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CONTENTS

BRUCE VANWYNGARDEN Editor SUSAN ELLIS Managing Editor JACKSON BAKER, MICHAEL FINGER Senior Editors TOBY SELLS Associate Editor CHRIS MCCOY Film and TV Editor CHRIS DAVIS, MICHAEL DONAHUE MAYA SMITH, MICAELA WATTS, JOSHUA CANNON Staff Writers JESSE DAVIS Copy Editors JULIE RAY Calendar Editor

OUR 1473RD ISSUE 05.18.17 Did you read this week about the two Australian guys who devised a scheme to enter any facility or event without being checked for identification or asked to pay? It was a very funny webpost. The two fellows had noticed that no one questions or pays any attention to people who appear to be working at a venue. What if, they thought, you were able to … blend in as an employee or as someone making a maintenence call? Could you just walk in? Would employees and customers just assume you were there on a service call of some sort? They decided to test their theory and ordered some yellow “high-visibility” vests, the kind universally worn by work crews and service employees. For their trial run, the two men went to a local movie theater. To their delight, they were able to walk past the entrance booth with barely a glance from the ticket taker. In they went and down they sat, right in one of the front rows. Free movie! They then decided to up the ante and try their hi-vis vest theory at the Melbourne Zoo. The two mates boldly walked past a line of patrons waiting to buy tickets and even chirped a cheeky “G’day” to the ticket seller and security guard as they entered. And again, no one questioned their right to do so. They snapped lots of photos of themselves posed in front of various cages and had a fine time. A few days later, they ventured out to a Coldplay concert at a stadium venue in Melbourne. Again, they walked past security without the slightest notice being given to their entry. They stolled down the side aisle, circled past the restraining barriers in front of the stage, and stood looking up the nostrils of the band as they performed. And again they took lots of smirky photos of themselves. The men discovered that the hi-vis vests, ironically enough, actually served as a sort of invisibility cloak. There’s probably a lesson there for all of us: If you act like you belong (and wear the right clothes), you can get away with just about anything. People are too preoccupied with their own jobs and lives to pay much attention to anything else. Maybe this “fake crews” phenomenon is just another variation of fake news? Speaking of … It was reported this week that Facebook’s plan to weed out fake stories is backfiring. When the social media giant tags a story as “disputed,” that post often gets tagged and shared in a viral fashion by those who think Facebook is trying quash or censor a story favorable to their political views. Similarly, President Trump’s spokespeople are getting burned on an almost daily basis by their own boss. When a negative story breaks, press secretary Sean Spicer, Vice President Mike Pence, National Security Advisor H. R. McMaster, and others are sent out to face the press with a denial of one sort or another. Then, almost without fail, the next day the president goes on television and says something (or tweets something) that destroys the officially crafted response. What’s fake? What’s real? What’s the truth? Who’s on first? We don’t know any more. And neither does the administration, apparently. Now, it’s being reported that the N E WS & O P I N I O N president is taking almost his entire NY TIMES CROSSWORD - 4 White House staff along with him THE FLY-BY - 5 on an 11-day, five-country tour that POLITICS - 8 begins later this week. Those traveling EDITORIAL - 10 with Trump include Jared Kushner, VIEWPOINT - 11 COVER — “LEGENDS OF Ivanka Trump, Steve Bannon, Reince BARBECUE” Priebus, Gary Cohn, Dina Powell, BY FLYER STAFF - 12 Stephen Miller, Sean Spicer, Rex STE P P I N’ O UT Tillerson, McMaster, and several WE RECOMMEND - 16 others. MUSIC - 18 If you think the idea of this AFTER DARK - 20 traveling circus going on the road is CALENDAR OF EVENTS - 22 terrifying, just imagine what the foreign FOOD - 30 governments must be thinking. Me, I SPIRITS - 33 think they all ought to be required to FILM - 34 wear hi-vis vests. C L AS S I F I E D S - 36 Bruce VanWyngarden LAST WORD - 39 brucev@memphisflyer.com

L A FAY E T T E S . C O M

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L A C K I P P I M B A S S O S T A M E R I N O R E C A L S T A L E C H S H N O T E R E V E G A Y P E N L O N G O C L E W H

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66 Attack on a walled city, maybe 67 Light beam bender 68 “I had no ___!” 69 First Canadian M.L.B. team

DOWN 1 Music often heard in Bollywood films 2 Concern regarding a litter box 3 Absolutely nobody 4 Co-discoverer of the contents of the circled letters 5 Constantly moving 6 What “to forgive” is 7 Children’s author Blyton 8 Baseball’s dead-ball ___ 9 Pale lagers 10 Ernie Banks, to fans 11 With 55-Down, form of the contents of the circled letters 12 Ad-___ 13 Close of a parental veto 21 Zilch 23 Poi base 25 Prefix with -morphic 26 Smartphone download 27 Mop & ___ 29 Spotted at the prom, perhaps?

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THE

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Questions, Answers + Attitude Edited by Toby Sells

f l y o n t h e w a l l Novel, Railgarten, { DAI LY D I SASTE R The Commercial Appeal didn’t just lose its editor, Louis Graham, to St. Jude Children’s Research Hospital and several well known reporters to layoffs. Memphis’ daily paper has also lost its ability to prevent tiny, tragic errors. You know, like when you run an

& bike lanes

W E E K T H AT W A S By Flyer staff

A new bookstore, a hearing for Railgarten, and more lunch and travel for the council.

above-the-fold-A-1 headline about a woman from “Columbia,” who runs a Colombian diner, right next to a picture of the smiling subject wearing a correctly spelled Colombia top. Maybe somebody was sipping too much juice down by the “Bug Light” stage over Music Festival weekend? (Yes, that one made the paper, too.) POTS & K ETTLES A representative of WMC-TV 5 took to Twitter last week to scold Jeffrey Beauregard Sessions III and tell the controversial U.S. Attorney General to “Get our name out ya mouth.”

GOOD NEWS A trailer filled with more than $5,000 worth of stolen Little Debbie snack cakes has been found. None of the delicious, individually wrapped treats were missing, according to Jonesboro, Arkansas, police. By Chris Davis. Email him at davis@memphisflyer.com.

WE LI K E B I K ES (AN D PAVI N G) Memphians gave their support last week to a set of new paving projects that promise new bike lanes. An online survey drew 1,700 individuals who left nearly 2,500 comments on 10 proposed projects. Among them is a high-profile project that would reduce Riverside to two car lanes and add bike lanes on both sides of the road. That project was supported by 72 percent of those surveyed.

VOTES FO R R AI LGARTE N, B EALE B U C KS The council set up votes last week for decisions on a permit for Railgarten and the end of the Beale Street Bucks program. Railgarten, the new Midtown entertainment complex, opened last month, but parts of it were soon closed on code violations. The council will hold an evidentiary hearing next week on whether or not the council should take back the permit it gave the company’s owners back in February. (Go to memphisflyer. com for an interview with Railgarten partner Martha Hample.) The council scheduled a vote on the controversial Beale Street Bucks program, run by the Downtown Memphis Commission (DMC). That program charges Beale Street patrons a $10 fee to enter the street on certain nights during certain hours. DMC leaders say the program was instituted last year after stampedes compromised security on the street and that the program has improved security there. Still, some council members believe the program targets African Americans, though DMC leaders say that is not the case. Council members delayed a vote on the program until after Memphis in May, per a request by Memphis Mayor Jim 5 Strickland.

m e m p h i s f l y e r. c o m

C O U N C I L WANTS M O R E LU N C H, TR AVE L A Memphis City Council committee approved the council’s proposed budget for next year with no discussion, even though the budget adds more money for extras like food, travel, and professional development. The council wants $1.9 million in taxpayer dollars to operate next year. That figure includes $10,000 on catering (mainly for council lunches), $100,000 for travel (to conferences and more), $10,000 for a new item for “professional growth and development,” and $105,000 for a new lobbyist. Go to memphisflyer.com for an interview with council chairman Berlin Boyd explaining the increases.

N I K E’S S O LAR S H I N E Solar panels will soon land on the roof of Nike’s North America Logistics Campus in Frayser thanks to a grant from the Tennessee Valley Authority. Memphis Light, Gas and Water won the grant, which landed a two-megawatt direct current solar panel array. The panels will go online in 2018 and are expected to generate 3.7 million kilowatt hours of electricity per year, enough to power 242 homes.

NEWS & OPINION

Like WMC, which, according to a recent Memphis Flyer survey, devotes nearly half of its nightly news content to reporting violent crime and mayhem, Sessions, a man once determined to be too racist to be a federal judge, described Memphis as a terrifying place in need of tougher drug-related sentencing. We wonder where he might have gotten the idea?

A “NOVEL” APPROACH A new bookstore called Novel is planned to open in the former Booksellers at Laurelwood space in August. A lease for half of the old Booksellers space was signed recently by a group of investors including John Vergos, Matthew Crow, Christy Yarbro, Wilson Robbins, and Frank Jones. The new store’s layout will differ from Booksellers and will include a magazine section, children’s section, a local section, and a cafe.


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When the final bell rings at the end of the school year, it’s not always good news for every student, especially for those who look forward to school every day just to get a decent meal. That is the case for 55,000 children in Shelby County who are facing food insecurity, based on results from a 2015 Feeding America survey. That means on an average day, one third of children in the county are without a reliable source of quality or nutritious food. Andrew Bell, communications manager for the Mid-South Food Bank, a non-profit that works to eliminate hunger in Shelby County and 30 other counties, said with no school-provided meals, food insecurity grows in the summer and hits those living in poverty the hardest. “People are having to decide between paying for air conditioning or feeding their families,” Bell said. “And they’re choosing air.” To help children without access to food during the summer, the food bank provides summer feeding programs for kids living in low-income households. For example, at Carpenter Street Art Garden, children can come receive a week’s worth of food to sustain them in the summer. Additionally, at the Buckman and Porter Boys and Girls Clubs, hot, nutritious meals are provided in a safe environment to children in need Monday through Thursday. However, as summer rolls around and the need for food increases, there is less food on the shelves of the food bank, as donations typically decrease after the winter holidays through the summer months, said Bell. “People are thinking about going on vacation, not donating,” he said. “This

puts a real strain on the food bank, as well as the food pantries and other agencies we donate to.” Bell said it is important that individuals and organizations remember that the food bank needs year-round donations, whether they be food or dollars, in order to continue providing food for their 240 partner agencies, including food pantries, soup kitchens, and shelters. This week, the food bank kicked off their largest food-and-funds drive of the year, Operation Feed, which is a community-wide, friendly competition between businesses and other groups. The drive will run through July 28th, ending with an awards ceremony celebrating the group collecting the most food or cash. Other groups, like the Cleaning Authority of Memphis, which provides services to 600 residences in the city, is doing its own thing to help the food bank and asking their customers to make donations. Through a two-year-old initiative called Cleaning Authority of Memphis CARES, company employees work to educate their customers on the need for food in the city and then provide a bag that the customer can fill with donated food goods before their next cleaning service. Last summer, the group was able to donate 2,000 pounds of food to the food bank. This year the company has a goal of 3,000. “We know the food bank runs low this time of the year,” said Rick Roland, Cleaning Authority of Memphis’ owner. “We’re always looking for ways to give back to community, and right now it needs food.”


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Closing It Out Gas tax, de-annexation bill redux were notable results of the 2017 legislative session. Watson (R-Hixson). As originally submitted, the bill was a far milder version of the sponsor’s 2016 bill that would have given residents of areas annexed since 1998 an easy route to severance from the annexing cities. The new version requires that an approving referendum must be held, not just in the territory seeking de-annexation, but in the municipality at large.  Another proviso, apparently shepherded into

• Two of the five Republicans who conducted the annual end-of-session press conference in the Old Supreme Court Chamber of the Capitol in Nashville A quartet of Memphians — (l to r) Peggy Turley, Linda Yan Archer, Ward Archer, and Jenna Stonecipher — carried their “Protect Our Aquifer” cause to last Thursday’s meeting of the TVA Board in Murfreesboro. See Stonecipher’s Viewpoint on the matter, p. 11.

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the bill by state Senate Majority Leader Mark Norris (R-Collierville), would have given cities with their own de-annexation formulas (like Memphis’ “right-sizing” plan) almost unlimited time to carry them out. But sharp questioning on the point by Senator Brian Kelsey (R-Germantown) forced a lastday amendment that compelled that such plans be carried out within a year after an enactment deadline of January 1, 2018. The House will no doubt act on its version of the bill in the 2018 session.

