Open Crit

Critique event where visual artists are invited to bring new and/or in-progress studio work for critical feedback and group discussion particular to each artist’s practice. Tues., Aug. 8, 5:30-7:30 p.m. CROSSTOWN ARTS, 430 N. CLEVELAND (507-8030), WWW.CROSSTOWNARTS.ORG.

O N G O I N G ART

The Salvation Army Kroc Center

Belz Museum of Asian and Judaic Art

800 E. PARKWAY S. (729-8007).

“Chinese Symbols in Art,” ancient Chinese pottery and bronze. www. belzmuseum.org. Ongoing. 119 S. MAIN, IN THE PEMBROKE SQUARE BUILDING (523-ARTS).

Bingham and Broad

“My Kin Is Not Like Yours,” exhibition of works by Debra Edge. Ongoing. 2563 BROAD (323-3008).

The Calliope

“Transmissions,” exhibition of new abstract works by Amy Hutcheson. www.amyhutcheson.com. Through Aug. 26. 456 TENNESSEE ST.

David Lusk Gallery

“The Price Is Right,” exhibition of work by 20 artists priced at $1,000 or less. www.davidluskgallery.com. Through Aug. 24. 97 TILLMAN (767-3800).

The Dixon Gallery & Gardens

“Fidencio Fifield-Perez and Vanessa González: Location, Location, Location,” exhibition of work utilizing maps to open up discussions on migration with ceramic and installation work processing the challenges of immigration. www. dixon.org. Through Sept. 24. “Edward Giobbi: An Artist Comes to Memphis,” exhibition of works influenced by Italian Renaissance masterpieces by one of the founding trustees of the Hugo Dixon Foundation (which formed the Dixon Gallery and Gardens). www.dixon.org. Through Sept. 24. “Power and Piety: Spanish Colonial Art,” exhibition of paintings, sculptures, religious objects, and decorative art from the 17th

Photos by Carla McDonald and Karen Golightly, Aug. 3-31.

L Ross Gallery

“Elvis Has Left the Building,” exhibition in celebration of all things Elvis, featuring work by contemporary Southern artists. www.lrossgallery.com. Through Aug. 31. 5040 SANDERLIN (767-2200).

Marshall Arts Gallery

“Love of Art” and “Memphis,” exhibition of work by Nikki Gardner and Debra Edge by appointment only. (647-9242). Ongoing. 639 MARSHALL (679-6837).

Memphis Botanic Garden

“Gardens: Indoor/Outdoor,” exhibition of garden-themed works by Libby Anderson. www.memphisbotanicgarden.com. Through Aug. 31. 750 CHERRY (636-4100).

Memphis Brooks Museum of Art

“By the Book: A Tribute to Dolph Smith,” exhibit focusing on Dolph Smith’s artist notebooks, featuring six on display. Also includes the work of 11 artists who have worked with Smith. Through Nov. 26. Rotunda Projects: Nnenna Okore, exhibition of works with burlap to fashion abstract objects inspired by textures, colors, and landscapes. www.brooksmuseum.org. Through Sept. 10. “Unwrapped! 100 Gifts for 100 Years,” exhibition of more than 100 works of art gifted to the museum ranging from ancient coins to contemporary glass and paintings to

continued on page 24


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FEDEXFORUM SATURDAY, AUGUST 5

TICKETS AVAILABLE AT TICKETMASTER.COM OR BY CALLING 1-800-745-3000.

TICKETS ON SALE NOW

AT TICKETMASTER.COM • VENUE BOX OFFICE CHARGE BY PHONE 800-745-3000

ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT

SEPTEMBER 23

m e m p h i s f l y e r. c o m

RUNAWAY JUNE

Must be 21 years or older to gamble or attend events. Know When To Stop Before You Start.® Gambling Problem? Call 1-800-522-4700. ©2017, Caesars License Company, LLC. All rights reserved.

23

6205_STA_4.575x12.4_4c_Ad_V1.indd 1

7/6/17 2:47 PM


CALENDAR: AUGUST 3 - 9 continued from page 22

PO ET RY /S PO K E N WO R D

quilts. www.brooksmuseum.org. Through Aug. 27. “About Face,” exhibition located in the Education Gallery highlighting the different ways artists interpret the connection between emotion and expression. www.brooksmuseum.org. Ongoing. “Drawing Memory: Essence of Memphis,” exhibition of works inspired by nsibidi, a sacred means of communication among male secret societies in southeastern Nigeria by Victor Ekpuk. www. brooksmuseum.org. Ongoing.

Found Studio

“Psychic Privates,” gorgeously profane lyrical meanderings performed over psychedelic sonic architecture. A sui-Southern freak show poetry reading by Kim Vodicka. 18 and up. (607-1328), www. foundmemphis.com. Free. Fri., Aug. 4, 5-8 p.m. 2491 BROAD (652-0848).

LECT U R E /S P EA K E R

“Native Bees: Their Biology, Diversity, and Role as Pollinators of Native Plants”

1934 POPLAR (544-6209).

Metal Museum

“Metal in Motion,” exhibition and group show of work involving moving parts including hand operated or run on a motor. www.metalmuseum.org. Through Aug. 27. “With Love, From Brent,” exhibition of nearly 200 pieces of jewelry created over the course of his life as gifts for his wife, mother, daughter, and sisterin-law alongside cards and letters drawn and written by L. Brent Kington. www.metalmuseum. org. Through Oct. 15.

Heather Holm, horticulturist and biologist and author, speaks on topic and signs books benefiting environmental education programming. $4. Mon., Aug. 7, 6:30 p.m. MEMPHIS BOTANIC GARDEN, 750 CHERRY (636-4100), WWW.WOLFRIVER.ORG.

TO U R S

Ghost Hunt: CSI Investigation

374 METAL MUSEUM DR. (774-6380).

Playhouse on the Square

“Floating Light,” exhibition of photographs exploring the weight of light and darkness over a span of undocumented time by local photographers Katherine Dean and Joseph Moseley. mca. edu. Aug. 5-Sept. 10.

Memphis Germantown Art League Member Showcase and Sale, WKNO Studio, Sunday, August 6th, 2-4 p.m.

66 S. COOPER (726-4656).

Slavehaven Underground Railroad Museum

“Images of Africa Before & After the Middle Passage,” exhibition of photography by Jeff and Shaakira Edison. Ongoing. 826 N. SECOND (527-3427).

Talbot Heirs

Debra Edge Art. Ongoing. 99 S. SECOND (527-9772).

