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Burger Week! P20 • Riko’s Kickin Chicken P31 • The Big Sick P34

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07.13.17 1481st Issue FREE

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Saturday morning dawned clear and bright, but I knew the heat was coming. So I set off around 8 a.m. for a bike ride. I planned to pedal to Overton Park, hit the trails for a circuit or two, then get onto the Hamp Line down Broad and work my way back through Binghampton to Midtown. When I came to the intersection of McLean and Poplar, I encountered a huge fustercluck of traffic and illegally parked cars on both sides of McLean. There was a line of people out the door of the Exxon station that stretched down the sidewalk for 50 yards. What in the world? I worked my way through the mess and continued north, figuring I’d find out later what was going on. What was going on, as everyone in Memphis now knows, was Z-Bo-gate — or Kiosk-gate, if you prefer. All over the city, kiosks set up for folks to pay their MLGW bills were giving people the information that their accounts were paid off. That news, which spread like a California wildfire on social media, was further fueled by a rumor that departing Grizzlies superstar Zach Randolph had given $1 million to MLGW to pay off people’s utility bills. Thousands of people waited hours in line to spend the $2 kiosk fee, happily exiting with zero-balance MLGW bills in hand, only to find out later that it was all a computer glitch of some sort and they’d just spent $2 — and wasted lots of time — chasing a fantasy. What does this incident say about Memphis? For one thing, it says that we have a lot of poor people, folks desperate enough to get relief from, say, a $300 utility bill, that they would spend hours on a beautiful Saturday waiting in line, hoping for a miracle. It says further, that social media has the power to lead people down a primrose path of foolishness. And it says people will often believe what they want to believe, even in the face of what common sense or a little fact-checking might otherwise tell them. But it’s not just poor people or people looking to beat the system who fall for this kind of stuff. That same weekend, thousands (maybe millions) of people on Facebook passed along a pasted-in message urging everyone they knew not to accept a friend request from one Jayden K. Smith, because doing so would expose all their personal information. Or some such hogwash. That was also a hoax, and though it had nothing to do with getting a bill paid, it had everything to do with human gullibility or the lack of initiative to do a little fact-checking before passing along false information as gospel. We, all of us — rich, middle-class, poor, black, white, brown — are constantly being inundated with news stories, rumors, memes, gossip, videos, and other useful and useless information through our phones and computers. It’s often difficult to discern the difference N E WS & O P I N I O N between what is true and what is just NY TIMES CROSSWORD - 4 internet horse puckery. The lines are THE FLY-BY - 5 blurred and getting blurrier as cries POLITICS - 7 of “Fake news!” continue to emanate EDITORIAL - 8 from the highest office in the land. VIEWPOINT - 9 COVER — “GOOD BURGER” That being the case, we should all keep BY FLYER STAFF - 10 in mind that the miraculous devices bringing us all this information also STE P P I N’ O UT WE RECOMMEND - 14 give us the ability to deter the spread MUSIC - 16 of falsehoods by making an inquiring AFTER DARK - 18 phone call or fact-checking via Google CALENDAR OF EVENTS - 22 or Snopes. BOOKS - 28 The bottom line is that we all need to ART - 30 remember to look before we leap — or FOOD NEWS - 31 link. Or before we go stand in line for SPIRITS - 33 three hours with Jayden K. Smith. FILM - 34 Bruce VanWyngarden C L AS S I F I E D S - 36 brucev@memphisflyer.com LAST WORD - 39

CONTENTS

BRUCE VANWYNGARDEN Editor SUSAN ELLIS Managing Editor JACKSON BAKER, MICHAEL FINGER Senior Editors TOBY SELLS Associate Editor CHRIS MCCOY Film and TV Editor ALEX GREENE Music Editor CHRIS DAVIS, MICHAEL DONAHUE MAYA SMITH, JOSHUA CANNON Staff Writers JESSE DAVIS Copy Editor JULIE RAY Calendar Editor

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Crossword

Edited by Will Shortz

ACROSS 1 “The Great” or “the Terrible” 8 Have more stripes than 15 Yankees closer Rivera 16 “Not gonna happen!” 17 Senselessness 18 Authentic 19 Like pork pie and clotted cream 21 Femme with a halo 22 Hustle 24 Eponymous physicist Ernst 25 Training tally 29 John with an Oscar 31 Bewildered 33 Turnpike ticket listings 35 Best Actress nominee for “Philomena,” 2013 37 Sorority character

F R I D AY

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38 Better adversary to deal with, in a saying 41 Unlikely husband material 42 Looks like a 41-Across 43 Name on an excavator 44 Old blacklisting org. 46 Brownies with cookies, maybe 48 Fostered 49 Turnovers, e.g. 51 Absorb 53 Activate, as a wah-wah pedal 55 Husband material 59 Genre for Ladysmith Black Mambazo 61 1984 biography subtitled “The Man, the Dancer” 63 Royal Stewart and Clan Donald 64 Bugs 65 Needs blessing, maybe

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3 Only remaining home of the Asiatic cheetah

4 Sound repeatedly heard at a wedding reception

7 Little green men

8 Has way more than enough, for short 9 See 50-Down

10 Approximate end of a rush hour

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20 Something to enter with a card

34 French seasoning

23 TV character who fronted as a waste management consultant

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40 ___ Mo’, three-time Grammy-winning bluesman 45 Hoffman won Best Actor for playing him 47 Chief flight attendant

36 Ginnie Mae’s dept.

50 1967 Cold War suspense novel by 9-Down

39 One who might drug a boxer

52 Florence’s ___ Palace

53 Scores of these may plague high schoolers 54 Less than slim 56 Chat, across the Pyrénées 57 Setting of Sisyphus’ perpetual rock-pushing 58 Almond or pecan 60 Additions after closings, in brief 62 One of three for Sisyphus?

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Crossword 37 Loose, now ACROSS DOWN 1 One of the Great 40 Powerful D.C. 1 Vase style Lakes lobby 2 Compatriot o 5 Menacing cloud 41 Raiser of Mao awareness, for 10 Sony offering short 3 Noted father14 Saint’s home, for son singer 44 Not accidental short 4 Ancient New 45 In opposition 15 Place for a Mexican barbecue 46 Guru, maybe 5 Part of a crib 16 Rich finish? 47 Straightens 17 “Don’t give up” 6 Living ___ 49 Firm parts: Abbr. 19 Rather powerful 50 Hockey team, 7 Major Asian ANSWER TO PREVIOUS PUZZLE engine e.g. carrier 20 Brown 51 Words on a 8 Attire 21 Some plants jacket 9 Like melanch 23 Value 53 Risked a ticket musical keys 25 Spooky quality Online subscriptions: Today’s puzzle and more than 7,000 past 55 Construction puzzles, nytimes.com/crosswords ($39.95 a year). 10 The poor staples … onoreach puzzle: nytimes.com/wordplay. Read about and comment 28 Smoothie fruit Crosswords for young solvers: nytimes.com/studentcrosswords. a hint to this 11 Not go along 29 Popular cookie puzzle’s theme 12 Prefix with la 31 Taking things for 59 Famous Amos granted on April 13 Bedevil SOUTHERN AVENUE CHARTER 60 Rocker SteveSCHOOL Fools’ Day and Visit and Enroll now! 18 Girl’s name th others 61 “Don’t go!,” e.g. may precede 32 “Time ___ …” 62 Obnoxious one N ISTRATIO REGTrack, 33 inh a sense 63 Subject of some 22 One may be t 9 July 2 starting in sp M codes 349A Not wait for Mr. M-12P Right, say 23 What’s shake 64 Scandinavian when you say capital 35 Huuuuuuuuge “Shake!”

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E P I C P O E M B R O W S E D E M O T A P E S H R E W S 25 Ones moving from home K E P T A T I T C Y C L I C OElementary D E School T S of S H U S A L M A 26 Fifth in a gro Academic Excellence of eight C &ECreative N AArts B O O Z E S I M P 901-743-7335 H E D P U D D I N G N E A 27 Saginaw-to-F Southern Avenue Charter School’s mission is to educate the whole child. All S I Z academically E S Qon UtheirOlevel, T whether E D it’s regular dir. students are challenged academics, is J A C gifted, U Zor Zspecial I education. Q U The I Xfamous O T“Hyde E Library” 29 Bitforof beachw technology based with more than 99,000 volumes of books and computers A L use. O Computer N Z Olabs andGcomputers U I Din the O classrooms are available. student ___ way At Southern Avenue Charter School all elementary students take30 Spanish. N A V A F F A I R E B F F All students are required to participate in one of the following Creative Arts Programs (Kaleidoscope): 33Group It may be add I K E A F STEM, U ZChorus, Z YDramatic W Arts, Y Digital L E Music, Piano, Photography, Ballet, Dance, Taekwondo, or a variety of sports, such toforalcohol T Soccer, AAvenue RBasketball, O S andRTrack. E Many B Artssupport C A students G E are Srequired as, are available At Southern Charter School’s Creative Program,programs to participate in parents and students: Before and after school care; free breakfast, lunch, fresh two of the following Kaleidoscope O Z A R K S T O M A T O E S 34 Pitiful fruit/vegetables, snack and supper; free uniforms for new students; etc. (Creative Arts) Classes: Foreign Language; Chorus; RSuzuki A Piano; G TGroup O Piano P or Violin; T WBallet; O Art; P Soccer; E NBasketball; C E Dramatic Arts; and / or Hit Arts the gas p Taekwondo. Southern Avenue SchoolRoad of Academic Excellence and35 Creative 901.743.7335 • 2221Charter Democrat Memphis, TN 38132 S M E A www.southernavecharterschools.org R Y E L M T R E E S hard

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HOLE FOODS “Butthole” was on every American’s tongue last week, and the international incident, now known to everybody with an internet connection as #buttholegate, was Memphis’ fault. Here’s what happened according to the prudes at The Washington Post (Yes, The Washington Post): “A woman named Chelsea Bartley left a two-star Google review of the Imagine Vegan Cafe, saying that even though she ‘eat[s] here all the time’ and ‘still probably will bc … there are few options,’ was disturbed by a recent incident in which the restaurant owner’s ‘bare butt naked baby was running around, stood up on a table with its black theyre [sic] so dirty feet, and bent over to show me it’s b——-.’ “This is a family newspaper,” the reporter noted parenthetically, explaining the censored “utthole.” By Chris Davis. Email him at davis@memphisflyer.com.

W E E K T H AT W A S By Flyer staff

MLGW, the DMC, & Sanitation Workers MLGW to round bills up next year, Patterson resigns from DMC, 1968 Sanitation Workers receive grant.

MLGW WILL ROUND UP BILLS Memphis Light, Gas, and Water (MLGW) announced last week that the utility will begin automatically rounding up bills of its residential and commercial customers to the next dollar, beginning January 1st for a program meant to ease the energy burden of the utility’s low-income customers. In January, the City Council required MLGW to provide an opt-out option, allowing the utility to automatically round up individuals’ bills unless the customer opts out. Donations will average about an added 50 cents on each bill, capping at $11.88 for a single customer during each year. The additional funds, which MLGW officials expect to equal as much as $2.5 million, will be donated to the Share the Pennies program, which funds grants for lowincome homeowners who, due to a combination of poverty and energy-inefficient homes, have a high energy burden — meaning they have to use a higher percentage of their resources to pay for basic heating and cooling. The grants will be used to make energy-efficient improvements, such as fixing broken windows, replacing insulation, and repairing furnaces, which MLGW officials say will lead to less wasted energy. Previously only available for senior or disabled customers and maxing at $1,500 per customer, the grants will now be open to all low-income customers with a new maximum of $4,000 per customer. DMC PRESIDENT RESIGNS Terence Patterson resigned his post as president and CEO of the Downtown Memphis Commission (DMC) last week. DMC board chairman Carl Person said Patterson is “leaving to pursue other opportunities. “The DMC appreciates his service as well as his willingness to work with the organization at our request during its transition into new leadership,” Person said in a statement. “We believe the organization is in a great position to build on its positive momentum.” Patterson will continue to serve in an advisory role to the DMC while board members work out the next steps to hire a full-time replacement. Chief Financial Officer Jennifer Oswalt, who was recently named CEO of the Flyer’s parent company, Contemporary Media Inc., will serve as the

group’s interim president until a replacement is found. In his resignation letter to the DMC board Thursday, Patterson said he was honored to serve in the role, especially as the first African-American and youngest president and CEO of the DMC. FINANCIAL ASSISTANCE FOR 1968 SANITATION WORKERS Memphis Mayor Jim Strickland announced last week that the city will provide financial support to the 14 living 1968 sanitation workers — four of whom still work in the field today — by awarding each of them $50,000 grants. Pending City Council approval, the city will also create a new retirement plan for sanitation workers by supplementing their social security and deferred compensation plans based on length of employment, matching up to 4.5 percent of the employee’s contributions. U OF M RECEIVES GRANT FOR DISASTER MITIGATION A multidisciplinary team led by the University of Memphis received a $3.2 million grant to map and assess damage from future floods and earthquakes in five West Tennessee counties, the university announced last week. The grant, awarded by the 2015 HUD National Disaster Resilience Competition, will also fund public education and community outreach in the five counties: Lake, Dyer, Lauderdale, Tipton, and Madison. The team will assist the five counties to prepare and respond to future disasters, as well as submit data-based funding requests for disaster relief. Additionally, the team will help the designated communities with infrastructure upgrades, such as rehabilitating outdated wastewater treatment plants. The $3.2 million awarded to the U of M is a part of a larger $44 million Rural by Nature award that the Tennessee Department of Economic and Community Development (TNECD) received to address areas of Tennessee that were impacted by the flood in 2011 and that are also in the New Madrid Seismic Zone — placing the areas at risk for earthquake damage.

m e m p h i s f l y e r. c o m

DAMMIT GANNETT “Rustic Steakhouse Offers Feast for the Eyes, Food Challenge for Carnivores,” a dining/lumber column by Commercial Appeal scribe Tom Bailey, reads like it was shot through Google Translate a couple of times at least. “The nearly open Marshall Steakhouse lords over I-22 just west of Holly Springs, promising a Mid-South dining experience like none other,” it begins. Then Bailey introduces owner Randall Swaney, a billboard executive who liked steakhouses so much he built one. According to the CA, “He hopes to open on July 14 his restaurant that has the outdoor influences of Loflin Yard or Railgarten and an indoor atmosphere that is part hunting lodge, part Peabody lobby.” Best passage: “Interstate travelers likely won’t be impressed by their backside view of the two-story, metal building, perched on Swaney’s six-acre strand between I-22 and Old Highway 178. But those who take Exit 26, swing around to Old Highway 178, and step onto the wood front porch — enlivened with a monumental, carved-wood, hand-painted sculpture of a Native American chief — enter new territory.”

Edited by Toby Sells

NEWS & OPINION

THE

Questions, Answers + Attitude

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Now What?

{

CITY REPORTER By Maya Smith

Activists remember last year’s I-40 bridge protest. A few-dozen people gathered in Tom Lee Park last Sunday to commemorate the more than 1,000 protesters who blocked the I-40 bridge one year ago to rally for justice in the wake of the then-recent killings of several black men by police officers. Sunday’s afternoon of events, organized by the Coalition for the Concerned Citizens of Memphis (C3), featured “street theater” comprised of skits related to social justice and meant to shed light on the “real obscenities” the C3 believes people of color currently face in society. Some skits touched on immigrant rights and police brutality, while others paid tribute to individuals such as Alton Sterling and Martin Luther King Jr. Al Louis, 63, a member of C3, was involved in the protest last year. He said he believed it was one of the greatest protests in the history of the city, but added there has not been nearly enough change in Memphis since last year, citing the small percentage of the city’s business receipts that minority businesses hold as an example. “There are no laurels to rest at,” said Louis. “This event is just to honor ourselves for a minute, then get right back on the grind.” However, Louis says he is beginning to see a crossracial effort that he did not expect to see in his lifetime. “This I’ve never seen before,” he said, regarding Sunday’s gathering. “It’s an effort among people of all hues and ethnic backgrounds. This is progress I never imagined I’d

see in my lifetime.” Representatives from five organizations, including the Memphis chapter of Black Lives Matter and Inward Journey were at the park Sunday, each with ideas about what needs to happen in the city for equality to be realized. Another group present was Movimiento Cosecha, a nationwide organization The Coalition for the that is in the process of beConcerned Citizens of ing launched in Memphis. Memphis (C3) Volunteer Coordinator with Movimiento Cosecha, Roberto Juarez said that as immigration tension rises in the country, the group wants to be able to get the undocumented community to come together and fight back strategically. He said the group organizes systematic boycotts and strikes, encouraging the community to have their voices heard by using their labor and consumer power. There were also members of Show Me 15, who say they want to see the crime rate in the city go down and wages go up. While the skits played out at Tom Lee Park, just a few blocks away, more activists celebrated the anniversary of the protest with a march from Robert

Church Park to City Hall. In what was called March for 1,000 Children, youth from all around the city came to write down what they want to see change in the city. Their suggestions were collected in a box. Organizers of the march say it was designed to send Memphis city officials a message that more changes need to take place.

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POLITICS By Jackson Baker

ENTERTAINMENT

Dueling Visions

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Luttrell and county commission make grudging progress toward a budget but are still scrapping over a tax rate.

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Disapproval of the GOP-dominated U.S. Senate’s pending version of a bill to repeal and replace the Affordable Care Act was fairly clearly the message of the day at a packed assembly of health-care advocates on Saturday at the IBEW meeting hall on Madison. (See more in editorial, p. 8.)