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The 2017 session of the Tennessee General Assembly, which came to an end last week, was one of the more momentous in recent years, as measured by the triumph of Governor Bill Haslam’s “IMPROVE Act,” which levies significant gasoline and diesel price increases to begin the long overdue process of rebuilding and renovating the state’s thoroughfares. There were fewer novelty bills and crank measures than usual, particularly in the area of social issues, though, unsurprisingly, a few measures friendly to the gun lobby found their way to passage — notably one entitled the Tennessee Hearing Protection Act, which basically removes restrictions from the sale of silencers for firearms.   And Memphis, along with the state’s other urban centers, experienced a shot fired across the bow with the Senate’s passage, on the session’s last day, of a de-annexation measure by Senator Bo


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E D ITO R IAL

Irvin Salky There will be — indeed, there already have been — major statesmen, captains of industry, stars of stage and screen, inventors, wizards, and saints who come and go in this world without leaving the kind of imprint on their environment and on humankind that Irvin Salky did. The diminutive 75-year-old genie — a Memphian first, last, and always — did not invent the art of friendship, nor distill the essence of cool, nor perfect the nature of service, but he mastered all these arts and did as much as any individual person could to help his often uncertain native city find its heart and discern those of its attributes that could appeal to, fascinate, and even ennoble the rest of the world. In 1977, Salky both founded and funded the Beale Street Music Festival, for decades now a celebration of the city’s own great musical history, an exposition of stateof-the-art musical forms from all over, a model for other cities, and, not least, a grand good time, a great party. Irv Salky served his community as a resident conscience of sorts, though he was never pompous or pious or didactic about it. In the mid-1960s, he was an early member of the city’s first fully integrated law firm — Ratner, Sugarmon, Lucas, Willis and Caldwell — which pursued civil rights causes and civil liberties issues that other firms were loath to touch. Cases in point included defending the Invaders, a black militant group that some blamed for street violence during the fateful sanitation strike of 1968, and Georgina Spelvin, the star of the sexually explicit 1973 film, The Devil in Miss Jones. Salky’s spirit and energy belied his undersized and increasingly frail physique. He lost part of a lung years ago because of what may have been a medical

May 18-24, 2017

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misdiagnosis and later would lose the rest of that lung to cancer. As with the human rights matters that moved him, he fought his health issues hard in these last several weeks, but the combined effects of a stroke and a bout of pneumonia finally proved too much for him. Salky’s circle of friends was extensive, including movie stars, musicians, and major politicians — none closer than 9th District congressman Steve Cohen, for whom Salky, his elder by several years, was something of a beacon. “A great friend and mentor to me and many, many others,” said Cohen in a Facebook post Thursday that, for many of us, was our first news about Irv’s passing. Cohen would have much to say about his friend then and in the days after that, including an eloquent and heartfelt eulogy before a large and diverse crowd on the occasion of Salky’s funeral Monday at Baron Hirsch Cemetery. But it is hard to improve on these words from the congressman’s Thursday night Facebook post: “Irvin was law, civil rights, music, jazz, sports, cool hats, sartorial style, classic aged cars, and Midtown. He was a Navy vet, a Vandy law and Memphis State grad, the guardian and manager of Phineas Newborn, Furry Lewis, and Memphis Slim among others, the founder of the Beale Street Music Festival, and the superb lawyer for so many. He loved Memphis, his partners at the Russell Sugarmon law firm, and really everyone he came in contact with. No more friendly or kind a person has Memphis known.”

C O M M E N TA R Y b y G r e g C r a v e n s


VIEWPOINT By Jenna Stonecipher

Protect Our Water bread. Yes, it will be be an improvement over the coal plant that currently services (and pollutes) our region. But TVA did not decide to make this change out of the goodness of their progressive hearts. Rather, they engaged in a consent decree with the Environmental Protection Agency, which alleged Clean Air Act violations at 11 coal-fired plants. The natural gas plant is but a BandAid, not a long-term solution. Natural gas these days is extracted through the process of hydraulic fracturing (fracking) via chemicals injected into the earth at high pressure. This process uses a startling amount of clean water, and it risks contaminating nearby groundwater in the area where extraction occurs.   Climate change, the overriding issue here, is a real and urgent global crisis with tangible economic consequences. At the time of TVA’s creation in the 1930s, the agency was envisioned as a utility provider — but that’s not all. It was also created to be a regional economic development agency, tasked with using federal experts to modernize the region’s economy and society. We are still in need of this grand vision and worthwhile mission.  We need the leaders of our nation’s largest public power agency to take action to protect our natural resources, our health, and our economy. And we need an energized and mobilized citizenry ready to demand the protection of our natural resources and the development of renewable energy for this region within the foreseeable future.  The fact that we do not have such a plan in place and yet continue to build infrastructure for a volatile and controversial fossil fuel industry is unacceptable. When I voice these concerns to my elected officials and those in the industry busily conducting business as usual, I receive patronizing responses that dismiss my sense of urgency. “We have enough drinking water to last another 50 years,” they say, causing alarm bells in my mind to sound loudly. In 50 years, I should be enjoying retirement, not fighting water scarcity.  So, consider this an open invitation to everyone who drinks water, to our scientific community, and to the public and private leaders within our region: You either represent the future or you represent the past — but the status quo will not stand. Plug into the Protect Our Aquifer movement and help protect our community’s greatest resource. Jenna Stonecipher is a former appointee of Shelby County government and current board member for Protect Our Aquifer.

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m e m p h i s f l y e r. c o m

When I was enrolled in university, my political science courses discussed future conflict and migrations resulting from water scarcity. I did not think that I would see evidence of this so soon after graduation.   A government geological study notes that there is a major cone of depression in the Memphis area as a result of longterm pumping of water at municipal and industrial well fields. This problem is in addition to the $615,000,000 lawsuit from Mississippi against Tennessee challenging the intense pumping of aquifer water in Memphis. This pumping has allegedly caused a depression in the Mississippi water table and altered the direction that water moves underground. This issue of our water aquifer is not a fad of environmentalism, nor is it a fund-raising platform for the Sierra Club. This is the kind of issue that will come to define our era, and Memphians are at the forefront of it in a very real way. With climate change altering rain patterns and, ultimately, aquifer recharge rates, it seems foolish to blindly obligate millions of gallons of this precious resource to the Tennessee Valley Authority for its proposed use in the cooling of their new natural gas plant here. A 2015 study cited that just 6 percent of groundwater is replenished within a “human lifetime” of 50 years. The water we drink from the Memphis Sand Aquifer is 2,000 years old. Let that sink in.  While water may be a renewable resource, it is finite in quantity and vulnerable to contamination. Brian Waldron, a researcher at the Ground Water Institute, has warned, “We don’t really know the rate at which the Memphis aquifer is replenished, nor do we know what the potential is for water degradation.”    So it is that citizens of Memphis — across party lines and socio-economic statuses — have become seriously concerned about the risk of contamination at the forthcoming TVA natural gas plant, where five newly drilled wells are located in near proximity to an unlined coal ash pond.  TVA needs independent, scientific experts to define the risks associated with groundwater contamination and to map the holes in the protective clay layers. We must insist that the TVA look at other alternatives, ones that do not commit our drinking water towards the maintenance of fossil fuel infrastructure for decades into the future.  And let’s stop pretending that this gas plant is the greatest thing since sliced

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C OV E R STO RY BY F LY E R STA F F / P H OTOS BY J UST I N FOX B U R KS

F O S D N E G E L

BA R B EC U E

Five Memphis BBQ masters share the secrets of their success.

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May 18-24, 2017

ravel outside Shelby County, and the Memphis brand boils down to two things: music and barbecue. Name the city’s music legends. (Go on. We’ll give you a minute. Jeopardy! music plays.) Elvis. Al Green. Otis Redding. B.B. King. Yes, there are many, many others. But your average Bostonian could probably guess at least one of those names.  But what about barbecue?  With a sniff of the wind, Memphians can tell if there’s a legit barbecue joint nearby, and, depending on geography, we can probably tell you which one it is and what’s best on the menu. Barbecue is a religion here, and fierce battles rage among devotees of wet ribs or dry rub or whether cole slaw belongs on a pulled-pork sandwich.  But what do we know about the minds and hands behind those rubbed ribs, those smoky butts, or those sausage-and-cheese plates? Who are the legends of Memphis barbecue?  The folks we’ve profiled here are big-name barbecue veterans. If you don’t know them, you know their restaurants — Central BBQ, Interstate Barbecue, Charles Vergos’ Rendezvous, Memphis Barbecue Company, and the Bar-B-Q Shop.  These are not the only legends of Memphis barbecue, of course. Memphians are lucky enough to have platoons of pitmasters working their magic under billowing cloaks of smoke and heat. But if you have to narrow it down to five, these folks are a good place to start. This week’s Memphis in May World Championship Barbecue Cooking Contest will shine a spotlight on the city’s second-biggest cultural export. Expanded now to four days, the contest (which locals simply call “Barbecue”) will bring teams, swine connoisseurs, and revelers of all sorts to Tom Lee Park. Barbecue is the second-biggest weekend on the MIM calendar, behind Music Fest in the number of total visitors. But don’t tell that to the hardcore barbecue believers. To them, it’s a time to let your hair down and to celebrate that simple food that ties us all together. It’s in that spirit that we share the stories of those 12 who made (and keep making) barbecue a big part of our city’s cultural definition.  — Toby Sells

Jim Neely — Interstate Barbecue In 1979, native Memphian Jim Neely, an ex-serviceman, was in his mid-40s and operating insurance agencies in Memphis, Nashville, Baton Rouge, and New Orleans. It was a network of offices he’d developed from a single Memphis-based unit seven years earlier, and he was spending a humongous amount of time on the road overseeing them all. Driving back to Memphis, usually late at night, he’d often find himself coping with a serious appetite, and he would think back to when he was growing up in Memphis and, as he puts it, “Every neighborhood had their own great little barbecue place.”  Not the big chains nor even large restaurants as such. Just little store fronts, each with a distinctive delectable home-grown menu. But, as Neely noticed, “By the mid’70s, all the owners of those places had begun to die out, and the places with them.” So, Neely decided to switch career tracks and bought a mom-and-pop grocery store at the intersection of Third and Mallory. He converted an unused space on the

Jim Neely

property into a makeshift barbecue stand, all the while experimenting with recipes in an effort to recapture the flavor of those long-gone neighborhood places. Here it is, 38 years later, and that mom-and-pop grocery store has expanded and morphed into a stateof-the-art barbecue restaurant, “Jim Neely’s Interstate BarBQ,” as the sign on it and three other Neely-owned restuarants (in the airport area, on Winchester, and on Stateline) will tell you.  Such is their renown that most Memphis residents (and many tourists) would likely answer “barbecue” if given the name “Neely” on a word-association test. In fact, for many years some Neely nephews used the family name on a local barbecue chain of their own. But, as visitors are instructed by a sign on the side of the flagship Third Street place (“My Holy Grail,” Neely calls it), it was Jim Neely who “Put the Name in BBQ” and “Before Me There Was None.” Everything about the Neely restaurants bears an individual touch, including the locally celebrated cole slaw, which his wife, Barbara, makes fresh every day. In the matter of cooking, Neely says, only half-facetiously, “I am like a Marine drill sergeant. There’s only one way to do things — my way.”  Neely devised his own pits, using a combination of steel plates and brick (“both fire bricks and common bricks”) and cooks with “natural gas combined with hickory wood and charcoal.” He boasts that no fire ever touches the meat, which is cooked with indirect heating via a tunnel in the pit. The process generates a natural moisture that marinates the meat, which is “tenderized in its own juices.” Besides the various ways in which one can order and eat barbecued pork, Neely offers an elaborate menu of other items, including spaghetti, chicken wings, and beef. He takes great pride in the latter, maintaining that his was the first barbecue place in this area to offer beef brisket, and that his beef ribs, “which I get shipped in,” are twice as thick as anybody else’s.  His barbecue sauce, too, prepared from a closely guarded recipe, is the product of years of experimentation. Neely is both a chef and the same dedicated entrepreneur he was in his insurance-business days. He’ll


Eric Vernon

be 80 in October and has no intention of slowing down. — Jackson Baker Frank and Eric Vernon — The Bar-B-Q Shop As I’m interviewing Frank and Eric Vernon, the fatherand-son team behind the Bar-B-Q Shop, Eric suddenly jumps up to greet a man coming in the door. It’s James Alexander, the legendary bass player of the Bar-Kays.  “He’s been coming here since it was Brady and Lil’s,” Eric says.  Frank Vernon says he started as a backyard pitmaster. At the time, the Vernons had their own small restaurant, called Frank’s. But Brady and Lil’s was a family favorite.  “When I didn’t cook, I would go by there and get my ribs, barbecue, and barbecue spaghetti,” Frank recalls. “It was a favorite of Willie Mitchell. All the Stax people used to go there because it was just down the road.”  Mr. Brady and Frank became close friends. When it came time to retire, he asked the Vernons if they would take over the restaurant.  “The sauce came from Mr. Brady,” Frank says. “At one time, he didn’t want to give it to us. He wanted to make it for us, which was a bad idea. We told him we wanted to think about it.” Brady called them over to his house later. “He said, I’m just going to give you the sauce when you buy the business,” Frank said. He then signed a Bible and presented it to the Vernons, sealing the deal. Frank tweaked the sauce recipe over the years to make it cling tighter to the ribs. Now, Eric makes more than 40 gallons per week from scratch at the Madison restaurant, and the bottled version is sold in more than 140 Kroger stores from the Missouri bootheel to the Delta. But the Shop first gained notoriety for barbecue spaghetti.  “That spaghetti has been around over 50 years,” Frank says. “It’s something unique. Everybody’s got a barbecue spaghetti now, but they don’t have the one that we have.” The shop’s Texas Toast barbecue sandwich was Frank’s invention. He says the entire meal is carefully balanced.  “That Texas Toast and the slaw and the meat, they all complement themselves and enhance themselves,” Frank says. “I don’t care if [another restaurant] goes and uses the Texas Toast. They ain’t gonna get the same flavor.”   Frank developed a glaze for barbecue chicken and then became curious how it would taste on pork ribs. In 2015, the glazed ribs were named Best Barbecue Plate in America by the Food Network.   The Shop’s proximity to Ardent Studios has made it a favorite of musicians, from Mavis Staples to Bobby “Blue” Bland to ZZ Top’s Billy Gibson, who has a favorite table.  “DJ Paul and them would pull up in a Range Rover and order ribs with the dry seasoning, back in the day when they were recording down the street,” says Eric. “We fed Justin Timberlake’s crew when they did a concert here.” 

