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CONTENTS

BRUCE VANWYNGARDEN Editor SUSAN ELLIS Managing Editor JACKSON BAKER, MICHAEL FINGER Senior Editors TOBY SELLS Associate Editor CHRIS MCCOY Film and TV Editor ALEX GREENE Music Editor CHRIS DAVIS, MICHAEL DONAHUE MAYA SMITH, JOSHUA CANNON Staff Writers JESSE DAVIS Copy Editor JULIE RAY Calendar Editor

I haven’t been writing about President Trump lately. One reason I haven’t is that you can read all you want to read about Trump, anytime you want to. In fact, you could easily spend all your waking hours reading about Donald Trump. The other reason is that when I write about Trump on Tuesday afternoon, my column is often old news by Wednesday noon, especially if the president is watching morning television and tweeting, which appears to rival golf as his favorite activity. This morning, for example, Trump tweeted: “Sorry folks, but if I would have relied on the Fake News of CNN, NBC, ABC, CBS, washpost or nytimes, I would have had ZERO chance winning WH.” I suspect the only reason Trump didn’t add Reuters, AP, Wall Street Journal, Financial Invited to Our Times, USAYou’re Today, Th e Guardian, and other major news outlets to that list is that Twitter limits him toLessons 140 characters. Grand Opening In the face of increasing pressure from the multiple investigations into his campaign’s connections to the Russian hacking of the presidential election, and — quite naturally — Only $99offor your the increasing number stories on those investigations, Trump is left with one option: first month of lessons Convince the American people that every news outlet is “fake,” except the few who will support him, no matter what he does. Part of this effort is the creation of his own fake news operation, which now includes 15 million fake Twitter followers, most of which are “bots” with no followers and no personal identification. But he also has many “followers” such as “Hispanics for Trump” and “Italian-Americans for Trump,” bogus accounts created by hackers who retweet Trump and defend him on comment sites and help spread false news stories. I can’t recommend strongly enough that you read a post that circulated this week called “How the Trump-Russia Data Machine Games Google to Fool Americans.” It’s staggering how we’re being played. One example cited occurred on May 15th, when Trump met with Russian officials in the White House and leaked classified intel to them. The mainstream media ran story after story about the incident. Then, oddly enough, the next day, May 16th, on right-wing media sites, a flood of stories appeared about the time President Obama leaked classified intel about the bin Laden raid that “got people killed.” Don’t remember that? That’s because it didn’t happen. Yet, if you googled “Obama collusion bin Laden” on May 16th, six years after bin Laden was taken out, the first four pages of Google listed stories about the mythical incident. That’s fake news, folks. And it’s a weapon being used by the Russians and by Trump’s newly reactivated “war room.” It’s why Trump suddenly has millions more “followers” than he had two weeks ago. They are cyber soldiers whose mission is to spread disinformation and confuse the American public. Their mission is to provide ammunition for your (often unwitting) Trump-loving friends in the war for American hearts and minds. None of this is normal. All of this should be terrifying. The very institutions our republic is based on — the free press, the judiciary, our intelligence and law enforcement services — are all under assault from this president. The mainstream press is “fake news.” The judicial system is full of biased, crackpot judges. The CIA, FBI, NSA, and other intelligence and law-enforcement organizations are now the “deep state,” whose only mission is to bring down our fearless and flawless leader. People, this is not normal. This is not who we are. This administration has no coherent policies on the environment or trade or foreign relations or NATO or health-care or the budget. As hurricane season approaches, we have no FEMA director. Hundreds N E WS & O P I N I O N of posts in the state department, justice NY TIMES CROSSWORD - 4 department, and other critical agencies THE FLY-BY - 5 have gone unfilled while the president POLITICS - 8 blathers and lies and tweets and golfs. He is EDITORIAL - 10 unstable. He has made us the laughingstock VIEWPOINT - 11 COVER — “RUSSIA!” of the free world. He needs to go, and soon, BY JACKSON BAKER - 12 before he takes the country down with him. He is falling apart in front of our eyes. STE P P I N’ O UT WE RECOMMEND - 16 This week, former FBI director James MUSIC - 18 Comey testifies before Congress. If his AFTER DARK - 20 testimony, as is expected, provides further CALENDAR OF EVENTS - 22 evidence of obstruction of justice, it will BOOKS - 28 likely ratchet up the pressure on this BAR REPORT - 30 president and begin a process that could SPIRITS - 33 lead to Trump’s impeachment. It can’t FILM - 34 happen soon enough. C L AS S I F I E D S - 36 Bruce VanWyngarden LAST WORD - 39 brucev@memphisflyer.com

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fly-by

Questions, Answers + Attitude Edited by Toby Sells

f l y o n t h e w a l l Winds, Power, & MLGW { CHOAS!

S T O R M T H AT W A S By Flyer staff

Hurricane Jerry Lee (or 901?) ripped the city, left a mess.

Google Trends recently tweeted a revealing map of America’s most misspelled words by state. North Dakota can’t seem to get “dilemma” right, while South Dakota struggles with “college.” “Sauerkraut” defeats Pennsylvanians, while Wisconsinites seem to have the most trouble with “Wisconsin.” Here in Tennessee, residents are given to rather chaotic spellings of the word “chaos.” This will come as no surprise to Fly on the Wall readers, who will be familiar with the catchphrase “Get CHOAS a copy editor.”

By Chris Davis. Email him at davis@memphisflyer.com.

Meanwhile, the Memphis Public Works Division received reports of 100 trees down in streets by 8 a.m. Sunday. DAY TWO: On Monday — Memorial Day — the number of those without power dropped to 125,000, as MLGW then had 70 additional outside crews working to restore power in the city. Mayor Jim Strickland and county officials began work to qualify the area for federal disaster assistance. To qualify, the cost of damages to public spaces and the costs of cleanup had to exceed $9 million. DAY THREE: Those without power on Tuesday had lowered to just above 64,000, while the number of reported trees in the street reached 439. The Memphis City Council approved Strickland’s request for $6 million from the emergency reserves for storm debris cleanup. DAY FOUR: Shelby County Mayor Mark Luttrell declared a state of emergency, beginning the process of qualifying for federal assistance. City officials projected storm costs at nearly $10 million, exceeding the federal assistance threshold. DAY FIVE: By Thursday, about 97 outside crews were working with MLGW. The number of those without power was less than 30,000. AT&T device-charging stations were established at libraries and community centers. The Salvation Army began serving meals at the Ed Rice Community Center. DAY SIX: On Friday, MLGW said their restoration resources had surpassed those of Hurricane Elvis in 2003. Those still without 5 power dropped to fewer than 22,000.

m e m p h i s f l y e r. c o m

While MLGW’s Twitter feed may have gotten a little testy from time to time, the Memphis utility company has been working overtime to serve those who lost power in last weekend’s devastating storm. That may not mean much to those who remain in the dark and have grown desperate enough to bribe hardworking linemen with cold beer. Like the old saying goes, “If at first you don’t succeed, remind everybody that the beer’s getting warm.”

Straight-line winds shot through Memphis last week, creating the third-largest power outage in Shelby County history, leaving 45 percent of Memphis Light, Gas and Water (MLGW) customers in the dark (and the heat). Telephone poles and power lines lay destroyed next to uprooted trees, which, in some cases, blocked access to roads. Trees rested on people’s houses and cars, especially in areas of town hit the hardest like Frayser and Midtown. Other places hit hard included Overton Park, where trees fell near Overton Bark and the Rainbow Lake Playground. The Tom Lee Memorial obelisk, which stood in the riverfront park, fell and smashed to pieces on the ground. Public buildings like the training centers for the Memphis Fire Services Division and Memphis Police Department sustained major damage to their roofs. Effects of the storm were felt throughout the city, as 188,000 MLGW customers were without power at the peak of the outages, leaving businesses closed, homes dark and hot, and traffic lights inoperable. As of press time, MLGW had whittled that number down to about 2,500 as crews worked throughout the weekend. But here’s what happened in the week following the storm … DAY ONE: MLGW began by repairing primary circuits tied to hospitals, water pumping stations, and sewer treatment plants, followed by circuits that affect the greatest number of customers. By Sunday morning, the utility was able to restore power to 41,000 of those customers, but estimated full restoration would take more than a week. The utility enlisted the help of 40 outside crews, including crews from North Carolina and Kentucky.

NEWS & OPINION

CHAOS!


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{

CITY REPORTER B y To b y S e l l s

Mississippi River mayors say climate change is a real threat. Mayors from across the country and up and down the Mississippi River (including Memphis Mayor Jim Strickland) vowed to keep working toward a clean future despite President Donald Trump’s removal of the United States from the Paris climate agreement. Trump said last week that the deal was a threat to the U.S. economy and its sovereignty. He said he planned to negotiate a better deal on climate change with other countries. The decision quickly made ripples at home as mayors with the Mississippi River Cities and Towns Initiative (MRCTI) said they were “disappointed” in the decision and that it removes the U.S. from the negotiating table on the details of the program. More specifically, they said rising waters in the Mississippi River would threaten $146.6 billion in agricultural products moved up and down the river each year. Strickland said $6.3 billion of those products move through Tennessee to U.S. and foreign markets, noting that the Port of Memphis is the second-largest on the river and fifth-largest nationwide. But Strickland took a broader look at the issue of climate change in a Friday statement, saying he “supports responsible climate policy and the goals of the Paris Agreement.” “In fact, the city of Memphis started taking action years ago on many of the items outlined by this group of mayors,” Strickland said. “For instance, we’ve already completed a greenhouse gas inventory, and Memphis

The so-called Climate Mayors issued a letter in support of the Paris Agreement. 3.0 will be working on a climate action plan.” On Thursday, a group of 86 mayors from across the country (who call themselves the Climate Mayors) issued a letter on Medium, saying “the president’s denial of global warming is getting a cold reception from America’s cities.” That letter said they’d push their own cities to increase investments in renewable energy, buy and create more demand for electric cars, cut greenhouse gas emissions, and more. “And if the president wants to break the promises made to our allies enshrined in the historic Paris Agreement, we’ll build and strengthen relationships around the world to protect the planet from devastating climate risks,” the letter said. “The world cannot wait — and neither will we.” The letter was signed by the mayors of the country’s biggest cities, including New York, Los Angeles, Chicago, Houston, and Boston. In Tennessee, it was signed by Nashville Mayor Megan Barry and Knoxville Mayor Madeline Rogero. Regionally, it was signed by the mayors of New Orleans and Little Rock.

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Meanwhile, Memphis Rep. Steve Cohen said the U.S. stood to save $5.3 trillion in health-care costs by staying in the agreement. Beyond the financial costs, the decision “could prove to be a calamitous decision to humanity.” “Without action, the continued effects of climate change will lead to increased instances of natural disasters, severe drought, and famine across the globe that could result in humanitarian crises and war,” Cohen said in a statement. U.S. Sen. Bob Corker said he talked to Trump’s team “several times” last week about the decision. “I appreciate the president’s desire to renegotiate an agreement that is more in line with what is achievable in a manner that promotes an increase in the standard of living of American citizens and protects our environment,” Corker said. Love one another. It’s that simple.

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POLITICS By Jackson Baker

Looking Ahead: The Electoral Picture Next week’s District 95 showdown is the opening act of an unfolding scenario. Nature, rather famously, abhors a vacuum. And, for better or worse, few vacuums exist, year by year, in the calendar of elections for Memphis and Shelby County.   Leap years occupy a special space on the election calendar by reason of their being the occasion for presidential elections. In recent years, however, including the whole of the 21st century, Tennessee’s ever-increasing reliability as a red state has significantly eroded the excitement that used to go with its former status as a bellwether state, partisan-wise. Once in a while, a fair amount of drama might attach to a Super Tuesday presidential primary in Tennessee, as it did, for example, in 2008, when Barack Obama and Hillary Clinton each had significant statewide campaigns going on the Democratic side. But normally there is an anti-climactic sense to those preferential primaries here, generally held in late February or March, the balance in both parties having already been tipped elsewhere — in Iowa or New Hampshire or South Carolina. The same steady process of Republicanization (how’s that for a coinage?) has increasingly applied to the rest of the electoral menu — including the races in even-numbered years for governor, U.S. Senate, the U.S. House of

Representatives, and the Tennessee legislature — though some suspense is often generated in primary elections. Such is likely to be the case next year, in what is shaping up to be a hotly contested (and well-financed) GOP primary for governor — with former state Commissioner of Economic Development Randy Boyd and Nashville businessman Bill Lee, both well-heeled, already running, ultra-rightist state Senator Mae Beavers of Mt. Juliet just declared, and 4th District U.S. Representative Diane Black, also wealthy, expected to jump in, along with presumed Shelby County favorite Mark Norris of Collierville, the state Senate majority leader. Democrats, too, will likely have a primary choice, with popular ex-Nashville Mayor Karl Dean already campaigning and another party favorite, state House minority leader Craig Fitzhugh of Ripley, seemingly sure to throw his hat in. (And hark!: Even so well-grounded a judge of the state political scene as the Tennessee Journal’s Ed Cromer suggests this week that 2018 could be a comeback time for Democrats in the gubernatorial race.) On the local election scene, next year’s Republican primary for Shelby County mayor is set for a showdown between Shelby County Commissioner Terry Roland and County Trustee David Lanier. On the Democratic side, former commissioner and longtime political broker Sidney Chism is one certain candidate. Others may emerge, with

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former commissioner and assistant University of Memphis law dean Steve Mulroy, who sought the office in 2014, being one possibility. The identity of the latest primary challenger to 9th District Democratic congressman Steve Cohen, who has fairly easily knocked off several in a row, is uncertain, and 8th District GOP congressman David Kustoff would seem to be home free at this juncture. Looking ahead into 2019, rumored possibilities to challenge Memphis Mayor Jim Strickland include former Democratic chair Keith Norman, pastor of First Baptist Church on Broad; Memphis Police Association president Mike Williams, who ran for the office in 2015; and Terrence Patterson, president and CEO of the Downtown Memphis Commission. Meanwhile, in the current electoral “off year” of 2017, there is a special election in state House District 95 (Collierville, Germantown, Eads) for the seat vacated in February by former Representative Mark Lovell amid allegations of sexual harassment. Though two independents, Robert Schutt and Jim Tomasik, are on the ballot, the race — to be decided next Thursday, June 15th — is considered to be between Republican nominee Kevin Vaughan, an engineer and real estate developer, and lawyer Julia Byrd Ashcroft, the Democratic nominee.

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NEWS & OPINION

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Heavy Weather There is a serious argument to be made that the most important recent development on the national political scene is not the ongoing and inexorable rush to judgment on the troubling Russophilic foibles of President Donald J. Trump, a Barnum-

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severity and in the damage wreaked, the severe weather disturbance that, a decade or so back, we locals dubbed “Hurricane Elvis.” Just a tad further back than that was an ice storm that immobilized transportation, caused fatalities, and knocked out power on a scale comparable to the other mentioned events. Beyond that, we residents of the Mississippi Delta area have learned to cope with frequent tornado watches and warnings and with the real thing itself — like the lethal one of the mid’90s that laid waste to portions of Germantown — and with several successor tornados of similar intensity. We’re talking about lives lost and endangered, billions of dollars in damages, nationwide, setbacks in urban progress, and, not least, the “fear itself ” that President Franklin Delano Roosevelt once declared to be our worst and most crippling adversary. That was a time, of course, when the leader of the nation could be trusted to deal truthfully and responsibility with reality. Virtually all the previous 44 presidents fell into that category. Now, we ended up with one who distrusts not only the consensus of the scientific community but, it would seem, truth itself. There has to be a way out of this predicament. Hopefully, the voices which assured us at the resolution of the Watergate crisis that “the system worked” will be able to say that again. But it remains to be seen.

