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05.04.17 1471ST ISSUE FREE

BEALE STREET MUSIC FESTIVAL GUIDE P19 COMPLETE SCHEDULE + ARTIST PROFILES + PARK MAP

music ISSUE 2017


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May 4-10, 2017


OUR 1471ST ISSUE 05.04.17

JUSTIN RUSHING Advertising Director CARRIE O’GUIN HOFFMAN Advertising Operations Manager JERRY D. SWIFT Advertising Director Emeritus KELLI DEWITT, CHIP GOOGE Senior Account Executives ALEX KENNER Account Executive ROXY MATTHEWS Sales Assistant DESHAUNE MCGHEE Classified Advertising Manager BRENDA FORD Classified Sales Administrator classifieds@memphisflyer.com LYNN SPARAGOWSKI Distribution Manager ROBBIE FRENCH Warehouse and Delivery Manager BRANDY BROWN, JANICE GRISSOM ELLISON, ZACH JOHNSON, KAREN MILAM, RANDY ROTZ, LEWIS TAYLOR, WILLIAM WIDEMAN Distribution THE MEMPHIS FLYER is published weekly by Contemporary Media, Inc., 460 Tennessee Street, Memphis, TN 38103 Phone: (901) 521-9000 Fax: (901) 521-0129 letters@memphisflyer.com www.memphisflyer.com CONTEMPORARY MEDIA, INC. KENNETH NEILL Chief Executive Officer MOLLY WILLMOTT Chief Operating Officer JEFFREY GOLDBERG Director of Business Development BRUCE VANWYNGARDEN Editorial Director KEVIN LIPE Digital Manager LYNN SPARAGOWSKI Distribution Manager MATTHEW PRESTON Social Media Manager BRITT ERVIN Email Marketing Manager ASHLEY HAEGER Controller CELESTE DIXON Accounting Assistant JOSEPH CAREY IT Director KALENA MCKINNEY Receptionist

National Newspaper Association

Association of Alternative Newsmedia

ROXI LOVE MAY 5 & 6

JAMIE BAKER & THE VIPS MAY 12 & 13

THE

AFTER DARK BAND MAY 19 & 20

JANINE LECLAIR MAY 26

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m e m p h i s f l y e r. c o m

CARRIE BEASLEY Senior Art Director CHRISTOPHER MYERS Advertising Art Director JEREMIAH MATTHEWS BRYAN ROLLINS Graphic Designers

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CONTENTS

BRUCE VANWYNGARDEN Editor SUSAN ELLIS Managing Editor JACKSON BAKER, MICHAEL FINGER Senior Editors TOBY SELLS Associate Editor CHRIS MCCOY Film and TV Editor JOSHUA CANNON, CHRIS DAVIS, MAYA SMITH, MICAELA WATTS, MICHAEL DONAHUE Staff Writers JESSE DAVIS, LESLEY YOUNG Copy Editors JULIE RAY Calendar Editor

Bruce is on vacation this week. Y’all let the man fish. Some thoughts on this week’s issue and more … • Last Monday, on my walk to the Big River Crossing from work, I crossed over the pedestrian bridge near the south entrance to Tom Lee and emerged into a cage, literally. What with all the rogue beavers and bears and zoo babies and new Blue Suede Brigade, the situation was if not startling then definitely weird. It was, of course, just Memphis in May shoring up the park and preparing for load in for this weekend’s fun. You can read all about the Beale Street Music Festival in this issue, including a trio of features about Snoop Dogg, Booker T. Jones, and Dead Soldiers and a full rundown of all the acts performing. Fingers crossed for good weather. The Flyer’s building happens to be very close to Tom Lee. Even with all the Memphis in May-induced traffic hassles (which promise to be worse this year with all the construction at the Brewery … already feeling pre-rage), it’s a pretty ideal location. I’ve been a vegetarian for 14 years, but one of my greatest pleasures is taking the bluff steps down to the park during Barbecue Fest and giving the park a looparound or two. (There’s also plenty of junk to eat, so don’t you worry about me.) One new development with Barbecue Fest this year is that Wednesday night will now be open to the public. Wednesday has been, for as long as I can remember, friends and family night, just sort of a chill evening before all the craziness. According to a Memphis in May rep, there were so many folks in the park on Wednesday already, it made sense to open it to the public. But the new NEW development is that there is a new event. Are you sitting? Sauce wrestling. Word is, there will be an actual wrestling ring covered in a tarp covered in barbecue sauce. So gross. I love it. • How does so much dog hair get in the fridge? • Michael Freakin’ Donahue, everybody! • I just saw a commercial of a lady shaving her armpits … with a huge, huge grin on her face as if swept away in the bliss of shaving one’s pits. This does not happen. Nope. Stop it. • I finally found a 901 Rock. Is this still a thing? Is Railgarten the new 901 Rock? I was told I need to put it back in the wild, but since I found it in a semi-scary, litter-strewn alley, I feel like I earned it. Can I throw it at somebody? • Also in this issue is a viewpoint by Martha Park. She wrote the Flyer’s cover story on the Ell Persons lynching last year. In the viewpoint, she writes about student involvement in the Lynching Sites Project, which “shin[es] the light of truth on lynchings in Shelby County, Tennessee.” One teen said, “We learn about Martin Luther King all the time, but we didn’t learn this history” — a notion shared by others in the viewpoint. At a time when Trump was quoted as saying, “People N E WS & O P I N I O N don’t ask that question, but why was NY TIMES CROSSWORD - 5 there the Civil War? Why could that THE FLY-BY - 6 one not have been worked out?,” the POLITICS - 7 more hard facts out there the better. EDITORIAL - 8 I’m not the first person to point out VIEWPOINT - 9 the parallel stories of Civil War monuCOVER — MUSIC ISSUE - 10 ments and the Lynching Sites Project. A STE P P I N’ O UT statement from the city of New Orleans, WE RECOMMEND - 14 which recently took steps to remove AFTER DARK - 16 MUSIC FEST GUIDE - 19 its Civil War monuments, reads, “[the CALENDAR OF EVENTS - 39 monuments] failed to appropriately THEATER - 46 reflect the values of diversity and incluFOOD - 47 sion that make New Orleans strong FOOD NEWS - 48 today.” Shouldn’t we able to make that SPIRITS - 49 same statement here? FILM - 50 Susan Ellis C L AS S I F I E D S - 52 ellis@memphisflyer.com LAST WORD - 55

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fly-by

f l y o n t h e w a l l Safer Streets, {

READING THE CA It’s tempting to just caption this pic “[COMMENT TK],” and leave it at that. But Name of Column has always been one of Fly on the Wall’s favorite columnists. Besides, with The Commercial Appeal’s parent company, Gannett, dismissing local talent left and right, delaying employee severance pay, and engaging in what some have described as “union busting” tactics, while changing a once acceptable daily into a paper wraith, it’s appropriate to flag this editorial effort as more evidence that all is well and everything’s going according to plan.

May 4-10, 2017

MEMPHIS IS UGLY This clip recently published in The Sacramento Bee announces another BS list for people to click on and get upset about. Memphis was ranked #9 on a list of America’s ugliest cities, as determined by the beautiful professional tourists of Travel & Leisure Magazine based on criteria — does anybody really care?

4

VERBATIM “You look like heroin might improve your life.” — overheard at the taping for season one of the You Look Like, an insult-based comedy game show created by Memphis comics Katrina Coleman and Tommy Oler. Craig Brewer’s BR2 Productions has teamed with the L.A.-based digital studio Gunpowder and Sky to develop the monthly P&H Cafe-based show/podcast into readymade content for streaming services. By Chris Davis. Email him at davis@memphisflyer.com.

Road Closed

Edited by Toby Sells

W E E K T H AT W A S By Flyer staff

“STATE O F TH E STR E ETS” K I C KS O F F Bike Walk Memphis, a group advocating for better biking and walking experiences in Memphis, kicked off the State of the Streets circuit, which is an effort to inform various community groups about the current conditions of the city’s streets and what the city is doing to improve them. The effort began last week. Nicholas Oyler, Bikeway and Pedestrian Program Manager at the City of Memphis, spoke to the Frayser Exchange community group about the dangers of Memphis streets and the need to invest in the 15,000 acres of city streets. “Our track record today is not good,” Oyler said. “Our streets are dangerous by design, but we can improve that.” Oyler told the group that as of now, 30 percent of the city’s sidewalks are impassible and need to be redone today, but the problem is the high price tag these projects have, costing millions of dollars. To make a dent in the problem, the city identified the 100 projects in the city that need the most attention in the Memphis Pedestrian Safety Action Plan. From there, 20 were chosen and federally funded to be demonstration projects in an effort to secure more funding, allowing the entire project to be implemented, said Oyler. Program Coordinator for Bike Walk Memphis Bridget McCall says the group hopes to reach more neighborhoods with the State of the Streets circuit to inform people that the city is aware of the problem and is moving in a direction of improvement. “We want to start having more conversations at a neighborhood level about the fact that there are plans that will make our streets safer,” McCall said. A N EW B LU E S U E D E B R I GAD E Gone are the sashes, khakis, and pith helmets, but their shoes are still blue suede. The Blue Suede Brigade 2.0 was introduced to the members of the Downtown Memphis Commission (DMC) during a meeting Friday. Training for the group kicked off on April 5th, and the group officially hit the streets last Wednesday. The Brigade will cover an area including Civic Plaza in the Core all the way down to G.E. Patterson in South Main and from B.B. King to Front. They cover that ground on foot (in special blue suede Nikes), bikes, and Segway transporters. The group will continue to focus on hospitality and offer referrals to out-of-town visitors, of course. But they’ll also report nuisance issues and assist the city with identifying code violations. D O NA H U E J O I N S C M I Contemporary Media Inc., publishers of The Memphis Flyer, Memphis magazine, Memphis Parent, and Inside Memphis Business, are pleased to announce the hiring of longtime Memphis journalist Michael Donahue. Donahue began his career in 1975 at the now-defunct Memphis Press-Scimitar and moved to The Memphis Commercial Appeal in 1984, where he wrote about food and dining, music, and covered social events until earlier this year. Donahue will write for the Flyer, Memphis magazine, and Inside Memphis Business.

MICHAEL DONAHUE PHOTO BY BRYAN ROLLINS

THE

Questions, Answers + Attitude

OVE RTO N GATEWAY P LAN S R EVI S E D After receiving much criticism of the proposed Overton Gateway, the developers altered their designs for the five-story apartment building and townhouses that would line seven acres near Sam Cooper at East Parkway. The developers, Makowsky Ringel Greenberg LLC, met with concerned members of the public on Wednesday, April 26th, to discuss the changes to the plans corresponding to the feedback received after the design was initially proposed. One of the key concerns of the first proposal was the intended heights of the buildings. Blair Parker, involved with site planning and architectural design for the project, said the concerns were heard and changes were made. However, as the group laid out the changes, which included the proposed five-story building being reduced to a three- and four-story complex, tensions — and eyebrows — rose in the room. Concerns from the first meeting — the crowds and traffic that the complex would draw — were still being expressed. The group announced that before moving forward with the project, many steps have to be taken, which include taking the conceptual plan before the land use control board. R OAD S C LOS E D FO R M E M P H I S I N MAY As trucks, volunteers, and workers begin to arrive to stage the Beale Street Music Festival, Riverside will be either partially or completely closed from Union to Georgia. Robert Griffin, the director of marketing for MIM, said the street is partially open for about 20 days of the festival cycle and is completely closed for no more than 15 days. A news release from MIM noted that the street’s closure is not related to the Riverside closure on the north end of the street. Riverplay, a pop-up park, will close Riverside from Union to Bass Pro Drive through August. MIM will also close Beale Street from Wagner Place to Front Street and Wagner Place from Beale to Linden on festival days.


For Release Saturday, May 6, 2017 T H E D U N C A N - W I L L I A M S S T. J U D E The New York Times Syndication Sales Corporation 620 Eighth Avenue, New York, N.Y. 10018 For Information Call: 1-800-972-3550 For Release Monday, February 13, 2017

Crossword

W H A T I F S

H A D A N I P

A Q U A R I A

T U L L E

L A O W L E S S T T E R E A R

R U B I R E F U L E I S L E P S O F A T V C R E W E A S I T D E F I T I M E Z E M P O M A N E M E

I N T H E B A G

N I N J A S

P A D A O M I N W I N G D E E R S L E D I P R I C O O D S I S T E D E D A R S C A U K E B N I L I E D A T

ANSWER E D K O C H

P E E D E E

I M P E N D

C O T T A

S J A C U A L O N N A V I K E A T A R O O Z A R R A G T styled by @andreafenise S M E A

P E E R A G E

P E S E T A S

E V I L O N E

R O L E X E S

53 ___-rock (music genre) 54 Land between Can. and Mex. 55 Inits. at the start of a memo 56 “You ready?” 59 Drilling tool 61 Hooded snake 64 Thin pancake 65 Place for the banjo in “Oh! Susanna” 66 Exposition 67 N.B.A. star ___ Irving 68 Freezes, with “over” 69 Worry

DOWN 1 Picnic pests 2 State that produces the most corn 3 Weather-related stoppage in baseball 4 Beach footwear 5 Tool building 6 Lipton offering 7 Genesis vessel 8 Word before congestion or spray 9 Job that might involve watching the kids? 10 Variety 11 French farewell 12 “Rats!” 13 Use a stencil on 18 Amorous cartoon skunk 22 “No thanks” 25 President after Nixon

1

2

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14

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18

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29

50

59

13

36

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PUZZLE BY NEVILLE FOGARTY

26 Like a sheep with all its wool 27 Praiseful poem 28 Onetime Volvo competitor 29 K, in the NATO alphabet 30 “According to conventional wisdom …” 35 Place to drink lined with TVs 36 French “to be” 37 “So long!”

39 Joy Adamson book about Elsa the lioness 40 Fencing sword 43 Coat and ___ 45 Decrease 48 Soft mineral 49 Phony doc 50 Unscrupulous moneylending 51 Rarin’ to go 52 Republican pol Haley from South Carolina

STYLE YOUR HOME

56 Gets 16-Across 57 Buffalo’s lake 58 Sour

60 Prefix with dermis

62 “Monsters, ___” (2001 movie) 63 Word before a maiden name

m e m p h i s f l y e r. c o m

E C O T Y P E

28 Exhibit in an anatomy class 31 Guided 32 Is sick 33 Four-baggers: Abbr. 34 Like favorite stations on a car radio 38 Pie ___ mode 39 Result of failure to comb the hair after sleep, maybe … or a feature of 17-, 25-, 49- or 61-Across? 41 School grp. 42 Young male viewed as a sex object 44 Black ___ (covert doings) 45 ___ Ticonderoga 46 Apr. 15 mail addressee 47 Place to pull over on an interstate 49 English monarch with a “lace” named after her

NEWS & OPINION

M A S S E U R

No.

Edited by Will Shortz No. 0109 37 Loose, now DOWN 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 1 40 Powerful D.C. 1 Vase style 14 15 16 lobby 2 Compatriot of 41 Raiser of 17 18 19 Mao awareness, for short 3 Noted father-or20 21 22 son singer 44 Not accidental 23 24 25 4 Ancient New 45 In opposition Mexican 46 Guru, maybe 28 29 30 31 5 Part of a crib 47 Straightens 32 33 34 6 Living ___ 49 Firm parts: Abbr. 35 36 50 Hockey team, 7 Major Asian e.g. carrier 37 38 39 40 4 51 Words on a 8 Attire jacket S T J U D E . o r g / d r a g o n b45 o at 44 46 9 Like melancholy 53 Risked a ticket D, MUSIC AND FUN FOR ALL AGES musical keys AF OL LO 47 D A Y A T M U D I S L A N D 48 RIVER PARK 49 55 Construction Online subscriptions: Today’s puzzle and more than 7,000 past puzzles, nytimes.com/crosswords ($39.95 a year). 10 The poor staples … onoreach puzzle: nytimes.com/wordplay. Read about and comment 50 51 52 young solvers: nytimes.com/studentcrosswords. aCrosswords hintforto this 11 Not go along puzzle’s theme 55 56 12 Prefix with lateral 53 54 59 Famous Amos 13 Bedevil 59 60 61 60 Rocker Steve 18 Girl’s name that 61 “Don’t go!,” e.g. 62 63 64 may precede Ann 62 Obnoxious one 63 Subject of some 22 One may be starting in sports PUZZLE BY HOWARD BARKIN codes 36 Actress Wilson of 43 Features of 54 Autho 23 What’s shaken 64 Scandinavian wrote Boston accents “Mrs. Doubtfire” when you say capital insan “Shake!” 45 Milieu of the 37 Sch. with the long TO PREVIOUS PUZZLE FX series “The 24 Big letters in George W. Bush horrib Americans” electronics Presidential P O E M B R O W S E gold vase 46 Poetic stanza Library T A P E S H R E W S 25 Ones moving far 56 Burie $3.99 48 Like government from home 38 Corral A T I T C Y C L I C bonds S S H vase U S A L M A 26 Fifth in a group 39 Strips at 57 Pull ( 49 German of eight breakfast B O O Z E S I M P $2.99 preposition P U D D I N G N E A 27 Saginaw-to-Flint 41 Tough, tenacious 51 Oil qtys. 58 Noted I Z E S Q U O T E D sorts dir. pseud 52 They burn Z Z I Q U I X O T E 29 Bit of beachwear 42 Wild blue in sh Z O G U I D O writin yonder 53 Racing letters 30 ___ way A F F A I R E B F F F U Z Z Y W Y L E 33 It may be added Online subscriptions: Today’s puzzle and more than 7,0 to alcohol puzzles, nytimes.com/crosswords ($39.95 a year). S R E B C A G E S The Salvation Army Family Stores K S T O M A T O E S 34 Pitiful Read about and comment on each puzzle: nytimes.com O P T W O P E N C E 35 Hit the gas pedal Crosswords for young solvers: nytimes.com/studentc 5 R Y E L M T R E E S hard

Crossword ACROSS 1 One of the Great Lakes 5 Menacing cloud 10 Sony offering 14 Saint’s home, for short 15 Place for a barbecue 16 Rich finish? 17 “Don’t give up” 19 Rather powerful engine ANSWER TO PREVIOUS PUZZLE 20 Brown 21 Some plants 23 Value 25 Spooky quality 28 Smoothie fruit 29 Popular cookie 31 Taking things for granted on April Fools’ Day and others 32 “Time ___ …” 33 Track, in a sense 34 Not wait for Mr. Right, say 35 Huuuuuuuuge ACROSS 1 Puts on TV or radio 5 Ending on several central Asian country names 9 Meanie in “Jack and the Beanstalk” 14 U.S. weather agcy. 15 Zeus’ wife 16 ___ and wiser 17 1990s TV series about a murder in a town in Washington 19 Film director Kurosawa 20 Made smooth, as wood 21 Part of the conjugation of the French “avoir” 23 And others, for short 24 Bump fists 25 K-K-K-5-5, e.g., in poker

Edited by Will Shortz

2679 Kirby Whitten Rd. Memphis, TN · 3329 Austin Pea Hwy Memphis, TN · 1621 Goodman Rd Horn Lake, MS


Outlook Unknown

{

S TAT E W AT C H B y M i c a e l a Wa t t s

In Memphis alone, 765 state employees employed through public higher education institutions now face uncertainty about their employment status, wages, and benefits following the signing of a controversial outsourcing contract between the state of Tennessee and commercial real estate giant Jones Lang LaSalle (JLL). The outsourcing plan would turn over maintenance and custodial staffing of all state-owned buildings to for-profit company JLL. Public college campuses would comprise the vast majority of privatizing public jobs. With 507 campus facility personnel, the University of Memphis employs the majority of the state workers in Memphis. At this point it’s unclear whether or not the university intends to sign on to the outsourcing services with JLL. The student-led organization Progressive Student Alliance has been following the development of the outsourcing plan closely for two years and met with U of M president David Rudd recently to gauge whether or not campus workers will wake up to privatized jobs. “Rudd has told us that he’s personally against the contract, but ultimately, it is something the university board must approve,” said PSA organizer Lindsey Smith. Smith added that some details about the legal mechanisms are unknown. “Not knowing any of the specifics around opting out leaves workers here feeling unsafe,” said Smith. In an email, FedEx CFO and executive vice president Alan Graf, who serves as the chairman of the university’s

newly established independent school board, said that the board hasn’t discussed the matter and the next public meeting would take place on June 6th. Provided the contract is approved by the state’s comptroller office, it would take effect by May 5th. Though Governor Bill Haslam and the Office of Customer Focused Government (OCFG) have repeatedly stressed that universities have the option not to sign on for JLL services, a full month before the U of M board would even publicly discuss the outsourcing plan would be a departure from the state’s own acceleration of the contract approval process. The contract was signed three days earlier than it was scheduled to be presented to JLL, in a decision that the Department of General Services official David Roberson dismissed as nothing unusual. “Those dates are just estimates,” Roberson said, referring to the timeline made available to the public. The state’s own request for proposals says Tennessee officials must inform institutions included in the scope of the contract. It’s unclear if any were. At last count, 42 legislators signed a letter sent to the OCFG urging for a halt in the contract until the economic implications can be further explored. At least 17 legislators have asked for economic impact statements specific to their district, but as of press time, none have been released through the state’s general

MICAELA WATTS

As the state quietly signs contract, campus workers face uncertainty.

Organizer Jayanni Webster services department, though they are constitutionally bound to do so. Smaller districts stand to be disproportionately affected by outsourcing should job losses occur, many of which rely on state-run parks as significant contributors to the local economy. Both Haslam and the OCFG have repeatedly and adamantly stuck by several points of assurance for the outsourcing plan: Jobs will be protected, benefits will be matched, the state could save upwards of $35 million a year with full participation, and every public institution has the discretion whether or not to sign on. But as specifics from the contract emerge, many of the administration’s talking points are coming into question, and opposing parties point to hazy language such as “total equitable compensation”, “similar essential value,” and “appropriate insurance coverage” as feeble reassurance. The Flyer has issued a request for comment to Rudd.