Craig Blondis & Roger Sapp — Central BBQ Barbecue was a byproduct of kicks and cleats, says Craig Blondis, who co-owns Central BBQ with Roger Sapp. “Roger and I knew each other from playing soccer, which is really how this whole thing started,” he says. Both had cooked on other barbecue teams, but as members of the Vagrants soccer team, Blondis and Sapp participated together in a barbecue cooking team in the Memphis in May World Championship Barbecue Cooking Contest. “Roger and I and all the soccer guys had a cooking team that, basically, we would enter as a Dutch international team, because a couple of guys we played soccer with were from Holland,” Blondis says. They called the team “Keujes Van Doorenburg,” which means “Pigs from Doorenburg” says Hans Bermel, who was one of the Dutch members of the team. Bermel is now an owner of Bermel Hair Salon. The barbecue restaurant began after Sapp bought the old Tony’s Pizza building and property on Central. He didn’t know what to do with it, so he said, “Let’s open a barbecue joint.” A couple of high profile Midtown barbecue restaurants had closed. “The Public Eye closed,” Sapp says. “John Wills closed. Central BBQ was the perfect name,” he says, because “everybody goes up and down Central.” The first Central BBQ opened on April 1, 2002. Blondis and Sapp later opened locations on Summer and on Butler in the South Main area near the National Civil Rights Museum.  Along with Ryan Trimm of Sweet Grass, they are currently in the process of opening Sunrise Memphis, a breakfast restaurant in the old Neely’s restaurant on Jefferson. A 250-seat event center is going to be built on property behind the Summer restaurant within the next two months, Sapp says. Why did Central BBQ catch on so fast?  “We didn’t copy the Rendezvous,” Sapp says. “We had our own style, and we went and stuck with it.” “We use a rotisserie convection-style pit,” Blondis says. “It’s basically gas-fed. The smoke source comes from the

Roger Sapp & Craig Blondis

Melissa Cookston

wood. It’s like a furnace or a heater in your house.” They cook their ribs “dry style,” rubbing the meat with spices, then letting it marinate overnight, before smoking it. “By doing that, you’re creating a thicker bark,” Blondis says. “You’re going to get more flavor in the bark as well. That’s really where you’re getting the smoke, but you’re also getting the flavor of the spices that are in there. And it creates a much better product.  “Sauce is meant to be an accompaniment. People who cook with sauce are hiding the fact that they’re not cooking their barbecue properly. “Down in Helena at King Biscuit [Blues Festival] I’ve taken grand championship first place in ribs a couple of times,” Blondis says. “But my contest is opening these doors every day at 11 a.m.” — Michael Donahue Melissa Cookston — Memphis Barbecue Co.  It was a cold wet weekend in Greenwood, Mississippi. The tent poles had been lost, so Melissa Cookston slept on a tarp under a warm grill. She was seven months pregnant. It was her first barbecue competition.  “It was terrible,” she says.  But she’d been practicing for weeks to get up the nerve to enter, and she didn’t want to quit. She persisted, and eventually, a shaft of golden sunlight cut through the dreary scene; she and her team won fifth place in the shoulder category (the only one they entered). “Back then, you’d have 100 teams in a small competition; it was crazy!” Cookston says, with traces of that original excitement still in her voice. “I will tell you that was like winning Memphis in May to me.” That victory ignited a flame inside Cookston. She and her husband eventually quit their jobs to focus on competition barbecue and later opened a barbecue restaurant (Memphis Barbecue Co. in Horn Lake). Her team competed and won on TLC’s BBQ Pitmasters. Cookston was later asked to join the show as a judge for two seasons.  She’s written two books, Smokin’ in the Boys’ Room and Smokin’ Hot in the South. Along with tips and recipes, both books include Cookston’s best-known and well-earned titles, the “most winningest woman in barbecue” and “the only female barbecue world champion.” Winning the Memphis in May World Championship Cooking Contest is, arguably, like winning the Super Bowl. Cookston’s team has won that title twice (2008, 2010). They’ve come in second (2012), won ribs (2012), and the whole hog category four times (2010, 2011, 2012, 2014).  But it was that first win on that cold, wet weekend in Greenwood that hooked her. “Competition barbecue is an addiction,” she said. “You win, like, third place in baked beans, and, before you know continued on page 14

COVER STORY m e m p h i s f l y e r. c o m

Frank recalls when “We used to close at 2 o’clock on Monday. One Monday, at about five minutes to 2, Luther Vandross’ bus drove up. They came in here and got every rib we had in the house.” The Vernons are consummate restaurant professionals, and it’s the loyalty of their customers that keeps them going. “The great thing about this business is when you walk out of the kitchen and see customers that you’ve been knowing for years,” Frank says. “Or you go up to a table that has never been here before, and they say, ‘This is great! Keep doing what you’re doing!’ And then you see them again.” — Chris McCoy

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continued from page 13 it, you’re rolling down the road with a $30,000 rig. It’s terrible. It worse than crack.” But competitive barbecue is a business for Cookston. Regular practice sessions are staged, timed, and judged just like a real cooking contest. In the past seven years, no alcohol was allowed in her MIM tent (though, she’s making an exception this year).  And this year, Cookston is coming to Tom Lee Park with a secret weapon. Over the last two-and-a-half years, she has bred, fed, and raised hogs of her own. Calling herself Frankenstein, Cookston says she cross-bred two types of hogs “to see if I could create the utopian hog for whole-hog cooking.”  Symbols of Cookston’s competition cooking success — trophies, plaques, and more — adorn the walls of her restaurant, where dozens of customers were already seated just a few ticks after noon on a recent weekday visit.  “We made a promise when we opened this place that we’d do things the right way, and we’ve kept that promise,” Cookston says. “People have appreciated it. Everybody’s happy to be eating good barbecue.”  — Toby Sells

May 18-24, 2017

John Vergos — Charles Vergos’ Rendezvous Thanks to a coal chute, the Rendezvous, begun by the late Charlie Vergos in 1948, now sells 8,000 pounds of ribs five days a week. “It started out as a tavern with ham and cheese sandwiches,” says Charlie’s son, John Vergos. “It wasn’t until he discovered the old coal chute that he started to experiment. I don’t know if it was behind bricks or what, but once he started burning something, he could see that it drew and he knew that he was in business.” His dad had some racks built and “started experimenting with all kinds of things. Ribs were actually a by-product. They were thrown away. He would get them

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Bobby Ellis

for 10 cents a pound.” At that time, people ate ribs on the Fourth of July and Memorial Day. They also were sold in some grocery stores. But his dad was the first in Memphis to sell them “in a regular commercial restaurant,” Vergos says, and the restaurant still uses his father’s “exact same recipe.”  “He first started cooking them Greek style, where you baste them in lemon and vinegar, salt, pepper, oregano, and garlic,” Vergos says. “But then he went to New Orleans and got all the Cajun spices, and he mixed them together. So, that’s the same recipe we use today.” They don’t use a barbecue pit at the Rendezvous. “They’re grilled; they’re smoked; and they’re charcoaled,” Vergos says. “It’s all happening at the same time. They’re cooked over charcoal, but the smoke’s created. So, you have that flavor. Plus, they’re being grilled.”

Asked to describe the ribs, Vergos says, “First of all, they don’t fall off the bone. We think ribs need to be chewed.” As for the taste, he says, “I love the taste. It’s not a heavy taste. Beause of the vinegar in it, it’s a fresh taste. There’s about 12 spices in our seasoning and they just all go together. The sum of the whole is much better than the individual parts. When you put it together, there’s just an indescribable taste. It’s sustained us for almost 70 years.” People call Bobby Ellis the “pit master,” but Vergos says, “He’s not a pit master. He’s our kitchen manager. Bobby’s cooked for years and years, but now he runs the place. Bobby’s probably the most important person in the restaurant because he’s been here 46 years. He knows every outlet, every door. He knows every vendor, every maintenance person. He knows where he can get things done. I’m much easier to replace than Bobby.” Each night, three people do the cooking at Rendezvous, Vergos says. “There are more than that working in the kitchen.” In addition to ribs, the Rendezvous serves barbecued chicken, pork chops, and brisket. Charlie Vergos once served barbecued bear to Buford Ellington, who was Tennessee governor at the time. “My dad didn’t realize when you cook bear meat you’re supposed to boil it first to get a bunch of fat out of it,” Vergos says. “If you don’t, once you start eating it, it expands in your mouth.” And that’s what was happening to Ellington when Charlie looked at him.  “He was turning green because he was choking,” Vergos says. “It had gotten lodged in his throat. [Charlie] claimed he invented the Heimlich maneuver because he grabbed [Buford] and pushed his chest.” His dad was relieved when everything came out okay.  “He was just [imagining] the headlines: ‘Governor Dies. Chokes at Rendezvous.’”  — MD


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steppin’ out

We Recommend: Culture, News + Reviews

Heavy Traffic

By Chris Davis

Few locations have inspired more creativity than Earnestine & Hazel’s. The tavern’s facade appears in paintings. Its interiors show up in movies. Dancers have celebrated the Soul Burger, and artists of every kind have delved into the former bordello’s seedy past. Usually it’s the bar’s sordid history that inspires, but all the stories about pimps and prostitutes inspired Squaring Up producer Aliza Moran to stop exoticizing the past and take a sober look at the present. Squaring Up, which opens this week at the Orange Mound Gallery, is an immersive and educational tour of human trafficking and the Memphis sex trade. “Memphis has the highest rate of sex trafficking in the state,” Moran says. “And whenever I talked to anybody about this they seemed surprised. A lot of people just don’t know.” Moran’s a versatile actor well known around town for her committed performances in shows like Sylvia at Theatre Memphis and Haint at TheatreWorks. But traditional performance just wasn’t satisfying her anymore. “I was bored,” she says. Project 1 Collaborative Arts was born from that boredom and a desire to reconnect with the kind of socially aware work she’d focused on in graduate school. Research Squaring Up brought Moran in contact with Thistle & Bee Enterprises, a not-for-profit supporting survivors of Memphis’ sex trade. A partnership was established, and the elusive project came into focus. “People look at human trafficking and say it’s just crime. They think it has nothing to do with them,” says Squaring Up director Julia Hinson. “There’s an old saying that prostitution is the oldest profession. I call it the world’s oldest oppression.” Using movement and monologue, Squaring Up turns survivor stories into an immersive theater experience. Admission to all shows is pay-what-you-can.

JUSTIN FOX BURKS

PROJECT 1 COLLABORATIVE ARTS AND THISTLE & BEE ENTERPRISES PRESENT “SQUARING UP” AT THE ORANGE MOUND GALLERY MAY 18TH-20TH AND MAY 25TH-27TH AT 7:30 P.M.

May 18-24, 2017

For all those fidgeters out there. The Last Word, p. 39

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Food and fun at the new and inventive Railgarten. Food News, p. 30

THURSDAY May 18

FRIDAY May 19

Left Unsung Growlers, 8 p.m. Y’all, it’s Memphis’ Grateful Dead tribute band.

The Game’s Afoot Germantown Community Theatre, 8 p.m., $24 Mystery/comedy set in 1936 involving the actor who played Sherlock Holmes, a murder, a castle, and Christmas.

Fourth Bluff Friday Fourth Bluff, 4-10 p.m. Beer and live music and more during this weekly party in the park. Tonight’s deets: Glitch Doctor and DJ WAHT, the Stick’em food truck, and Amurica photo booth.

The Chainsmokers FedExForum, 7 p.m., $45-$255 The EDM hitmakers take the stage tonight at the Forum.

Memphis in May World Championship Barbecue Cooking Contest Tom Lee Park, 11 a.m., $5 The big one, y’all. Smoke, fun, and loads of pork. The Kingsford Tour of Champions kicks off at 2 p.m.

SoundOff Crosstown Arts, 6 p.m. Part of a quarterly forum on the art and science of audio recording and its innovative history in Memphis. Tonight’s topic will be “From Studio to Turntable” and will feature Grammy-winning producer Matt Ross-Spang and engineer Jeff Powell, moderated by Scott Bomar.

SATURDAY May 20 How-To Festival Germantown Community Library, 1-4 p.m. DIY experts gather today to share what they know during this event. Includes everything from mountain dulcimer and glass-blowing to jewelry making. GRRL FEST Hi-Tone, 7 p.m. Hell, yeah! Celebrating women who rock. The lineup includes NOTS, Crystal Shrine, Bruiser Queen, Ten High, and more. Benefiting the Southern Girls Rock Camp.


Dave Catching

Catching On Dave Catching’s story starts in Memphis. The Eagles of Death Metal (EODM) guitarist helped launch Memphis’ punk scene as part of a theatrical noise-country outfit called the Modifiers. It’s been said that no other band represented the early Antenna Club scene better than the Mods, with a rotating cast of local heroes like Alex Chilton, Randy Chertow, and Craig Shindler. Memphis guitar wizard Dave Catching went with the band to L.A., where they hooked up with Doors drummer John Densmore and went nowhere. The Left Coast wasn’t good to the Modifiers, but it worked out okay for Catching, who’s currently enjoying his Rancho de la Luna recording studio in Joshua Tree, California, and touring with EODM. Catching’s got a fine rock resume. Before hooking up with EODM, he played with Fred Drake in the psychedelic band earthlings? and was an original member of Queens of the Stone Age. He tried to shift gears in 1993 by following his parttime band the Continental Drifters back to New Orleans, where he opened a restaurant and started a new weird life. But there was more music to make, and Catching returned to California, and a full time life of music in 2000. In 2016, Eagles of Death Metal made international headlines for the worst reason imaginable. They were on stage at the Bataclan in Paris when their concert was interrupted by three men with AK47 assault rifles. A day of terrorist attacks in the French capital resulted in 130 dead. Nowhere was the loss of life greater than at the Bataclan. Catching started playing guitar in Memphis when he was 15. It’s taken him to amazing and terrifying places. This week, he’s coming home with his fellow Eagles to play Minglewood Hall. MASTODON WITH EAGLES OF DEATH METAL AND RUSSIAN CIRCLES AT MINGLEWOOD HALL THURSDAY, MAY 18TH, 7:30 P.M. $37-$47. MINGLEWOODHALL.COM

SUNDAY May 21

TUESDAY May 23

WEDNESDAY May 24

Good People St. Mary’s Cathedral, 2-3:30 p.m., donations welcomed An Elaine Blanchard production covering her childhood and racism, violence, and injustice.

The National Weather Service Answers Your Questions Collierville Public Library, 5-6 p.m. Meteorologist Jim Branda answers all your weather-related questions, like when to seek shelter during storms.

The Parking Party Overton Park Golf Shack, 6-8 p.m., donations welcomed A fund-raiser for the Overton Park Alliance and Park Friends for the Overton Park Conservancy’s parking lot fund.

Barrier Free Crosstown Concourse, Central Atrium, building hours A section of Yancy Villa-Calvo’s “Barrier Free” installation will be on display in the Crosstown building. The installation builds on the proposed border wall, while encouraging the viewer to reflect on larger barriers, such as race and gender.

“Ancient Perfume Bottles with a Modern Twist” Dixon Gallery & Gardens, noon-1 p.m., $5 Lunchtime talk by glass artist Dale Strand.