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Luttrell had held the line back then, pleading that the county had infrastructure needs (it plainly did), and the tax rate held firm. The mayor’s victory proved to be a pyrrhic one, however — especially as the county’s general fund, even with a good deal of overdue paving and other infrastructure work taken care of, turned out in an ad hoc audit to have a significant and unforeseen surplus: upwards of $20 million. That was enough, contended the commission’s tax relief advocates, to have underwritten the gift to the taxpayers that they had intended but, ultimately, under pressure from the administration, had backed away from. That was essentially the casus belli for what has turned out to be a two-year power struggle between the mayor and his commissioners. The commission, with two fired-up Republicans, Heidi Shafer of East Memphis and Terry Roland of Millington in the lead, and with a sufficient number of other suburban Republicans, along with fellow-traveling inner-city Democrats, following, began campaigning for new commission perks, including a greater share in budgetary decisions, and to that purpose, the acquisition of an independent commission attorney so as to augment its own oversight. The commission ultimately got a lawyer approved, former commissioner Julian Bolton, though both his title and his function are more tightly circumscribed than the commissioners preferred. And the battle goes on, with both sides taking as much as they can and giving up as little as they have to. Right now the $4.10 tax rate seems to be holding, but sans a vote, some or all of that hard-earned three-cent discount could vanish in further negotiation, as could other budget goodies voted on on Monday. (More details this week in Politics Beat blog on memphisflyer.com)

NEWS & OPINION

The voices of Shelby County commissioners audiby changed during the course of Monday’s special meeting — a marathon affair that had been called to deal with a budget that was already past its July 1st deadline. Toward the end of a meeting that started at 3 p.m. and adjourned at 10:15 p.m., the commissioners sounded either strident (maybe “strung out” is closer) or exhausted. What had not changed was the substance of what they were saying. The commissioners — or at least what seems to be a working majority of them — remained fixed on a course that will give their constituents a tax cut of from 1 to 3 cents on a still-to-be-determined tax rate. Mayor Mark Luttrell, who was as edgy as anybody on Monday, went with the flow and reluctantly consented to budget amendments that cut close into what he sees as a necessary fiscal reserve. But he is clearly resolved to do what he can between now and the fixing of the tax rate to either scale back the amendments or keep the rate close to the level of 4.13 cents, a statusquo figure adjusted to the latest county property assessment and designed to generate the same amount of revenue as the current pre-assessment rate of 4.37 cents. Luttrell made it clear that he wants to have enough of a discretionary fund on hand to deal with exigencies. That was the case also two years ago, when the administration and the commission had a similar disagreement, one that ultimately saw a win for the mayor in the slowing down of what had been a pell-mell move toward a tax decrease and then the aborting of that tax-cut initiative altogether.

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7/6/17 2:47 PM


E D ITO R IAL

Health-care Manifesto It was a heck of a party, jammed to the rafters and brimming with overflow energy. The only problem was that the chief invited guests were a no-show, though no one was much surprised by that.

rock for

We’re talking about last Saturday’s town hall on health care at the IBEW union hall on Madison, sponsored by a generous assortment of local organizations devoted to the subject and dedicated to the preservation of the Affordable Care Act, currently under threat of elimination by a GOP-dominated Congress and a fellow-traveling tag-along president. In theory, Tennessee’s two Republican Senators, Lamar Alexander and Bob Corker, both regarded as antagonistic toward the ACA (aka Obamacare) were to be the guests of honor, but, as was relayed with heavily underscored irony early on by co-host Mary Green of the progressive group Indivisible, both senators had responded that they had “schedules that would not allow them to come.” That got an appropriate mix of groans, sardonic laughs, and boos from the audience, and the laughter got more uproarious when Green drew attention to the fact that Alexander and Corker, along with fellow Obamacare opponent David Kustoff, the GOP congressman from the 8th District, were all represented at the meeting by life-size cardboard cutouts that were “questioned,” mocked, and scolded in the course of the meeting. Another Indivisible host, Emily Fulmer, noted the fact that passage of the pending Senate bill, disingenuously called the Better Care Reconciliation Act (BCRA) would mean $880 billion in cuts for Medicaid, which in one form or another pays for the medical needs of 60 percent of the American population. Aftyn Behn of the Tennessee Justice

Center presented slides demonstrating, among other things, that BCRA would mean disastrous cutbacks for hospitals and programs designed to curb the current opioid epidemic. Tennessee, she observed, owned the dubious distinction of having the nation’s leading rate of hospital closures, “with more rural closures coming, including one in Blount County on Lamar Alexander Parkway.” That got the wry laugh it deserved. Ashley Coffield of Planned Parenthood pointed out that the bill included a provision to “defund” her organization and prohibit women, children, and men from availing themselves of the wide range of “affordable, high quality, and non-judgmental health care” offered by Planned Parenthood. Allison Donald of the Center for Independent Living and ADAPT, which sees to the needs of the disabled, saw services to these “most vulnerable” about to be disrupted. Physicians Art Sutherland and Tom Gettelfinger pointed out the ongoing hijacking of heath care by selfserving corporations and the outrageous spike in therapeutic drug prices. Essence Jackson of Sistercare proclaimed the obvious: “Health care is not a privilege; it’s a human right!” And Virgie Banks of the COPPER Coalition exhorted, “Keep the pressure on!” As she and the others noted, the BCRA will likely come to a vote the week of July 24th. It would behoove all of us with a concern for the general health and welfare our citizenry to pay heed to what was said on Saturday.

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VI EWPO I NT By Juan Williams

State of Mind? puts him at odds with people who point at the capacity of “systemic poverty” to defeat even the smartest, most ambitious young person. Those voices say that a combination of broken families, bad neighborhoods, bad schools, and the persistence of racism can snare anyone and keep them on the margins of society, regardless of their personal character. But the critics are missing a key point. Liberal or conservative, we can all agree it is important to encourage anyone living in poverty to look for a way out, to find the path to a better life. If the poor wait on the government to end their poverty, they will be waiting a long time. I have known Carson for several years. My son Raffi is his press secretary. But my view, which is sympathetic to Carson’s description of poverty as a “state of mind,” is not a result of loyalty to him. I grew up in Section 8 housing and have experienced being poor. Social science data confirms that the best ways for people of all colors to avoid poverty is to stay in school and graduate, take even a menial job to build a resumé and connections, don’t marry until you have a career on track, and don’t have a child until you are married. People who follow that prescription have close to zero chance of living in poverty. I think major black voices should join Carson in stating that there are steps individuals can take — and advise their children to take — to win their personal fight against poverty. Conservatives who favor small government are currently intent on limiting federal entitlement programs. Trump’s budget includes harsh cuts that would make poverty worse for many — including the $6.2 billion proposed cuts to HUD. Those conservatives are deluding themselves if they think big cuts are going to help the poor. But liberals are deluding themselves if they don’t see the good in Carson offering hope to people in need of inspiration. Republicans and Democrats need to support the inspiring message that fired up the growth of the black middle class a generation ago: We shall overcome. Juan Williams is an author and a political analyst for Fox News Channel. Ben Carson

m e m p h i s f l y e r. c o m

Representative Maxine Waters stirred up a big crowd in New Orleans recently by using extreme language to critique Ben Carson, the secretary of Housing and Urban Development (HUD). Waters, the top Democrat on the House Financial Services Committee, said Carson “knows nothing” about the housing agency’s mission and “doesn’t care about people in public housing,” adding that she would not be polite if and when Secretary Carson came before her to testify. “If he thinks … I am going to give him a pass,” she said, “I am going to take his ass apart!” Waters also said that an earlier comment from Carson, in which he drew a parallel between the aspirations of black slaves and the hopes of people who voluntarily immigrated to America, was evidence that he “doesn’t know the difference between an immigrant and a slave.” Yes, Waters was throwing around strong words to stir up laughter at the expense of President Trump’s only black cabinet secretary. But beyond the trash talk there is an important political debate for black America. The heart of Waters’ anger at Carson goes to what he said about poverty in a May radio interview with Armstrong Williams. Carson said: “I think poverty, to a large extent, is also a state of mind.” Given the high poverty rate among black Americans (24 percent), especially black children (near 40 percent), Waters reacted with alarm. Poverty is not just a mental state to her. She knows the horrid reality of poverty in her Los Angeles district. Overall, more than 43 million Americans lived in poverty in 2015 — about 13.5 percent of the population, according to the Census Bureau. That number includes over 14 million children — about 20 percent of all American children. But Carson was not putting down the poor. He grew up in poverty in Detroit with a single mother. He cares about poor people and speaks with evangelical passion about the power of personal responsibility to push young people out of poverty. Carson’s belief in personal responsibility

NEWS & OPINION

DREAMSTIME | RICHARD KOELE

Ben Carson’s controversial remarks about poverty also offer hope and truth.

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good Burger JUSTIN FOX BURKS

Huey Burger

A look at some of Memphis’ most iconic hamburgers. COVER STORY BY FLYER STAFF

July 13-19, 2017

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t seems like lately the hamburger is taking up a larger chunk of our culinary landscape. Why is that? John T. Edge is the director of the Southern Foodways Alliance and author of the recently released Potlikker Papers. But, more importantly for our purposes, he is the muse behind Hog & Hominy’s John T. Edge Burger, which was named best burger in the country by Food & Wine last spring. In 2005, he published a book titled Hamburger & Fries, one in a series that included Fried Chicken and Apple Pie. Edge had an inkling of the coming burger wave when he was writing his 2005 book, but he couldn’t quite put his finger on it then. “I think it’s been building. I saw the beginnings of it in the early 2000s. There’s a way to pin that to 9/11 and the aftermath of 9/11 and a deepening appreciation of the American vernacular food. It’s not just hamburgers; it’s fried chicken; it’s apple pie,” he says. “All of those singular American foods we’ve come to appreciate. And I think in this political divisive moment we live in now, you can extend that out to iconic American food — that in a moment when it’s difficult to take pride in our political leaders, you can take pride in our cultural creations, and one of our singular cultural creations is the hamburger.” It’s Burger Week, y’all. The Flyer has teamed up with 15 local restaurants for a $5 burger deal. $5! You can’t beat that. Check out the Burger Week spread on page 20, or go to memphisflyerburgerweek.com for all the details. In the spirit of Burger Week, we dedicate the cover space to some of Memphis’ most iconic hamburgers. Enjoy, and go eat you a burger. — Susan Ellis

The Greek Burger His dad, Alex Kasaftes, served “a great ham sandwich” when he opened Alex’s Tavern

in 1953, says Alex’s son, Rocky Kasaftes. “My mom would cook the ham at home in the 10 oven. Maybe use brown sugar, Coca-Cola, and cloves,” he says. “Daddy would bring the ham over here and set it in a rack. He would slice the ham off the rack.”

Alex eventually sold hamburgers. Rocky’s Rocky mom, Eugenia, also sold hamburgers when Kasaftes she owned Highpoint Grill, the fore-runner to High Point Pub. Rocky and his mom began serving hamburgers in the mid-’70s at Alex’s Tavern, but Rocky, who now owns Alex’s, soon made the burgers his own. “Someone brought me a thing of Cavender’s, the Greek seasoning.” He began using Cavender’s on the burgers as well as a “special kind of pepper, too. Not regular pepper. Seasoned pepper.” Rocky likes to cook his burgers in a skillet. “When it’s almost done, I put that cake dome on top of it. It kind of steams that cheese.” Rocky’s hamburger has had a few names over the years. “They used to call it the ‘Alex Burger.’ The ‘Rocky Burger.’ I like the ‘Greek Burger’ ’cause we’re Greek. That’s what’s in the window. That’s what I like. In respect to mom and dad.” — Michael Donahue Alex’s Tavern, 1445 Jackson, 278-9086

Huey Burger You want to know how to make a good burger? There’s no better person to ask than

Jimmy Lee, general manager of Huey’s Germantown. Lee’s been with the company for 20 years — about the length of time Huey’s has been dominating the burger category in the Memphis Flyer Best of Memphis polls. Huey’s famous hamburger got its start in the early 1970s while Thomas Boggs was still just a bartender in Midtown. “John Gray’s Big Star was right around the corner on McLean,” says Lee. “There wasn’t much on the menu back then, but they did do a burger. Our kitchen manager in Midtown, Terry Gant, would walk over to John Gray’s meat market with a shopping cart and buy ground chuck. He would patty up the burgers by


hand. Then the company developed our special seasoning. … The meat that we’re buying today is certified Angus beef, which is better than what we were using back then. But the way we cook and season the burgers has remained largely unchanged in the last 40-plus years.” Boggs would eventually buy the business and, with his partner Jay Sheffield, build the little dive into an iconic regional franchise. “We don’t mash the burgers. That was one of the things Thomas Boggs taught us. It’s a major taboo. It squeezes all the juices out.” In addition to the classic Huey Burger, a number of specialty burgers have cropped up on the menu in recent years. New topping combinations, such as the West Coast’s guacamole and Monterey Jack combo, are developed by Huey’s employees in periodic, in-house contests. Huey’s Burger Week contribution, the Bluez 57 Burger, came out of one such contest. — Chris McCoy Huey’s, multiple locations, hueyburger.com

burgers these days? Who’s responsible for this gourmet burger trend that’s sweeping the country? Why, Memphis restaurateur Wally Joe, of course. Not really, but the affable owner-chef at Acre restaurant does joke that some of his chef friends have pinpointed the beginning of the over-the-top burger craze with the cheeseburger that Joe created circa-2003 for his former restaurant, Wally Joe’s. “Fredric Koeppel of the CA wrote about it, and it just took off,” Joe remembers. Acre And it does sound pretty good. Burger “We used trimmings from in-house, dry-aged ribeyes for the meat,” Joe says. “We created a house-made horseradish brioche bun, added black truffle cheese and tomato confit, and served it with hand-cut fries.” Wally Joe knows a thing or two about great food. He’s been cooking since he was a kid, beginning at his family’s restaurant, KC’s, in Cleveland, Mississippi, back in the mid1990s. He was the first Mississippi chef ever invited to cook at the famed James Beard House and is a master of several types of cuisine. So what makes a great burger? “The most important thing is that it can’t be lean beef,” Joe says. “You want about an 80 percent lean/20 percent fat ratio. Ground chuck is probably the perfect beef for a good, home-cooked burger.” And what kind of burger does Joe serve now at Acre? “Just your basic burger — good beef grilled to order, aged cheddar, lettuce, tomato, horseradish. What’s more allAmerican than a burger?” — Bruce VanWyngarden Acre, 690 S. Perkins, 818-2273, acrememphis.com

Jerry’s Burger Six days a week, David Acklin wakes up at 5 a.m. to begin his routine. He makes a few

stops on his way to work. One at Superlo Foods for some ground beef, then to Easy Way for tomatoes and lettuce, to Sam’s Club for other supplies, and lastly to a couple of banks. Then he drives to a small pink and green shack on Wells Station — better known as Jerry’s Sno Cones — to begin preparing for the day ahead. Jerry’s is often known for its sno cones, but for the past eight or nine years, its burgers have begun making a name for themselves. Acklin, owner of the 50-year-old dive, says the reason Jerry’s burgers have a reputation of being good is because he tries to make each burger like one he would make at home and as fresh as possible. “I could pick up a frozen patty like everyone else, but we’re just not going to do that,” he says. “No two of our burgers are shaped the same — I promise you that.” Each morning before Jerry’s opens for business, Acklin personally seasons the beef, forms them out one-by-one by hand, then weighs each one to be sure it is right at onethird of a pound. He says although Jerry’s will sell about 250 burgers each day, he wants to keep it “old school” by having just one person cooking the burgers and another grilling butter-coated buns. Jerry’s offers burgers with the basic accoutrements like cheese, lettuce, tomato, and mayo, as well as nine specialty burgers like one with pesto, one with chili and cole slaw, and another with teriyaki sauce and pineapple. Each burger has a story, Acklin says. He enjoys recreating burgers that others were excited to tell him about or one from a special occasion, like the ’70s burger, topped with Swiss cheese, worcestershire sauce, and mushrooms, which is based on a burger Acklin’s sister told him she had on her first date. One of Acklin’s goals for Jerry’s is to have a real contender for one of the top three burgers in the city. “We don’t have to be No. 1,” he says. “Number two or three is good for me.” — Maya Smith Jerry’s Sno Cones, 1657 Wells Station, 767-2659, jerryssnowcones.com continued on page 12

Soul Burger Earnestine & Hazel’s, the weathered but somehow elegant dive at the northwest corner

of South Main and G.E. Patterson, one of several bistros in the stable of legendary folk restaurateur Bud Chittom, fairly drips with grease, spice, and history. So does the Soul Burger, the basic but well-layered hamburger that has been devoured many thousands of times over by Memphians and tourists, the famous and unfamous alike, since the establishment, once upon a time a church, then a pharmacy (owned by Abe Plough), then a bordello (run by the eponymous ladies of the current establishment’s name) became a restaurant for good in 1992, thanks to Russell George. George offered one specialty, the Soul Burger, and that, served with packages of chips and washed down with sodas or beer, is still the staple meal, one that’s been dubbed a classic in connoisseurs’ journals around the world. Cooked on a long tabletop grill that’s decades old, the Soul Burger starts out with mayonnaise and mustard mixed on the bottom half of a bun, then gets a well-done beef patty still oozing its own natural grease, pickles are added, shortly to be topped by a layer of cheese, then a succulent pile of thoroughly grilled onions, and finally doused in a spicy “Soul Sauce” made according to a The Soul closely guarded recipe. A top bun finishes off Burger the tasty masterpiece, some 600 specimens of which can be cooked and served on a busy weekend day, claims veteran counterman Clarence Connery, who with irrepressible bartender Karen Brownlee, carries on the tradition of George, who died in 2013, and equally revered manager Keenan Harding, who passed away in June.