Village Frame & Art

Gallery Artists, exhibition of work by Charlie Ivey, Virginia Schoenster, Lou Ann Dattilo, and Matthew Hasty. Ongoing.

August 3-9, 2017

Bring It! Live

The stars of Lifetime’s hit series, Miss D and her Dancing Dolls, return to the live stage. $32-$100. Fri., Aug. 4, 8 p.m. THE ORPHEUM, 203 S. MAIN (525-3000), WWW.ORPHEUM-MEMPHIS.COM.

Open to any anyone regardless of experience. See website for class schedule. Mon.-Thur., Aug. 7-10.

WKNO Studio

BALLET MEMPHIS, 7950 TRINITY, WWW.BALLETMEMPHIS.ORG.

2017 MGAL Member Showcase and Sale, exhibition by members of the Memphis Germantown Art League. www.wkno.org. Aug. 3-29.

THE BROOM CLOSET, 546 S. MAIN (497-9486), WWW.HISTORICALHAUNTSMEMPHIS.COM.

Memphis Triple Nickel Fri.-Sun., Aug. 4-6, 8 a.m.

MEMPHIS INTERNATIONAL RACEWAY, 5500 VICTORY LANE, WWW.RACEMIR.COM.

Free Week at Ballet Memphis

540 S. MENDENHALL (767-8882).

7151 CHERRY FARMS (458-2521).

24

DA N C E

Begin on a haunted corner of the South Main Historical District. Continue in the dark basement of a murder scene. $20. Sat., Aug. 5, 7:30-9:30 p.m.

continued on page 27


NOW OPEN! Elvis Week 2017 will welcome fans from around the world to Graceland and Memphis for a week of concerts, panel discussions and more, all celebrating the life and legacy of Elvis. Join us at the new Elvis Presley’s Memphis entertainment complex and The Guest House at Graceland for more than 30 events, all celebrating the King of Rock ‘n’ Roll. Some highlights include: FRIDAY, AUGUST 11 Elvis Week Dance Party 8:00 p.m., Graceland Soundstage at Elvis Presley’s Memphis SATURDAY, AUGUST 12 The Gospel Music of Elvis Presley Celebration Concert 8:00 p.m., Graceland Soundstage at Elvis Presley’s Memphis SUNDAY, AUGUST 13 Elvis 101 10:00 a.m., Graceland Soundstage at Elvis Presley’s Memphis

A Salute to Sun Records with John Paul Keith 8:00 p.m., Graceland Soundstage at Elvis Presley’s Memphis MONDAY, AUGUST 14 Official Graceland Insiders Conference 9:00 a.m. – 2:30 p.m., Graceland Soundstage at Elvis Presley’s Memphis A Band of Legends Remembers Elvis 8:00 p.m., Graceland Soundstage at Elvis Presley’s Memphis

TUESDAY, AUGUST 15

THURSDAY, AUGUST 17

Songwriters Showcase 3:00 p.m., Graceland Soundstage at Elvis Presley’s Memphis

Conversations on Elvis: Elvis in the Movies 10:00 a.m., Graceland Soundstage at Elvis Presley’s Memphis

Candlelight Vigil 8:30 p.m., Gates of Graceland WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 16 Conversations on Elvis: In the Studio 10:00 a.m., Graceland Soundstage at Elvis Presley’s Memphis Elvis: Live in Concert 8:00 p.m., FedExForum

FRIDAY, AUGUST 18 Hollywood Night at The Guest House 6:00 p.m., The Guest House at Graceland

Purchase tickets and learn about all the events at ElvisWeek.com

ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT

m e m p h i s f l y e r. c o m

E LV I S W E E K 2 0 1 7 | A U G U S T 1 1 - 1 9 , 2 0 1 7 | G R A C E L A N D ® | E LV I S W E E K . C O M

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Summer to $20 dog and cat adoptions AUGUST 1 – 31

August 3-9, 2017

ALL AVAILABLE PETS

26

COCO PUFF Former swimsuit model

2350 APPLING CITY COVE, MEMPHIS, TN 38133 MEMPHISANIMALSERVICES.COM | 901-636-1416


CALENDAR: AUGUST 3 - 9 continued from page 24

S P EC IA L EVE NTS

E X P OS/ SALES

First Friday: Yellow Jack!

The dimly lit mansion will be staged as the 1878 Yellow Fever Epidemic. Fever-cooling refreshments served. $15. Fri., Aug. 4, 5-8 p.m.

2017 Memphis Pet Expo

Sat., Aug. 5, 10 a.m.-5 p.m., and Sun., Aug. 6, 11 a.m.-4 p.m.

WOODRUFF-FONTAINE HOUSE, 680 ADAMS (526-1469), WWW.WOODRUFF-FONTAINE.ORG.

AGRICENTER INTERNATIONAL, 7777 WALNUT GROVE (757-7777), WWW.MEMPHISPETEXPO.COM.

“Harry Potter’s World: Renaissance Science, Magic, and Medicine”

Aldi Job Fair Thurs., Aug. 3.

Traveling exhibit created by the National Library of Medicine. Through Aug. 12.

AGRICENTER INTERNATIONAL, 7777 WALNUT GROVE (757-7777), WWW.CAREERS.ALDI.US.

LUCIUS E. & ELSIE C. BURCH JR. LIBRARY, 501 POPLAR VIEW, COLLIERVILLE (457-2600), WWW.COLLIERVILLELIBRARY.ORG.

Choose901 Back to School Pop-Up Shop

Go back to school with fresh Memphis-themed designs in brand-new backpacks, hats, ringer tees, supply pouches, and more. Teachers get 10 percent off with school ID. $5-$40. Fri., Aug. 4, 3-7 p.m., and Sat., Aug. 5, 11 a.m.-3 p.m.

“Elvis Has Left the Building” at L Ross Gallery, Friday, August 4th

CROSSTOWN CONCOURSE (FORMERLY SEARS CROSSTOWN), N. CLEVELAND AT NORTH PARKWAY, CHOOSE901. COM/POPUP-SHOP/.

continued on page 29

Saturday, August 19

F ES T IVALS

Continuum Music Festival

Collaborations among musicians and artists of diverse genres from Memphis and beyond, bringing to life unique performance experiences. $25, $60 weekend pass. Thur.-Sat., Aug. 3-5.

Great Hall • 8PM

CROSSTOWN ARTS, 430 N. CLEVELAND (507-8030), WWW.CROSSTOWNARTS.ORG.

