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MLGW Real Estate Moves P6 • Chris Milam P18 • Bacon & Bourbon P30 • Ghost in the Shell P34

04.06.17 • 1467TH ISSUE

G R EG CRAVE NS

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NASHVILLE GETS SERIOUS

The General Assembly brushes aside fringe matters and gets down to business.


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JUSTIN RUSHING Advertising Director CARRIE O’GUIN HOFFMAN Advertising Operations Manager JERRY D. SWIFT Advertising Director Emeritus KELLI DEWITT, CHIP GOOGE Senior Account Executives ALEX KENNER Account Executive ROXY MATTHEWS Sales Assistant DESHAUNE MCGHEE Classified Advertising Manager BRENDA FORD Classified Sales Administrator classifieds@memphisflyer.com LYNN SPARAGOWSKI Distribution Manager ROBBIE FRENCH Warehouse and Delivery Manager BRANDY BROWN, JANICE GRISSOM ELLISON, ZACH JOHNSON, KAREN MILAM, RANDY ROTZ, LEWIS TAYLOR, WILLIAM WIDEMAN Distribution THE MEMPHIS FLYER is published weekly by Contemporary Media, Inc., 460 Tennessee Street, Memphis, TN 38103 Phone: (901) 521-9000 Fax: (901) 521-0129 letters@memphisflyer.com www.memphisflyer.com CONTEMPORARY MEDIA, INC. KENNETH NEILL Chief Executive Officer MOLLY WILLMOTT Chief Operating Officer JEFFREY GOLDBERG Director of Business Development BRUCE VANWYNGARDEN Editorial Director KEVIN LIPE Digital Manager LYNN SPARAGOWSKI Distribution Manager KENDREA COLLINS Marketing/Communications Manager BRITT ERVIN Email Marketing Manager ASHLEY HAEGER Controller CELESTE DIXON Accounting Assistant JOSEPH CAREY IT Director KALENA MCKINNEY Receptionist

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CONTENTS

BRUCE VANWYNGARDEN Editor SUSAN ELLIS Managing Editor JACKSON BAKER, MICHAEL FINGER Senior Editors TOBY SELLS Associate Editor CHRIS MCCOY Film and TV Editor CHRIS DAVIS, JOSHUA CANNON, MAYA SMITH, MICAELA WATTS Staff Writers JESSE DAVIS, LESLEY YOUNG Copy Editors JULIE RAY Calendar Editor

OUR 1467TH ISSUE 04.06.17 Gannett, The Commercial Appeal’s corporate overlord, began rolling out the company’s “Newsroom of the Future” concept in Memphis last week. Apparently, the newsroom of the future will fit into a nice-sized basement rec room. Twenty journalists were laid off, including many folks whose bylines are familiar to all of us. The CA is now reportedly down to 48 people in its editorial department. Gannett treats its papers like McDonald’s franchises, and its Tennessee franchises have been consolidated into a network that will create and share content, most notably from the Nashville Tennessean and the Knoxville News Sentinel, which also suffered layoffs last week. Gannett’s flagship paper is USA Today, which supplies national content to the chain’s regional news properties. The truth is that the Newsroom of the Future should be called the “Newsroom of Shareholder Value.” Gannett is cutting costs to boost (or maintain) its stock price and earn a profit margin that will please Wall Street. In the wake of last week’s layoffs, I heard and read comments from many Memphians that they were going to cancel their subscription; that the CA was worthless; that they could get all the local news they needed from television, The Daily News, the Memphis Business Journal, and the Flyer. No, you can’t. Sure, you can get good reporting from all of those news outlets, but none of them are staffed adequately to provide what a good daily newspaper — even one that’s been “rightsized” — can bring. But the paper is just a shell of its former self, you say. Yes, it is, but it is still essential and invaluable. Let’s take a look at Tuesday’s CA. On page one, there was a story about Wiseacre Brewing declining to expand into the Mid-South Coliseum; a feature about a Memphis saxophone player Dr. Martin Luther King spoke to from the balcony of the Lorraine Motel, before being hit by an assassin’s bullet; and a USA Today Network story about our Nashville legislators double-dipping on their expense accounts. The rest of the front section featured mostly national news, much of it reported the day before on the web. But if your job doesn’t allow you to surf the net all day, the Tuesday paper had a good aggregation of major national and world news. The Business section was all local reporting, much of it fresh. The Local section broke news on Memphis Judge Jon McCalla’s ruling on billboards as “free speech,” which will likely be contested all the way to the Supreme Court. A solid story not reported elsewhere. We also got stories on musician David Porter and the “penny for your parks” issue in Mississippi, David Waters’ column about the late Benjamin Hooks, the police report, and two pages of obits. All local. The “M” section, which used to be about Memphis society, food, and general soft features, is now basically all generated from elsewhere. You want a chicken thighs recipe from the Associated Press? Got you covered. Also Chess Quiz, Horoscope, Answers (from God?), Ask Annie, Today in History, Jumble, Crossword, Sudoku, and Daily Bridge Club. (Bridge? Seriously? Okay.) So none of that is local, but it goes well with coffee. Then there’s the Sports section, which features local reporting on the Grizzlies and Tigers and lots of national and N E WS & O P I N I O N regional wire stories. NY TIMES CROSSWORD - 4 No, the CA is not The New York Times THE FLY-BY - 5 (which isn’t failing, by the way), but it’s still POLITICS - 8 a vital part of the fabric of the city. Without EDITORIAL - 10 a daily paper, we might as well be CovingVIEWPOINT - 11 ton. COVER — “NASHVILLE GETS So, folks, don’t cancel your subscripSERIOUS” tion to the CA. And if you don’t have a BY JACKSON BAKER - 12 subscription, then go online and pay the STE P P I N’ O UT small charge for access. WE RECOMMEND - 16 If you don’t support the organizations MUSIC - 18 (however corporately flawed) that are AFTER DARK - 20 reporting the news in Memphis (and that CALENDAR OF EVENTS - 22 FOOD NEWS - 30 includes the Flyer and other local print SPIRITS - 33 media), they might not be around when FILM - 34 you need them. C L AS S I F I E D S - 36 And we do need them. Every day. LAST WORD - 39 Bruce VanWyngarden brucev@memphisflyer.com

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For Information For Release M

The New York Times Syndication Sales Corporation 620 Eighth Avenue, New York, N.Y. 10018 For Information Call: 1-800-972-3550 For Release Wednesday, February 8, 2017

Crossword

Crossword

Edited by Will Shortz

No. 0104

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MURDER OWL 2 “All of my friends are kidding me now. They think this is real funny that I got attacked by an owl.” — Memphian and self-described “bird man” Neal Cordell telling WREG’s Bridget Chapman why he wears a batter’s helmet when he goes outside to fetch his morning newspaper these days. While Cordell didn’t get a good look at the assailant who left him with a bloody head, talon marks suggest fowl play. This kind of attack hasn’t been reported in Memphis since 2013, when Fox 13’s giant monster beat reporter Lauren Lee tweeted about a 20-lb bird-beast with a 5-foot wingspan then terrorizing residents of the High Point neighborhood in East Memphis. The so-called “Murder Owl” even took a swipe at Shelby County District Attorney General Amy Weirich, who described it as having “the wing span of a Buick” and as being the biggest thing she’d ever seen in her life. Could it be this flying ball of malice and feathers has returned for a terrifying sequel? God help us all. C O L. TO M’S O F F I C E Interiors of a Nashville-area structure that once served as an office for Elvis’ colorful manager, Colonel Tom Parker, are being dismantled. The site will be bulldozed this week and is the future home to an automated car wash. NEW[S]SPEAK “Reporters, editors, and photographers create real news. Journalism you can trust.” The Commercial Appeal advertises its values while gutting its newsroom, laying off reporters, editors, and photographers.

By Chris Davis. Email him at davis@memphisflyer.com.

{

Edited by Toby Sells

W E E K T H AT W A S By Flyer staff

CA layoffs, bike lanes, & bus routes Layoffs begin newspaper “transformation,” bike lanes (again) for Riverside, take the bus to IKEA. Layoffs begin “historic transformation” at newspaper The Commercial Appeal bled 20 jobs from its newsroom last week, a move that came almost exactly one year after Gannett Co. Inc. purchased the paper. Reporters, editors, photographers, and “digital producers” were cut, including Michael Donahue, a CA institution, longtime sports writer Phil Stukenborg, entertainment editor Mark Richens, and more. Newsroom staffers were also trimmed at Gannett papers in Nashville and Knoxville last week. All of it was part of a new Gannett plan to “re-secure and levelset our economic vitality to support our journalism,” Laura Hollingsworth, president of The Tennessean and of the USA Today Network - Tennessee, said in an email to employees. CA executive editor Louis Graham said it was the beginning of a “historic transformation” for the paper, noting it would better align its newsroom to work with Gannett newsrooms across the state. But he promised “coverage decisions will be made locally, in our newsroom, and the CA will maintain its strong voice in Memphis, for Memphis.” That promise came in a letter from the editor that shared the same structure, phrasing, and — in some places — the exact same words in a letter from editor to Tennessean readers published on the same day by Hollingsworth. Bike lanes may stripe Riverside again City officials unveiled plans for adding bike lanes here in a series of 10 repaving projects, including a controversial move to once again put bike lanes on Riverside and slim car traffic there to two lanes. In all, 10 projects were discussed in a public meeting here last week, but the Riverside project got the most attention. Bike lanes were tried on the street along the Mississippi River once before but were removed because of public outcry against them. Nicholas Oyler, the city’s bikeway and pedestrian program manager, said the new design for Riverside is much improved from the pilot proposal. The new plan will open both sides of the street for pedestrian, bike, and car traffic with all of it

separated by the existing median. Pedaltown headed for Broad A “simple and unintimidating” bike shop is headed to Broad. Clark Butcher, owner of Victory Bicycle Studio, will soon open Pedaltown Bicycle Company directly next to Victory on Broad between Merton and Bingham. Butcher said the new store is designed for more casual riders and will offer “a lower cost of entry to bicycling.” Bikes at Pedaltown will average about $350, Butcher said. New bus routes for Shelby Farms, IKEA Memphis Area Transit Authority (MATA) added three new fixed bus routes last week to Shelby Farms, IKEA, and Memphis International Airport. Those new routes and some other tweaks came with a $500,000 price tag paid for largely by federal air quality grants. MATA officials said the new routes will serve areas experiencing job growth. Business owner racks up complaints The Better Business Bureau of the Mid-South (BBB) alerted consumers here about a business owner who has racked up dozens of complaints linked to several of his businesses. A BBB investigation found that businesses owned by James E. Jones, of Memphis, garnered up to 130 complaints in six years in 11 states that allege false advertising, missed appointments, and more. One customer said that workers from one business showed up to clean her air ducts with a shop vacuum and a leaf blower.

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CITY REPORTER By Maya Smith

Buyer’s Market MLGW buys out homes, plans to expand.