David Acklin of Jerry’s Sno Cones

COVER STORY m e m p h i s f l y e r. c o m

JUSTIN FOX BURKS

Acre Burger Why are so many restaurants — upscale and otherwise — creating such fantastical

The Soul Burger still reigns as does Earnestine & Hazel’s itself, its lower walls covered with testimonial portraits from movers, shakers, and stars, the upper walls dotted with vintage vinyl records put there when episodes of the recent TV series Sun Records were filmed there, the establishment’s famous jukebox and its dance-and-performance floor ready to party. — Jackson Baker Earnestine & Hazel’s, 531 S. Main, 523-9754, earnestineandhazelsjukejoint.com

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continued from page 11

Pirtle’s Burger “No frills hamburger” is what Tawanda Pirtle

calls the burgers sold at the eight locations of Jack Pirtle’s Chicken. Tawanda Pirtle, who owns the chain with her Pirtle husband, Cordell, also refers to them as “American grilled,” “Southern grilled,” and “a very filling plain-old-fashioned grilled” hamburger. “Cheese, lettuce, tomato, onions, and pickles,” she says. “And mustard, mayonnaise, and ketchup, if you prefer.” They’ve been selling hamburgers as long as they’ve been selling chicken, Pirtle says. “We’ve been doing hamburgers since we opened in 1957. Mr. Pirtle always believed you had to have a variety so your customers would eat with you every day.” They use a “special seasoning” on the burgers, Pirtle says. “The seasoning we use is a seasoning Mr. Pirtle came up with himself. It’s a special Jack Pirtle’s seasoning.” That seasoning accounts for the tastiness of the burger, says Pirtle, who wouldn’t divulge even a single ingredient. “Just a mixture of spices we call ‘good stuff.’” The hamburgers are grilled on “just an old fashioned flat grill. And we toast our buns on the same grill.” For a place that has the word “chicken” in its title, hamburgers are “very popular,” Pirtle says. “Our hamburgers are not as popular as our steak sandwich, but we’ve always sold a lot of our hamburgers.” Has anyone ever ordered chicken on their hamburger? “We haven’t had that yet, but it’s not that we wouldn’t do that. Can you imagine having a burger and a couple of grilled tenders or fried tenders laid across it? That might be pretty tasty.” — MD Jack Pirtle’s Chicken multiple locations, jackpirtleschicken.com

Belmont Burger The Belmont Burger doesn’t look like a lot of hamburgers you see around town. It’s

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July 13-19, 2017

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served on a French loaf instead of a hamburger bun, but it’s been a favorite of customers at Belmont Grill for decades. They began serving the burger “when we took over The Belmont in 1984,” says manager/owner Jeff Anderson. They began using the French loaf right away. “It’s always been done like that. It’s different than anything else that was out there at the time. Everybody had a burger, but it was totally different than what anybody had. So, that’s what made it unique. That’s how the popularity started. The French loaf and the sauce we put on it before we charbroil it.” Anderson wouldn’t elaborate on that sauce. “We just call it the ‘black sauce.’ That’s as far as we go.” As for the cooking method, Anderson says, “It’s cooked on a charbroiler. It’s just an open flame. The marinade definitely helps give it a unique taste. And the French loaf. It’s not a burger bun. You get a little more of a crispy bite to it.” The Belmont Burger has “always been our No. 1 seller,” Anderson says. “We probably sell six times more than any other sandwich. In a day’s time, 50 to 100. It just depends.” — MD Belmont Grill, 4970 Poplar, 767-0305

Roxie’s Burger In May 2016, fire engines rushed to Roxie’s Grocery, the tiny Uptown market on Third

Street. Local hamburger aficionados held their breath. When the store finally reopened, April 1, 2017, an oversized crowd showed up to welcome them back. “We ran out of everything,” Keisha Edwards recalls, describing the happy chaos of opening day. “We ran out of cups. We even ran out of ground beef.” Roxie’s is sometimes described as a “best kept secret,” although the sundry and kitchen where longtime regulars gather out front to sit on milk crates and shoot the breeze over cornbread and daily specials, has been serving the Uptown/Greenlaw neighborhood for 33 years. During that time, it’s earned a strong word-of-mouth reputation for dishing up tasty soul food and one of the biggest and best-dressed flat-top burgers in town. “In the world,” Edwards corrects. Edwards, Roxie’s official historian, says the key to a good burger is love — and patience. “You’ve got to let it take as long as it takes,” she says. “You don’t want to rush it.” Edwards personally recommends the Mr. Goodburger as her ideal of what the perfect burger should be. It ups the ante with two spicy, bun-challenging patties, bacon slices, and three different cheeses. “I want a burger that’s a complete meal,” she says. Roxie’s — Chris Davis Burger Roxie’s Grocery, 520 N. 3rd, 525-2817


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COVER STORY m e m p h i s f l y e r. c o m

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steppin’ out

We Recommend: Culture, News + Reviews

Upside Down

Fela Kuti

By Chris Davis

Skin is a political expression, and Fela Kuti used to show a lot of it in the 1960s and ’70s. First, he wore open shirts. Then no shirt. Then, eventually, the revolutionary singer, bandleader, multi-instrumentalist, and pioneer of Afrobeat wore nothing but the briefest briefs and the disfiguring map of scars he collected at the hands of Nigerian authorities. Fela was a complicated and tireless agent of change, pushing back against government corruption. The vibrant music he made — a pan-African fusion with a twist of James Brown — brought Fela money and fame. It also brought soldiers to the door of his nearly autonomous compound. He was arrested more than 200 times, and beaten even more frequently as he fought his multi-front battle against colonialism, corruption, poverty, and personal demons. Finding Fela, showing at South Main’s Art Village Gallery Friday, July 14th, is a tightly packed documentary by Academy Award-winning filmmaker Alex Gibney. It’s built around the creation of the Tony-winning musical Fela!, a challenging live show that seemed to defy all conventions of the typical Broadway musical. Twenty-minute, primarily instrumental songs and Pan-Africanist politics weren’t the sort of things audiences were accustomed to seeing on the Great White Way, even in 2010. The show would have to be as innovative and unconventional as the man it portrayed. Finding Fela uses the Broadway show as a framing tool as it digs deep to tell the multifaceted story of musical and conventional revolution, with the aid of interviews and fantastic archival footage.

JUSTIN FOX BURKS

“FINDING FELA,” ART VILLAGE GALLERY FRIDAY, JULY 14TH, 6 P.M. $4 ARTVILLAGEGALLERY.COM

July 13-19, 2017

Tyler Hildebrand talks about Snoopy, the Memphis scene, and “Retirement.” Art, p. 30

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THURSDAY July 13

FRIDAY July 14

Rhythm Nation Living Hope Church (815 N. McLean), 7 p.m. This MTV-inspired dance class returns. Tonight’s class is Pussycat Doll’s “Dontcha.” Costumes encouraged.

Three Tenors and a Baritone Theatre Memphis, 8 p.m., $30 Cabaret performance as part of Theatre Memphis’ Summer Showcase, featuring Philip Himebook, Charles McGowan, Joseph Lackie, and Charles Hodges.

Dancing with the Stars Live! The Orpheum, 7:30 p.m., $49.50 Featuring Lindsay Arnold, Sharna Burgess, Artem Chigvintsev, Sasha Farber, Keo Motsepe, Gleb Savchenko, Emma Slater, Alan Bersten, Hayley Erbert, and Britt Stewart.

KC and the Sunshine Band Horseshoe Casino, 8 p.m., $26 Shake, shake, shake, shake your booty! “Transcendence” Master Design Salon (5149 Wheelis), 5-9 p.m. Opening reception of works by Gwendolyn Barnes Constantine inspired by a friend’s recovery from a horrible attack.

Riko’s Kickin’ Chicken — it’s Burger Week, but this chicken packs a punch. Food, p. 31 SATURDAY July 15 The Maltese Falcon The Orpheum, 7 p.m., $8 Screening of this Humphrey Bogart classic film. Bastille Day Cafe 1912, 5 p.m. till closing Annual event celebrating Bastille Day with a special French menu and decorations. Reservations: 722-2700.

Beauty Shop 15th Anniversary Bar DKDC, 9:30 p.m. Party celebrating the restaurant’s 15th year, featuring music by the Wild Magnolias. Naturals in the City Hair & Wellness Expo Minglewood Hall, 10 a.m. Annual show highlighting natural hair and wellness products. Includes seminars, vendors, and more.


Roadkill Zip-Tie Drags

Hooptie Heaven By Chris Davis Roadkill editor Elana Scherr wants motorsports to be for everybody. “Imagine a dog show where all the dogs are rescues,” she says, describing the kinds of drag races she promotes. “That’s the Zip-Tie Drags.” Scherr’s the editor of Roadkill Magazine and Roadkill.com, which are aimed at a community of car enthusiasts who want to race and work on cars without breaking the bank. “We’re not about 100-point restorations,” Scherr says, describing the casual, recreational Roadkill vibe. “We’re about friends getting together, getting some beverages, and working on [rescue] cars over a weekend.” Roadkill’s Zip-Tie Drags were created as a gathering place for fans of the magazine and lifestyle. “Motorsports can be intimidating,” Scherr says. “People are like, ‘Can I bring my crappy Toyota Celica to this muscle car race?’ Or, ‘All I have is a mini van. Can I still hang out?” At a Zip-Tie event, the answer is always yes. “We have what’s called the $3,000 hooptie challenge,” Scherr says, spelling it out: “H-O-O-P-T-I-E.” It’s a race exclusively for cars valued at $3,000 or less. “Rather than best, fastest, and most expensive cars, we’re looking for the worst — real piles. We want cars so bad people would gladly sell them for $3,000 or less. “I should point out, we do have a safety check,” Sherr adds. “We’re not letting people do something dangerous.” So, if all you’ve got is a mini van, can you still hang out? The last Zip-Tie event found two different mini-vans squaring off against three Ford Festivas, a Dodge Shadow, and a Buick with every body panel a different color. The threshold for entry is low. Roadkill web series stars David Freiburger and Mike Finnegan (who’ve yet to win a challenge) will be on hand to meet fans, sign autographs, and answer car questions. ROADKILL ZIP-TIE DRAGS AT THE MEMPHIS INTERNATIONAL RACEWAY JULY 14TH-15TH $15-$40, EVENTS@ROADKILL.COM

Moonlighting for the Cure Tin Roof, 5-10 p.m. Fund-raising event for St. Jude. Each band performing features one St. Jude employee “moonlighting.”

Memphis Eats Food Festival Robert Church Park, 11 a.m. Inaugural event featuring tons of food, with special guest Logan Guleff. Continues Sunday.

A Day in the Life Hi-Tone, 7 p.m. Music for a Purpose concert tour, with concert being filmed for a documentary.

Zine Workshop story booth, 1-5 p.m. Zine-making workshop in advance of next week’s Memphis Zine Fest. Participants can make a zine for themselves or to sell at the festival.

Booksigning by Frank Murtaugh Burke’s Book Store, 5:30 p.m. Flyer friend Frank Murtaugh signs his novel Trey’s Company, about a group of young friends who thickand-thin it through life-changing events. Jason D. Williams Lafayette’s Music Room, 8 p.m. Concert by piano wiz Jason D. Williams.

ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT

WEDNESDAY July 19

m e m p h i s f l y e r. c o m

Sick of summer blockbusters? Zoe Kazan (left) and Kumail Nanjiani star in the autobiographical The Big Sick. Film, p. 34

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M U S I C F E AT U R E B y A l e x G r e e n e

Wild Magnolias! A New Orleans “tribe” brings NOLA funk to Cooper-Young. Big Chief Bo Dollis Jr. and the Wild Magnolias

July 13-19, 2017

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trip to New Orleans is a regular pilgrimage for many Memphians in search of novel music, cuisine, and culture. Visiting the Big Easy scratches an itch that can’t be satisfied elsewhere. But it’s rare that we get a slice of New Orleans coming up our way. This Saturday, July 15th, will be a notable exception, when the Wild Magnolias bring Mardi Gras to CooperYoung to cap off the Beauty Shop’s 15-Year Anniversary Party. As one of the premiere African-American “tribes” that emerge in full-feathered glory at Carnival time every year, the Wild Magnolias bring a long tradition of deep funk and street marching with them. Karen Carrier, the Beauty Shop’s owner, has always drawn on Crescent City culture for inspiration, and music has always been central to her experience. It was at the 1976 New Orleans Jazz and Heritage Festival that she met her future partners in the original Automatic Slim’s eatery in Manhattan, and she has attended dozens of Jazz Fests since. During one of these visits, she befriended Bo Dollis Sr., the Wild Magnolias’ Big Chief from 1964 until just before his death in 2015. Now his son, Bo Dollis Jr., leads the group. “We played when she first opened her restaurant,” he recalls. “I was young at the time, but I still remember it.” That, of course, was before Hurricane Katrina devastated New Orleans and scattered most members of the Mardi Gras tribes. It took little time for them

to regroup. “Me and my tribe, we came right back the same year as Katrina. That was the hardest Mardi Gras ever. You saw more people crying because they thought this or that person was dead.” It was also a challenge, says Dollis, because tribes typically work for a full year readying themselves for Mardi Gras, and months had been lost. Now, with the tribes in full swing again, such preparations still preoccupy him. “Everybody’s sewing right now, trying to get ready for Mardi Gras,” he notes. “These suits take a long time. It takes all year to get these suits together. Right now in New Orleans, it’s sewing season.” The tribe’s handiwork will be on full display this Saturday night: a five-piece band accompanied by two “Indians” in all their feathered splendor. At 6:30 p.m., they will lead a second line parade on Cooper, followed by a performance later that night at the Beauty Shop’s sister venue, Bar DKDC. While the group naturally performs Mardi Gras parade music, they have been associated with more eclectic sounds for decades. The first Wild Magnolias album, released in 1974, was a clarion call for Crescent City funk, with the band, known as the New Orleans Project, led by the legendary Willie Tee. The sounds of percussive clavinet and metallic vocoder vocals gave a near-disco quality to their biggest hit from that era, “Smoke My Peace Pipe (Smoke it Right).” Their releases since then have been few and far between, but 2013’s New Kind of Funk showed that the spirit of

experimentalism was alive and well. By then the group was led by Bo Dollis Jr., but, as he recalls, “That last album was dedicated to my dad. Some of the songs are his that I just revamped. Some of it’s hip-hop, some of it’s country, some of it is just straight Mardi Gras Indian. There were two originals that were mine, and the rest, like ‘Coconut Milk’ or ‘New Kind of Funk,’ were songs he did a long time ago, and I just revamped them.” Unpredictable synthesizer and guitar textures abound, though all are grounded with powerful live drumming. Dollis says the group is now working on a new album. “For the next album, it’ll be straight Mardi Gras and Mardi Gras Indian. We’re just getting in the studio. It’s been like a month now that we’ve just started working on it. I’m looking at probably Mardi Gras time that we’ll release it, so probably around January; if not that, then maybe Jazz Fest time.” And as for this week’s performance? “It ain’t just Mardi Gras, because I put some funk into it. I might put some oldies-but-goodies into it. It’s just a big party. So I tell anybody who comes to my show, don’t never come dressed up, because you gonna be dancing. My Indians gonna make you dance. I’m gonna make you dance. I might even get in the crowd with you and dance. It’s just a big, fun type of party, but at the same time it’s the New Orleans beat behind it.” Dollis’ parting words of advice: “Let ’em know to come comfortable, because you gonna get a workout.”


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50 WINNER S WIN THEIR SHAR $ 5,000 E ACE HOF DAY!

Even more

July 1 3 TH – 1 5 TH 2 016

20%

30-70%

REGULARLY PRICED MERCHANDISE*

ALL CLEARANCE MERCHANDISE

OFF

OFF

A P E R F E C T F I T S I N C E 1 94 9

408 Perkins Ext | Memphis, TN 38117 | 901-682-7575 | trousseau.com | *Excludes special orders, previous purchases and items already on sale. This offer can not be combined with other offers.

ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT

Inventory Sale

m e m p h i s f l y e r. c o m

Bally’s Tunica and RIH Acquisitions MS II, LLC have no affiliation with Caesars License Company, LLC and its affiliates other than a license to the Bally’s name. Must be 21 years of age or older. Gambling Problem? Call 1-888-777-9696.

17


PARTICLE DEVOTION THE HI TONE CAFE THURSDAY, JULY 13TH

CARA ROBBINS

MIA BORDERS HARD ROCK CAFE SUNDAY, JULY 16TH

FOXYGEN LEVITT SHELL SATURDAY, JULY 15TH

After Dark: Live Music Schedule July 13 - 19 Alfred’s 197 BEALE 525-3711

Gary Hardy & Memphis 2 Thursdays-Saturdays, 6-9 p.m.; Karaoke Thursdays, TuesdaysWednesdays, 9 p.m.-1 a.m., and Sundays-Mondays, 10 p.m.-2 a.m.; Mandi Thomas Fridays, Saturdays, 6-9 p.m.; The 901 Heavy Hitters Fridays, Saturdays, 10 p.m.-2 a.m.; Flyin’ Ryan Fridays, Saturdays, 2:30 a.m.; Memphis Jazz Orchestra Sundays, 6-9 p.m.