Scavenger Hunt on Broad

Grab a clue card at any participating shop. Complete the card and turn it back in for a chance to win prizes from the shops of Broad Avenue. Kebab Food Truck will also be on the street. Free. Fri., Aug. 4, 5-8 p.m.

Tickets start at $40 Available at the Fitz Gift Shop or call Ticketmaster at 800-745-3000 or visit Ticketmaster.com

BROAD AVENUE ART DISTRICT, BROAD AVENUE (249-2834), WWW.BROADAVEARTS.COM.

S P O R TS / F IT N ES S

$219 Hotel Package

Memphis Redbirds Home Games

For more information, visit website. Through Aug. 10.

Includes a deluxe room and two reserved tickets. Call 1-662-363LUCK (5825) AND MENTION CODE: CPMG19

AUTOZONE PARK, THIRD AND UNION (721-6000), WWW. MEMPHISREDBIRDS.COM.

Triathlon Swim and Transition Clinic

Coached by Danny Fadgen and Margarett Frisby. Swim Clinics will cover open-water strategies, training structure in the pool, physics of freestyle, and more. For more information and registration, visit website. Sun., Aug. 6, 9 a.m.

CASINO PROMOTIONS

MEMPHIS JEWISH COMMUNITY CENTER, 6560 POPLAR (761-0810), WWW.PR-EVENTMANAGEMENT.NET.

M E E TI N G S

BENJAMIN L. HOOKS CENTRAL LIBRARY, 3030 POPLAR (415-2700), WWW.NAMI-MEMPHIS.COM.

Meristem Women’s Book Club

Read and explore written works by women and LGBT authors. Second Wednesday of every month, 7 p.m.

P L AY

&

E A R N

HANDBAG EVENT

OUTMEMPHIS: THE LGBTQ CENTER OF THE MID-SOUTH, 892 S. COOPER (278-6422), WWW.MGLCC.ORG.

S U N D AYS I N A U G U ST

KIDS

H O T E L L O B B Y, 2 P M - 6 P M

Firefly Glow Party

Featuring the Illumination Station, firefly friend craft, Glow Lab, performances by Bridging Souls, and an LED hoop-show. Reservations required. $12 members, $15 nonmembers. Fri., Aug. 4, 7-9 p.m.

THURSDAYS, AUGUST 3, 17 & 31 • 3PM

Earn only 50 points or earn 100 points and play twice!

Earn 200 points and choose from Kenneth Cole or US POLO. If Versace is more your style, earn 400 points.

MEMPHIS BOTANIC GARDEN, 750 CHERRY (636-4100), WWW.MEMPHISBOTANICGARDEN.COM.

Jurassic Journeys on Land, Sea, and Air

Featuring animated dinosaurs and other animals from Kokoro. Featuring some new and old friends. Through Sept. 10. MEMPHIS PINK PALACE MUSEUM, 3050 CENTRAL (636-2362), WWW.MEMPHISMUSEUMS.ORG.

FitzgeraldsTunica.com • 1-662-363-LUCK (5825) • Must be 21 and a Key Rewards member. See Cashier•Players Club for rules. Tax and resort fee not included in listed price. Advance hotel reservations required and subject to availability. $50 credit or debit card is required upon hotel check-in. Arrivals after 6pm must be guaranteed with a credit card. Management reserves the right to cancel, change and modify the event or promotion. Gaming restricted patrons prohibited. Gambling Problem? Call 1-800-522-4700.

ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT

Join us for a discussion of ways to improve Mental Health Services in Memphis. Hosted by NAMI in room C. Thurs., Aug. 3, 6-8 p.m.

m e m p h i s f l y e r. c o m

Mental Health Town Hall Meeting

27


You know you need a check up.

rock for

rock fo

Insured or not, we’ve got you covered. We accept most insurance plans and, if you’re uninsured, we offer deep discounts for preventative and problem visits. So don’t let questions about coverage keep you from the BENEFITING CHU care you need.

August 18 &19 HiTone • Crosstown Concourse B

E

N E F for I T I rock

N

To learn more, visit —

outreach.ppgmr.org

G

Jus’ Blues Music Foundation

rock fo

Jus’ Blues Music Awards Week

Presents

THE BIGGEST, THE BADDEST, THE BLUESIEST STAR STUDDED EVENT OF THE SUMMER BENEFITING CH 2017 JUS’ BLUES MUSIC AWARDS

NIGHT OF THE LIVING LEGENDS

BENEFITING CHURCH HEALTH

BLUESVILLE - HORSESHOE CASINO HOTEL - AUGUST 3, 2017

TUNICA, MISSISSIPPI HOSTED BY

BEV JOHNSON & WILLIE CLAYTON

4 DAYS IF NOTHING BUT THE BLUES • OVER 20 PERFORMANCES August 3-9, 2017

FRI AUG 4

r o c k

for

FRI AUG 4 SAT AUG 5

BLUES GOT A SOUL HISTORIC CONFERENCE HISTORICAL PHOTO PRESENTATION BY: LEGENDARY PHOTOGRAPHER JIM ALEXANDER

rock fo

JUKE JOINT FRIDAY NIGHT FISH PARTY AT THE JUS’ BLUES JUKE JOINT CAFE A BLUES JUKE JOINT PARTY DOWN IN THE “DELTA BABY”

TUNICA, MISSISSIPPI

JUS’ BLUES WHITE LINEN PARTY

NEWLY RENOVATED LEGENDARY PARADISE ENTERTAINMENT CENTER Starring Millie Jackson w/ special guest The Temprees & Chick Rodgers

rockforlove.org PRESENTED BY

BENEFITING CHURCH HEALTH

28

BENEFITING CHU


Certified Pre-Owned*

CALENDAR

Financing as low as 1.99% plus 2 years pre-paid maintenance on select models only.

continued from page 27 Jus’ Blues Music Award Week: Juke Joint Party Jam & Fish Fry

VARIOUS LOCATIONS, SEE WEBSITE FOR MORE INFORMATION, WWW.JUSBLUES.ORG.

Meet on the roof for music and fun. $10$15. Thursdays, 6-10 p.m. Through Aug. 17. THE PEABODY HOTEL, 149 UNION (529-4000), WWW.PEABODYHOTEL.COM.

2018’s are arriving – reserve your test drive today! Ask Us About Our Vehicles Under $30,000.

SHARPE PLANETARIUM, MEMPHIS PINK PALACE MUSEUM, 3050 CENTRAL (636-2362), WWW.MEMPHISMUSEUMS. ORG.