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like figure who seems more and more out of his element, even dangerously so. That would be the alarming decision by Trump to remove the United States from the common-sense Paris Accord pledging the nations of the Earth to work together on a means to combat the unmistakable menace of climate change. Trump’s decision puts the United States, formerly something of a leader on the environmental front, in the unaccustomed position of an international outlier — at variance not only with scientific consensus but with world opinion. As such, it is as much a scandal and embarrassment as is his cavalier disregard of the nation’s long-established NATO alliance. The president’s decision to jettison such environmental safeguards as currently exist (backed by his scofflaw appointee as EPA head Scott Pruitt) constitutes an immediate threat to public safety, which is more consistently threatened these days by unpredictable phenomena from the natural world than it is by ISIS, al Qaeda, Vladimir Putin, and all the country’s other potential political and military enemies rolled into one. Memphians in particular have spent much of the last 10 days coping with the loss of power coming from the latest in what, in a very short number of years, has been a series of freak weather events. The swirling winds and seeming nonstop rainstorms of the weekend before last closely resembled, both in their

memphis flyer memphisflyer.com


VI EWPO I NT By Juan Williams

New Message Needed Democrats search for a new direction and new leaders. congress continue to probe into the Trump campaign’s ties to Russia, the GOP policy agenda could be derailed before the 2018 races. A Politico/Morning Consult poll last week found that 43 percent of voters want impeachment proceedings right now. A Quinnipiac University poll last month found the president with the support of just 29 percent of self-described independents — a group with which he had scored plurality support last November. But all that is noise inside a political bubble unless there is a winning message from Democrats that goes beyond another dose of fury at Trump. Last week, a group of Democrats formed the People’s House Project to elect left-of-center candidates. The new group’s goal is to give Democratic candidates in the Midwest and rural areas a new look, with a jobs-first focus. It is one front in the battle to shape the Democrats’ future. That includes the search for an energetic, charismatic leader able to withstand Trump’s attacks.

Former Vice President Biden announced last week that he is forming a political action committee to support candidates in the 2018 congressional races. It is also a possible platform for him to run in 2020. And two senators, Elizabeth Warren of Massachusetts and Cory Booker of New Jersey, also look to be auditioning for the role of leading Democrat. They offer different looks for the anti-Trump brigade. Warren satisfies Democrats who want to go toe-to-toe with a president they view as illegitimate, corrupt, dangerous, and even treasonous. They want Trump treated by Democrats the way President Obama was treated by Republicans for the last eight years — with contempt and unrelenting opposition. Meanwhile, Booker wants to offer a contrast to the president by branding himself and Democrats as a force for unifying the nation across political lines. “It’s gotta be about love. It’s gotta be about the connections we have to each other,” he told Vox recently. The Democrats’ search for answers remains a work in progress. Juan Williams is an author and a political analyst for Fox News Channel.

m e m p h i s f l y e r. c o m

The Democratic base is fired up. With Trump’s withdrawal from the Paris climate deal, the party is unified in its fury at him.

NEWS & OPINION

Republicans won the May special election for Montana’s congressional seat even after their candidate throttled and body-slammed a reporter. The upcoming special election in Georgia remains close even with a weak Republican candidate. So, what will it take for Democrats to start winning? First, the Montana fisticuffs showed that Republicans can react volcanically to questions about President Trump’s failed effort to repeal and replace the Affordable Care Act, also known as Obamacare. Their candidate went ballistic when the reporter, Ben Jacobs of The Guardian, asked about the projected higher premiums and fewer people insured under Trump’s health-care plan. Second, last week’s poor jobs numbers and Trump’s lack of progress on tax reform offer more evidence that the GOP lacks a strong record for its candidates to run on. And, third, the Democratic base is fired up. With Trump’s withdrawal from the Paris climate deal, the party is unified in its fury at him. But with the president retaining strong support among his GOP base, are these hopeful signs just mirages similar to the illusions that led Democrats to think Trump could never be elected president? Is there any concrete reason to think that the nation’s politics have changed enough to give the Democrats the 24 seats they need to take control of the House and set themselves up to defeat Trump in 2020? In Montana, the Democratic candidate lost by only six points, while Hillary Clinton, the party’s 2016 presidential nominee, lost by 20. That margin narrowed even as the GOP outspent the Democrats. And most people voted long before the Republican, Greg Gianforte, resorted to violence. Kyle Kondik, managing editor of the Crystal Ball newsletter from the University of Virginia’s Center for Politics, says: “Democrats can point to overall special election trends that suggest the opportunity for significant gains next year if they can be replicated on a nationalized scale.” The Democratic Congressional Campaign Committee announced last month that it was expanding the targets for GOP-held House seats in 2018 beyond the 23 districts currently represented by a Republican but won by Clinton. They are now aiming at an incredible 79 seats. Before he withdrew from the climate deal, Trump’s approval rating was underwater by 14 points: Gallup reported last week that the president’s job performance was approved by 40 percent of the country, while 54 percent disapproved. And as the FBI, special counsel, and

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C OV E R STO RY AN D P H OTO G R AP H S BY

JAC KS O N B A K E R

RUSSIA!

Jackson Baker explores the surprising riddles and realities of a once — and possibly future — adversary.

I

June 8-14, 2017

t is a time, as we all know, when relations have become complicated again between the United States and Russia, formal allies during two 20th-century wars, deadly opponents during decades of the undeclared Cold War, and, at least, theoretically, friendly for some years until the relatively recent past. It is a time when many American politicians are again declaring that a resurgent Russia — no longer Communist and deprived of peripheral portions of the old Soviet Union that are now formally independent — has become this nation’s most formidable adversary once again. But not all American politicians: Our chief domestic drama now centers on the fact that the administration of our newly installed president, Donald Trump, a man of uncertain purpose despite his ad hoc Republican identity and his shrilly stated “America first” declarations, is under 12 suspicion of ongoing collusion with the regime of Russian strongman Vladimir

Putin, a former KGB official who is suspected of having arranged the cyberhacking and sabotage of Trump’s 2016 presidential opponent, Hillary Clinton. Hopefully, a number of investigations now under way will clear up this mystery. But, for most Americans, another mystery remains. No longer an Iron Curtain monolith per se, Russia today has a formally democratic structure, and Putin, now president of his nation and ensconced in a dominant leadership position for the entirety of the 21st Century, is subject to election. But there remain strong suspicions about the validity of Russian democracy, and numerous students of the country insist that dissent, whether by political opponents or by journalistic inquiry, is dangerous and potentially fatal. Meanwhile, Russia’s interventions in Syria and neighboring Ukraine have aroused fears of a renewed imperialism. Though much has undoubtedly

changed about Russia, a statement made by the great British leader Winston Churchill at the conclusion of the Second World War still represents the American state of mind: Russia, said Churchil in a description suggestive of the famous Matryoshka dolls that incorporate layered images within images, “is a riddle wrapped inside an enigma inside a mystery.” All of which encouraged me, in a bucket-list mood, to get a glimpse of the Russian reality for myself. Assisted enormously by the office of 9th District Tennessee Congressman Steve Cohen, I got my visa (no easy thing) and boarded a flight in mid-May for a week in Moscow. I am under no delusion that so brief an exposure entitles me to speak with authority about the nature of that aforesaid riddle. But it certainly opened my eyes.   There came an afternoon, early in my visit, when, in the course of doing a little sightseeing, I disembarked from a tour

bus in the general vicinity of the Kremlin, thinking I could fairly easily find my way “home” to the Best Western Plus Vega Hotel and Convention Center some 12 miles away in Moscow’s Izmailovo District. The problem was that the Kremlin is not a single place; it is a district in itself, a walled-in former fortress of almost 70 acres, encompassing five palaces, four cathedrals, a plethora of monuments, and various official buildings, including both the seat of government and the residence of President Putin, the successor in power to the various czars, Soviet premiers, and Communist Party general secretaries who have ruled the vast Eurasian land mass that is Russia. It is said that that Moscow is some 20 times the size of Washington, D.C., and, while that is misleading, in that the American capital’s teeming Maryland and Virginia suburbs expand its metropolitan reach enormously, it is still likely that the enclosed Kremlin area is large enough to


incorporate most of the important public buildings of Washington, including most of the mall that stretches from the Capitol to the Lincoln Memorial. Which is a way of saying that the periphery of the walled-in Kremlin (the word means “citadel,” roughly) is too extensive to function as a single landmark. And, further, that the Metro station I entered — the one embedded in a glossy, American-style shopping mall with brandname boutiques and a McDonald’s that teemed day and night with Russian patrons — did not lead as directly as I would have liked to the Metro’s blue line, the one leading to the Partizanskaya station in the Izmailovo district. Advice to future American travelers to Moscow (of whom, I suspect, there will be an increasing number, revived Cold War or no revived Cold War): While learning enough of the complex Russian language to get by as a tourist, unaided, is a seriously daunting task, one should at least try to

And, as far as incriminating videos involving playfully incontinent hookers in my hotel room, a la circumstances imputed by one intelligence source to an erstwhile Trump visit, you can be sure that wasn’t going to happen. A little more about the denizens of the Moscow Metro — and the population at large — before dissertating somewhat on my Moscow hotel, a revelation in itself. As I said in one of my fairly frequent Facebook posts during my several days in Moscow, the typical Metro rider is a jeans-wearing millennial glued to a cell phone. Having not ventured beyond the capital city itself, I cannot vouch for the rest of Russia, but, the aforesaid linguistic issue notwithstanding, the inhabitants of Moscow are much more like you and me than they are different. Many of us — even our own millennial population — were raised on Cold-War shibboleths depicting Russia as a “thirdworld” nation, an “evil empire,” a place where hot water was not available, public transportation unreliable, cars unavailable, and public conveniences nonexistent. The Russian subject (“citizen” seemed too free and easy a term) was characterized as a robot-like serf with a brain washed so much and so often as to be barely capable of real thought. In several of my Facebook posts describing the flora and fauna that I encountered (well, the fauna, anyway; my late wife Linda was the botanist, not me) or in conversations upon my return, I reported such phenomena as the multiplicity of BMWs, Audis, and Mercedes on the heavily trafficked (and well-paved) thoroughfares of Moscow; the plethora of hip oases in the mode of Cooper-Young or Overton Square; the ubiquity of American rock-and-roll in bars, bistros, and on elevators; and the even more obvious omni-presence of familiar commercial brands: McDonald’s, Domino’s, Prada, Apple, Canon, Sony, Levi’s, Colgate, Coca-Cola, Avon, Black & Decker, Dolby, G.E., Mary Kay, Dior, etc., etc.   A friend in Memphis, mid-trip, emailed me to suggest — whether facetiously or in earnest — that what I was seeing could be branded by the name “Potemkin.” That

was a reference to one Grigory Potemkin, a seedy courtier and entrepreneur of the 18th century who, in order to impress the touring Empress Catherine II, constructed a series of make-believe villages along the Dnieper River, using false fronts which he assembled and re-assembled in advance of the movement downstream of Catherine’s traveling party. But no, the all-too-evident modernities of Moscow and the abundant splashes everywhere of urban affluence are not cases of the Potemkin village, unless the proprietors of the brand names sampled above are in on the scam. Making allowances for conspicuous differences of a linguistic, architectural, and, undoubtedly, political nature, the Moscow of 2017 would seem to be both more prosperous and more contemporary in its ways — even in the would-be hipsters sporting “Fuck You” and “Meh” T-shirts — than most Americans would imagine. Some of this is undoubtedly due to Russia’s burgeoning trade in its sizeable oil and gas resources; much of it, too, has to do with commercial relationships with the West that are by no means one-sided. I mentioned my hotel: Its very name, Best Western Plus Vega Hotel and Convention Center, advertises its pedigree. It is one of numerous plush hostelries in Moscow that speak to the fact of multinational corporate affluence. Numerous such high-rise palaces, many clearly foreign-owned, dot the city’s landscape, catering to both an international clientele and what would seem to be an indigenous upstart population. The unmistakeable sound of Russian was the dominant language in overheard conversations at the Vega, as in the pricey clothing stores in Moscow’s several multistory shopping malls, the oldest and bestknown of which, the government-owned GUM, directly adjoins Red Square and the Kremlin. It is hard to tell whether a significant middle class is developing in Moscow (which, in the years immediately following the fall of the Soviet Union in 1989-91, experienced a fair share of oligarchic continued on page 14

The Kremlin, a view from the bridge

COVER STORY m e m p h i s f l y e r. c o m

(left) A view of St. Basil’s Cathedral, a Moscow landmark; (top) Marshal Zhukov, the conqueror of Berlin, in front of the Russian Historical Museum; (above) statue in Partizanskaya station of an 18-year-old Russian partisan, killed in the Great Patriotic War (World War II)

master the phonetic sounds of the cyrillic alphabet. That will help somewhat to distinguish one unfamiliar name from another, though there has been a tendency in recent years to render significant public signs in Moscow in both Russian and English. Restaurant menus, directional indicators to various important public places, and, yes, subway signs get this treatment. The problem is that this bi-lingualism, so clearly meant as a convenience to tourists, seems too new to have affected the mass of ordinary Muscovites. Stop someone in a central area of Berlin or Paris or Rome to ask directions in English, and there is a fair chance that, with a minimum of trial and error, you’ll manage to get yourself a serviceable dialogue. Not so in Moscow, particularly so in the city’s Metro (subway) stations, where the helpful English subscripts are less than a year old. What can and does happen is that you often find yourself trying to communicate by a means uncannily like a game of charades, with hand gestures, purposeful pointing, and exaggerated facial expressions. In six days in Moscow, I never encountered anything remotely suggestive of an animosity to Americans, though I did suspect that the proud Muscovites found it not worth the bother to digest a foreign language, particularly one emanating from a once-rival superpower. So getting to the Metro system’s blue line on the afternoon in question was, for me, a downright Odyssean quandary, involving any number of wrong-way wanderings and thwarted dialogues. In my less frantic moments, I harbored the sardonic thought that I would have been better off if some of the darker warnings I’d had from people back home (before the trip and via texts during it) had been on target. That is, if I’d been under surveillance, shadowed by agents of this presumed adversary regime, one or more of my surreptitious minders might have broken cover long enough to point me in the right direction. The fact is, as I’d assured all my solicitous advisers back in the States, I was neither important enough to be shadowed nor so dull that I wouldn’t notice it if it happened.