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Sometimes you can’t put a dollar value on your community, on your neighborhood, or on your home, but Memphis Light, Gas, and Water (MLGW) has been asking residents in the Hollywood community to do just that. The utility is buying huge blocks of land there to expand its North Service Center, located in the 1100 and 1000 blocks of Tupelo Street. The station is home to the company’s automotive shops, where over 1,000 service vehicles are repaired and stored. MLGW needs more property to meet its goal of expanding the body, heavy equipment, paint, and transformer shop, all located at the North Service Center, according to Gale Carson, MLGW’s director of corporate communications. “We just need more space,” Carson said. “It’s a business plan. I’m sure every progressive company has plans for growth. It’s just strategic planning.” Carson says these plans are part of a long-term project and have been in the works for a while. But some in the community said they had no idea what was going on until this year, when they were approached by MLGW officials looking to buy their homes. MLGW buys the houses at fair market value and gives residents up to 60 days to move. The majority of residents, many of them elderly, on Bingham, Houck, the eastern side of Shasta, and the northeast side of Dexter, have already been uprooted. According to company officials, most residents were happy to sell their homes. However, residents who remain in the area wonder what the station expansion will mean for the aesthetics of the neighborhood and worry about

the added noise and air pollution. “If it’s going to look anything like it currently looks — industrial — it will further add to the decline of the Hollywood community and North Memphis in general,” said a resident who wished to remain anonymous. Jim Kovarik, a staffer at the Community Development Council and Livable Memphis, said he has been working on projects in the area and is not happy with what MLGW is doing. He questioned the utility’s intentions and said it should also invest in those neighborhoods. “How will MLGW prove itself to be a good neighbor?” Kovarik asked. “They have a public charge to do good, and I’m not seeing that. To make this right, they have to contribute back to the community in some way.” In the past, MLGW has bought out land in areas like Binghampton and Raleigh and recently proposed using emminent domain to acquire three acres owned by Loeb Realty Co. near Overton Park to build a pay station. But the utility dropped the plan after receiving a negative public response. Kovarik said he sees a stark contrast in how MLGW conducts business in “rich white neighborhoods versus poor black neighborhoods.” He said MLGW continues to take advantage of lower income communities, targeting the property of those who are not equipped to fight back. “MLGW is just another public entity running roughshod on a poorly organized and battered community,” Kovarik said. “They should step up to the plate and say, ‘How can we make this neighborhood better than it was when we came, not worse?’”


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3/31/17 9:34 AM


POLITICS By Jackson Baker

They’re Back! The General Assembly tackles two Shelby County hot topics: de-annexation and school vouchers. As the current session of the Tennessee General Assembly heads toward its conclusion, either late this month or early in May (see cover story, “Nashville Gets Serious,” p. 12), two questions of serious concern to the Memphis area are about to be revisited. Up for reconsideration this week are the voucher bill, co-sponsored by state Senator Brian Kelsey (RGermantown) and state Representative Harry Brooks (R-Knoxville), and a measure enabling de-annexation, sponsored by state Senator Bo Watson (R-Hixson) and state Representative Mike Carter (R-Ooltewah). The voucher measure, a variant of which has been brought up unsuccessfully by Kelsey for years, may have its best prospects for passage yet — its odds improved by the fact that it is styled as a “pilot program” restricted to the Shelby County Schools district alone. That fact removes some of the onus from legislators elsewhere in the state who might be deterred by the prospect of immediate blowback affecting their own districts. In much the same manner, the way was cleared in 2012 for the Norris-Todd bill, which eliminated a freeze on new special school districts in Tennessee and allowed new suburban districts in Shelby County, when

Norris-Todd was successfully revised to apply only to Shelby County. The difference, and it could prove to be major, is that support for Norris-Todd was relatively stout in the major suburbs of Memphis, represented by several key legislators, notably state Senate Majority Leader Mark Norris of Collierville, the bill’s chief author, while a majority of Shelby County legislators, Republican and Democratic and from Memphis and as well as its suburbs, are on record as opposing vouchers. And the Kelsey bill prompts doubts as to its ultimate constitutionality, inasmuch as it fails to qualify as a “private” bill — i.e., one supported by a county’s chief legislative body. That would be the Shelby County Commission, which voted unanimously in February to oppose the voucher measure. In any case, the voucher bill, which has been hanging fire on the Senate side for a month awaiting action by the House, was placed on the calendar of the House Government Operations Committee last Thursday. Action was deferred until Wednesday of this week. The Watson-Carter bill on de-annexation is essentially the same measure that was introduced last year, gaining quick passage in the House and getting immediate traction in the Senate, until an all-out resistance on the part of Memphis city officials, the city’s allies in other Ten-

nessee cities, and the Greater Memphis Area Chamber of Commerce managed to get it postponed in the Senate State and Local Government Committee. That reprisal was based on the understanding that Memphis deserved the option of proposing its own formula for de-annexation — one presumably kindlier than the Watson-Carter version, which provided a fairly easy means for any area annexed by a city since 1998 to hold a referendum to gain its independence. A hastily appointed city/county task force came up with a formula for “right-sizing” the city and allowing a relatively graceful exit of such hotbeds of de-annexation sentiment as South Cordova and Southwind-Windyke. But the right-sizing plan envisioned that implementation would be postponed until 2021, a fact unsettling to local de-annexation activists. And, instead of promptly giving the plan an up-or-down vote, the city council has opted for a more deliberated response, allowing for a series of public meetings in the potentially affected areas and envisioning possible referenda in those areas later on. Both those facts moved Carter and Watson to schedule new action on their bill, which was first reset for last Thursday’s calendar of the Senate State and Local Government Committee and then postponed for action by the committee on Tuesday of this week.

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people during the period July 1, 2015, through June 30, 2016. This was troubling news to the boosters among us, especially since the Memphis figures compare unfavorably to the other major cities in Tennessee. We have known for some time that Nashville, against whom we have traditionally tried to compare ourselves, has put us in its rear-view mirrors, growth-wise. During the year of comparison, the state’s capital city acquired 36,337 new residents, for a growth rate of 2 percent. Ours was a woeful 0.1 percent. But Knoxville and Chattanooga also outgrew us. So did Little Rock, Arkansas. Only Jackson, Tennessee, which lost 61 residents in the year being measured, did worse than Memphis in our general geographic area. Oh, wait, that other Jackson, the one in Mississippi, also fared more poorly, coming in with a population gain of 563. Keep in mind, too, apropos the meager growth or the Memphis metropolitan area, 1:11 AM that the nine counties which comprise it contain at least three — Tipton and Fayette counties in Tennessee and DeSoto County in Mississippi — that we had grown accustomed to envying for their visible spurts in new, shiny subdivisions and commercial strips. That these bedroom suburbs had not managed to raise the whole metropolitan complex above the curve tells us something — not just that rural terrains, which make up so much of the greater Memphis area, have been steadily shedding population (that much we knew) but that the dominant economy

of Memphis, focused on our muchvaunted status as a distribution center, is not one that generates appreciable numbers of either high incomes or skilled jobs. If it comes to it, we can call the roll of this or that new industry come to town, but there are not enough of them to render us competitive with high-growth urban areas. And we can also make up a list of major manufacturers or corporate entities that have deserted us over the years.   One of the bragging points of our current state administration is the Tennessee Promise program which relegates significant funding to pay tuition at Tennessee’s fairly impressive number of community colleges. No doubt 9th District Congressman Steve Cohen, a skeptic regarding that program’s value, has been influenced in his views by the fact that this program is largely financed by monies originally raised by proceeds from the state’s lottery, brought into being by then state Senator Cohen to provide college scholarships for needy students with proven academic potential. Cohen sees Tennessee Promise as going in another direction altogether — toward the provision of a generous supply of worker cadres for relatively low-paying jobs in the distribution industry. That may or may not be an accurate view, but one thing is certain: On the Monopoly board of urban America, the Memphis of today would be represented by a token in the shape of a warehouse. In any case, the new census figures have us asking ourselves: Are we, as a community, merely standing still? And, if so, what is the alternative?

April 6-12, 2017

C O M M E N TA R Y b y G r e g C r a v e n s

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VIEWPOINT By Ashley Cathey

Fight For $15 those in power, including the police. In Memphis, the Fight for $15 chapter that I am part of recently filed a federal civil rights lawsuit against the city, following years of illegal surveillance by the police in an effort to stifle our protests. And we have no choice but to protest. Today more than half of black workers and nearly 60 percent of Latinos in America are paid less than $15 an hour. And as black and brown communities continue to face poverty wages, police brutality, and efforts to suppress our right to organize, the Fight for $15 and Movement for Black Lives have emerged to fight civil rightsera racism with 21st century activism.

On April 4th — the anniversary of Dr. King’s assassination — I’m joining thousands of other workers who, like me, are fighting for a $15-an-hour wage and union rights. It would be easy to look at history and think that things can never change, and we do still have a way to go here in Memphis and across the country. But in just a few years since I’ve joined the Fight for $15, we’ve convinced many — from voters to politicians to corporations — that raising pay is a good idea, in the process, winning wage hikes for 22 million workers across the country, including more than 10 million workers who are on their way to a $15-an-hour wage. In what was ultimately his last speech, “I’ve Been to the Mountaintop,” Dr. King said “The greatness of America is the right to protest for right.” Those of us marching on April 4th know we have the right to protest and won’t be intimidated or silenced. At a time when communities of color are facing attacks — from the White House down to local police departments —  joining together is more important now than ever.

m e m p h i s f l y e r. c o m

I grew up not far from the Lorraine Motel in Memphis, Tennessee, where Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. was killed 49 years ago while supporting black sanitation workers who were on strike. Since Dr. King’s death, my hometown has been remembered as a civil rights milestone. But the story of black and brown workers in Memphis linking arms with advocates for racial justice is not just a chapter of our past — it’s a real part of this city’s present, and I’m proud to be on the front lines. On April 4th — the anniversary of Dr. King’s assassination — I’m joining thousands of other workers who, like me, are fighting for a $15-an-hour wage and union rights, as we join forces with the Movement for Black Lives to lead a two-dozen-city Fight Racism, Raise Pay protest. The nationwide protests will conclude with a march here in Memphis ending at the Lorraine Motel, where workers, national civil rights leaders, clergy, and elected officials will hold a moment of silence to remember Dr. King’s sacrifice and reflect on our own struggles. Our movements are joining together because the fight for economic and racial justice remains as linked today as it was during Dr. King’s time — and I’ve seen firsthand how these two movements share a deep bond. My mother spent her whole life working in the fast-food business to support our family. When I was 14 and my brother was 11, our father left and our mom did what she could to make sure we had everything we needed. Like my mom, I now work as a cashier at Checkers. I have a second job as a housekeeper at a local hotel but still struggle to pay my rent and afford even basic necessities on $7.35 an hour. I joined the Fight for $15 nearly three years ago because I realized the only way I would have a real shot at a better life is by organizing and going on strike to demand $15 an hour and union rights. But just as it was in the time of Dr. King, when black and brown people speak out, we face harassment and intimidation from

NEWS & OPINION

BASHEERADESIGNS | DREAMSTIME.COM

On the front lines of Dr. King’s battle for economic and racial justice.