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STILL GROUNDBREAKING.


THE BEST

POLITICS By Jackson Baker

ENTERTAINMENT IN TUNICA

Creating opportunity for minority and women contractors is the order of the day in Memphis and Shelby County. going to minority contractors. It had grown to 16 percent on his watch, he trumpeted. “That’s 33 percent in one year!” But he followed up that heady statistic with one that was (no other way to put it) dismaying. “Twenty-five years ago, only 1 percent of the businesses in Memphis were owned by African Americans,” he reminded the gathering. “And today it’s still the same,” Strickland lamented. “City government needs to lead the way,” the mayor said, going on to proclaim, “For the first time ever, employees are being evaluated on their minority contracting at City Hall.” And he finished up with an exhortation to the group: “If you’re not certified as a credentialed builder, go downtown and get certified!” This event didn’t come to pass in a vacuum. Giving Mayor Strickland the benefit of the doubt, city government may, in fact, be attempting to lead the way in contracting reform. But this is one of those exercises that requires coordination in the community at large, and at least two other major entities are all in on the effort, as well. Simultaneously, the Greater Memphis Chamber of Commerce, in an announcement this week, has set a goal for 2017 of seeing “600 total new contracts for minority- and women-owned enterprises (MWBE) and locally owned small businesses (LOSB). …” And the Shelby County Commission, which over the past year devoted commendable time and energy to the preparation of an in-depth disparity study, has seen its own MWBE/LOSB efforts redoubled and then some, voting both to expand the existing county Equal Opportunity Compliance office (EOC) and to endow a brand new office entrusted with the task of actively seeking out women and minority contractors. Yep, it takes a village.

BARENAKED LADIES MAY 5

THE RIGHTEOUS BROTHERS MAY 13

WAYNE NEWTON

RON WHITE

UP CLOSE AND PERSONAL

FOR MATURE AUDIENCES

MAY 20

JUNE 16

BILLY CURRINGTON JUNE 23

FEATURING CLARE BOWEN, CHRIS CARMACK, CHARLES ESTEN, AND JONATHAN JACKSON

CMT’S NASHVILLE IN CONCERT JULY 29 ON SALE THIS FRIDAY AT 10AM

UPCOMING SHOWS May 28 | Patti LaBelle June 3 | Anthony Hamilton June 30 | Cameo and Morris Day & the Time July 14 | KC & the Sunshine Band October 21 | Trace Adkins

JACKSON BAKER

Tickets available online at Ticketmaster.com or by calling 1-800-745-3000.

John Boatner (right), a Democrat new to local party ranks, was one of those attending the first of several reorganization forums for a revived Shelby County Democratic Party. The kickoff meeting was held on Saturday at the Raleigh office of state Representative Antonio Parkinson.

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m e m p h i s f l y e r. c o m

It was a couple of weeks ago that a group of Memphis contractors gathered in East Memphis for a fund-raiser to benefit the city’s mayor. It was a hastily arranged affair, but with only three days’ notice, the group of builders had been able to put together a kitty of $18,500. Not too shabby. The foregoing paragraph, or something like it, could have been written at various times over the last several decades of Memphis history. It has surely happened over and over — contractors hobnobbing with their city’s chief executive and, depending on how one looks at it, either giving him a pat on the back for his performance and friendship or scratching that back with hopes of getting some scratch back later on in the form of city business. What distinguished this circumstance from the great majority of similar such events preceding it over the years was that the assembled wellwishers were, with few exceptions, African Americans, and their tribute, considered either as praise or as a proffered quid pro quo, was presented in self-evident sincerity and good faith. So was the response of the beneficiary, Mayor Jim Strickland, a white man and the first member of his race to hold Memphis’ prime leadership position in a quarter of a century. “We measure what we do,” Strickland told his hosts. “We measure how long it takes to answer a 911 call. We measure crime. We measure how long it takes us to fill potholes. We also measure how we do on minority- and women-owned business contracts.” Strickland went on to state for the record that, when he took office not quite a year-and-a-half ago, some 12 percent of city construction work was

NEWS & OPINION

Making Things Level

7


E D ITO R IAL

Good Tidings As the Tennessee General Assembly winds down, we find ourselves more gratified than usual. For one thing, the solons up thataway managed to bite the bullet and actually pass a major new tax bill to fund long overdue improvements

Memphis • 61 South McLean • 901.725.4200

Help us care for the working uninsured

in the state’s seriously needy roadways. The good thing about the 6 percent tax increase on gasoline at the pump (that’s 10 percent for diesel) is that a substantial hunk of it will be paid by the 18-wheelers and doubled-up dinosaurs that come wheeling through Memphis in such quantity on a daily basis, contributing more than their share of wear and tear to our thoroughfares. Never mind that the legislature’s conservatives made certain to “balance” (actually, over-balance) the gas tax with massive new tax cuts to benefit corporations and the well-off. We’ll do our best to give the benefit of the doubt, one more time, to those who imagine that such giveaways actually create a “stimulus” to growth or an incentive to new industry. But no such rosy scenario can justify the Assembly’s decision to accelerate the expiration of the Hall tax on interest and dividends — a modest levy that disproportionately affects the wealthy and has been the source of needed revenues for the state’s cashstrapped municipalities. Nor has there ever been a true rationale for the ongoing abolition of the estate tax (the “death tax” as its critics disingenuously call it), something which only the tiniest percentage of the state’s ultra-wealthy have ever had to pay, and in percentages so small as to leave the wellbeing of their lucky heirs utterly intact. But, after all, another throw-in to the gas-tax package — optimistically called the “Improve Act” by Governor Bill Haslam, who aggressively pushed it — is a 20 percent reduction in the tax

on food and groceries. That’s something that benefits everybody — rich and poor, buyer and seller. Politics, when it works, involves trade offs, and, all things considered, the Improve Act is a good trade off. Another area in which the General Assembly has gotten down to business in a commendable way is that of criminal justice, where cooperation between Democrats and Republicans can be said to be flourishing. Highlights have been bills to facilitate the employment of rehabilitated felons and to reduce the pain and effort and cost of expungement. Such measures have a positive effect on workforce recruitment; at the same time, they serve as encouragement for Tennesseans determined to correct past mistakes and to improve their lot in life. To be sure, there have been legislative actions to carp about — like the absurd bill, steamrollered through both chambers, that removes impediments to the sale of silencers for firearms and was sold on the basis that its intent is to safeguard citizens’ hearing. The gun lobby still has too much power in the General Assembly. But, as we have noted more than once, not much time was wasted this year on such misbegotten measures as the “bathroom bill” targeting transgenders or the “natural marriage” act with its presumptuous challenge on a matter that the U.S. Supreme Court seems to have resolved by its recent ruling in favor of same-sex marriage. And, one more time, private-school vouchers didn’t make it.

May 4-10, 2017

C O M M E N TA R Y b y G r e g C r a v e n s

churchhealth.org/donate

8


V I E W P O I N T B y M a r t h a Pa r k

Hard History Donald Trump, one who is so markedly different from former President Obama that it’s hard to begin to quantify. This election has caused many of us to reorient and wonder what happened to the country we thought we were working toward. I asked students what this work means in light of Trump’s election. “[Trump] is the epitome of why we should know our history,” Alexis said. While Obama addressed the legacy of slavery, segregation, and the criminalization of black and brown lives, the new administration cashes in on white fears and nostalgia. Our current president neglected to mention Jews on Holocaust Remembrance Day, and his press secretary claimed Hitler did not use chemical weapons on his own people. As our country’s leader, this president will not model or encourage a complex understanding of our history. We have to do that work ourselves. “Our ancestors went through too much for us to give up. We have to be what they fought for,” Taylor said. All the students I spoke with said learning about this history inspired conversations with family members. For Central High School junior Ethan Haley, Persons’ lynching quickly became personal. “My great-grandfather had actually gone to this lynching,” he said. “I didn’t know that. Now, it’s more of a personal thing. I represent a change in my family.” At the Sunday, May 21st memorial service, Overton High School students will dedicate the historic marker that is the culmination of over a year of research, writing, and fundraising. The descendants of Antoinette Rappel, whose murder led to Persons’ lynching, will be present. LSP members are working to reach out to Persons’ descendants, too. The May 21st event will mark not the end of the Lynching Sites Project’s work, but the beginning. There were over 30 documented lynchings in Shelby County, more than any other county in Tennessee. Four of the locations have been identified so far, and LSP hopes to place a historical marker at each site. At the Facing History and Ourselves Teach-In, Ethan closed his presentation by reminding participants that an estimated 5,000 people were present at Persons’ lynching. What if 5,000 were present at the memorial? Originally from Memphis, Martha Park is the Philip Roth Resident in Creative Writing at Bucknell University’s Stadler Center for Poetry.

NEWS & OPINION

This time last year, the 100th anniversary of Ell Persons’ lynching seemed far on the horizon. A lot has happened over the course of the year, as Memphians have rallied around the work of the Lynching Sites Project. Students at Overton High School raised the $2,500 required to fund a historic marker that will be placed on the Summer Avenue bridge spanning the Wolf River. Members of the Central High School Key Club went to the site to clear brush and make a path. Students from several schools were present at LSP’s event commemorating the People’s Grocery lynching. Earlier this spring, more than 1,500 Central High School students and teachers gathered at an assembly to hear the story of Ell Persons’ lynching; Hattiloo Theatre presented The Strange Fruit, a reflection on the legacy of lynching, in partnership with Memphis Symphony Orchestra and Collage Dance Collective; and Facing History and Ourselves students led a community teach-in about lynching history in the South. I met with Overton High School seniors Khari Bowman, Taylor Williams, Alexis Sledge, and Kam Johnson, and Central High School students Myles Franklin, Amal Altareb, Talia Glenn, Ethan Haley, and Nina Howard to ask them about engaging with this history. Students at both schools expressed a frustration with the way history has been taught in the classroom: “We learn about Martin Luther King all the time, but we didn’t learn this history,” Alexis said. “Memphis history is not all Elvis and Beale Street. It’s a combination of the good and the bad,” Kam said. “If you can talk about individual battles in a war, you can talk about a lynching,” Ethan said. For these students, learning about Ell Persons inspired a renewed enthusiasm for history: “There are these lynchings that are literally down the street in our city that we don’t know about. It’s not even curriculum. To find out something new, it made me want to learn more,” Talia said. Kam wondered, “What other history has been forgotten in Memphis?” “We didn’t know about Ell Persons. … Imagine what else happened that we don’t know about yet,” Alexis said. Nina said, “This marker is really important, because now people will pass [the site] and realize they’re passing history.” Of course, since this time last year, our country also elected a new president,

m e m p h i s f l y e r. c o m

Memphians have rallied around the work of the Lynching Sites Project.

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SNOOP DOGG’S AMERICA

Reflections on hip-hop’s amabassador to the world

May 4-10, 2017

SNOOP DOGG

10

LEGENDS OLD AND NEW THREE MUST-SEES AT THE 2017 BEALE STREET MUSIC FESTIVAL COVER STORY BY CHRIS McCOY AND ALEX GREENE

On the 5th of May at 11:15 p.m., a legend will appear on the FedEx Stage, bathed in lights, voice booming over Beale Street and beyond. When he appears, you’ll see more than a mortal. You’ll see the Snoop Dogg of the mind. With Snoop planted into our collective consciousness, it’s hard to deny the message of “Legend,” the lead track from his 2016 release, Coolaid. “I can die right now/Still a legend!” The album captures our zeitgeist: angry, absurd, lurid, ridiculous. The “Lavender” video depicts a land of rampant, clownish brutality, culminating with a “BANG!” flag pistol fired squarely at a Donald Trump-like figure. And while not all of the album is so political, Coolaid clearly struck a nerve, reaching number five on the R&B/hip-hop album charts. Snoop is everywhere now, ascended to ubiquity with all of his bluntness and flow — and his contradictions — intact. He’s the rapper with the cute name on the morning show; he’s the guy in the weed video with Willie Nelson; he’s the guy who quotes The Art of War, relishing the power of his weaponry, then exhorts people to love themselves; the guy who speaks of Martha Stewart’s warmth and humanity, then reminds listeners that “rap come from the streets, so we can never lose that mentality.” A vocal Hillary supporter, he’ll exclaim that we desperately need a female president, then launch a rap of sexual humiliation and domination that would make Trump blush. Like Walt Whitman, he contains multitudes. One way Snoop can cover so much territory is by keeping it lighthearted. Devin Steel of K97 FM says, “You can’t really take what Snoop says seriously; he just makes fun party music. You take it more like, ‘I wonder, what is he gonna say?’ or listen for the word play. It’s fun. Nothing too serious. And he still has the art of storytelling in his lyrics.” Perhaps this balancing act between the ridiculous and the sublime comes down to Snoop’s uncanny knack for improvisation. He’s always been master of freestyle, the branch of rap that plays out like verbal jazz. Rap created on the spot, live before an audience, was perfected on the West Coast, with Los Angeles’ Freestyle Fellowship arguably the masters of the style as it gained traction in the 1990s. This was the young Snoop’s milieu. His improvisational powers remain formidable. Boo Mitchell, producer and engineer at Royal Studios, worked with Snoop when collaborating with William Bell and other Hi/Stax Records alums for the 2014 film, Take Me to the River. “He wrote his rap in 10 minutes,” says Mitchell. “I sat and watched him do it.” Mitchell recalls a moment when “… we were rehearsing for a concert after the film’s debut. We had a big band, four horns and all that stuff. [Snoop] came in while


DEAD SOLDIERS

we were playing, and it blew him away. He started dancing and went into a freestyle as we played.” Mitchell, Bell, Snoop, and Cody Dickinson did more sessions earlier this year at Snoop’s Mothership Studio — their contribution to Take Me to the River’s sequel. Now in production, the sequel will be based in New Orleans, once again pairing eclectic artists from different eras. As Mitchell points out, the early California rappers like Snoop had a special fondness for old-school Memphis soul: Rufus Thomas’ “The Breakdown (Pt. II)” was used by N.W.A., for example. Devin Steel agrees: “In the evolution of Southern hip-hop, in the late ’80s, what drew people, especially hip-hop artists, in the South to the West Coast was the use of live bass and sampling a lot of Stax, a lot of the Memphis sound. We were drawn to that more than to the East Coast, and that’s what married the West Coast and the South together.” For Snoop Dogg, this connection has always had a personal dimension. “I interviewed him backstage recently,” Steel remembers, “and it was all these city officials and groupies and a lot of weed smoke there all in the same place. It was a very weird situation — and Snoop was playing Al Green’s greatest hits! His family is from Mississippi; that’s

what he grew up on.” Snoop’s father is from Magnolia, and his mother is from McComb. “Even on his stuff with Dr. Dre and ‘Nuthin’ but a G Thang’, sampling Leon Haywood,” says Steel, “A lot of that stuff is old soul, borderline blues, and it was perfect for him and his flow and his personality and where he came from.” And as for the show, Steel says, “You have to say you saw him at least once in your lifetime. Because he has so many hits, through the span of two and a half generations, and his show is really, really good. So you kinda say, ‘Oh, damn, I forgot about that! Oh, damn, I forgot about that!’ He’s perfect for Memphis; he’s got Isaac Hayes samples and all that. It lights a part of your brain from the feelgood era of hiphop, where everybody knows the lyrics.” - Alex Greene

BOOKER T. JONES COMES HOME The architect of Memphis soul reflects on 55 years in the spotlight.

Memphis is a place that has produced more than its share of musical geniuses, but the title of first among equals must belong to Booker T. Jones. He started working as a staff musician at Stax at age

16. In 1962, his song “Green Onions” was a huge hit for the label. It became the landmark instrumental of the rock and soul era. The song bore all the hallmarks of the sound he would help create for Stax: an instantly hummable hook, a groove that is somehow both urgent and laid back, and a deceptive complexity that remains as fresh on the thousandth listen as on the first. Jones was a child prodigy, and he says it was the musical education he got growing up in 1950s Memphis that propelled him to greatness. “My grandmother taught piano. I had Chopin, Brahms, and Liszt in my home over there on Edith Street. My mother played piano, and her mother taught her to play. I had a Hammond organ teacher who … I haven’t run into any teachers who could come close to her. She was right around the corner over there on Orleans, teaching me how to play how I play now. Her name was Elmertha Cole, and somehow they were able to buy a very expensive Hammond B3 organ and get it into their house. I was very fortunate. I have no idea where I could have found that otherwise. She was something special. She had an understanding and was exacting, and she cared a lot. It was just the right person at the right time.” He says he is immensely proud of the Stax Music Academy, and he remains a tireless advocate for music education at a time when many public schools are dropping programs. “I think a lot of legislators just don’t realize all of the things that are subconsciously taught by music. All of the math, the psychology that you learn by playing an instrument. It is taught very subtly. When kids learn piano at a young age or they pick up a flute or a saxophone, at first they entertain themselves. They’re engaged … In our society, we use music for everything. We use music when we feel good; we use it when we feel bad; we use it when we get married; we use it when somebody dies.

DEAD SOLDIERS THROW DOWN

Don’t call these Memphians “country.” Before I interviewed Ben Aviotti and Michael Jasud about the new Dead Soldiers album The Great Emptiness, I had resolved not to ask them the dreaded “genre question.” The band, who made a name for themselves in Memphis with scorching live sets, freely crosses styles.

continued on page 13

COVER STORY m e m p h i s f l y e r. c o m

BOOKER T. JONES

It’s the fabric of our society, and it needs to be taught early.” Music teaches creative collaboration, and very few people have collaborated with as wide an array of artists as Jones. With William Bell, he co-wrote “Born Under a Bad Sign” for Albert King; 50 years later he co-wrote songs for Valerie June’s debut album. He played with Ray Charles and backed up everyone from Neil Young to Rancid. People backing him up have included the Drive-By Truckers, Questlove, Lou Reed, and Sharon Jones. In 1977, he produced Willie Nelson’s album Stardust. “We realized we had grown up playing the same songs. ‘Stardust,’ ‘Georgia on My Mind’ … those are the songs he got to do as a young man playing clubs in Texas, and they were the same ones I had done in Memphis with Puff Beane and Willie Mitchell. So we wanted to make a record together, but it was tough to get the record company to let us make that record.” Stardust went triple Platinum and made Willie Nelson a household name. At age 72, Jones is still a road warrior. In the last month alone, he played three nights in Tokyo, the massive Byron Bay Bluesfest in New South Wales, Australia, and shows in Sydney and Melbourne. I caught up with him resting in Lake Tahoe, California, before he heads off to England and Ireland. Then he will return to Memphis to close out Beale Street Music Festival’s Blues Tent, Sunday night at 8:35 p.m. “It’s going to be a look into what made me who I am today, musically. It’s going to be my favorite music I’ve been involved with as a player and as a songwriter and sideman. ‘Green Onions’ is still my favorite song. I still love to play the Booker T. and the MGs music. I like to get up and play guitar. I started doing that in Memphis, but of course, I didn’t get the job at Stax as a guitar player. I play some songs that influenced me to be a musician, blues songs in particular. It’s my life in music up to today. That encompasses a wide range of music, because I’ve played with a lot of different people. That’s what I do on stage. It’s a little bit unpredictable, but it usually includes four or five songs by Booker T. and the MGs and music that I’ve written for other people, like Bill Withers. I might even do a Wilson Pickett song or something I did with Bob Dylan or a Beatles song … I have a lot of musical influences. On stage, I just enjoy myself, and hopefully the audience goes with me.” - Chris McCoy

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ART OF SCIENCE 2017

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Their songcraft bears the stamp of classic rock and outlaw country. Their blistering instrumental workouts skirt the bluegrass line, and rollicking jams sometimes resemble Gogol Bordello’s punky gypsy jazz. The Soldiers cut their teeth as a whiskey-soaked bar band, yet they routinely conjure moments of orchestral beauty. They can twang, but they have a soul horn section. They follow Memphis tradition of smashing together any and all musical influences that float down the river. But that means that they are tired of being asked “What are you?” by people whose jobs it is to put labels on things. For the record, they brought it up. “People thought we were a country band, which was wrong. We’re not a country band,” says Jasud. “That’s insulting both ways,” says Aviotti. “It’s a huge insult to country music, and it’s an insult to us,” says Jasud. “It’s the worst when you actually have to fill it out for the publishing,” says Aviotti. “I’m like, acoustic Christian contemporary has its own subgenre …” “… That’s the worst one …” injects Jasud. “… Then it’s just, are you rock or are you country? Are you post-punk shoe gaze, or are you rock or country? Maybe Americana?” says Aviotti.