Late, Light Brunch

Come meet and celebrate with OUTMemphis’s newest Men’s Sexual Health Specialist, Jessie Claudio. Sat., Aug. 5, 11 a.m.

The 15 Film Series

Films in the series will engage with three themes: Memphis history, art, and spatial justice. Free. Thursdays, 6 p.m. Through Sept. 30. CLAYBORN TEMPLE, 294 HERNANDO, WWW.ONLOCATIONMEMPHIS.ORG.

Aircraft Carrier Guardians of the Sea

Find yourself aboard a carrier alongside 6,000 highly skilled sea and air personnel, in the midst of a giant war simulation. Through Nov. 17. CTI 3D GIANT THEATER, IN THE MEMPHIS PINK PALACE MUSEUM, 3050 CENTRAL (636-2362), WWW.MEMPHISMUSEUMS.ORG.

$35,999

STOCK#P3218

2017 CLA 250

2016 C 300

$32,999

$37,999

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$51,999

2014 INFINITI Q50 2010 E 63 AMG

5389 POPLAR AVE.

STOCK#22693A

(East Memphis, just west of I-240)

$30,999

901-888-7220 • MERCEDESMEMPHIS.COM

STOCK#22601C

$25,999

*Disclaimer: Excludes tax, title, registration, and dealer prep. All vehicles subject to change. Financing as low as 1.99% OAC. 2 years pre-paid maintenance on select models only. See dealer for details. Offers expire 8-31-17

OUTMEMPHIS: THE LGBTQ CENTER OF THE MID-SOUTH, 892 S. COOPER (278-6422), WWW.OUTMEMPHIS.ORG.

FI LM

$31,999

$24,999

The Generous Pour

CAPITAL GRILLE, THE, 6065 POPLAR (683-9291), WWW. THECAPITALGRILLE.COM.

2015 GLK 350

STOCK#P3152

FO O D & D R I N K EVE N TS Experience seven acclaimed wines from California and Oregon paired with the restaurant’s signature menu items, $28. Through Sept. 3.

2015 C 300

Blood Donors Needed Platelll

If you are between the ages of 18 and 50 and in good health, you may be eligible to donate blood products for support of research that could lead to the development of new therapies for treatment of cancer and other diseases. Financial compensation is provided. Walk-in donations are not accepted. For more information or to make an appointment contact: 901-252-3434 info@keybiologics.com www.keybiologics.com

Back to the Future

Bring blankets or lawn chairs, grab a spot on the Great Lawn, and enjoy a movie on the big screen. There will be food trucks as well as popcorn for purchase. No outside alcohol. Free for members, $10 nonmembers. Sat., Aug. 5, 8 p.m. SHELBY FARMS, 500 N. PINE LAKE (767-PARK), WWW. SHELBYFARMSPARK.ORG.

Memphis Film Prize

Three days of film competition at Studio on the Square in Midtown, Q&A, Prize Party, and Awards Brunch. See website for more information and schedule of events. Aug. 4-6.

LESSONS

WWW.MEMPHISFILMPRIZE.COM.

FOR ALL AGES

Time Warp Drive-In

Movies start at dusk. See website for theme and movie line-up. Wed., Aug. 9. MALCO SUMMER 4 DRIVE-IN, 5310 SUMMER ((901)6812020), WWW.MALCO.COM.

A Wider Angle Film Series: 1944

Official Oscars submission and mega-hit in its home country of Estonia, tells the war story of Eastern Front’s bloodiest battle. In Estonian, Russian, and German with English subtitles. Free. Wed., Aug. 9, 6 p.m. BENJAMIN L. HOOKS CENTRAL LIBRARY, 3030 POPLAR (415-2726).

NEW+ USED

GUITARS

GEAR REPAIR LESSONS

Big selection! Everyday low pricing! Free layaway! We take trade ins! special financing available

5832 STAGE RD. • 901-371-0928 • REVOLVEGUITARS.COM LOCATED IN HISTORIC BARTLETT STATION AT THE RAILROAD TRACKS facebook.com/pages/REvolve-Guitar-Music-Shop

m e m p h i s f l y e r. c o m

Hosted by Memphis Post Office with Postmaster Reginald Capers. Wed., Aug. 9, 9 a.m.

$34,999

STOCK#P3173

ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT

Total Eclipse of the Sun Forever Stamp Unveiling Ceremony

$20,999

STOCK#P3244

Sunflowers

AGRICENTER INTERNATIONAL, 7777 WALNUT GROVE (7577777), WWW.AGRICENTER.ORG.

2017 GLA 250

STOCK#P3242M

Peabody Rooftop Party

Over 78,000 sunflower seeds were planted for the community to enjoy. Sunflowers are located along Walnut Grove Road and Germantown Parkway. Through Aug. 4.

2012 C 250 STOCK#P3241

Featuring awards, formal dinner, conference, booksigning, fish fry, White Linen Party, and more. All events held at Horseshoe and Roadhouse casinos in Tunica. White Linen Party held in Memphis. $15-$200. Wed.-Sat., Aug. 2-5.

29


BAR REPORT By Meghan Stuthard

OZ

A return to Old Zinnie’s.

R LIVE MUSIC EVERY WEDNESDAY AND FRIDAY 855 Kentucky St

August 3-9, 2017

No ve m

11AM-3AM

ber 11 • 10AM - 4

PM

Mark your calendars NOW for a fun and free

curated exhibition and sale of handmade crafts

from area makers and artisans.

Saturday November 11th

30

901.207.5111

10am- 4pm i n th e

Crosstown area .

accepting vendor applications now through august 15th, 2017.

memphiscraftsanddrafts.com

Ginger serves up drinks and memories at Old Zinnie’s.