Smokey and the Bandit Malco Paradiso, 2 p.m. Fortieth anniversary of this Burt Reynolds/Sally Field road comedy, presented by TCM.

m e m p h i s f l y e r. c o m

Richard Gere gets in over his head in Norman. Film, p. 34

ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT

CREATIVE COMMONS | SYLVIABOBILVIA

By Chris Davis

17


MUSIC By Alex Greene

Black Magic

Amy Black comes to Memphis and soaks in the Hi groove.

May 18-24, 2017

18

Joe Restivo has come to master such soul stylings. On a few tracks, he is joined by fellow City Champs members Al Gamble (organ) and George Sluppick (drums). The Champs have a long history of emulating the Hi sound in their instrumental forays, and it shows here. Finally, where Restivo is absent, we hear former Stax guitarist Bobby Manuel on the axe. The result is a classic Memphis soul stew. Surprisingly, these legends were a new discovery for Black. “The Hi Rhythm Section and the folks who recorded with Willie Mitchell are now favorites of mine, but a year ago, I didn’t know about them.” Working with them brought out new qualities in her music. “It’s definitely a little bit dirtier, more from your gut. I am so drawn to that feel and sound. I didn’t know that I could sing this music, and now it’s what I do.”

Amy Black

Having written or co-written most of the album’s material, Black has clearly internalized the soul sounds she’s only recently discovered. “What Makes a Man?,” arguably the heaviest groove of the set, would stand alongside many a classic single of the 1970s, equal parts desire and dark, brooding reflection. Other numbers confidently break out a gritty blues shuffle or the upbeat soul of Wendy Rene. And there is a healthy dose of soul’s most direct influence, gospel music. Both the cover of Otis Clay’s song and Black’s original “Let the Light In” stand as spiritual exhortations to aspire to our better angels. As Black notes of the latter tune, “I had no idea how much we, as a country, would need this song. I wrote it for myself, to make sure that I’m letting light into my own darkness. But with events being what they are, it’s a good time to sing it. I always dedicate it to Mavis [Staples]. Her spirit and music inspire and educate me. They represent the fight against darker forces and the need to persevere.” Amy Black will play at Lafayette’s Music Room on July 6th.

STACIE HUCKEBA

T

he Hi Rhythm Section conjures up 50 years of Memphis history with every groove they lay down. Perhaps it’s the drive — elemental, relentless — at times honing in on a single note, bearing down like box cars slowrolling through the city. Or it could come down to a telepathic connection between players like Howard Grimes, Charles Hodges, and Leroy Hodges, as nuances of dynamics and polyrhythms gel into a fluid, soulful whole. Whatever makes the magic, these players have gained international fame, and in recent years, artists like Chan Marshall (Cat Power) and Frazey Ford have come to Memphis just to work with them. Now we can add Amy Black to that list, who’s penned a new album of songs, Memphis, scheduled for a June 2nd release. Recorded at Scott Bomar’s Electraphonic Recording, the album earns its title with compositions perfectly suited to the Hi Rhythm Section sound. Black, who spent her childhood years in Alabama, and recently relocated to Nashville, started out mining the Americana vein when she began singing professionally 10 years ago in Boston. In 2015, she made a marked turn to soul with The Muscle Shoals Sessions, which featured legendary keyboardist Spooner Oldham. The sessions introduced her to embellishing songs with horns, to which, as she confesses, “I’m addicted.” The horns on Memphis are pitchperfect. Arranged by trumpeter Marc Franklin, they evoke the classic blasts you know from old records, even while remaining focused on the needs of the song at hand. Franklin is joined by Kirk Smothers and Art Edmaiston on reeds; the trio is well-versed in the horn fills that define the Stax and Hi sounds. Locally, they can be heard with the new Love Light Orchestra, or in Bomar’s group The Bo-Keys. Franklin also arranged the strings for Black’s album, adding a dark resonance to “Nineteen” and lyrical swells to Black’s cover of Otis Clay’s “If I Could Reach Out (and Help Somebody).” Of course, taking center stage are the Hodges brothers — Charles on organ and piano, Leroy on bass — and drummer Howard Grimes. Beyond the deep pocket, flashes of virtuosity are tempered with the restraint of seasoned players who know how to let a song breathe. Brother Mabon Lewis “Teenie” Hodges passed away three years ago — hard shoes to fill for a guitarist. But local journeyman


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KID N PLAY SATURDAY, MAY 20TH TUNICA ROADHOUSE

ELF POWER SUNDAY, MAY 21ST HARBOR TOWN AMPHITHEATRE

CHAINSMOKERS FRIDAY, MAY 19TH FEDEXFORUM

After Dark: Live Music Schedule May 18 - 24 Blues City Cafe 138 BEALE 526-3637

Alfred’s 197 BEALE 525-3711

Gary Hardy & Memphis 2 Thursdays-Saturdays, 6-9 p.m.; Karaoke Thursdays, TuesdaysWednesdays, 9 p.m.-1 a.m., and Sundays-Mondays, 10 p.m.-2 a.m.; Mandi Thomas Fridays, Saturdays, 6-9 p.m.; The 901 Heavy Hitters Fridays, Saturdays, 10 p.m.-2 a.m.; Flyin’ Ryan Fridays, Saturdays, 2:30 a.m.; Memphis Jazz Orchestra Sundays, 6-9 p.m.

B.B. King’s Blues Club 143 BEALE 524-KING

The King Beez Thursdays, 5:30 p.m.; B.B. King’s All Stars Thursdays, Fridays, 8 p.m.; Will Tucker Band Fridays, Saturdays, 5 p.m.; Lisa G and Flic’s Pic’s Band Saturdays, Sundays, 12:30 p.m.; Blind Mississippi Morris Sundays, 5 p.m.; Memphis Jones Sundays, Wednesdays 5:30 p.m.; Doc Fangaz and the Remedy Tuesdays, 5:30 p.m.

Blue Note Bar & Grill 341-345 BEALE 577-1089

Queen Ann and the Memphis Blues Masters Fridays, Saturdays, 8 p.m.-midnight.

Blind Mississippi Morris Fridays, 5 p.m., and Saturdays, 5:30 p.m.; Brad Birkedahl Band Thursdays, Wednesdays, 8 p.m.; Earl “The Pearl” Banks Saturdays, 12:30 p.m., and Tuesdays, 7 p.m.; Brandon Cunning Trio Sundays, 6 p.m., and Mondays, 7 p.m.; FreeWorld Sundays, 9:30 p.m.

Club 152 152 BEALE 544-7011

Live Music WednesdaysSundays, 7-11 p.m.; Live DJ Wednesdays-Sundays, 11 p.m.; Third Floor: DJ Tubbz Fridays, Saturdays, 10 p.m.

FedExForum 191 BEALE STREET

The Chainsmokers Friday, May 19.

Handy Bar 200 BEALE 527-2687

Bad Boy Matt & the Amazing Rhythmatics Tuesdays, Thursdays-Sundays, 7 p.m.-1 a.m.

Hard Rock Cafe 126 BEALE 529-0007

Brad Birkedahl Trio Saturday, May 20, 6-9 p.m.; Kingpin Skinny Pimp Birthday Bash Saturday, May 20, 10 p.m.-2 a.m.; Vinnie Hines Sunday, May 21, 9-11 p.m.

159 BEALE

Chris Gales Solo Acoustic Show Mondays-Saturdays, 12-4 p.m.; Eric Hughes Thursdays, Fridays, 5-8 p.m.; Karaoke MondaysThursdays, Sundays, 8 p.m.; Live Bands Fridays, Saturdays, 8 p.m.

King’s Palace Cafe 162 BEALE 521-1851

David Bowen Thursdays, 5:309:30 p.m., Fridays, Saturdays, 6:30-10:30 p.m., and Sundays, 5:30-9:30 p.m.

King’s Palace Cafe Patio 162 BEALE 521-1851

Sonny Mack Mondays-Fridays, 2-6 p.m.; Cowboy Neil Mondays, Thursdays, 7-11 p.m., and Saturdays, Sundays, 2-6 p.m.; Sensation Band Tuesdays, Fridays, 7-11 p.m.; Fuzzy and the Kings of Memphis Saturdays, 7-11 p.m.; Chic Jones and the Blues Express Sundays, 711 p.m.; North and South Band Wednesdays, 7-11 p.m.

King’s Palace Cafe Tap Room 168 BEALE 576-2220

Big Don Valentine’s Three Piece Chicken and a Biscuit Blues Band Thursdays, Tuesdays, 8 p.m.-midnight.

Rum Boogie Cafe

Dirty Crow Inn

The Silly Goose

182 BEALE 528-0150

855 KENTUCKY

100 PEABODY PLACE 435-6915

Young Petty Thieves Thursdays, 8 p.m.-midnight; Pam and Terry Friday, May 19, 5:30-8:30 p.m., and Saturday, May 20, 5:308:30 p.m.; Sensation Band Sunday, May 21, 7-11 p.m.; Eric Hughes Band Mondays, 8 p.m.-midnight; Gracie Curran Tuesdays, 8 p.m.-midnight; Plantation Allstars Wednesdays, 8 p.m.-midnight.

Rum Boogie Cafe Blues Hall 182 BEALE 528-0150

Memphis Bluesmasters Thursdays, Sundays, 8 p.m.-midnight; Vince Johnson and the Plantation Allstars Fridays, Saturdays, 4-8 p.m. and Sundays, 3-7 p.m.; McDaniel Band Tuesdays, Wednesdays, 8 p.m.-midnight, Friday, May 19, 9 p.m.-1 a.m., and Saturday, May 20, 9 p.m.-1 a.m.; Brian Hawkins Blues Party Mondays, 8 p.m.-midnight.

531 S. MAIN 523-9754

Amber Rae Dunn Hosts: Earnestine & Hazel’s Open Mic Wednesdays, 8-11 p.m.

Flying Saucer Draught Emporium 130 PEABODY PLACE 523-8536

Songwriters with Roland and Friends Mondays, 7-10 p.m.

Harbor Town Amphitheater 740 HARBOR BEND

Tobin Sprout, Elf Power Sunday, May 21.

St. Mary’s Cathedral 700 POPLAR 527-3361

Good People Sunday, May 21, 2-3:30 p.m.

The Peabody Hotel 149 UNION 529-4000

Ghost Town Blues Band Thursday, May 18, 6-11 p.m.

South Main Ghost River Brewing 827 S. MAIN 278-0087

Me & Leah Saturday, May 20, 5-8 p.m.; Sunday Evening Slowdown Sunday, May 21, 5-8 p.m.

Huey’s Downtown

Loflin Yard

77 S. SECOND 527-2700

7 W. CAROLINA

Silky O’Sullivan’s

Paulette’s

South Main Sounds

183 BEALE 522-9596

RIVER INN, 50 HARBOR TOWN SQUARE 260-3300

Live Pianist Thursdays, 5:308:30 p.m., Fridays and Saturdays, 5:30-9 p.m., Sundays, 11 a.m.2 p.m., and Mondays-Wednesdays, 5:30-8 p.m.

550 S. MAIN 494-6543

Massimo Bevilacqua, David Evans, Frankie Hollie, Pete Wood and Tracey Cayolle Friday, May 19, 7-9 p.m.

Purple Haze Nightclub

New Daisy Theatre Belle Tavern 117 BARBORO ALLEY 249-6580

The Rusty Pieces Sunday, May 21, 6-9 p.m.

140 LT. GEORGE W. LEE 577-1139

DJ Dance Music MondaysSundays, 10 p.m.

Rumba Room 303 S. MAIN 523-0020

Salsa Night Saturdays, 8:30 p.m.-3 a.m.

Bar DKDC 964 S. COOPER 272-0830

The Subtractions Friday, May 19; DJ Alix Brown with La Femme’s Sache Got Saturday, May 20; Harlan T. Bobo Sunday, May 21; Some Sons of Mudboy Wednesday, May 24.

May 18-24, 2017

Kayla Walker Thursdays, 67 p.m.; Susan Marshall Fridays, Saturdays, 7-10 p.m.; Nat “King” Kerr Fridays, Saturdays, 9-10 p.m.; Susan Marshall Wednesdays, 6-8 p.m.

Earnestine & Hazel’s

DJ Cody Fridays, Saturdays, 10 p.m.

Electric Church Sundays, 2-4 p.m.

Dueling Pianos Thursdays, Wednesdays, 9 p.m.-1 a.m., Fridays, Saturdays, 9 p.m.-3 a.m., and Sundays, Tuesdays, 8 p.m.midnight.

In Flames, White Knuckle Riot Friday, May 19, 7 p.m.; Paul Oakenfold Saturday, May 20, 10 p.m.; G-Mo Skee, Young Wicked, Gorilla Voltage Sunday, May 21, 8 p.m.

Bobbie & Tasha Wednesdays, 8-11 p.m.

Soul Shockers Sunday, May 21, 8:30 p.m.-midnight.

330 BEALE 525-8981

Itta Bena 145 BEALE 578-3031

King Jerry Lawler’s Hall of Fame Bar & Grille

20

THE CHAINSMOKERS FRIDAY, MAY 19

JAMES TAYLOR SATURDAY, AUGUST 5

BRUNO MARS SUNDAY, SEPTEMBER 17

JANET JACKSON WEDNESDAY, DECEMEBER 6

Performing with special guest Kiiara and featuring Emily Warren. Tickets available!

Rock and Roll Hall of Famer, and five-time Grammy Award winner is performing, with special guest Bonnie Raitt. Tickets available!

The Grammy Award winner is bringing The 24K Magic World Tour to FedExForum. Tickets available!

Global music icon and six-time Grammy Award winner is bringing her State Of The World Tour to FedExForum. Tickets available!

Get tickets at FedExForum Box Office | Ticketmaster locations | 1.800.745.3000 | ticketmaster.com | fedexforum.com


After Dark: Live Music Schedule May 18 - 24 Boscos

Minglewood Hall

Mortimer’s

2120 MADISON 432-2222

1555 MADISON 866-609-1744

590 N. PERKINS 761-9321

1737 MADISON 443-5232

Karaoke Thursdays, 9:30 p.m.; Kyle Pruzina Live Mondays, 10 p.m.-midnight.