THEY CAN TWANG, BUT THEY HAVE A HORN SECTION. “So, we decided we are going to call ourselves City Music,” says Jasud. The band formed in 2011, but Jasud says their roots go back farther than that. “Ben’s like five or six years older than I. I was this punk-ass 14-year-old kid hanging out around older, wilder music folks. That’s when I met Ben.” An eight-piece lineup recorded The Great Emptiness with Toby Vest and Pete Matthews at High/Low Recording last year: Jasud and Aviotti on guitars and vocals (with occasional banjo), Clay Qualls on bass (with occasional mandolin), multi-instrumentalists Nathan Raab and Krista Wroten-Combest providing whatever the song needs, Paul Gilliam on drums, and Nashon Benford and Victor Sawyer blowing trumpet and trombone, respectively. The big-band approach is the key to their slippery sound on new songs like “Teddy Bears” and “Prophets of Doom,” which evolved with input from the entire crew. “There are various approaches to music with this band. Nobody has the same perspective. When we go into a song, we’re never on the same page,” says Aviotti. “We just try everybody’s ideas. Nothing is sacred. When everybody agrees that it’s good, then it’s done.” The group dynamic did not appear

overnight. “Our process is, we got really good at arguing with each other,” says Jasud. “It was bloody and prolonged and painful, but we slowly figured out how to argue with each other to where it really became just about the ideas. They’re not arguments any more. It’s just, ‘Let’s try it!’” While they can sound ramshackle and jammy, Dead Soldiers sweats the details. Wroten-Combest and Benford played together in Memphis Dawls and brought their experience at creating lush soundscapes to the band. “Krista, to her eternal credit, has played with orchestras and writes scores,” says Aviotti. “She’s extremely good at orchestration.” The orchestral sound is evident in the

closing moments of The Great Emptiness, as the closing tones of “Cheap Magic” modulate upwards toward heaven, as the melody from “The Entertainer” floats through the ether. It’s a beautiful moment, but maybe not what you would call heartfelt. “That’s a sarcastic modulation,” says Aviotti. “We were writing lyrics that were sarcastic, and we were trying to make the music do that, too,” says Jasud. The lyrics of “Georgia Tann” touch on a dark bit of Memphis history. “Georgia Tann was the head of the Tennessee Children’s Home Society, an adoption agency here during E.H. Crump’s reign … They would steal children from their

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homes and low income schools and whatnot and adopt them to rich people for money. In some cases, it was indentured servitude. There are all sorts of horror stories about torture and kids dying in her care. She died a free woman, but there was a pending case against her for hundreds of counts of wrongful deaths.” Dead Soldiers will bring songs from The Great Emptiness to the River Stage on Saturday afternoon at 2:20 p.m. “Some of these songs are the first songs we wrote as a band, five or six years ago. We’re just now finally figuring out how they are supposed to go together,” says Aviotti. “But some of them are brand new, hot off the pan!” - Chris McCoy

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COVER STORY m e m p h i s f l y e r. c o m

continued from page 11

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steppin’ out

We Recommend: Culture, News + Reviews

Blues City

Blues Awards Week

By Chris Davis

This weekend, Bluff City residents will go down to the foot of Beale Street for three days of rock, rap, country, reggae, soul, and just about everything else. There will be blues, too, although for fans of the Devil’s music, what happens in the festival’s Blues Shack is just a prelude of what’s to come, once the final notes have faded and the last stragglers have vacated Tom Lee Park. The time has come once again to celebrate the down-home sounds that first put Memphis on the map. Wednesday, May 10th, the night before The Blues Foundation’s annual awards gala, five new artists and one publisher will be inducted into Memphis’ Blues Hall of Fame. Performers being honored include Stax recording artist Mavis Staples, whose vocals on “Respect Yourself” and other Staple Singers hits helped lift the souls and spirits of civil rights marchers; Johnny Copeland, the Texas blues wailer known for songs like “Please Let Me Know”; Mississippi-raised, Chicago-tested guitar wizard Magic Slim; jazzy keyboard player, Henry Gray who cut his teeth with Howlin’ Wolf; and country- and gospel-influenced singer Latimore, best known for his smooth 1974 hit “Let’s Straighten It Out.” Living Blues co-founder Amy van Singel is also being inducted. Blues Awards Week kicks off Monday, May 8th at 7 p.m. with a screening of the Corky Siegel documentary, Born in Chicago. Siegel, who’ll be on hand to sign CDs and answer questions, plays a “Chamber Blues” concert at Lafayette’s Music Room Tuesday, May 9th. Other Blues Awards Week events include the unveiling of a new exhibit at the Blues Hall of Fame, Big Lou Johnson’s Hall of Fame tribute jam honoring new inductees, as well as harmonica master James Cotton and rock-and-roll pioneer Chuck Berry. The awards are presented at the Cook Convention Center Thursday, May 11th. THE BLUES FOUNDATION’S BLUES AWARDS WEEK. VARIOUS LOCATIONS. BLUES.ORG

May 4-10, 2017

We do our own stunts! The Last Word, p. 55

Boil-then-bake bagels and beneficial bacteria Food News, p. 48

THURSDAY May 4

FRIDAY May 5

Future FedExForum, 7 p.m. Potential for crunkness: very high. Featuring Migos, Tory Lanez, and Kodak Black.

“Inaugurate the Resistance” Crosstown Arts, 6-9 p.m. A mixed-media show based on Memphians’ experiences at the Women’s March in D.C.

Approaching Happiness Growlers, 6:30-9 p.m., $5 Comedy from Krish Mohan exploring happiness and mental illness.

Peabody Rooftop Party Peabody Hotel, 6 p.m., $10 Tonight’s music is by Frankie Hollie & the Noise, and for the VIPs, a taco bar.

Million Dollar Quartet Playhouse on the Square, 8 p.m., $25 Opening weekend of this musical retelling of when Elvis met Johnny, Jerry Lee, and Carl.

Memphis Orchid Society Annual Show and Sale Memphis Botanic Garden, noon-5 p.m. Show and sale presented by the Memphis Orchid Society. Through Sunday.

Barenaked Ladies Horseshoe Casino, 8 p.m., $37 Pop at some of its poppiest, Barenaked Ladies perform tonight.

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Beale Street Music Festival Tom Lee Park, 5 p.m., $50-$60 Snoop Dogg and MGMT headline tonight. Also performing during the fest: Bush, Soundgarden, Jill Scott, and Death Cab for Cutie. Southern Junkers Vintage Market Agricenter International, 9 a.m., $8 With vintage, antique, and repurposed good and all-around cool junk. Plus food and a fashion show on Saturday.


Hitmakers

By Chris Davis

It doesn’t take much to get former FM 100 DJ Jon Scott going. “It was a moment in time,” he says, bubbling over with classic Classic Rock triumphalism. “It was a moment the likes of which nobody had ever seen before and nobody ever will see again.” He’s referring to a day in February 1967, when the 20-year-old Memphis superstation said goodbye to Frank Sinatra and Dean Martin and hello to Iron Butterfly and Quicksilver Messenger Service. Scott says the effort to shake things up kicked into high gear in 1971 when he played Hendrix’s “Star Spangled Banner,” and the station’s switchboard lit up from callers wanting to either complain or cheer. The response gave the station a real sense of its enormous reach and proof there was a market waiting to be tapped. “If we wanted to take a break and smoke a joint, we’d put on something a little longer,” Scott says, describing an unprecedented shift in media culture as the old guard faded away and new kids like Scott, Mike Powell, and Ron Olson introduced extended drum solos to an enormous far-ranging listening audience. Previously, rock and soul were strictly AM, and with a grandfather-clause-protected broadcast range several times larger than usually allowed by the FCC, FM 100 quickly became a hitmaker. Scott says the music industry quickly took notice of the regional powerhouse that helped launch ZZ Top’s career and is credited with popularizing artists like Bowie and Billy Joel. That meant access, and access means good stories. In the mid-1970s, the station partnered with Midtown venues like Lafayette’s Music Room and the Ritz to live broadcast concerts by artists like Joel and Tom Waits. “The station’s all corporate now,” Scott grumbles, acknowledging that if anybody’s going to recognize the station’s milestone, it’s going to be the original jocks. Sunday, May 7th at 3 p.m., Scott and fellow record-spinners Powell, Olson, Greg Hamilton, Gary Phillips, Carter Davis, Leon Griffin, Henry Nelson, and Mitch McCracken will gather at Lafayette’s Music room to tell stories from the early days of FM rock. A VIP concert featuring the LaFayette’s All-Star band follows with “surprise” appearances throughout the evening. FM 100 50TH ANNIVERSARY & CONCERT WITH JON SCOTT & MIKE POWELL AT LAFAYETTE’S MUSIC ROOM, SUNDAY, MAY 7TH, 3 P.M. - 9 P.M. $10

Discover the Dinosaurs: Unleashed Memphis Cook Convention Center, 9 a.m.-7 p.m., $19 Twenty life-like dinosaurs in this educational exhibit for kids 2 to 12. Symphony in the Gardens The Dixon Gallery & Gardens, 6-8 p.m., $12-$20 Outdoor concert by the Memphis Symphony Orchestra playing bigband music.

“Jason Miller: objets de memoire” Dixon Gallery & Gardens, 1-5 p.m. From Jason Miller’s “Artifact of a Relationship” series featuring images of items super close-up.

Tom Petty FedExForum, 7 p.m. One of the greats. Tom Petty performs tonight as part of his 40th anniversary tour. Opening is Joe Walsh.

“Metal in Motion” Metal Museum, noon-5 p.m. Group show of art with working motors that the viewer is encouraged to operate.

Brooks Outside: Tape Art Memphis Brooks Museum of Art, 9 a.m.-5 p.m. Artists from the Tape Art collective will be putting up an outdoor temporary mural today. And you can help them. Part of the Brooks’ centennial celebration.

ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT

MONDAY May 8

SUNDAY May 7

m e m p h i s f l y e r. c o m

Anne Hathaway (above) stars in Nacho Vigalondo’s new monster movie Colossal. Film, p. 50

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TOM PETTY MONDAY, MAY 8TH FEDEXFORUM

BARENAKED LADIES FRIDAY, MAY 5TH HORSESHOE CASINO

MIGOS THURSDAY, MAY 4TH FEDEXFORUM

After Dark: Live Music Schedule May 4 - 10 7 p.m.; FreeWorld Sundays, 9:30 p.m.

5-8 p.m.; Karaoke MondaysThursdays, Sundays, 8 p.m.; Live Bands Fridays, Saturdays, 8 p.m.

Club 152 Alfred’s 197 BEALE 525-3711

Gary Hardy & Memphis 2 Thursdays-Saturdays, 6-9 p.m.; Karaoke Thursdays, TuesdaysWednesdays, 9 p.m.-1 a.m., and Sundays-Mondays, 10 p.m.-2 a.m.; Mandi Thomas Fridays, Saturdays, 6-9 p.m.; The 901 Heavy Hitters Fridays, Saturdays, 10 p.m.-2 a.m.; Flyin’ Ryan Fridays, Saturdays, 2:30 a.m.; Memphis Jazz Orchestra Sundays, 6-9 p.m.

B.B. King’s Blues Club 143 BEALE 524-KING

The King Beez Thursdays, 5:30 p.m.; B.B. King’s All Stars Thursdays, Fridays, 8 p.m.; Will Tucker Band Fridays, Saturdays, 5 p.m.; Lisa G and Flic’s Pic’s Band Saturdays, Sundays, 12:30 p.m.; Blind Mississippi Morris Sundays, 5 p.m.; Memphis Jones Sundays, Wednesdays 5:30 p.m.; Doc Fangaz and the Remedy Tuesdays, 5:30 p.m.

Blue Note Bar & Grill 341-345 BEALE 577-1089

Queen Ann and the Memphis Blues Masters Fridays, Saturdays, 8 p.m.-midnight.

Blues City Cafe 138 BEALE 526-3637

King’s Palace Cafe David Bowen Thursdays, 5:309:30 p.m., Fridays, Saturdays, 6:30-10:30 p.m., and Sundays, 5:30-9:30 p.m.

FedExForum

King’s Palace Cafe Patio

191 BEALE STREET

Future, Migos, Tory Lanez, Kodak Black Thursday, May 4, 7 p.m.; Tom Petty and the Heartbreakers with Joe Walsh Monday, May 8, 7 p.m.

Handy Bar 200 BEALE 527-2687

Bad Boy Matt & the Amazing Rhythmatics Tuesdays, Thursdays-Sundays, 7 p.m.-1 a.m.

162 BEALE 521-1851

162 BEALE 521-1851

Sonny Mack Mondays-Fridays, 2-6 p.m.; Cowboy Neil Mondays, Thursdays, 7-11 p.m., and Saturdays, Sundays, 2-6 p.m.; Sensation Band Tuesdays, Fridays, 7-11 p.m.; Fuzzy and the Kings of Memphis Saturdays, 7-11 p.m.; Chic Jones and the Blues Express Sundays, 711 p.m.; North and South Band Wednesdays, 7-11 p.m.

King’s Palace Cafe Tap Room

Hard Rock Cafe 126 BEALE 529-0007

Jerred Price Friday, May 5, 9-11 p.m.; Almost Elton John Saturday, May 6, 8-10 p.m.; The Amber McCain Band Sunday, May 7, 7-11 p.m.; Carlos Ecos Band Monday, May 8, 9 p.m.-midnight.

Big Don Valentine’s Three Piece Chicken and a Biscuit Blues Band Thursdays, Tuesdays, 8 p.m.-midnight.

Itta Bena

330 BEALE 525-8981

145 BEALE 578-3031

Kayla Walker Thursdays, 67 p.m.; Susan Marshall Fridays, Saturdays, 7-10 p.m.; Nat “King” Kerr Fridays, Saturdays, 9-10 p.m.; Susan Marshall Wednesdays, 6-8 p.m.

King Jerry Lawler’s Hall of Fame Bar & Grille 159 BEALE

Chris Gales Solo Acoustic Show Mondays-Saturdays, 12-4 p.m.; Eric Hughes Thursdays, Fridays,

168 BEALE 576-2220

New Daisy Theatre

Rum Boogie Cafe Blues Hall 182 BEALE 528-0150

Memphis Bluesmasters Thursdays, Sundays, 8 p.m.-midnight; Vince Johnson and the Plantation Allstars Fridays, Saturdays, 4-8 p.m., and Sundays, 3-7 p.m.; Freeverse Friday, May 5, 10 p.m.-2 a.m.; McDaniel Band Tuesdays, Wednesdays, 8 p.m.-midnight, and Saturday, May 6, 9 p.m.-1 a.m.; Brian Hawkins Blues Party Mondays, 8 p.m.-midnight.

Silky O’Sullivan’s 183 BEALE 522-9596

Dueling Pianos Thursdays, Wednesdays, 9 p.m.-1 a.m., Fridays, Saturdays, 9 p.m.-3 a.m., and Sundays, Tuesdays, 8 p.m.-midnight.

Amon Amarth, Goatwhore Thursday, May 4, 7 p.m.; Zoogma Friday, May 5, 11 p.m.; Feed Me Saturday, May 6; The Grateful Dead Experience Sunday, May 7, 10:30 p.m.

Rum Boogie Cafe 182 BEALE 528-0150

Young Petty Thieves Thursdays, 8 p.m.-midnight; Pam and Terry Friday, May 5, 5:30-8:30 p.m., Saturday, May 6, 5:30-8:30 p.m., and Sunday, May 7, 3:30-

Center for Southern Folklore Hall 119 S. MAIN AT PEMBROKE SQUARE 525-3655

Delta Cats, Billy Gibson, and Linear Smith First Friday of every month, 11:30 a.m.1:30 p.m.

Dirty Crow Inn 855 KENTUCKY

Frankie Hollie Friday, May 5, 9 p.m.; Cam Kimbrough Saturday, May 6, 9 p.m.; Bobbie & Tasha Wednesdays, 8-11 p.m.

Earnestine & Hazel’s 531 S. MAIN 523-9754

Amber Rae Dunn Hosts: Earnestine & Hazel’s Open Mic Wednesdays, 8-11 p.m.

Flying Saucer Draught Emporium 130 PEABODY PLACE 523-8536

679 ADAMS 524-1886

Dim the Lights featuring live music and DJs First Saturday of every month, 10 p.m.

Celtic Woman: Voices of Angels Thursday, May 4, 7-10 p.m.

The Rusty Pieces Sunday, May 7, 6-9 p.m.

The Peabody Hotel 149 UNION 529-4000

Frankie Hollie and the Noise Thursday, May 4, 6-10 p.m.

South Main Loflin Yard 7 W. CAROLINA

Electric Church Sundays, 2-4 p.m.

Memphis Farmers Market PAVILION OF CENTRAL STATION, S. FRONT & G.E. PATTERSON

The Skitch, Amber Dunn, Austin Holcomb Saturday, May 6, 8:30 a.m.-12:30 p.m.

Mollie Fontaine Lounge

The Orpheum

117 BARBORO ALLEY 249-6580

Salsa Night Saturdays, 8:30 p.m.-3 a.m.

Songwriters with Roland and Friends Mondays, 7-10 p.m.

203 S. MAIN 525-3000

Belle Tavern

Rumba Room 303 S. MAIN 523-0020

Paulette’s RIVER INN, 50 HARBOR TOWN SQUARE 260-3300

Live Pianist Thursdays, 5:308:30 p.m., Fridays and Saturdays, 5:30-9 p.m., Sundays, 11 a.m.2 p.m., and Mondays-Wednesdays, 5:30-8 p.m.

Boscos 2120 MADISON 432-2222

Sunday Brunch with Joyce Cobb Sundays, 11:30 a.m.-2:30 p.m.

Canvas 1737 MADISON 443-5232

Karaoke Thursdays, 9:30 p.m.; Kyle Pruzina Live Mondays, 10 p.m.-midnight.

Celtic Crossing 903 S. COOPER 274-5151

Live Music Friday, May 5, 69 p.m.; Jeremy Stanfill and Joshua Cosby Sundays, 6-9 p.m.; Candy Company Mondays.

May 4-10, 2017

Blind Mississippi Morris Fridays, 5 p.m., and Saturdays, 5:30 p.m.; Brad Birkedahl Band Thursdays, Wednesdays, 8 p.m.; Earl “The Pearl” Banks Saturdays, 12:30 p.m., and Tuesdays, 7 p.m.; Brandon Cunning Trio Sundays, 6 p.m., and Mondays,

152 BEALE 544-7011

Live Music WednesdaysSundays, 7-11 p.m.; Live DJ Wednesdays-Sundays, 11 p.m.; Third Floor: DJ Tubbz Fridays, Saturdays, 10 p.m.

6:30 p.m.; FreeWorld Friday, May 5, 9 p.m.-1 a.m., and Saturday, May 6, 9 p.m.-1 a.m.; Sensation Band Sunday, May 7, 7-11 p.m.; Eric Hughes Band Mondays, 8 p.m.-midnight; Gracie Curran Tuesdays, 8 p.m.midnight; Plantation Allstars Wednesdays, 8 p.m.-midnight; Albert Castigilia Wednesday, May 10, 9 p.m.

TOM PETTY & THE HEARTBREAKERS MONDAY, MAY 8 16

Performing with special guests Joe Walsh. Tickets available!

THE CHAINSMOKERS FRIDAY, MAY 19

JAMES TAYLOR SATURDAY, AUGUST 5

BRUNO MARS SUNDAY, SEPTEMBER 17

Performing with special guest Kiiara and featuring Emily Warren. Tickets available!

Rock and Roll Hall of Famer, and five-time Grammy Award winner is performing, with special guest Bonnie Raitt. Tickets available!

The Grammy Award winner is bringing The 24K Magic World Tour to FedExForum. Tickets available!

Get tickets at FedExForum Box Office | Ticketmaster locations | 1.800.745.3000 | ticketmaster.com | fedexforum.com


After Dark: Live Music Schedule May 4 - 10 The Cove

Overton Park Golf Shack

2559 BROAD 730-0719

2080 POPLAR

P&H Cafe 1532 MADISON 726-0906

Rock Starkaraoke Fridays; Admiral Longtooth Saturday, May 6; Open Mic Music with Tiffany Harmon Mondays, 9 p.m.-midnight; Vanessa Rochelle, Aiyana Cadwell Wednesday, May 10.

551 S. MENDENHALL 762-8200

Intimate Piano Lounge featuring Charlotte Hurt Mondays-Thursdays, 5-9:30 p.m.; Larry Cunningham Fridays, Saturdays, 6-10 p.m.

Jack Rowell’s Celebrity Jam Thursdays, 8 p.m.; Eddie Smith Fridays, 8 p.m.; Brian Johnson Band Saturday, May 6, 8 p.m.; The X-Portables Sunday, May 7, 4-8 p.m.; Eddie Harrison Mondays, 6-10 p.m.; Debbie Jamison & Friends Tuesdays, 6-10 p.m.; Elmo and the Shades Wednesdays, 8 p.m.-midnight.

Crockett Hall Tuesdays with the Midtown Rhythm Section Tuesdays, 9 p.m.

Bartlett Hadley’s Pub 2779 WHITTEN 266-5006

Full Circle Friday, May 5, 9 p.m.; No Hits Wonder Saturday, May 6, 9 p.m.; Swingin’ Leroy Saturday, May 6, 9 p.m.; Nuttin Fancy and Jonez’n Sunday, May 7, 5:30 p.m.; Red Letter Day Wednesday, May 10, 8 p.m.

Huey’s Cordova 1771 N. GERMANTOWN PKWY. 754-3885

No More Drama Sunday, May 7, 8:30 p.m.-midnight; Tuesday Tunes on the Terrace Tuesdays, 5-8:30 p.m.

Frayser/Millington Old Millington Winery 6748 OLD MILLINGTON 873-4114

Maria Spence and the Penny Kings Sunday, May 7.

Hi-Tone 412-414 N. CLEVELAND 278-TONE

Germantown

Adam Hood Thursday, May 4, 6 p.m.; Sweet Talker, Joybomb, Mike Hewlett and the Racket Friday, May 5, 8 p.m.; The Fritz, Agori Tribe Friday, May 5, 10 p.m.; Tigerlake, Mellow Tonin Saturday, May 6, 7:30 p.m.; Los Psychosis, Those Far Out Arrows, Los Cantadores Saturday, May 6, 8 p.m.; Kara Kole, Haley Daniels, Mahogany Dannie Sunday, May 7, 9 p.m.; The New Schematics, the Pressure Kids, Drew Erwin, the New Respects Tuesday, May 9, 7:30 p.m.

Germantown Performing Arts Center 1801 EXETER 751-7500

PBJ Picnic with Farmer Jason Saturday, May 6, 10:30 a.m.; Scheherazade and the Bruch Violin Concerto Saturday, May 6, 7 p.m.; GPAC Youth Symphony Program Sunday, May 7, 3 p.m.

Huey’s Southwind 7825 WINCHESTER 624-8911

El Ced and Groove Nation Sunday, May 7, 8:30 p.m.-midnight.

Huey’s Midtown

Huey’s Germantown

1927 MADISON 726-4372

7677 FARMINGTON 318-3034

Dead Irish Blues Sunday, May 7, 4-7 p.m.; Pamela K. Ward Sunday, May 7, 8:30 p.m.midnight.

Butterchild Sunday, May 7, 8-11:30 p.m.