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NASHVILLE GETS SERIOUS The General Assembly brushes aside fringe matters and gets down to business.

April 6-12, 2017

COVER STORY AND PHOTOGRAPHS BY JACKSON BAKER

“Natural marriage” advocate David Fowler fails to convince state Rep. G.A. Hardaway and other Civil Justice subcommittee members that state law overrides a U.S. Supreme Court decision.

Dianne Baker of Millington was one of several spokespersons for Shelby County’s suburbs who gave the county’s legislative delegation an earful last week.

The state Senate’s Republican leaders (l to r, right side of table: Speaker Randy McNally, Majority Leader Mark Norris, and Speaker Pro Tem Jim Tracy) get some pressure from the press.

Memphis State Senator Lee Harris, at microphone, takes issue with the GOP leadership as (l to r) state Reps. Antonio Parkinson, G.A. Hardaway, and Joe Towns, all of Memphis, and state Senator Jeff Yarbro of Nashville wait their turn.

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he timetable of the Tennessee General Assembly once sprawled a bit, with a session ending sometime in May, generally. But now and then, one would get into June and even, within the memory of many legislators still serving, go on later than that. There was the time in 2001 when Jimmy Naifeh, the longtime speaker of the state House of Representatives and a no-nonsense legislative boss if there ever was one, stepped down from his perch on the House dais, stood for a moment in the well, and took a few steps into the main central aisle of the chamber, as if he meant to do something hands-on. The look on Naifeh’s face was somewhere between wrathful and pleading, as he intoned loudly, “It’s July, folks!” Indeed it was. Those were the years, from the late 1990s into the early years of the current century, when state government, grappling with looming financial shortages of all 12 kinds, and struggling in particular with the costs of the ever-expanding rolls of TennCare, was looking desperately for ways to raise money.

The impasse had gotten to the point that Republican Governor Don Sundquist, a dependable fiscal conservative during his years as a Reaganite Congressman, broke with his own personal history and his party’s traditional philosophical base and proposed something as daring as a state income tax. One result of that was a mass protest, whetted by radio talk-show hosts, that culminated, on the night of July 12, 2001, in an unruly mob invasion of the state Capitol and its grounds. Windows got broken, the heavy locked doors of the state Senate chamber, where a compromise income-tax package was being negotiated, were pounded on, and whatever deal had been about to happen there was aborted. There would not be a fiscal solution of any kind until the next year, a time when several parks were closed and various state services had begun to be shut down. Forgoing the national holiday, the two legislative chambers met on July 4th and agreed to a patchwork revenue package based on hiking the state sales tax to its current rate. The same year, a Democratic governor, former health-care entrepreneur, and ex-


Nashville Mayor Phil Bredesen, was elected. He would prove as atypical to his party’s image as Sundquist had been to his. Launching an austerity regime, Bredesen slashed the TennCare rolls and imposed across-the-board departmental budget cuts of 8 percent. And thus did one era make way for another.

Things may be changing. Against all odds, Nashville seems to be getting serious. And, ironically, a signal of that potential transformation came last week through the aegis of a major participant in the events of July 12, 2001, that pivotal moment when a mob action deflected an effort toward a long-term reform. One of those actively involved that night in working out the compromise that might have yielded a workable income-tax measure was a Republican state Senator from Chattanooga named David Fowler. After leaving the legislature in 2006, Fowler donated $20,000 to an organization called the Family Action Council of Tennessee (FACT). The former state senator and lawyer ultimately became the chief spokesperson for FACT, which advocates social conservatism and attention to fundamentalist Christian concerns in public policy. Now president of FACT, Fowler lives in Nashville and is an accustomed presence on Capitol Hill. Last year he famously led a group of conservative pastors in a rally on behalf

Three legislative veterans from Shelby County, all former state representatives, were among those who turned up last week at a reunion for General Assembly members at the Ellington Agricultural Center in Nashville. From l to r: Ed Haley, now city manager of Millington; Chris Turner, now a General Sessions Criminal Court judge; and Dan Byrd, now vice chairman and COO of the Bank of Bartlett. Haley was a Republican; Turner and Byrd served as Democrats.

of a bill that would compel transgender students to use bathrooms designated for their birth genders. The issue was one of several these days, in Tennessee and many another states, which contrast the social traditions of a social or religious group with the economic realities of the state as a whole. Mindful of this inherent conflict, Fowler hit it head on, acknowledging that passage of the bill might cause the state to lose important conventions and forfeit possible industrial relocations, but calling on the legislature to “put their principles and their conscience above matters of mere economics.” But the matter, of course, was — and is — more complex than that. In the 21st century, the dichotomy cannot be reduced to one of money versus morality. Words like “principles” and “conscience” can also be adduced, and increasingly are so adduced, to support an evolving social belief in the human and legal rights of transgenders. When push came to shove, that fact probably did as much or more to tip the balance in legislators’ minds against the “bathroom bill,” as did the admittedly intense lobbying against it by the state’s business interests. The bill’s sponsor, Representative Susan Lynn (RMt. Juliet) withdrew the measure. But it returned in this session, sponsored by Representative Mark Pody (R-Lebanon) and Senator Mae Beavers (R-Mt.Juliet), two legislators lacking in the theatrical flair of a Campfield but equally prone to playing Horatio-at-the-Gate for causes which an increasing number of their legislative colleagues see as retrograde and wrong-headed. And this year the bill failed even to get a motion out of the Senate Education Committee, a fact which both shocked and gratified Henry Seaton of the ACLU, who observed that “it seems like we are making progress” in raising legislators’ consciousness on the transgender issue. And then there was what was called the “Natural Marriage” bill, also sponsored by the duo of Pody and Beavers. And there was Fowler in the House Civil Justice Subcommittee last week, making the best argument he could for a measure, reserving marriage in Tennessee to cases involving a man and a woman, that manifestly is in conflict with the U.S. Supreme Court’s watershed 2015 opinion in the Obergefell v. Hodges cases declaring same-sex marriages legal everywhere in the United States. Fowler’s argument — that, while the Supreme Court’s opinion compelled Tennessee to recognize same-sex marriages in other states, it did not invalidate the state’s own ability to define marriage within its own borders — was ingenious in a sense, but it also had the taint of the disingenuous. Memphis Democrat G.A. Hardaway called him on it, pointing out further that Fowler was a party to two separate lawsuits challenging the Supreme Court’s authority to deal with state marriage laws — a potential conflict of interest. Like the lawsuits he was engaged in, Fowler’s testimony was seemingly based on the highly questionable thesis that the U.S. Supreme Court had no authority to override a state law on marriage — notwithstanding the obvious fact that the court had done just that. In the end, the committee by unanimous agreement did what a legislative unit normally does for bills with no chances of passage. It punted, “rolling” the bill, in legislative vernacular — until a late point in the next session. continued on page 14

COVER STORY m e m p h i s f l y e r. c o m

The next 15 years in state government would see a progressive slide away from governmental activism toward various kinds of retrenchment. The temper of the state’s voters shifted, and both Naifeh and the state Senate’s venerable Democratic Speaker John Wilder would eventually have to surrender control of their chambers to Republicans — though the new House Speaker, Beth Harwell, a Nashvillian, is somewhat more mellow in her conservatism than Ron Ramsey of Kingsport, who displaced Wilder in the Senate. The populism of the left yielded year by year to the populism of the right. The famous argument over guns versus butter would be decided in favor of guns. Literally so, as the NRA and the home-grown Tennessee Firearms Association began having their way with legislators, and it became harder and harder to find public places that were off limits to lethal weaponry. Bars, parks, parking lots, schools — all yielded in turn to legislation backed by the gun lobby. Attitudes toward education shifted, as well. Where once the focus of public education had been on the teaching incentives of Governor Lamar Alexander or the fiscal largesse and curricular pump-priming of Governor Ned McWherter’s Basic Education Plan (BEP), now it was channeled through various formulas that were deconstructive of the traditional public-school concept and smacked of privatization at their core. At the insistence of Ramsey, who saw the Tennessee Education Association as a political adversary, teachers’ bargaining rights were legislated out of existence. And even the more moderate Republican governor, oil-company scion Bill Haslam, gave the go-ahead to a veritable plethora of concepts — charter schools, takeover districts administered by the state, online “districts” run by profit-seekers from out of state, and standardized testing as an apparent end in itself — that unraveled the whole notion of what public schools had been. Having basically slain the idea of an income tax, progressive or otherwise, the new Republican legislative majority (a super-majority in both chambers after 2014, assured of majority votes without need of — or concern for — Democratic votes) took steps to make sure it stayed dead, authorizing a state referendum on a constitutional ban of a state income tax authored by state Senator Brian Kelsey (R-Germantown). As was the case with Republicanism in the nation as a whole, the state’s new GOP establishment was a strange yokedom of fiscal and social conservatives, whereby the advocates of, say, tort reform limiting awards in personal-damage litigation made common cause with the opponents of abortion and gay rights. And vice versa. There was a nether end of the reigning coalition, too. With the stripped-down Democratic caucus depending heavily on minority members, racial and otherwise, there was a certain kind of reactionary sentiment to be found on the other side — embodied, arguably, in the GOP insistence for photo-ID voting and, without doubt, in the “discovery” by two Republican legislators of a potential jihadist foot-bath in the Capitol that turned out to be a mop sink. And who could forget the immortal legislative contributions of former Republican state Senator Stacey Campfield (R-Knoxville), a one-man cornucopia of bizarre and meanspirited legislation — a bill calling for death certificates for aborted fetuses, his “Don’t-sayGay” bill forbidding mention of homosexuality in elementary school, another measure requiring school personnel to out gay students to their parents, a bill to deny welfare payments to parents of poorly performing students, his charge of racism when he, a white, was denied membership in the Legislative Black Caucus, etc. Those bills did not pass, but, as much as the gun zealotry of the last several legislative sessions, the goofy stuff from the now departed Campfield (he was defeated in the 2014 GOP primary by the infinitely more dignified Richard Briggs) became a metaphor of sorts for what was arguably an unserious period in Tennessee legislative history — one that rewarded selfish and peripheral concerns at the expense of fundamental structural needs. (Campfield’s bills may have gone by the wayside, but the legislature did, after all, vote in all solemnity to enshrine the Barrett .50 caliber as the Official State Rifle; and it failed by a trice to designate the Bible as the Official State Book.)