Celtic Crossing 903 S. COOPER 274-5151

Jeremy Stanfill and Joshua Cosby Sundays, 6-9 p.m.; Candy Company Mondays.

Murphy’s 1589 MADISON 726-4193

River City Cadillacs Friday, May 19; The Fast Mothers Saturday, May 20; Fresh Flesh with Dana Wednesday, May 24.

University of Memphis The Bluff 535 S. HIGHLAND

DJ Kaz Thursday, May 18, 10 p.m.; Will Tucker Band Friday, May 19, 10 p.m.; The Hi-Techs Saturday, May 20, 10 p.m.; Bluegrass Brunch with the River Bluff Clan Sunday, May 21, 11 a.m.

Van Duren Solo Thursdays, 6:30-8:30 p.m.

Poplar/I-240 East Tapas and Drinks 6069 PARK 767-6002

Eddie Harris Thursdays, Fridays, 6:30-9:30 p.m.; Elizabeth Wise Tuesdays, 7-9 p.m.; Van Duren Solo Tuesdays, 7-9 p.m.

Cheffie’s Cafe

Bumpus Harley Davidson Collierville

483 HIGH POINT TERRACE 202-4157

325 S. BYHAILIA 316-1121

High Point Pub

2130 W. POPLAR 854-4455

Songwriter Night hosted by Leigh Ann Wilmot and Dave “The Rave” Saturdays, 5-8 p.m. 477 HIGH POINT TERRACE 452-9203

Pubapalooza with Stereo Joe Every other Wednesday, 8-11 p.m.

2559 BROAD 730-0719

Old Millington Winery 6748 OLD MILLINGTON 873-4114

Rice Drewry and Three Degrees Sunday, May 21.

1911 POPLAR 244-7904

Germantown

Left Unsung: A Memphis Grateful Dead Tribute Thursday, May 18; Crockett Hall Tuesdays with the Midtown Rhythm Section Tuesdays, 9 p.m.

Huey’s Southwind 7825 WINCHESTER 624-8911

After Dark Sunday, May 21, 8:30 p.m.-midnight.

Hi-Tone

Huey’s Germantown

412-414 N. CLEVELAND 278-TONE

Le Temulte Noir Sunday, May 21, 4-7 p.m.; Young Petty Thieves Sunday, May 21, 8:30 p.m.-midnight.

Lafayette’s Music Room 2119 MADISON 207-5097

Burnham Road Thursday, May 18, 8 p.m.; Deering and Down Friday, May 19, 6:30 p.m.; Cassette Set Friday, May 19, 10 p.m.; Parker McKay Saturday, May 20, 6:30 p.m.; Seeing Red Saturday, May 20, 10 p.m.; Joe Restivo 4 Sundays, 11 a.m.; Mighty Souls Brass Band Sunday, May 21, 8 p.m.; John Paul Keith and Co. Mondays, 6 p.m.; Scott and Vanessa Sudbury Monday, May 22, 6 p.m.; John Kilzer Tuesdays, 8 p.m.; Breeze Cayolle and New Orleans Wednesdays, 5:30 p.m.; Andrew Leahey and the Homestead Wednesday, May 24, 8 p.m.

Midtown Crossing Grill 394 N. WATKINS 443-0502

“The Happening” Open Songwriter Showcase Tuesdays, 6:30-9:30 p.m.

Cordova

2 Mule Plow Sunday, May 21, 4-7 p.m.; The Chaulkies Sunday, May 21, 8:30 p.m.-midnight; Tuesday Tunes on the Terrace Tuesdays, 5-8:30 p.m.

Growlers

Huey’s Midtown

No More Drama Sunday, May 21, 8:30-11:30 p.m.

Huey’s Cordova

Ed Finney and the U of M Jazz Quartet Thursdays, 8 p.m.; The Burners Friday, May 19, 9 p.m.; The Bluff City Backsliders Saturday, May 20, 10 p.m.; David Collins Jazz Sunday, May 21, 69 p.m.; Don and Wayde Tuesdays, 7-10 p.m.; Karaoke Wednesdays, 9 p.m.

1927 MADISON 726-4372

Huey’s Collierville

1771 N. GERMANTOWN PKWY. 754-3885

The Cove

China Gate LP Release featuring Boyscott, Elf Rage, Melinda, blaketheman1000 Thursday, May 18, 8 p.m.; Racquets, Rock Eupora, Brother Moses, and Pariah Fairy Friday, May 19, 8-11:45 p.m.; GRRL FEST Saturday, May 20, 7 p.m.; Joshua Powell and the Great Train Robbery, Grandpa Grew Trees Sunday, May 21, 8 p.m.; Chandler Murphy, Brooks Gengenbach Monday, May 22, 8 p.m.; Alex Fraser, Austin Holcomb, the Ellie Badge Tuesday, May 23, 8 p.m.

Dantones Band Saturday, May 20, 11 a.m.-3 p.m.

7677 FARMINGTON 318-3034

The Dantones Sunday, May 21, 8-11:30 p.m.

North Mississippi/ Tunica

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P&H Cafe 1532 MADISON 726-0906

Rock Starkaraoke Fridays; Open Mic Music with Tiffany Harmon Mondays, 9 p.m.-midnight; The Cap Gun Coalition Tuesday, May 23; Mitchell Ferguson Wednesday, May 24.

The Phoenix 1015 S. COOPER 338-5223

The Phoenix Blues Jam Tuesdays, 8-11 p.m.

Wild Bill’s 1580 VOLLINTINE 207-3975

The Wild Bill’s Band Fridays, Saturdays, 11 p.m.-3 a.m.

Young Avenue Deli 2119 YOUNG 278-0034

School of Rock Memphis Presents: Best of Season Show Sunday, May 21, 3-5:30 p.m.

East Memphis Folk’s Folly Prime Steak House

5727 QUINCE 682-2300

Ghost Town Blues Band Sunday, May 21, 8:30 p.m.-midnight.

Memphis Nites Club

Owen Brennan’s

551 S. MENDENHALL 762-8200

Intimate Piano Lounge featuring Charlotte Hurt MondaysThursdays, 5-9:30 p.m.; Larry Cunningham Fridays, Saturdays, 6-10 p.m.

Huey’s Poplar 4872 POPLAR 682-7729

3297 KIRBY 797-8599

Chick Rogers Sundays, 5 p.m.-3 a.m.

THE REGALIA, 6150 POPLAR 761-0990

Lannie McMillan Jazz Trio Sundays, 10 a.m.-2 p.m.

Live Entertainment Fridays, Saturdays, 9 p.m.-1 a.m.

Horseshoe Casino & Hotel AT CASINO CENTER, SOUTH OF MEMPHIS, NEAR TUNICA, MS 1-800-303-SHOE

Wayne Newton Saturday, May 20.

Thirsty Lizard 6541 US-51 662-536-6054

Teachers Pet Wednesday, May 24, 7-11 p.m.

Neil’s Music Room Eric Lewis’ CD Release Party and Birthday Bash Thursday, May 18, 7 p.m.; Jack Rowell’s Celebrity Jam Thursdays, 8 p.m.; Eddie Smith Fridays, 8 p.m.; Royal Blues Band Saturday, May 20, 8 p.m.; Benefit for St. Benedict’s Music Department Sunday, May 21, 8-10:30 p.m.; Eddie Harrison Mondays, 6-10 p.m.; Debbie Jamison & Friends Tuesdays, 6-10 p.m.; Elmo and the Shades Wednesdays, 8 p.m.midnight.

Hollywood Casino 1150 CASINO STRIP RESORT, TUNICA, MS 662-357-7700

Tunica Roadhouse

Bartlett Hadley’s Pub 2779 WHITTEN 266-5006

Almost Famous Friday, May 19, 9 p.m.; Thump Daddy Saturday, May 20, 9 p.m.; Furious George Sunday, May 21, 5:30 p.m.; Jonez’n Wednesday, May 24, 8 p.m.

Shelby Forest General Store 7729 BENJESTOWN 876-5770

Gary Keith Friday, May 19, 12-3 p.m.; Tony Butler Fridays, 6-8 p.m.; Robert Hull Sundays, 12:30-3:30 p.m.; Cecil Yancy Sunday, May 21, 12:30-3:30 p.m.

1107 CASINO CENTER, TUNICA, MS 662-363-4900

Live Music Fridays, Saturdays; Kid N Play Saturday, May 20.

Whispering Woods Hotel and Convention Center 11200 GOODMAN, OLIVE BRANCH, MS 662-893-6369

Michael Grimm “In the Raw” Friday, May 19, 6:30-9:30 p.m.

West Memphis/ Eastern Arkansas Cherry St. Pavilion HELENA, AR

17th Annual Arkansas Delta Family Gospel Fest Saturday, May 20, 12-7 p.m.

m e m p h i s f l y e r. c o m

Canvas

Mastodon, Eagles of Death Metal, Russian Circles Thursday, May 18, 6:30 p.m.; Sarah Simmons with Star & Micey Saturday, May 20, 7 p.m.; Meet the DJ Conference Monday, May 22, 2 p.m.

Collierville

ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT

Sunday Brunch with Joyce Cobb Sundays, 11:30 a.m.-2:30 p.m.

Summer/Berclair

21


SEE IT AT THE PINK PALACE!

CALENDAR of EVENTS:

May 18 - 24

Send the date, time, place, cost, info, phone number, a brief description, and photos — two weeks in advance — to calendar@memphisflyer. com or P.O. Box 1738, Memphis, TN 38101. DUE TO SPACE LIMITATIONS, ONGOING WEEKLY EVENTS WILL APPEAR IN THE FLYER’S ONLINE CALENDAR ONLY.

TH EAT E R

The Evergreen Theatre

Don’t Tell Me I Can’t Fly!, parental dictates leads a little girl to seek her own fantasies and ultimately who she really is. www.theatreworksmemphis.org. $20. Sun., 3 p.m., and Fri., Sat., 7:30 p.m. Through May 21. 1705 POPLAR (274-7139).

Germantown Community Theatre

The Game’s Afoot, it is December 1936 and Broadway star William Gillette, admired for his leading role in the play Sherlock Holmes, has invited fellow cast members to his Connecticut castle for weekend revelry. www.gctcomeplay.org. $24. Sundays, 2 p.m., and Fridays, Saturdays, 8 p.m. Through June 4. 3037 FOREST HILL-IRENE (453-7447).

March 4 - June 23, 2017

Hernando High School Performing Arts Center

Peter Pan Jr., final performance for STARS program. www.kudzuplayers.com. Sat., May 20. 805 DILWORTH LANE, HERNANDO, MS.

Memphis Hunt & Polo Club

Sunday Shakespeare Brunch: The Merchant of Venice, featuring buffet brunch, assorted drinks, and one of Shakespeare’s most daring works. www.tnshakespeare.org. $55. Sun., May 21, 12:30 p.m. 650 S. SHADY GROVE (683-2783).

Orange Mound Gallery

Squaring Up, unique theatrical experience combining movement, monologues, and collaborative artmaking. Performers and audience explore the world of human sex trafficking with stories from survivors, advocates, and social workers. project1arts.com. Thursdays-Saturdays, 7:30 p.m. Through May 31. 2232 LAMAR.

Playhouse on the Square

3050 Central Ave / Memphis 38111

901.636.2362

Million Dollar Quartet, on a Tuesday night shortly before Christmas in 1956, Johnny Cash, Jerry Lee Lewis, Elvis Presley, and Carl Perkins gather together at Sun Studio for the first and only time. Rock-n-roll at the moment of creation. www. playhouseonthesquare.org. $25-$45. Thursdays-Saturdays, 8 p.m., and Sundays, 2 p.m. Through May 28. 66 S. COOPER (726-4656).

May 18-24, 2017

St. Mary’s Cathedral

Good People, story of Elaine Blanchard’s childhood introduction to racism, violence and injustice. Donations welcome. (604-2149), www.elaineblanchard.com. Free. Sun., May 21, 2-3:30 p.m. 700 POPLAR (527-3361).

TheatreWorks

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Killer Joe, a broke west Dallas trailer trash family come up with a plan to kill the father’s ex-wife to collect her life insurance policy. They hire Killer Joe, a cop by day who moonlights as a murderer for hire. Adult content. (484-3467), www.newmoontheatre.org/. $20. Fridays, Saturdays, 8-10 p.m., and Sundays, 2-4 p.m. Through May 28. 2085 MONROE (274-7139).

Smokey and the Bandit at Malco Paradiso, Sunday and Wednesday Universal Parenting Place

PlayBack Memphis, bringing stories to life in a safe space to unlock healing, transformation, and joy. Families welcome. (207-3694). Free. Third Thursday of every month, 4:30-6 p.m. LEMOYNE-OWEN COLLEGE, 990 COLLEGE PARK.

A R T I ST R E C E PT I O N S

The Dixon Gallery & Gardens

Opening reception for “Jason Miller: objets de mémoire,” exhibition of photographs using everyday objects that have meaning and memories in the artist’s life. www.dixon.org. Thurs., May 18, 6-8 p.m. 4339 PARK (761-5250).

OT H E R A R T HAPPE N I NGS

“Artists & Activism” Panel Discussion

Commemorating the Ell Persons lynching, panelists will address new developments in the study of lynching and its relationship to cultural expression. Thurs., May 18, 6-8 p.m. UNIVERSITY OF MEMPHIS, ART AND COMMUNICATION BUILDING, WWW.CROSSTOWNARTS.ORG.

Celebrate South America Floral Demonstration

Rick Pudwell will create colorful and artistic designs featuring flowers from South America in celebration of Memphis in May’s honored country, Colombia. Completed designs will be given away as door prizes. $5 members, $12 nonmembers. Wed., May 24, noon. MEMPHIS BOTANIC GARDEN, 750 CHERRY (636-4100), WWW.MEMPHISBOTANICGARDEN.COM.

ONGOI NG ART

Art Village Gallery

“Cartagena: Memorias y Conexiones,” exhibition salutes honored Memphis in May country with works by Colombian artist Jorge Yances. www.artvillagegallery.com. Through May 26. 410 S. MAIN (521-0782).