North Mississippi/ Tunica

Lafayette’s Music Room

Dan McGuinness

2119 MADISON 207-5097

Lafayette’s Country Party featuring Phil Vaught Thursday, May 4, 9 p.m.; John Paul Keith Friday, May 5, 6:30 p.m.; The Bo-Keys Friday, May 5, 10:30 p.m.; 3RD Man Saturday, May 6, 11:30 a.m., and Wednesday, May 10, 5:30 p.m.; The Southern Edition Saturday, May 6, 3 p.m.; Jeremy Stanfill and Aron Shiers Saturday, May 6, 6:30 p.m.; Joe Restivo 4 Sundays, 11 a.m.; The Original FM 100 DJs Sunday, May 7, 3 p.m.; John Paul Keith and Co. Mondays, 6 p.m.; John Kilzer Tuesdays, 8 p.m.; Breeze Cayolle and New Orleans Wednesdays, 5:30 p.m.; Mo Lowda and the Humble Wednesday, May 10, 8 p.m.

Midtown Crossing Grill 394 N. WATKINS 443-0502

Memphis Ukelele Meetup Tuesdays, 6-7:30 p.m.; “The Happening” Showcase Tuesdays, 6:30-9:30 p.m.

All New 2017 Fiat 124 Spider test drive one today

GOSSETT FIAT 1901 COVINGTON PIKE • FIATUSAOFMEMPHIS.COM • 388.8989

The Phoenix 1015 S. COOPER 338-5223

The Phoenix Blues Jam Tuesdays, 8-11 p.m.

Wild Bill’s 1580 VOLLINTINE 207-3975

The Wild Bill’s Band Fridays, Saturdays, 11 p.m.-3 a.m.

Minglewood Hall 1555 MADISON 866-609-1744

The PC Band Friday, May 5, 9 p.m.

Mulan Asian Bistro

East Memphis

2149 YOUNG 347-3965

The Dixon Gallery & Gardens

Murphy’s

Symphony in the Gardens Sunday, May 7, 6-8 p.m.

Richard & Jesse with Campfire Cassettes Wednesday, May 10.

978 REDDOCH 767-6940

4339 PARK 761-5250

Owen Brennan’s

RockHouse Live

THE REGALIA, 6150 POPLAR 761-0990

5709 RALEIGH-LAGRANGE 386-7222

First Friday at Five Coffee House Concert First Friday of every month, 5 p.m.

Lannie McMillan Jazz Trio Sundays, 10 a.m.-2 p.m.

Huey’s Poplar

Salsa

4872 POPLAR 682-7729

THE REGALIA, 6150 POPLAR, SUITE 129 683-6325

The Dantones Sunday, May 7, 8:30 p.m.-midnight.

Dantones Band Friday, May 5, 6-10 p.m.

Mortimer’s

Summer/Berclair

590 N. PERKINS 761-9321

Chris Gales Sunday Brunch First Sunday of every month, 12-3 p.m. 1589 MADISON 726-4193

Howard Vance Guitar Academy

Van Duren Solo Thursdays, 6:30-8:30 p.m.

Poplar/I-240 East Tapas and Drinks 6069 PARK 767-6002

Eddie Harris Thursdays, Fridays, 6:30-9:30 p.m.; Elizabeth Wise Tuesdays, 7-9 p.m.; Van Duren Solo Tuesdays, 7-9 p.m.

Cheffie’s Cafe 483 HIGH POINT TERRACE 202-4157

Songwriter Night hosted by Leigh Ann Wilmot and Dave “The Rave” Saturdays, 5-8 p.m.

High Point Pub 477 HIGH POINT TERRACE 452-9203

Pubapalooza with Stereo Joe Every other Wednesday, 8-11 p.m.

Live Bands Fridays, Saturdays, 8 p.m.; Open Mic Mondays Mondays, 8 p.m.-midnight; Live Music Tuesdays, Wednesdays, 8 p.m.-midnight.

Shelby Forest General Store 7729 BENJESTOWN 876-5770

Tony Butler Fridays, 6-8 p.m.; Highland Duo Saturday, May 6, 12-3 p.m.; Robert Hull Sundays, 12:30-3:30 p.m.

Collierville Huey’s Collierville 2130 W. POPLAR 854-4455

The Heart Memphis Band Sunday, May 7, 8:30-11:30 p.m.

3964 GOODMAN, SOUTHAVEN, MS 662-890-7611

Acoustic Music Tuesdays.

Horseshoe Casino & Hotel AT CASINO CENTER, SOUTH OF MEMPHIS, NEAR TUNICA, MS 1-800-303-SHOE

Barenaked Ladies Friday, May 5.

Huey’s Southaven 7090 MALCO, SOUTHAVEN, MS 662-349-7097

Hillbilly Mojo Sunday, May 7, 8 p.m.-midnight; Karaoke Night Mondays, 9-11 p.m.

Raleigh Stage Stop 2951 CELA 382-1576

Blues Jam hosted by Brad Webb Thursdays, 7-11 p.m.; Dantones Band Saturday, May 6, 9:30 p.m.1:30 a.m.; Open Mic Night and Steak Night Tuesdays, 6 p.m.-midnight.

West Memphis/ Eastern Arkansas Phillips County Community College 1000 CAMPUS 870-338-6474

Warfield Concerts Presents Sonny Burgess & the Legendary Pacers Sunday, May 7, 6-8 p.m.

m e m p h i s f l y e r. c o m

Growlers 1911 POPLAR 244-7904

Park Friends Spring Music Series Wednesday, May 10, 6-8 p.m.

Cordova

Neil’s Music Room 5727 QUINCE 682-2300

ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT

Ed Finney and the U of M Jazz Quartet Thursdays, 8 p.m.; Big Barton Friday, May 5, 9 p.m.; Josh Walker and Paul Mallory Saturday, May 6, 9 p.m.; David Collins Jazz Sunday, May 7, 6 p.m.; Don and Wayde Tuesdays, 7-10 p.m.; Karaoke Wednesdays, 9 p.m.

Folk’s Folly Prime Steak House

17


18

May 4-10, 2017


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BEALE STREET MUSIC FEST 2017

Hello and welcome to the Beale Street Music Festival. Every spring since 1977, we’ve gathered some of the world’s best in Tom Lee Park for a three-day celebration of the past, present, and future of music. This weekend you’ll hear Nashville superstars Kings of Leon, Seattle’s legendary hard rockers Soundgarden, Athens, Georgia, jam masters Widespread Panic, and Long Beach, California’s, hip-hop ambassador Snoop Dogg — and that’s just the beginning. Memphis remains one of the world’s great music cities, and there’s no shortage of MidSouth talent playing, from Stax Records’ resident genius Booker T. Jones, to the sultry ballads of Amy LaVere, the polynomial pop of Marcella & Her Lovers, and Memphis jam gods FreeWorld. You can dig deep into the schedule listings that follow to find new favorites, such as country renegade Sturgill Simpson or hip-hop hitmaker Wiz Khalifa, or music that takes you back, like the soul sounds of Charles Bradley and His Extraordinaires. Or you can find a good spot in front of a stage, camp out, and just take what comes. Either way, you’re in for a fantastic weekend of music down by the river. — Chris McCoy

m e m p h i s f l y e r. c o m

JUNE 17

Must be 21 years or older to gamble or attend events. Know When To Stop Before You Start.® Gambling Problem? Call 1-800-522-4700. ©2017, Caesars License Company, LLC. All rights reserved.

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MUSIC FEST ENDS AT MIDNIGHT … BUT THE PARTY GOES ‘TIL 3AM.

May 4-10, 2017

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FEAST DOWNTOWN

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Festival FRIDAY, MAY 5TH

Taking Back Sunday Sum 41 Jimmy Eat World Snoop Dogg

GATES OPEN 5 P.M.

Bud Light S t age . . . The Record Company The Strumbellas Grouplove MGMT

River St ag e . . .

FreeWorld Charles Bradley and His Extraordinaires Greensky Bluegrass Widespread Panic

Orion Blue s Te n t . . . Tas Cru Ghost Town Blues Band Toronzo Cannon Peter Wolf

Blues Shack . . .

Brad Webb Zeke Johnson

6:20 7:55 9:35 11:15

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BEALE STREET MUSIC FEST 2017

FedEx St a g e . . .

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MGMT

21


BEALE STREET MUSIC

bands

FRIDAY, MAY 5TH FEDEX STAGE TAKING BACK SUNDAY • 6:20 P.M.

Taking Back Sunday is the epitome of a hook-y, New York punk-rock band — resilient and dependable. Currently reunited with its “classic era” lineup, the band is sure to deliver well-known cuts like “Cute Without the ‘E’” and “MakeDamnSure.”

SUM 41 • 7:55 P.M.

Canadian punk rockers Sum 41 have certainly been through the ringer, and the band’s long resume bears out that truth. Numerous commercial hits are evidence of their success, but none is more resonant than 2001’s “In Too Deep.”

JIMMY EAT WORLD • 9:35 P.M.

Based in Mesa, Arizona, Jimmy Eat World broke into the mainstream with their fourth album, Bleed American. With precise drumbeats and power-pop’s attention to melody, these alt-rockers are sure to have the crowd singing along to songs about lucky coins and John Irving novels.

SNOOP DOGG • 11:15 P.M.

The legendary one returns, more relevant than ever. With his “Lavender” video, the West Coast rapper is a lightning rod for anti-Trump, pro-weed sentiments, even as he expands his brand into cooking shows and Planet Earth narration. His beats and rhymes are as fresh and unpredictable as ever. (See Cover Story on p. 10.) PHOTO COURTESY OF CHOOSE901

BUD LIGHT STAGE THE RECORD COMPANY • 6:15 P.M.

This rock-and-roll trio was nominated for the Best Contemporary Blues Album Grammy for their 2016 debut, Give It Back to You. The Record Company have toured in support of legends like Mavis Staples and the late, great B.B. King and have been guests on Conan and NPR’s World Cafe.

THE STRUMBELLAS • 7:45 P.M.

May 4-10, 2017

Celebrate Downtown’s latest murals under new string lights with a FREE concert from Memphis’ own SOUTHERN AVENUE! LOCATION: Barboro Alley (next to Local, between Gayoso and Union) Craft beer Amurica Photobooth MEMPops Grind City Getdown signup Nora Jones ticket giveaway Ping pong tables, cornhole & more alley games! FEATURED ARTISTS: Christopher Reyes with Birdcap, Joseph Boyd, Lawrence Matthews and Chester Treasure, Emily Miller, and Eszter Szisk & Stephanie Cosby.

22

DOWNTOWNMEMPHIS.COM/BARBOROALLEYPARTY

Canadian folk-pop/alt-country darlings the Strumbellas are probably the only band at this year’s BSMF to have performed at the NHL Heritage Classic. Their layered harmonies and chiming guitars and pianos are the stuff indie-film soundtracks are made of and should pair nicely with sunset on the river.

GROUPLOVE • 9:20 P.M.

Grouplove deliver summer-ready singles so addictive they should come with a label warning. Their spot opening for MGMT at BSMF is the next stop on a tour that includes dates at Lollapalooza and Leeds Festival. Expect skeleton-print bodysuits, synthesizers, and an undeniable compulsion to dance.

MGMT • 11 P.M.

Connecticut (by way of Memphis, courtesy of Flyer editor Bruce Van Wnygarden’s son Andrew) indie-rockers MGMT have earned a place in the indie-rock annals on the basis of the fantastic debut album Oracular Spectacular alone. Subsequent albums Congratulations and the self-titled MGMT proved their staying power.

RIVER STAGE FREEWORLD • 6:00 P.M.

Now in their 30th year of irrepressible grooving, these local fixtures are not your typical jam band, bringing the serious jazz chops of saxophonist Herman Green and other


Widespread Panic

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Memphis greats into its mix. Set to release their seventh album this fall, look for the band to preview some new material.

CHARLES BRADLEY AND HIS EXTRAORDINAIRES • 7:15 P.M.

Bradley’s back with his crack soul outfit, the Extraordinaires. Daptone Records, home of the late, great Sharon Jones, has perfected bringing the sound of old soul and funk records into the 21st century, and Bradley has a voice of gravel and velvet to carry the enterprise to new heights.

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GREENSKY BLUEGRASS • 8:50 P.M.

With beards, boots, and banjos (and the clever sense of humor their name implies), Greensky Bluegrass put their own rockin’ spin on the bluegrass genre. Dobro and mandolin snake and twine over acoustic guitar and upright bass. If your feet ain’t stomping, you ain’t listening.

FRIDAYS IN MAY 6PM -10PM

WIDESPREAD PANIC • 10:30 P.M.

Name a music festival in the U.S., and Widespread Panic have probably headlined it. The band turned 30 this year, and in that time, Widespread Panic have released 12 studio albums and 43 live albums. Panic is headlining a three-night run at Red Rocks Amphitheatre in Colorado later this summer.

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FRIDAY, MAY 5 2PM - 5PM

New York native Tas Cru, along with his Band of Tortured Souls, is a rare blues artist that defies convention. His irreverent catalog is highlighted by 2016’s Simmered and Stewed, which heats up on the strength of his deft cigar box and resonator guitar licks.

WIN YOUR SHARE OF

GHOST TOWN BLUES BAND • 7:45 P.M.

$ 5,000!

Memphis’ own Ghost Town Blues Band combine elements of old-school Stax soul and modern Beale Street in a way that truly lets the listener know where they came from. The band’s third and most successPeter Wolf ful record to date, Hard Road to Hoe, was released in 2015.

TORONZO CANNON 9:25 P.M.

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The Chicago Way ain’t just the 2015 Alligator Records debut from the Windy City blues artist Toronzo Cannon; it’s his way of life. The skilled singer and guitarist practically eats, sleeps, and breathes uptown Chicago blues, and it shows.

PETER WOLF 11:10 P.M.

Best known as the voice of the J. Geils Band from 1967-1983, Wolf made a name for himself as a soulful, frenetic front man. Drawing on a storied solo career for over three decades, the recent death of his longtime collaborator J. Geils may bring out the oldies.

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BEALE STREET MUSIC FEST 2017

TAS CRU • 6:15 P.M.

m e m p h i s f l y e r. c o m

ORION BLUES TENT

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BEALE STREET MUSIC

Festival SATURDAY, MAY 6TH

FOOD / DRINKS / PATIO

855 Kentucky St

11AM-3AM

901.207.5111

Wiz Khalifa

Fe d E x S t a g e ...

COME BY DIRTY CROW

BEFORE & AFTER MUSIC FEST TO ENJOY OUR

MOUTHWATERING WINGS ON THE PATIO!

Amy LaVere John Paul White Dawes Drive-By Truckers The Revivalists Kings of Leon

GATES OPEN 1 P.M.

B u d Li g h t S t age ... Lil Wyte KONGOS GRiZ Mutemath 2 Chainz Wiz Khalifa

May 4-10, 2017

R i v e r S t a g e ... Dead Soldiers Deer Tick Highly Suspect Silversun Pickups X Ambassadors Death Cab for Cutie

O ri o n B l u e s Tent ... Daddy Mack Blues Band Blind Mississippi Morris Carlos Elliot Jr. Corey Harris Band Ronnie Baker Brooks Big Head Blues Club

B l u e s S h a ck ...

24

Blind Mississippi Morris Washboard Shorty & Reverend Robert Rev

2:30 4 5:35 7:10 8:50 10:30

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BEALE STREET MUSIC

bands

SATURDAY, MAY 6TH

John Paul White

FEDEX STAGE AMY LAVERE • 2:30 P.M.

This local heroine up and got hitched to Austin’s Will Sexton, and now they’re inseparable, both onstage and off, to great musical effect. Her upright bass playing and plaintive singing lead the group through her original songs, with echoes of country, gypsy jazz, blues, rockabilly, and moody mambo.

JOHN PAUL WHITE • 4:00 P.M.

Co-founder of Grammy-winners The Civil Wars, White has more recently pursued a solo career in the same vein of traditional American songwriting. Starting with basic folk-rock instrumentation, he’ll then add subtle atmospheric touches to his arrangements. Fresh off a collaboration with Rodney Crowell, he’s clearly on a roll.

DAWES • 5:35 P.M.

L.A.-based folk-rockers Dawes released their fifth studio album, We’re All Gonna Die, last fall. Reminiscent of Jackson Browne’s The Pretender, the LP is packed with songs that feel timeless and lived-in, with snatches of bright acoustic guitar, clean electric guitars, and swirls of keyboard chords providing a bed for the lyrics.

DRIVE-BY TRUCKERS • 7:10 P.M.

Drive-By Truckers are the undisputed kings of alt-country. An essential track is “Self Destructive Zones,” their gritty ode to a hair-metal guitarist who is on the verge of commercial success until Kurt Cobain takes grunge mainstream overnight and puts an end to the era of hair and “pointy, cheap guitars.”

THE REVIVALISTS • 8:50 P.M.

If you need more saxophones in your life, The Revivalists have you covered. Fresh from the New Orleans Jazz and Heritage Festival, this soulful septet is bringing its infectious dance beats to the Bluff City. Not unlike last year’s sultry soul-rockers, Nathaniel Rateliff & the Night Sweats, The Revivalists bring back vintage funk and roots-rock styles.

26 CONTINUED ON PAGE 30


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BANDS / SATURDAY CONTINUED FROM PAGE 26

LIVE ENTERTAINMENT Every Friday & Saturday Night!

8PM - MIDNIGHT MAY 5 & MAY 6 H LOUDPAQ MAY 12 & MAY 13 H THE HIGH ROLLERS MAY 19 & MAY 20 H DUSTY HUNDLEY BAND MAY 26 & MAY 27 H PLAY IT 4WARD SUNDAY, MAY 28 H ACES WILD

Death Cab for Cutie

KINGS OF LEON • 10:30 P.M.

Formed in Nashville in 1999, family-band Kings of Leon began with a sound not unlike a punk-rock Creedence Clearwater Revival. Now, the band has turned stadiumsized, with seven studio albums, 12 Grammy nominations, and four Grammy wins under their belt. Kings of Leon released their most recent album, WALLS, last fall.

BUD LIGHT STAGE LIL WYTE • 2:10 P.M.

This white rapper from Frayser has proven himself legit, working with Three 6 Mafia and others for over a decade and regularly showing in the U.S. rap charts. Known for his rapid-fire delivery, he’s staked out his own style both musically and pharmaceutically, creating a blend of medical cannabis.

KONGOS • 3:45 P.M.

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South African siblings by way of Arizona, this musical family treads the slightly rockier side of pop with four-to-the-floor stompers colored by synth and accordion textures. Produced and polished, they nevertheless bring some surprises to their compositions, with clever hooks, breakdowns, and singalong choruses.

GRIZ • 5:20 P.M.

Self-described future-funk DJ GRiZ (aka Grant Kwiecinski) crafts dramatic songs with sci-fi noises, late-night TV horn squeals, and R&B-inspired beats. A veteran of festivals such as Electric Forest and Lollapalooza, GRiZ has collaborated with incendiary guitarist Eric Krasno and livetronica legends Big Gigantic.

MUTEMATH • 7:00 P.M.

Not exactly a throwback, not exactly a “contemporary act,” New Orleans rockers Mutemath embrace the freedom of 1960s rock-and-roll without sacrificing modern relevancy. 2009’s Armistice was the band’s biggest hit on the charts, but 2015’s Vitals might be their most confident effort.

2 CHAINZ • 8:40 P.M.

Dirty South vet 2 Chainz has had an incredibly long and diverse hip-hop career since his 1997 debut with Playaz Circle. He’s worked with everyone from Lil Wayne to Drake and Kanye, while keeping up a vigorous schedule of solo releases that made him a pioneer of trap. Consistently creative and usually ahead of his time, 2 Chainz looks to light up the Bud Light Stage audience.

WIZ KHALIFA • 10:25 P.M.

Genuine pop hitmakers come along only so often in a lifetime, but Pittsburgh rapper Wiz Khalifa is absolutely one of them. From the early days of “Say Yeah” to his most recent No. 1 “See You Again” (a tribute to the late actor Paul Walker, which spent 12 straight weeks atop the Billboard charts), Wiz can certainly be relied upon.


RIVER STAGE DEAD SOLDIERS • 2:20 P.M.

This Memphis band wowed audiences at South by Southwest this year and is energetically promoting their new album, which takes their earlier work in a more eclectic direction. Blending horns, fiddle, and layered harmonies over a solid rock foundation, with forays into old-world music, their shows are guaranteed to energize. (See Cover Story on p. 10)

DEER TICK • 3:50 P.M.

Folk-rock without being retro, and boasting an unpredictable gritty streak, this Rhode Island outfit is now in their 10th year. Steadily growing into a bigger sound with more recent albums, with the addition of keyboards and occasionally horns, the group walks a fine line between Americana and innovation.

HIGHLY SUSPECT • 5:25 P.M.

Three-time Grammy nominees Highly Suspect are an alt-rock group from Cape Cod. Formed by brothers Rich and Ryan Meyer with their friend and guitarist, Johnny Stevens, Highly Suspect are reminiscent of Oceansize without all that impossible-to-dance-to compound measure. Who needs 11/4 when you have songs like “My Name Is Human”?

SILVERSUN PICKUPS • 7:00 P.M.

Silversun Pickups achieved both critical and commercial success with a career built on a foundation of layers upon layers of guitar harmonies. Their debut album, Carnavas, is packed with Billboard-charting singles that set the tone for the next decade-and-ahalf of releases that are by turns quiet and delicate and loud and overdriven.

X AMBASSADORS • 8:40 P.M.

This Ithaca, New York, rock quartet has certainly made its mark on the pop landscape in a relatively short period of time. The band’s 2015 major-label debut VHS features charttopping singles such as “Unsteady” and “Renegades,” and more is yet to come.  

DEATH CAB FOR CUTIE • 10:20 P.M.

Seattle’s Death Cab for Cutie has been labeled lots of things over the years: “punk,” “emo,” “indie-rock,” etc. But the truth is, simply, that the band makes great pop music, and there is no greater evidence than their 2003 hit “The New Year.”

ORION BLUES TENT

VOTED #1 IN 901

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BLIND MISSISSIPPI MORRIS • 3:50 P.M. A Clarksdale native from a family rich with musical heritage, this award-winning harmonica player/bluesman is a perfect fit for the festival, reminding us of the sounds that made Beale Street great. With over 20 years of performing under his belt, expect to hear the blues done right.