B.B. King’s Blues Club 143 BEALE 524-KING

The King Beez Thursdays, 5:30 p.m.; B.B. King’s All Stars Thursdays, Fridays, 8 p.m.; Will Tucker Band Fridays, Saturdays, 5 p.m.; Lisa G and Flic’s Pic’s Band Saturdays, Sundays, 12:30 p.m.; Blind Mississippi Morris Sundays, 5 p.m.; Memphis Jones Sundays, Wednesdays 5:30 p.m.; Doc Fangaz and the Remedy Tuesdays, 5:30 p.m.

Blue Note Bar & Grill 341-345 BEALE 577-1089

Queen Ann and the Memphis Blues Masters Fridays, Saturdays, 8 p.m.-midnight.

Blues City Cafe 138 BEALE 526-3637

King’s Palace Cafe Patio 162 BEALE 521-1851

Live Music Wednesdays-Sundays, 7-11 p.m.; Live DJ WednesdaysSundays, 11 p.m.; Third Floor: DJ Tubbz Fridays, Saturdays, 10 p.m.

Handy Bar 200 BEALE 527-2687

The Amazing Rhythmatics Tuesdays, Thursdays-Sundays, 7 p.m.-1 a.m.

Hard Rock Cafe 126 BEALE 529-0007

The Jason Wells Band Thursday, July 13, 8-11 p.m.; Tori Tollison Friday, July 14, 8 p.m.; Driftwood Ramblers Saturday, July 15, 7 p.m.; Mia Borders Sunday, July 16, 7 p.m.; Memphis Music Monday Third Monday of every month, 6-9 p.m.

Itta Bena

King’s Palace Cafe Tap Room 168 BEALE 576-2220

Big Don Valentine’s Three Piece Chicken and a Biscuit Blues Band Thursdays, Tuesdays, 8 p.m.-midnight; Cowboy Neil Band Friday, July 14, 9 p.m.-1 a.m.; Juke Joint Allstars Saturday, July 15, 9 p.m.-1 a.m.

New Daisy Theatre

145 BEALE 578-3031

Susan Marshall Thursday, Friday, 6-9 p.m., Nat “King” Kerr Fridays, Saturdays, 9-10 p.m., Kayla Walker Monday, July 17, 6-8 p.m., Gerald Stephens Wednesday, July 19, 6-9 p.m.

King Jerry Lawler’s Hall of Fame Bar & Grille 159 BEALE

Chris Gales Solo Acoustic Show Mondays-Saturdays, 12-4 p.m.; Eric Hughes Thursdays, 5-8 p.m.; Karaoke Mondays-Thursdays, Sundays, 8 p.m.; Live Bands Fridays, Saturdays, 8 p.m.

King’s Palace Cafe 162 BEALE 521-1851

Sonny Mack Mondays-Fridays, 2-6 p.m.; Cowboy Neil Mondays, Thursdays, 7-11 p.m. and Saturdays, Sundays, 2-6 p.m.; Sensation Band Tuesdays, Fridays, 7-11 p.m.; Fuzzy and the Kings of Memphis Saturdays, 7-11 p.m.; Chic Jones and the Blues Express Sundays, 7-11 p.m.; North and South Band Wednesdays, 7-11 p.m.

David Bowen Thursdays, 5:309:30 p.m., Fridays, Saturdays, 6:30-10:30 p.m., and Sundays, 5:30-9:30 p.m.

330 BEALE 525-8981

Daisyland presents EPTIC Saturday, July 15, 10 p.m.; Daisyland Special Edition with ZOMBOY Wednesday, July 19.

Sensation Band Thursday, July 13, 8 p.m.-midnight, and Sunday, July 16, 8 p.m.-midnight; Pam and Terry Friday, July 14, 5:30-8:30 p.m. and Saturday, July 15, 5:30-8:30 p.m.; FreeWorld Friday, July 14, 9 p.m.-1 a.m., and Saturday, July 15, 9 p.m.-1 a.m.; Eric Hughes Band Mondays, 8 p.m.-midnight; Gracie Curran Tuesdays, 8 p.m.-midnight; Plantation Allstars Wednesdays, 8 p.m.-midnight.

Flying Saucer Draught Emporium

182 BEALE 528-0150

130 PEABODY PLACE 523-8536

Memphis Bluesmasters Thursdays, Sundays, 8 p.m.-midnight; Vince Johnson and the Plantation Allstars Fridays, Saturdays, 4-8 p.m. and Sundays, 3-7 p.m.; Little Boy Blues Friday, July 14, 9 p.m.-1 a.m.; Chris McDaniel Tuesdays, Wednesdays, 8 p.m.midnight, and Saturday, July 15, 9 p.m.-1 a.m.; Brian Hawkins Blues Party Mondays, 8 p.m.-midnight.

Silky O’Sullivan’s 183 BEALE 522-9596

Dueling Pianos Thursdays, Wednesdays, 9 p.m.-1 a.m., Fridays, Saturdays, 9 p.m.-3 a.m., and Sundays, Tuesdays, 8 p.m.-midnight.

Tin Roof

Songwriters with Roland and Friends Mondays, 7-10 p.m.

Huey’s Downtown 77 S. SECOND 527-2700

Soul Shockers Sunday, July 16, 8:30 p.m.-midnight.

Paulette’s RIVER INN, 50 HARBOR TOWN SQUARE 260-3300

Moonlighitng for the Cure Saturday, July 15, 5-10 p.m.

Purple Haze Nightclub

Karaoke Thursdays, 9:30 p.m.; Kyle Pruzina Live Mondays, 10 p.m.-midnight.

The Silly Goose

903 S. COOPER 274-5151

DJ Dance Music MondaysSundays, 10 p.m.

100 PEABODY PLACE 435-6915

DJ Cody Fridays, Saturdays, 10 p.m. 149 UNION 529-4000

Belle Tavern

South Main

117 BARBORO ALLEY 249-6580

855 KENTUCKY

Nancy Apple Thursdays, 8 p.m.; Bobbie & Tasha Wednesdays, 8-11 p.m.

Earnestine & Hazel’s 531 S. MAIN 523-9754

Amber Rae Dunn Hosts: Earnestine & Hazel’s Open Mic Wednesdays, 8-11 p.m.

Boscos 2120 MADISON 432-2222

140 LT. GEORGE W. LEE 577-1139

Waker Thursday, July 13, 6-11 p.m.

Dirty Crow Inn

Steve Selvidge Friday, July 14; DKDC five year anniversary party feat. Wild Magnolias Saturday, July 15; Dr. David Evans Wednesday, July 19.

Sunday Brunch with Joyce Cobb Sundays, 11:30 a.m.-2:30 p.m.

The Peabody Hotel

The Rusty Pieces Sunday, July 16, 6-9 p.m.

Bar DKDC 964 S. COOPER 272-0830

Live Pianist Thursdays, 5:30-8:30 p.m., Fridays and Saturdays, 5:30-9 p.m., Sundays, 11 a.m.-2 p.m., and Mondays-Wednesdays, 5:30-8 p.m.

315 BEALE

Rum Boogie Cafe 182 BEALE 528-0150

Rum Boogie Cafe Blues Hall

Ghost River Brewing 827 S. MAIN 278-0087

Bonfire Orchestra Saturday, July 15, 6-9 p.m.; Sunday Evening Slowdown with Andrew Bryant Sunday, July 16, 5-7:30 p.m.

Loflin Yard 7 W. CAROLINA

Electric Church Sundays, 2-4 p.m.

LYFE Kitchen 272 S. MAIN 526-0254

Live Music on the Patio Thursdays, 6-8 p.m.

Canvas 1737 MADISON 443-5232

Celtic Crossing Jeremy Stanfill and Joshua Cosby Sundays, 6-9 p.m.; Candy Company Mondays.

The Cove 2559 BROAD 730-0719

Ed Finney and the U of M Jazz Quartet Thursdays, 8 p.m.; Grape Friday, July 14, 9 p.m.; The Bluff City Backsliders Saturday, July 15, 10 p.m.; Don and Wayde Tuesdays, 7-10 p.m.; Karaoke Wednesdays, 9 p.m.

Growlers 1911 POPLAR 244-7904

The Putz, Capgun, Molly Simms Thursday, July 13; The Dirty Streets, James & the Ultrasounds Friday, July 14; PXLS Saturday, July 15; Symptoms, Last Chance Tuesday, July 18; Crockett Hall Tuesdays with the Midtown Rhythm Section Tuesdays, 9 p.m.

July 13-19, 2017

Blind Mississippi Morris Fridays, 5 p.m. and Saturdays, 5:30 p.m.; Brad Birkedahl Band Thursdays, Wednesdays, 8 p.m.; Earl “The Pearl” Banks Saturdays, 12:30 p.m. and Tuesdays, 7 p.m.; Brandon Cunning Trio Sundays, 6 p.m., and Mondays, 7 p.m.; FreeWorld Sundays, 9:30 p.m.

Club 152 152 BEALE 544-7011

18

JAMES TAYLOR SATURDAY, AUGUST 5

ELVIS: THE WONDER OF YOU WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 16

R. KELLY SUNDAY, AUGUST 27

WWE RAW MONDAY, AUGUST 28

Rock and Roll Hall of Famer, and five-time Grammy Award winner is performing, with special guest Bonnie Raitt. Tickets available!

The critically-acclaimed concert event celebrating the life and music of Elvis Presley during the 40th anniversary. Tickets available!

Returning to FedExForum for a night of R&B, with speacials guests Tyrese and Monica. Tickets available!

The superstars of WWE return to action in Memphis for the last time in 2017. Tickets available!

Get tickets at FedExForum Box Office | Ticketmaster locations | 1.800.745.3000 | ticketmaster.com | fedexforum.com


After Dark: Live Music Schedule July 13 - 19 East Memphis

Solo Tuesdays, 7-9 p.m.

Chris Johnson Saturday, July 15, 8 p.m.

Folk’s Folly Prime Steak House

5727 QUINCE 682-2300

Wild Bill’s

Intimate Piano Lounge featuring Charlotte Hurt MondaysThursdays, 5-9:30 p.m.; Larry Cunningham Fridays, Saturdays, 6-10 p.m.

Hi-Tone

Stanley BBQ

412-414 N. CLEVELAND 278-TONE

2110 MADISON

1580 VOLLINTINE 207-3975

The Wild Bill’s Band Fridays, Saturdays, 11 p.m.-3 a.m.

Young Avenue Deli 2119 YOUNG 278-0034

Fingertrick Saturday, July 15, 10 p.m.

Neil’s Music Room

551 S. MENDENHALL 762-8200

Huey’s Poplar 4872 POPLAR 682-7729

Gary Escoe’s Atomic Dance Machine Sunday, July 16,

Jack Rowell’s Celebrity Jam Thursdays, 8 p.m.; Eddie Smith Fridays, 8 p.m.; Triple X Saturday, July 15, 8 p.m.; Cowboy Bob and the Bounty Hunters Sunday, July 16, 5-9 p.m.; Eddie Harrison Mondays, 6-10 p.m.; Debbie Jamison & Friends Tuesdays, 6-10 p.m.; Elmo and the Shades Wednesdays, 8 p.m.-midnight.

Huey’s Collierville

South Memphis Stax Museum of American Soul Music 926 E. MCLEMORE 946-2535

Live in Studio A at Stax Museum Tuesday, July 18, 2-4 p.m.; Gee Whiz! Wednesday Workshops Wednesday, July 19, 10 a.m.-noon.

2130 W. POPLAR 854-4455

The Dantones Sunday, July 16, 8:30-11:30 p.m.

Cordova Huey’s Cordova 1771 N. GERMANTOWN PKWY. 754-3885

2 Mule Plow Sunday, July 16, 4-7 p.m.; Vintage Sunday, July 16, 8:30 p.m.-midnight.

T.J. Mulligan’s Cordova 8071 TRINITY 756-4480

The Southern Edition Band Tuesdays.

Huey’s Midtown 1927 MADISON 726-4372

Frayser/Millington

The Outcry Sunday, July 16, 4-7 p.m.; Grady Champion Sunday, July 16, 8:30 p.m.-midnight.

Haystack Bar & Grill 6560 HWY. 51 N. 872-0567

Lafayette’s Music Room

Slap Junior Saturday, July 15, 9 p.m.-1 a.m.

2119 MADISON 207-5097

Johnny Mac Thursday, July 13, 6 p.m.; Alvin “Youngblood” Hart’s Muscle Theory Thursday, July 13, 9 p.m.; Blackwater Trio Friday, July 14, 6:30 p.m.; Shufflegrit Friday, July 14, 10 p.m.; 3RD Man Saturday, July 15, 11:30 a.m.; Heath ’N Company Saturday, July 15, 3 p.m.; The Michael Brothers Saturday, July 15, 5:30 p.m.; An Evening with Ashley McBryde Saturday, July 15, 9 p.m.; Joe Restivo 4 Sunday, July 16, 11 a.m.; Star & Micey Sunday, July 16, 4 p.m.; Henry Gross Sunday, July 16, 8 p.m.; Amy LaVere & Will Sexton Monday, July 17, 6 p.m.; Boss Trio Tuesday, July 18, 5:30 p.m.; Marcella Simien Trio Tuesday, July 18, 8 p.m.; 3RD Man Wednesday, July 19, 5:30 p.m.; Jason D. Williams Wednesday, July 19, 8 p.m.

Germantown Bobby Lanier Farm Park 7901 POPLAR PIKE

The Whippersnappers Thursday, July 13, 5-7:30 p.m.

Huey’s Southwind 7825 WINCHESTER 624-8911

Young Petty Thieves Sunday, July 16, 8:30 p.m.-midnight.

You want it.

Huey’s Germantown

We Gossett!

• Exceptional Customer Service • Huge Selection and Savings • 12 Brands with Over 2000 Vehicles to Choose From

7677 FARMINGTON 318-3034

Bluff City Soul Collective Sunday, July 16, 8-11:30 p.m.

North Mississippi/ Tunica

Levitt Shell

Hollywood Casino

OVERTON PARK 272-2722

1150 CASINO STRIP RESORT, TUNICA, MS 662-357-7700

The Suffers Thursday, July 13, 7:30-9 p.m.; Phoebe Hunt and the Gatherers Friday, July 14, 7:30-9 p.m.; Foxygen Saturday, July 15, 7:30-9 p.m.; Making Movies Sunday, July 16, 7:30-9 p.m.

Live Entertainment Fridays, Saturdays, 9 p.m.-1 a.m.

AT CASINO CENTER, SOUTH OF MEMPHIS, NEAR TUNICA, MS 1-800-303-SHOE

Midtown Crossing Grill 394 N. WATKINS 443-0502

www.GossettMotors.com

“The Happening” Open Songwriter Showcase Tuesdays, 6:30-9:30 p.m.

KC and the Sunshine Band Friday, July 14.

Minglewood Hall

8:30 p.m.-midnight.

1555 MADISON 866-609-1744

Naturals in the City Hair & Wellness Expo Saturday, July 15, 10 a.m.; Jimmy Herring & the Invisible Whip Wednesday, July 19, 7 p.m.

University of Memphis

Murphy’s

The Bluff

1589 MADISON 726-4193

535 S. HIGHLAND

The Whiffs Thursday, July 13; Aktion Kat Friday, July 14, 9:30 p.m.; Roger Mexico Saturday, July 15.

Otherlands Coffee Bar 641 S. COOPER 278-4994

Sam Mooney, Scottie Spiegelman Saturday, July 15, 8-11 p.m.

P&H Cafe 1532 MADISON 726-0906

Rock Starkaraoke Fridays; Open Mic Music with Tiffany Harmon Mondays, 9 p.m.-midnight.

DJ Ben Murray Thursdays, 10 p.m.; The Bluff City Bandits Friday, July 14, 10 p.m.; Party Shot Saturday, July 15, 10 p.m.; Bluegrass Brunch with the River Bluff Clan Sundays, 11 a.m.

Independent Presbyterian Church 4738 WALNUT GROVE 685-8206

Matthew Smith Concert Sunday, July 16, 6-7:30 p.m.

Lannie McMillan Jazz Trio Sundays, 10 a.m.-2 p.m.

Summer/Berclair Cheffie’s Cafe

3297 KIRBY 797-8599

483 HIGH POINT TERRACE 202-4157

Mortimer’s 590 N. PERKINS 761-9321

Van Duren Solo Thursdays, 6:30-8:30 p.m.

Poplar/I-240 East Tapas and Drinks 6069 PARK 767-6002

Eddie Harris Thursdays, Fridays, 6:30-9:30 p.m.; Elizabeth Wise Tuesdays, 7-9 p.m.; Van Duren

7090 MALCO, SOUTHAVEN, MS 662-349-7097

THE REGALIA, 6150 POPLAR 761-0990

Memphis Nites Club Chick Rogers Sundays, 5 p.m.-3 a.m.

Huey’s Southaven

Owen Brennan’s

Songwriter Night hosted by Leigh Ann Wilmot and Dave “The Rave” Saturdays, 5-8 p.m.

High Point Pub 477 HIGH POINT TERRACE 452-9203

Pubapalooza with Stereo Joe Every other Wednesday, 8-11 p.m.