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despotism) or whether it is the present status of fluctuating international currencies that favors the current conspicuous consumerism on display. As of May 2017, the Russian ruble was worth a shade less than 2 cents on the American dollar. A charge of $50 (the cost of an opportunistic cab driver’s assessment for a roundabout ride to the hotel from the Domodedovo Airport, 37 miles away) required a payment of 3,000 rubles. Not bad, but I was reliably informed later on that I could have bargained that way down; I did, on the way out of town later on. Forget the third-world stories. Everything in the Best Western Vega was new and shiny and well maintained. Everything worked. Besides a posh 24-7 restaurant, there was a sizeable dining area featuring three lavish buffets, each offering an abundance of well-prepared indigenous and standard international fare for the equivalent of $12. Housekeeping and amenities were superb. For purposes of comparison, the two hotels nearest the Tennessee state Capitol in Nashville might ask a minimum of $350 a night, depending on season and availability. A sum considerably less than that amount purchased five nights at the Vega, more than comfortable but mid-range pricewise by the measure of an online search of available hotels. Numerous night spots were in the immediate vicinity, including a karaoke joint wherein, my ears suggested, some would-be mezzo soprano was having a go at a Dionne Warwick oldie, and, charm of charms, a short walk from the hotel was the Disneyland-like Izmailovo complex, whose fairy-tale towers — newish and candy-colored, but built in the country’s long-gone medieval style — housed a mile or two of stalls selling all kinds of souvenirs, including artifacts of the Soviet era. And offering free shots of vodka to the browser. Now, that was indeed a Potemkin Village, and Empress Catherine would have been as delighted by it as I was.   For at least half of my stay in Moscow (and the most productive half, by far), I had the good fortune of being shown around by a talented young tour guide named Ksenia Terenteva. Still in her mid-20s and of

provincial origins, she had mastered several languages, including English, in which her proficiency, though fluid and idiomatic, ranks in her estimation as being only thirdbest, after her prowess in her native Russian and Spanish. We took a sight-seeing boat trip down the Moscow River, the main backdrop of which was the same Kremlin vista which forms the recurrent prop for nightly cable reports on CNN, MSNBC, and Fox. In that context, it always appears other-worldly and menacing, like the fortress it originally was. It appears otherwise to one floating downstream in an excursion boat, seeing the vast complex in bas-relief against a gorgeous blue sky, its several cathedral spires competing for the eye’s attention, with the whole of it set off the rest of an eclectically designed Moscow skyline and underscored by the steady stream of commuter traffic on the riverside roadway at its base. Seen that way, the Kremlin comes off as part monument, in the manner of the Houses of Parliament in London, and part tourist eye candy — especially as one sees it in the context of the apartment buildings, hotels, greenery, and other official buildings and historical structures of its immediate surroundings. Essentially, Moscow boasts three dominant architectures: medieval structures, like the beautifully ornate onion-bulb churches (one of which, the Cathedral of Christ the Savior, was razed under Soviet dictator Joseph Stalin but restored in the last decade); monolithic block-sized Stalin-era apartment and office buildings as well as several huge baroque-style structures (called the Seven Sisters) commissioned by the dictator; and modern, even ultra-modern, skyscrapers that suggest Atlanta, Manhattan, or, in fact, Anywhere, U.S.A. On our boat trip, Ksenia pointed out an enormous amount of scaffolding on the far bank, just to the east of the Kremlin, where, she said, an oversized new park is under construction — a showcase playground (“a big Central Park,” she called it) that will be divided into four parts, each of which will somehow simulate the climate and characteristics of a different season. Russian diners in the McDonald’s at the entry to the Kremlin


This new waterfront wonder is due to be finished by 2018, when Moscow will host the World Cup in soccer. The new super-park will co-exist with the sprawling, grandly landscaped 300-acre Gorky Park downriver, in effect, book-ending the Kremlin and the rest of the central-city waterfront. Numerous signs around town, as many in English as in Russian, advertise the imminence of the World Cup, and

elsewhere along the Moscow riverfront, as in the city center, new grand hotels are being built and others renovated under the aegis of Hilton and Radisson and other marquee chains to house the expected minions who dote on the game and are sure to be flooding Moscow. An inevitable aside: No one should be surprised if, by the time of the first game of the Cup, due to begin in June of next year in Luzhniki Stadium, it should be complemented by some new structure bearing the name Trump. And that would be an appropriate symbol of the latest

political matters, mainly with Ksenia, suggested that Russians have a sense of things that is basically a mirror image of what Americans believe. In their telling, it is not Russia which meddles in the affairs of other nations and has committed atrocities in Syria, but America. (As if to support this notion, American commandos and air units operating in Syria did, in fact, account for inadvertent civilian deaths in a raid on a presumed ISIS stronghold that week.) Trump is hardly regarded as statesmanlike (Ksenia referred to him as an “ill-prepared showman”), but former opponent Hillary Clinton fares worse. She is spoken of as harshly as Putin is over here, and the first time I ever heard the name Seth Rich was from Ksenia, who had picked up from Russian media the notion, pushed in America by Sean Hannity of Fox News, that Rich, a former Democratic National Committee staffer killed in a burglary last July, had been the actual donor to Wikileaks of material embarrassing to Clinton’s presidential campaign and had paid for that transgression with his life. I had hoped to have a conversation with one “Susie,” a member of the dissident Pirate Party of Russia, about the Russian political climate as it affected her, but — no other way to put it — she had second thoughts about talking to me. And I can only conjecture as to her reasons. For more from Jackson’s trip, see the July issue of Memphis magazine.

COVER STORY m e m p h i s f l y e r. c o m

Changing of the guard in Moscow’s Red Square

permutation in the affairs of the city of Moscow and the nation it administers. That necessarily returns one to the subject of politics, which I expect to cover in more depth in a projected follow-up article in Memphis magazine. Some nutshell moments, for now: To my disappointment, while the cable on my flat-screen hotel TV could yield up some vintage Nirvana and other cultural offerings (including serious ballet, like the superb version of Tchaikovsky’s Swan Lake I saw done bravura-style in an adjunct building of the Bolshoi Theatre), it lacked access to CNN, MSNBC, or Fox, the main conduits of news from America. The nearest equivalent were several Russian news channels, a couple of which, including the well-known RT, broadcast in English, as did a Chinese channel. All of those, during my stay, focused on what was then the ongoing world tour of President Trump, and, while they seemed reliably credible on the details of his itinerary, they avoided mention of the ongoing collusion investigation in America. There was one exception — a Russianlanguage channel which offered a summary of the situation one night. I have no idea what the Russian commentary was saying, but the montage of images — Trump, FBI director James Comey, and members of Congress, among others — were familiar and in proper chronological order. Such conversations as I had about

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steppin’ out

We Recommend: Culture, News + Reviews

Invisible Memphis

If on a summer’s night

By Chris Davis

“Also in Raissa, city of sadness, there runs an invisible thread that binds one living being to another for a moment, then unravels, then is stretched again between moving points as it draws new and rapid patterns so that at every second the unhappy city contains a happy city unaware of its own existence.” — Invisible Cities, Italo Calvino Where do we live? How is it usually described? How might it be understood? These are just a few of the questions posed by Our Own Voice Theatre Troupe’s latest offering, Unseen City. The new work, written and directed by Alex Skitolsky and choreographed by Kimberly Barksdale Baker, is inspired by Italo Calvino’s Invisible Cities, a brief novel short on narrative but rich in substance. Invisible Cities tells the story of Venetian explorer Marco Polo entertaining the great Kublai Khan with exotic descriptions of cities he’s visited. Polo’s colorful, often fantastical accounts contradict the Mongol ruler’s advisors and magistrates because of Polo’s tendencies to look beyond brick, mortar, and statistics to describe the real building blocks of every place in the world: ideas. Unseen City is a collaborative work that began with tours through Memphis neighborhoods and conversations with residents. The theatrical event attempts to reimagine Memphis as a place that’s greater than “its past and popular associations” by telling the story of an “otherworldly conqueror” who wants to understand his latest acquisition. But the more he learns about the Bluff City and its people, the less he understands. Unseen City’s action isn’t confined to the stage or even the theater. Although the show’s first half employs dance and storytelling, the second act becomes an interactive tour of Overton Square.

June 8-14, 2017

OUR OWN VOICE THEATRE TROUPE PRESENTS “UNSEEN CITY” AT THEATREWORKS JUNE 9TH-24TH, 8 P.M. $12. CASH ONLY. 274-1000

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Hey, hey, he was a Monkee — Mike Nesmith’s autobiography dazzles. Books, p. 28

Six barstools, chilled glasses, and Tigers fans — the Big S scores a perfect 10. Bar Report, p. 30

THURSDAY June 8

FRIDAY June 9

SATURDAY June 10

“Disappointed” Memphis College of Art, 6-8 p.m. Opening reception in the Alumni Gallery featuring digital collage works by Joshua Strydom, exploring “unrequited expectations.” Specifically, Strydom recorded the disappointed faces of tourists at well-known attractions.

Blythe & Young Block Party Blythe and Young, 5-8 p.m. Party in honor of this Cooper-Young block. Each business will have its own event.

Norah Jones Mud Island Amphitheatre, 8 p.m., $37 Norah Jones performs tonight in support of her genre-stretching album, Day Breaks. Opening is the Candles. The Comedy of Errors Theatre Mainstage, University of Memphis, 7 p.m., $16 The Tennessee Shakespeare Company presents this play about twins separated at birth.

Cut Throat Freak Show Hi-Tone, 7 p.m., $8 Cut Throat Freak Show — burlesque, fire-eating, juggling, stunts, and more — pulls into town for its 20th anniversary tour. Uncensored Live: Variety Show Chuckles Comedy Club, 7-10 p.m., $10 A showcase with sketch and standup comedy, music, dance, and live painting (!).

The Moonpie Project Crosstown Alley, 5-8 p.m. The latest in this ongoing mural series features the work of Benjamin Pierce in which he depicts “the world as I choose to see it.”

OUTbid: An Evening of Pure Imagination Clark Opera Memphis Center, 7 p.m., $50 Silent and live auctions benefiting OUTMemphis and featuring wine and craft beer and music by the Bluff City Soul Collective.


Shannon Merritt (left) and Jamie Wright

BAM!

JUNE 8

By Chris Davis

901 Comics turns one year old this week, and Shannon Merritt, a co-owner of the Cooper-Young shop at 2162 Young, is unequivocal about the milestone. “This has been the best year of my adult life,” the lifelong comic book fan says. In past lives, Merritt, who sports a forearm tattoo of Daredevil (original yellow costume, of course), has been a couple of different kinds of hero. He’s served his country in the Marine Corps, and he’s served his community as an officer with the Memphis Police Department. But secretly — and sometimes not so secretly — all he ever really wanted to be was a comic book store guy. The missing piece of the puzzle was partner Jamie Wright, a P&H Cafe barback and comic book collector who took a job helping Marvel’s Iron Man creator Stan Lee work marathon autograph sessions. With Wonder Woman on top at the box office and comic book properties dominating screens large and small, there’s never been a better time to be a fan, and Merritt says business has been good. “This is the coolest neighborhood in Memphis,” he adds, stressing the need for a comic shop to be more than just a place to pick up graphic novels and superhero titles. Nestled between a record store and a coffee shop, it’s a location that attracts readers, writers, artists, and musicians looking as much for community as commerce. “Now I get to try out all the things I thought would be great to do if I ever had a comic book store,” Merritt says. He’s particularly proud of his book club for comic readers and recent changes that make 901 Comics a more welcoming space for gaming culture. This week, 901 Comics celebrates a year in business with in-store signings by Marvel and DC veterans Joe Staton and Pat Broderick on Friday and Saturday, June 9th and 10th. Saturday’s 5-8 p.m. music lineup at the Cooper-Young Gazebo features the Turn It Offs, the Gloryholes, Shamefinger, and comedian Brandon Sams. 901 COMICS ONE YEAR ANNIVERSARY CELEBRATION ALL WEEK LONG WITH CREATOR SIGNINGS JUNE 9TH-10TH AND MUSIC IN THE COOPER-YOUNG GAZEBO SATURDAY JUNE 10TH, 5-8 P.M. FREE.

DEAD SOLDIERS

JUNE 7

DEBORAH SWINEY & ED FINNEY 8PM JUNE 8

DEAD SOLDIERS 9PM JUNE 9

ALMOST FAMOUS 10PM JUNE 10

GRAHAM WINCHESTER & THE AMMUNITION 10PM JUNE 11

JIMMY DAVIS 4PM JUNE 12

SCOTT & VANESSA SUDBURY 6PM JUNE 13

Feast on the Farm Agricenter International, 6 p.m., $125 Fund-raising dinner for Agricenter International featuring food from Erling Jensen, Fork It Over, the Butcher Shop, Pimento’s, MEMPops, Taziki’s, and more.

WEDNESDAY June 14

GPAC Food Truck & Music Festival Germantown Performing Arts Center, 3-8 p.m. All your favorite food trucks will be there, including Say Cheese, Mojo Cafe, Arepa901, and Riko’s Kickin’ Chicken. Music by Jason D. Williams, Memphis Jones, and Proud Mary.

Food Truck Garden Party Memphis Botanic Garden, 5-8 p.m., $10 Tonight’s theme is Beach Party. Live music by Movie Night.

Author Festival Barnes & Noble Wolf Chase, 1-4 p.m. Annual festival featuring local authors discussing their books. This year’s lineup includes Otis Sanford (From Boss Crump to King Willie: How Race Changed Memphis Politics) and Dr. Carlos Handy (Father of the Blues: An Autobiography).

JUNE 14

BREEZE CAYOLLE & NEW ORLEANS 5:30PM JUNE 9

ALMOST FAMOUS

The Bacon Brothers Germantown Performing Arts Center, 7:30 p.m., $35 Rock concert by Kevin Bacon and his brother Michael.

2 1 1 9 M A D I S O N AV E N U E MEMPHIS, TN 38104 (901) 207-5097 L A FAY E T T E S . C O M

m e m p h i s f l y e r. c o m

Troisique, The Chosen Ones Halloran Centre, 5:30 p.m., $45 Involves a short film, a dramatic stage play, and a fashion show.

SUNDAY June 11

JAMES AND THE ULTRASOUNDS 8PM

ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT

Chris Pine (left) tries to keep up with Gal Gadot in Wonder Woman, the first feature film about the Amazing Amazon. Film, p. 34

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MUSIC By Alex Greene

Red Hot! A homegrown tribute to Sun Records.

June 8-14, 2017

S

18

un Records’ legacy has been on the rise. Occasionally eclipsed by other luminaries of rock-and-roll, these days it would seem to be at high noon. The Country Music Hall of Fame recently hosted a special exhibit on Sam Phillips, Sun’s visionary founder. Meanwhile, Peter Guralnick recently published the definitive biography of Phillips. And then we have the CMT series, Sun Records, which was wellreceived despite not being renewed for a second season. But the most telling sign of a rejuvenated Sun has been the revival of the studios that originally captured the music. Engineer/producer Matt Ross-Spang began his career at Sun Studio, helping to stock its recording facility with vintage gear, and more recently moved to Sam Phillips Recording, helping to renovate it. Fittingly, the first project done in the newly reorganized space was the tribute Feel Like Going Home: The Songs of Charlie Rich. Now, recorded jointly at Phillips and Sun, we have another tribute album about to drop nationally, Red Hot: A Memphis Celebration of Sun Records, with all sales revenue benefiting the St. Jude Children’s Research Hospital. This album, already available in Memphis, is notable for relying only on local talent. Originating well before the television series, it leapt from the imaginations of Bryan Hayes and Steve Dunavant, of the local Americana Music

Society. They contacted co-producer Tamara Saviano. “Steve and I first reached out to Tamara,” says Hayes. “She had done several of these tribute albums. She won a Grammy for Beautiful Dreamer: The songs of Stephen Foster. And when we reached out to her, she said she wanted to work with Luther [Dickinson].” As it turned out, Dickinson would become both co-producer and band leader. This was especially fitting given that his father, the late Jim Dickinson, cut the “Cadillac Man” single for Sun in 1966. A crack team of Memphis players steeped in the Sun tradition was recruited: Luther Dickinson on guitar, his brother Cody on drums, John Paul Keith on guitar, Amy LaVere on bass, and Rick Steff on piano. This house band drew on the vocal talents of the players for some numbers. “We knew everybody was going to honor the original compositions and recordings, but we wanted to have a little bit of leeway for our players to put their stamp on it,” says Hayes. John Paul Keith, whose voice (since he quit smoking) conjures up the young Roy Orbison, kicks things off, with a sax cameo from Jim Spake. Amy LaVere offers a smooth version of “Ten Cats Down” by the Miller Sisters. And Luther Dickinson offers a two-part workout of Howlin’ Wolf’s “Moanin’ at Midnight.” But the band also backs notable guest vocalists, including Jimbo Mathus, Alvin Youngblood Hart, Shawn Camp, and Bryan Hayes himself. The most vintage sounds blossom in Valerie June’s “Sure

(from left to right) Kevin Houston, Cody Dickinson, Ken Steorts, Bryan Hayes, Steve Dunavant, Jimbo Mathus, Rick Steff, Valerie June, Amy LaVere, Luther Dickinson, and John Paul Keith

to Fall (In Love with You).” Chuck Mead, musical director for the CMT series, also leads several Sun Records cast members and the house band through an impromptu version of “Red Hot.” I asked John Paul Keith if there were any rehearsals. “Oh no!” he said. “We just showed up. They didn’t rehearse when they made the records. Why should we? We even had the advantage of hearing it all our lives.” Simply being in the old studios put the band in the right frame of mind as they cut most of the album live. “In some cases, we were using the exact same microphones used in the original sessions,” notes Hayes. “Rick Steff was playing the same piano that Charlie Rich recorded on. The band would do a runthrough, Matt would set the mics up, and we were rolling tape. There were a couple of them that were one-takers.” Staying true to the spirit of Sun also informed the song selection. Keith notes, “I was really pleased when I saw the final track listing. There was some really well-known stuff, but there were some deep cuts as well.” The only deviation from this was the album’s one original song, “Tough Titty” by Bobby Rush. His contribution highlights Sun’s blues legacy, which is often overlooked. Says Keith, “You could argue that Sun was one of the most important blues labels ever.” In view of Phillips’ quest for the unique, Rush’s tune may conjure the label’s original spirit best of all. Though there was never a Sun version of the song, as Keith notes, “Bobby recorded it there, so there is one now.”