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continued from page 13

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A clear pattern seemed to be developing in this session of the General Assembly. With, at most, a month left to go in the 2017 session, all attention was being focused, not on the kinds of tendentious and eccentric measures that had dominated so much of the legislature’s recent history but on indisputably serious matters relating to the root realities of the state itself — or to the counties and municipalities that comprise it. The session’s chief gun bill, an “open carry” bill eliminating a need for permits to carry a concealed weapon, was disposed of summarily last week, in the same session of the House Civil Justice Subcommittee that shunted aside “natural marriage.” That measure, HB 40, co-sponsored by Representative Micah Van Huss (R-Jonesborough) and Beavers (who seems almost Zelig-like in her attachment to fringe bills), was dismissed in the committee by voice vote. As the General Assembly hits the stretch in the 2017 session, it will be focusing its major efforts on the centerpiece of Haslam’s agenda, an infrastructure program announced in his State of the State message of late January. This governor is given to catchy titles for his major legislation. There was Tennessee Promise, his name for a scholarship program, paid for mainly by money diverted from the lottery-built Hope Scholarship fund, paying student expenses at the state’s community colleges. There was Tennessee Reconnect, a scholarship program for adults needing to finish lapsed degree efforts. Most memorably, there was Insure Tennessee, Haslam’s name for a plan that, through a waiver granted by Barack Obama’s Department of Health and Human Services, would have allowed Tennessee to partake of an estimated billion dollars or more of annual federal funding to expand TennCare, Tennessee’s version of Medicaid. A partisan reaction by the GOP super-majority to a program it identified with “Obamacare” killed Insure Tennessee, but the newly serious legislature might give some version of the program a reexamination, especially since the Trump administration in Washington failed in its preliminary efforts to kill the ACA. In any case, the Haslam infrastructure proposal, an ambitious and long overdue program of roadway rehabilitation billed in the State-of-the-State as the Improve Act, is still very much alive, though the governor’s original proposal for financing the plan’s $10 billion worth of improvements with a 7-percent increase in the state gas tax, coupled with decreases in a variety of other taxes, including the sales tax on groceries, has been modified once or twice and is subject to more changes. It is up for consideration in finance committees of both Hedy Weinberg of the ACLU, chambers this week. here testifying against the “natural marriage” bill Think of it: A General Assembly that once before the House Civil Justice actually wasted time on the legality of eating Subcommittee, has stayed busy on roadkill is now clearly training attention on the civil liberties front. the condition of Tennessee’s roads. One important modification to the Improve Act occurred in a Senate committee, with an amendment sponsored by state Senate Majority Leader Mark Norris (R-Collierville). Norris, who is eyeing a 2018 gubernatorial race (and who has billboards in Shelby County and elsewhere proclaiming him to be “Fighting Elder Abuse in Tennessee”), made sure to include in the bill several financial-relief provisions for Tennessee’s military veterans and its elderly population. Even as the legislature’s Republican leadership is settling down to serious business, its once-dominant Democratic contingent, now become a shrunken minority (5 senators out of 33; 25 Democrats out of 99), is into a comeback of sorts, pointing out in a recent endof-week press conference that Norris’ amendment has a distinct resemblance to provisions long championed by themselves. The Democrats, led by Representative Craig Fitzhugh of Ripley in the House and Memphian Lee Harris in the Senate, are also campaigning hard for a revival of some variant of Insure Tennessee. Matters still to be resolved include two key ones of major importance to Memphis and Shelby County — a proposal for a “pilot program” of publicly funded privateschool vouchers, restricted to the Shelby County Schools system and a possible revisiting of the de-annexation issue that has roiled relations between Memphis and its suburbs. (See Politics, p. 8.) In any case, things have unmistakably taken a serious turn up Nashville way. Anybody who doubts that should ask former state Representatives Jeremy Durham of Franklin and Mark Lovell of Eads, both forced out of their legislative positions during the last year for allegations of sexual hanky-panky. Heck, folks, hanky-panky used to be the General Assembly’s very stock-in-trade!


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steppin’ out

We Recommend: Culture, News + Reviews

Beam ’Em Up

USS Enterprise

By Susan Ellis

LUCA OLEASTRI | DREAMSTIME.COM

Steve Mulroy, law professor and former county commissioner, is a hardcore Trekkie. To wit: On his last day on the commission, he had it declared Shelby County Star Trek Day. He’s also been known to don the uniform; he’s been to conventions and Star Trek: The Experience in Las Vegas. And yet, somehow, someway, his family is not dying of embarrassment. Indeed, says Mulroy, they’re Trekkies, too. “I raised my kids right,” he says. The third annual Shelby County Star Trek Day will be celebrated on Saturday, April 8th, from 11 a.m. to 6 p.m., at the Fox & Hound on Sanderlin. There will be costume and trivia contests, memorabilia on display, merch, and episodes on the TVs. Mulroy is particularly excited about the town hall meeting, during which the Trekkies lay it all out. The Fox & Hound will also be serving Star Trek-themed food and drink — from Romulan ale and Klingon Bloodwine to tranya and Vulcan soup. Mulroy says he got into Star Trek as a kid. “I fell in love immediately,” he says of the original series. “They were imaginative, thought-provoking, and there was a real sense of adventure.” Later, when he was older, he recognized how progressive the series, which featured the first on-screen interracial kiss, truly was. Mulroy has favorite episodes (“The Doomsday Machine”) and secondary series (Deep Space Nine) and movies (The Wrath of Khan), and he can argue points great and small, like, for instance, the classic Kirk vs. Picard contretemps. “Definitely Kirk all the way,” he says.

April 6-12, 2017

DON PERRY

SHELBY COUNTY “STAR TREK” DAY AT FOX & HOUND (5101 SANDERLIN), SATURDAY, APRIL 8TH, 11 A.M.-6 P.M.

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A Big Beer in craft clothing Spirits, p. 33

Memphis Veg Fest and Bacon & Bourbon Food News, p. 30

THURSDAY April 6

FRIDAY April 7

New Voices Department of Theatre & Dance, University of Memphis, 7:30 p.m. World premiere of six dances created by U of M students. Performed in the round. Tickets must be reserved: memphis.edu/ theatre. “Scent and Symbolism: Perfumed Objects and Images” Dixon Gallery & Gardens, 10 a.m.-5 p.m. An exhibit on the history of scented objects featuring 140 perfume bottles.

The Strange Fruit The Cannon Center, 7 p.m., $30 Collaboration between Hattiloo, Collage Dance Collective, the Memphis Symphony Orchestra, La Chorale acapella, and actors Phil Darius Wallace and Rychetta Watkins, centering around the lynchings at or near Memphis between 1877 and 1950. This is the opening event of the three-day National Black Box Performing Arts Festival, highlighting the works of African Americans and Latinos. Includes a performance by Debbi Morgan of All My Children and shows in Overton Park and the Brooks. Information: blackboxfest.com.

1984 Studio on the Square, various times Week-long screenings of the 1984 film 1984 based on the George Orwell book about a dystopian future. Part of a nationwide movement protesting Trump. “Everything Is Terrible” Crosstown Arts, 6-9 p.m. One-night show featuring works by Alex Paulus including “Don Jon Trump, Jerry Maguire, tiny nude people doing things, and lots of other weird stuff.”

Dixon Garden Fair Dixon Gallery & Gardens, 9 a.m.-4 p.m. Annual plant sale featuring hard-tofind native plants, shade perennials, Itoh peonies, and more. Sounds of Kolachi Buckman Arts Center at St. Mary's School, 8 p.m., $25 Performance by this 10-piece supergroup out of Pakistan.


The King of rock-and-roll (and style)

Stuck on You

By Susan Ellis

About 15 years ago, Zoey Goto, an English fashion journalist, saw a picture of Elvis and was stunned. In fact, she was so taken that she says she immediately took a plane to Memphis. She was also perturbed as to why Presley’s sense of style was never adequately covered. So, she decided to do it herself. Elvis Style: From Zoot Suits to Jumpsuits makes the argument that Elvis was a fashion innovator. Goto will be signing the book at Lanksy Bros. on Wednesday. Where do you see Elvis in contemporary fashion and design? My book Elvis Style is making the argument that Elvis is a pivotal figure in menswear and should get recognition as such. I don’t feel the fashion world really appreciates Elvis’ impact. For example, I was telling a fashion editor friend about my book a while ago, and she wanted me to reassure her that I was venturing into this with an ironic slant. I was like “No, I am really serious about this! Elvis should be included in the syllabus at fashion universities because his impact is that important.” I think it helps that I got people like Patricia Field (stylist on Sex & the City) and the costume designer Deborah Nadoolman Landis (Michael Jackson’s “Thriller”) to back up this argument. Deborah even says in Elvis Style that there wasn’t a costume designer alive who hasn’t been inspired by Elvis. Your book argues that Elvis’ influence isn’t just about clothes and hair but covers cars and home design as well. How so? I think Elvis was ahead of the curve in many ways, not just purely clothing and hairstyles. For example, it is now pretty standard for celebrities to be photographed at home, showcasing their luxurious private world, but Elvis was doing this way back in the mid-’60s, when he invited Mid-South magazine into Graceland to photograph him and his interior choices. I also found that looking beyond just the clothing revealed so much more about Elvis. He had style across the board, and he was was utterly consistent. It wasn’t as if Elvis wore these expressive, wild outfits and then went home to his minimalist, white cube of a house! The jumpsuits, pimped-up cars, and thematic interiors all mirror each other and tell us much about the wonderfully creative, playful, and, at times, extreme person that Elvis was. “ELVIS STYLE: FROM ZOOT SUITS TO JUMPSUITS” BOOKSIGNING AT LANSKY BROS., WEDNESDAY, APRIL 12TH, 5 P.M.

Springloaded: Coppelia Remix Germantown Performing Arts Center, 7:30 p.m., $25 Annual spring concert featuring a mash-up of contemporary dance, tap, hip-hop, and jookin.

31st Annual Super Chevy Show Memphis International Raceway, 8 a.m. Three-day show, including an appearance by the 300-mph Queen of Diamonds jet car.

Citizen Cope Clayborne Temple, 6 p.m., $45 online, $60 at the door Concert with Citizen Cope and openers the Mighty Soul Brass Band, benefiting Memphis Tilth.

Work by Chloe York Found Studio, 6-9 p.m. Exhibition “to visually change objects and forms deemed ugly or untouchable by society to suit its standard of what beauty is.”

Rasheeda Speaking Theatre Memphis, 8 p.m., $25 Workplace thriller involving racism and paranoia.

“Easter Through the Looking Glass” Children’s Museum of Memphis, 10 a.m.-1 p.m. Easter Bunny will be there, as well as Alice of Wonderland and her cat friend. Plus, kids can make a duct tape Easter basket and visit the candy station.

ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT

SATURDAY April 8

m e m p h i s f l y e r. c o m

The new Ghost in the Shell — we’ve seen live-action adaptations you anime fans wouldn’t believe. Film, p. 34

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M US I C By J.D. Reager

These Days

When his life got rough, Chris Milam made a record. Chris Milam

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oughly three years ago, Memphis singersongwriter Chris Milam’s life was stable. He was an up-andcoming musician with two albums under his belt, and he was engaged to be married. But, as the saying goes, life had other plans. “I don’t want to air dirty laundry,” says Milam, referring to the break-up of his relationship. “But it’s a jarring, lonely, and embarrassing thing to build a life with someone, then lose it. It’s not uncommon, but it’s hard.” To add insult to injury, Milam — newly single and semi-homeless — then lost everything he owned when his car was stolen at a gig in Jackson, Mississippi. Nothing, including Milam’s guitar, clothes, and possessions, was ever recovered. “I mean, I put everything I had into a car, and then the car got stolen. It’s almost funny,” he says. Milam jokes about these things now, but it was clearly a trying time for him. Gigs had to be cancelled; new plans (including one for a place to live) had to be made. The silver lining was that the events influenced Milam to write the material for his new album, Kids These Days, his strongest collection of songs to date. “When you’ve got that many questions, you’re desperate for any answer,” he says. “I didn’t have any, and I realized that these songs all dealt with one question in different ways: What now?” When he had enough new cuts to start recording, Milam sought help from Toby Vest of High/Low Recording. Vest not only helped shape Kids These Days musically, but also encouraged Milam to

JOEY MILLER

Mr. Sipp Saturday, April 8th continue to work on the project. “After Jackson, one of the first people I talked to was Toby,” says Milam. “We’d started the record but had a long way to go. He said, ‘You’re out a tour. You’re out everything right now. Let’s make a record and not worry about anything else.’ He and Pete [Matthews, Vest’s studio partner] opened their doors, gave me a purpose. I won’t forget that.” Milam and Vest hired the ace squad of backing musicians quite often associated with High/Low — including Vest himself, guitarist Luke White (Snowglobe), drummer Greg Faison (the Bulletproof Vests), and string players Jana Misener and Krista Wroten (the Memphis Dawls). The end result is both a more natural and atmospheric sound than Milam’s previous efforts.

“I put everything I had into a car, and then the car got stolen. It’s almost funny.” “It was important that the listener could hear a real performance by the folks in the room — intimate, vital, idiosyncratic,” says Milam. “Toby and Pete have an extended family of musicians they call in for different projects. They’re all killers. They understood what I was going for and filled the songs with life — beautiful, weird life.” This Thursday, Milam will officially unveil Kids These Days at a release show at Loflin Yard. After that, he’ll spend most of the year promoting it on the road, hopefully with a bit of better luck this time. Chris Milam’s Kids These Days release party is at Loflin Yard on Thursday, April 6th at 8 p.m. Admission is $5.


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After Dark: Live Music Schedule April 6 - 12 Alfred’s 197 BEALE 525-3711

Gary Hardy & Memphis 2 Thursdays-Saturdays, 6-9 p.m.; Karaoke Thursdays, TuesdaysWednesdays, 9 p.m.-1 a.m., and Sundays-Mondays, 10 p.m.-2 a.m.; Mandi Thomas Fridays, Saturdays, 6-9 p.m.; The 901 Heavy Hitters Fridays, Saturdays, 10 p.m.-2 a.m.; Flyin’ Ryan Fridays, Saturdays, 2:30 a.m.; Memphis Jazz Orchestra Sundays, 6-9 p.m.

King’s Palace Cafe Patio 162 BEALE 521-1851

Live Music WednesdaysSundays, 7-11 p.m.; Live DJ Wednesdays-Sundays, 11 p.m.; Third Floor: DJ Tubbz Fridays, Saturdays, 10 p.m.

FedExForum 191 BEALE STREET

Panic! At the Disco Saturday, April 8, 7 p.m.

Handy Bar 200 BEALE 527-2687

Bad Boy Matt & the Amazing Rhythmatics Tuesdays, Thursdays-Sundays, 7 p.m.-1 a.m.

B.B. King’s Blues Club

Hard Rock Cafe

143 BEALE 524-KING

126 BEALE 529-0007

The King Beez Thursdays, 5:30 p.m.; B.B. King’s All Stars Thursdays, Fridays, 8 p.m.; Will Tucker Band Fridays, Saturdays, 5 p.m.; Lisa G and Flic’s Pic’s Band Saturdays, Sundays, 12:30 p.m.; Blind Mississippi Morris Sundays, 5 p.m.; Memphis Jones Sundays, Wednesdays 5:30 p.m.; Doc Fangaz and the Remedy Tuesdays, 5:30 p.m.

Blue Note Bar & Grill 341-345 BEALE 577-1089

Queen Ann and the Memphis Blues Masters Fridays, Saturdays, 8 p.m.-midnight.

Blues City Cafe 138 BEALE 526-3637

Blind Mississippi Morris Fridays, 5 p.m. and Saturdays, 5:30 p.m.; Brad Birkedahl Band Thursdays, Wednesdays, 8 p.m.; Earl “The Pearl” Banks Saturdays, 12:30 p.m. and Tuesdays, 7 p.m.; Brandon Cunning Trio Sundays, 6 p.m., and Mondays, 7 p.m.; FreeWorld Sundays, 9:30 p.m.

April 6-12, 2017

Club 152 152 BEALE 544-7011

Josh Taerk Thursday, April 6, 6-9 p.m.

Itta Bena 145 BEALE 578-3031

Kayla Walker Thursdays, 67 p.m.; Susan Marshall Fridays, Saturdays, 7-10 p.m.; Nat “King” Kerr Fridays, Saturdays, 9-10 p.m.; Susan Marshall Wednesdays, 6-8 p.m.

King Jerry Lawler’s Hall of Fame Bar & Grille 159 BEALE

Chris Gales Solo Acoustic Show Mondays-Saturdays, 12-4 p.m.; Eric Hughes Thursdays, Fridays, 5-8 p.m.; Karaoke MondaysThursdays, Sundays, 8 p.m.; Live Bands Fridays, Saturdays, 8 p.m.

King’s Palace Cafe 162 BEALE 521-1851

David Bowen Thursdays, 5:309:30 p.m., Fridays, Saturdays, 6:30-10:30 p.m., and Sundays, 5:30-9:30 p.m.

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Sonny Mack Mondays-Fridays, 2-6 p.m.; Cowboy Neil Mondays, Thursdays, 7-11 p.m., and Saturdays, Sundays, 2-6 p.m.; Sensation Band Tuesdays, Fridays, 7-11 p.m.; Fuzzy and the Kings of Memphis Saturdays, 7-11 p.m.; Chic Jones and the Blues Express Sundays, 711 p.m.; North and South Band Wednesdays, 7-11 p.m.

King’s Palace Cafe Tap Room

Combo Saturday, April 8, 4-8 p.m.; Brian Hawkins Blues Party Mondays, 8 p.m.-midnight; McDaniel Band Tuesdays, Wednesdays, 8 p.m.-midnight.

Silky O’Sullivan’s 183 BEALE 522-9596

Dueling Pianos Thursdays, Wednesdays, 9 p.m.-1 a.m., Fridays, Saturdays, 9 p.m.-3 a.m., and Sundays, Tuesdays, 8 p.m.midnight.

168 BEALE 576-2220

Big Don Valentine’s Three Piece Chicken and a Biscuit Blues Band Thursdays, Tuesdays, 8 p.m.-midnight.

Rum Boogie Cafe 182 BEALE 528-0150

Young Petty Thieves Thursday, April 6, 8 p.m.-midnight; Pam and Terry Friday, April 7, 5:308:30 p.m.; Freeworld Friday, April 7, 9 p.m.-1 a.m.; Jeff Crosslin Saturday, April 8, 5:30-8:30 p.m.; Mr. Sipp Saturday, April 8, 9 p.m.-midnight; Eric Hughes Band Monday, April 10, 8 p.m.-midnight; Gracie Curran Tuesday, April 11, 8 p.m.-midnight; Plantation Allstars Wednesday, April 12, 8 p.m.-midnight.

Rum Boogie Cafe Blues Hall 182 BEALE 528-0150

Memphis Bluesmasters Thursdays, Sundays, 8 p.m.-midnight; Vince Johnson and the Plantation Allstars Fridays, Saturdays, 4-8 p.m., and Sundays, 3-7 p.m.; Cowboy Neil Friday, April 7, 8 p.m.-midnight, and Saturday, April 8, 8 p.m.-midnight; Mambo

Brinson’s 341 MADISON 524-0104

Brinson’s Re-Opening Party Friday, April 7, 8-11 p.m.

Center for Southern Folklore Hall 119 S. MAIN AT PEMBROKE SQUARE 525-3655

Delta Cats, Billy Gibson & Linear Smith First Friday of every month, 11:30 a.m.-1:30 p.m.

Clayborn Temple 294 HERNANDO

Citizen Cope: A Benefit Concert for Memphis Tilth Saturday, April 8, 6-11 p.m.

Dirty Crow Inn 855 KENTUCKY

Bobbie & Tasha Wednesdays, 8-11 p.m.

Earnestine & Hazel’s 531 S. MAIN 523-9754

Amber Rae Dunn Hosts: Earnestine & Hazel’s Open Mic Wednesdays, 8-11 p.m.

Flying Saucer Draught Emporium 130 PEABODY PLACE 523-8536

Songwriters with Roland and Friends Mondays, 7-10 p.m.

Loflin Yard 7 W. CAROLINA

Chris Milam - Kids These Days Album Release Show Thursday, April 6, 8-11 p.m.; Electric Church Sundays, 2-4 p.m.

Huey’s Downtown 77 S. SECOND 527-2700

Deering and Down Trio Sunday, April 9, 8:30 p.m.-midnight.

Paulette’s RIVER INN, 50 HARBOR TOWN SQUARE 260-3300

Live Pianist Thursdays, 5:308:30 p.m., Fridays and Saturdays, 5:30-9 p.m., Sundays, 11 a.m.2 p.m., and Mondays-Wednesdays, 5:30-8 p.m.

Purple Haze Nightclub 140 LT. GEORGE W. LEE 577-1139

DJ Dance Music MondaysSundays, 10 p.m.

Rumba Room 303 S. MAIN 523-0020

Salsa Night Saturdays, 8:30 p.m.-3 a.m.

The Silly Goose 100 PEABODY PLACE 435-6915

DJ Cody Fridays, Saturdays, 10 p.m.

South Main Ghost River Brewing 827 S. MAIN 278-0087

Me & Leah Saturday, April 8, 69 p.m.; Sunday Evening Slowdown with Crockett Hall & Yesse Yavis Sunday, April 9, 5-7:30 p.m.

Bar DKDC 964 S. COOPER 272-0830

Marcella and Her Lovers Friday, April 7; Subtractions with Fresh Flesh Saturday, April 8; Detective Bureau Sunday, April 9; Devil Train Monday, April 10; Deering and Down Wednesday, April 12, 7:30 p.m.