JUSTIN FOX BURKS

FOOD / DRINKS / PATIO

ight at the corner of Belvedere and Madison sits one of Midtown’s oldest bars, Old Zinnie’s. It opened its doors in 1973 and, thankfully, probably hasn’t changed much since. We’ve all been to OZ at 1688 Madison, whether we needed a good happy hour while we waited on our laundry at the laundromat across the street or because our car got towed from that same parking lot and we couldn’t leave. Maybe we went because it was cheap or because there’s never live music and all you want to do is hang out and chat. Maybe you, like me, ended up there because the crowd was too much at the Lamplighter, and it was quicker to run over to OZ and grab a beer. Maybe we were both there at some point for the PBR on draft and 50-cent wing night on Mondays. I have gone for all these reasons and more to that dependable little corner bar with the big windows and the chalkboard that still advertises Washington Apple shots. But I haven’t gone to Old Zinnie’s in a while. I haven’t gone to that dependable little corner bar with the big windows in two years because I was not yet brave enough to return. You, like me, probably have a place where you find your peace. Maybe you find your solace in a church, or maybe you feel most serene in a vegetable garden. But maybe you, like me, find your peace in the comfort of a sturdy old bar, a dependable jukebox, and a smattering of post-workday curmudgeons. Your peace, like mine, isn’t necessarily at the bottom of a bottle, where it’s easy to forget, but found in what a bar can represent: a place to remember. So, one week after saying goodbye to a friend and two years after saying goodbye to another, I went to Old Zinnie’s to say hello to ghosts. The great thing about great bars is that they never change. OZ still sports the stained-glass window of an ice cream sundae and the assortment of “There, I fixed it” oddities like the shot glass holding up the TV. Although Old Zinnie’s serves food, there’s always the trusty popcorn machine at the end of the bar for those looking for a snack. Ginger was working the evening that I went. You know Ginger, too, because she’s been there a while. She’s happy to pour you a drink and to discuss the menu. The bar itself is open from 2 p.m. to 3 a.m., but food is only served from 6 to 11 p.m. The regulars claim that the OZ burger is among the city’s most underrated. I also took note of the bolo-

gna sandwich, appropriately christened “The Zinnieloney.” The great thing about Old Zinnie’s, beyond its resistance to change over the years, is that it felt exactly the same as the last time that I was there, when I went with someone who is no longer here. Myriad people have passed through my life; some are now dead, and others are just gone. But at OZ, in that old smoky bar, I am able to remember them best. This awful summer heat seems to breed tragedy, like it’s so hot that it drives people, in some overheated frenzy, to do the unthinkable. It’s puzzling that heat can make a world feel so cold. But Zinnie’s, with its Tullamore Dew restroom signs (Dewds and Dewdettes), preserves our memories for us. Zinnie’s, with its famous Zebra Stripe shots (main ingredient: strawberry vodka), like all the dark, smoky bars, has served as a place to find peace. It was to Old Zinnie’s that I went, as I have gone to many wonderful places like it, to offer up a prayer and a wish. May we all find what we seek, whether it is a joint that still serves crinkle fries and hands out bottled beers in koozies or a bar that stands for more than that. Maybe it’s our hope that these spaces, where we find our tranquility, will get us through the summer without having to say any more goodbyes. Maybe you, like me, are tired of drinking with ghosts.


MIDTOWN 725-PIES (7437)

LUNCH SPECIAL HALF POBOY

CHOOSE A SIDE: FRIES, CHIPS, or SIDE SALAD Drink Included

$9

Upgrade the side to a cup of gumbo or etouffee for $1. 535 SOUTH HIGHLAND AVENUE • MEMPHIS, TN 38111 • 901-454-7771

THEBLUFFMEMPHIS.COM

DELIVERS DOWNTOWN 5-777-PIE (743) WWW.ALDOSPIZZAPIES.COM

$7 STEAK 59

SANDWICH

August Live Music pe

rformances and Elv

BEGINNING AUGUS is Week Events T 11TH www.hardrock.com/m em phis for more details

) | Mandible w/ Special Last Chance Elvis Tribute Artist Contest (3 Nights yne | Hard Rock & Burgo a Katrin | l O'Nea Jon | Guest Kennedy Lofton After Parties Hunter Harley Davidson Bike Night | Jeff Lewis Elvis Week ng Band Cunni on Gotcher | Chris Johnson Duo | Brand Apple "Bad" Sean | n Tori Tolliso

126 Beale St. / 901.529.0007

MEDIUM FRIES & 32 OZ. DRINK

m e m p h i s f l y e r. c o m

ck Memphis Live At Hard Ro e ic Pr ed rr H Je Jerred Price FRI AUGUST 4T ton John with El t os lm A H 5T SAT AUGUST h Band 6TH The Skitc SUN AUGUST Music Monday is ph em M 7TH MON AUGUST

COMBOS INCLUDES:

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GET ONE 2 PC DARK DINNER

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W/ PURCHASE OF ONE 2PC DARK DINNER & 2 MED DRINKS.

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Dine In & Drive Thru: 3571 Lamar Ave • 2520 Mt Moriah Drive Thru / Carry Out: 1217 S. Bellevue • 4349 Elvis Presley • 811 S Highland

ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT

Free Live Music. All Ages. Legendary Menu.

WITH GRAVY, THE ORIGINAL JACK COMES SLAW & PICKLES PIRTLE’S STEAK SANDWICH

2484 Jackson Ave • 1370 Poplar Ave • 890 Thomas

Facebook.com/Jackpirtles

Twitter.com/Jackpirtles1957

Write Us: Customer2jackpirtles@Gmail.com / Buses Welcome! We Accept All Major Credit Cards

31


RESTAURANT & BAR

tiki thursdays 8/3

DELICIOUS!

Live music from Turnstyles Hula hoop lessons from Co-Motion And (you guessed it) Tiki drinks

tuesday fam jams 8/8 Kid & grown-up friendly tunes from Tiger Lake w/ Mellow Tonin Playground, Diner, Family Feud Ping Pong

all the plays wednesdays 8/9 Beer Pong Extravaganza

SOMETHIN’ FOR ERRBODY. NOTHIN’ FOR COVER CHARGE.

Open: 10:30am - 3am • Delivery: 11am - 2:15pm / 5pm - 2:15am 346 North Main, Memphis, TN 38103 (on the trolley line) westysmemphis.com

AUGUST PRESTON SHANNON

August 3-9, 2017

August 4th & 5th August 18th & 19th

FREEWORLD August 11th & 12th August 25th and 26th Say goodbye to grocery shopping. Try grocery delivery risk free!