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19


ROBERT RANDOLPH THURSDAY, JUNE 8TH NEW DAISY THEATRE

NORAH JONES THURSDAY, JUNE 8TH MUD ISLAND AMPHITHEATRE

PAUL MCKINNEY SATURDAY, JUNE 10TH CROSSTOWN ARTS

After Dark: Live Music Schedule June 8 - 14 5:30-9:30 p.m.

Club 152 152 BEALE 544-7011

Alfred’s 197 BEALE 525-3711

Gary Hardy & Memphis 2 Thursdays-Saturdays, 6-9 p.m.; Karaoke Thursdays, TuesdaysWednesdays, 9 p.m.-1 a.m., and Sundays-Mondays, 10 p.m.-2 a.m.; Mandi Thomas Fridays, Saturdays, 6-9 p.m.; The 901 Heavy Hitters Fridays, Saturdays, 10 p.m.-2 a.m.; Flyin’ Ryan Fridays, Saturdays, 2:30 a.m.; Memphis Jazz Orchestra Sundays, 6-9 p.m.

B.B. King’s Blues Club 143 BEALE 524-KING

The King Beez Thursdays, 5:30 p.m.; B.B. King’s All Stars Thursdays, Fridays, 8 p.m.; Will Tucker Band Fridays, Saturdays, 5 p.m.; Lisa G and Flic’s Pic’s Band Saturdays, Sundays, 12:30 p.m.; Blind Mississippi Morris Sundays, 5 p.m.; Memphis Jones Sundays, Wednesdays 5:30 p.m.; Doc Fangaz and the Remedy Tuesdays, 5:30 p.m.

Blue Note Bar & Grill 341-345 BEALE 577-1089

Queen Ann and the Memphis Blues Masters Fridays, Saturdays, 8 p.m.-midnight.

Blues City Cafe 138 BEALE 526-3637

Handy Bar 200 BEALE 527-2687

Bad Boy Matt & the Amazing Rhythmatics Tuesdays, Thursdays-Sundays, 7 p.m.-1 a.m.

Hard Rock Cafe 126 BEALE 529-0007

Torri Tollison Thursday, June 8, 6:30-9:30 p.m.; School of Rock Friday, June 9, 6-8 p.m.; Laughing at the Rock Comedy Show Friday, June 9, 9-11 p.m.; Chris Johnson Duo Saturday, June 10, 7-10 p.m.; 901 Old School Saturday Saturday, June 10, 10 p.m.-2 a.m.

Itta Bena 145 BEALE 578-3031

Gerald Stephens Fridays, Saturdays, 6-9 p.m.; Nat Kerr Fridays, Saturdays, 9-10 p.m.;Kayla Walker Tuesday, 6-8 p.m.; Gerald Stephens Wednesday, 6-8 p.m.

King Jerry Lawler’s Hall of Fame Bar & Grille 159 BEALE

Chris Gales Solo Acoustic Show Mondays-Saturdays, noon4 p.m.; Eric Hughes Thursdays, 5-8 p.m.; Karaoke MondaysThursdays, Sundays, 8 p.m.; Live Bands Fridays, Saturdays, 8 p.m.

162 BEALE 521-1851

Sonny Mack Mondays-Fridays, 2-6 p.m.; Cowboy Neil Mondays, Thursdays, 7-11 p.m., and Saturdays, Sundays, 2-6 p.m.; Sensation Band Tuesdays, Fridays, 7-11 p.m.; Fuzzy and the Kings of Memphis Saturdays, 7-11 p.m.; Chic Jones and the Blues Express Sundays, 7-11 p.m.; North and South Band Wednesdays, 7-11 p.m.

King’s Palace Cafe Tap Room 168 BEALE 576-2220

David Bowen Thursdays, 5:309:30 p.m., Fridays, Saturdays, 6:30-10:30 p.m., and Sundays,

Silky O’Sullivan’s 183 BEALE 522-9596

Dueling Pianos Thursdays, Wednesdays, 9 p.m.-1 a.m., Fridays, Saturdays, 9 p.m.-3 a.m., and Sundays, Tuesdays, 8 p.m.-midnight.

Big Don Valentine’s Three Piece Chicken and a Biscuit Blues Band Thursdays, Tuesdays, 8 p.m.-midnight. 855 KENTUCKY

182 BEALE 528-0150

Sensation Band Thursday, June 8, 8 p.m.-midnight; Pam and Terry Friday, June 9, 5:30-8:30 p.m.; Jeff Crosslin Saturday, June 10, 5:308:30 p.m.; Anthony Gomes Saturday, June 10, 9 p.m.-midnight; Eric Hughes Band Mondays, 8 p.m.-midnight; Gracie Curran Tuesdays, 8 p.m.-midnight; Plantation Allstars Wednesdays, 8 p.m.-midnight.

Bobbie & Tasha Wednesdays, 8-11 p.m.

Earnestine & Hazel’s 531 S. MAIN 523-9754

Amber Rae Dunn Hosts: Earnestine & Hazel’s Open Mic Wednesdays, 8-11 p.m.

Flying Saucer Draught Emporium 130 PEABODY PLACE 523-8536

Songwriters with Roland and Friends Mondays, 7-10 p.m.

The Halloran Centre 225 S. MAIN 529-4299

Troisique, the Chosen Ones Saturday, June 10, 7 p.m.

Huey’s Downtown

182 BEALE 528-0150

Memphis Bluesmasters Thursdays, Sundays, 8 p.m.-midnight;

Norah Jones Thursday, June 8.

Paulette’s

Live Music on the Patio Thursdays, 6-8 p.m.

RIVER INN, 50 HARBOR TOWN SQUARE 260-3300

Live Pianist Thursdays, 5:308:30 p.m., Fridays and Saturdays, 5:30-9 p.m., Sundays, 11 a.m.2 p.m., and MondaysWednesdays, 5:30-8 p.m.

Purple Haze Nightclub 140 LT. GEORGE W. LEE 577-1139

DJ Dance Music Mondays-Sundays, 10 p.m.

Salsa Night Saturdays, 8:30 p.m.-3 a.m.

330 BEALE 525-8981

Rum Boogie Cafe

272 S. MAIN 526-0254

Rumba Room

Dirty Crow Inn

Robert Randolph and The Family Band Thursday, June 8, 7 p.m.; Morgan Page Saturday, June 10; J. Cole Wednesday, June 14.

LYFE Kitchen

125 N. FRONT 576-7241

303 S. MAIN 523-0020

New Daisy Theatre

Rum Boogie Cafe Blues Hall

King’s Palace Cafe 162 BEALE 521-1851

King’s Palace Cafe Patio

Mud Island Amphitheatre

The Silly Goose 100 PEABODY PLACE 435-6915

DJ Cody Fridays, Saturdays, 10 p.m.

The Peabody Hotel 149 UNION 529-4000

Seeing Red Thursday, June 8, 6-11 p.m.

South Main Ghost River Brewing 827 S. MAIN 278-0087

Paul Taylor Saturday, June 10, 6-9 p.m.; Sunday Evening Slowdown with Luke White Sunday, June 11, 5-7:30 p.m.

Loflin Yard 7 W. CAROLINA

Electric Church Sundays, 2-4 p.m.

77 S. SECOND 527-2700

John D’Amato Blues Band Sunday, June 11, 8:30 p.m.-midnight.

Bar DKDC 964 S. COOPER 272-0830

Mighty Souls Brass Band Friday, June 9; Pig Star Saturday, June 10.

Boscos 2120 MADISON 432-2222

Sunday Brunch with Joyce Cobb Sundays, 11:30 a.m.-2:30 p.m.

Canvas 1737 MADISON 443-5232

Karaoke Thursdays, 9:30 p.m.; Kyle Pruzina Live Mondays, 10 p.m.-midnight.

Celtic Crossing 903 S. COOPER 274-5151

Celtic Crossing Friday Patio Sessions: Kyndle & Adam Friday, June 9, 6-9 p.m.; Jeremy Stanfill and Joshua Cosby Sundays, 6-9 p.m.; Candy Company Mondays.

The Cove 2559 BROAD 730-0719

Ed Finney and the U of M Jazz Quartet Thursdays, 8 p.m.; Austin Holcomb Friday, June 9, 9 p.m.; Java Trio Saturday, June 10, 9 p.m.; Don and Wayde Tuesdays, 7-10 p.m.; Karaoke Wednesdays, 9 p.m.

Crosstown Arts Gallery 422 N. CLEVELAND

The Music of Miles Davis: From Bebop to Hip Hop Saturday, June 10, 6 p.m.

June 8-14, 2017

Blind Mississippi Morris Fridays, 5 p.m. and Saturdays, 5:30 p.m.; Brad Birkedahl Band Thursdays, Wednesdays, 8 p.m.; Earl “The Pearl” Banks Saturdays, 12:30 p.m., and Tuesdays, 7 p.m.; Brandon Cunning Trio Sundays, 6 p.m., and Mondays, 7 p.m.; FreeWorld Sundays, 9:30 p.m.

Live Music WednesdaysSundays, 7-11 p.m.; Live DJ Wednesdays-Sundays, 11 p.m.; Third Floor: DJ Tubbz Fridays, Saturdays, 10 p.m.

Vince Johnson and the Plantation Allstars Fridays, Saturdays, 4-8 p.m., and Sundays, 3-7 p.m.; Myra Hall Band Friday, June 9, 9 p.m.-1 a.m.; Juke Joint Allstar Saturday, June 10, 9 p.m.-1 a.m.; Brian Hawkins Blues Party Mondays, 8 p.m.-midnight; Chris McDaniel Tuesdays, Wednesdays, 8 p.m.-midnight.

20

YO GOTTI & FRIENDS THURSDAY, JUNE 29

JAMES TAYLOR SATURDAY, AUGUST 5

ELVIS: THE WONDER OF YOU WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 16

JANET JACKSON WEDNESDAY, DECEMEBER 6

Memphis born rap and hip-hop artist will host his Birthday Bash 5 at FedExForum for the first time. Tickets available!

Rock and Roll Hall of Famer, and five-time Grammy Award winner is performing, with special guest Bonnie Raitt. Tickets available!

The critically-acclaimed concert event celebrating the life and music of Elvis Presley during the 40th anniversary. Tickets available!

Global music icon and six-time Grammy Award winner is bringing her State Of The World Tour to FedExForum. Tickets available!

Get tickets at FedExForum Box Office | Ticketmaster locations | 1.800.745.3000 | ticketmaster.com | fedexforum.com


After Dark: Live Music Schedule June 8 - 14

Hi-Tone 412-414 N. CLEVELAND 278-TONE

Jared & the Mill, The Rocketboys Thursday, June 8, 6:30 p.m.; Dylan Galvin and Vinnie Hines Sunday, June 11, 7-10 p.m.; Dylan Galvin, Vinnie Hines Sunday, June 11, 8 p.m.; Needle Points, Stone Rangers, Raquets Monday, June 12, 8 p.m.; 205 Tuesday, June 13, 9 p.m.; Pumpkinseed, Yesse Yavis Wednesday, June 14, 8 p.m.

East Memphis Folk’s Folly Prime Steak House 551 S. MENDENHALL 762-8200

Intimate Piano Lounge featuring Charlotte Hurt Mondays-Thursdays, 5-9:30 p.m.; Larry Cunningham Fridays, Saturdays, 6-10 p.m.

Jack Rowell’s Celebrity Jam Thursdays, 8 p.m.; Eddie Smith Fridays, 8 p.m.; On the Patio: Off the Tracks Saturday, June 10, 4-8 p.m.; Led Zeppin Saturday, June 10, 8 p.m.; Flashback Sunday, June 11, 3-6 p.m.; On the Patio: Bar Misfits Sunday, June 11, 5-9 p.m.; Eddie Harrison Mondays, 6-10 p.m.; Debbie Jamison & Friends Tuesdays, 6-10 p.m.; Elmo and the Shades Wednesdays, 8 p.m.-midnight.

Museum Tuesdays, 2-4 p.m. and Tuesdays, 2-4 p.m.; Gee Whiz! Wednesday Workshops Wednesday, June 14, 10 a.m.-noon.

Winchester/ Hickory Hill The Height Lounge 6135 MT. MORIAH 572-1154

Dope on Arrival: Summer Saturday, June 10, 7-11 p.m.

Side Car Cafe 2194 WHITTEN 388-0285

T.J. Mulligan’s Cordova 8071 TRINITY 756-4480

Slap Junior Saturday, June 10, 7-11 p.m.

The Southern Edition Band Tuesdays.

Collierville

Frayser/Millington

Huey’s Collierville

Huey’s Millington

2130 W. POPLAR 854-4455

The Sojourners Sunday, June 11, 8:30-11:30 p.m.

8570 US 51 NORTH,

Young Petty Thieves Sunday, June 11, 8:30 p.m.-midnight.

Old Millington Winery 6748 OLD MILLINGTON 873-4114

Dynamic Score Records Showcase with Andrew Cabigao Sunday, June 11.

Huey’s Midtown

Germantown

1927 MADISON 726-4372

The Chaulkies Sunday, June 11, 4-7 p.m.; Groovement Sunday, June 11, 8:30 p.m.-midnight.

Germantown Performing Arts Center

Lafayette’s Music Room

Bacon Brothers Wednesday, June 14, 7:30-9:30 p.m.

1801 EXETER 751-7500

2119 MADISON 207-5097

Jana Misener Thursday, June 8, 6 p.m.; Dead Soldiers Thursday, June 8, 9 p.m.; Deering and Down Friday, June 9, 6:30 p.m.; Almost Famous Friday, June 9, 10 p.m.; John Paul Keith and Co. Saturday, June 10, 6:30 p.m.; Graham Winchester and the Ammunition Saturday, June 10, 10 p.m.; Tom Lonardo Quartet Sunday, June 11, 11 a.m.; Jimmy Davis Sunday, June 11, 4 p.m.; Brian Breeze Cayolle & New Orleans Sunday, June 11, 8 p.m.; Scott and Vanessa Sudbury Monday, June 12, 6 p.m.; 3RD Man Tuesday, June 13, 5:30 p.m.; James and the Ultrasounds Tuesday, June 13, 8 p.m.; Breeze Cayolle & New Orleans Wednesday, June 14, 5:30 p.m.

Huey’s Southwind 7825 WINCHESTER 624-8911

After Dark Sunday, June 11, 8:30 p.m.-midnight.