Bartlett Hadley’s Pub 2779 WHITTEN 266-5006

Almost Famous Friday, July 14, 9 p.m.; Full Circle Saturday, July 15, 9 p.m.; The Shotgun Billys Sunday, July 16, 5:30 p.m.; Juno Marrs Wednesday, July 19, 8 p.m.

Shelby Forest General Store 7729 BENJESTOWN 876-5770

Tony Butler Fridays, 6-8 p.m.; Robert Hull Sundays, 12:30-3:30 p.m.

Sweet Tea Jubilee Sunday, July 16, 8 p.m.-midnight; Karaoke Night Mondays, 9-11 p.m.

Tunica Roadhouse 1107 CASINO CENTER, TUNICA, MS 662-363-4900

Live Music Fridays, Saturdays.

Raleigh Stage Stop 2951 CELA 382-1576

Blues Jam hosted by Brad Webb Thursdays, 7-11 p.m.; No Hit Wonders Saturday, July 15, 9:30 p.m.-1:30 a.m.; Alex Ward’s PigN-Whistle Dance Party Sunday, July 16, 2-6 p.m.; Open Mic Night and Steak Night Tuesdays, 6 p.m.-midnight.

m e m p h i s f l y e r. c o m

Horseshoe Casino & Hotel

ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT

Sun Seeker, Crockett Hall, Particle Devotion Thursday, July 13, 8 p.m.-1 a.m.; The Outcry Debut Thursday, July 13, 8:15 p.m.midnight; Post Animal, China Gate, Brainstorm, The Evening Attraction Friday, July 14, 8 p.m.; A Day in This Life (concert and movie filming) Saturday, July 15, 7 p.m.; Heels new EP The Long Con Release Show hosted by the Modern Interest Sunday, July 16, 8 p.m.; Behold the Brave, In the Whale Monday, July 17, 8 p.m.; RavenEye, Radio Birds Tuesday, July 18, 8 p.m.; New Found Glory Wednesday, July 19, 7 p.m.

Collierville

19


The story goes that around the turn of last century, some fellow in Texas fried up some ground beef and put it between two slices of bread, and, thus, the burger was born. A more plausible scenario: Clarions sounded, the earth shook, the skies parted, and then — behold! — the burger, all beef and American cheese and pickle, that was soon to evolve, like that fish crawling out of the muck, into all types of creatures — turkey, triple-stacked, stuffed, bacon-studded, sliders, donut buns, et al. Too much? Not enough? In any case, it’s Memphis Flyer Burger Week, during which 15 restaurants across the city are offering a specialty burger. Check out our Burger Map of all participating restaurants at memphisflyerburgerweek.com. Check in at participating Burger Week restaurants, take a photo of your burger, and tag @memphisflyer using #FlyerBurgerWeek on Instagram or Twitter. Each tag will be entered to win our Grand Prize Package — the winner will be selected based on most Burger Week restaurants visited and most likes received! And every day of Burger Week we’ll be giving away prizes to random #FlyerBurgerWeek taggers. Burger On!

#flyerburgerweek memphisflyerburgerweek.com Thank you to Memphis Flyer Burger Week sponsors Tennessee Beef Council and Bite Squad. SPONSORED BY:

Dirty Crow

Use the code BURGERWEEK for a free entree (up to $15 off food cost, for new customers only) at BiteSquad!

Burger week Commandments

1. THEY MIGHT RUN OUT (AND THEY WILL MAKE MORE TOMORROW)

If a place runs out toward the end of a shift, take it like a champ and go back the next day. And thank them for working their butts off to do this for you — don’t be a jerk to our restaurants.

2. THERE WILL BE WAITS

Don’t be surprised if restaurants have waits. In fact, be surprised if they don’t!

July 13-19, 2017

3. YOU WILL TIP AND GIVE THANKS

$5 brings out the cheap in all of us. But really you’re getting a gourmet burger, so kindly tip at least 20%. The people who are serving you are working hard during Burger Week, so a kind word will also be welcome — these people are our friends and neighbors.

Our 80/20 Angus beef with onion soup mix in the burger, cooked to perfection. With melted Provolone cheese, beefy soup onions, more melted Provolone cheese, and topped with crispy fried onion straws. All in between a toasted Brioche bun. Served with a side of au jus for dipping. 855 KENTUCKY thedirtycrowinn.com

Flying saucer

SA N M I G U E L

Beef and chorizo, avocado, pico de gallo, fried egg, queso fresco, and Tabasco mayo. 130 PEABODY PLACE beerknurd.com

4. YOU REALLY SHOULD BUY A DRINK AND SOME FRIES

While extra purchases are not a requirement, we think it says something good about you if you show a little love to a restaurant going above and beyond to bring you an awesome burger. Pick up some fries and a pint of beer! You’ll enjoy yourself more.

5. CHECK TWITTER, FACEBOOK, AND INSTAGRAM

Restaurants have been encouraged to post wait times and burger availability for the day on Facebook and Twitter. And participants can share their eats on Instagram and Twitter by tagging @memphisflyer with #FlyerBurgerWeek. And follow us and get up-to-date info on everything #FlyerBurgerWeek.

20

F R E N C H O N I O N B U RG E R

6. DINE-IN

Please note that the $5 burgers are dine-in only.

Four way Restaurant T H E F O U R WAY B U RG E R

Thick and juicy, the Four Way Burger is the Soulsville-area participant in Memphis Flyer Burger Week, and it’s soul food at it’s best. 998 MISSISSIPPI fourwaymemphis.com


Huey’s

B L U E Z 57 B U RG E R

World Famous Huey Burger topped with blue cheese crumbles, Heinz 57 sauce, mayo, lettuce, tomato, and crispy onion straws on a buttered, toasted sesame seed bun. ALL LOCATIONS hueyburger.com

Jack Pirtle’s Chicken

B U RG E R

6oz hand-ground hamburger patty, topped with sauteed mushrooms, Swiss cheese, lettuce, tomato, and homemade sun-dried tomato aioli. 7124 US-64 #101 901mojo.com

RAWK’n Grub Food Truck T H E C A N VA S

You are the burger artist! Add any or all of the usual burger toppings, then take your pick of any one of: egg, bacon, bourbon-smoked salt caramelized onions, Tom’s dips, and various cheese options. 1737 MADISON (AFTER 5PM) rawkngrub.com

Stanley Bar-B-Que

JAC K P I RT L E ’S O L E FA S H I O N G RI L L E D B U RG E R

T H E C O M M O N B U RG E R

LBOE - Last Burger on Earth TH E MAC - N - C H E ESE BU RG E R

Tin Roof T H E S M A S H VI L L E

Local

Tops Bar-B-Q $5 D O U B L E

Jack Pirtle’s Ole Fashion Grilled Burger for just $3.75 — add cheese, chilli, or slaw for .39 each! ALL LOCATIONS jackpirtleschicken.com

8oz of locally sourced ground beef OR 8oz ground turkey OR 4.25 oz chipotle black bean patty — topped with homemade macaroni and cheese, hardwood smoked bacon, and a slice of American cheese! 2021 MADISON lboerestaurant.com

T H E $5 B U RG E R

Ground chuck, cheddar, pickled red onion, and smoked ketchup. 95 S. MAIN 2126 MADISON localgastropub.com

Lyfe Kitchen + Chisca Bar TH E GOBBLER

Decadent turkey burger with bacon, cheddar cheese, avocado smash, pickled carrots, served on a local sourdough bun! 272 S. MAIN lyfekitchen.com

The common burger is a steamed burger that was considered one of the top-10 burgers in NYC. Fresh and super juicy. 2110 MADISON stanleybbq.net

B U RG E R

Custom ground Angus beef burger, with barbecue pulled pork, slaw, and bacon! 315 BEALE tinroofmemphis.com

C H E E S E B U RG E R

2 beef patties served with cheese, lettuce, tomato, onion, and mayonnaise! ALL LOCATIONS topsbarbq.com

Wimpy’s burgers & Fries TH E BARNYARD BU RN E R

1/3 pound of fresh ground grass-fed beef, topped with crispy, thick-cut applewood smoked bacon and a perfectly fried egg, tangy sauce, red onion rings, crisp lettuce, and cherry peppers. 150 N. AVALON 231 GOODMAN RD. E., SOUTHAVEN wimpysburgers.com

m e m p h i s f l y e r. c o m

1/4 lb grilled chuck, mashed with Ball Hoggerz pulled pork barbecue and cooked to your liking — topped with special cheese sauce and Brim’s sweet and hot pork rinds. 1911 POPLAR AVENUE 901growlers.com

Memphis Mojo Cafe S H RO O M SWI SS

ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT

Growlers

M EMPHIS AS C H UCK!

21


NOMINATE PINK PALACE BEST MUSEUM

CALENDAR of EVENTS:

July 13 - 19

Send the date, time, place, cost, info, phone number, a brief description, and photos — two weeks in advance — to calendar@memphisflyer. com or P.O. Box 1738, Memphis, TN 38101. DUE TO SPACE LIMITATIONS, ONGOING WEEKLY EVENTS WILL APPEAR IN THE FLYER’S ONLINE CALENDAR ONLY.

TH EAT E R

The Evergreen Theatre

Guilt, Lies, & Lust … Nowhere to Hide, the final chapter of Kingston Blackmon, full of sex appeal and deception. Chicago’s underworld takes center stage where the rules are kill or be killed. See who remains when the dust settles. (652-5761), www.innercitysouth.com. $25. Fridays, 7-9 p.m., Saturdays, 3-5 & 7-9 p.m., and Sundays, 3-5 p.m. Through July 23. 1705 POPLAR (274-7139).

Harrell Performing Arts Theatre

DINOSAURS AT THE

PINK PALACE

MAY 27 - SEPT. 10, 2017

A Funny Thing Happened on the Way to the Forum, comedy in which Pseudolus, a crafty slave, struggles to win the hand of a beautiful courtesan named Philia for his young master, Hero, in exchange for freedom. www.colliervilleartscouncil.org. $12-$20. Sundays, 2:30 p.m., and Fridays, Saturdays, 7 p.m. Through July 23. 440 POWELL, COLLIERVILLE (853-3228).

Hernando High School Performing Arts Center

Disney Sleeping Beauty Kids, performance as part of the Kidzu Playhouse 2017 Summer Camps program. www.kudzuplayers.com. Fri., July 14, 7 p.m. 805 DILWORTH LANE, HERNANDO, MS.

Theatre Memphis

Summer Showcase: Three Memphis Tenors … and a Baritone, evening that will unite the best and brightest voices for the perfect summer offering. www.theatrememphis.org. $30. Sundays, 2 p.m., Fridays, Saturdays, 8 p.m., and Thursdays, 7:30 p.m. Through July 23. 630 PERKINS EXT. (682-8323).

Sponsored by:

3050 Central Ave / Memphis 38111

TheatreWorks

Victory Blues, after WWII, Jerry Greisinger has returned to a world that has little to do with the one he left. Follow Jerry, his wife, and friends as they adjust. Winner of the 2015 NewWorks@TheWorks Playwriting Competition. www. playhouseonthesquare.org. $25-$40. Fridays, Saturdays, 8 p.m., and Sundays, 2 p.m. Through July 30. 2085 MONROE (274-7139).

P!NK PALACE MUSEUM

901.636.2362

A R TI ST R E C E PT I O N S

July 13-19, 2017

Master Design Salon and Wellness Studio

Much Higher Fidelity!

Artist reception for “Transcendence,” exhibition of paintings by Gwendolyn Barnes Constantine. Fri., July 14, 5-9 p.m. 5149 WHEELIS (685-2351).

OTHER ART HAPPENINGS

2160 YOUNG AVE. | 901.207.6884 HALFORDLOUDSPEAKERS.COM

Open Crit

Critique event where visual artists are invited to bring new and/or in-progress studio work for critical feedback and group discussion particular to each artist’s practice. Free. Tues., July 18, 5:30-7:30 p.m. CROSSTOWN ARTS, 430 N. CLEVELAND (507-8030), WWW.CROSSTOWNARTS.ORG.

UrbanArt Commission Second Office Hours

Explore opportunities to improve the public art plan in Memphis and UAC’s processes. Conversation led by Lauren Kennedy and Linda Steele. Informal, open event. Light snacks and beverages. Thurs., July 13, 5:30-7 p.m. ORANGE MOUND GALLERY, 2232 LAMAR, WWW.URBANARTCOMMISSION.ORG.

ONGOI NG ART

Belz Museum of Asian and Judaic Art

“Chinese Symbols in Art,” ancient Chinese pottery and bronze. www. belzmuseum.org. Ongoing. 119 S. MAIN, IN THE PEMBROKE SQUARE BUILDING (523-ARTS).

Bingham and Broad

“My Kin Is Not Like Yours,” exhibition of works by Debra Edge. Ongoing. 2563 BROAD (323-3008).

The Calliope

“Transmissions,” exhibition of new abstract works by Amy Hutcheson. www.amyhutcheson.com. Through Aug. 26.

Casting Demonstration

456 TENNESSEE ST.

METAL MUSEUM, 374 METAL MUSEUM DR. (774-6380), WWW.METALMUSEUM.ORG.

“BrainStormArts,” exhibition of collage, acrylics, and silk screens by Amelia Lovel benefiting those with brain trauma injuries. Through July 14.

Saturdays, Sundays, 3 p.m.

Crosstown Arts Digital Lab

22

Sprinkler Day at Memphis Botanic Garden, Saturday, July 15th at 10 a.m.

Six-station computer lab supports Memphis’ creative community by providing artists and musicians full access to industry standard art- and music-making technology. TuesdaysThursdays, 10 a.m.-9 p.m., and Fridays, Saturdays, 10 a.m.-6 p.m. CROSSTOWN ARTS, 430 N. CLEVELAND (507-8030), WWW.CROSSTOWNARTS.ORG.

The Caritas Village

2509 HARVARD (324-5246).

David Lusk Gallery

“The Retirement Party,” exhibition of graphic, large-scaled mixed-media works by Tyler Hildebrand. www.davidluskgallery.com. Through July 29. 97 TILLMAN (767-3800).

The Dixon Gallery & Gardens

“Jason Miller: objets de mémoire,” exhibition of photographs using everyday objects that have meaning and memories in the artist’s life. www.dixon.org. Through July 23. “Made in Dixon,” exhibition showcasing the colorful and joy-filled artwork created by artists of all ages in the Dixon’s educational programs. www.dixon.org. Ongoing. 4339 PARK (761-5250).

Eclectic Eye

“Destination Memphis,” exhibition of a visual journey of Memphis music by Ron Olson. www.eclectic-eye. com. Through July 26. 242 S. COOPER (276-3937).

FireHouse Community Arts Center

Mosal Morszart, exhibition of works by Black Arts Alliance artist. www. memphisblackartsalliance.org. Ongoing. 985 S. BELLEVUE (948-9522).

Fratelli’s

“Memphis Series,” exhibition of penand-ink works by David Tankersley. www.memphisbotanicgarden.com. Through Aug. 28. 750 CHERRY (766-9900).

Jay Etkin Gallery

“Side by Side,” exhibition of African tribal and Peruvian folk art. www. jayetkingallery.com. Through Aug. 1. 942 COOPER (550-0064).

Memphis Botanic Garden

“Magic,” exhibition of works by Michael Moffit. www.memphisbotanicgaren.com. Through July 31. 750 CHERRY (636-4100).

Memphis Brooks Museum of Art

“A Feast for the Eyes: 200 Years of American Still-Life Painting from the Hevrdejs Collection,” exhibition of rarely seen still-life paintings by major American artists including James Peale, John F. Peto, Thomas Hart Benton, Georgia O’Keeffe, and Andrew Wyeth. www.brooksmuseum.org. Through July 30.

Rotunda Projects: Nnenna Okore, exhibition of works with burlap to fashion abstract objects inspired by textures, colors, and landscapes. Through Sept. 10. “Unwrapped! 100 Gifts for 100 Years,” exhibition of more than 100 works of art gifted to the museum ranging from ancient coins to contemporary glass and paintings to quilts. Through Aug. 27. “About Face,” exhibition located in the Education Gallery highlighting the different ways artists interpret the connection between emotion and expression. Ongoing. “Drawing Memory: Essence of Memphis,” exhibition of works inspired by nsibidi, a sacred means of communication among male secret societies in southeastern Nigeria by Victor Ekpuk. www.brooksmuseum. org. Ongoing. 1934 POPLAR (544-6209).

Memphis College of Art

“Disappointed,” exhibition of photography and digital collage by Joshua Strydom. www.mca.edu. Through July 30. 1930 POPLAR (272-5100).

Metal Museum

“Metal in Motion,” exhibition and group show of work involving moving parts including hand-operated or run on a motor inviting the viewer to interact with the art. www. metalmuseum.org. Through Aug. 27. “F.I.R.E. James Wade Jr.,” exhibition of cast metal works and drawings by James Wade Jr. that investigate the meaning of place by referencing industrial, agrarian, and vernacular landscapes. Through July 16. “Implements of Grandeur,” exhibition of handmade tools by metalsmiths throughout the United States, including Jack Brubaker, David Court, Dennis Dusek, Jeffrey Funk, Seth Gould, Tom Latané, Timothy Miller, and others. www.metalmuseum.org. Through July 30. 374 METAL MUSEUM DR. (774-6380).

continued on page 24


this week

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SEPTEMBER 23

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C A L E N D A R : J U LY 1 3 - 1 9 continued from page 22 Playhouse on the Square “Home > House,” exhibition of works by Kevin Mitchell. www. mca.edu. Through July 30. 66 S. COOPER (726-4656).