Boscos 2120 MADISON 432-2222

Sunday Brunch with Joyce Cobb Sundays, 11:30 a.m.-2:30 p.m.

Canvas 1737 MADISON 443-5232

Karaoke Thursdays, 9:30 p.m.; Kyle Pruzina Live Mondays, 10 p.m.-midnight.

Celtic Crossing 903 S. COOPER 274-5151

Jeremy Stanfill and Joshua Cosby Sundays, 6-9 p.m.; Candy Company Mondays.

The Cove 2559 BROAD 730-0719

Ed Finney and the U of M Jazz Quartet Thursdays, 9 p.m.; Big Barton Friday, April 7, 8:30 and 10:15 p.m.; Java Trio Saturday, April 8, 9:30 p.m.; David Collins Jazz Sunday, April 9, 6 p.m.; Justin White Mondays, 7 p.m.; Don and Wayde Tuesdays, 7-10 p.m.; Karaoke Wednesdays, 10 p.m.

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After Dark: Live Music Schedule April 6 - 12

Hi-Tone 412-414 N. CLEVELAND 278-TONE

All Them Witches, Ranch Ghost Thursday, April 6, 8 p.m.; Negro Terror, Drones, Hauteur, Evince Friday, April 7, 9 p.m.; The Kickback: ’80s & ’90s Hip-Hop with Live Band Friday, April 7, 9 p.m.; Battle of the Bands Saturday, April 8, 8 p.m.; Terry Malts, Data Drums Sunday, April 9, 9 p.m.; Colony House Wednesday, April 12, 8 p.m.

3245 CENTRAL 323-8597

Highbridge Voices - The Bronx’s Premier Youth Choir Monday, April 10, 7-8 p.m.

Wild Bill’s 1580 VOLLINTINE 207-3975

The Wild Bill’s Band Fridays, Saturdays, 11 p.m.-3 a.m.

Highpoint Church 6000 BRIARCREST

The Garden Tour with Kari Jobe Sunday, April 9, 7-10 p.m.

Howard Vance Guitar Academy 978 REDDOCH 767-6940

First Friday at Five Coffee House Concert First Friday of every month, 5 p.m.

back Sunday, April 9, 4-7 p.m.; Debbie Jamison & Friends Tuesdays, 610 p.m.; Elmo and the Shades Wednesdays, 8 p.m.-midnight.

Owen Brennan’s THE REGALIA, 6150 POPLAR 761-0990

RockHouse Live

Huey’s Cordova

5709 RALEIGH-LAGRANGE 386-7222

1771 N. GERMANTOWN PKWY. 754-3885

Live Bands Fridays, Saturdays, 8 p.m.; Open Mic Mondays Mondays, 8 p.m.-midnight; Live Music Tuesdays, Wednesdays, 8 p.m.-midnight.

Lannie McMillan Jazz Trio Sundays, 10 a.m.-2 p.m.

Young Petty Thieves Sunday, April 9, 8:30-midnight.

T.J. Mulligan’s Cordova 8071 TRINITY 756-4480

The Southern Edition Band Tuesdays.

Frayser/Millington Old Millington Winery 6748 OLD MILLINGTON 873-4114

Dr. David Evans with Elmo Lee Thomas Sunday, April 9.

Germantown Huey’s Southwind 7825 WINCHESTER 624-8911

Memphis All Stars Sunday, April 9, 8:30 p.m.-midnight.

Huey’s Midtown 1927 MADISON 726-4372

The Chaulkies Sunday, April 9, 4-7 p.m.; Vintage Sunday, April 9, 8:30 p.m.-midnight; Heart Memphis Band Sunday, April 9, 8:30 p.m.-midnight.

7677 FARMINGTON 318-3034

Lafayette’s Music Room

North Mississippi/ Tunica

Huey’s Germantown Soul Shockers Sunday, April 9, 8-11:30 p.m.

2119 MADISON 207-5097

Joe Restivo 4 Sundays, 11 a.m.; John Paul Keith and Co. Mondays, 6 p.m.; John Kilzer Tuesdays, 8 p.m.; Breeze Cayolle and New Orleans Wednesdays, 5:30 p.m.

The Fillin Station 4840 VENTURE DR., SOUTHAVEN, MS 662-510-5423

Brian Johnson Band Wednesday, April 12, 6-10 p.m.

Midtown Crossing Grill

Hollywood Casino

394 N. WATKINS 443-0502

Beer and Hymns Friday, April 7, 5:45-7 p.m.; Memphis Ukelele Meetup Tuesdays, 67:30 p.m.; “The Happening” Open Songwriter Showcase Tuesdays, 6:30-9:30 p.m.

1150 CASINO STRIP RESORT, TUNICA, MS 662-357-7700

Live Entertainment Fridays, Saturdays, 9 p.m.-1 a.m.

All New 2017 Fiat 124 Spider

Minglewood Hall 1555 MADISON 866-609-1744

TAUK Soul Mechanic Thursday, April 6, 8 p.m.; Jim Breuer Friday, April 7, 8 p.m.; White Animals with Walrus Friday, April 7, 8 p.m.

P&H Cafe 1532 MADISON 726-0906

Rock Starkaraoke Fridays; Mary Kay Berger, Josh McLane Saturday, April 8; Open Mic Music with Tiffany Harmon Mondays, 9 p.m.-midnight.

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The Phoenix

422 S. GROVE PARK 682-8436

1015 S. COOPER 338-5223

Airside Thursday, April 6, 6 p.m.

The Phoenix Blues Jam Tuesdays, 8-11 p.m.

East Memphis

Playhouse on the Square

Buckman Arts Center at St. Mary’s School

66 S. COOPER 726-4656

60 N. PERKINS EXT. 537-1483

Midtown Opera Festival.

Railgarten 2160 CENTRAL

John Paul Keith Thursday, April 6, 7 p.m.; Pixl Friday, April 7, 9-11 p.m.; Deering and Down Saturday, April 8, 911 p.m.; Graber Bluegrass Jam Sunday, April 9, 4-7 p.m.

Pakistan’s Sounds of Kolachi Friday, April 7, 8 p.m.

Mortimer’s 590 N. PERKINS 761-9321

High Point Pub 477 HIGH POINT TERRACE 452-9203

Pubapalooza with Stereo Joe Every other Wednesday, 8-11 p.m.

551 S. MENDENHALL 762-8200

Eddie Harris Thursdays, Fridays, 6:30-9:30 p.m.; Elizabeth Wise Tuesdays, 7-9 p.m.; Van Duren Solo Tuesdays, 7-9 p.m.

6069 PARK 767-6002

Neil’s Music Room 5727 QUINCE 682-2300

Jack Rowell’s Celebrity Jam Thursdays, 8 p.m.; Eddie Smith Fridays, 8 p.m.; The Breaks Friday, April 7, 9 p.m.; Rewind Saturday, April 8, 8 p.m.; Flash-

7729 BENJESTOWN 876-5770

Tony Butler Fridays, 6-8 p.m.; Crosstown Bluegrass Saturday, April 8, 12-3 p.m.; Lee Cagle Sunday, April 9, 12:30-3:30 p.m.

Huey’s Collierville

Poplar/I-240 East Tapas and Drinks

Shelby Forest General Store

Collierville

Van Duren Solo Thursdays, 6:30-8:30 p.m.

Folk’s Folly Prime Steak House Intimate Piano Lounge featuring Charlotte Hurt MondaysThursdays, 5-9:30 p.m.; Larry Cunningham Fridays, Saturdays, 6-10 p.m.

Summer/Berclair

Bartlett Hadley’s Pub 2779 WHITTEN 266-5006

The Nuttin’ Fancy Band Friday, April 7, 9 p.m.; The Backstreet Crawlers Saturday, April 8, 9 p.m.; Thump Daddy Sunday, April 9, 5:30 p.m.; Juno Marrs Wednesday, April 12, 8 p.m.

Horseshoe Casino & Hotel AT CASINO CENTER, SOUTH OF MEMPHIS, NEAR TUNICA, MS 1-800-303-SHOE

Chubby Checker Saturday, April 8.

Huey’s Southaven 7090 MALCO, SOUTHAVEN, MS 662-349-7097

The Dantones Sunday, April 9, 8 p.m.-midnight.

West Memphis/ Eastern Arkansas Downtown Helena, AR CHERRY STREET

Cherry Street Fair Saturday, April 8, 5-8 p.m.

Southland Park 1550 N. INGRAM, WEST MEMPHIS, AR 800-467-6182

2130 W. POPLAR 854-4455

Live Music Fridays, Saturdays, 10 p.m.; Live Band Karaoke Wednesdays, 7 p.m.

Cordova

The New Backdour Bar & Grill

Delta Rain Sunday, April 9, 8:3011:30 p.m.

Chuckles Comedy Club 1700 DEXTER

Uncensored Live: A Variety Show Mondays-Sundays, 7 a.m.-7 p.m.; Uncensored Live: A Variety Show Thursday, April 6, 7-10 p.m.

302 S. AVALON 596-7115

Karaoke with Tim Bachus Mondays, 8 p.m.-1 a.m.; DJ Stylez Wednesdays, 8 p.m.-1 a.m.

m e m p h i s f l y e r. c o m

Crockett Hall Tuesdays with the Midtown Rhythm Section Tuesdays, 9 p.m., Terry Prince & the Principles, Heavy Pull Friday, April 7, 9 p.m.

St. John’s Episcopal Church

ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT

Growlers 1911 POPLAR 244-7904

21


THE PINK PALACE IS OPEN!

CALENDAR of EVENTS:

April 6 - 12

Send the date, time, place, cost, info, phone number, a brief description, and photos — two weeks in advance — to calendar@memphisflyer.com or P.O. Box 1738, Memphis, TN 38101. DUE TO SPACE LIMITATIONS, ONGOING WEEKLY EVENTS WILL APPEAR IN THE FLYER’S ONLINE CALENDAR ONLY.

Broad Avenue Spring Art Walk, Friday, April 7th

March 4 - June 23, 2017

TH EAT E R

Circuit Playhouse

The Bridges of Madison County, based on the best-selling novel about a beautiful Italian woman who married an American soldier to flee war-torn Italy. A ruggedly handsome photographer seeking direction changes her life forever. www. playhouseonthesquare.org. $25-$40. Thurs.-Sat., 8 p.m., and Sun., 2 p.m. Through April 9. 51 S. COOPER (725-0776).

Hattiloo Theatre

The Strange Fruit, opening for the National Black Box Performing Arts Festival. Centers on lynchings in and near the Memphis area that took place between 1877 and 1950, honoring the lives, deaths, and memories of the victims and communities. www.blackboxfest.com. $30. Thurs., April 6, 7 p.m. Debbi Morgan’s One-Woman Show, part of the National Black Box Performing Arts Festival. www. hattilootheatre.org. Sat., April 8, 7:30-9:30 p.m.