Crosstown Arts

“The Moonpie Project: New Mural by Kevin Bongang,” exhibition of mural series featuring Nashvillebased artist. www.crosstownarts.org. Through May 31. 430 N. CLEVELAND (507-8030).

Crosstown Concourse (formerly Sears Crosstown)

“Barrier Free,” exhibition of a socially engaged art installation designed by Yancy Villa-Calvo to create awareness and encourage viewers to pause, reflect, and act on proposed wall along the US-Mexico border. www.crosstownarts.org. Through May 26. N. CLEVELAND AT NORTH PARKWAY.

The Dixon Gallery & Gardens

“Scent and Symbolism: Perfumed Objects and Images,” exhibition considering the role of scent in the history of art through a collection of 140 scented bottles. Regular Admission. Through July 2. “Jason Miller: objets de mémoire,” exhibition of photographs using everyday objects that have meaning and memories in the artist’s life. Through July 23. “Artifact of a Relationship,” exhibition of photographs by Jason Miller. Through May 31. “Made in Dixon,” exhibition showcasing the colorful and joy-filled artwork created by artists of all ages in the Dixon’s educational programs. www.dixon.org. Ongoing. 4339 PARK (761-5250).

Memphis Brooks Museum of Art

Brooks Outside: Tape Art, exhibition of temporary tape murals by The Rhode Island artist collective. Through May 26. “Art Builds Creativity,” exhibition of student artwork created by Brooks Museum’s 2016-17 Art Builds Creativity participants. Through May 21. “A Feast for the Eyes: 200 Years of American Still-Life Painting from the Hevrdejs Collection,” exhibition of rarely seen still-life paintings by major American artists including James Peale, John F. Peto, Thomas Hart Benton, Georgia O’Keeffe, and Andrew Wyeth. Through July 30. Rotunda Projects: Nnenna Okore,

exhibition of works with burlap to fashion abstract objects inspired by textures, colors, and landscapes. Through Sept. 10. Selections from William Eggleston’s Portfolios, exhibition of 18 photographs from most of the portfolios in the Brooks Museum’s collection. Through May 31. “Drawing Memory: Essence of Memphis,” exhibition of works inspired by nsibidi, a sacred means of communication among male secret societies in southeastern Nigeria by Victor Ekpuk. www.brooksmuseum. org. Ongoing. 1934 POPLAR (544-6209).

Metal Museum

“Metal in Motion,” exhibition and group show of work involving moving parts including hand-operated or run on a motor inviting the viewer to interact with the art. Through Aug. 27. “F.I.R.E. James Wade Jr.,” exhibition of cast metal works and drawings by James Wade, Jr. that investigate the meaning of place by referencing industrial, agrarian, and vernacular landscapes. Through July 16. “Implements of Grandeur,” exhibition of handmade tools by metalsmiths throughout the United States including Jack Brubaker, David Court, Dennis Dusek, Jeffrey Funk, Seth Gould, Tom Latané, Timothy Miller, and others. Through July 30. “Rise and Shine,” exhibition of pieces inspired by artisan traditions and tropical nature of the Pacific and Caribbean regions of Colombia by Colombian silversmith Alexandra Agudelo. www.metalmuseum. org. Through May 31. 374 METAL MUSEUM DR. (774-6380).

Stax Museum of American Soul Music

“Portraits in Soul: Rare Images from the API Archive,” exhibition of photographs by Bill Carrier Sr. and his team at Allied Photography Illustrators (API). www.staxmuseum. com. Through June 20. 926 E. MCLEMORE (946-2535).

continued on page 24


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C A L E N DA R: M AY 1 8 - 2 4 You Look Like A Comedy Show. Ross Turner and Katrina Coleman host this month. $8. Sat., May 20, 9 p.m.-midnight.

continued from page 22 DA N C E

Discussion with Grammy award-winning producer and recording engineer Matt RossSprang and recording engineer, mixer, producer, and mastering engineer Jeff Powell. Thurs., May 18, 6:30 p.m.

1532 MADISON (726-0906).

Enchantments: An Evening of Two Fairytales

PO ET RY /S PO K E N WO R D

Join Roudnev Youth Ballet for their classical adaptation of H.C. Andersen’s The Little Mermaid and Bihler’s newest original work, Ghostwriter. $25. Sat., May 20, 2-3:15 & 6-7:15 p.m.

Brinson’s

CROSSTOWN ARTS, 430 N. CLEVELAND (507-8030), WWW.CROSSTOWNARTS.ORG.

Strictly Hip-Hop Sunday, featuring open mic, live band, and DJ. $5, ladies free. Sundays, 5 p.m.

C O N F E R E N C ES/ C O NVE NT I O N S

341 MADISON (524-0104).

BUCKMAN ARTS CENTER AT ST. MARY’S SCHOOL, 60 N. PERKINS EXT. (537-1483), WWW.BUCKMANARTSCENTER.COM.

Cordova Branch Library

2017 Tennessee Bike Summit

May Day! Open Mic, poetry, and positivity benefiting Golden Cross Senior Ministries. Featuring authors selling and signing the book Voices of Warriors, games, prizes, and more. fb.me/spartancitypoets. Free. Sat., May 20, 3-5 p.m.

Interiorworks 17

Dancer-conceived, dancerproduced experience including new works by Ballet Memphis Company dancers, hors d’oeuvres, and beverages to benefit the Artists’ Resource Fund. Donations. Thur.-Sat., May 18-20, 7:30 p.m.

Over 100 planners, advocates, public officials, and citizens from across the Southeast convene to make their communities better places for people who walk and bike. Thur.-Fri., May 18-19. MUD ISLAND RIVER PARK, 125 N. FRONT (576-7241).

8457 TRINITY (415-2764).

LECT U R E /S P EA K E R

BALLET MEMPHIS, 7950 TRINITY, WWW.BALLETMEMPHIS.ORG.

TO U R S

The National Weather Service Answers Your Questions

C O M E DY

Cooper-Young Garden Walk

130-plus gardens open for viewing. Featuring unique, creative art installations. Keynote speaker, Lisa Orgler. $15. Sat.-Sun., May 20-21, 9 a.m.-4:30 p.m.

How does National Weather Service track changing weather? At what point should you seek shelter during storms? These questions about the weather and more will be answered by meteorologist Jim Branda. Free. Tues., May 23, 5-6 p.m.

Midtown Crossing Grill

Locally Sourced Stand-Up, evening of free stand-up comedy from some of the best comedians in Memphis. Sat., May 20, 7-9 p.m. 394 N. WATKINS (443-0502).

ADDRESS: 37 South Cooper, Memphis, TN 38104 ONLINE: www.hattiloo.org BOX OFFICE: 901.525.0009

SoundOff: From Studio to Turntable

P&H Cafe

COOPER-YOUNG DISTRICT, CORNER OF COOPER AND YOUNG (2995887), WWW.COOPERYOUNGGARDENCLUB.ORG.

COLLIERVILLE PUBLIC LIBRARY, 501 POPLAR VIEW PARKWAY (4572601), COLLIERVILLELIBRARY.ORG.

Open Mic Comedy, Thursdays, 9 p.m.

continued on page 27

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C A L E N DA R: M AY 1 8 - 2 4 continued from page 24 E X P OS/ SALES

Repticon Memphis Reptile & Exotic Animal Show

Reptile event featuring vendors offering reptile pets, supplies, feeders, cages, and merchandise as well as live animal seminars, raffles, and prizes. Educational, family-oriented fun for everyone. $10. Sat., May 20, 10 a.m.-5 p.m., and Sun., May 21, 10 a.m.-4 p.m. LANDERS CENTER (DESOTO CIVIC CENTER), 4560 VENTURE, SOUTHAVEN, MS (863-268-4273), WWW.REPTICON.COM.

V.I.B. (Very Important Bride) Show

Plan your wedding featuring vendors, games, and door prizes. Food tasting by the Whispering Woods Catering Chef. Free. Tues., May 23, 7-9 p.m.

Eye Opener 5K PJ Run

Register online and join in the the fight against drowsy driving. Wear your PJs to Memphis’ only PJ Run featuring food, family fun, awards, and a chance to take home a Queen Size bed from Sleepy Zzzs. $15. Sat., May 20, 6-8 p.m. HOUSTON LEVEE PARK, 9777 WOLF RIVER (486-2984), WWW.EYEOPENER5KPJRUN.RACESONLINE.COM.

Heroes in Recovery 6K

Run/walk to break the stigma associated with substance abuse and mental health disorders and support Grace House of Memphis. The sixth kilometer, as opposed to a typical 5K, symbolizes the extra effort to sustain recovery. $25-$40. Sat., May 20, 8-11 a.m. OVERTON PARK, EAST PARKWAY PAVILION, WWW.HEROESINRECOVERY.COM.

Memphis Redbirds Home Games

For more information, visit website. Through May 18.

Junior Fishing Rodeo

AUTOZONE PARK, THIRD AND UNION (721-6000), WWW.MEMPHISREDBIRDS.COM.

Day of fishing and fun at Catch’em Lakes for children ages five-13 only. For more information, visit website. Sat., May 20.

Rylee’s Run 5K

AGRICENTER INTERNATIONAL, 7777 WALNUT GROVE (757-7777), WWW.AGRICENTER.ORG.

MIKE ROSE SOCCER COMPLEX, 9000 E. SHELBY (205-5311851), RACESONLINE.COM/EVENTS/RYLEES-RUN-5K.

S P EC IA L EVE NTS

KIDS

Featuring the Germantown Symphony, tour of rose garden, and Plein-Air Memphis artists selling their art with part of the proceeds benefiting the Collierville Arts Council. $30-$60. Sun., May 21, 5 p.m.

Benefiting LeBonheur Children’s Hospital and March of Dimes. $25. Fri., May 19, 7-10 p.m.

Girls N’ Pearls Candid Conversation

UCAN of Memphis. Lunch provided. 25. Sat., May 20, 9:30 a.m.-2 p.m. YOUNG LIFE MEMPHIS, 1177 POPLAR (262-8642), WWW.UCANOFMEMPHIS.ORG.

WHISPERING WOODS HOTEL AND CONVENTION CENTER, 11200 GOODMAN, OLIVE BRANCH, MS (368-6782), WWW.MIDSOUTHWEDDINGSHOW.COM.

9th Annual Symphony in the Rose Garden

HISTORIC HOME OF BOB AND MARY JEAN SMITH, 156 WEST POPLAR, COLLIERVILLEARTSCOUNCIL.ORG.

continued on page 28

F ES T IVALS

Foundry Invitational & River Exhibition

Featuring foundry workshops, slide lecture, opportunity to participate in an iron pour, and Family Fun Day on Saturday with food trucks and handson activities. Thurs., May 18, 10 a.m.-5 p.m., Fri., May 19, 10 a.m.-5 p.m., Sat., May 20, 10 a.m.-5 p.m., and Sun., May 21, 12-5 p.m. METAL MUSEUM, 374 METAL MUSEUM DR. (774-6380), WWW.METALMUSEUM.ORG/FIRE.

How-To Festival

DIY experts share demonstrations and hands-on learning for all ages. Free. Sat., May 20, 1-4 p.m. GERMANTOWN COMMUNITY LIBRARY, 1925 EXETER (757-7323), WWW.HOWTOFESTIVAL.COM.

el James Micha

June 9 - 11 Tickets start at $10 Available at the Fitz Gift Shop or call Ticketmaster at 800-745-3000 or visit ticketmaster.com. Hotel Packages start at $79 Call 1-662-363-LUCK(5825) and mention code: CPRED. Tripadvisor Best magic show in Las Vegas

CASINO PROMOTIONS Tuesdays in May

MONDAY, MAY 22

Junior Fishing Rodeo at the Agricenter International, Saturday, May 20th May Memphis Flea Market

Tournament: 3pm Come join the fun because everyone who plays wins... EVERYONE!

Win a half side of beef and an 8-cubic foot freezer. Receive one entry for every 20 points earned each Tuesday.

Stop by Redeemers Group booth while enjoying a day of fun. $3. Sat., May 20, 8 a.m.-5 p.m., and Sun., May 21, 9 a.m.-4:30 p.m. TIGER LANE, 335 SOUTH HOLLYWOOD, WWW.REDEEMERSGROUP.COM.

ALL YOU CAN EAT BUFFET

The Parking Party

Joint fund-raiser hosted by Overton Park Alliance and Park Friends to raise funds for OPC’s Parking lot fund featuring Loveland & Duren. Donations accepted. Wed., May 24, 6-8 p.m. OVERTON PARK GOLF SHACK, 2080 POPLAR (413-1031), WWW.PARKFRIENDS.NET.

S P O R TS / F IT N ES S

Fridays & Saturdays in May • 6pm - 10pm If the last three digits of your Key Rewards card match the three selected numbers in the exact order, you win a guaranteed minimum of $500 cash! 5X entries on Sundays, 10X entries on Mondays, and 20X entries on Tuesdays.

35th Annual Memphis in May Triathlon

Featuring Sports Expo and spectator watching. Fri.Sun., May 19-21. EDMUND ORGILL PARK, MILLINGTON, TN, WWW.PR-EVENTMANAGEMENT.NET.

FitzgeraldsTunica.com • 1-662-363-LUCK (5825) • Must be 21 and a Key Rewards member. See Cashier • Players Club for rules. Tax and resort fee not included in listed price. Advance hotel reservations required and subject to availability. $50 credit or debit card is required upon hotel check-in. Arrivals after 6pm must be guaranteed with a credit card. Management reserves the right to cancel, change and modify the event or promotion. Gaming restricted patrons prohibited. Gambling Problem? Call 1-800-522-4700.

TUESDAYS IN MAY

ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT

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C A L E N DA R: M AY 1 8 - 2 4 continued from page 27 Basset Belly Rubs Dog Wash

Have your dog washed for a $10 donation benefiting Bassett Belly Rubs Rescue. Sat., May 20, 11 a.m.-2 p.m. HOLLYWOOD FEED, 5502 POPLAR (249-5691), WWW.HOLLYWOODFEED.COM.