CARLOS ELLIOT JR.

• 5:30 P.M.

Carlos Elliot Jr.’s claim to be a blues pioneer is rightful. The Columbian singer/guitarist has successfully channeled his love for the hill country blues of North Mississippi into a rich stew of Latin and African influences, most notably on 2015’s Del Otun & El Mississippi.

COREY HARRIS BAND • 7:10 P.M.

Effortlessly combining elements of Delta blues and reggae, Corey Harris has earned his reputation as one of the finest working musicians in the game today. He already has over 15 albums under his belt, but 2003’s Mississippi to Mali might be his best.

RONNIE BAKER BROOKS • 8:55 P.M.

Few pedigrees read as strongly as that of Ronnie Baker Brooks, the respected Chicago blues singer/guitarist and son of the legendary (and recently deceased) Lonnie Brooks. His newest album, Times Have Changed, was released earlier this year.

BIG HEAD BLUES CLUB • 10:45 P.M.

There are supergroups, and then there are supergroups. Big Head Blues Club combines members of the mighty Big Head Todd and the Monsters with well-known blues cats Cedric Burnside and Lightnin’ Malcolm and the dynamic Ruthie Foster on lead vocals.  It can’t be missed.

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With a lineage going back to underground blues legends the Fieldstones, the Daddy Mack Blues Band is as “Memphis blues” as it gets. Mack Orr delivers the pain on lead vocals and guitar, and his fine band does the rest.

m e m p h i s f l y e r. c o m

DADDY MACK BLUES BAND • 2:15 P.M.

31


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33


BEALE STREET MUSIC

bands

FEDEX STAGE MACHINE GUN KELLY • 3:30 P.M.

Machine Gun Kelly is not just another rapper-turned-actor. His catalog of hits, including “Wild Boy,” “Invincible,” and “Till I Die,” all bear the mark of his lyrical mastery.

SUNDAY, MAY 7TH

ALTER BRIDGE • 5:05 P.M.

Orlando hard rockers featuring former members of Creed, Mark Tremonti, Brian Marshall, and Scott Phillips, along with lead screamer and sometime Slash collaborator Myles Kennedy, will bring the heavy noise to the FedEx Stage.

MIDNIGHT OIL • 6:40 P.M.

Austrailian pop rockers Midnight Oil’s “Beds Are Burning” and “Forgotten Years” underscore the band’s dedication to both social justice and solid rock music.

Soundgarden

BUSH • 8:20 P.M.

The second wave of grunge takes a lot of flak, but no band deserves less of it than Bush. The group has consistently cranked out undeniable hits in its 25-year history, including “Everything Zen,” “Glycerine,” and “The Chemicals Between Us.”

SOUNDGARDEN • 10:05 P.M.

Very few bands encapsulate an era, but Soundgarden might be one of the precious few who come close when it comes to ’90s grunge.

BUD LIGHT STAGE MARCELLA & HER LOVERS • 2:15 P.M. This Louisiana native brings her own blend of swamp soul with a dynamite band.

ANI DIFRANCO • 3:45 P.M. CONTINUED ON PAGE 36

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BANDS / SUNDAY CONTINUED FROM PAGE 34 Allow us to list some of DiFranco’s achievements: genre-defying songsmith, a multiinstrumentalist, a feminist icon, and supporter of worthy humanitarian causes.

ZIGGY MARLEY • 5:25 P.M.

Fresh from winning his eighth Grammy for last year’s self-titled album, this scion of the Lion knows how to keep the reggae flame burning with integrity and grit.

BEN HARPER & THE INNOCENT CRIMINALS • 7:15 P.M.

Harper has followed his own star since his debut, 23 years ago. Intriguing lyrics and nuanced harmonies float over an earthy mix of rhythm and roots.

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STURGILL SIMPSON • 9:05 P.M.

Since going solo in 2013, Sturgill Simpson has quickly become the “it” singer-songwriter in Americana/roots music.

RIVER STAGE LANITA SMITH • 2:15 P.M.

Memphis-raised Lanita Smith relocated to Los Angeles when she started getting gigs at Coachella and on Jimmy Kimmel Live, but she’s back in town in support of Love Can Do.

BAHARI • 3:30 P.M.

Every fuzzed-out guitar lick and hand-clap-driven chorus from this all-female trio is soaked through with sun, salt, and surf.

MAYER HAWTHORNE • 5:05 P.M.

By participating, you consent to receive text messages sent by an automatic telephone dialing system. Consent to these terms is not a condition of purchase.

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Mayer Hawthorne’s official website takes the form of a classified personal ad. He’s a single Aquarius with a bachelor’s degree who lists his occupation as singer/DJ. Sounds like a catch. Hawthorne is a member of bands Tuxedo and Jaded Incorporated, and you can catch his solo show at the River Stage on Sunday. .

TORI KELLY • 6:45 P.M.

Tori Kelly got her start 10 years ago, posting videos to YouTube. She has since competed on American Idol, broken into the Billboard Hot 100, and won a Grammy for Best New Artist.

JILL SCOTT • 8:30 P.M.

Jill Scott is a quadruple threat — a singer/songwriter, actress, and poet. And with two gold- and one platinum-selling album, if she’s spreading herself too thin, it doesn’t show.

ORION BLUES TENT EDEN BRENT • 2:15 P.M.

May 4-10, 2017

Eden Brent is a true student of the blues, having been trained by the great boogie-woogie pianist Abie “Boogaloo” Ames (thus earning the nickname “Little Boogaloo”).

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SUPER CHIKAN • 3:45 P.M.

Winner of the Blues Music Awards in 2010, James Johnson bring some scintillating electric guitar and even some yodeling into the mix.

PRESTON SHANNON • 5:20 P.M.

A Beale Street fixture, Shannon offers the best of homegrown blues guitar and soulful singing.

POPA CHUBBY • 6:55 P.M.

Precious few modern blues acts are as wildly prolific as New York’s Popa Chubby. The man has done it all over the course of 26 (and counting) albums since 1994.

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BOOKER T. JONES • 8:35 P.M.

A true legend and founder of the Stax sound, Booker T. Jones continues to be the king of minimalist soul and funk. Mixing vocals with his trademark organ instrumentals, he combines innovation with a respect for his own history. (See Cover Story p. 10)


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CALENDAR of EVENTS:

May 4 - 10

Send the date, time, place, cost, info, phone number, a brief description, and photos — two weeks in advance — to calendar@memphisflyer.com or P.O. Box 1738, Memphis, TN 38101. DUE TO SPACE LIMITATIONS, ONGOING WEEKLY EVENTS WILL APPEAR IN THE FLYER’S ONLINE CALENDAR ONLY.

CROSSTOWN ARTS, 430 N. CLEVELAND (507-8030), WWW.CROSSTOWNARTS.ORG.

Small Shop Saturday

Featuring a weekly local vendor in the tap room. Meet the artist and learn about their craft. Saturdays, 1-4 p.m. GHOST RIVER BREWING, 827 S. MAIN (278-0087), WWW.GHOSTRIVERBREWING.COM.

The Evergreen Theatre

ONGOI NG ART

Art Village Gallery

Reception for Kea Woods’ “4 the Culture” at Found Studio, Friday, May 5th

Hattiloo Theatre

37 S. COOPER (502-3486).

The Salvation Army Kroc Center

Cinderella, hearts of children and adults alike will soar when the slipper fits. All performances are pay what you can, sold at the door beginning an hour before each performance. www.stagedoormemphis.org. Sundays, 2:30 p.m., and Thursdays-Saturdays, 7 p.m. Through May 14. 800 E. PARKWAY S. (729-8007).

Playhouse on the Square

Million Dollar Quartet, on a Tuesday night shortly before Christmas in 1956, Johnny Cash, Jerry Lee Lewis, Elvis Presley, and Carl Perkins gather together at Sun Studio for the first and only time. Rock-and-roll at the moment of creation. www. playhouseonthesquare.org. $25-$45. Sundays, 2 p.m., and ThursdaysSaturdays, 8 p.m. Through May 28. 66 S. COOPER (726-4656).

Theatre Memphis

Cat on a Hot Tin Roof, literary classic explores the family relationships of a wealthy Southern tycoon with recurring motifs of social mores, greed, mendacity, decay, sexual desire, repression, and death in the Mississippi Delta. www.theatrememphis.org. $25. Fridays, Saturdays, 8 p.m., Sundays, 2 p.m., and Thursdays, 7:30 p.m. Through May 14. 630 PERKINS EXT. (682-8323).

TheatreWorks

Call for Writers: ETC 2nd annual 10-Minute Play Festival, eight-10 vignettes will be performed at Theatreworks in early September. Three playwrights will win cash prizes. www.etcmemphistheater.com. $10 entry fee. Through June 30. 2085 MONROE (274-7139).

ARTIST RECEPTIONS

Crosstown Arts

Artist reception for “Inaugurate the Resistance,” exhibition of visual tunnel featuring video footage which took place in January during Women’s Marches in Washington, D.C., and Memphis, portrait wall, and audio stories. www.inauguratetheresistance.com. Fri., May 5, 6-9 p.m., and May 6-8, 9 a.m.-7 p.m. 430 N. CLEVELAND (507-8030).

Fogelman Galleries of Contemporary Art, University of Memphis

Artist reception for graphic design senior show, exhibition of works by Orline Bowers, Karly Burris, Joshua Carodine, Mahala Davis, Kelly Henderson, Khrystopher James, Kristina Marlow, Helen Quisenberry, Alli Reed, Wallace Robinson, and Jhayla Young. www.memphis.edu. Thurs., May 4, 6-8 p.m.

Botero on Botero

Author Juan Carlos Botero focuses on the art of his father, Colombian master Fernando Botero, in a special presentation. The most important themes and subject matter present in Botero’s art are discussed. Wed., May 10, 6-8 p.m. MEMPHIS BROOKS MUSEUM OF ART, 1934 POPLAR (544-6209), WWW.BROOKSMUSEUM.ORG.

Call to Artists for Curb Couture Trashion Show

Fashion designs must be comprised of at least 75 percent recycled or reused materials. Event date is June 4. For more information email trashion.show@memphistn.gov. Through May 12.

Call to Artists for UrbanArt Public Art

Artist opportunities for murals, sculptures, and more. See website for registration and more information. Ongoing. WWW.URBANARTCOMMISSION.ORG.

Casting Demonstration Saturdays, Sundays, 3 p.m.

3715 CENTRAL.

METAL MUSEUM, 374 METAL MUSEUM DR. (774-6380), WWW.METALMUSEUM.ORG.

Found Studio

Cooper-Young Art Tours

Artist reception for “4 the Culture,” exhibition of work inspired by artist’s generation and cultures by Kea Woods. Fri., May 5, 6-8 p.m. 2491 BROAD (652-0848).

L Ross Gallery

Opening reception for “Ephemera,” exhibition of abstract paintings by Lisa Weiss. www.lrossgallery.com. Fri., May 5, 6-8 p.m. 5040 SANDERLIN (767-2200).

OTHER ART HAPPENINGS

Art After Dark

Galleries and gardens will be open late. Featuring light refreshments, entertainment, and a cash bar. Free with admission. Every third Thursday, 6-8 p.m. THE DIXON GALLERY & GARDENS, 4339 PARK (761-5250), DIXON.ORG.

Artist Talk for “Bluff Poem”

Exhibition of new work by Memphis painter Don Estes. Sat., May 6, 11 a.m. DAVID LUSK GALLERY, 97 TILLMAN (7673800), WWW.DAVIDLUSKGALLERY.COM.

First Friday of every month, 6-9 p.m. COOPER-YOUNG DISTRICT, CORNER OF COOPER AND YOUNG, WWW.COOPERYOUNG.COM.

David’s Animal Rescue Party Featuring auctions, art sales, and pet-related items from local vendors in honor of former St. Francis of Assisi School student who died in a car accident. Benefits animal rescue organizations. Free. Sat., May 6, 10 a.m.-2 p.m. SAINT FRANCIS OF ASSISI CATHOLIC SCHOOL, 2100 GERMANTOWN PARKWAY (388-7321), WWW.ANIMALRESCUECLUBATSFA.SHUTTERFLY.COM.

Artist reception for “Cartagena: Memorias y Conexiones”

Exhibition salutes honored Memphis in May country with works by Columbian artist Jorge Yances. $10. Sat., May 6, 4-6 p.m. ART VILLAGE GALLERY, 410 S. MAIN (521-0782), WWW.ARTVILLAGEGALLERY.COM.

“Cartagena: Memorias y Conexiones,” exhibition salutes honored Memphis in May country with works by Columbian artist Jorge Yances. www.artvillagegallery.com. May 5-26. 410 S. MAIN (521-0782).

Crosstown Arts

“The Moonpie Project: New Mural by Kevin Bongang,” exhibition of mural series featuring Nashvillebased artist. www.crosstownarts.org. Through May 31.

• Huge selection of jewelry precious and costume, 1850 to 1950 • Retro Furniture • Pottery & Glass • Collectibles & Art We replace stones in costume jewelry.

Wed - Sat 11-5 Sun 12-4

430 N. CLEVELAND (507-8030).

The Dixon Gallery & Gardens

Scent and Symbolism: Perfumed Objects and Images, exhibition considering the role of scent in the history of art through a collection of 140 scented bottles. Regular Admission. Through July 2. “Artifact of a Relationship,” exhibition of photographs by Jason Miller. May 7-31. “Jason Miller: objets de mémoire,” exhibition of photographs using everyday objects that have meaning and memories in the artist’s life. May 7-July 23. “Made in Dixon,” exhibition showcasing the colorful and joy-filled artwork created by artists of all ages in the Dixon’s educational programs. www.dixon.org. Ongoing. 4339 PARK (761-5250).

C O M E DY

Growlers

Approaching Happiness with Krish Mohan, socially conscious comedian explores the idea of happiness and perceptions of mental illness in today’s society, removing the stigmas associated with immigration, drugs, gun control, racism, and more. (412-605-4807). $5. Fri., May 5, 6:30-9 p.m. 1911 POPLAR (244-7904).

High Cotton Brewing Co.

Jim Seward, middle-aged, middle Tennessee comedy to the middle of downtown’s Edge district featuring Cortney Warner, Natasha Ferrier, Derik Zoo. Hosted by Doug Gillon and Jonny Bratsveen with Ben Aviotti. Free. Tues., May 9, 7:30-9:30 p.m. 598 MONROE (896-9977).

continued on page 40

PAP SMEAR $155

NEW PATIENTS, EXAM ONLY

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CHO CES

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1726 Poplar Avenue Memphis, TN 38104 901/274-3550 www.memphischoices.org

m e m p h i s f l y e r. c o m

51 S. COOPER (725-0776).

Mother’s Day SALE!

ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT

Dearly Departed, in the backwoods of the Bible Belt, the Turpin family has just suffered the loss of their father. Problems keep overshadowing the solemn occasion. Living and dying in the South are seldom tidy and always hilarious. www.playhouseonthesquare. org. $25-$40. Thursdays-Saturdays, 8 p.m., and Sundays, 2 p.m. Through May 14.

Gem of the Ocean, takes place in 1904 in the Hill District of Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania. The play unfolds in the home of Aunt Ester, a 285-year-old wise woman. Citizen Barlow has come for her soulcleansing powers. www.hattiloo.org. Through May 14.

421 N. Watkins St Memphis, TN 38104

Monthly critique event where visual artists are invited to bring new and/ or in-progress studio work for critical feedback and group discussion particular to each artist’s practice. Tues., May 9, 5:30-7:30 p.m.

Circuit Playhouse

1705 POPLAR (274-7139).

TUT-UNCOMMON ANTIQUES

Open Crit

TH EAT E R

The Latin Soul in You, when Jason thinks that there is nothing to do to rescue his business, he meets up with his best friend, Enrique, who injects him with hope and desire to fight for what he loves. www. cazateatro.org. $20. Fri., May 5, 8 p.m., and Sat., May 6, 2 & 8 p.m.

901-278-8965

39


SEE IT AT THE

COUNTRY PARTY

C A L E N DA R: M AY 4 - 1 0

PINK PALACE PHIL VAUGHT MAY 4 T H U R S D A Y S

F E A T U R I N G

continued from page 39 P&H Cafe

Open Mic Comedy, Thursdays, 9 p.m. 1532 MADISON (726-0906).

L E CT U R E / S P E A K E R

Architects of the World Series Lecture

EDITED BY EARNEST SUAREZ

In conjunction with Memphis in May International Festival with Giancarlo Mazzanti, principal and founder, El Equipo de Mazzanti, Bogotá, Colombia Free. Tues., May 9, 6-7:30 p.m.

M AY 3

JASON D. WILLIAMS 8PM

MEMPHIS COLLEGE OF ART, 1930 POPLAR (525-3818), AIAMEMPHIS.ORG/ EVENTS/2017/5/9/ARCHITECTSOF-THE-WORLD-SERIES-LECTURE.

M AY 4

LAFAYETTE'S COUNTY PARTY FEATURING PHIL VAUGHT 9PM

Special 2-night event!

M AY 5

THE BO-KEYS 10:30PM M AY 6

SOUTHERN EDITION BAND 3PM M AY 7

FM100 50TH ANNIVERSARY & CONCERT: JON SCOTT & MIKE POWELL 3PM M AY 9

May 4-10, 2017

CLASSICALLY BLUE: CORKY SIEGEL WITH MUSICIANS FROM IRIS ORCHESTRA & MEMPHIS BLUES SOCIETY 7PM

Thursday & Friday 85853_Poster.indd 1

May 11 & 12 at 7pm Reserve your tickets now: 901.636.2362. No seating after the movie begins at 7pm, please arrive EARLY! Box office opens at 6pm May 11 & 12.

3050 Central Ave / Memphis 38111

901.636.2362

M AY 7

B.B. King Boulevard Tour 12/11/07 11:14:59 AM

Historian Jimmy Ogle leads a free tour of B.B. King Blvd. from the Sterick Building to Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. Avenue. Meet up at Madison Avenue & B.B. King Blvd (former Third Street). Free. Thurs., May 4, 11:45 a.m. (604-5002), WWW.JIMMYOGLE.COM.

The Lewis Ranch Tours

Jerry Lee Lewis’ private getaway gives fans a look at the life of a rock-and-roll legend. Tours available Mon.-Sat., 10 a.m.-4 p.m. $30. Ongoing. THE LEWIS RANCH, 1595 MALONE (662-393-8770), WWW.THELEWISRANCH.COM.

E X PO S/ SA L E S

FM100 50TH ANNIVERSARY & CONCERT: JON SCOTT & MIKE POWELL 3PM

Lil’ Pollution Preventers Expo

Celebrate art contest with fun activities and goodies. Tues., May 9, 2-5 p.m. AGRICENTER INTERNATIONAL, 7777 WALNUT GROVE (452-2151), WWW.AGRICENTER.COM.

2 1 1 9 M A D I S O N AV E N U E MEMPHIS, TN 38104 (901) 207-5097 L A FAY E T T E S . C O M

40

TO U R S

Thanks Memphis for voting us the Best Indian Restaurant! Memphis Flyer's 2016 Best of Memphis readers' poll

1720 Poplar at Evergreen 278-1199

Memphis Orchid Society Annual Show and Sale

Fri., May 5, 12-5 p.m., Sat., May 6, 9 a.m.-5 p.m., and Sun., May 7, 11 a.m.-4 p.m. MEMPHIS BOTANIC GARDEN, 750 CHERRY (636-4100), WWW.MEMPHISORCHIDS.ORG.

Jorge Yances’ “Cartagena: Memorias y Conexiones” at Art Villages Gallery Mint Cream Vintage Expo

Showcasing the best in vintage clothing, jewelry, shoes, toys, and furniture and featuring professional beauticians performing vintage hairstyle demos, fashion show, classic car show, music, food trucks, and more. $5. Sun., May 7, 11 a.m.-7 p.m. TADS IMAGINARIUM, 343 MADISON.

Southern Junkers Vintage Market

Featuring vintage, farmhouse, antiques, repurposed, art, handmade, jewelry, cool junk, music, food, and vintage fashion show on Saturday. $8, $12 weekend pass. Fri.-Sat., May 5-6, 9 a.m.

Oxford Pride Parade and Weekend

Designed to create inclusive, welcoming spaces for the University of Mississippi’s LGBTQ student body and for Lafayette County. Free. Sat., May 6, 2 p.m.-3 a.m. DOWNTOWN OXFORD, TOWN SQUARE (270-7799).

S PO R TS / F IT N ES S

Bartlett Area Chamber of Commerce 2017 Stakeholder’s Cup Golf Tournament

Day of fun loaded with prizes benefiting Bartlett Area Chamber of Commerce. See website for registration. Fri., May 5, 11 a.m. QUAIL RIDGE GOLF COURSE, 4055 ALTRURIA (386-6951), WWW.BARTLETTCHAMBER.ORG.

Go Ape Treetop Adventure

AGRICENTER INTERNATIONAL, 7777 WALNUT GROVE (412-5425).

Course in Shelby Farms Park open for its second season. Ongoing.

F EST IVA LS

SHELBY FARMS, 500 N. PINE LAKE (767-PARK), WWW.GOAPE.COM.

Beale Street Music Festival

Memphis Rockin’ Radial Series

AND PLEASE FEATURE FM100 50TH ANNIVERSARY & C

#BSMF17 is a three-day music festival featuring over 60 artists. $50 per day. Fri., May 5, 5-11:45 p.m., Sat., May 6, noon-11:45 p.m., and Sun., May 7, noon-11:45 p.m. TOM LEE PARK, OFF RIVERSIDE DR. (525-4611), WWW.MEMPHISINMAY.ORG.

Lantern Light Festival Memphis

Featuring over 400 lanterns, 400-foot dragon, 30-foot-tall panda, and entertainment including acrobats from China and live music. $16-$20. Fri.-Sun., 6 p.m.-midnight. Through May 7. AGRICENTER INTERNATIONAL, 7777 WALNUT GROVE (651-5042000), WWW.LANTERNLIGHTFESTIVAL.COM.