Huey’s Germantown

$13988

$154 or

Levitt Shell

mo

OVERTON PARK 272-2722

Delhi 2 Dublin Thursday, June 8, 7:30-9 p.m.; John Paul White Friday, June 9, 7:30-9 p.m.; Humming House Saturday, June 10, 7:30-9 p.m.; Marcia Ball Sunday, June 11, 7:30-9 p.m.

Midtown Crossing Grill 394 N. WATKINS 443-0502

“The Happening” Open Songwriter Showcase Tuesdays, 6:30-9:30 p.m.

P&H Cafe 1532 MADISON 726-0906

Rock Starkaraoke Fridays; Bronson Wisconsin, Chris Curtis Saturday, June 10; Open Mic Music with Tiffany Harmon Mondays, 9 p.m.-midnight.

Young Avenue Deli 2119 YOUNG 278-0034

MovieNight album release show Saturday, June 10, 9 p.m.

GOSSETT FIAT 1901 COVINGTON PIKE • 388.8989 • FIATUSAOFMEMPHIS.COM

HT659190-MSRP 16240-DISCOUNT 1252-REBATE 1000-3500 CASH DOWN-72 MO. 3.25 APR-EXCLUDES T, T& L-WAC INCLUDES ALL REBATES & INCENTIVES-PF $498.75-OFFER VALID THROUGH END OF MONTH.

Huey’s Poplar

Owen Brennan’s

Cordova

4872 POPLAR 682-7729

THE REGALIA, 6150 POPLAR 761-0990

Chuckles Comedy Club

Vintage Sunday, June 11, 8:30 p.m.-midnight.

Memphis Nites Club 3297 KIRBY 797-8599

Chick Rogers Sundays, 5 p.m.-3 a.m.

Mortimer’s 590 N. PERKINS 761-9321

Van Duren Solo Thursdays, 6:30-8:30 p.m.

University of Memphis Amro Music Store 2918 POPLAR 325-6403

Makin’ Music with Doc and Doc Sunday, June 11, 3-4:15 p.m.

The Bluff 535 S. HIGHLAND

DJ Kaz Thursdays, 10 p.m.; Nick Black Friday, June 9; Josh

Lannie McMillan Jazz Trio Sundays, 10 a.m.-2 p.m.

Summer/Berclair Cheffie’s Cafe 483 HIGH POINT TERRACE 202-4157

Songwriter Night hosted by Leigh Ann Wilmot and Dave “The Rave” Saturdays, 5-8 p.m.

Poplar/I-240 6069 PARK 767-6002

Neil’s Music Room

5727 QUINCE 682-2300

Bartlett Hadley’s Pub

Huey’s Cordova

2779 WHITTEN 266-5006

1771 N. GERMANTOWN PKWY. 754-3885

The Nuttin’ Fancy Band Friday, June 9, 9 p.m.; Backstreet Crawlers Saturday, June 10, 9 p.m.; Juno Marrs Wednesday, June 14, 8 p.m.

Shelby Forest General Store

East Tapas and Drinks Eddie Harris Thursdays, Fridays, 6:30-9:30 p.m.; Elizabeth Wise Tuesdays, 7-9 p.m.; Van Duren Solo Tuesdays, 7-9 p.m.

1700 DEXTER

Uncensored Live: Variety Show Thursday, June 8, 7-10 p.m.

7729 BENJESTOWN 876-5770

South Memphis Stax Museum of American Soul Music 926 E. MCLEMORE 946-2535

Live in Studio A at the Stax

Tony Butler Fridays, 6-8 p.m.; Robert Hull Sundays, 12:30-3:30 p.m.

Burris Sunday, June 11, 8:30 p.m.midnight; Patio Party: Loveland Duren Tuesday, June 13.

Neshoba Unitarian Universalist Church 7350 RALEIGH-LAGRANGE 266-2626

Otter Creek Saturday, June 10, 7-9 p.m.

7677 FARMINGTON 318-3034

The Lizard Kings Sunday, June 11, 8-11:30 p.m.; Patio Party: The Pistol & the Queen Wednesday, June 14.

St. George’s Episcopal Church 2425 SOUTH GERMANTOWN 754-7282

Sunday Afternoon Concert Sunday, June 11, 2-3:30 p.m.

North Mississippi/ Tunica Bally’s CASINO CENTER DRIVE IN TUNICA, MS 1-800-38-BALLY

Roxi Love Friday, June 9, 9 p.m.-1 a.m. and Saturday, June 10, 9 p.m.-1 a.m.

Huey’s Southaven 7090 MALCO, SOUTHAVEN, MS 662-349-7097

Grand Theft Audio Sunday, June 11, 8 p.m.-midnight; Karaoke Night Mondays, 9-11 p.m.

Thirsty Lizard 6541 US-51 662-536-6054

Teacher’s Pet Wednesday, June 14, 7-11 p.m.

Raleigh Stage Stop 2951 CELA 382-1576

Blues Jam hosted by Brad Webb Thursdays, 7-11 p.m.; Prosevere Saturday, June 10, 9 p.m.-midnight; Open Mic Night and Steak Night Tuesdays, 6 p.m.-midnight.

m e m p h i s f l y e r. c o m

Crockett Hall Tuesdays with the Midtown Rhythm Section Tuesdays, 9 p.m.

Phillips Band Saturday, June 10; Bluegrass Brunch with the River Bluff Clan Sundays, 11 a.m.

ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT

Growlers 1911 POPLAR 244-7904

21


DINOSAURS AT THE

PINK PALACE

CALENDAR of EVENTS:

JUNE 8 - 14

TH EAT E R

Circuit Playhouse

Ripcord, comedy that takes us to the Bristol Place Assisted Living Facility where foul-tempered Abby has just learned that she has to share her sunny top-floor room with newcomer Marilyn. www. playhouseonthesquare.org. $25-$40. Thursdays-Saturdays, 8 p.m., and Sundays, 2 p.m. Through June 25. 51 S. COOPER (725-0776).

The Evergreen Theatre

MAY 27 - SEPT. 10, 2017

L.G.B.T.Q…..Damn Funny, evening of hilarity touching on a variety of subjects from gay conversion therapy to Britney Spears No. 1 fan and more. www. etcmemphistheater.com. $15. Sundays, 2 p.m., and Fridays, Saturdays, 8 p.m. Through June 17. 1705 POPLAR (274-7139).

Hattiloo Theatre

Aida, an enslaved Nubian princess finds her heart entangled with an Egyptian soldier who is engaged to the Pharaoh’s daughter. www.hattiloo. org. June 9-July 2. 37 S. COOPER (502-3486).

Mainstage Theatre (University of Memphis)

Sponsored by:

The Comedy of Errors, set in Greece of 1600, two sets of identical twins separated shortly after birth find themselves (but not each other) in town on the same madcap day. (759-0604), www.tnshakespeare.org. $10-$34. Sundays, 3-5 p.m., and Thursdays-Saturdays, 7-9 p.m. Through June 18. U OF M CAMPUS (678-2576).

Playhouse 51

3050 Central Ave / Memphis 38111 P!NK PALACE MUSEUM

8077 WILKINSVILLE (872-7170).

Theatre Memphis

June 8-14, 2017

LE S IONS

901.636.2362

Welfarewell, still of sound mind, Esmerelda Quipp’s 80-year-old body is beginning to “come unglued,” as she puts it. . www.playhouse51.com. Sundays, 2 p.m., and Fridays, Saturdays, 7:30 p.m. Through June 18.

South Pacific, musical follows a nurse stationed on an island during World War II. www.theatrememphis.org. $30. Sundays, 2 p.m., Fridays, Saturdays, 8 p.m., and Thursdays, 7:30 p.m. Through June 25.

olunteer.

630 PERKINS EXT. (682-8323).

PEOPLE REAL PEOPLE REAL PEOPLE REAL NEEDS NEEDS REAL NEEDS REAL SOLUTIONS REAL SOLUTIONS REAL SOLUTIONS

Visit mifa.org mifa.org to Visit mifa.org to volunteer. Visit tovolunteer. volunteer.

22

TheatreWorks

Unseen City, an otherworldly conqueror claims the city of Memphis for his kingdom and sends a band of adventurers to survey the city. Ensemble of explorers and the audience re-imagine the city altogether. (274-1000), $12. Fridays, Saturdays, 8-9:30

Send the date, time, place, cost, info, phone number, a brief description, and photos — two weeks in advance — to calendar@memphisflyer.com or P.O. Box 1738, Memphis, TN 38101. DUE TO SPACE LIMITATIONS, ONGOING WEEKLY EVENTS WILL APPEAR IN THE FLYER’S ONLINE CALENDAR ONLY.

p.m. Through June 24. 2085 MONROE (274-7139).

A R T I ST R E C E PT I O N S

Memphis College of Art Artist reception for “Disappointed” and “Best in Class 2016/17,” exhibition of works by Josh Strydom and the best work from students in all grade levels. www.mca.edu. Fri., June 9, 6-8 p.m. 1930 POPLAR (272-5100).

WKNO Studio

Artist reception for “A Little R & R: Reflection & Retrospection,” exhibition of photography by Candace Spearman. www.wkno.org. Fri., June 9, 6-8 p.m. 7151 CHERRY FARMS (458-2521).

Woman’s Exchange Tea Room

Opening reception for seventh annual Woman’s Exchange Art Gallery, www. womans-exchange.com. Sun., June 11, 2-5 p.m. 88 RACINE (327-5681).

OT H E R A R T HAPPE N I NGS

Fashination Revival II Bee Specs Agency fashion show hosted by Tyara Nicole and celebrity stylist Harrison T. Crite. Live performance by Brennan Villines. Fri., June 9, 5-11 p.m. CROSSTOWN ARTS, 430 N. CLEVELAND (507-8030), WWW. CROSSTOWNARTS.ORG.

The Moonpie Project Presents Benjamin Pierce

New mural by Benjamin Pierce. Fri., June 9, 5-8 p.m. CROSSTOWN ARTS, 430 N. CLEVELAND (507-8030), WWW. CROSSTOWNARTS.ORG.

“One Beer, Home by Midnight”

Exhibition on the lives of Cara DiStefano and Joshua Strydom from their time in the City of One Hundred Spires, Prague, Czech Republic. Thurs., June 8, 6-9 p.m. CROSSTOWN ARTS, 430 N. CLEVELAND (507-8030), WWW. CROSSTOWNARTS.ORG.

ONGOI NG ART

Art Museum at the University of Memphis (AMUM)

“Africa: Art of a Continent,” permanent exhibition of African art from the Martha and Robert Fogelman collection. Ongoing. 142 COMMUNICATION & FINE ARTS BUILDING (678-2224).

Hip-Hop Yoga at Your Inner Yogi Saturday Belz Museum of Asian and Judaic Art

“Chinese Symbols in Art,” ancient Chinese pottery and bronze. www.belzmuseum.org. Ongoing. 119 S. MAIN, IN THE PEMBROKE SQUARE BUILDING (523-ARTS).

Bingham and Broad

“My Kin Is Not Like Yours,” exhibition of works by Debra Edge. Ongoing. 2563 BROAD (323-3008).

David Lusk Gallery

“This Land: An American Portrait,” exhibition of photographs by Jack Spencer. Also featuring book of photographs, This Land. www.davidluskgallery. com. Through July 1. 97 TILLMAN (767-3800).

The Dixon Gallery & Gardens

“Scent and Symbolism: Perfumed Objects and Images,” exhibition considering the role of scent in the history of art through a collection of 140 scented bottles. Regular Admission. Through July 2. “Jason Miller: objets de mémoire,” exhibition of photographs using everyday objects that have meaning and memories in the artist’s life. Through July 23. “Made in Dixon,” exhibition showcasing the colorful and joy-filled artwork created by artists of all ages in the Dixon’s educational programs. www.dixon.org.

Ongoing. 4339 PARK (761-5250).

FireHouse Community Arts Center Mosal Morszart, exhibition of works by Black Arts Alliance artist. www. memphisblackartsalliance. org. Ongoing. 985 S. BELLEVUE (948-9522).

Fratelli’s

Glenda Brown summer show, exhibition of paintings representing recent works of Brown and her students. Call for more information about Glenda Brown’s classes. www. memphisbotanicgarden. com. Through June 29. 750 CHERRY (766-9900).

Marshall Arts Gallery “Love of Art” and “Memphis,” exhibition of work by Nikki Gardner and Debra Edge by appointment only. (647-9242). Ongoing. 639 MARSHALL (679-6837).

Memphis Botanic Garden

“Artists’ Link Garden Friends,” www.memphisbotanicgarden.com. Through June 29.

paintings to quilts. Through Aug. 27. “A Feast for the Eyes: 200 Years of American Still-Life Painting from the Hevrdejs Collection,” exhibition of rarely seen still-life paintings by major American artists including James Peale, John F. Peto, Thomas Hart Benton, Georgia O’Keeffe, and Andrew Wyeth. Through July 30. “Rotunda Projects: Nnenna Okore,” exhibition of works with burlap to fashion abstract objects inspired by textures, colors, and landscapes. Through Sept. 10. “Drawing Memory: Essence of Memphis,” exhibition of works inspired by nsibidi, a sacred means of communication among male secret societies in southeastern Nigeria by Victor Ekpuk. www.brooksmuseum.org. Ongoing. 1934 POPLAR (544-6209).

Memphis College of Art

“Disappointed,” exhibition of photography and digital collage by Joshua Strydom. www.mca.edu. Through July 30. 1930 POPLAR (272-5100).

750 CHERRY (636-4100).

Memphis Brooks Museum of Art

“Unwrapped! 100 Gifts for 100 Years,” exhibition of more than 100 works of art gifted to the museum ranging from ancient coins to contemporary glass and

continued on page 24


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ON STAGE through JUNE 18 at the U of M tnshakespeare.org (901) 759-0604

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Artist reception for “A Little R & R: Reflection & Retrospection,” photography by Candace Spearman at WKNO Studio, on Friday, June 9th, 6-8 p.m.

continued from page 22 Memphis Zoo

“Nature Connects: Art with LEGO Bricks,” exhibition of 15 LEGO brick sculptures. www.memphiszoo.org. Through July 9. 2000 PRENTISS PLACE IN OVERTON PARK (333-6500).

Metal Museum

“Metal in Motion,” exhibition and group show of work involving moving parts including hand-operated or run on a motor inviting the viewer to interact with the art. Through Aug. 27. “F.I.R.E. James Wade Jr.,” exhibition of cast metal works and drawings by James Wade Jr. that investigate the meaning of place by referencing industrial, agrarian, and vernacular landscapes. Through July 16. “Implements of Grandeur,” exhibition of handmade tools by metalsmiths throughout the United States including Jack Brubaker, David Court, Dennis Dusek, Jeffrey Funk, Seth Gould, Tom Latané, Timothy Miller, and others. Through July 30. 374 METAL MUSEUM DR. (774-6380).

Slavehaven Underground Railroad Museum “Images of Africa Before & After the Middle Passage,” exhibition of photography by Jeff and Shaakira Edison. Ongoing. 826 N. SECOND (527-3427).

Stax Museum of American Soul Music June 8-14, 2017

“Portraits in Soul: Rare Images from the API Archive,” exhibition of photographs by Bill Carrier Sr. and his team at Allied Photography Illustrators (API). www.staxmuseum. com. Through June 20. 926 E. MCLEMORE (946-2535).

Talbot Heirs

Debra Edge art. Ongoing.

Gener ousl y spo nso re d by:

A nn a nd We llfo rd Tab or

99 S. SECOND (527-9772).

Village Frame & Art

Gallery Artists, exhibition of work by Charlie Ivey, Virginia Schoenster, Lou Ann Dattilo, and Matthew Hasty. Ongoing. 540 S. MENDENHALL (767-8882).

WKNO Studio

24

“A Little R & R: Reflection & Retrospection,” exhibition of photography by Candace

Spearman. www.wkno.org. Through June 28. 7151 CHERRY FARMS (458-2521).