Slavehaven Underground Railroad Museum “Images of Africa Before & After the Middle Passage,” exhibition of photography by Jeff and Shaakira Edison. Ongoing.

THURSDAY, JULY 13:

THE SUFFERS

826 N. SECOND (527-3427).

S P O N S O R E D B Y:

“Sun, Fun, and the Arts.” (7547282), www.stgeorgesgermantown.org. Free. Through July 30.

FRIDAY, JULY 14:

PHOEBE HUNT & THE GATHERERS S P O N S O R E D B Y:

SATURDAY, JULY 15

FOXYGEN S P O N S O R E D B Y:

2425 SOUTH GERMANTOWN (754-7282).

TOPS Gallery

“Drawings and Song,” exhibition of drawings on paper by Henry Speller, a drawing on board by Coy Love, and limited lathe-cut record documenting a 1978 home performance by Love, Speller, and his wife Georgie Speller. www.topsgallery.com. Through July 22. 400 S. FRONT.

SUNDAY, JULY 16:

MAKING MOVIES S P O N S O R E D B Y:

LEVITTSHELL .ORG

St. George’s Episcopal Church

CONCERTS BEGIN 7:30PM UN LESS OTH ERWISE NOTED

Tops Gallery: Madison Avenue Park

“Cease To Exist, Give In to Good Vibes,” exhibition of six new paintings by Dale McNeil. www.topsgallery.com. Through July 25. 151 MADISON (340-0134).

WKNO Studio

“Becky Zee’s 366 Days,” exhibition of 366 clay creatures, one for each day of the 2016 leap year, by Becky Zee. www.wkno. org. Through July 28. 7151 CHERRY FARMS (458-2521).

DA N C E

Chale Akwaaba

Translation, “Homie, Welcome,” featuring DJ Siphne Aaye with the hottest afrobeats from West Africa, exclusive remixes from Ghana, soca, and dancehall. Dance lessons by J. Mack before party. Sat., July 15, 9 p.m. CANVAS, 1737 MADISON (443-5232).

July 13-19, 2017

Dancing with the Stars: Hot Summer Nights

Featuring the hottest cast in dance, including Lindsay Arnold, Sharna Burgess, Artem Chigvintsev, Sasha Farber, and others. $50. Thurs., July 13, 7:30 p.m. THE ORPHEUM, 203 S. MAIN (5253000), WWW.ORPHEUM-MEMPHIS.COM.

Rhythm Nation

Choreography class celebrating videos from the early MTV days. Thursdays, 7 p.m. Through July 30. MCLEAN BAPTIST CHURCH, 815 N. MCLEAN (274-3766), WWW. PROJECTMOTIONDANCE.ORG.

PO E T RY / S PO K E N WOR D

Belle Tavern

24

Writers Persist: Starting Over, join us as Memphis prose and poetry writers share pieces on starting over. It could be a character starting over, a poem about a new beginning, or a reflection

Booksigning by Frank Murtaugh at Burke’s Book Store, Wednesday, July 19th at 5:30 p.m. on a failed project. (647-2432). Free. Sun., July 16, 7-9 p.m. 117 BARBORO ALLEY (249-6580).

B O O KS I G N I N G S

Booksigning by Ace Atkins and Drake Hall

Author discusses and signs new book in the Quinn Colson series, The Fallen. Radio host Drake Hall to join Atkins in conversation. Wed., July 19. BARNES & NOBLE, 2774 N. GERMANTOWN (386-2468), WWW. STORES.BARNESANDNOBLE.COM.

Booksigning by Frank Murtaugh

Author discusses and signs Trey’s Company. Wed., July 19, 5:30 p.m. BURKE’S BOOK STORE, 936 S. COOPER (278-7484), WWW. BURKESBOOKS.COM.

Booksigning by Richard and David Tillinghast Authors read and sign book of essays, Journeys Into the Mind of the World: A Book of Places and book of poems, Sisters, Cousins, and Wayward Angels. Thurs., July 13, 5:30-7 p.m. BURKE’S BOOK STORE, 936 S. COOPER (278-7484), WWW. BURKESBOOKS.COM.

F EST IVA LS

Memphis Urban Arts Festival Weekend

Featuring cooking demos, competitions, business showcase, and more. $7-$10. Fri.-Sun., July 14-16, noon-10 p.m. BOYS & GIRLS CLUB OF MEMPHIS, 1100 VOLLINTINE (527-7994).

S PO R TS / F IT N ES S

Memphis Redbirds Home Games Through July 16.

AUTOZONE PARK, THIRD AND UNION (721-6000), WWW.MEMPHISREDBIRDS.COM.

RiverPlay Bootcamp

Meet at the Gear Shack at RiverPlay. Free. Wednesdays, 6 p.m. Through Aug. 2. RIVERPLAY, RIVERSIDE AND JEFFERSON (636-6669), WWW.THEFOURTHBLUFF.COM.

Roadkill Zip-Tie Drag Race

$15-$40. Fri., July 14, 3-8:30 p.m., and Sat., July 15, 7 a.m.10:30 p.m. MEMPHIS INTERNATIONAL RACEWAY, 5500 VICTORY LANE (969-7223), ROADKILL.COM.

C O N F E R E N C ES/ C O NVE NT I O N S

M E ETI N G S

Groove Phi Groove Social Fellowship Inc. Conclave

Our mission is to ensure that patients in Memphis with lupus, as well as their caregivers, family, and friends, have a safe and supportive place to connect. Free. Third Saturday of every month, 1-3 p.m.

Scholarship luncheon on Friday. Some events at the Doubletree Hotel and Saturdays’ Youth Empowerment Summit at Lemoyne-Owen College. July 19-22, 9 a.m.-6 p.m. MEMPHIS HILTON, 939 RIDGE LAKE (215-684-9842).

Lupus Support Group

NESHOBA COMMUNITY RESOURCE CENTER, 7715 E HOLMES (7552250), WWW.FACEBOOK.COM/ CURELUPUSTN.

continued on page 27


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No ve m

P 4 ber 11 • 10AM

M

Mark your calendars NOW

for a fun and free curated exhibition and sale of handmade crafts

July 13-19, 2017

from area makers and artisans.

Saturday November 11th

in the

Crosstown area .

At our third annual Memphis Flyer

Crafts and Drafts, guests will enjoy:

holiday shopping

26

10am- 4pm

kids beer activities garden. and a

Proceeds benefit

Crosstown Arts!

accepting vendor applications now through august 15th, 2017.

memphiscraftsanddrafts.com


C A L E N D A R : J U LY 1 3 - 1 9 making a donation of $1, $3 or $5. Through July 31.

KIDS

Camp Venture Summer Program

Day camp for ages 3-14 with autism and special needs. For more information, visit website. Mondays-Fridays, 8 a.m.-2 p.m. Through July 28. ABA DEVELOPMENT, 7953 STAGE HILLS (634-8005), WWW.ABADEVELOPMENT.ORG.

Gee Whiz! Wednesday Workshops

Drop-in programs feature music, arts, and hands-on fun. Free for participants. Wed., July 19, 10 a.m.-noon. STAX MUSEUM OF AMERICAN SOUL MUSIC, 926 E. MCLEMORE (942-7685).

Grizzlies Code Camp

Provides opportunities for youth to learn computer programming concepts. $10. Mondays, Wednesdays, Fridays, 9-11 a.m. Through July 21. LESTER COMMUNITY CENTER, 317 TILLMAN (229-1720), WWW.CODE-CREW.ORG.

WWW.THEFRESHMARKET.COM.

Bike to Dinner: Sabor Caribe

Arrive early if you are renting bikes. Wed., July 19, 6:30-9:30 p.m. REVOLUTIONS COMMUNITY BICYCLE SHOP, 1000 S. COOPER (INSIDE FIRST CONGREGATIONAL CHURCH) (2583130), WWW.REVOLUTIONSMEMPHIS.COM.

Good People Good Beer 2017

Evening of beer, food, and more benefiting Operation Broken Silence. $45. Sat., July 15, 7 p.m. PROP CELLAR, 4726 POPLAR, WWW.OPERATIONBROKENSILENCE.ORG.

Memphis Caribbean Jerk Festival

Music, food, and raffles benefiting the Sickle Cell Foundation of Tennessee. $20. Sat., July 15, 12-10 p.m. TIGER LANE, 335 SOUTH HOLLYWOOD, WWW.MEMPHISJERKFEST.COM.

TEP Ice Cream Social

art, music, and early films. $9. Wed., July 19, 7 p.m.

NESHOBA UNITARIAN UNIVERSALIST CHURCH, 7350 RALEIGH-LAGRANGE (266-2626), WWW.TNEP.NATIONBUILDER.COM.

The Maltese Falcon

FI LM

Movie Mania: Pete’s Dragon

Ice cream social benefiting Tennessee Equality Project. $10. Sun., July 16, 2-4 p.m.

MEMPHIS BROOKS MUSEUM OF ART, 1934 POPLAR (5446209), WWW.BROOKSMUSEUM.ORG.

Fri., July 14, 7 p.m.

THE ORPHEUM, 203 S. MAIN (525-3000), WWW.ORPHEUMMEMPHIS.COM.

Free. Fri., July 14, 6:30-10 p.m.

The 15 Film Series

Films in the series will engage with three themes: Memphis history, art, and spatial justice. Free. Thursdays, 6 p.m. Through Sept. 30.

CARRIAGE CROSSING, HOUSTON LEVEE & BILL MORRIS PKWY. (854-8240), SHOPCARRIAGECROSSING.COM.

Twilight Tuesday

CLAYBORN TEMPLE, 294 HERNANDO, WWW.ONLOCATIONMEMPHIS.ORG.

David Lynch: The Art Life

Family friendly movies on the roof of BSL. Free. Tuesdays, 8:30 p.m. Through July 25.

Close look at the American director, screenwriter, producer, painter, musician, and photographer’s

BEALE STREET LANDING, BEALE AND RIVERSIDE, WWW. MEMPHISRIVERFRONT.COM.

I Dig Dinos! Dino Days

Summer program all about dinos. See real fossils, prepare a dino dinner, walk like a dinosaur, and see just how big a T-rex really was. Thursdays, Fridays, noon. Through July 31.

Saturday, August 19

MEMPHIS PINK PALACE MUSEUM, 3050 CENTRAL (636-2362), WWW.MEMPHISMUSEUMS.ORG.

Jurassic Journeys on Land, Sea, and Air

Featuring animated dinosaurs and other animals from Kokoro. Featuring some new and old friends. Through Sept. 10.

Great Hall • 8PM

MEMPHIS PINK PALACE MUSEUM, 3050 CENTRAL (6362362), WWW.MEMPHISMUSEUMS.ORG.

Sprinkler Day

Join us on the Great Lawn for a morning of slipping, sliding, and splashing through a variety of fun sprinklers. Bring your swimsuit, towel, and picnic lunch. Concessions available. Sat., July 15, 10 a.m.-noon.

Tickets start at $40 Available at the Fitz Gift Shop or call Ticketmaster at 800-745-3000 or visit Ticketmaster.com

MEMPHIS BOTANIC GARDEN, 750 CHERRY (636-4100), WWW.MEMPHISBOTANICGARDEN.COM.

Summer Night Lights and Twilight Basketball

$219 Hotel Package

Community centers offer fun and basketball in a safe place to play. Fridays, Saturdays. Through July 31.

Includes a deluxe room and two reserved tickets. Call 1-662-363LUCK (5825) AND MENTION CODE: CPMG19

WWW.MEMPHISGUNDOWN.ORG.

S P E C IAL EVE N TS

The Beauty Shop 15-year Anniversary Party

Bringing back the 2002 menu, Second Line down Cooper on Friday, and music. Fri.-Sun., July 14-16. BEAUTY SHOP, 966 S. COOPER (272-7111), WWW.THEBEAUTYSHOPRESTAURANT.COM.

CASINO PROMOTIONS

Best of Memphis 2017 Nominations

Vote for the best of Memphis. Issue hits the streets September 27th. Through July 18. WWW.MEMPHISFLYER.COM.

m e m p h i s f l y e r. c o m

Memphis Fighting Game Community

BYO controller. $5. Third Sunday of every month, 1-5 p.m. Through Sept. 30. GREATER MEMPHIS MAGIC ARENA, 7505 HWY 64, WWW. MEMPHISFGC.COM.

Nominations for IMB Fourth Annual Innovation Awards

Now accepting nominations for person, business, or organization as a leader among innovators. See website for full details. Through July 14.

Peabody Rooftop Party

Meet on the roof for music and fun. $10$15. Thursdays, 6-10 p.m. Through Aug. 17. THE PEABODY HOTEL, 149 UNION (529-4000), WWW.PEABODYHOTEL.COM.

Southaven Hollywood Feed Dog Wash

WEDNESDAY, JULY 19 & THURSDAY AUGUST 3 • 3PM Earn only 50 points or earn 100 points and play twice!

All proceeds from the store’s self-serve dog wash benefits a Southaven teen with a rare genetic disease who is being treated at St. Jude Children’s Research Hospital. $10. Sat., July 15, 9 a.m.-6 p.m. HOLLYWOOD FEED SOUTHAVEN, 356 E. GOODMAN (662470-5990), WWW.HOLLYWOODFEED.COM.

FO O D & D R I N K EVE N TS

1-3-5 Food Drive

Fresh Market stores partner with local food banks for a charitable giving campaign focused on stocking the pantry for those in need. Guests can help by

FitzgeraldsTunica.com • 1-662-363-LUCK (5825) • Must be 21 and a Key Rewards member. See Cashier•Players Club for rules. Tax and resort fee not included in listed price. Advance hotel reservations required and subject to availability. $50 credit or debit card is required upon hotel check-in. Arrivals after 6pm must be guaranteed with a credit card. Management reserves the right to cancel, change and modify the event or promotion. Gaming restricted patrons prohibited. Gambling Problem? Call 1-800-522-4700.

ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT

WWW.INSIDEMEMPHISBUSINESS.COM.

27


BOOKS By Corey Mesler

Family Ties Talking to the Tillinghast brothers.

R

ichard Tillinghast and David Tillinghast are brothers, poets, and children of Memphis. Richard is the author of Journeys Into the Mind: A Book of Places. David is the author of Sisters, Cousins, and Wayward Angels. In advance of their signing in Memphis, I was able to corner the Tillinghasts and ask them a few questions. They are eloquent — and loquacious — fellas.

July 13-19, 2017

Memphis Flyer: What was it like growing up with two writers in the house? Did both of you know you were going to be poets early on, and did you read each other’s work? Any competition there? David: From the start, Richard knew that he would be a writer. My interests lay in other areas, such as sports and girls. I enjoyed hunting and fishing, while Richard was concentrating scholastically. I joined the Navy. I saw lots of the world. Certainly, there is no competition because that’s in bad taste. Richard: Competition? Well, of course, all siblings compete with each other, but in this case I would say not so much. In my last couple of years in high school, David was in the Navy and off at college, so we weren’t at home together. I don’t think at that time it was clear to either of us that we’d be poets. I was taking classes with Mr. Callicott and playing drums in a band, and my ambitions were to be a painter and/or a drummer. I was still playing in bands [when] I went off to Sewanee, and it was only there that it became clear to me I wanted to write poetry and make my living as a college professor.

28

I’ve known the Tillinghast name for as long as I’ve been a bookseller, and I was told long ago that you are Memphians. Tell me the particulars and what Memphis means to you. David: Memphis is our hometown, historical as well as actual; our 1888 home on South Cox was way out in the country then. Mother and her two brothers went to Central High School. My grandfather, A. J. Williford, was a prominent attorney in Memphis. I remember hot, sweaty summer nights eating watermelon at the Pig and Whistle. Some of us boys would ride our bicycles to the Malco Theater to watch Randolph Scott. Some afternoons, I would take the street car up to the Falls Building on Front Street where my father

had an office. Richard: Yes, even with the old New England name of Tillinghast, David and I are both Memphians. This identification gets stronger and stronger for me as I get older and now spend my summers at Sewanee. Our father was a New England Yankee, and our earliest American ancestor came to Rhode Island in 1640. The Williford side of the family has been in West Tennessee since before the Civil War. When you grow up in Memphis, that’s what you are, a Memphian and a Southerner. Though I have traveled all over the world, I am very proud to be from Memphis. David and I both graduated from Central High. I was among those who hung out with Furry Lewis. Bill Eggleston was a friend, and his work epitomizes something important about our region, as do the paintings of Carroll Cloar and Burton Callicott. Jesse Winchester as a singer and songwriter, the great historian Shelby Foote, and Peter Taylor as a friend and mentor are also Memphians whose work means a lot to me. And my favorite question to ask writers: whom do you read and, if apropos, who influenced you? David: Of the yonder writers, there is Homer’s Odyssey; the letters of Peter Abelard to Heloise; and of course, passages from Shakespeare, the old English ballads. Moving sketchily forward, there is Bobby Burns, James Whitcomb Riley, Winston Churchill’s histories, W. H. Auden. The Georgian poets of the first war: Wilfred Owen, Edward Thomas, Rupert Brooke. Erich Maria Remarque, John Steinbeck’s stories, Hemingway. On a more immediate level, I was influenced by my mentors George Garrett and James Dickey, not stylistically, but through our everyday contact, which eventually developed into friendship. Richard: What do I read? Here is my summer reading: Robert Macfarlane’s Landmarks. Dennis Covington’s riveting Salvation on Sand Mountain. Donald Hall’s Essays After Eighty. Two books by Sewanee graduate Jon Meacham: American Lion: Andrew Jackson in the White House and Franklin and Winston. The Oracle at Stoneleigh Court by Peter Taylor. And I’m re-reading “The Bear” by the greatest of them all, William Faulkner. Richard and David Tillinghast booksigning at Burke’s Book Store Thursday, July 13th at 5:30 p.m.