32

KEEPING THE BLUES ALIVE

7 DAYS A WEEK FOR 32 YEARS 182 BEALE STREET | MEMPHIS, TN | 901.528.0150 www.rumboogie.com


S P I R ITS By Andria Lisle

Tomato Sauced Exploring drink options beyond the Bloody Mary.

a tablespoon of salt, then strain the pulp through cheesecloth to make a gallon of “water.” Combine three ounces of that concoction with an ounce of vodka, stir with ice, then strain into a coupe glass. The drink was so light and refreshing that I enjoyed several throughout the week as the temperatures soared into the upper 90s. The Tomato Margarita recipe I discovered at SeriousEats.com utilizes a similar juicing method. To make a post-work margarita, I pulsed an overly-ripe Cherokee Heirloom beefsteak tomato with a cup of tequila, then strained. I skipped making the fennel salt the recipe called for, although it seemed simple enough — I just didn’t want to turn on my stove long enough to toast the fennel seeds. Instead, I used a lime wedge and kosher salt to salt the rim of my tasting glass, then poured three ounces of tomato tequila, two teaspoons of agave nectar, and fresh lime juice into a cocktail shaker and added ice. I shook it, strained it, drank it, and immediately made another

one. More savory-tasting than my go-to margarita recipe, this cocktail quickly vaulted to the top of my list. Another cocktail I really enjoyed drinking and making: The Rickey Tomato, found in the pages of Food & Wine magazine. A differently acidic take on the traditionally lime-based Gin Rickey, this drink appealed to me because there was little prep work to do before (ahem) enjoying the fruits of my labor. All I had to do was muddle three very ripe cherry tomatoes in the bottom of a mixing glass, then add one and one-half ounces gin, three quarters of an ounce of St-Germain, an ounce of Vermouth, and a pinch of sea salt. I shook the ingredients with ice, then strained into a highball glass with fresh ice. I garnished the glass with a cherry tomato and a sprig of cilantro, and drank. The cocktail tasted like summer in a glass.

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he worst time I embarrassed myself in front of a bartender wasn’t what you’d expect. I was in New Orleans. It was Ash Wednesday, and over the previous few days, I’d caught more beads than I could count at the Mardi Gras parades that passed down Magazine Street. Before driving back to Memphis, my traveling partner and I stopped into Juan’s Flying Burrito with friends for a round of tacos. I ordered a Bloody Mary to ease the pain of the multiple-day party and asked the bartender if she could make it “light on the vodka.” The stares that came my way made me feel as if I’d knocked into the DJ at a dance party, and my friend ribbed me the entire way back to Memphis. I didn’t care, though — I was too busy trying to hold my still-aching head below visibility level as he drove, the scenery on I-55 flying past the window. All that said, I still enjoy a good Bloody Mary — and I drink mine at regular strength these days. But why, I recently wondered, wasn’t I drinking other tomato-based cocktails? So I sized up the summer bounty at Memphis Farmers Market’s newest pop-up market, MFM Squared, which occurs every Wednesday evening in Court Square. I purchased sweet and tart tomato varieties of every shape and size, with tints that ranged from ruddy pink to deep purple. The choice can be overwhelming, so keep this tip in mind: yellow tomato varieties are usually the sweetest, while green varieties can be the tartest. Pink and red tomatoes are usually wellbalanced between the two flavor profiles. Ask farmers for their “ugliest” tomatoes, which may be cracked or misshapen, but still taste delicious. Then I headed to the internet, where I found dozens of cocktail recipes. First, I tried the exotic-sounding Summer in St. Leonard, a vodka-based drink that uses fresh tomato watermelon water as its base. Found on Bon Appetit’s website, the recipe was simple enough — puree four large tomatoes with approximately two pounds of watermelon and

33


FILM REVIEW By Chris McCoy

The Big Money

Ten films will compete this weekend for the $10,000 Memphis Film Prize.

T

his is the weekend with the highest stakes for the plucky independent filmmakers of Memphis — at least monetarily speaking. For the second year, the Memphis Film Prize is offering a $10,000 reward — and a chance to go on to compete for $50,000 — for the best film between five and 15 minutes long. The Film Prize program got its start five years ago in Louisiana, when film producer Greg Kallenberg founded the nonprofit and gathered sponsors for what is believed to be the richest short film prize in the world. After four successful years in Shreveport, the film prize expanded to Memphis last year. “If you were there last year, you saw all of the crowds and the madness, which we anticipate and hope for this year,” says David Merrill, who coordinates the Memphis program. Last year’s winner was McGhee Monteith, an actorturned-director with the intense family drama “He Could Have Gone Pro.” “She got $10,000 from the Memphis Film Prize, and then she went down to Shreveport,” says Merrill. “She didn’t get the grand prize, but she did get a special reward — a $3,000 stipend to make another film.

So, at least in theory, she has $13,000 in Film Prize money to work on something new.” Out of the more than 40 entries in this year’s competition, 10 were chosen to screen at the competition, which will run on Friday and Saturday at Malco Studio on the Square. “There’s a bumper crop of new talent. There are some experienced filmmakers this year, as well as some first-timers,” says Merrill. Among the newcomers to the Film Prize Top 10 this year is Matteo Servente’s “We Go On.” Servente, who immigrated to Memphis from Torino, Italy, is an experienced filmmaker who co-directed the 2012 feature The Romance of Loneliness. “We Go On” was written by Burke’s Book Store owner and noted Memphis novelist Corey Mesler and shot by cinematographer Ryan Earl Parker. It stars Bill Baker and Curtis Jackson as two men in a hospice whose lives are enriched by a charismatic nurse, played by Emma Crystal. Nathan Ross Murphy both directs and stars in “Muddy Water” as a boxer preparing for a shot at the big time. His co-star is last year’s film prize winner McGhee Monteith, as well as musician Caleb Sweazy, Kaitlin Elizabeth Mur-

Robb Rokk’s “The Game” is one of 10 films on display at the Memphis Film Prize. phy, Jacob Wingfield, and Billie Worley. The film is ably lensed by Andrew Trent Fleming. Rosalyn Ross stars in the title role of “Grace,” directed by Kevin Brooks. Grace is a woman whose dreams of singing stardom spiraled into prostitution until one day she happens upon a karaoke competition and gives it her all for a shot at redemption. Ross, a former Fisk Jubilee Singer, and Brooks, a Sundance fellow, make a potent team in this emotionally raw film. Ross also makes an appearance in “Sarah?,” a comedy by actor, director, and former member of Pezz, Christian Walker. Billie Worley is meeting his Tinder date Sarah at the Hi-Tone — only to find that “Sarah” is actually Memphis actor/director Drew Smith. Marcus Santi, who made an appearance at last year’s Film Prize with a heavy drama, this year teams up with

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FILM REVIEW By Chris McCoy of filmmakers and critics from outside the Memphis area and a popular vote from the audience. The winner will go on to compete in October at the Louisiana Film Prize in Shreveport. “Part of the mission of film prize is to incentivize filmmakers, and to give a push toward the economic development of the filmmaking community,” says Merrill. “I can tell you from my own experience that the filmmakers hired editors, they hired DPs, they rented cameras and equipment. They hired wardrobe, hair and makeup people, not to mention actors and onscreen talent. We’re seeding the ground.”