C O M E DY

Chuckles Comedy Club

Uncensored Live: Variety Show. www.chucklescomedyhouse.com. $10. Thurs., June 8, 7-10 p.m. 1700 DEXTER.

Hi-Tone

Cut Throat Freak Show. (480-382-5228). $8. Thurs., June 8, 9 p.m. 412-414 N. CLEVELAND (278-TONE).

S PO R TS / F IT N ES S

Derby Wars: MRD Double Header

$5-$9. Sat., June 10, 6-10 p.m. PIPKIN BUILDING, MID-SOUTH FAIRGROUNDS, WWW.MEMPHISROLLERDERBY.COM.

FedEx/St. Jude PGA Championship Golf Tournament Through June 11.

TPC AT SOUTHWIND, 3325 CLUB AT SOUTHWIND (748-0330), WWW. STJUDECLASSIC.COM.

Full Moon Yoga in the Park

The Fitz

Enjoy an afterwork flow under the full moon with complimentary wine. Suggested donation, $7 by Your Inner Yogi. Fri., June 9, 6-7 p.m.

711 LUCKY LANE (1-800-766-LUCK).

COURT SQUARE, AT N. MAIN AND COURT (512-4534), YOURINNERYOGI.COM.

Redneck Comedy Magic: James Michael, www. fitzgeraldstunica.com. $10. June 9-11.

F EST IVA LS

Barnes and Noble Author Festival

Hip-Hop Yoga Series

BARNES & NOBLE, 2774 N. GERMANTOWN (386-2468), WWW.BN.COM.

Experience yoga in an energetic, inspiring, and fun way to your favorite hip-hop and R&B tunes with certified yoga teacher Kandace Stewart. Centering and breathwork, followed by traditional yoga poses. $15-$65. Sat., June 10, 3-4:30 p.m.

Blythe & Young Block Party

YOUR INNER YOGI, 10 N. SECOND (512-4534), WWW.CLIENTS.MINDBODYONLINE.COM.

Nine local authors will be participating. Each author will give a 20-minute presentation during the event. Sat., June 10, 1-4 p.m.

Participating merchants are throwing their own free event during the party. Sat., June 10, 5-8 p.m. COOPER-YOUNG DISTRICT, CORNER OF COOPER AND YOUNG, WWW. BLYTHEANDYOUNG.COM.

Cherry Street Fair

Enjoy the sites and sounds of the Arkansas Delta at this family-friendly Arkansas Delta Byways Bootstrap Award winning event. Free. Second Saturday of every month, 5-8 p.m. DOWNTOWN HELENA, AR, CHERRY STREET (870-338-3300).

GPAC Food Truck & Music Festival and Online Auction

Celebrate Memphis music with performances by Jason D. Williams, Memphis Jones, and Proud Mary. Free. Sun., June 11, 3-8 p.m. GERMANTOWN PERFORMING ARTS CENTER, 1801 EXETER (751-7500), WWW.GPACWEB.COM.

Memphis Redbirds Home Games

For more information, visit website. Through June 16. AUTOZONE PARK, THIRD AND UNION (721-6000), WWW.MEMPHISREDBIRDS.COM.

KIDS

Gee Whiz! Wednesday Workshops

Gee Whiz! Wednesday Workshops at the Stax Museum provide youth and young children the opportunity to express themselves through structured activities. Drop-in programs feature music, arts, and hands-on fun. Go to www.staxmuseum.com for more details. Free for participants. Wed., June 14, 10 a.m.-noon. STAX MUSEUM OF AMERICAN SOUL MUSIC, 926 E. MCLEMORE (942-7685).

continued on page 27


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26

June 8-14, 2017


CALENDAR: JUNE 8 - 14 continued from page 24

F I LM

Kids and Kalimba

Bike-in Movie Benefiting UBFM: E.T.

K-Love Fan Awards: Ignite Hope

Beer proceeds benefit Urban Bicycle Food Ministries. Free. Fri., June 9, 6-10 p.m.

THE BIKESMITH, 509 N HOLLYWOOD (871-2453), WWW. BIKESMITHTRUCK.COM.

The Sandlot

STAX MUSEUM OF AMERICAN SOUL MUSIC, 926 E. MCLEMORE (942-7685), WWW.STAXMUSEUM.COM.

Breakfast At Tiffany’s

THE ORPHEUM, 203 S. MAIN (525-3000), WWW. ORPHEUM-MEMPHIS.COM.

Kids in the Garden

THE ORPHEUM, 203 S. MAIN (525-3000), WWW. ORPHEUM-MEMPHIS.COM.

A Stray

Also showing at Southaven’s Majestic and Cordova Cinema. Thurs., June 8, 7:30 p.m. MALCO PARADISO CINEMA, 584 S. MENDENHALL (6821754), WWW.MALCO.COM.

Troisique, The Chosen Ones

$8. Sat., June 10, 1 p.m.

Action-packed short film, dramatic stage play, and fierce runway fashion show for a dynamic production welcoming a new era of fashion shows. $45. Sat., June 10, 5:30-9 p.m.

Desperate to outrun his bad luck, a young Muslim refugee seems like he just might make it, until he crosses paths with a stray dog. Wed., June 14, 7 p.m.

THE HALLORAN CENTRE, 225 S. MAIN (609-9826).

A Wider Angle Film Series: Mad Tiger

Rockumentary about New York-based “Japanese action comic punk band” Peelander-Z. English and Japanese with English subtitles. Free. Wed., June 14, 6 p.m.

CROSSTOWN ARTS, 430 N. CLEVELAND (507-8030), WWW.CROSSTOWNARTS.ORG.

BENJAMIN L. HOOKS CENTRAL LIBRARY, 3030 POPLAR (415-2726).

S P EC IAL EVE N TS

Aura Photos and Private Sessions with John Cappello

FREE

Offering private sessions and aura photos. $25$100. Sun., June 11, 10 a.m.-2 p.m.

TICKETS

THE BROOM CLOSET, 546 S. MAIN (497-9486), WWW. THEBROOMCLOSETMEMPHIS.COM.

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Just bring in ad and show your Key Rewards Players Card to the Host desk during operating hours for two FREE tickets while supplies last.

Honors the most elite athletes in Memphis high school sports. $23. Fri., June 9, 7 p.m. THE ORPHEUM, 203 S. MAIN (525-3000), WWW. ORPHEUM-MEMPHIS.COM.

Night at the Lorraine

Celebrate the history of the Lorraine Motel benefiting National Civil Rights Museum. Step back in time with an evening of food, music, and fun where B.B. King, Nat King Cole, Isaac Hayes, and others were guests. $75-$200. Sat., June 10, 7-11 p.m. NATIONAL CIVIL RIGHTS MUSEUM, 450 MULBERRY (521-9699), WWW.CIVILRIGHTSMUSEUM.ORG/.

OUTbid: An Evening of Pure Imagination

Featuring wine and craft beer samples paired with scrumptious food, live music by the Bluff City Soul Collective, and silent and live auction items and experiences benefiting OUTMemphis. $50. Sat., June 10, 7-10:30 a.m. CLARK OPERA MEMPHIS CENTER, 6745 WOLF RIVER PARKWAY, WWW.OUTMEMPHIS.ORG.

Peabody Rooftop Party

Meet on the roof for music and fun. $10-$15. Thursdays, 6-10 p.m. Through Aug. 17. THE PEABODY HOTEL, 149 UNION (529-4000), WWW. PEABODYHOTEL.COM.

FO O D & D R I N K EVE N TS

5th Annual Cotton Bowl Brunch

Join the King and Queen of Carnival Memphis at a seated luncheon. Enjoy brunch and complimentary brunch cocktails, live music, and a special exhibition highlighting the history of Carnival Memphis. $50. Fri., June 9, 11:30 a.m.

el James Micha

June 9 - 11 Tickets start at $10 Available at the Fitz Gift Shop or call Ticketmaster at 800-745-3000 or visit ticketmaster.com. Hotel Packages start at $79 Call 1-662-363-LUCK(5825) and mention code: CPRED. Tripadvisor Best magic show in Las Vegas

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THE COTTON MUSEUM, 65 UNION (531-7826), WWW. MEMPHISCOTTONMUSEUM.ORG.

A Fitz Table Games Exclusive

,000 $10 GOING ALL IN

Concoct

Make a drink and a masterpiece. For ages 21+. Register online. $40-$75. Sat., June 10, 5 p.m. SHELBY FARMS, 500 N. PINE LAKE (767-PARK), WWW. SHELBYFARMS.ORG.

Feast on the Farm

Evening of country charm with live and silent auction, dance band, and great food benefiting Agricenter’s education programs. $125. Sat., June 10, 6-11 p.m.

TUESDAY, JUNE 20 & WEDNESDAY, JULY 5 • 3PM Earn only 50 points or earn 100 points and play twice!

Cash and Promo Chips Giveaway Sunday, July 2 • 9:30pm

Receive entries with winning hands now through July 1 while playing Blackjack, 3-Card Poker, Roulette, Mississippi Stud and Craps.

AGRICENTER INTERNATIONAL, 7777 WALNUT GROVE (757-7777), WWW.AGRICENTER.ORG.

Food Truck Garden Party: Beach Party

Join the party featuring live music with Movie Night, cash bar, Play Zone, and food from the Memphis Food Truckers Alliance. Admission includes one drink ticket. $5 members, $10 nonmembers. Wed., June 14, 5-8 p.m. MEMPHIS BOTANIC GARDEN, 750 CHERRY (636-4100), WWW.MEMPHISBOTANICGARDEN.COM.

®

Tickets start at only $30. Purchase tickets at the Fitz Gift Shop or call Ticketmaster at 800-745-3000 or visit ticketmaster.com.

FitzgeraldsTunica.com • 1-662-363-LUCK (5825) • Must be 21 and a Key Rewards member. See Cashier*Players Club for rules. Tax and resort fee not included in listed price. Advance hotel reservations required and subject to availability. $50 credit or debit card is required upon hotel check-in. Arrivals after 6pm must be guaranteed with a credit card. Management reserves the right to cancel, change and modify the event or promotion. Gaming restricted patrons prohibited. Gambling Problem? Call 1-800-522-4700.

m e m p h i s f l y e r. c o m

THE DIXON GALLERY & GARDENS, 4339 PARK (7615250), WWW.DIXON.ORG.

Chris Brown: Welcome To My Life

MALCO SUMMER 4 DRIVE-IN, 5310 SUMMER (681-2020), WWW.MALCO.COM.

ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT

Will give kids ages 7-10 a chance to experience nature up close and learn the basics about planting and garden design. Snack and tools included. Reservations required. $10 members, $15 nonmembers. Sat., June 10, 10:30 a.m.-noon.

Movies start at dusk. See website for theme and movie line-up. Sat., June 10.

MALCO PARADISO CINEMA, 584 S. MENDENHALL (6821754), WWW.MALCO.COM.

Ekpe Abioto with his Kalimba (thumb piano) pays homage to friend and singer Maurice White, Memphis native and founder of Earth, Wind and Fire. Tues., June 13, 1-2 p.m.

$8. Thurs., June 8, 6 p.m.

Time Warp Drive-In

Tues., June 13, 7 p.m.

27


BOOKS By Corey Mesler

Hey Hey

On Mike Nesmith’s memoir Infinite Tuesday.

THURSDAY, JUNE 8:

DELHI 2 DUBLIN S P O N S O R E D B Y: D E L O I T T E

FRIDAY, JUNE 9:

JOHN PAUL WHITE S P O N S O R E D B Y:

SATURDAY, JUNE 10:

HUMMING HOUSE S P O N S O R E D B Y:

SUNDAY, JUNE 11:

MARCIA BALL

June 8-14, 2017

S P O N S O R E D B Y:

28

T

hings I knew about Mike Nesmith before reading this book: He was the best songwriter and most interesting persona in the Monkees. His mother invented Liquid Paper and made a fortune. He was one of the first musicians to play country-rock. And he invented MTV, making one of the first music videos to promote his song “Rio” and conceiving of a show devoted to such videos, a show he wanted to call Popclips. First, a few personal remarks. The second album I owned was More of the Monkees (the first was Jefferson Airplane’s Surrealistic Pillow). I loved the “prefab four,” but my nostalgia for them is not what makes me still listen to them today. The made-for-TV band, against all odds, made some great music. I also own every solo CD Nesmith ever made, even the obscure ones like The Wichita Train Whistle Sings. I think he is one of the most unappreciated songwriters in pop music. I love his songs from the Monkees albums, from “Sweet Young Thing” and “Papa Gene’s Blues” to his ethereally beautiful “I Know What I Know” on their most recent album, Good Times. And I love his solo work, which I would put on a par with Stephen Stills’ or Lou Reed’s, to name two artists who started in a group and then made vital music afterward. So, I came to his memoir Infinite Tuesday: An Autobiographical Riff (Crown Archetype, $28) with high hopes. I was not disappointed. Nesmith, as narrator of his own life, is engaging, intelligent, lyrical, and sincere. And it doesn’t hurt that he has quite a story to tell. Rather than a linear approach he imparts his narrative nonconsecutively, in well-thought-out vignettes and portraits. He name-drops Timothy Leary, John Lennon, Jimi Hendrix, Jack Nicholson, and Johnny Cash, among others, but through all his tales runs a humility and genuineness that is disarming. And, even when he’s not talking about the Monkees or his solo career or his movie star friends, the vignettes are still fascinating because of this honesty and because he’s such a charming narrator. He’s equally appealing talking about his mother, his friends, his study of Christian Science,

his interest in quantum physics. He knows what’s meat and what’s fat, and the book is decidedly low-fat. And, eventually, it coalesces into a compelling chronicle, like a novel made from attractive mosaic shards. If you’re looking for dirt on Micky, Peter, and Davy, you won’t find it here. Nesmith glosses over the Monkees years, mostly substituting self-deprecating feelings of otherness and disassociation for descriptions of on-set craziness or backstage peccadilloes. A reluctant TV star, he outlines some of the surrealistic events which created the show and, ultimately, led to its demise. He says “The creators of The Monkees may have thought they were creating a simple television property, a paean to the times, but what they were actually producing was Pinocchio. The show and all its parts and characters would come to life and begin to breathe and move and sing and play and write and think on their own. What had started as a copy of the 1960s became a fact of the 1960s. What had started as fanciful effect became casual fact.” Along the way, he experienced some dark times, some periods of self-doubt and instability. He chronicles these gloomy days with grace and wit. Behind the accomplished rock star and actor lies a vulnerable human being, open-hearted and seeking, and I appreciated the opportunity to walk in his shoes for a while. And, much later, discussing how he came up with the concept which would become MTV, about which he is characteristically humble, he says “To American eyes the little film was a white elephant, a trinket, fascinating and entertaining but with no apparent application among current television outlets. In the U.S., the music video had been born an orphan, without a place to be played.” That, as we know, changed, and a monster was birthed, a monster that would change how folks listened to or thought about rock music. And, finally, here is a one sentence fractal that can serve as a sum-up for Nesmith’s sometimes absurdist, sometimes moving, sometimes funny, always diverting autobiographical riffs, “I tiptoed through my inner world looking for the rules that governed, being careful not to damage the tulips.”


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BAR REPORT By Meghan Stuthard

10/10

The Big S, a very Memphis bar.