29

ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT

m e m p h i s f l y e r. c o m


ART By Michael Donahue

Real Life

Tyler Hildebrand on “Retirement.”

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yler Hildebrand is getting older. “I just turned 33 July 3rd,” he says. “I found a gray hair in my beard. It’s the first one. You know what? I’m feeling old.” “Retirement Party” is the name of his new show of mixed-media (house paint and found objects) works at David Lusk Gallery. “I’m retiring a lot of things. I think this is it for me as a working artist.” Hildebrand, a former Memphian now living in his hometown of Cincinnati, began drawing as a child. “My grandma was an art teacher. I was never that close to her. I was close with my other grandma, who was just kind of a rough lady. She would cuss, and she would take off her shoe and hit somebody. That happened.” Hildebrand joined his high school football team and then his football career suddenly came to an end. “I got in trouble and went to rehab in Mexico, so I didn’t get to play my senior year. It was mostly stupid stuff. You’d get arrested for weed. Or you’d steal some liquor from Kroger. And that kind of stuff adds up. So, at a certain point, they’re like, ‘Well, you’re going to have to do some time in juvie.’ It was wild. It was an experience. It was cool.” And he said, “I wanted to be a tough guy. But, looking back, I wasn’t as tough as I thought.” Hildebrand majored in illustration when he was at Ringling College of Art and Design in Sarasota, Florida. After graduation, Hildebrand, who married his high school sweetheart, Emily, opened Hilde’s Gallery and sold his own work. Hildebrand and his wife moved to Memphis after he got a scholarship to Memphis College of Art. Memphis, he says, “is one of my favorite places. It has a weird feel here. It’s just authentic. And sort of dark. It’s got some kind of an aura about it. Some history. Some ghosts.

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Tyler Hildebrand

Something’s going on here.” Hildebrand developed his style, which he calls “a little edgy.” He created his “Mohawk Blvd.” series, which were based on a tough Cincinnati neighborhood, where he used to get in trouble when he was younger. He created fictional characters that populated the area. After he and his wife moved to Nashville, Hildebrand created another series called “Lumberjack Road,” which was based on their lower-middle-class Nashville neighborhood that was filled with food chains. “There was this sculpture where this lumberjack cut this lady’s head open at this table, and it was just White Castles coming out of her head. That was it. Waffle House and White Castles were everywhere.” He and his wife moved to Baltimore, where Hildebrand got a job teaching drawing at the University of Maryland. “That’s when I really kind of started painting whatever I wanted to paint. And I started feeling older.” One painting in the Lusk show includes several colorful Snoopy rugs. “You like Snoopy when you’re a kid.” The painting also includes the face of Johnny Cash, one of his heroes along with Waylon Jennings. Jennings “was a rebel before punk rock or anything. He and Johnny Cash were the outlaws.” And the painting includes a depiction of a man defecating on a wall. “It’s like young to old. And this is the reality. This is real life now. I’m not in this adolescent fairytale anymore. This is real. I’ve got to do stuff. Make money.” His Lusk show includes about a yearand-a-half of work. “I feel like this is my last hurrah. There’s a lot of work. I’ve got a 9-to-5 job now I really like. It’s a desk job. I work at a college. I do sort of administrative stuff. But I’m liking the routine. I like it better than being alone in a studio kind of weirding myself out.” Instead of spending time painting, Hildebrand is “worrying about getting the gutters fixed and stuff like that. Just normal stuff. My wife and I are trying to start a family. I kind of like the normal stuff a little bit.” But then, he said, “I might start painting flowers.” At David Lusk Gallery through July 29th


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Come & Get It The scoop on Riko’s Kickin’ Chicken and Pinks Coffee House.

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Tiffany Wiley of Riko’s Kickin’ Chicken shows off their popular wings. honey gold sauce, and they were faced with another opening day. “It went viral,” Tiffany says. “We had a line out the door.” continued on page 32

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ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT

JUSTIN FOX BURKS

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oney Gold, Honey Hot, BBQ, Lemon Pepper. We’re talkin’ wings here, Riko’s wings to be exact. Riko’s Kickin’ Chicken, created by Mariko “Riko” Wiley, has been a serious contender on the food truck scene over the past three years, serving up party-size wings, whole wings, as well as legs and thighs. Riko, who has worked in the restaurant business for a decade, had that proverbial entrepreneurial bug, while at the same time experienced that universal food truck dilemma: Omnipresence is still just an idea. In March, Riko and his wife, Tiffany, responded to these circumstances with a physical address — 1329 Madison, near the corner of Cleveland. If opening day is any indication, they made the right choice. “We had a line around the building from open to close. We closed at midnight that day,” Tiffany says. She says their biggest seller is the 10-piece party wings, rolled and dipped in one of 10 sauces for $5, but they also have some not-so-wingy best-sellers, too. The shrimp burger is a popular choice — a beef or turkey burger, grilled and topped with shrimp ($10), as are the Kickin’ loaded fries — French fries covered in Ranch dressing, bacon bits, jalapeños, and cheese ($4.99), which you can make Kickin’ Chicken loaded fries if you want to top them with chicken. Recently Riko thought he would try dipping his catfish filets in his signature

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COME & GET IT continued from page 31

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One of Leanne Nastasi’s favorite college memories was hitting all the different coffee houses in Montreal. When the Canadian sales manager and her husband were transferred to Olive Branch, Mississippi, for his work, she couldn’t find any eclectic coffee shops. So she just opened her own, Pinks Coffee House. “I found the perfect spot,” Nastasi says. The spot she found was on Pigeon Roost Road in the Old Towne district of Olive Branch, and over the last three years, Nastasi has carved out just the kind of coffee house she — and her customers — have been looking for. “I knew it needed to be a place kids could come to, so I created the TV room in the back with sofas,” she says. She really wanted to create a place for everyone. “It’s a community meeting place, a safe place, where you can come and not be concerned about what you look like or who you are,” Nastasi says. When she first opened, she tried to create a traditional coffee house, with a top-of-the-line espresso machine and such, but she found that her customers wanted candy-bar coffee drinks and homestyle meals. Now she has people driving in from Cordova and Vicksburg just for her chicken salad. “I put cranberries, pecans, local honey, and not too much mayo and serve it on a croissant,” Nastasi says. Her BLAT is her second-biggest seller, also served on a croissant, which she heats before adding the mayo ($7.25), and customers especially like her BLTP — her BLT topped with her popular spicy pimento cheese ($7.25). She makes quiche — with or without crust, funeral potatoes, mango salsa, and all sorts of sweets, including cupcakes, mini cupcakes, oatmeal cranberry cookies, peanut butter pie, and on and on, and her Rolo caramel mocha is nothing to sneeze at. She also hosts family game nights, tea parties, offers catering and lunch boxes, and kids cooking classes, and her daughter, Gracie, who is 8, runs a kids’ book club. “I have a little girl who wants to be a baker, so I pay her to come in and make the mini cupcakes,” Nastasi says. “It’s a place where you can come with your laptop and get to know different people,” she says. “If you stick around, you feel like you’re part of a family.” Pinks Coffee House, 9120 Pigeon Roost in Olive Branch, (662) 420-7229. Find them on Facebook. Open Monday through Friday 7-ish to 5-ish, Saturday 8 a.m. to 4 p.m.

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They also offer Kickin’ Fried Bologna ($6) which comes with slaw and barbecue sauce, a veggie burger ($6), tacos (two for $7) with your choice of chicken, fish, or shrimp, and cakes and banana pudding, and they offer catering and hope to open a second location in the future. “We’re really embracing the area and getting to know everyone,” Tiffany says. “We cook to order and cook it when the customer comes in and orders. We put a lot of love into our food,” she says. Riko’s Kickin’ Chicken, 1329 Madison, 726-5347. You can find them on Facebook and Instagram. Open Tuesday-Thursday 11 a.m. to 8 p.m., Friday 11 a.m. to 10 p.m., and Sunday noon to 4 p.m. Check Facebook for Monday openings.

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S P I R ITS By Richard Murff

Oxford Beer Run!

Bacon, Eggs…Champagne?

Mississippi brewers can now open taprooms.

O

n the afternoon of July 1st, I drove into a changed Mississippi under gray clouds that foretold a fine summer rain. Some 15 hours earlier, at precisely midnight, that state’s House Bill 1322 went into effect, allowing for legal existence of that wonderful institution beer lovers in Tennessee have taken for granted for so long: the brewery taproom. Until that day, the nine breweries in Mississippi could only sell their product through a distributor, on tap through restaurants and bars, and in package. They weren’t allowed to sell it onsite, but could offer paid brewery tours that gave away free samples. It was a measly loophole that didn’t encourage visitors to hang around and hoist a few.

Yalobusha — its wonderfully named Snopes Pilsner and Blues Trail Farmhouse Ale — was as good a place as any to consider the implications of the three-year political slog it took to pass a law with a lot of economic upside and little to no downside. After all, there are a lot cheaper and quicker ways of getting into drunken foolishness than drinking craft beer at a homegrown brewery. But Mississippi was the first state to pass prohibition and the last to repeal it, so its relationship with alcohol is complicated. per Which has given brewers that much person more to celebrate. Theirs is a business with pretty thin margins after everyone involved has taken their bit. The general rule of thumb among the brewers with whom I spoke was that each barrel sold on 800.467.6182 • West Memphis, AR premise (without a middle man) generates about $1,000 of much-needed revenue. southlandpark.com Sell enough of See Player Rewards for details. Players must be 21 years of age or older to game and 18 years of age or older to those, and you bet at the racetrack. Play responsibly; start making new for help quitting call 800-522-4700. local hires to deal with the demand. The legal fight was largely SOUTHL-57280 Flyer 6/15/17 4.575x6.1 Sunday Brunch 3.indd 1 6/13/17 10:27 AM spearheaded by Jackson attorney Matthew McLaughlin, who is also the executive director of the Mississippi Brewers Guild. McLaughlin expects the number of breweries in the state to double over the next 18 to 24 months. “It, in theory, lowers the risk of new products that they [brewers] want to introduce, because they have the opportunity to test in a taproom.” Low-risk testing leads to more by Susan Ellis innovation, which leads to more products and growth which, politics aside, ought to be pretty straightforwardly a positive outcome. Breweries are embracing their Monday-Friday 11am-2pm new freedom in different ways. For the moment, Yalobusha is all about the beer, MemphisFlyer.com letting the local pizza place and food trucks handle the suds-sopping pub grub AY aspect. MONDAY-FRID The Lazy Magnolia Brewery, in Kiln, is adding a small kitchen to its works in order to make it a destination brewpub. WELLS If you’ve never heard of Kiln, Mississippi, EER WINE B don’t worry, few have. Apparently, that includes the global satellite communication system. The website offered directions and a helpful warning 1250 N. Germantown Pkwy • Cordova that if you put their address in GPS, you 87 S. Second St. • Memphis will get lost. @kookycanuck Which sounds like a road trip I’m just 33 going to have to take. kookycanuck.com

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Now all that has changed. Granted, Mississippi has not been on the cutting edge of the craft beer industry. Only Georgia — despite big, cosmopolitan Atlanta — still doesn’t allow on-premise sales at breweries. Back in 2013, Mississippi became the 49th state to allow home brewing. But this is Mississippi, so, all things considered, coming in 49th out of 50 is like winning the silver. (Lucky Town Brewing in Jackson, has released a brew called Old No. 49 Farmhouse Ale to commemorate the “victory.”) So it was that Mrs. M and I — under those cloudy skies and with R.E.M. on the stereo — went down to Water Valley, a little Oxford bedroom community. Along with the other eight Mississippi breweries, the Yalobusha Brewing Company was celebrating the long overdue HB1322. Located in what Water Valley calls downtown, Yalobusha has staked out a great spot in the former Hendricks Foundry building, connected to a small coffee shop by an even smaller games arcade. Flanked on either side of the building were food trucks offering tacos and a pizza stand. It’s neat. There, over two great offerings from

Memphis:

ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT

Yalobusha Brewery


FILM REVIEW By Chris McCoy

True Stories The Big Sick is a rom-com built around a real-life love story.

A

utobiography is traditionally the realm of the writer, not the filmmaker. Maybe that’s because it’s a lot easier to sit down and write the story of your life than it is to hire a film crew and play yourself doing the things you did in real life. You’ll also be much more successful at conveying to the audience the subjective experience of being you in written form than you would be by trying to recreate real-life events in front of a camera. No matter how much time and money you spend, it’s just never going to look the same, if for no other reason than the fact you’ll be older the second time around. These difficulties are part of what make the success of The Big Sick so remarkable. It’s the true story of how the two screenwriters, Kumail Nanjiani and Emily V. Gordon, met and fell in love. What raises the difficulty level significantly is that Nanjiani plays himself. Documentarians such as Agnès Varda and Ross McElwee have used the medium of film to paint sometimes unflattering portraits of themselves. Memphis filmmaker Kentucker Audley made two intimately autobiographical films: the coming of

age story Open Five, and Open Five 2, which was about the personal repercussions of making an autobiographical film. Mumblecore made a trope of actors having the same names as their characters, but how much they were really “being themselves” is up for debate. Maybe the closest analog for what Nanjiani does in The Big Sick is Audie Murphy in To Hell and Back, only Murphy was a Congressional Medal of Honor winner, and Nanjiani was a comedian. Not to belittle the comedian’s courage. Ever tried to do standup? It’s scary. It’s even harder at Kumail’s at level, which is “You put out the chairs at the comedy club, so you get to do five minutes of material.” Kumail’s got a squad of fellow comedians suffering in the trenches, including Aidy Bryant and Bo Burnham, and a side hustle as an Uber driver. (This is the first clue as to the level of authenticity in The Big Sick. Nanjiani and Gordon got married in 2007, while Uber didn’t get started until 2009.) One night at the club,

Kumail Nanjiani (left) and Zoe Kazan star in The Big Sick, a rom-com based on Nanjiani’s marriage to Emily V. Gordon.

he gets especially big laughs from a cute girl in the audience and introduces himself afterward. Emily is played by Zoe Kazan, who does a fantastic job. She’s a North Carolina girl in Chicago to go to grad school and become a therapist. She continues to insist that she is not interested in dating anyone, even as the number of their dates ticks upwards. But their budding romance threatens to stall out because of cultural forces they can’t control. Kumail’s got a traditional Pakistani family, and that means he’s expected to acquiesce to an arranged marriage. The portrayal of family is another factor that makes The Big Sick an exceptional and unconventional rom-com. It’s clear that Kumail gets his razor wit from his father,

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1720 Poplar at Evergreen 278-1199


FILM REVIEW By Chris McCoy could have easily descended into either schmaltz or self aggrandizement. Director Michael Showalter must get a lot of credit for keeping the tone exactly right and pulling great performances out of the skilled cast. This is a comedy with real-life stakes that’s not about being cruel to anyone. It’s also a little shaggy and loose, which is excusable because the characters are so fun to be around. A tighter edit might have elevated The Big Sick to true greatness, but pretty darn good doesn’t feel like settling.

War for the Planet of the Apes PG13 The Big(ger) Sick: Stick Around for More Laughs R Spider-Man: Homecoming PG13 Despicable Me 3 PG Baby Driver R

Maudie PG13 Spider-Man: Homecoming PG13 The Big Sick R The Beguiled R

War for the Planet of the Apes PG13 (Giant Screen) Wish Upon PG13 The Big(ger) Sick: Stick Around for More Laughs R Spider-Man: Homecoming PG13

Samanthakamani (Telugu) NR Despicable Me 3 PG Baby Driver R 47 Meters Down PG13

War for the Planet of the Apes PG13 Wish Upon PG13 Spider-Man: Homecoming PG13 Despicable Me 3 PG The House R Transformers: The Last Knight PG13 All Eyez On Me R 47 Meters Down PG13 SPECIAL EVENTS: Falsettos Wed. 7/12-7:00pm & Sat. 7/15-1:00pm @ Paradiso NT Live: Salome Sun. 7/16-1:00pm & Tue. 7/18-7:00pm @ Paradiso Shark Week 2017 Tue. 7/18 – 7:30pm @ Paradiso

Angels in America Part One: Millennium Approaches Thur. 7/20 – 7:00pm @ Paradiso

The Mummy (2017) PG13 It Comes at Night R Wonder Woman PG13

m e m p h i s f l y e r. c o m

The Big Sick Now playing Ridgeway Cinema Grill

ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT

played by Anupam Kher, and brother, played by Adeel Akhtar. His longsuffering mother Sharmeen (Zenobia Shroff), tries to set Kumail up with a long list of what are certainly suitable bridal choices, but none of them are Emily. Kumail is certain that if his family knows he’s in love with a white girl, he’ll be disowned, so he pushes Emily away. That’s when tragedy strikes. Emily’s parents, with whom Kumail gets unexpectedly well acquainted, are played by Ray Romano and Holly Hunter. Romano gets laughs while delivering a performance of unexpected depth — I’ve never been a fan, but he does good work here. Hunter looks relaxed and in her element, shining in her individual scenes while playing perfectly with the ensemble. The Big Sick is a balancing act that

35


CERTIFIED/LICENSED EDUCATORS CERTIFIED/LICENSED EDUCATORS

901-575-9400 classifieds@memphisflyer.com ADOPTION

LEGAL NOTICES

maintain a MS Gaming Commission Work Permit, pass a prescreening including but not limited to background and drug screen. To apply, log on to boydcareers.com and follow the prompts to Tunica. Boyd Gaming Corp is a drug free workplace and equal opportunity employer. Must be at least 21 to apply.