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Jason Van Sickel and Daniel Martine for the comedy “You Don’t Know Jack Squat,” in which he stars as a gonzo strength coach pushing a program of “Optimization, maximization, glutemazation” on his weary gym rats. Another entry in this year’s varied program is “The Game,” a drama from Desoto Arts Institute founder Robb Rokk. Penned by Kyle Needham, it stars Mikayla House and Christiana Smith as a young couple with dark secrets. Memphis fight choreographer Jyo Carolino makes his directorial debut with “Gauntlet Run: Breach,” a frenetic actioner that will be part of a new web series. Syderek Watson stars in Will Robbins’ “Driven” as a husband whose pathological jealousy drives him to the brink of madness. The winner of the $10,000 prize will be determined by the combination of a jury

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TH E LAST WO R D by Juan Williams

The Trump Effect President Trump, with his low approval ratings, chaotic White House, and health-care failure, might as well be on the ballot in three elections before the end of the year. In Alabama, Republicans running to fill the Senate seat vacated by Attorney General Jeff Sessions are staging a red-state referendum on Trump, who won the state by almost 30 points last November. But the president is dividing his Alabama supporters with steady attacks on one of the state’s favorite sons: Sessions. Trump is also at the center of two gubernatorial races — in Virginia and New Jersey. Trump lost both states in the presidential election. Democrats now delight in stirring up their base by putting Trump’s face on every Republican opponent. The question in Alabama, however, is which candidate for the GOP nomination is the most pro-Trump. Luther Strange, the Republican appointed to hold the seat until the December general election, is running as a GOP primary candidate who “strongly supported our president from Day 1.” He is attacking one opponent, Mo Brooks, for saying during the presidential campaign that Trump voters would come to “regret” backing the billionaire. Brooks supported Senator Ted Cruz and blasted Trump as a “serial adulterer.” A poll made public last week found Strange leading the race with 33 percent of the vote; another proTrump candidate, former judge Roy Moore, with 26 percent; and Brooks in last place with 16 percent. Brooks has offered to drop out of the race if Sessions wants to resign his post and run for his old seat again. The primary will be held August 15th, with a possible runoff in September. In the Virginia and New Jersey gubernatorial races, the polarizing dynamic around Trump is different: Democrats are stigmatizing their GOP opponents as Trump acolytes. Virginia’s Lieutenant Governor Ralph Northam, the Democrats’ nominee, is running an advertisement calling Trump a “narcissistic maniac.” “I stand by what I said,” Northam said at a debate held earlier this month. “I believe our president is a dangerous man. I think he lacks empathy. And he also has difficulty telling the truth, and it happens again and again.” The Republican candidate, former RNC chairman Ed Gillespie, who is roughly tied with Northam at 44 percent support in the polls, countered that the Democrat’s attack would make it more difficult to work with Trump on behalf of Virginia. Gillespie has already been torched by Trump politics. Despite a big money advantage, he came within 1.2 percentage points of losing the GOP primary to Corey Stewart, a diehard Trump supporter who accused Gillespie of not being loyal to the president. Now Gillespie needs to make sure Stewart’s Trump-loving voters turn out for him in November. But he also has to appeal to moderates and independents in a state Hillary Clinton won by five points. Trump is also a major factor in New Jersey’s gubernatorial race, where Clinton won by 14 points. The difficulties Republicans face there are ratcheted up due to incumbent Governor Chris Christie’s rapid fall in the polls. Christie was also a strong, public voice for Trump. Those factors are hurting GOP nominee Kim Guadagno. A July Monmouth University poll found Democrat Phil Murphy leading Guadagno, 53 percent to 26 percent, with 14 percent undecided. Guadagno has tried to distance herself from Trump. After the infamous tape where he was heard bragging about being able to grab women by their genitals, Guadagno declared she would not vote for Trump. “No apology can excuse away Mr. Trump’s reprehensible comments degrading women,” Guadagno wrote on Twitter. “We’re raising my 3 boys to be better than that.” Democrat Murphy has turned his campaign into part of the “Resist” Trump movement. He promises that when he is governor, New Jersey will be “a state where we draw a line against Donald Trump.” Murphy, President Obama’s ambassador to Germany, has suggested there are parallels between Trump’s rise and the rise of Adolf Hitler in 1920s Germany. “I’m a modest student of German history,” Murphy told voters at a town hall earlier this year. “And I know what was being said about somebody else in the 1920s. And you could unfortunately drop in names from today into those observations from the 1920s.” Elections in odd-numbered years are often a harbinger of the following years’ midterm elections. When Republicans Christie and Bob McDonnell won the New Jersey and Virginia gubernatorial races in 2009, it foreshadowed the Tea Party-wave election of 2010. When Democrats Jon Corzine and Tim Kaine won those races in 2005, it foreshadowed the Democrats’ takeover of Congress in 2006. Currently, Democrats hold a 48-39 percent lead over Republicans in the Real Clear Politics polling average when voters are presented with a generic choice for congressional elections. As Virginia and New Jersey go, so goes the nation? Juan Williams is a FOX News political analyst. He writes for The Hill, where a version of this column first appeared.

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THE LAST WORD

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Off-year elections in Alabama, New Jersey, Virginia may foretell the 2018 mid-terms.

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JUST ANNOUNCED: Tue Sept 19 - Lettuce Sat Oct 7- Daisyland w/ Riot Ten Fri Nov 3 - Daisyland w/ Borgore Mon Nov 6 - Cannibal Corpse Wed November 29 - Hollywood Undead UPCOMING: Sun Aug 6 - HELLYEAH Tues Aug 8 - Lalah Hathaway Wed Aug 9- Jidenna Fri Aug 25 - Daisyland w/ Ganja White Night Sun Aug 27 - A Drag Salute to Divas Thu Aug 31- Smash Mouth Tue Sept 12 - Nothing More Thu Sept 14 - Toadies w/ Local H Fri Sept 15 - Daisyland w/ Valentino Khan Sun Sept 17 - Will Hoge w/ Dan Layus (Of Augustana) Sat Sept 23 - Andy Mineo w/ Social Club Misfits, Wordsplayed Sun Sept 24 - Tank Tues Sept 26 - ZZ Ward Wed Oct 4 Blue October Sat Oct 21- Yngwie Malmsteen

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Esp. on labels: Gennett, Paramount, Vocalion, QRS, Superior, Supertone, Champion, OKeh, Perfect, Romeo, Sun, Meteor, Flip; many others. Also large quantities of older 45’s. Paul. 901-435-6668

TUT-UNCOMMON ANTIQUES 421 N. Watkins St. 278-8965 Pipes, Incense, Tshirts, Water Pipes, Tapestries, Vaporizers, Clothing, Hand-Blown Glass, Rolling Papers, Cigars, Hookahs, E-cigs & Liquid, Memphis As F*UCK, Locally-Made Products and So Much More!