Music by the Lake

Free outdoor concert featuring music, vendors, and fun. Fri., May 5, 6-9 p.m. BARTLETT PERFORMING ARTS AND CONFERENCE CENTER, 3663 APPLING (385-6440), WWW.BPACC.ORG.

$25. Fri.-Sat., May 5-6. MEMPHIS INTERNATIONAL RACEWAY, 5500 VICTORY LANE, WWW. RACEMIR.COM.

KIDS

JASON D

LAFAYETTE'S COUNTY PAR

Discover the Dinosaurs: Unleashed

Venture back to a time when the dinosaurs roamed the earth featuring up-close encounters with a lifelike Stegosaurus, Velociraptor, and the king T-Rex in a walk-through exhibit. $14-$52. Sat.-Sun., May 6-7, 9 a.m.-7 p.m. MEMPHIS COOK CONVENTION CENTER, 255 N. MAIN (612-375-9670), DISCOVERTHEDINOSAURS.COM. CENTRAL (636-2362), WWW.MEMPHISMUSEUMS.ORG.

THE BO

SOUTHERN

Open Nominations for the 2017 Beat the Odds Awards

FM100 50TH ANNIVERSARY & CO

Nominate an extraordinary and deserving youth overcoming challenges. Visit website to learn more about the program, nominations, and information about upcoming events. Through May 31.

CLASSICALLY BLUE: CORKY SIEGEL WITH MUSICIANS WWW.MEMPHISBEATTHEODDS.ORG.

continued on page 42


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C A L E N DA R: M AY 4 - 1 0 “Inaugurate the Resistance” at Crosstown Arts

Southland Park is the ONLY place to bet on the

continued from page 40

Kentucky Derby

PRIZM Camp Registration

Visit website for more information and registration for June Music Camp & International Chamber Music Festival. $375$700. Through May 15.

on May 6th! See Player Rewards for details.

WWW.PRIZMENSEMBLE.COM.

Registration for Kidzu Playhouse 2017 Summer Camps

800.467.6182 • West Memphis, AR southlandpark.com

Choose from several camps in June and July ending in production performance. For camp information and registration, see website. $75-$350. Through July 1.

See Player Rewards for details. Players must be 21 years of age or older to game and 18 years of age or older to bet at the racetrack. Play responsibly; for help quitting call 800-522-4700.

HERNANDO HIGH SCHOOL PERFORMING ARTS CENTER, 805 DILWORTH LANE, HERNANDO, MS, WWW.KUDZUPLAYERS.COM. 4/24/17 12:50 PM

SOUTHL-56864 Flyer Qtr 5.4.17 Kentucky Derby.indd 1

Registration for Memphis College of Art Summer Art Camp

May 4-10, 2017

For children ages 3-18 featuring discount for children registered by March 31. Offering full- and half-day options for six weeklong sessions beginning June 5. Preview Day, April 1. Scholarships available. Through May 4.

MAY 27 Pre-show entertainment

Mighty Souls Brass Band

gates open at

Featured guest soloist

La’Porsha Renae picnic baskets & lawn chairs are welcomeD

VIP TABLES AVAILABLE FOR MORE INFORMATION,

CALL 901-576-4107

42

SUMMERSYMPHONYLIVE.COM MEMPHISSYMPHONY.ORG

trugreen lawn

tickets are $20 in advance for adults ($25 at the door)

$10 for children kids zone

fireworks show

purchase tickets AT TICKETMASTER.COM or MEMPHIS BOTANIC GARDEN BOX OFFICE.

THEATRE MEMPHIS, 630 PERKINS EXT. (682-8323), WWW.THEATREMEMPHIS.ORG.

Teen Book Club

Read and discuss the book of the month, eat a few snacks, play a review game, discuss the book read, vote on our next book. For teens, 6th-12th grade. Free. Second Monday of every month. COLLIERVILLE LIBRARY, 91 WALNUT (457-2601), WWW.COLLIERVILLELIBRARY.ORG.

Tennessee Shakespeare Company Summer Camps Registration

MEMPHIS COLLEGE OF ART, 1930 POPLAR (272-5100), WWW.MCA.EDU.

Registration for Memphis Public Libraries Summer Camps

TheatreKids Spring Musical Registration

VARIOUS LOCATIONS, SEE WEBSITE FOR MORE INFORMATION, WWW.MEMPHISLIBRARY.ORG.

Stroll with the Trolls

show starts at

For youth ages 6-18. Participants will have the chance to perform and help create a show. Interns will serve as both actors and teachers. For more information, registration, and performance dates, call, visit website or email showagon@theatrememphis. org. Through May 31.

Register for one of three camps for children in grades K1-12. See website for more information and registration. $200-$500. Through June 1.

Camps are free and held at various Library branches for students between the ages of 10 and 18, from June 12 -August 3. Students learn skills like coding, music production, and STEAM. Through May 31.

SATURDAY,

Registration for Summer Performance Workshop/Call for Paid Interns

Festival with themed arts and crafts, clip-on hair extensions to match the color of your favorite Troll, face painting, photos with trolls, edible sand art, and balloon twisting from The Balloon Guy. $5 members, $20 nonmembers. Sat., May 6, 10 a.m.-1 p.m. CHILDREN’S MUSEUM OF MEMPHIS, 2525 CENTRAL (320-3170), WWW.CMOM.COM.

HUTCHISON SCHOOL, 1740 RIDGEWAY (761-2220), WWW.TNSHAKESPEARE.ORG.

Open to students grades 7-12. Rehearsals begin Jan. 3 for a production of Willy Wonka. For more information and registration, visit website. Through Dec. 16. BARTLETT PERFORMING ARTS AND CONFERENCE CENTER, 3663 APPLING (385-6440), WWW.BPACC.ORG.

S P EC IA L EVE NTS

Amazing Scavenger Hunt Adventure

Guided from any smart phone, teams see the sights while solving clues, completing challenges, and learning local history. Available 365 days, Sunrise to Sunset. Use promo MEMPHISFLYER for special discount. Ongoing. VARIOUS LOCATIONS, SEE WEBSITE FOR MORE INFORMATION (805-603-5620), WWW.URBANADVENTUREQUEST.COM.

“Back to the Moon for Good”

Fifty years ago the U.S. was in a heated race to the moon. This program reflects on that legacy and looks to the future, motivated by the Google XPRIZE. $7. Through June 2. SHARPE PLANETARIUM, MEMPHIS PINK PALACE MUSEUM, 3050 CENTRAL (636-2362), WWW.MEMPHISMUSEUMS.ORG.

Bingo Night

Play to win a Sweetwater kayak. Mondays, 7-9 p.m. CASUAL PINT, 395 S. HIGHLAND.

Blues Hall of Fame Induction Ceremony

Honorees include Johnny Copeland, Henry Gray, Willie Johnson, Latimore, Amy van Singel, Magic Slim, and Mavis Staples, highlighted by testimonials, video clips,, and acceptance speeches. $100. Wed., May 10, 5:30 p.m. THE HALLORAN CENTRE, 225 S. MAIN (529-4299), WWW.BLUES.ORG.

Blues Music Awards Week

Fans, musicians, and music world professionals are invited to celebrate the blues with events including films, music, and more ending with the Blues Music Awards ceremony. Mon.-Fri., May 8-12. VARIOUS LOCATIONS, SEE WEBSITE FOR MORE INFORMATION, WWW.BLUES.ORG.

Drive it Home Vehicle Raffle

Win choice of a new 2017 Ford Mustang, Fusion or Escape benefiting Ronald McDonald House Charities® of Memphis. Only 5,000 tickets will be sold. See website for more information. $20. Through May 26. WWW.DRIVEITHOMEMEMPHIS.COM.

Extreme Deep: Mission into the Abyss

Offers opportunities for handson exploration of life at the bottom of the sea. Interactive exhibit that highlights the adventure of deep-sea exploration and discovery. Through May 6. MEMPHIS PINK PALACE MUSEUM, 3050 CENTRAL (636-2362), WWW.MEMPHISMUSEUMS.ORG.


Certified Pre-Owned*

CALENDAR

Financing starting at 1.99% PLUS 2 years prepaid maintenance.

Free-to-Play Themed Game Crawl

$3 pints and free game play. Mondays, 6 p.m.midnight.

2016 CLA 250C

REC ROOM, 3000 BROAD (209-1137), WWW.RECROOMMEMPHIS.COM.

STOCK#P3125

$31,999

LITE Pitch Night Spring 2017

Want to help select the next great entrepreneurial idea in Memphis? Hear 27 high school students pitch ideas to the community. Audience members will help in selecting $1,000 in additional funds for two students. Free. Thurs., May 4, 6-8 p.m.

2015 C 300 STOCK#22601A

$32,999

MEMPHIS BOTANIC GARDEN, 750 CHERRY (636-4100), WWW.LITEMEMPHIS.COM.

Pre-Owned

MIFA Founders Day Celebration

Featuring keynote speaker Rabbi Michael E. Danziger recognizing outstanding donors and volunteers. $35. Thurs., May 4, 5:30-7:30 p.m.

2014 C 300 SPORT AWD STOCK#P3111

RHODES COLLEGE, MCCALLUM BALLROOM OF THE BRYAN CAMPUS LIFE CENTER, 2000 N. PARKWAY (843-3000), WWW.MIFA.ORG.

$25,999

2013 ML 350

National Small Business Week

Support the contributions of America’s entrepreneurs and small business owners to the country’s economy. Through May 6.

STOCK#P9301A

$25,999

WWW.SBA.GOV.

2015 C 300 AWD

Nature Photography Garden Cleanup

Sign in at the horticulture before heading out to the garden. Participants/volunteers should bring hand tools, (bypass pruners, loppers, hand saws) water, and a hat. For more information, email chris. obryan@memphisbotanicgarden.com. Every other Wednesday, 9 a.m.-noon.

STOCK#P3110M

$27,999

2013 E 350 SPORT AWD STOCK#9244A

$27,999

MEMPHIS BOTANIC GARDEN, 750 CHERRY (636-4100), WWW.MEMPHISBOTANICGARDEN.COM.

Open House

Members and non-members are invited to come check out makerspace. Fridays, 6 p.m. MIDSOUTH MAKERS, 2804 BARTLETT, WWW.MEETUP.COM/MIDSOUTHMAKERS/.

Peabody Rooftop Party

Meet on the roof for music and fun. $10-$15. Thursdays, 6-10 p.m. Through Aug. 17.

5389 POPLAR AVE.

2014 E 350

901.398.4962 • MERCEDESMEMPHIS.COM

$30,999

(East Memphis, just west of I-240)

STOCK#P3074

Financing as low as 1.99% plus 2 years prepaid maintenance on select Certified Pre-Owned models only. Excludes taxes, title, registration, and dealer prep. See dealer for details. Offers expire 5-31-17

THE PEABODY HOTEL, 149 UNION (529-4000), WWW.PEABODYHOTEL.COM.

Spay and Neuter Services for LowIncome Pet Owners

Texas Hold ’EM Poker Free. Wednesdays, 6:30 p.m.

STAGE STOP, 2951 CELA (382-1577), WWW.THESTAGESTOPMEMPHIS.COM.

Tupelo Blue Suede Cruise

Car enthusiasts from across the country showcase a variety of antique, classic, and hot rod automobiles Thur.-Sun., May4-7.

Looking for adults in good health between the ages of 18-45 to provide blood to support important research activities. Confidential interview and screening provided. Financial compensation provided. For more information contact: 1256 Union Avenue, Suite 200 Memphis, TN 38104 901-252-3434

BANCORPSOUTH ARENA, 375 N. MAIN (662-841-6528), WWW.BLUES.COM.

“Voices of the Civil Rights Movement”

Interactive exhibit featuring two video archives within a walk-up kiosk combining two media projects and commemorates the 50th anniversary of the March on Washington. Ongoing. NATIONAL CIVIL RIGHTS MUSEUM, 450 MULBERRY (521-9699), WWW.CIVILRIGHTSMUSEUM.ORG.

VolunCheers

LESSONS

Drinks and snacks are provided for volunteer happy hour to help a different organization with a specific task each month. Usually held the second Tuesday each month. For location and time, see website. Ages 21+. Second Tuesday of every month.

FOR ALL AGES

VARIOUS LOCATIONS, SEE WEBSITE FOR MORE INFORMATION, WWW.VOLUNTEERODYSSEY.COM.

Whet Thursday

Enjoy the museum after hours, participate in the foundry class, explore the galleries, enjoy a drink from the cash bar, food trucks, live music, and more. Free. First Thursday of every month, 5-8 p.m. Through Oct. 5. METAL MUSEUM, 374 METAL MUSEUM DR. (774-6380), WWW.METALMUSEUM.ORG.

continued on page 45

NEW+ USED

GUITARS

GEAR REPAIR LESSONS

Big selection! Everyday low pricing! Free layaway! We take trade ins! special financing available

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m e m p h i s f l y e r. c o m

MID-SOUTH SPAY & NEUTER SERVICES, 854 GOODMAN (324-3202), WWW.SPAYMEMPHIS.ORG.

Seeking: Adults age 18-45, in good health.

ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT

Cost lowered to $20 a pet for qualifying pet owners who must be receiving some form of government assistance to qualify for grant given by the Margarette J. Sather Animal Welfare Fund. Call for appointment. Through Aug. 31.

43


One Nation. One Mission. Many Opportunities.

• $70 covers office visit and 30-day supply of Phentermine

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Transportation Security Officers at Memphis International Airport (MEM)

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1660 Bonnie Lane • Cordova TN • cordovamedical.com

May 4-10, 2017

MON, WED, FRI: 8-3:30 • TUES, THUR: 9-5:30 • CLOSED WEEKDAYS 11:30-1:00 • SAT: 9-1:30

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PLUS Federal benefits • Paid, ongoing training TSA offers an attractive benefits package including: health, dental, vision, life and long-term care insurance; retirement plan; Thrift Savings Plan [similar to 401(k)]; Flexible Spending Account; Employee Assistance Program; personal leave days; and paid federal holidays.

Please apply through May 23 rd, 2017 online at: https://tsajobs.tsa.dhs.gov or text “TSO” to 95495 or call 1.877.872.7990 Follow us on Twitter @CareersatTSA U.S. Citizenship Required Equal Opportunity Employer Standard Messaging and Data Rates Apply


C A L E N DA R: M AY 4 - 1 0 continued from page 43 Worship at the River

Come share in an informal service of song, prayer, and reflection with members from Mullins United Methodist Church at the landing just beyond the pedestrian bridge. Sun., May 7, 10:30-11:30 a.m.

Indie Wednesday

See independent films at various locations. Wednesdays, 7 p.m., and Tues., May 9, 7 p.m. Through May 31. VARIOUS LOCATIONS, SEE WEBSITE FOR MORE INFORMATION, WWW.INDIEMEMPHIS.COM.

Jean-Michel Cousteau’s Secret Ocean

WOLF RIVER GREENWAY, THE NEWEST SECTION OF THE MEMPHIS GREENWAY ON HUMPHREYS BLVD. (685-8253).

Son of ocean pioneer Jacques Cousteau offers a breakthrough look at a secret world within the ocean. Mondays-Fridays, 4 p.m.

H O L I DAY EVE N TS

CTI 3D GIANT THEATER, IN THE MEMPHIS PINK PALACE MUSEUM, 3050 CENTRAL (636-2362), WWW.MEMPHISMUSEUMS.ORG.

Cinco De Mayo Party

Memphis Women in Film: Equal Means Equal

Featuring party favors, Latin music, lime toss contest, and more. Fri., May 5th, noon. THE FITZ, 711 LUCKY LANE (1-800-766-LUCK), WWW.FITZGERALDSTUNICA.COM.

FO O D & D R I N K EVE N TS

Screening and panel discussion for film about an unflinching look at how women are treated in the United States today. Examining both real-life stories and precedent-setting legal cases. Mon., May 8, 6:30-8:30 p.m. CROSSTOWN ARTS, 430 N. CLEVELAND (507-8030), WWW.CROSSTOWNARTS.ORG.

MicroCinema Club: Hometowner IndieGrant Shorts

Encore presentation of seven Memphis short films supported by Indie Memphis’ IndieGrants program. Wed., May 10, 6:30-9 p.m.

A Wider Angle Film Series: Neither Heaven Nor Earth

CROSSTOWN ARTS, 430 N. CLEVELAND (507-8030), WWW.CROSSTOWNARTS.ORG.

A French NATO force monitoring a remote Afghan-Pakistani border region is faced with a mysterious existential threat causing members of the unit to disappear without a trace. French with English subtitles. Free. Wed., May 10, 6 p.m.

Movie Mania: Moana

BENJAMIN L. HOOKS CENTRAL LIBRARY, 3030 POPLAR (415-2726).

Enjoy family-friendly movies in Central Park with pre-movie fun including music and giveaways. Free. Fri., May 5, 6:30-10 p.m. CARRIAGE CROSSING, HOUSTON LEVEE & BILL MORRIS PKWY. (854-8240), WWW.SHOPCARRIAGECROSSING.COM.

Saturday Night Fever 40th Anniversary

Wild Africa Ongoing.

CTI 3D GIANT THEATER, IN THE MEMPHIS PINK PALACE MUSEUM, 3050 CENTRAL (636-2362), WWW.MEMPHISMUSEUMS.ORG.

Wed., May 10, 2 & 7 p.m.

MALCO PARADISO CINEMA, 584 S. MENDENHALL (682-1754), WWW.MALCO.COM.

Agricenter Farmers Market

Saturday, 7 a.m.-5:30 p.m. and Monday-Friday, 7:30 a.m.-5:30 p.m. AGRICENTER INTERNATIONAL, 7777 WALNUT GROVE (452-2151), WWW.AGRICENTER.ORG.

Brunch with Live Music

Live musicians play while guests enjoy brunch. Saturdays, Sundays, 10 a.m.-1 p.m. Through July 16. STONE SOUP CAFE, 993 S. COOPER (922-5314).

Cinco de Mayo $100 Margarita

Features premium liquor served in Baccarat’s uniquely designed Diamant Highball. Guests will be invited to take home the glass in Baccarat’s iconic red box. $100. Thur.-Sat., May 4-6, 5-10 p.m. FLEMING’S PRIME STEAKHOUSE, 6245 POPLAR (761-6200), WWW.FLEMINGSSTEAKHOUSE.COM.

Food Truck Fridays

Fridays, 11:30 a.m.-1:30 p.m. Through Sept. 29. THE DIXON GALLERY & GARDENS, 4339 PARK (761-5250), WWW.DIXON.ORG.

Food Truck Rodeo

Sun., May 7, 11 a.m.-3 p.m. SHELBY FARMS, 500 N. PINE LAKE (767-PARK), WWW.SHELBYFARMS.ORG.

Music at St. Mary’s

Peabody Afternoon Tea

Traditional English afternoon tea, three-course menu of savory tea sandwiches, assorted sweets, and warm scones. $35-$45. Wednesdays-Saturdays, 1-3:30 p.m. CHEZ PHILIPPE, THE PEABODY, 149 UNION (529-4188), WWW.PEABODYHOTEL.COM.

Que on the Yazoo

Weekend activities include beer run, barbecue contest, motorcycle ride and show, and more. Fri.-Sat., May 5-6. DOWNTOWN GREENWOOD, GREENWOOD, MS, WWW.QUEONTHEYAZOO.SQUARESPACE.COM.

Bring It Food Hub: Spring 2017 Produce Subscription Signups

Sign up for service, Mar. 21-May 12. Through May 12. WWW.BRINGITFOODHUB.COM.

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The Big Picture: Rethinking Dyslexia

SUNDAY LIVE

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Debunks common myths associated with dyslexia and features interviews with a variety of individuals with this learning disability. Brief panel discussion will follow with Bodine School’s leadership team. Free. Tues., May 9, 7 p.m. MALCO RIDGEWAY FOUR, 5853 RIDGEWAY CENTER PARKWAY (681-2046), WWW.BODINESCHOOL.ORG.

Colombia Magia Salvage

Documentary film by director Mike Slee, showing the best of Colombian nature and its wonderful biodiversity, with incredible shots of amazing creatures and landscapes of Colombia. Sun., May 7, 2 p.m. MEMPHIS BOTANIC GARDEN, 750 CHERRY (636-4100), WWW.MEMPHISBOTANICGARDEN.COM.

800.467.6182 • southlandpark.com West Memphis, ARkansas Players must be 21 years of age or older to game and 18 years of age or older to bet at the racetrack. Play responsibly; for help quitting call 800-522-4700.

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ST. MARY’S CATHEDRAL, 700 POPLAR (527-3361), WWW.STMARYSMEMPHIS.ORG.

ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT

Hear Wednesday morning musicians at Eucharist in Sisters’ Chapel followed by a community breakfast. The program will feature a wide variety of musical styles with instruments and vocals. Wednesdays, 8 a.m.

45 4/10/17 4:39 PM


T H E AT E R B y C h r i s D a v i s

Thunderstorms Theatre Memphis neuters Cat on a Hot Tin Roof.