AUTO AUCTION White’s Wrecker will auction the following cars on 7/13/17. 4828 Elmore Rd, Memphis, TN 38128. 2011 Chevy 2G1WG5EK4B1175378 2005 Toyota 4T1BE32K15U976259 1997 Honda 2HGEJ634XVH108392 2012 Nissan 1N4AA5AP7CC820269 2004 Ford 1FMCU02154KA97922 2000 Ford 1FMZU74E7YZA82791 1984 Chevy 1G1AN69H9EX100140 2003 Honda SHSRD78843U135320 2011 Chevy 1G1ZA5E17BF235586 1998 Gmc 1GTCS1442W8511486

USIC LOCATE TECHNICIAN Daytime, full-time Locate Technician positions available! • 100% PAID TRAINING • Company vehicle & equipment provided •PLUS medical, dental, vision & life insurance Requirements: Must be able to work outdoors, HS Diploma or GED, Ability to work OT and weekends, Must have valid driver’s license with safe driving record. Apply today: www.usicllc.com EEO/AA

HELP ME FULFILL my dream of becoming a Mom through the gift of adoption. Kelly 800-554-4833 Exp. Pd.

BUSINESS OPPORTUNITIES PAID IN ADVANCE! Make $1000 A Week Mailing Brochures From Home! No Experience Required. Helping home workers since 2001! Genuine Opportunity. Start Immediately! www.MailingPros.net (AAN CAN)

GENERAL ANIMAL LOVERS Bring Your Dog to Work. Carriage Drivers needed downtown. Valid license required. UptownCarriages.com 901-496-2128 EXPERIENCED SCREEN PRINTER Send resume to jbranch@spikner.com or fax it to 901-725-1572

HELP WANTED

July 13-19, 2017

CLEAN AND PINK Is a upscale residential cleaning company that takes pride in their employees & the clients they serve. Providing exceptional service to all. The application process is extensive to include a detailed drug test, physical exam, and background check. The training hours are 8am-6pm Mon-Thur. 12$-19$hr. Full time hours are Mon ñ Thu & rotating Fridays. Transportation to job sites during the work day is company provided. Body cameras are a part of the work uniform. Uniform shirts provided. Only serious candidates need apply. Those only looking for long term employment need apply. Cleaning is a physical job but all tools are company provided. Send Resume to cleannpink@msn.com

36

COPELAND SERVICES, L.L.C. Hiring Armed State Licensed Officers/ Unarmed Officers. Three Shifts Available. Same Day Interview. 1661 International Place 901-258-5872 or 901-818-3187 Interview in Professional Attire NEEDED ADULT Models/Entertainers. No experience necessary. Call 901-527-2460

SAM’S TOWN HOTEL & Gambling Hall in Tunica, MS is looking for the next Direct Marketing Pro, is it you? We need someone who has excellent organizational skills, knows Direct Mail and Database Marketing, previous Casino Marketing experience preferred. Must have strong written and oral communication skills and the ability to meet deadlines in the fast paced casino environment, proficient in Microsoft Office, CMS and LMS. Must be able to obtain and

Southern Avenue Charter Elementary and Southern Avenue Charter Elementary and Middle Schools hiring certified/licensed educators LEGALare NOTICES • EMPLOYMENT Middle Schools are hiring certified/licensed educators for the 2016/2017 school year: for the 2016/2017 school year: HOSPITALITY/ CERTIFIED/LICENSED EDUCATORS EDUCATORS RESTAURANTCERTIFIED/LICENSED ELEMENTARY TEACHERS: CERTIFIED/LICENSED EDUCATORS CERTIFIED/LICENSED EDUCATORS Southern Avenue Charter Elementary and Southern Avenue Charter Elementary andis hiringand ELEMENTARY TEACHERS: thElementary Southern Avenue Charter Elementary Southern Avenue Charter School Southern Avenue Charter Elementary and KK-5 Grade educatorseducators Middle Schools are hiring certified/licensed Middle Schools are hiring certified/licensed certified/licensed educators for the 2017/2018 school year: Middle Schools are hiring certified/licensed educators th Middle Schools are hiring certified/licensed educators for the 2016/2017 school year: KK-5 Grade for for thethe2016/2017 school 2016/2017 school year:year: MIDDLE SCHOOL TEACHERS: ELEMENTARY TEACHERS: for the 2016/2017 school year: BELMONT GRILL Now Hiring Cooks. Must be able to work days. Apply in person Mon-Fri, 2-4pm. 4970 Poplar @ Mendenhall. No phone calls please.

ELEMENTARY TEACHERS: KK-5 Grade ELEMENTARY TEACHERS: 6thKK-5 - 8thGrade Grade MIDDLE SCHOOL TEACHERS: ELEMENTARY TEACHERS: th MIDDLE SCHOOL TEACHERS: Certification inth Math, Arts, Science KK-5 Grade thLanguage 6 8 Grade 6 - th 8 Grade Grade MIDDLE SCHOOL TEACHERS: KK-5 Certification in Math, Language Arts, Science Certification in Math, Language Arts, Science th

RAFFERTY’S We are looking for service minded individuals, that don’t mind working hard. We work hard, but make $. Apply in the store. 505 N Gtown Pkwy

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ACADEMIC COACHES 6 - 8 Grade MIDDLE SCHOOL TEACHERS: Certification in Math, Language Arts, Science ACADEMIC th th COACHES Elementary and Middle School Elementary School 6 8 Grade MIDDLE SCHOOL TEACHERS: Elementary and Middle School th

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ACADEMIC COACHES ACADEMIC COACHES Certification inthMath,thLanguage Arts, Science SENDElementary Resumes: 6 -and 8 Grade SENDElementary Resumes: and Middle School Middle School

Southern Avenue Charter Schools Certification in Math, Language Arts, Science Southern Avenue Charter ACADEMIC COACHES 2605 Nonconnah Blvd. Schools SEND Resumes: Suite 150 2605 Nonconnah Blvd. Southern Avenue Charter Schools SEND Resumes: Elementary and Middle School Memphis, TN 38132 2605 Nonconnah Blvd. ACADEMIC COACHES Suite 150 evans1194@aol.com Southern Suite Avenue Charter Schools 150 1999 MADISON AVE MEMPHIS, TN lmadison@sacsmemphis.org TN 38132 SEND Resumes: Memphis, TNBlvd. 38132 and Middle School Elementary 2605Memphis, Nonconnah COME JOIN OUR TEAM OF SALES ASSOCIATES. evans1194@aol.com Southern Avenue Charter Schools evans1194@aol.com ONLY MATURE, SELF MOTIVATED, HARD WORKING Suite 150 EXPERIENCED SALES ASSOCIATES NEED APPLY. lmadison@sacsmemphis.org lmadison@sacsmemphis.org 2605 Nonconnah Blvd. SEND Resumes: Memphis, TN 38132 APPLY IN PERSON ONLY MON-THUR 10A TO 6P Suite 150 Southern Avenue Charter Schools *RETAIL COMPUTER SKILLS, STRONG PERSONALITY evans1194@aol.com Memphis, TN 38132 AND WORK ETHIC REQUIRED. *HOURLY PLUS 2605 BONUS Nonconnah Blvd. lmadison@sacsmemphis.org *WILL WORK A RETAIL SCHEDULE INCLUDING EVENINGS, evans1194@aol.com Suite 150 WEEKENDS AND HOLIDAYS AS REQUIRED *MUST BE lmadison@sacsmemphis.org ABLE TO ADAPT QUICKLY TO A FAST PACED, CHANGING

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ENVIRONMENT SALES EXPERIENCE A MUST AND A PLUS.

NOW HIRING SALES REP/ACCOUNT REP Contemporary Media Inc., locally owned and operated publisher of Memphis magazine, The Memphis Flyer, Memphis Parent, and Inside Memphis Business is looking for a full-time salesperson to join our team. Must have proven sales experience, excellent communication skills (both written and oral) and be a self-starter. Candidate must be highly organized and able to thrive in a high volume, fast-paced and teamoriented environment. Knowledge of the local market a plus. Preferred Qualifications: · Print, digital, event sponsorship, and mobile selling experience · High-level cold calling · Negotiation skills · High competency in MS Office or Google Drive products · Ability to communicate effectively to a large group Compensation package commensurate with experience, plus paid company benefits

JOIN FEDEX

• Now hiring permanent part-time Handlers, day and night, at $12.62 per hour for the Memphis, TN location • Medical coverage starting as low as $5 per month • Tuition assistance • Nationwide training and opportunities

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Apply in Person FedEx Express Memphis World Hub Recruitment Center 2874 Business Park Dr., Building D Memphis, TN 38118

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Please send cover letter and resume to: HR@contemporary-media.com No phone calls please.

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REAL ESTATE • SERVICES DOWNTOWN APTS

Memphis. 2BR Apts & Townhomes $707; 3BR Apts & Townhomes $813. Community Room, Computer Room, Fitness Room. A smoke free community. 440 South Lauderdale Memphis, TN 38126 | 901-254-7670.

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MOBILE HOME New gated mobile home community, Memphis Blues offers new 3BR/2BA. Located 10 min. from Downtown. Starting @ $799. (Approx. 1200 sq. ft) Call 901-610-8446

1025 JUNE ROAD #4 Great E. Memphis 1 BR, 1 BTH, 2nd flr. rental in gated Poplar East Apartments 1Min from Starbucks & I-240. Pool & Clubroom included. $781/mo. Call 508-0639.

MIDTOWN APT CENTRAL GARDENS 2BR/1BA, hdwd floors, ceiling fans, french doors, all appls incl. W/D, 9ft ceil, crown molding, off str pking. $720/mo. Also 1BR, $650/mo. 833-6483. LUXURY MIDTOWN APT 1703 Locket Place: 3BR/2BA, full kitchen, all hardwood floors, secured parking, 2 fireplaces, 2 large balconies. Over 2000 sq ft. Centrally located. $1300/mo. 901.859.1725 OVERTON SQUARE Studio efficiency $395, 1BR $545 or XLG 1BR $650, W/D, remodeled, porch, pet friendly. $25 credit ck fee. 452-3945

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THE LAST WORD by Jen Clarke

Farewell, Grit ’n Grind

m e m p h i s f l y e r. c o m

My early NBA memories from FedExForum are hazy. I remember a late-season game in 2005 against the Spurs, who were supposed to be “resting.” The Grizzlies ultimately won despite the persistence of Manu GinÓbili, back when he had hair. Since then I’ve groaned “Ugggh, this friggin’ guy” every time our teams meet — which is too frequently, if you ask me. I saw Yao Ming vomit on the baseline once, and I’m pretty sure he stayed in the game. Among vague recollections of J-Will passes and Mike Miller threes are visions of Pau Gasol checking his nose for blood. Thanks to a holiday ticket promotion during the lowest point of the Iavaroni era, I sat courtside when Chris Paul’s Hornets came to town. The thing I remember most about that game was my husband’s ruthless heckling of Peja Stojaković’s shoes, which were still prettier than the home team’s defense. Either I picked the worst games to attend, or the Forum was a different place before it became the Grindhouse. (Pretty sure it’s the latter.) The memories start to crystallize around the time Zach Randolph arrived: The first home game of the 2009 season felt more like the beginning of a crazy experiment than a basketball game. I felt dizzy in the top row, growl towel aloft, that April afternoon in 2011 when the Grizzlies shocked the Spurs and everyone else who assumed they were just happy to be there. I can tell you where I was Left to right: Tony Allen sitting and what I was wearing that Friday night in 2013 as we and Zach Randolph jingled our keys at that former Hornets star who had become a pesky, detested Los Angeles Flopper. At the risk of revising history, it wasn’t always sunshine. But every season, at least, felt like a chapter in a story. Zach Randolph, the basketball player, made the Grizzlies relevant. Then Tony Allen, the basketball player, made them fun. Together, as people, they made them relatable. We knew in our minds a day would come when Memphis, the community, would need them as people more than the Grizzlies needed them as players on the court. We knew one day they’d decide their bodies had given enough to the grind of training camps and ice baths, media avails, and six months on the road. We hoped in our hearts the dates would align. It’s more than basketball, until it’s only basketball, and you realize you’ve invested too much emotional capital in some dudes who chase a ball around. They tried to prepare us, but some data is just too painful to take. Such is life in a one-sport town. Zach Randolph and Tony Allen are beloved by Memphians for a lot of reasons — their “blue collar player” and “all heart, grit, grind” philosophies are engraved in the team’s mythology. But more than anything, to me they embody the fundamental contradictions the city represents. Tough but generous. Proud but flawed and extremely misunderstood. Stubborn and a little anachronistic. They “get it” because they lived it. Like most of my friends who move away, Z-Bo just got a better job offer out of town. He still loves Memphis so deeply that a rumor he’d covered the city’s outstanding utility bills on his way out of town was completely believable. Sometimes business is business, though. That’s another one of the city’s contradictions, sadly — we love you, but we just can’t, y’know, pay you. Loyalty is priceless but damn, $24 million for two years’ work is impossible to turn down. For at least three years, national sportswriters have warned the end of “grit and grind” was approaching. Slowly suffocating opposing teams with defense was no longer a sustainable strategy in “today’s NBA,” they said. The eulogies began as soon as Tony Allen cryptically deleted “currently grinding for the Memphis Grizzlies” from his Twitter profile. Maybe “#GnG” is over, if the term is shorthand for an era, like the Bad Boy Pistons or Showtime Lakers. But just because the most beloved player is wearing a different jersey and the Grindfather is more like a forefather doesn’t mean the Memphis Grizzlies’ best days are behind them. Mike Conley’s annual All-Star snubs will continue. The games won’t be nationally televised, and when they are, everyone’s names will be mispronounced. As long as they can continue to weaponize underdogism, small-market disrespect, and our paradoxical need to prove outsiders wrong despite claiming not to care, the culture lives on. Jen Clarke is an unapologetic Memphian and a digital marketing specialist.

THE LAST WORD

LARRY KUZNIEWSKI

It may be the end of an era, but Zach and Tony gave us everything.

39


MINGLEWOOD HALL

ON SALE FRIDAY: Turnpike Troubadours [8/23] Paul Cauthen [9/14] Scott Bradlee’s Postmodern Jukebox [11/28]

Est. 1942

7/15: International Hair & Beauty Show 7/19: Jimmy Herring & The Invisible Whip 7/20: Rob Bell ìThe Bible Belt Tourî 7/22: BBBS Sports Ball 8/1: Foster The People w/ Alex Cameron 8/18: Elivs Burnin’ Love 9/28: Marshall Tucker Band Methodist Healthcare Fundraiser 10/26: Chase Rice

UPCOMING Sat July 15 - Daisyland w/ Eptic Wed July 19- Daisyland w/ Zomboy Thu July 20 - George Porter Jr. Mon Jul 24 - DJ Shadow w/ MOPHONO, Strooly, and MarceauxMarceaux Sun Aug 6 - HELLYEAH Wed Aug 9- Jidenna Thu Aug 24 - Flow Tribe w/ Zigadoo Moneyclips Fri Aug 25 - Daisyland w/ Ganja White Night Sun Aug 27 - A Drag Salute to Divas Tue Sept 12 - Nothing More Thu Sept 14 - Toadies w/ Local H Fri Sept 15 - Daisyland w/ Valentino Khan Sun Sept 17 - Will Hoge Sat Sept 23 - Andy Mineo w/ Social Club Misfits, Wordsplayed Sun Sept 24 - Tank Tues Sept 26 - ZZ Ward Wed Oct 4 - Blue October NEW DAISY THEATRE | 330 Beale St Memphis 901.525.8981 • Advance Tickets available at NewDaisy.com and Box Office

1884 LOUNGE

7/21: Secret Service w/ James and the Ultrasounds 7/29: Battle of the Bands for St. Jude 8/4: Whiskey Myers 8/10: Drivin N Cryin w/ Birdcloud 8/15: PJ Morton (Maroon 5) w/ Ash. -band

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MURPHY’S

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Pool Table • Darts • WI-FI • Digital Jukebox Visit our website for live music listings or check the AfterDark section of this Memphis Flyer KITCHEN OPEN LATE, OPEN FOR LUNCH! 1589 Madison • 726-4193 www.murphysmemphis.com

TUT-UNCOMMON ANTIQUES 421 N. Watkins St. 278-8965 1500 sq. ft. of Vintage & Antique Jewelry. Retro Furniture and Accessories. Original Paintings, Sculpture, Pottery, Art & Antiques. We are the only store in the Mid-South that replaces stones in costume jewelry.

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7/12: $3 Pint Night! 7/13: Memphis Trivia League! 7/15: Chris Johnson Band 7/22: Avon Dale 7/29: UFC 214 Comier vs. Jones 2 8/3: Terrapin Give Away Night Kitchen Open Late! Now Delivering All Day! 278-0034 (limited delivery area)

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Memphis Flyer 7.13.17  

This week: It's Memphis Flyer Burger Week, so we took a look at some of Memphis' most iconic burgers and the people who make them. Also: Rik...

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