3050 Central Ave / Memphis 38111

April 6-12, 2017

901.636.2362

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547-7997

night club shooting in 2016. Hispanic, Latino, Puerto Rican, and African-American male and female actors, from early 20s to mid-30s. For more information on other roles, see website. www. etcmemphistheater.com. Mon., April 10, 6 p.m. 2085 MONROE (274-7139).

A R T I ST R E C E PT I O N S

Crosstown Arts

Opening reception for “The Moonpie Project: New Mural by Kevin Bongang,” exhibition of mural series featuring Nashville-based artist. Limited-edition, artist-designed, enamel label pin featuring an original Bongang design will be available for purchase. Fri., April 7, 5-8 p.m. Artist reception for “Everything Is Terrible,” exhibition of new work featuring Don Jon Trump, Jerry Maguire, tiny nude people doing things, and lots of other weird stuff by Alex Paulus.. www. crosstownarts.org. Fri., April 7, 6-9 p.m.

37 S. COOPER (502-3486).

430 N. CLEVELAND (507-8030).

McCoy Theatre

Fogelman Galleries of Contemporary Art, University of Memphis

The Rhodes Cycle, medieval Biblical play produced by the Rhodes Department of Theatre in collaboration with community partners, artists, and performers. Will be performed in Oak Alley. www. rhodes.edu/mccoy. Free. Tues., April 11, 7 p.m. RHODES COLLEGE, 2000 N. PARKWAY (843-3000).

Theatre Memphis

Rasheeda Speaking, tense workplace thriller examines the realities of office politics when two female co-workers, one black, one white, are driven apart by the implications and leading suggestions of their boss. www.theartrememphis.org. $25. Sundays, 2 p.m., and Fridays, Saturdays, 8 p.m. Through April 23. 630 PERKINS EXT. (682-8323).

TheatreWorks

Someday for a Crown, when Alzheimer’s disease changes a loved one’s personality, do we try to get them to “come back” or do we try to “meet them where they are?” Semi-autobiographical account of a close family’s struggles. www.theatreworksmemphis.org. $15. Sun., 2 p.m., and Fri., Sat., 8 p.m. Through April 9. Casting Call for Thomas Freeheart and the Nature Prince, the play that centers around an outcast teenager who possesses otherworldly powers, destined to protect and defend a war-torn spirit world from an evil adversary. For more information, email contact@thomasfreeheartplay.com. Sat., April 8, 12-3 p.m. Auditions for Pulse Project, cold readings from the script for performance, June 10-18, about Orlando

Opening reception for NCUR 2017 Visual Arts, exhibition in conjunction with the National Conference on Undergraduate Research featuring the work of students from universities around the country. Oral presentations on April 7 in the Art & Communication Bldg. (678-2000), www. memphis.edu. Thurs., April 6, 4-6 p.m., and Fri., April 7, 9 a.m.-4 p.m. 3715 CENTRAL.

Found Studio

Artist reception for Chloe York, exhibition to visually change objects and forms deemed ugly or untouchable by society to suit its standard of what beauty is. Fri., April 7, 6-9 p.m. 2491 BROAD (652-0848).

Jay Etkin Gallery

Marshall Arts Gallery

Opening reception for 2017 MCA Spring MFA Thesis Exhibition, www.mca.edu. Fri., April 7, 6-8 p.m. 639 MARSHALL (679-6837).

Memphis Botanic Garden

Opening reception for “Fusion,” exhibition of works representing artist Lauren Pigford’s life in Memphis and her experience of the outdoors. www.memphisbotanicgarden.com. Wed., April 12, 5-7 p.m. 750 CHERRY (636-4100).

OT H E R A R T HA P P E N I N G S

“Artangel Everywhere” Open Call for Ideas

Networked space sought to commission and produce a major project that can be experienced anywhere in the world. For more information, visit website. Through April 30. WWW.ARTANGEL.ORG.UK.

Broad Avenue Spring Art Walk

Enjoy a celebration of visual, performing, and public art. Fri., April 7, 5-10 p.m. BROAD AVENUE ART DISTRICT, BROAD AVENUE (378-4270), WWW.BROADAVEARTS.COM.

Call to Artists for Curb Couture Trashion Show

Fashion designs must be comprised of at least 75 percent recycled or reused materials. Event date is June 4. For more information email trashion. show@memphistn.gov. Through May 12.

Cooper-Young Art Tours

For more information, featured artists, and popup performances, visit website. First Friday of every month, 6-9 p.m. COOPER-YOUNG DISTRICT, CORNER OF COOPER AND YOUNG, WWW.COOPERYOUNG.COM.

Opening reception for “Beyond,” exhibition of work by John Torina, David Nakabayashi, Jan Hankins, Alla Bartoshchuk, Nathan Yokum, Mickey Bond, Roy Tamboli, Stephanie BrodyLederman, Keith Rash, and Mary Long. www. jayetkingallery.com. Fri., April 7, 6-9 p.m.

Saturday Sketch

942 COOPER (550-0064).

THE DIXON GALLERY & GARDENS, 4339 PARK (761-5250), WWW.DIXON.ORG.

L Ross Gallery

Opening reception for “Lady Portraits,” exhibition of mixed-media acrylics/papers/graphite/oil pastels by Leslie Barron. www.lrossgallery.com. Fri., April 7, 6-8 p.m. 5040 SANDERLIN (767-2200).

Sketch in the gardens or galleries with a special guest instructor each month. Bring a pad of paper or a sketchbook. Pencils and colored pencils only please. For ages 15+. Second Saturday of every month, 10 a.m.

continued on page 25


MOONSHINE

BALL SLICK RICK

98.9 THE VIBE’S BIRTHDAY BASH WITH SPECIAL GUEST AL KAPONE

APRIL 21

JAYE HAMMER & DENISE LASALLE APRIL 22

KID N PLAY MAY 22

JOSH KELLEY JUNE 17

ON SALE THIS FRIDAY AT 10AM

TICKETS AVAILABLE AT TICKETMASTER.COM OR BY CALLING 1-800-745-3000.

JUNE 5 - JULY 21 1930 Poplar Ave. | Overton Park | Memphis, TN 38104 901.272.5116 | mca.edu |

ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT

I

m e m p h i s f l y e r. c o m

tickets starting at $7

Must be 21 years or older to gamble or attend events. Know When To Stop Before You Start.® Gambling Problem? Call 1-800-522-4700. ©2017, Caesars License Company, LLC. All rights reserved.

23

3795_STA_4.575x12.4_4c_Ad_V1.indd 1

3/31/17 9:28 AM


True Story:

Love one another. It’s that simple.

First Congregational Church

Bicycles. Actors. Dancers. Farmers.You call this a church? You bet we do!

Come be part of it.

www.firstcongo.com Phone: 901.278.6786 1000 South Cooper Memphis, TN 38104

April 6-12, 2017

Sunday Worship 10:30 am

24

GRIZZLIES VS PISTONS SUNDAY, APRIL 9

PANIC! AT THE DISCO SATURDAY, APRIL 8

Be there early for a 5pm tip-off, plus a Tony Allen Pepper Grinder for the first 4,000 fans. 901.888.HOOP · grizzlies.com

Death of a Bachelor Tour is set to hit FedExForum, with special guests Misterwives and Saint Motel. Tickets Available!

JEFF FOXWORTHY & LARRY THE CABLE GUY FRIDAY, APRIL 14 Superstar comedians reunite on We’ve Been Thinking Tour. Tickets Available!

Get tickets at FedExForum Box Office | Ticketmaster locations | 1.800.745.3000 | ticketmaster.com | fedexforum.com

FUTURE THURSDAY, MAY 4 The multi-platinum, record-setting hip-hop innovator is bringing the Nobody Safe tour to FedExForum. Tickets Available!


CALENDAR: APRIL 6 - 12 continued from page 22 O N G O I N G ART

Memphis Zoo

“Nature Connects: Art with LEGO Bricks,” exhibition of 15 LEGO brick sculptures. www. memphiszoo.org. Through July 9. 2000 PRENTISS PLACE IN OVERTON PARK (333-6500).

PURE JOY!”

WINNER OF 4 TONY AWARDS B E S T M U S I C A L R E V I VA L

Metal Museum

C A M E RON M A C K I N TO S H ’S

INCLUDING

S PE CTA C U L A R N E W PROD U CT ION OF

A N D R E W L L O Y D W E B B E R ’S

—The New York Times

“Guns, Violence, & Justice.” Through April 30. “Tributaries: Caitie Sellers,” exhibition of jewelry in copper and silver from architectural imagery. www.metalmuseum. org. Through April 16.

ONCE YOU’VE SEEN IT IT, YOU’LL FIND IT HARD TO SETTLE FOR LESS EVER AGAIN.” —The Wall Street Journal

374 METAL MUSEUM DR. (774-6380).

Orange Mound Gallery

“Fiber: A Tribute to Black Femininity,” exhibition of work by Brittney Bullock, Siphne A. Sylve, Felicia Wheeler, and Catherine Patton. Through April 16.

‘TAKE A DEEP BREATH AND

PREPARE TO BE DAZZLED’ THE SCOTSMAN

2232 LAMAR.

148 TUCKER (272-5113).

OPERA

Midtown Opera Festival

Have dinner while enjoying the Opera Prelude Talk or attend any number of Opera productions. See website for more information. $100 festival pass. Through April 9. PLAYHOUSE ON THE SQUARE, 66 S. COOPER (726-4656), WWW.OPERAMEMPHIS.ORG.

DAN C E

Collage Dance Collective

Featuring five new works. $25. Sat., April 8, 7:30 p.m., and Sun., April 9, 2:30 p.m. THE HALLORAN CENTRE, 225 S. MAIN (529-4299), WWW.ORPHEUM-MEMPHIS.COM.

NBE Springloaded: Coppélia Remix

Unique hybrid dance creations, stirring up classical ballet, contemporary dance, tap, hiphop, flamenco, and Memphis Jookin’ into captivating theatrical productions that appeal to all ages. $25. Fri., April 7, 7:30-9:30 p.m., Sat., April 8, 5:30-7:30 p.m., and Sun., April 9, 2:30-4:30 p.m. GERMANTOWN PERFORMING ARTS CENTER, 1801 EXETER (751-7500), GPACWEB.COM.

New Voices

Dance concert featuring six world-premiere dances created by young, emerging choreographers from U of M. Performed in the round to view the dances from all sides. Tickets must by reserved online. Free. April 6-8, 7:30-9:30 p.m., and April 8-9, 2-4 p.m. UNIVERSITY OF MEMPHIS, DEPARTMENT OF THEATRE & DANCE, 3745 CENTRAL (678-2576), WWW.MEMPHIS.EDU/THEATRE.

Wizard of Oz

Performance by Ballet Memphis. $7-$75. Sat., April 8, 2 & 7:30 p.m., and Sun., April 9, 2 p.m. THE ORPHEUM, 203 S. MAIN (525-3000), WWW.BALLETMEMPHIS.ORG.