May 4-10, 2017

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everything 1636 UNION AVENUE 901.276.6321 artcentermemphis.com

ike the classic drama’s pivotal character, Brick Pollitt, a frustrated alcoholic who lost the one great, good, true thing in his life and now spends his days drinking till he feels peace, Theatre Memphis’ revival of Cat on a Hot Tin Roof is a handsome, aging wreck still waiting for “the click.” Tennessee Williams’ Pulitzer Prizewinning script is 62 years old, but there’s still plenty of life left in its gleefully profane old body. Time may have been kinder to The Glass Menagerie, but Cat has aged well enough. It’s still a potent meditation on family, legacy, mortality, and the terrible lies we tell ourselves to keep on living. The play’s most famous character, Maggie the Cat, Brick’s manipulative, Nashville-trash wife, is as fascinating as she ever was, and Natalie Jones gives the character plenty of genuine Ole Miss je ne sais quoi. The cast is beautiful. The design is nifty. But opening night at Theatre Memphis was plagued by slow cues and sputtered lines that made the show crawl like cold molasses. Williams’ nods to King Lear aren’t subtle. The author’s own ambitions are also fairly evident. He wants this play to come on like a devastating force of nature and leave audiences feeling like they’ve weathered a thunderstorm of Biblical proportions. To that end, director Anita “Jo” Lenhart’s production is too cool, too formal, and far too rigid. It’s too many perfect lines, cut on the bias, against the grain of a play that that coos and whispers, before it roils, then boils, and, per the play’s famous Dylan Thomas epigraph, rages against the dying of the light. Cat’s top-shelf cast of actors walk those rigidly proscribed lines like everybody knows where they’re supposed to go, but nobody’s entirely sure why they’re going there. Words and ideas get lost in business, and those that aren’t lost are projected, in an actorly manner occasionally resembling human speech. Williams built Cat like a piece of music, weaving distant conversations over croquet, phone calls from neighboring rooms, the sounds of children shrieking and tearing about the grounds, fireworks, and a wild storm, with aria-like monologues and explosive confrontations. The story of brothers competing for a birthright conjures Biblical images of Jacob and Esau and Christ’s parable of the prodigal son. The characters may be petty, but there are no small themes here. Cat wants to be epic at every turn. Speaking of epic, Bill Baker is a heroic

force for good in Memphis theater. His personal work is experimental and essential, but rare forays into more traditional drama are also reliably satisfying. For reasons difficult to identify, Baker’s struggling in the role of Big Daddy and only occasionally connects with the coarse “Mississippi Redneck” who made a fortune, and, unaware of his positive cancer diagnosis, is planning to spend his twilight years in an extravagant sexual escapade. Key lines of dialogue just weren’t there when he needed them. Few things are harder for an actor than playing a character who only wants to disappear. Presumed homosexual

Tennessee Williams’ Cat on a Hot Tin Roof

Brick Pollitt is one of the most sadistically sullen, inward-focusing characters ever imagined for the stage, and, like so many actors before him, the usually excellent Gabe Beutel-Gunn fights to stay in scenes and on task. Jones is more successful, as Maggie, who’s eaten up with longing but willing to do whatever it takes to avoid being old without money. As is the case with everybody else, Jones’ blocking feels choreographed, and her long, jazzy speeches could stand a lot more clarity and color. Kinon Keplinger and Shannon Walton are pure competence as the family’s chief breeders, Brother Man and Sister Woman. Their brief but memorable appearance, in supporting roles, are the night’s most fully realized performances. Lenhart has assembled such an incredibly strong, smart cast it’s impossible to imagine this Cat won’t land on its feet when the performances settle. The click, however, requires confidence. And nothing expresses doubt like a pre-show curtain speech assuring audiences that, in spite of whatever they may think, a main character is indeed using his crutch appropriately, “according to extensive research.” Y’all, please. Cat on a Hot Tin Roof at Theatre Memphis through May 14th


F O O D B y A r i L e Va u x

Go Green Cooking spinach by the handful.

Bhutanese spinach with chile and cheese 1-3 ounce dried red chile four handfuls of spinach ½ to 1 cup Mexican cheese blend (or ¼ ½ cup feta) salt (unless using feta) water or stock cooking oil

N O M I N AT E S O M E O N E WHO STEPPED UP

The Volunteer Memphis Awards recognize individuals, volunteerism and make Memphis a better place. To nominate, please visit volunteermemphis.org.

All nominations must be received by May 12, 2017. Recipients will be recognized at the Volunteer Memphis Awards on June 29, 2017 at the Memphis Botanic Gardens Sponsored By:

News Channel 3, ServiceMaster, Tactical Magic, Volunteer Tennessee, The Memphis Flyer, First Tennessee Foundation, Huey’s, BlueCross BlueShield of Tennessee, Buckman, Baptist Memorial Health Care, and Regions Bank VOLUNTEER MEMPHIS IS AN ACTION INITIATIVE OF

m e m p h i s f l y e r. c o m

First, get the chile soaking. Rip out the stem ends of the pods, tearing off the good bits of flesh and discarding the stems, inner seed heads, and as many seeds as you wish for the desired heat level. Tear up the leathery walls of the chile pods or leave them intact, depending on how avoidable you want the pepper pieces to be. Cover with water and soak. Meanwhile, mince a medium-sized onion, and sauté it in olive oil and maybe a little butter. Add the half-soaked chile, and allow to cook, covered, with the onions. After about five minutes on medium heat, add two or three handfuls of spinach — as many as you can fit in the pan — in whole leaf form. If things are on the dry side, add water or stock, a half-cup at a time, until the pan bubbles with deliciousness. Cover. After about five minutes, the spinach will have cooked down. Add more spinach if you can push it in, ideally another handful or two, and then add the cheese — ½ to 1 cup of Mexican blend, depending on how big your cheese tooth is. Some Bhutanese expats will occasionally use feta — if so, mind the salt. Cover again for about five minutes, then stir until all the cheese has melted into the sauce. Add more water or stock as necessary so it doesn’t dry out. If the cheese burns it will be a chewy, lumpy mess; but if the pan is properly hydrated, the cheese will dissolve into a luxurious gravy. Add salt to taste, and serve with jasmine or basmati rice — or better yet, Bhutanese red rice.

ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT

ARI LEVAUX

S

pinach, the meatiest of vegetables, is finally in season. The fleshy leaves of spring spinach are juicy with a potent green serum that’s high in iron and exceptionally rich in chlorophyll, which is a close chemical relative to hemoglobin, the red stuff in blood. This time of year, spinach is so abundant one can cook with it by the handful. Spring spinach comes in waves, the first of which was planted last summer as a fall crop and coaxed through the winter under a blanket of snow. In spring, the overwintered spinach rages to life, with leaves that are as sweet as they are lusty. These leaves grew from roots that were well-established last fall, as opposed to the second wave of spinach, planted months ago in greenhouses. It’s about the same size as the overwintered spinach, but lacks the experience and terroir of the elder plants, which have had more time to accumulate nutrients. Young spinach, including the socalled baby spinach that’s all the rage, is very convenient. It barely needs washing or any form of prep and is as tender as veal. It may not have the sweetness of an overwintered spinach, but neither does it have the bitterness. The final wave of springtime spinach hits right before solstice, when the field spinach gets big and leafy. It won’t be as sweet as overwintered spinach, but it will be just as meaty. Assuming you have the good stuff, then, what to do? If you can get the good stuff, the overwintered green crème, then I’d recommend a very simple pesto with nothing more than spinach, olive oil, and salt. This is a spectacular way to enjoy the subtle complexity of an overwintered spinach. Like a vegetal blood transfusion in your mouth. The leaves of springtime spinach clean easily. A blemish on a leaf can be tolerated in pesto, the sausage of plant foods. If your spinach is good but not quite top level, a more typical pesto with nuts, cheese, garlic, and zest will be a very satisfying way to enjoy the season. I’ve also had great results by simply combining fresh spinach pesto au natural with yearold basil pesto from the freezer. The next recipe comes by way of Bhutan, a little Buddhist country in the Himalayas, where chile is king and cheese is queen and all other foods are cooked in a combination thereof.

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F O O D N E W S B y L e s l e y Yo u n g

Eat, Drink A look at Dave’s Bagels and Benefizz.

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May 4-10, 2017

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Steve Cantor has always been a software guy, since age 19, as a matter of fact. Fast forward a few decades, and who knew he would be talking about bacterial mothers, probiotics, and second brains? “I’ve been perfectly happy doing software,” Cantor says. “I never considered doing anything else until now.” Cantor is the brewer/scientist behind the probiotic water kefir drink Benefizz, formerly Memfizz, which can now be found in more than 30 locations in both Memphis and Nashville. It started with Memphis’ favorite pastime — porch-sittin’, with a friend from Arkansas who was bemoaning the fact that she didn’t have the time her water kefir drinks deserved as far as meeting the requests from her Arkansas clients. “Two days later, I woke up and thought wait a minute, I can do something with this, so I emailed [my friend],” Cantor says. At first he sold bottles at his wife, Karen Lebovitz’ coffee shop, Otherlands, under the name Memfizz. The popularity of the naturally carbonated, healthy beverage garnered him a business partner in the form of Southern Growth Studio.

JUSTIN FOX BURKS

D

ave Scott of Dave’s Bagels knows a good bagel when he tastes one. The breakfast food to this Pennsylvaniaby-way-of-New Jersey native is like grits are to many a Southerner. “They are a staple breakfast food, and they’ve always been my favorite,” Scott says. A backpacking trip across the country that landed him in Portland, Oregon, left Scott feeling a little malnourished in the boiled bread department, so he decided to just make his own. “Portland has a lot going on, but their bread game leaves something to be desired,” Scott says. Luckily for him, his best friend was a Jewish girl from Brooklyn. “She was my best critic,” Scott says. “It took me a year or two of messing with recipes until she said I should sell them.” Bagel-making remained a hobby to the property manager and event coordinator, until he followed a girl to Memphis and needed something to do. He got a similar response from his Memphis friends that he did in Portland — he should sell his handmade bagels. He first took his breakfast breads to Curb Market on Cooper, where he would sell out of four to six dozen bagels every Sunday. He worked up to quadrupling his products and would sell out in under two hours. The bagel guru has since moved to a bigger commercial kitchen in the Edge and hired a part-time employee, and he has gone from producing 500 bagels a week to 800. He should receive a bagel former machine any day now, which will kick up production to 500 a day. Then devotees can look to find him in more grocery stores across the city. Right now his bagels are served at Otherlands, Strano!, the Bayou, Coffee Central in Southaven, and Broken Cup Cafe in Senatobia as well as at the Memphis Farmers Market on Saturdays. Flavors include plain, poppy, sesame, garlic and onion, everything, Italian herb, Cajun, chocolate, cinnamon apple, and cinnamon raisin. “I use all natural ingredients and no preservatives,” he says. What makes his bagels so yummy? “I use the boil-then-bake method. I don’t do steam. I like delicious, chewy bagels. I don’t like the cakey stuff,” he says. For more information, find him on Facebook at Dave’s Bagels.

Dave Scott of Dave’s Bagels

Benefizz comes in three flavors — ginger, cranberry, and lemon. He hopes to offer grapefruit soon, but not until he can meet those demands with time and labor. Changing the name to Benefizz not only creates a more globally marketable product, but it also celebrates the ultimate purpose of drinking something that’s made from bacteria that likes to eat sugar. “I don’t make any health-care claims, but through all of my questioning and searching, I’ve come to accept that we are just hosts for bacteria,” he says. “There’s good and bad, and if you put more good bacteria in [i.e. probiotics], you can fight off the bad. There’s only so much space and energy for bacteria to live in.” “They say the second brain is the gut,” Cantor says. “I like to think that we offer something that tastes good that’s good for lots of different things.” For a list of where Benefizz is offered, visit drinkbenefizz.com.


S P I R ITS By Richard Murff

To Your Health The magic pairing of red wine and red meat.

Commenting on the report, although not involved, Dr. James O’Keefe, Chief of Preventive Cardiology at St. Luke’s Mid-American Heart Institute said, “This is what I’ve been telling people for years based on observational data.” He then went on to say, “If you have a glass of red wine with your evening meal tonight, your peak blood sugar, if you measured it an hour later, would be about 30 percent lower than if you hadn’t had the wine.” It’s this post-meal blood sugar spike that causes the inflammation that contributes to diabetes, dementia, heart disease, arthritis, and a near-fatal jump in health statistics. Keep in mind, all the health returns on booze start to diminish rapidly. Overdoing it is likely going to have you staring at the ceiling at 2 a.m. in a sugar rush. But you knew that. Again, science has proven our instincts sound: that red wine and red meat pair well. Like most things that instinctively go together, there is a good reason for it: It’s the body making its needs known to those sensible enough to listen to it. The coexistence between science and religion has been, at times, problematic. Even in the ancient world, virgins were something of a perishable commodity. Science and instinct, generally, get along famously.

m e m p h i s f l y e r. c o m

to arteriosclerosis, cancer, diabetes, and giving the Beef Council nightmares. Don’t worry, enjoy your meal, you’ll be fine. Red wine, and all those polyphenols, arriving in the stomach at the same time the MDL is released seems to neutralize the toxins before they can get into the bloodstream or guilty conscience. According to the study, the MDL level in the stomach was 50 percent highter than the control baseline after red meat and red wine. In full disclosure, the tests were performed on rats — not known to be picky drinkers — so your mileage may vary.

ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT

THOMAS PERKINS | DREAMSTIME.COM

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umans are survivors. Science repeatedly tells us that this has more to do with instinct than smarts. When pre-science humans really put their brains to something, we were often wide the mark: Disemboweling virgins so the sun won’t eat the Earth leaps immediately to mind. Instinct is another matter. If not perfect, it tends to serve us at least pretty well. Alcohol has long been considered medicinal, even if we didn’t know why. And practically, in a world before plastic wrap and disinfectants, it was. What instinct told us, science has subsequently proven: that a little booze is good for us. Studies show that moderate consumption of alcohol raises the level of highdensity lipoprotein (HDL) in the body. HDL is known as “the good cholesterol” by those who know these things. To the rest of us, HDL promotes solid cardiovascular health and aids in the fight against dementia. Not only does it help you avoid a heart attack, you are lucid enough to contemplate your good fortune. A few years ago, Dr. Joseph Kanner, of the Hebrew University of Jerusalem, went a step further to ask why we instinctively pair red wine with red meat in a wonderfully titled paper: “The Stomach as ‘Bioreactor’: When Red Meat Meets Red Wine.” In his report, published in the Journal of Agriculture and Food Chemistry, Dr. Kanner says that not only is red wine good for you, it can prevent other things from being bad for you. Red wine, in addition to its HDL-boosting properties, is rich in polyphenols: powerful antioxidants thought to protect the body from cancer and heart disease. Here’s the thing, most of the benefits of red wine come not from drinking it alone, but pairing it with food. Say that you’re having a nice steak, that seductive boogieman, and you pair it with a dry red wine. When you start to digest the meat, it releases an oxidizing toxin ominously called malondialdehyde (MDL), which is tied

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FILM REVIEW By Chris McCoy

Monsters Large and Small Anne Hathaway terrorizes Seoul in the brilliant Colossal.

W

hen I am called upon to give lectures on screenwriting, one of the things I like to talk about is the Giant Robot Problem. It goes something like this: From Voltron to Optimus Prime to the Big O, everybody loves giant robots — especially the Japanese. What could be cooler than strapping into a 30-story, humanoid mecha and crushing your enemies beneath your giant metal boots? But if giant robots are so cool, why haven’t we built one yet? After all, we can put a man on the moon and take selfies with our lunch — why not Voltron? The answer is, as cool as they look, giant robots aren’t really good for much. Anything a giant robot can do, you can use a specialized tool to do better. Need an invulnerable war machine? We have those. They’re called tanks. Want to dig a giant hole in the ground? You can either spend billions building a giant robot and give it a giant shovel, or you can just rent a commercial earth mover. Basically, the only things giant robots are good for are fighting giant monsters or other giant robots, and since neither one of those actually exists, we don’t build giant robots. This is why long-running anime series starring giant robots always evolve into soap

operas about the people who drive the giant robots, proving that character development is always the most important element. Director Nacho Vigalondo’s new film Colossal adds new dimensions to the eternal dance between giant monster and giant robot, while reinforcing the principle that character development is everything. Like any great kaiju movie, it begins in an Asian megalopolis — in this case, Seoul — with an innocent child witnessing the arrival of a giant monster. The dark, scaly, hundred-meter-tall creature materializes in a cloud of lightning and mystery, only to vanish again just as quickly. Fast forward to 25 years later, and we meet Gloria (Anne Hathaway), a magazine writer in New York living with her boyfriend Tim (Dan Stevens). At least, Gloria used to be a magazine writer. She got laid off a year ago, and now she mostly just parties hard with her semi-glamorous publishing friends while mooching off of the dregs of Tim’s largesse. But Tim’s done watching her drink herself into an early grave, and he gives her the boot from his swank Manhattan apartment. Thus, Gloria is faced with the ultimate nightmare

Anne Hathaway and Jason Sudeikis wrestle with life’s issues in Nacho Vigalondo’s new film Colossal.

of every young go-getter who goes to the Big Apple to get her fame and fortune: She has to move back home to the small town where she came from. Living alone in the vacant house where she grew up, she vows to quit drinking and get her life back on track. But her plan, and her sobriety, is instantly undermined in a chance meeting with Oscar (Jason Sudeikis), an old friend from elementary school who, wouldn’t you know it, runs the neighborhood watering hole. Soon, she’s working night shifts in the bar and staying after close to pound beers with Oscar, local loudmouth Garth (Tim Blake Nelson), and the quiet-but-hunky handyman Joel (Austin Stowell). Around the same time, the mysterious monster reappears in Seoul. But this time, it’s back for all to see, trashing neighborhoods and killing hundreds of hapless Koreans as it rampages through the city.

JUNE 23

Little Big town JULY 1

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st. paul & the broken bones and

May 4-10, 2017

Drew Holcomb & The Neighbors AUGUST 26

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steve miller band

season passes ON SALE NOW! To purchase TruGreen® lawn tickets, visit ticketmaster.com. For more information, call 901-636-4107.

liveatthegarden.COM 50


FILM REVIEW By Chris McCoy Only it’s not really rampaging so much as wandering aimlessly, seemingly distracted by invisible specters only it can see. The world pays rapt attention to the improbable drama, but Gloria notices something strange about the monster’s behavior. It seems to have the same tics she does, such as nervously scratching at the top of its head, and its uncoordinated ramblings look a lot like her movements when she’s stumbling home drunk every morning. Could she somehow be unwittingly controlling the monster? Meanwhile, her relationship with her childhood friend Oscar is taking an unhealthy, controlling turn — just as the giant monster of Seoul is joined by an equally mysterious giant robot. Colossal’s gimmick is gigantic,

Chonda Pierce: Enough Tues. 5/9-7:00pm @ Paradiso

TCM: Saturday Night Fever 40th Anniversary Wed. 5/10- 2:00pm & 7:00pm @ Paradiso

Smurfs: The Lost Village PG The Case for Christ PG The Boss Baby PG Beauty and the Beast (2017) PG Get Out R

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Phoenix Forgotten PG13 Gifted PG13

ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT

Logan R The Circle PG13 The Fate of the Furious PG13 Unforgettable R

Guardians of the Galaxy Vol. 2 PG13 The Circle PG13 How to Be a Latin Love (subtitled) PG13 Sleight R Unforgettable R Born in China G The Fate of the Furious PG13

SPECIAL EVENTS:

Colossal Now playing Studio on the Square

Grey Lady R The Dinner R Their Finest R Gifted PG13

Guardians of the Galaxy Vol. 2 PG13 The Circle PG13 The Lost City of Z PG13

Guardians of the Galaxy Vol. 2 PG13 (Giant Screen 1:00 4:00 7:00 10:00) The Zookeeper’s Wife PG13

but the meat of this fascinating little picture is the interactions of a pair of ordinary, down-on-their-luck people just trying to create lives that make sense. Like Being John Malkovich, Colossal uses a fantastical premise to explore real human emotions and psychology. Hathaway and Sudeikis are both brilliant in this psychologically complex examination of how one person’s inner conflicts can ripple outward and affect people who have little to do with the original issues, even if, in this case, those people are being crushed underfoot half a world away.

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EMPLOYMENT • REAL ESTATE

901-575-9400 classifieds@memphisflyer.com BUSINESS OPPORTUNITIES PAID IN ADVANCE! Make $1000 A Week Mailing Brochures From Home! No Experience Required. Helping home workers since 2001! Genuine Opportunity. Start Immediately! www.IncomeStationl.Net (AAN CAN)

GENERAL ANIMAL LOVERS Bring Your Dog to Work. Carriage Drivers needed downtown. Valid license required. UptownCarriages.com 901-496-2128

HELP WANTED COPELAND SERVICES, L.L.C. Hiring Armed State Licensed Officers/ Unarmed Officers. Three Shifts Available. Same Day Interview. 1661 International Place 901-258-5872 or 901-818-3187 Interview in Professional Attire

SAM’S TOWN HOTEL & Gambling Hall in Tunica, MS is looking for the next Direct Marketing Pro, is it you? We need someone who has excellent organizational skills, knows Direct Mail and Database Marketing, previous Casino Marketing experience preferred. Must have strong written and oral communication skills and the ability to meet deadlines in the fast paced casino environment, proficient in Microsoft Office, CMS and LMS. Must be able to obtain and maintain a MS Gaming Commission Work Permit, pass a prescreening including but not limited to background and drug screen. To apply, log on to boydcareers.com and follow the prompts to Tunica. Boyd Gaming Corp is a drug free workplace and equal opportunity employer. Must be at least 21 to apply. SENIOR MANUFACTURING TECHNICAL SPECIALIST needed at Buckman Laboratories in Memphis, TN. Must have 3 yrs of direct

chemical manufacturing process exp., including: Polymer manufacturing w/ emphasis on epichlorohydrinamine & epichlorohydrin based tissue chemistries; Optimization for batch processing (particularly dithiocarbamate, amine, and esterification chemistries); Project development & mgmt.; R & D coordination & Emphasis in plant safety & environmental requirements. Must be available for long-term assignment atBuckman facilities or customer sites in the U.S. Please send resumes to hrjobs@buckman.com. Buckman Labs is an EOE ñ M/F/D/V. USIC LOCATE TECHNICIAN Daytime, full-time Locate Technician positions available! •100% PAID TRAINING •Company vehicle & equipment provided •PLUS medical, dental, vision & life insurance Requirements: Must be able to work outdoors, HS Diploma or GED, Ability to work OT and weekends, Must have valid driver’s license with safe driving record. Apply today: www.usicllc.com EEO/AA

HOSPITALITY/ RESTAURANT

SALES/MARKETING

BELMONT GRILL Now Hiring Cooks. Must be able to work days. Apply in person Mon-Fri, 2-4pm. 4970 Poplar @ Mendenhall. No phone calls please. PASTA MAKER RESTAURANT Is Hiring Servers, Host/Hostess, Dishwashers, Pantry & Prep Cooks. Apply at 2095 Exeter Rd, Suite 30, Germantown, TN. 901.779.3928

RAFFERTY’S We are looking for service minded individuals, that don’t mind working hard. We work hard, but make $. Apply in the store. 505 N Gtown Pkwy

SALES OPPORTUNITY •Base pay $800 per month •Plus generous 20% commission. •New business just starting up Contact abscottmcc@gmail.com or call 901-406-5258 to schedule an interview.