3 MEMPHIS LOCATIONS

2119 Young Ave • 278-0034

8/2: $3 Pint Night! 8/3: Memphis Trivia League! 8/4: Friends at the Falls, the Middle Ground, Airside Kitchen Open Late! Now Delivering All Day! 278-0034 (limited delivery area)

8/4: Whiskey Myers w/ Mutual Live 8/10: Drivin N Cryin w/ Birdcloud 8/12: Memphis Grateful Dead Tribute 8/15: PJ Morton (Maroon 5) w/ Ash. -band 8/25: Another Society

I Buy Old Windup Phonographs & Records

MURPHY’S

YOUNGAVENUEDELI.COM

1884 LOUNGE

MORE EVENTS AT MINGLEWOODHALL.COM

NEW DAISY THEATRE | 330 Beale St Memphis 901.525.8981 • Advance Tickets available at NewDaisy.com and Box Office

Pool Table • Darts • WI-FI • Digital Jukebox Visit our website for live music listings or check the AfterDark section of this Memphis Flyer KITCHEN OPEN LATE, OPEN FOR LUNCH! 1589 Madison • 726-4193 www.murphysmemphis.com

8/18: Elvis Burnin’ Love 8/19: Drop the Mic Poetry Slam 8/23: Turnpike Troubadours w/Shane Smith & the Saints 9/2: V3Fights MMA 9/28: Marshall Tucker Band Methodist Healthcare Fundraiser 10/3: Portugal. The Man 10/7: Judah & The Lion w/ The Academic 10/13: Maren Morris w/ Ryan Hurd 10/18: Spoon w/ Mondo Cozmo 10/26: Chase Rice

HIGHLAND STRIP

CORDOVA

MIDTOWN

555 S HIGHLAND 901 452 4731

981 N GERMANTOWN PKWY 901 654 3678

2027 MADISON AVE 901 590 0048

whatevershops.com

GONER RECORDS

1500 sq. ft. of Vintage & Antique Jewelry. Retro Furniture and Accessories. Original Paintings, Sculpture, Pottery, Art & Antiques. We are the only store in the Mid-South that replaces stones in costume jewelry.

JESSE of Tequila Band - Five Piece Band - available for weddings, corporate events, parties etc... in Memphis and Nashville. Song list on website. More information including song lists and booking information at www. rick.business or call 407.608.8015. Calendar will fill up fast so act now. Special discounts for veterans.

The Coach House @ Loflin Yard

loflinyard.com • 7 W. Carolina Ave • 249-3046

New/ Used LPs, 45s & CDs. We Buy Records! 2152 Young Ave 901-722-0095

Coco & Lola’s MidTown Lingerie

Show some lace with Cosabella !! www.cocoandlolas.com

Finest lace - Coolest place 710 S. Cox|901-425-5912|Mon-Sat 11:30-7:00

MEMPHIS MADE BREWING Taproom hours:

Mon 4 - 7 p.m., Thurs & Fri 4 - 10 p.m., Sat 1 - 10 p.m., Sun 1 - 7 p.m.

Where there’s always something going on.

HAPPY HOUR | MON–FRI 2–7 | $1 OFF ALL DRINKS

768 S. Cooper • 901.207.5343 FREE BREWERY TOURS 4 P.M. SATURDAY & SUNDAY

FABULOUS CARPET CARE Steam Clean 3 Rooms For $99. “It’s Thorough, Dries Quickly & Stays Clean Longer - Or It’s Free.” Call 901.282.5306

MONDAY

TUESDAY

WEDNESDAY

PINT NITE

2f1

FAT TIRE HUMP DAY

DRAFTS

WHISKEY FLIGHTS 2 OFF

$

TAX PREPARER NEEDED Established firm seeks experienced Tax preparer for forms 1120 & 1065. CPA/EA NOT required. All work performed at our location Email resume & wage requirements to admin@taxmidsouth.com

BOOK REPAIR

Have an old book or bible that needs repair? Call Art, Friends of the Library at 901.483.0478.

PROFESSIONAL INTERIORS Painting, Wallpapering, Wallpaper Removal & Drywall Repair. Call 318-499-1779

3

$

5PM–CLOSE

THURSDAY

FISH & CHIPS TRADITIONAL IRISH SEISUIN EVERY OTHER TUESDAY

FRIDAY

BRUNCH

PATIO SESSIONS

LIVE MUSIC b 6P HOUSE DJ 10P

EXPERIENCED SCREEN PRINTER Send resume to jbranch@spikner.com or fax it to 901-725-1572

DJ TAZ b 10P

Call 901.359.3102

The Biggest, The Baddest, The Bluesiest Star Studded Event Of The Summer

2017 JUS’ BLUES MUSIC AWARDS NIGHT OF THE LIVING LEGENDS Bluesville - Horseshoe Casino Hotel

AUG 3, 2017 Tunica, Mississippi Hosted By Bev Johnson & Willie Clayton

NOW HIRING

Private Adult Models/Entertainers. No experience necessary. Ca11 901-527-2460

LIVE IRISH MUSIC EVENINGS

T CANDY COMPANY Stay up to date with

SATURDAY

I BUY RECORDS!

$200 IN PRIZES STARTS AT 7P SUNDAY

TUESDAY

$

MARTIN & TAYLOR 6:30 – 9:30P

FOR A CAUSE

CHRIS JOHNSON EVERY OTHER

STARTING AT 8PM

4 SHOOTERS a 16 OZ. PINTS $6 BOMBS a SPECIALTY COCKTAILS

TRIVIA

The Jus’ Blues Music Foundation, Inc. Presents Jus’ Blues Music Awards

MORGAN AC & HEATING Floor Furnace, Wall & Central Heat. Call 901-774-COOL

CHIP N’ DALE’S ANTIQUES 3457 Summer Avenue Memphis, TN 38122 EVERYTHING ON SALE! Open Tues-Sat | 901-452-5620

Memphis Flyer 8.3.17  

This week: Changes are in store for MATA, but what are they? Also: a return to Old Zinnie's, a rundown of the Memphis Film Prize, Rollin' wi...