JUSTIN FOX BURKS

A

couple weeks ago, we had a full-on Memphis meltdown after some nerd from Nashville began trolling us with a series of misspelled tweets and non-applicable GIFs (full disclosure: I am Nashville-born and mostly Nashville-raised, and this cretin offended even me). It was absolutely maddening, but here’s the deal: That guy doesn’t get it and never will, and that’s just fine with me because that means he stays the hell out of Memphis and the hell out of bars like the Big S Grill. The Big S is Memphis through and through and embodies all this city has to offer, and it does it all in a tiny, unassuming house next to the train tracks. 1179 Dunnavant is stuck in time. It doesn’t look like it has changed anything about itself since the ’60s except for the name (formerly it was known as the Hawkins Grill). Indeed, the telephone directory hanging by the front door looked older than I am. The Big S has six barstools, five tables, and three booths, keeping it intimate. We sat at the bar, where there were holes worn in the fabric from years of boot toes pressing into the sides. The place was dim, lit only by a few red lights. My buddy and I looked at each other. The Big S Grill was a winner. There are a handful of things that make a bar: the music, the people, and the drinks. A bar doesn’t require anything more than that, which is why it baffles the mind that so many bars are terrible. The Big S Grill scores a 10/10 in every category.

Sam Price (owner for 51 years) and his daughter, Aniese Cannon

The jukebox is packed with soul classics, and not one patron in there was under 60. But the drink of choice in the Big S is where the Memphis really comes through. We were served two 40-ounce bottles of beer with a chilled rocks glass and a napkin. A chilled rocks glass and a napkin! I dare you to find a better setup than that. My friend and I were one of several people in there, but every other patron was an older gentleman. Just like with Ashton Kutcher, the headwear was evenly split between fedoras and trucker hats, but unlike Ashton Kutcher, none of these guys’ hats made them look like assholes. In fact, any one of those guys could’ve been my

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&

ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT

own grandfather, sitting there with a trucker hat perched on his head, barbecue sauce running down his arms as he ate his pulled pork sandwich at a gritty neighborhood bar. The Big S serves their barbecue from a smoker out front, and although we didn’t partake, we were the only ones in there not eating. It looked and smelled incredible. Like many of these lesser-known dives, the Big S Grill allows folks to bring in their own liquor for a small fee. At a table nearby, three men were passing around a bottle of Svedka. The bartender had brought them beer mugs full of ice in which to make their mixed drinks. A whole beer mug for a vodka drink? Giddy up! My friend noticed one of them wearing a Memphis Tigers shirt and remarked, “I like your shirt.” The man replied, “You like the blue? You gotta like the blue if you’re in Memphis.” While the rest of us entitled jerks have been arguing about the Tigers since halfway through the Pastner era, the loyalty of the men of the Big S Grill has never even faltered. We paid our tab, a beyond-reasonable $9 for two 40-ounce beers, and as we stood up to leave, the owner walked over and introduced himself. The Big S Grill has been run by the same folks, more or less, since the 1960s. This guy has surely seen the best and worst in people over the years, but greeted us as warmly as he would greet his own grandchildren. He called out, “Y’all come back now, you hear?” — just like in the movies — as we were walking out. The next time we run across some Nashvillian — or any other city’s lessthan-stellar example of a citizen — who wants to hurl racial slurs and lame jokes at Memphis, don’t let him win. Be glad that he’s off making some other city’s population dumber. Be happy that he doesn’t understand. Be thrilled that we’re taking the highest road, all while sitting in a low-ceilinged bar drinking beer with grandpas. The Big S, 1179 Dunnavant (775-9127)

31


SATURDAY 3-6 PM

June 17

@ Overton Park Greensward

TICKETS ON SALE NOW! participants:

June 8-14, 2017

Sponsored by:

Caleb Hollingsworth, Agent

®

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32

The Fiesta

Wagon

memphismargaritafestival.com


S P I R ITS By Andria Lisle

Cappelletti

morphine bottle, according to my savvy salesman. I’m not sure if it’s true, but it makes for a good story. Since my indoctrination into the world of Cappelletti, I’ve noticed it on bar shelves across Memphis. At home, I prefer to drink it the easy way: over ice with soda, tonic, or Prosecco. At Acre in East Memphis, they up the ante by adding Cathead Vodka and tangerine to Cappelletti and sparkling wine for a cocktail called the End of the Line. Alchemy, at the north end of Cooper-Young, chose Cappelletti for its namesake cocktail, the Alchemist, which combines high-end bourbon, vermouth, and Peychaud’s Bitters with the aperitif. Cafe 1912, a few blocks up Cooper from Alchemy, has the familiar-shaped bottle on the liquor shelf behind the bar, where they’re happy to concoct a Cappelletti-based cocktail of your choice. Now that the heat is here and farmers markets are in full swing, I’ve moved on to mixing Cappelletti with gin and basil, using a Tom Collinsesque cocktail I found on Food & Wine’s website. Simple to make, the drink has high flavor rewards. Combine an ounce of gin, an ounce of Cappelletti, a half-ounce of lemon juice, a quarter-ounce of simple syrup, and three basil leaves in a cocktail shaker with ice. Do your thing for a few moments, then double-strain into a tall glass with ice. Garnish with extra basil leaves and lemon slices, and voila! Summer drinking at its finest. Dinah Sanders’ acclaimed cocktail book The Art of the Shim recommends a drink called the Teresa, which combines two ounces of Cappelletti, an ounce of lime juice, and three-quarters ounce of crème de cassis. Shake until well-chilled, letting some of the ice in the cocktail shaker dilute the alcohol, then enjoy. Another great cocktail for your repertoire: the Ruby Diamond, which I found on Epicurious. This elegant drink combines gin, mescal, Cappelletti, lemon juice, and orange juice. The ingredients are shaken with ice, strained, and served in a chilled Champagne coupe. You can’t go wrong with Cappelletti — unless, like me, you decide to share your favorite new liqueur on social media. I Instagrammed a few cocktails — the bottle and its vibrant label in the picture — and the next time I needed a bottle, the liquor store was out of stock.

30 taps. Try them all

one growler at a time. MIDTOWN 1620 Madison Ave.

MEMPHISCASHSAVER.COM

ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT

L

ast month, I wrote about the enduring appeal and easy sophistication of Campari and soda — and then I walked into my favorite liquor store for a bottle of Campari and walked out with something I love even better: Cappelletti. Billed as a vino apertivo, Cappelletti is, like Campari, a bitter, herbaceous mixer with a touch of citrus. Both Campari and Cappelletti boast that gorgeous red color. Unlike Campari, Cappelletti is wine based rather than alcohol based, and, as a result, its finish is a bit smoother. Adding to its attraction, a bottle of Cappelletti costs much less than its legendary cousin. The bottle, too, is shaped uniquely — like a WWI-era

m e m p h i s f l y e r. c o m

A refreshing wine-based summer cocktail mixer.

33


FILM REVIEW By Chris McCoy

Paradigm Shift Wonder Woman is a long-overdue triumph.

I

n 1949, classics professor Joseph Campbell published The Hero with a Thousand Faces. He compared hundreds of different stories and myths from all over the world — from Gilgamesh to Perseus, Beowulf to Odysseus, Jesus to Mohommad — identifying common elements and structures that seemed to serve some universal psychological need. The hero is introduced in his Ordinary World; he is Called to Adventure but Refuses the Call, only to change his mind after a Meeting with the Mentor. Then he Crosses the Threshold into an unfamiliar world, meets Allies and faces Tests, which ultimately lead to a journey into the underworld where he faces an Ordeal and gains a Reward. But the Road Back is fraught with danger (usually a big chase scene), often resolved by a Leap of Faith, leading to a Resurrection, when the hero comes back from the brink of (or, in the case of Jesus, actual) death, to Return home, where he assumes his place in society as a wise and strong leader. George Lucas read Campbell’s work while a student at USC, and he applied Campbell’s ur-structure to Star Wars. By the mid-’80s, the secret was out, and everyone in Hollywood was creating self-conscious versions of what Campbell called the “monomyth.” In as much as

the Hero’s Journey got filmmakers to pay attention to story structure, it has been a good thing. But its ubiquity and the belief that it was a magic formula for success has created a stultifying sameness in screenplays. The other problem with the Hero’s Journey is that it’s always about a he. There are goddesses aplenty, but female mythological heroes, such as the Greek huntress Atalanta, are rare. What happens when you test the monomyth by setting a woman on the Hero’s Journey? Wonder Woman is the third-oldest surviving comic book hero. She made her debut as a Nazi-punching feminist eight years before Campbell’s book. And yet, 40 years after Christopher Reeve donned the Superman tights and 28 years after Tim Burton brought Batman to the big screen, we are only now seeing a Wonder Woman feature film. Swamp Thing got a movie before Wonder Woman, but maybe we had to wait for the stars to align for Diana Prince to get a treatment as good as Patty Jenkins’ film. The only bright spot in the turgid Batman v Super-

Gal Gadot (above) wields sword and shield — and the golden Lasso of Truth — in Patty Jenkins’ triumphant, new Wonder Woman film.

man was Gal Gadot’s cameo as the Amazing Amazon. Now that she’s carried a $143 million production on her chiseled back, it’s clear Gadot is a movie star of the first water. Her jawline is more heroic than Ben Affleck, and her face is friendlier and more expressive than Henry Cavill. She’s just as great when she’s wrapping boy toy Steve Trevor (Chris Pine) in her magic lasso as when she’s storming across no man’s land in 1917 Belgium, but Gadot’s best scene is when the Amazon princess tries ice cream for the first time. Diana’s confident, determined gaze melts away for a moment, and we can see her think “maybe the World of Men isn’t so bad after all!” Wonder Woman was formed from clay and given life

June 8-14, 2017

MIDTOWN 725-PIES (7437)

DELIVERS DOWNTOWN 5-777-PIE (743)

34

WWW.ALDOSPIZZAPIES.COM


FILM REVIEW By Chris McCoy

The Mummy (2017) (Giant Screen) PG13 Megan Leavey PG13 Wonder Woman PG13

Wonder Woman Now playing Multiple locations

My Cousin Rachel PG13 The Wedding Plan PG Churchill PG Wonder Woman PG13

Pirates of the Caribbean: Dead Men Tell No Tales PG13 Baywatch R Alien Covenant R

The Mummy (2017) PG13 It Comes at Night R Megan Leavey PG13 Wonder Woman PG13 Captain Underpants: The First Epic Movie PG 3 Idiotas PG13 Pirates of the Caribbean: Dead Men Tell No Tales PG13 SPECIAL EVENTS:

TCM: Some Like it Hot (1959)

Sun. 6/11- 2:00pm & Wed. 6/14 – 7:00pm @ Paradiso

Black Butler: Book of the Atlantic (subtitled) Mon. 6/12 – 7:00pm @ Paradiso

K-Love Fan Awards “Ignite Hope”

Guardians of the Galaxy Vol. 2 PG13 Norman R

Baywatch R Alien: Covenant R Everything, Everything PG13 Guardians of the Galaxy Vol. 2 PG13 The Fate of the Furious PG13 Beauty and the Beast (2017) PG

m e m p h i s f l y e r. c o m

The Mummy (2017) PG13 Wonder Woman PG13 Pirates of the Caribbean: Dead Men Tell No Tales PG13 Baywatch R Guardians of the Galaxy Vol. 2 PG13

fection, she’s got to do things the hard way. The difference between a tyrant and a hero is that a hero leads by example, and men — humans — follow willingly. That’s what it takes to bring about a paradigm shift, and that’s what the Hero’s Journey has always been about. Making the Hero with a Thousand Faces a woman proves the primal power of the oldest story by opening it up to half the world. After untold thousands of years, it still works. As we filed out of a packed matinee screening, I heard a teenage girl exclaim, “I’m ready to go kick some ass!”

ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT

by Zeus, but godlike perfection is boring, so Jenkins and writer Allan Heinberg use Diana’s naive wonder to endear her to the audience. Wonder Woman is a Hero’s Journey, but with its multiple flashbacks, it’s not a conventional one. Diana doesn’t Refuse the Call to heroism in the beginning — she waits until after she has seen the destruction of war and the corruption of men. For Diana’s Ordeal in the underworld, Jenkins and Heinberg turn to the Gospel of Matthew. Ares (David Thewlis) shows her the world and points out, correctly, that she’s not like these puny humans. If she wants to end suffering and impose order, she can do it by force and rule as the awesome queen she is. Diana, like Jesus, rejects the temptation. Despite the fact that these humans — these men — don’t deserve her per-

Tue. 6/13 – 7:00pm @ Paradiso

Black Butler: Book of the Atlantic (dubbed) Wed. 6/14 – 7:00pm @ Paradiso

35


EMPLOYMENT • REAL ESTATE

901-575-9400 classifieds@memphisflyer.com LEGAL NOTICES AUCTION White’s Wrecker will auction the following cars on 6/9/17. 4828 Elmore Rd, Memphis, TN 38128. 00 Chevy 1GCCS1950Y8307192 84 Chevy 1GCCC14HXES110737 02 Nissan 1N6ED26Y22C358542 10 Chevy 2G1FC1EV8A9203326 13 Nissan 3N1AB6AP5BL689944 07 Ford 1FMYU02Z67KB68593 98 Chevy 1GNEK13R1XJ378968 05 Nissan 1N4AL11D65C336170 09 Infinti JNKCV61E89M301096 05 Bmw WBAEV33455KW18737 02 Chevy 1Y1SK52852Z409592 07 Bentley SCBCR73W57C041683 07 Infinti JNKBV61EX7M710399 09 Audi WAUDK78T49A019092 03 Dodge 1D4HR48N13F509356 PUBLIC AUCTION Aamco Transmissions, 2439 Covington Pike, Memphis, TN 38128 June 29, 2017 at 10:00 A.M. 2001 LEXUS GS430VIN: JT8BL69S410002230 $1200 Owed by Anthony Reese PUBLIC AUCTION Aamco Transmissions, 2439 Covington Pike, Memphis, TN 38128 July 6, 2017 At 10:00 A.M.2002 CHEVROLET TAHOEVIN: 1GNEK13Z82R305266 $1900 Owed by Jade Sulton 2003 FORD TARUSVIN: 1FAFP55S33G158590 $1270 Owed by Cornelius Markum Needs Engine 2004 PONTIAC MONTANAVIN: 1GMDX03E84D254344 $2400 Owed by Faith Ministries 2003 CHEVROLET TAHOEVIN: 1GNEK13Z13J296653 $4200 Owed by Montrel Johnson

HELP WANTED

CLEAN AND PINK Is a upscale residential cleaning company that takes pride in their employees & the clients they serve. Providing exceptional service to all. The application process is extensive to include a detailed drug test, physical exam, and background check. The training hours are 8am-6pm Mon-Thur. 12$-19$hr. Full time hours are Mon-Thu & rotating Fridays. Transportation to job sites during the work day is company provided. Body cameras are a part of the work uniform. Uniform shirts provided. Only serious candidates need apply. Those only looking for long term employment need apply. Cleaning is a physical job but all tools are company provided. Send Resume to cleannpink@msn.com COPELAND SERVICES, L.L.C. Hiring Armed State Licensed Officers/ Unarmed Officers. Three Shifts Available. Same Day Interview. 1661 International Place 901-258-5872 or 901-818-3187 Interview in Professional Attire. USIC LOCATE TECHNICIAN Daytime, full-time Locate Technician positions available! •100% PAID TRAINING •Company vehicle

& equipment provided •PLUS medical, dental, vision & life insurance Requirements: Must be able to work outdoors, HS Diploma or GED, Ability to work OT and weekends, Must have valid driver’s license with safe driving record. Apply today: www.usicllc.com EEO/AA

HOSPITALITY/ RESTAURANT BELMONT GRILL Now Hiring Cooks. Must be able to work days. Apply in person Mon-Fri, 2-4pm. 4970 Poplar @ Mendenhall. No phone calls please. EXCITING! Downtown restaurant is opening on June 23, 2014. Currently accepting applications for all positions (servers, dishwashers, bartenders, and cooks). We will be a busy and high volume restaurant. Be a part of something that Memphis has never seen before. Contact Beth at 901-326-9503 for more information.