THE MIDTOWNER on mclean

Recently renovated & remodeled! All units are 2 bedrooms/1 bath Rates starting at $995

Mid-Town Apartments For Rent

129 Stonewall Street # 3

1 & 2 BRs UNITS AVAILABLE $595-$750 Per Month

Contact Chelsea Conlee 901.461.2090 Management That Cares 901.756.4469

25 N Idlewild Street #10

Call or Text Chris 901-282-5445 Enterprise Realtors Inc. 901-867-1000

One Nation. One Mission. Many Opportunities.

NOW HIRING

May 4-10, 2017

Transportation Security Officers at Memphis International Airport (MEM) No Experience Required Part-time pay rate starting at $15.37 per hour (Includes 15.06% locality pay)

PLUS Federal benefits • Paid, ongoing training TSA offers an attractive benefits package including: health, dental, vision, life and long-term care insurance; retirement plan; Thrift Savings Plan [similar to 401(k)]; Flexible Spending Account; Employee Assistance Program; personal leave days; and paid federal holidays.

Please apply through May 23 rd, 2017 online at: https://tsajobs.tsa.dhs.gov or text “TSO” to 95495 or call 1.877.872.7990 Follow us on Twitter @CareersatTSA

52

JOIN FEDEX

• Now hiring permanent part-time Handlers, day and night, at $12.62 per hour for the Memphis, TN location • Medical coverage starting as low as $5 per month • Tuition assistance • Nationwide training and opportunities

Applicant Eligibility • Must be at least 18 years old • Must be able to lift 75 pounds • No minimum education requirements • Background check and drug screen required

Apply in Person FedEx Express Memphis World Hub Recruitment Center 2874 Business Park Dr., Building D Memphis, TN 38118

Business Hours 8:30 AM to 3:00 PM - Monday through Friday 6:30 PM to 8:00 PM - Monday and Tuesday evenings 8:30 AM to Noon - Saturday mornings To learn more, go to careers.fedex.com/express

U.S. Citizenship Required Equal Opportunity Employer Standard Messaging and Data Rates Apply

EOE, M/F/D/V


REAL ESTATE • SERVICES LOCAL DRIVERS WANTED! Be your own boss. Flexible hours. Unlimited earning potential. Must be

21 with valid U.S. driver’s license, insurance & reliable vehicle. 866-329-2672 (AAN CAN)

TAXES *2017 Tax Change Benefits*

Personal/Business + Legal Work By a CPA-Attorney Practicing in Midtown & Memphis Since 1989

(901) 272-9471

DOWNTOWN APTS

Memphis. 2BR Apts & Townhomes $707; 3BR Apts & Townhomes $813. Community Room, Computer Room, Fitness Room. A smoke free community. 440 South Lauderdale Memphis, TN 38126 | 901-254-7670.

MINUTES FROM DOWNTOWN Come visit the brand new Cleaborn Pointe at Heritage Landing. Located just minutes from historic Downtown

Overton Place Communities Overton Place Communities Studios,1 1& & 2 bedroom Studios, 2 BR apartments, apartments, duplexes, and duplexes, and houses are homes are Now Available NOW AVAILABLE for occupancy! for occupancy! 1214 Overton 1214 Overton ParkPark 901/276-3603 (901)276-3603 Office hours – Monday – Friday 9 A.M. – 6 P.M. Office Hours: Saturday – 10 A.M. – 5 P.M. Monday-Friday Saturday: 9 a.m. - 6 p.m. 10 a.m. - 5 p.m.

Cost - $120.00/week

1726 Madison Ave

...I’m a handsome 1 year old male. I love other dogs and people. I have a few dog friends at the shelter that I play with. But I need a real home. I have been waiting patiently for almost a whole month for someone to rescue me. Please come meet me!”

Bruce Newman newmandecoster.com

Midtown Friendly!

Call Ranise at 815-228-0511 or email her at ranise.aliverescue@gmail.com to find out about adopting me. Ranise Coppens ALIVE Rescue Memphis President aliverescuememphis.org facebook.com/aliverescuememphis

NOEL!

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3707 Macon Rd. • 272-9028 lecorealty.com Visit us online, call, or office for free list.

Kimbrough Towers A Northland Community

Unique Community Features Include

Visit us @ www.lecorealty.com come in, or call

• Historic Central Gardens District • Controlled access building • Garage parking available • Parquet wood flooring • 9 foot ceilings • 24 hour Fitness & Laundry Centers • Private park with picnic & grilling • Central heat and air

Leco Realty, Inc. @ 3707 Macon Rd. 272-9028

A P A R T M E N T S

WHITESTATION Close to Park. 3BR/2BA, CH/A, fenced back yard. $850/mo. 407-718-6391

MIDTOWN APT CENTRAL GARDENS 2BR/1BA, hdwd floors, ceiling fans, french doors, all appls incl. W/D, 9ft ceil, crown molding, off str pking. $720/mo. Also 1BR, $650/mo. 833-6483. EVERGREEN HISTORIC DISTRICT XLG 1BR $650, W/D, hdwd flrs, Pets ok, porch. Approx 1000 sq ft. $25 credit ck fee. 901.452.3945 MIDTOWN APARTMENTS 1 and 2 BR units available. $595-$750 Per Month 129 Stonewall #3 & 25 N Idlewild #10 CALL or TEXT Chris 901-282-5445 ENTERPRISE REALTORS INC. 901-867-1000 THE MIDTOWNER Recently renovated & remodeled! All units are 2 bedrooms/1 bath. Rates starting at $995 per month. Contact Chelsea Conlee 901.461.2090 Management That Cares 901.756.4469.

SHARED HOUSING ALL AREAS Free Roommate Service @ RentMates. com. Find the perfect roommate to complement your personality and lifestyle at RentMates.com! (AAN CAN) FURNISHED ROOMS Bellevue/McLemore, Airways/Park, North Memphis, W/D, Cable TV/ Phone. 901-485-0897

Houses & Duplexes for Rent ALL AREAS

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EAST MEMPHIS HOMES FOR RENT

Reserve your new home today at the historic Kimbrough Towers

888-446-4954

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MIDTOWN ROOMS FOR RENT Central Heat/Air, utls included, furnished. 901.650.4400 NICE ROOMS FOR RENT S. Pkwy & Wilson. Utilities and Cable included. Fridge in your room. Cooking and free laundry privileges. Some locations w/sec. sys. Starting at $435/ mo. + dep. 901.922.9089 ROOMS FOR RENT Starting at $125/week. Fully furnished w/ cable & TV. Utilities included. Call 502-9214

U OF M AREA APT

ANNOUNCEMENTS PREGNANT? CONSIDERING ADOPTION? Call us first. Living expenses, housing, medical, and continued support afterwards. Choose adoptive family of your choice. Call 24/7. 877-362-2401 (AAN CAN)

MASSAGE TOM PITMAN, LMT Massage The Way You Like It. Swedish/Deep Tissue - Relaxation, Hot Stones. Credit Cards. Call 761-7977. tompitmanmassage.com, tom@tompitmanmassage.com WILLIAM BREWER Massage Therapist (Health & Wellness offer) 377-6864

MIND, BODY, SPIRIT IF YOU HAD HIP OR KNEE REPLACEMENT SURGERY AND SUFFERED AN INFECTION between 2010 and the present time, you may be entitled to compensation. Call Attorney Charles H. Johnson 1-800-535-5727

NUTRITION/HEALTH 48 PILLS + 4 FREE! VIAGRA 100MG/ CIALIS 20mg Free Pills! No hassle, Discreet Shipping. Save Now. Call Today 1-877-621-7013 (AAN CAN) MAKE THE CALL TO START GETTING CLEAN TODAY. Free 24/7 Helpline for alcohol & drug addiction treatment. Get help! It is time to take your life back! Call Now: 855-732-4139 (AAN CAN) STRUGGLING WITH Drugs or Alcohol? Addicted to Pills? Talk to someone who cares. Call the Addiction Hope & Help Line for a free assessment. 800-978-6674 (AAN CAN)

M.E SEEKING SINGERS WANTED For recording R&B and Pop demos. Send tape or demos to Quince Records, P.O. Box 751082, Memphis, TN 38141.

DATING SERVIES LIVELINKS - CHAT LINES Flirt, chat and date! Talk to sexy real singles in your area. Call now! (877) 609-2935 (AAN CAN)

570 S. PRESCOTT #3 Spacious upstairs 1 BR, study, vaulted ceiling, skylight, plantation blinds, gas stove, refrig., pantry, washer & dryer, deck, fenced yard. $695. Jane W. Carroll, Wadlington, Realtors, 674-1702, 458-0988

VW • AUDI MINI•PORSCHE

1st Annual Community Wide Yard Sale located in the Court Yard at Georgian Woods Apartments on April 29th 8am-12pm with a wide variety of items including furniture, clothing, kitchenware, etc.

2451 Union Avenue #2, Memphis, TN 38112 (901) 458-7052 • M-F, 9-5 by appt only LiveAtGeorgianWoods.com

German Car Experts

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Call today for an appointment!

570 S. Prescott #3 Charming Upstairs 1BR w/ deck, vaulted ceilings, sky light, spacious LR, big Kit. W/D, gas stove, fridge, plantation blinds. Porch w/swing. $725/mo

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(901) 674-1702

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TH E LAST WO R D by Susan Wilson

Body Parts Last weekend my honey and I went to a bar in town we love for people watching. As soon as we sat down, he pointed out a woman with a shirt proclaiming, “I DO MY OWN STUNTS!” “I’m getting that for you,” he said. I might or might not have been regaling him with the tale of how I fell UP some stairs when going to lunch with some coworkers. Or it could have been how I took my wedge sandals off to walk out to the mailbox, replaced them with Sensible Shoes, and still managed to turn my ankle by stepping into a sewer grate. Wait, no. We were most definitely talking about how I tried to turn my pillow over to the cool side the night before and punched myself in the face. Which is NOT the same story as the time I was having a dream I was cornered by a beaver and decided what the hell, I’ll just punch him, and punched the headboard in my sleep. I am not a delicate flower. I’m tall and always on the chubby side. But the recent additions of a desk job, a severe vitamin D deficiency, and treatments for a yet-to-be-diagnosed brand of arthritis have created a delightful pile of manure in which full-on obesity has blossomed. Being in my mid-40s has something to do with it. As do tacos. I have been taking one particular medicine that makes it seem sensible to eat an entire box of oatmeal cream pies because it’s either that or, you know, punch walls. But the thing is that I don’t move the way I used to because my center of gravity has shifted. To Cleveland, apparently. It’s rather like how, when you’re pregnant, you have to have someone you trust to tell you whether you’re wearing matching shoes because you just have to slip into whatever you feel on the floor. If you bend over to look yourself, you’ll end up rolling head-first into the back wall of your closet. Now that we totally bypass spring in favor of summer, this issue presents some wardrobe challenges. Slim ankle pants are a good look on most people except those with no bones where their ankles should be. My never-slight ankles have now been replaced by fat deposits the same consistency as perfect brioche dough. Ankle pants now make me look like a human Go-Gurt tube busted on both ends. I check out plus-size catalogs which have become almost fashionable in the last couple of years. I say “almost” because what, at first glance, seems to be a perfectly innocuous peasant shirt ends up being a style called a “cocoon blouse,” which involves elastic at neck, elbows, and hem. Also things called “elegant embellishments” — lace, trim, and ruffles, the likes of which I have only seen on the christening gowns of Victorian-era babies. Printed denim jeans with matching jackets is apparently a thing again. Which is great. Because I genuinely enjoy going calf roping on the weekends just like millions of other women do. I guess. I mean, that is the only legitimate reason I can think of to wear a Canadian tuxedo. Office looks are scarce. Unless you work at an office where an off-the-shoulder ruffled tunic worn with a pencil skirt is the height of professionalism. I know those jobs exist, but I don’t know anyone with one. Except for my friend Pernilla, who is awesome and wears skull-print leggings to work. No, an off-theshoulder blouse requires the kind of undergarment sacrifices I am not willing to make. And the pencil skirt is a no-go now that we’re out of black tights season. There are only two solutions to this issue. One is win the lottery and hire someone to custom-make my clothes. I’m working on that one two bucks at a time. The other is, you know, don’t be fat. That right there is tough, too because it’s not necessarily based on luck, but on the idea that one exercises and does not keep Pringles in one’s desk for a snack during conference calls. I have a great ballet workout video with this beautiful ballerina from North Carolina. She’s got the most soothing manner, and if I ever meet her, I’m going to rip her adorable ponytail off her head and beat her with it. She has no mercy. She’s like a really cute dominatrix. It’s just that I have to take a break from Mistress Toe Shoes because the last time I did the workout I fell over during an unsuccessful arabesque and knocked myself out when I hit the corner of the coffee table. I didn’t know one literally saw stars when one got knocked out. The things you learn from good, clean living. Susan Wilson also writes for yeahandanotherthing.com and likethedew.com. She and her husband, Chuck, have lived here long enough to know that Midtown does not start at Highland.

m e m p h i s f l y e r. c o m

Have you seen my center of gravity?

THE LAST WORD

PONTUS EDENBERG | DREAMSTIME.COM

The things you learn from good, clean living.

55


MINGLEWOOD HALL

ON SALE FRIDAY: Maren Morris [10/13] Jimmy Herring [7/19] Hip Abduction [6/2] V3Fights [6/17]

Est. 1942

Just Announced: Mon July 24 - Dj Shadow Upcoming Shows Thu May 4 - Amon Amarth Fri May 5 - Zoogma - Late Nite - Doors 10pm Sat May 6 - Daisyland w/ Feed Me Sun May 7 - The Schwag - Late Night - Doors 10pm Fri May 19 - In Flames w/ Kataklysm and White Knuckle Riot Sat May 20 - Daisyland w/ Paul Oakenfold Fri May 26 - Wake the Nation Tour Sun May 21 - Twiztid Tue June 6 - Skillet Thu June 8 - Robert Randolph and the Family Band Sun June 18 - Blackbear Tue June 20 - Russ Sat July 15 - Daisyland w/ Eptic Thu July 20 - George Porter Jr. Sun Aug 6 - HELLYEAH Thu Aug 24 - Flow Tribe NEW DAISY THEATRE | 330 Beale St Memphis 901.525.8981 • Advance Tickets available at NewDaisy.com and Box Office

VOTED MEMPHIS’ #1 ALTERNATIVE SMOKE SHOP 3 YEARS IN A ROW!

Perfect for this weekend’s BEALE ST. MUSIC FEST! Specials on pocket vaporizers for tobacco leaf or concentrate and everything you need for tbe weekend!

MURPHY’S Pool Table • Darts • WI-FI • Digital Jukebox Visit our website for live music listings or check the AfterDark section of this Memphis Flyer KITCHEN OPEN LATE, OPEN FOR LUNCH! 1589 Madison • 726-4193 www.murphysmemphis.com

YOUNGAVENUEDELI.COM 2119 Young Ave • 278-0034

5/3: $3 Pint Night! 5/4: Memphis Trivia League! 5/11: Cooper Young Pup Crawl for Humane Society 5/13: UFC 211 Miocic vs. Dos Santos 2 5/27: Change the Atlantic 6/10: MovieNight Album Release Show 6/17: The Latest 6/24: Native Blood Kitchen Open Late! Now Delivering All Day! 278-0034 (limited delivery area)

GONER RECORDS Jazz Sale Sat/Sun 25% Off! We Buy Records! 2152 Young Ave 901-722-0095

THREE MEMPHIS SHOPS HIGHLAND STRIP 555 S HIGHLAND 901 452 4731

whatevershops.com

CORDOVA

981 N GERMANTOWN PKWY 901 654 3678

MIDTOWN

2027 MADISON AVE 901 590 0048

Join our texting club and get 10% off your next purchase! Text WHATEVER to 51660 . Message & data rates may apply*

SOUTH OF BEALE 361 S Main St 38103 901.526.0388 southofbeale.com

GROWLERS 1911 Poplar Avenue 38104 901.244.7904 901growlers.com

www.cocoandlolas.com Finest lace - Coolest place 710 S. Cox|901-425-5912|Mon-Sat 11:30-7:00

BOOK REPAIR Have an old book or bible that needs repair? Call Art, Friends of the Library at 901.483.0478.

I BUY RECORDS! Call 901.359.3102

Painting, Wallpapering, Wallpaper Removal & Drywall Repair. Call 318-499-1779

TUT-UNCOMMON ANTIQUES 421 N. Watkins St. 278-8965 1500 sq. ft. of Vintage & Antique Jewelry. Retro Furniture and Accessories. Original Paintings, Sculpture, Pottery, Art & Antiques. We are the only store in the Mid-South that replaces stones in costume jewelry.

The Coach House @ Loflin Yard

May 5 - Chinese Connection Dub Embassy May 6 - John Paul Keith May 12 - The City Champs May 13 - The Lovelight Orchestra May 19 - John Nemeth Album Release Show Advance tickets at www.brownpapertickets.com loflinyard.com • 7 W. Carolina Ave • 249-3046

5/6 EPOCH OF UNLIGHT/ HELLTHRASHER/ CRANK BAIT

New Taproom hours:

Memphis in May = Lingerie !!

I Buy Old Windup Phonographs & Records

5/5 KRISH MOHAN 6PM TOY TRUCKS & GLORIOUS ABHOR 9PM JOE MARCINEK & FRIENDS 5/7 TEA DANCE HOSTED BY GOLDIE DEE

Coco & Lola’s MidTown Lingerie

MORE EVENTS AT MINGLEWOODHALL.COM

5/4 - OVERLAKE/ JACK ALBERSON/ TAPE DECK

Kung Fu DVD’s $10.00 www.dach.us • 4491 Summer•901.685.3224 Tues – Sat 11:00 – 6:00

Steam Clean 3 Rooms For $99. “It’s Thorough, Dries Quickly & Stays Clean Longer - Or It’s Free.” Call 901.282.5306

5/13: School of Rock 5/20: Sarah Simmons w/ Star & Micey 5/27: 10 Years ìAutumn Effect Anniversay Tourî 5/31: Kevin Ross 7/12: John Moreland 8/10: Drivin N Cryin w/ Birdcloud

PROFESSIONAL INTERIORS

SINCE 1971

We carry the very best in pipes, incense, tshirts, water pipes, tapestries, vaporizeres, hand-blown glass, rolling papers, clothing, hookahs, Memphis As F*CK, locally-made products and so much more!

Largest Martial Arts Supplier Since 1979

FABULOUS CARPET CARE

1884 LOUNGE

Esp. on labels: Gennett, Paramount, Vocalion, QRS, Superior, Supertone, Champion, OKeh, Perfect, Romeo, Sun, Meteor, Flip; many others. Also large quantities of older 45’s. Paul. 901-435-6668

DACH ORIENTAL IMPORTS

Mon 4 - 7 p.m. Thurs & Fri 4 - 10 p.m. Sat 1 - 10 p.m. Sun 1 - 7 p.m. 768 S. Cooper 901.207.5343 MENTION AD & GET FREE HI-5 FROM VANESSA

5/5: PC Band R. Kelley Tribute 5/18: Mastodon w/ Eagles of Death Metal 5/21: SCM Awards 5/28: Trey Songz 6/3: THE SHINS 6/21: In This Moment 6/23: Eddie B Comedy [SOLD OUT] 7/1: Too Short w/ Playa Fly & Gangsta Blac 7/8: Steve Earle & The Dukes w/ The Mastersons 7/22: BBBS Sports Ball 8/1: Foster the People 10/7: Judah & The Lion

5/8 THE LOVE DIMENSION/ VANESSA SILBERMAN/ KYLE PRUZINA 5/10 BEARLY FUNNY COMEDY SHOW 5/12 WISEACRE SEASONAL LAUNCH 8PM 5/13 WHORES / WRONG & BUMMER

Memphis’ First Gastropub. Since 2009. Strong Chef-Driven Food Craft Beer & Cocktails.

5/16 HOLY GOLDEN/ CROCKETT HALL 5/18 LEFT UNSUNG MEMPHIS GRATEFUL DEAD TRIBUTE

CAPTAIN DAN’S STEAMIN’ HOT LOUISIANA CRAWFISH FOR SALE

FRI SAT & SUN 1-7 • $4.50 per lb. Corner of Madison & Morrison “COME GET YOU SOME!”

METRIX 7 DIGITAL MUSIC DISTRIBUTION metrix7digital.net or DLN XM.7 Digital

TORTURED ARTIST

THE BEST IN CRAFT CUISINE & COCKTAILS

Art and jewelry made by local artists 629 S Cooper Wednesday-Sunday 10-6

OPENS DAILY AT 4:00 FOR DINNER & 10:30 SUNDAY FOR BRUNCH

MONDAY-FRIDAY FROM 4:00-6:00PM

1/2 OFF EVERYTHING HAPPY HOUR MONDAY NIGHT IS INDUSTRY NIGHT WITH SPECIALS STARTING AT 10:00PM

940 South Cooper Str. 38104 901.726.4444 / alchemymemphis.com

MORGAN AC & HEATING create veggie-centric bowls that fuel your fast-paced life ZAKA BOWL 575 Erin Drive 38117 901.509.3105 zakabowl.com

Floor Furnace, Wall & Central Heat. Call 901-774-COOL

SPORTS TALK RADIO

Advertising/Sponsorship Sales Excellent part-time income. Earn up to $1,800 1st month. Great Opportunity. Call 901-527-2460

Memphis Flyer 5.4.17  

This week: It's the Music Issue! Interviews with Snoop Dogg, Booker T. Jones, and Dead Soldiers. Plus: our guide to the Beale Street Music F...