CTHA Inaugural Annual Meeting and Community Improvement Gala Featuring local leaders representing safety, public health, mental health, and government affairs. A community call to action will be given by actress Lynn Whitfield. $125-$200. Tues., May 23, 7-9 p.m. MEMPHIS HILTON, 939 RIDGE LAKE (684-6011), WWW.COMMONTABLEHEALTH.ORG.

Dog Day at the Garden

$5 members, $10 nonmembers. Sun., May 21, 2-5 p.m. MEMPHIS BOTANIC GARDEN, 750 CHERRY (636-4100), WWW.MEMPHISBOTANICGARDEN.COM.

Peabody Rooftop Party

Meet on the roof for music and fun. $10-$15. Thursdays, 6-10 p.m. Through Aug. 17. THE PEABODY HOTEL, 149 UNION (529-4000), PEABODYHOTEL.COM.

Ruby Bridges Reading Festival

Each child in grades prekindergarten through high school has a chance to receive

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free books and entertainment including storytelling, face painting, balloon animals, performances, and food truck treats. Free. Sat., May 20, 10 a.m.-3 p.m. NATIONAL CIVIL RIGHTS MUSEUM, 450 MULBERRY (521-9699), WWW.CIVILRIGHTSMUSEUM.ORG.

FO O D & D R I N K EVE NTS

3rd Annual International Tea

To benefit the Arc Mid-South. $25. Sat., May 20, 2-4 p.m. THE SALVATION ARMY KROC CENTER, 800 E. PARKWAY S. (327-2473), WWW.THEARCMIDSOUTH.ORG.

Charlie’s Crusaders Pet Rescue Italian Dinner

Great Italian food and a chance to bid on prizes benefiting Charlie’s Crusaders Pet Rescue. $20. Sun., May 21, 12-4 p.m. COLETTA’S, 2850 APPLING (496-1962), WWW.CHARLIESCRUSADERS.ORG.

Memphis BBQ for a Cause

Memphis in May attendees have the opportunity to enjoy competition barbecue, other meats and side dishes with Memphis BBQ for a Cause and Smoking Pigs Barbeque Company. $60. Thurs., May 18, 5-9 p.m. TOM LEE PARK, OFF RIVERSIDE DR., MEMPHISBBQFORACAUSE.COM.

Memphis in May World Championship Barbecue Cooking Contest $5-$35. Wed.-Sat., May 17-20.

TOM LEE PARK, OFF RIVERSIDE DR., WWW.MEMPHISINMAY.ORG.

F I LM

Finding Tobey

Documentary details the history of the Memphis skateboarding scene. RSVP by email, findingtobey@gmail.com. findingtobey@gmail.com. Fri., May 19, 7:30 p.m. CROSSTOWN ARTS, 430 N. CLEVELAND (507-8030), WWW.CROSSTOWNARTS.ORG.

In Our Hands: The Battle for Jerusalem Tues., May 23, 7 p.m.

MALCO PARADISO CINEMA, 584 S. MENDENHALL (682-1754), WWW.MALCO.COM.

Now Is the Time: Healthcare for Everyone Movie with discussion regarding Republican plans to replace ACA(Obamacare). Free. Wed., May 24, 6:30-8:30 p.m.

NESHOBA UNITARIAN UNIVERSALIST CHURCH, 7350 RALEIGH-LAGRANGE (266-2626), WWW.NESHOBACHURCH.ORG.

Smokey and the Bandit 40th Anniversary

Sun., May 21, 2 p.m., and Wed., May 24, 7 p.m. MALCO PARADISO CINEMA, 584 S. MENDENHALL (682-1754), WWW.MALCO.COM.

Love one another. It’s that simple.

First Congregational Church

She never had a church. He’d never missed a Sunday. They found a church that speaks to both of them.

Together.

www.firstcongo.com Phone: 901.278.6786 1000 South Cooper Memphis, TN 38104 Sunday Worship 10:30 am


29

ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT

m e m p h i s f l y e r. c o m


F O O D N E W S B y L e s l e y Yo u n g

On Track

Short ribs are the star.

From Ping-Pong to fancy ice cream, Railgarten offers something for everyone.

JUSTIN FOX BURKS

P

eople always say you have to have a lot of money to enjoy New York. Not true. All you have to do is walk out of your front door. On one of my jaunts that involved little planning and a lot of wandering with my camera around Williamsburg, I stumbled upon Rough Trade Records, of London punk and post-punk fame and reported to be the largest record store in NYC. Besides its size, what was most mystifying was the sheer beauty of the design. There were stacks of old rail cars, some of them suspended in the air, beautifully lit with proper windows installed, serving as coffee shops or an office stacked above the checkout counter. I wanted to curl up and live there. It was magical. There are some groups in Memphis that are working to bring similar types of magical spaces to Memphis, namely It’s Fine, the management group behind Rec Room, Loflin Yard, and, most recently, Railgarten. With Railgarten, the group offers their own take of using old rail cars as creative spaces, such as a stage, a bar, a seating area, and on and on. That’s just the

beginning. Railgarten is a campus of “the largest sandbox in Memphis,” depending on whether it’s being used for volleyball or by a bunch of kids; a massive playground; quite possibly several hundred lawn chairs; a Ping-Pong bar with professional-level tables that is adults-only after 6 p.m. and can be used by league players or on a first date; a tiki bar with drinks conceived by cocktail artist Mary Oglesby, who also came up with the Jameson and coffee Slushee and the whiskey and Coke Icee for the Ping-Pong bar; as well as a traditional diner and an ice cream shop. Yes, that means boozy milkshakes, and they even have a gin-and-juice flavored ice cream. But we’re here to talk about food. The group brought in Aaron Gardner of Monkey Train Grazing Co. food

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talking to them,” Jambon says. “We had no idea what we would do our first weekend open. We have a willingness to do what is necessary to be good neighbors and accommodate and make concessions to what code asks us to do. “We want this to be a space that offers something to almost everybody. Families can walk here and bring their kids, or college kids can come and play games. We feel like there is a need for a venue like this,” Jambon says. Railgarten, 2166 Central, 231-5043, railgarten. com. Open Sun.-Thurs., 7 a.m. to midnight, Fri. and Sat., 7 a.m.-2 a.m.

ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT

truck fame. Gardner served time at California’s The French Laundry, New York’s Daniel as well as La Grenouille, and Hillstone Restaurant Group, which eventually brought him to Memphis to help run Houston’s. “With the diner, I went with food I liked to eat, staples of any diner but with a twist,” Gardner says. What he means is, he puts pork belly on a burger and puts the burger on a Hawaiian bun. By pot roast, he means short ribs, or rather double-milk stout-braised short ribs, over three-cheese pimento mac and cheese ($18.50). And by French dip, he means Gotta Get Up to Get Down stout-braised short ribs, gruyere cheese, sriracha fried onions, horseradish cream, served on a French baguette with their secret au jus ($14.75). They have a veggie burger that rivals any regular burger, according to director of operations Mason Jambon, who has worked at restaurants all over the country, including Commander’s Palace. “What we have here is finer diner food,” Jambon says. “It’s a twist on traditional diner fare, exciting but accessible. That’s what we strive for throughout the property.” Next door to the diner they serve 16 flavors of gelato or sorbet by High Road Craft Ice Cream (“made by chefs for chefs,” according to their website), with flavors such as the above-mentioned Gin and Juice, Bananas Foster, Thai Street Coffee, and Cheesecake Brownie. They also make their own toppings and even heat up cobbler if you so choose to add to your Caramel Pecan ice cream. I am antiexclamation point, but they have a real SnoWizard SnoBall machine from New Orleans! As you may have heard, parts of the property were shut down by code enforcement after the opening. As reported by the Flyer’s Toby Sells, “The next council meeting will feature an evidentiary hearing on whether or not the council should take back the permit it gave Railgarten owners back in February to operate their entertainment complex in Midtown.” According to the council’s attorney Allan Wade, Railgarten owners did not tell council members they were going to use parts of the property, and “the hearing will likely be a public review of the facts in the case in which council members will weigh the pros and cons of revoking the permit” given in February. The next hearing will be held May 23rd. “We are talking to valet companies to address any parking issues, and we’ve reached out to our neighbors and are

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THANK YOU MEMPHIS FOR VOTING US

S P I R ITS By Richard Murff

Best Chinese

Ghost Gauntlet

5 YEARS IN A ROW!

WE DELIVER!

The Flying Saucer: renovated and ready for takeoff.

four or five others,” locally and from the corporate office in Dallas. This includes Brandy (who does her best to understand). Anyone remotely familiar with the current beer scene will recognize most of the names on this list: Sierra Nevada Pale Ale, Duvel Belgian Blonde, and standbys like Founder’s, Oskar Blues, and Dogfish Head — but even the most pedantic beer snob will admit these are standbys for a reason. The list isn’t definitive and will change from time to time. Then there are the Exceptionals, the silver medal winners that rotate out a little more often. The bottom line is that one side of the menu style lists beers by region and style, and the other by excessive awesomeness.

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All this is part of a remodeling and grand re-opening which closed the Saucer down for six weeks. As Kirk told me about the kitchen (about three times larger), the new food menu, and improvements to the beer garden to enhance the acoustics, all I could think was that the contractors had done a fantastic job, because I still couldn’t see what they’d done. It is still the Flying Saucer, though, and they still sport 75 beers on tap and about 150 labels in bottles. The remodel has left the famous porcelain saucers festooned on walls and ceiling — a testament to those who have tried 200 different beers. Don’t get too ambitious. The Saucer will only give you credit for three a day, so thanks again, legal. Of course, it’s for your own good, and no one wants you bathing in the stuff — it’s bad hygenie and bad manners. For the true beer adventurers (in this harbor town), you try four of the Memphis brews on the gauntlet and get another local kid on tap.

m e m p h i s f l y e r. c o m

The bartender, Brandy (such a fine girl), wouldn’t even tell me what I’d ordered.

ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT

I

was drinking a brown ale. At least that’s what I think that it was. It was brown and certainly an ale — but there are purists who will argue that this doesn’t qualify it as an official brown ale. With all due respect, it was a brown ale. This state of confusion was caused by the Flying Saucer’s “Ghost Gauntlet,” which consists of four unnamed local brews, numbered sequentially to keep you in the dark about just what you are drinking. The ABV is listed, but I’m pretty sure that’s just the legal department being a wet sandwich. I ordered number ... well, why spoil the surprise? It was brown, an ale, and very good. The bartender, Brandy (such a fine girl), wouldn’t even tell me what I’d ordered after she’d laid it down. So the only option at that point was to drink up and hope my luck held out. It did. Kirk Caliendo, the Flying Saucer’s friendly GM, assured me that all the Ghost Gauntlet beers have been vetted. The point, of course, is to drink all four in the gauntlet sometime in the next couple of weeks, then go online and vote for your favorite. Whichever candidate garners the most votes goes into the 75-draft-beer lineup. The Ghost Gauntlet is good for anyone falling into a “beer rut,” or worse, overwhelmed by the choices out there. For me, whatever the hell I was drinking was a pleasant surprise, one that I’d almost certainly have missed had I relied on my own waning brainpower to order. The purpose, other than having a little fun with beer, says Kirk, is to “judge based on the palate, as opposed to the perceived value of the brand.” If running the Ghost Gauntlet is a bit much, or you’re one of those control freaks who wants a modicum of control over what you ingest, higher up on the menu is the Transcendent 20: a selection of beers that takes the guesswork out by focusing on the absolute best of the best of a style, as picked by Kirk and “touched by about

33


FILM REVIEW By Chris McCoy

Wheeler Dealer Richard Gere gets in over his head in Norman.

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T

he word “entrepreneur” has its roots in a French word that originally meant something like “gobetween.” By that definition, Norman Oppenheimer (Richard Gere) is a consummate entrepreneur. He runs the consulting firm Oppenheimer Strategies — rather, he is the consulting firm Oppenheimer Strategies. We first meet him, white iPhone earbuds in place, mapping out social connections on a Starbucks napkin. He’s trying to land a $300 million deal for … something. We’re not quite sure what. And neither are any of the people he gets on the other end of the phone. But Norman doesn’t seem to get discouraged, even as door after door is slammed in his face. When his nephew Philip Cohen (Michael Sheen) describes contacting one of his billionaire targets, Jo Wilf (Harris Yulin), as “a drowning man waving to get the attention of an ocean liner,” Norman replies that he is “a very good swimmer, as long as I have my head above water.” Norman’s consulting business basically consists of his trying to bring people together — he even consults with other consultants, he brags. But the biggest problem is, he doesn’t add much value to the deal. Whatever water he used to carry in New York is long dried up. Now, he’s just an old widower living by his wits, waiting for his luck to run out. But then, Norman is hit with one final stroke of luck. After talking his way into an international oiland-gas exploration conference,

Richard Gere plays the titular role in Joseph Cedar’s Norman.

he sets his sights on Micha Eshel (Lior Ashkenazi), a Deputy Minister of Trade and Labor for the Israeli government who seems to be on the way out of government. The plan is to use Micha’s name to get a foot in the door with billionaire Arthur Taub (Josh Charles) and to use Taub’s name to get Micha’s attention. Both parties think Norman is friends with the other party, and he plays the two off of each other for influence. If this plot is sounding unbelievably convoluted to you, that means you’ve got a good handle on Norman (full title: The Moderate Rise and Tragic Fall of a New York Fixer). The film is at its best in the early stages, when Gere as Norman serves as a sort of tour guide through the corridors of elite New York wealth and power. People in fine suits are unfailingly cordial, until they sense that Norman is no use to them and throw him out. That all changes when, after a story break of three years, Micha’s luck turns and he becomes Prime Minister of Israel. With a single warm hug at a state reception, people are giving Norman their card instead of the other way around. And that, of course, is when Norman gets himself in way over his head. What Norman thinks of as favors for an old friend, Israeli federal law enforcement officer Alex Green (Charlotte Gainsbourg) thinks of as illegal influence peddling. Israeli-American writer/director Joseph Cedar has crafted a story


FILM REVIEW By Chris McCoy

Alien Covenant R King Arthur: Legend of the Sword PG13 Snatched R

Chuck R Norman R A Quiet Passion PG13 Snatched R

Radha (Telugu) NR Guardians of the Galaxy Vol. 2 PG13 (Giant Screen) The Zookeeper’s Wife PG13

Alien: Covenant R Diary of a Wimpy Kid: The Long Haul PG Everything, Everything PG13 King Arthur: Legend of the Sword PG13 Snatched R The Wall R Guardians of the Galaxy Vol. 2 PG13

SPECIAL EVENTS:

TCM: Smokey and the Bandit 40th Anniversary Sun. 5/21 – 2:00pm & Wed. 5/24-7:00pm @ Paradiso

In Our Hands: Battle for Jerusalem Tue. 5/23- 7:00pm @ Paradiso

Norman Opens Friday Ridgeway Cinema Grill

Baywatch R – Opens Everywhere Thurs. 5/25 (check listings)

The Fate of the Furious PG13 Gifted PG13

How to Be a Latin Love (subtitled) PG13 Sleight R The Fate of the Furious PG13 The Boss Baby PG Beauty and the Beast (2017) PG

m e m p h i s f l y e r. c o m

Alien: Covenant R King Arthur: Legend of the Sword PG13 Snatched R Guardians of the Galaxy Vol. 2 PG13

none of that can overcome the fact that Norman is a fairly innocuous film. Its highs are not very high, its laughs never grow beyond a chuckle, and its lows leave you with a shrug rather than a tear. It’s good to see original ideas and mature, politically sophisticated subject matter get a chance in contemporary Hollywood, but simple competence isn’t enough to make Norman more than a passing curiosity.

ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT

that lies somewhere between The Manchurian Candidate and the Bill Murray/Richard Dreyfuss comedy What About Bob? His biggest directorial challenge is making scene after scene of Richard Gere talking on his omnipresent iPhone visually interesting, and he goes far beyond the conventional split screen by digitally blending the halls of power with whatever random Office Depot the borderline-destitute Norman happens to be drifting through at the moment. Gere, for his part, is at least taking the role seriously. He shares some crackerjack scenes with Steve Buscemi as a pugilistic rabbi and Hank Azaria as a younger hustler who latches onto Norman late in the proceedings. But still,

35


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COPELAND SERVICES, L.L.C. Hiring Armed State Licensed Officers/ Unarmed Officers. Three Shifts Available. Same Day Interview. 1661 International Place 901-258-5872 or 901-818-3187 Interview in Professional Attire. USIC LOCATE TECHNICIAN Daytime, full-time Locate Technician positions available! •100% PAID TRAINING •Company vehicle & equipment provided •PLUS medical, dental, vision & life insurance Requirements: Must be able to work outdoors, HS Diploma or GED, Ability to work OT and weekends, Must have valid driver’s license with safe driving record. Apply today: www.usicllc.com EEO/AA

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Pointe at Heritage Landing. Located just minutes from historic Downtown Memphis. 2BR Apts & Townhomes $707; 3BR Apts & Townhomes

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THE LAST WORD by Jen Clarke

The Spin Zone

m e m p h i s f l y e r. c o m

The herky-jerky pace of activity of our current news environment has blessed me in an unexpected way: I have given up on writing about it, at least for now. Each time I’ve tried, I’ve gotten as far as jotting notes and organizing a loose outline, only to be interrupted by a notification from CNN or The Washington Post signaling that the rest of the world has moved on to some fresh new confusion. An evergreen piece would be only eight words long: “Please slow down while I process this information.” At first, it was frustrating, but now I feel liberated. I have more time to listen and absorb. I’m free to devote my creative energy to other topics, such as a cultural phenomenon that has piqued my curiosity. So, at the risk of going full Andy Rooney, can someone explain to me how fidgeting became cool all of a sudden? Fidget spinners — and their more complicated cousin, the fidget cube — appear to be this year’s Pokémon Go. As with most trends, the movement started with kids and quickly ballooned to become Fun for Everyone. Now, we’re at the Thinkpiece Phase, during which the trend is over analyzed as a sure sign of the times and indicator of society’s progress or decay, depending on whom you ask. Soon, someone will walk into oncoming traffic or commit some other reckless behavior while participating in the trend. TV news will follow with dramatic warnings that This Hot New Trend Might Be Deadly, and the life cycle will be complete. For those unfamiliar with the phenomenon, the spinner is a gadget that operates like a handheld top or pinwheel. Each has a bearing at the center and three rounded “blades.” While holding the bearing, the user flicks one of the blades and the gizmo starts spinning. And spinning. That’s it. “Oh, those things,” you might be thinking. Yep. Those things come in every color. Some glow in the dark. Some have LED lights. A sleek carrying case can keep your spinner safe and dust-free. Some kind of heavily branded luxury spinner will hit the market any day now, The spinner so keep an eye on Kendall Jenner’s Instagram feed for that. Or a $1,000 limited-edition model will come preloaded with a U2 album or something. Are the spinners a salve for sensory issues and attention disorders? Are they the heir to the pointless toy trends of my childhood, say, slap bracelets and Pogs, or their more complicated predecessor, the Rubik’s Cube? Or has society already devolved so much in the past 120 or so days, as one New Yorker writer implies, that “spinning one’s wheels has been recast as a diverting recreation and embraced by a mass audience?” Who knows! All I can tell you is that fidget spinners are So. Hot. Right. Now. At a gas station near my home, they’re prominently displayed in front of the register next to the lighters, lottery tickets, and Lightning cables. In my Facebook feed, they’re confiscated and adulated in equal measure by my teacher and parent friends. In pedicure chairs and doctors’ offices, at tables at Gus’s, in line for the restroom at FedExForum, people of all ages are letting their fidget flags fly. On behalf of everyone who has received a warning side-eye in church or been reprimanded in class for an irrepressible urge to squirm, I say: It’s about time this behavior was normalized. Inability to sit still has long been considered a deficiency or a distraction. Yet everybody fidgets, and restlessness is not a 21st-century ailment. In fact, one theory suggests that our brains cannot devote 100 percent of our working memory to a single task because our prehistoric ancestors needed to focus on hunting and gathering while also remaining alert to vicious predators in their surroundings. When phones were tethered to walls, we coiled the cords around our fingers during long calls. When they became cordless, we paced. Now, we compulsively check our smartphones out of boredom. Long before they were enhanced with addictive chemicals, cigarettes were the original fidget devices. That’s why smokers who attempt to quit are advised to find ways to keep their hands busy. At my office, preoccupying “desk toys” — Slinkies, stress balls, and even tiny Zen gardens — adorn almost every workspace. I suppose that makes us doodlers, pen clickers, toe tappers, knuckle poppers, and tabletop drummers fidget hipsters. It’s nice to be on the vanguard for once. Jen Clarke is an unabashed Memphian and a digital marketing strategist.

THE LAST WORD

FULLEMPTY | DREAMSTIME.COM

Fidgeting has become cool — for a minute or two.

39


MINGLEWOOD HALL

ON SALE FRIDAY: Lil Yachty [7/14] Perpetual Groove [6/29] Whiskey Myers [8/4] 5/18: Mastodon & Eagles of Death Metal w/ Russian Circles 5/21: SCM Awards 5/22: Meet the DJ 5/28: Trey Songz w/ Mike Angel 6/3: The Shins w/ Surfer Blood 6/17: V3Fights 6/21: In This Moment w/ Starset, VIMIC, Little Miss Nasty 6/23: Eddie B Comedy (2 Shows SOLD OUT) 7/1: Too Short w/ Playa Fly & Gangsta Blac 7/8: Steve Earle & The Dukes w/ The Mastersons 7/19: Jimmy Herring & The Invisible Whip 8/1: Foster The People w/ Alex Cameron

Est. 1942 Just Announced: Sat July 19 - Daisyland w/ Zomboy Tue Sept 26 - Jidenna Upcoming Shows Fri May 19 - In Flames w/ Kataklysm and White Knuckle Riot Sat May 20 - Daisyland w/ Paul Oakenfold Sun May 21 - Twiztid Fri May 26 - Wake the Nation Tour Sat Jun 3 - Memphis Punk Fest 5 Tue June 6 - Skillet Thu June 8 - Robert Randolph and the Family Band Sat June 10 - Daisyland w/ Morgan Page Sun June 18 - Blackbear Tue June 20 - Russ Sat July 15 - Daisyland w/ Eptic Thu July 20 - George Porter Jr. Mon July 24 - Dj Shadow Sun Aug 6 - HELLYEAH Thu Aug 24 - Flow Tribe NEW DAISY THEATRE | 330 Beale St Memphis 901.525.8981 • Advance Tickets available at NewDaisy.com and Box Office

1884 LOUNGE

5/20: Sarah Simmons w/ Star & Micey 5/27: 10 Years “Autumn Effect Anniversary Tour” w/ Black Map 5/31: Kevin Ross 6/2: The Hip Abduction

MORE EVENTS AT MINGLEWOODHALL.COM

TUT-UNCOMMON ANTIQUES 421 N. Watkins St. 278-8965 1500 sq. ft. of Vintage & Antique Jewelry. Retro Furniture and Accessories. Original Paintings, Sculpture, Pottery, Art & Antiques. We are the only store in the Mid-South that replaces stones in costume jewelry.

MURPHY’S Pool Table • Darts • WI-FI • Digital Jukebox Visit our website for live music listings or check the AfterDark section of this Memphis Flyer KITCHEN OPEN LATE, OPEN FOR LUNCH! 1589 Madison • 726-4193 www.murphysmemphis.com

MOTHER’S DAY SALE!

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New Taproom hours:

HIGHLAND STRIP 555 S Highland 901 452 4731

CORDOVA 981 N GTown Pkwy 901 654 3678 whatevershops.com

Join our texting club and get 10% off your next purchase! Text WHATEVER to 51660 . Message & data rates may apply*

UBER EATS NOW AVAILABLE AT THESE RESTAURANTS SOUTH OF BEALE 361 S Main St 38103 901.526.0388 southofbeale.com

Mon 4 - 7 p.m. Thurs & Fri 4 - 10 p.m. Sat 1 - 10 p.m. Sun 1 - 7 p.m. 768 S. Cooper 901.207.5343 MENTION AD & GET FREE HI-5 FROM VANESSA

Steam Clean 3 Rooms For $99. “It’s Thorough, Dries Quickly & Stays Clean Longer - Or It’s Free.” Call 901.282.5306

Memphis in May = Lingerie !! www.cocoandlolas.com Finest lace - Coolest place 710 S. Cox|901-425-5912|Mon-Sat 11:30-7:00

I Buy Old Windup Phonographs & Records

Esp. on labels: Gennett, Paramount, Vocalion, QRS, Superior, Supertone, Champion, OKeh, Perfect, Romeo, Sun, Meteor, Flip; many others. Also large quantities of older 45’s. Paul. 901-435-6668

Memphis’ First Gastropub. Since 2009. Strong Chef-Driven Food Craft Beer & Cocktails.

I BUY RECORDS! Call 901.359.3102

May 19 - John Nemeth Album Release Show May 20 - Gracie Curran loflinyard.com • 7 W. Carolina Ave • 249-3046

5/24 SACRIFICIAL SLAUGHTER/ VOICES OF RUIN/ PROCESS OF SUFFOCATION 5/26 PEZZ/ PARASITES/ RADIO BUZZ KILLS/ SHAME FINGER 5/26 DAY SHOW 7-9PM DAN MONTGOMERY CD RELEASE 5/28 KIKAGAKU MOYO (JAPAN)/ AL LOVER 6/2 MEMPHIS PUNK FEST 5

MUSIC DISTRIBUTION metrix7digital.net or DLN XM.7 Digital

FRI SAT & SUN 1-7 • $4.50 per lb. Corner of Madison & Morrison “COME GET YOU SOME!”

METRIX 7 DIGITAL

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CHIP N’ DALE’S ANTIQUES 3457 Summer Avenue Memphis, TN 38122 EVERYTHING ON SALE! Open Tues-Sat | 901-452-5620

MONDAY-FRIDAY FROM 4:00-6:00PM

1/2 OFF EVERYTHING HAPPY HOUR

940 South Cooper Str. 38104 901.726.4444 / alchemymemphis.com

The Coach House @ Loflin Yard

CAPTAIN DAN’S STEAMIN’ HOT LOUISIANA CRAWFISH FOR SALE

OPENS DAILY AT 4:00 FOR DINNER & 10:30 SUNDAY FOR BRUNCH

WITH SPECIALS STARTING AT 10:00PM

Painting, Wallpapering, Wallpaper Removal & Drywall Repair. Call 318-499-1779

5/18 LEFT UNSUNG (MEMPHIS GRATEFUL DEAD TRIBUTE) 5/19 FLIRTING W/ SINCERITY/ WARM/ NORTH BY NORTH 5/20 PYRAMID $CHEME 5/21 DAY SHOW W/ JEFFREY & THE PACEMAKERS 4-9PM 5/21 COMMUNITY CENTER 5/23 REGGAE PINT NITE W/ DJ KRISTAFAR ROBBIN

THE BEST IN CRAFT CUISINE & COCKTAILS

MONDAY NIGHT IS INDUSTRY NIGHT

PROFESSIONAL INTERIORS

GROWLERS 1911 Poplar Avenue 38104 901.244.7904 901growlers.com

(NO COVER)

FABULOUS CARPET CARE

Coco & Lola’s MidTown Lingerie

MIDTOWN

2027 Madison Ave 901 590 0048

MORGAN AC & HEATING create veggie-centric bowls that fuel your fast-paced life ZAKA BOWL 575 Erin Drive 38117 901.509.3105 zakabowl.com

Floor Furnace, Wall & Central Heat. Call 901-774-COOL

SPORTS TALK RADIO

Advertising/Sponsorship Sales Excellent part-time income. Earn up to $1,800 1st month. Great Opportunity. Call 901-527-2460

Memphis Flyer 5.18.17  

This week: It's BBQ Fest week here, so we talked to some of the legends of Memphis BBQ to find out their secrets. Also: the Food Bank needs...