RAFFERTY’S We are looking for service minded individuals, that don’t mind working hard. We work hard, but make $. Apply in the store. 505 N Gtown Pkwy

RETAIL WIZARD’S SMOKE SHOP Seeks mature, motivated, reliable Salesperson. Computer skills needed. $9 hrly + depends on experience. Work a retail scheduled as required. Adapt quickly to fast paced environment. Apply in person at 1999 Madison Ave, MonThur, 11am-5pm. Or email resume to wizxtoo@bellsouth.net

SHARED HOUSING 309 N. MONTGOMERY Room for rent with discount on rent for housekeeping assistance. Call Walter 288-7512.

Advanced Concert Ticket Sales

DOWNTOWN APTS MINUTES FROM DOWNTOWN Come visit the brand new Cleaborn Pointe at Heritage Landing. Located just minutes from historic Downtown Memphis. 2BR Apts & Townhomes $707; 3BR Apts & Townhomes $813. Community Room, Computer Room, Fitness Room. A smoke free community. 440 South Lauderdale Memphis, TN 38126 | 901-254-7670.

MIDTOWN APT CENTRAL GARDENS 2BR/1BA, hdwd floors, ceiling fans, french doors, all appls incl. W/D, 9ft ceil, crown molding, off str pking. $720/ mo. Also 1BR, $650/mo. 833-6483. OVERTON SQUARE Studio efficiency $395, 1BR $545 or XLG 1BR $650, W/D, remodeled, porch, pet friendly. $25 credit ck fee. 452-3945

ALL AREAS Free Roommate Service @ RentMates. com. Find the perfect roommate to complement your personality and lifestyle at RentMates.com! (AAN CAN)

Nationwide Promotion and Production Company is seeking individuals to staff our Memphis, TN office. We Offer: • Monday-Friday 12-9pm • Hourly Pay + Bonus • Benefits include: Dental, Vision & Life • Paid Vacation, Holidays, Sick Days! • Management Opportunity Looking for Highly Motivated, Career Oriented People With Good Communication Skills! For An Interview Now,

CALL SAM 901-347-3557

BUSINESS OPPORTUNITIES PAID IN ADVANCE! Make $1000 A Week Mailing Brochures From Home! No Experience Required. Helping home workers since 2001! Genuine Opportunity. Start Immediately! www.IncomeStationl.Net (AAN CAN)

1999 MADISON AVE MEMPHIS, TN

COME JOIN OUR TEAM OF SALES ASSOCIATES. ONLY MATURE, SELF MOTIVATED, HARD WORKING EXPERIENCED SALES ASSOCIATES NEED APPLY.

APPLY IN PERSON ONLY MON-THUR 10A TO 6P

GENERAL ANIMAL LOVERS Bring Your Dog to Work. Carriage Drivers needed downtown. Valid license required. UptownCarriages.com 901496-2128

*RETAIL COMPUTER SKILLS, STRONG PERSONALITY AND WORK ETHIC REQUIRED. *HOURLY PLUS BONUS *WILL WORK A RETAIL SCHEDULE INCLUDING EVENINGS, WEEKENDS AND HOLIDAYS AS REQUIRED *MUST BE ABLE TO ADAPT QUICKLY TO A FAST PACED, CHANGING ENVIRONMENT SALES EXPERIENCE A MUST AND A PLUS.

Be part of the exciting new Riverfront Concept…

JOIN FEDEX

June 8-14, 2017

• Now hiring permanent part-time Handlers, day and night, at $12.62 per hour for the Memphis, TN location • Medical coverage starting as low as $5 per month • Tuition assistance • Nationwide training and opportunities

Hiring now for June opening. All FOH & BOH Positions Available!

Nice people who can think on their feet only. Be part of a fun, upbeat environment with the best view in the city.

36

Apply in person T - F between 10 AM & 1 PM. 251 Riverside Dr, where Beale meets Riverside.

Applicant Eligibility • Must be at least 18 years old • Must be able to lift 75 pounds • No minimum education requirements • Background check and drug screen required

Apply in Person FedEx Express Memphis World Hub Recruitment Center 2874 Business Park Dr., Building D Memphis, TN 38118

Business Hours 8:30 AM to 3:00 PM - Monday through Friday 6:30 PM to 8:00 PM - Monday and Tuesday evenings 8:30 AM to Noon - Saturday mornings To learn more, go to careers.fedex.com/express

EOE, M/F/D/V


REAL ESTATE • SERVICES

901-575-9400 classifieds@memphisflyer.com FURNISHED ROOMS Stage Road/Covington Pike, Airways/ Park, North/South Memphis, W/D, Cable TV/Phone. 901-485-0897

Mid-Town Apartments For Rent

129 Stonewall Street # 3

1 & 2 BRs UNITS AVAILABLE $595-$750 Per Month

MIDTOWN ROOMS FOR RENT Central Heat/Air, utls included, furnished. 901.650.4400

25 N Idlewild Street #10

Call or Text Chris 901-282-5445 Enterprise Realtors Inc. 901-867-1000

VW • AUDI MINI•PORSCHE

German Car Experts

Specializing in VW & Audi Automobiles

Also Servicing

Mini • Porsche Factory Trained Experience Independent Prices

4907 Old Summer Rd.

(Corner of Summer & Mendenhall)

(901) 761-3443 www.WolfsburgAuto.com

Call today for an appointment!

Laurie Stark • 28 Years of Experience • Life Member of the Multi Million Dollar Club • From Downtown to Germantown • Call me for your Real Estate Needs

NICE ROOMS FOR RENT S. Pkwy & Wilson. Utilities and Cable included. Fridge in your room. Cooking and free laundry privileges. Some locations w/sec. sys. Starting at $435/ mo. + dep. 901.922.9089 RARE VACANCY! Midtown room for rent near medical district. Very safe, private entrance. Very large. Fully furnished. Wifi. $120/ wk + dep. Utilities included. 901-725-3892.

BUY, SELL, TRADE KILL ROACHES GUARANTEED! Buy Harris Roach Tablets with Lure. Odorless, Long Lasting. Available: Hardware Stores, The Home Depot, homedepot.com (AAN CAN) PERSONAL COLLECTION Of Memphis In May signs & posters. Signed, numbered & framed from 1980-2007. Call Bobby 901.484.4800

ANNOUNCEMENTS PREGNANT? CONSIDERING ADOPTION? Call us first. Living expenses, housing, medical, and continued support afterwards. Choose adoptive family of your choice. Call 24/7. 877-362-2401 (AAN CAN)

The Edison The Edison

MASSAGE

Premier retailers, chic eateries, fresh markets & live entertainment venues • Townhouse, garden or high-rise units areto trolley justlineminutes away! • Adjacent • Located near historic Beale Street and AutoZone Park • BeautifulCall park-like setting today!

Classic apartment community featuring 1 & 2-bedroom high-rise units; 1, 2 & 3-bedroom garden units, & 2 and 3-bedroom townhomes. Conveniently located: Easy access to premier retailers, chic eateries, fresh markets & live entertainment venues that are just minutes away.

• Close to UTHSC

Small •••• 1BR $575-$615 1Petsdiscounts &welcome 2-br high-riseReduced units Student Great views of$635-$685 downtown deposit of •••• 2BR 1, 2 Covered parking& 3-br garden units $100 ••3BR $755-$785 2 and 3-br townhomes

567 Jefferson Ave Phone: (901) 523-8112 567 Jefferson Ave | Memphis, TN 38105-5228 Email: edison@mrgmemphis.com Phone: (901) 523-8112 | Email: edison@mrgmemphis.com

TAXES *2017 Tax Change Benefits*

Personal/Business + Legal Work

TOM PITMAN, LMT Massage The Way You Like It. Swedish/Deep Tissue - Relaxation, Hot Stones. Credit Cards. Call 761-7977. tompitmanmassage.com, tom@tompitmanmassage.com WILLIAM BREWER Massage Therapist (Health & Wellness offer) 377-6864

MIND, BODY, SPIRIT TREAT THE CONDITION Transform your life! Are you dependent or addicted to painkillers, opiates, methadone or heroin? SUBOXONE, ZUBSOLV, BUNAVAIL: Introduction, maintenance, medical withdrawal & counseling. Opiate dependence exists in all walks of life. Private, confidential, in-office treatment. Staffed by a suboxone certified physician. Call (901) 761-8100 for more information.

STOP OVERPAYING for your prescriptions! SAVE! Call our licensed Canadian and International pharmacy, compare prices and get $25.00 OFF your first prescription! CALL 1-888-329-9529 Promo Code CDC201725

NUTRITION/HEALTH 48 PILLS + 4 FREE! VIAGRA 100MG/ CIALIS 20mg Free Pills! No hassle, Discreet Shipping. Save Now. Call Today 1-877-621-7013 (AAN CAN) MAKE THE CALL TO START GETTING CLEAN TODAY. Free 24/7 Helpline for alcohol & drug addiction treatment. Get help! It is time to take your life back! Call Now: 855-732-4139 (AAN CAN)

M.E SEEKING SINGERS WANTED For recording R&B and Pop demos. Send tape or demos to Quince Records, P.O. Box 751082, Memphis, TN 38141.

AUTO ‘99 FORD EXPEDITION $1100 OBO. Call T. J. at 901-371-1334

DATING SERVIES LIVELINKS - CHAT LINES Flirt, chat and date! Talk to sexy real singles in your area. Call now! (877) 609-2935 (AAN CAN)

By a CPA-Attorney Practicing in Midtown & Memphis Since 1989

(901) 272-9471 1726 Madison Ave

(901)761-1622 • Cell (901)486-1464

Bruce Newman newmandecoster.com

Midtown Friendly!

Kimbrough Towers A Northland Community

3707 Macon Rd. • 272-9028 lecorealty.com Visit us online, call, or office for free list.

Houses & Duplexes for Rent ALL AREAS Visit us @ www.lecorealty.com come in, or call Leco Realty, Inc. @ 3707 Macon Rd. 272-9028

1703 Lockett Place UPSTAIRS LUXURY MIDTOWN APT

1703 Locket Place is a hidden treasure that offers true midtown charm and architecture. It is located off Madison Ave. across from Belvedere Park and Casablanca Restaurant. It’s also just a short walk to Overton Park or Overton Square. This two level apartment is 2000+ sq. ft. and has a great view, and includes the full range of amenities: · Secured Parking · 3 Bedrooms · 2 Fireplaces · 2 Full Bathrooms · Large Kitchen w/ Appliances · 2 Large Balconies and Patio · Pine Hardwood Floors

Unique Community Features Include • Historic Central Gardens District • Controlled access building • Garage parking available • Parquet wood flooring • 9 foot ceilings • 24 hour Fitness & Laundry Centers • Private park with picnic & grilling • Central heat and air

Reserve your new home today at the historic Kimbrough Towers

888-446-4954

Monday-Friday 8-5 www.KimbroughTowers.com

Rent: $1,400 | Contact 901.859.1725 ...I’m a handsome 1 year old male. I love other dogs and people. I have a few dog friends at the shelter that I play with. But I need a real home. I have been waiting patiently for almost a whole month for someone to rescue me. Please come meet me!”

NOEL!

“Hi I’m

Call Ranise at 815-228-0511 or email her at ranise.aliverescue@gmail.com to find out about adopting me. Ranise Coppens ALIVE Rescue Memphis President aliverescuememphis.org facebook.com/aliverescuememphis

CLASSIFIEDS memphisflyer.com

5384 Poplar Ave., Suite 250, Memphis, TN 38119

37


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T H E L A S T W O R D b y Tr o y L . W i g g i n s

On the Moon Too many white people are detached from earthly reality.

m e m p h i s f l y e r. c o m

Imagine pledging allegiance to a nation that would rather you not exist, would gladly deny you the rights that you have earned for yourself 20 times over. Imagine being forced to watch from your hovels and tenements as the machine of progress trampled over any hope you had of an equitable future. Imagine being a citizen of a country or state or city that prioritized the feelings of some of its citizens over the realities of its majority. Imagine living in a “land of the free” that elected a national leader whose driving purpose seems to be to strip away the limited freedoms that exist for people unlike him and his family, all while fattening his pockets off the blood of the land. Imagine that this “land of the free” replicates these types of leaders at almost every level. Gil Scott-Heron’s 1970 poem “Whitey on the Moon” was a symbolic questioning of American achievement in the face of the social crises listed above. At the time he wrote this poem, our country’s goal was to win the Space Race, in part to establish our military supremacy and deflect any threats Gil Scott-Heron against our nation’s greatness. We funneled billions of taxpayer dollars, thousands of hours of labor, and tons of resources toward low-orbit supremacy, an undertaking that ran side-by-side with antiracist, anti-poverty social movements. Civil rights movement leaders and poor black people alike wondered how America could devote so much time and effort to sending astronauts to space but not make any attempt to do right by oppressed populations. Well, the answer is simple. Whitey’s always been on the moon. When I say this, I don’t mean that American whites are actually on the moon. I mean that they are detached from earthly reality, and every bit of progress or protest by nonwhites shoves them further into space, where logic doesn’t exist. This is especially true now, when the halls of power are populated by white men who feel comfortable pandering to the most bigoted of populations and creating policy that reflects their oppressive beliefs. For too long in America, too many white Americans have believed that white people are the vanguards of progress, technological information, culture, and freedom. Only the moon-addled can look at our world and continue to think like this. The number of white nationalist hate groups has spiked since November. The vast majority of hate crimes are now perpetrated against non-whites, immigrants, religious minorities, and members of the LGBT community. Every day it seems like there’s a video of a Muslim woman going to do her grocery shopping and being accosted by a soccer mom with the rage-flames of xenophobia in her eyes. People of color are being murdered by random, racist whites every other day in extremely violent ways. Bystanders and good samaritans are being slashed and stabbed by white men who armor themselves in the flag and see themselves as defenders of white American ideals. Corporations — many of them led by moon-addled white folks and enabled by white politicians — make it their policy to destroy access to wealth from workers, to keep them laboring and sick and fearful. Other groups in this country — the groups who are often on the receiving end of white folks’ moon-borne oppression — are made to feel like they are the problem with American culture. If they didn’t practice their heathen religions, if they didn’t have those weird cultural traditions, if they would just be white, then these problems with oppression wouldn’t exist and everyone would be free. What really sucks about this condition of white moon-blindness is that you’re always prepared for it, but it can still catch you unawares even though it is innocuous, and any white person can simply decide to let it rip, leaving you either stuck wishing you had said the right thing, facing the judgmental stares of your peers, or even, sometimes, dead. And with one of the mooniest white men in the United States currently occupying the position of president, every moon-wild bigot in the country — and even some moon-wild non-bigots — will be in rare form. They’ll be invading your neighborhoods and communities, getting you arrested and moving their friends into your grandparents’ homes. They’ll be following you around, yelling racial slurs at you, and then trying to kill you when you fight back. They’ll be casually offensive toward you or pass laws to disenfranchise you or consume your culture until there’s nothing left, but you’ll be sure that you’re the problem and not them. Troy L. Wiggins is a Memphis writer whose work has appeared in the Memphis Noir anthology, Make Memphis magazine, and The Memphis Flyer.

THE LAST WORD

CREATIVE COMMONS | ADAM TURNER

I can’t pay no doctor bill. (but Whitey’s on the moon) Ten years from now I’ll be payin’ still. (while Whitey’s on the moon) The man jus’ upped my rent las’ night. (’cause Whitey’s on the moon) No hot water, no toilets, no lights. (but Whitey’s on the moon) — “Whitey on the Moon,” Gil Scott-Heron, 1970

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MINGLEWOOD HALL ON SALE FRIDAY: Kyle Kinane [9/11]

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Memphis Flyer 6.8.17  

This week: Jackson Baker went to Russia to explore what live is like inside our once (and maybe future) adversary. Also: Chris McCoy on Wond...