C O M E DY

Chuckles Comedy Club

Uncensored Live: A Variety Show, diverse array of Memphis-based talent including music, spoken word, comedy, parodies, contortionist, and live painting. (503-3242), www. chucklescomedyhouse.com. $10. Mon.-Sun., 7 a.m.-7 p.m. Through April 6. 1700 DEXTER.

P&H Cafe

Open Mic Comedy, Thursdays, 9 p.m. 1532 MADISON (726-0906).

P O ETRY / S P O K E N WOR D

Crosstown Story Booth

Impossible Language, ongoing poetry reading series curated in collaboration with Memphis/Fayetteville-based poet Bailey Hutchinson featuring poetry readings by writers shaping the literary scene in Fayetteville, Arkansas. www. crosstownarts.org. free. Sat., April 8, 7-9 p.m. 422 N. CLEVELAND (507-8030).

B O O KS I G N I N G S

Booksigning by Zoey Goto

Author discusses and signs Elvis Style: From Zoot Suits to Jumpsuits. Wed., April 12, 6 p.m.

LANSKY AT THE PEABODY, 149 UNION, INSIDE THE PEABODY LOBBY (529-9070), WWW.ZOEYGOTO.COM.

L E CT U R E / S P E A K E R

“Building a World Class Zoo”

NOV 29 - DEC 10, 2017

FA R A ND AWAY THE

BEST MUSIC A L OF T HE Y E A R ! ” N PR

Brooks Museum League meeting featuring Matt Thompson, Director of Animal Programs, Memphis Zoo, speaking about how far the Memphis Zoo has come, exciting things going on right now, and what the future holds. Fri., April 7, 11 a.m. MEMPHIS BROOKS MUSEUM OF ART, 1934 POPLAR (544-6209), WWW.BROOKSMUSEUM.ORG.

“Faith and the Power of Imperfection”

Nadia Bolz-Weber speaks on topic. Free. Thurs., April 6, 68 p.m. EMMANUEL UNITED METHODIST CHURCH, 2404 KIRBY (754-6548), WWW.EMMANUELMEMPHIS.ORG.

BR OA DWAY.C OM ’ S AU DIE NC E C HOIC E AWA R D F OR BES T M U S I C A L

DAT ES

V EN U E 2018 JANUARY 23-28, TICK ET INFOR M ATION

FEBRUARY 13-18, 2018

TICK ET INFOR M ATION

“BROADWAY’S FUNNIEST MUSICAL COMEDY IN AT LEAST 400 YEARS!”

TO U R S

-Time Out New York

Old Forest Hike

Walking tour of the region’s only urban old-growth forest. Second Saturday of every month, 10 a.m. OVERTON PARK, OFF POPLAR (276-1387).

F E ST IVA LS

Lantern Light Festival Memphis

Featuring over 400 lanterns, 400-foot dragon, 30-foot-tall panda, and entertainment including acrobats from China and live music. $16-$20. Fridays-Sundays, 6 p.m.-midnight Through May 7. AGRICENTER INTERNATIONAL, 7777 WALNUT GROVE (651-504-2000), WWW.LANTERNLIGHTFESTIVAL.COM.

National Black Box Performing Arts Festival

Promoting cultural equity by showcasing the works of African-American and Latino artists. Highlights emerging, underexposed, and underappreciated playwrights, dancers, filmmakers, and others. Thur.-

continued on page 27

10 TONY AWARD ® nominations including

BEST MUSICAL

MARCH 7-25, 2018

APRIL 10-15, 2018

ACT NOW TO LOCK IN YOUR SEATS! Call (901) 525-3000 or visit Orpheum-Memphis.com Sponsored by

m e m p h i s f l y e r. c o m

2017 MCA Art Education Thesis Exhibition, www.mca. edu. April 7-28.

OCTOBER 24-29, 2017

SEPTEMBER 19-24, 2017

Nadia Bolz-Weber at Emmanuel United Methodist Church, Thursday, April 6th

ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT

Tom Johnston Gallery

25


5th Annual Wesberry Golf Classic Ridgeway Country Club Memphis, TN May 1, 2017 Four Person Scramble $175 Per Player

Proceeds benefit more than 1,200 children & adults with disabilities

Thank you to our sponsors

Registration 10:30 am Lunch 11:30 am; Shotgun start 12:30 pm Awards reception following tournament

Anne Wesberry

Putting and flight contests, door prizes and giveaways

To register, visit www.srvs.org or call 901-312-6802

April 6-12, 2017

kevin don't bluff LESSONS FOR ALL AGES

NEW+ USED

26

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5832 STAGE RD. • 901-371-0928 • REVOLVEGUITARS.COM LOCATED IN HISTORIC BARTLETT STATION AT THE RAILROAD TRACKS facebook.com/pages/REvolve-Guitar-Music-Shop

Kevin Lipe on the Memphis Grizzlies before, during, and after the game. @FlyerGrizBlog memphisflyer.com/blogs/BeyondTheArc


CALENDAR: APRIL 6 - 12 continued from page 25

Opening reception for Lauren Pigford’s “Fusion” at Memphis Botanic Garden, Wednesday, April 12th

Sun., Apr. 6-9. WWW.BLACKBOXFEST.COM.

Relay For Life of Memphis

S P O RTS / F IT N ES S

Free. Sat., April 8, 2-9 p.m.

Earth Day 5K

Shelby County Star Trek Day

TIGER LANE, 335 SOUTH HOLLYWOOD (278-2091), WWW.RELAYFORLIFE.ORG.

Participants are invited to plant trees in a post-race planting ceremony or to take a sapling home to green up their community. $30. Sun., April 9, 2 p.m.

Featuring special guests, Trekkie food, sketch artist, specialty drinks, trivia, and more. Sat., April 8, 11 a.m.-6 p.m. FOX AND HOUND SPORTS TAVERN, 5101 SANDERLIN (763-2013).

SHELBY FARMS, 500 N. PINE LAKE (767-PARK), WWW.SHELBYFARMS.ORG.

Star Trek Day Celebration

In celebration of Star Trek day, all Star Trek books and merchandise will be 10 percent off, and anyone wearing Star Trek gear will receive 15 percent off anything in the store. Star Trek-themed snacks and raffle. Sun., April 9, 12-5 p.m.

Go Ape Treetop Adventure

Course in Shelby Farms Park open for its second season. Ongoing. SHELBY FARMS, 500 N. PINE LAKE (767-PARK), WWW.GOAPE.COM.

continued on page 28

Swinging for Streets Golf Tournament Benefiting Street Ministries. Mon., April 10, 11 a.m.-5 p.m.

CHICKASAW COUNTRY CLUB, 3395 GALLOWAY, WWW.STREETSMINISTRIES.ORG.

Saturday, April 8 • Noon – 6pm

M E E TI N G S

Live music featuring O.B. Buchana FREE admission and parking

Reimagining the Civic Commons: The Fourth Bluff

Well-known urban strategist, Carol Coletta, will lead a discussion involving plans to improve and revitalize the public space (Civic Commons/4th Bluff) downtown Memphis. Sat., April 8, 9:30-11 a.m.

• Over 200 Hot Corvettes & Camaros • Live Bands & DJs • Mouthwatering Crawfish & Barbeque

COSSITT LIBRARY, 33 S. FRONT (415-2766).

• Refreshing Beer Garden

KIDS

• Strolling Entertainers

2017 Cover Kids Contest

• Festival Vendors

Winners will be featured in the May 2017 issue of Memphis Parent and receive a four-pack of movie passes from Malco Theatres. All contest entrants have a chance to win a Grand Prize Package. See website for details. $20. Through April 10.

• Family Fun Including FREE Face Painting and Balloon Making • Live Radio Remotes: KIX 106 Noon–2pm I 98.1 The Max 2pm–4pm 103.5 WRBO 4pm–6pm

WWW.MEMPHISPARENT.COM.

Open Nominations for the 2017 Beat the Odds Awards

Nominate an extraordinary and deserving youth overcoming challenges. Visit website to learn more about the program, nominations, and information about upcoming events. Through May 31.

Sponsored By:

WWW.MEMPHISBEATTHEODDS.ORG.

S P EC IAL EVE N TS

CASINO PROMOTIONS

“Back to the Moon for Good”

Fifty years ago the U.S. was in a heated race to the moon. This program reflects on that legacy and looks to the future, motivated by the Google XPRIZE. $7. Through June 2.

Tuesdays in April 4pm & 8pm

SHARPE PLANETARIUM, MEMPHIS PINK PALACE MUSEUM, 3050 CENTRAL (636-2362), WWW.MEMPHISMUSEUMS.ORG.

CIVIC CENTER PLAZA, MAIN STREET MALL (888-4369), WWW.MEMPHISCAC.ORG.

Day of Peace Concert benefiting OUTMemphis & Planned Parenthood

Featuring African Jazz Ensemble, Syrrup, Marcella and Her Lovers, Gracie Curran, and the High Falutin’ Band featuring Susan Marshall and Reba Russell. Sun., April 9, 4-8 p.m.

Fridays & Saturdays in April • 6pm - 10pm (Excludes April 29) If the last three digits of your Key Rewards card match the three selected numbers in the exact order, you win a guaranteed minimum of $500 cash! 5X entries on Sundays, 10X entries on Mondays, and 20X entries on Tuesdays.

Win a half side of beef and an 8-cubic foot freezer. Receive one entry for every 20 points earned each Tuesday.

FEATURED ENTERTAINMENT

LEVITT SHELL, OVERTON PARK (272-2722).

Extreme Deep: Mission into the Abyss

Offers opportunities for hands-on exploration of life at the bottom of the sea. Interactive exhibit that highlights the adventure of deep-sea exploration and discovery. Through May 6. MEMPHIS PINK PALACE MUSEUM, 3050 CENTRAL (636-2362), WWW.MEMPHISMUSEUMS.ORG.

SATURDAY, APRIL 29 7 pm

$189 Hotel Package Includes a deluxe room and two reserved show tickets. Call 1-662-363-LUCK (5825) and mention code CPMMA

Tickets starting at $30

Memphis Fashion Week

Celebrate local and regional fashion through designers, photographers, models and boutiques featuring kick-off party, preview party, and emerging designers benefiting the Memphis Fashion Design Network. Through April 7. WWW.MEMPHISFASHIONWEEK.ORG.

FitzgeraldsTunica.com • 1-662-363-LUCK (5825) • Must be 21 and a Key Rewards member. See Cashier • Players Club for rules. Tax and resort fee not included in listed price. Advance hotel reservations required and subject to availability. $50 credit or debit card is required upon hotel check-in. Arrivals after 6pm must be guaranteed with a credit card. Management reserves the right to cancel, change and modify the event or promotion. Gaming restricted patrons prohibited. Gambling Problem? Call 1-800-522-4700.

m e m p h i s f l y e r. c o m

City leaders, citizens, and youth serving professionals will gather to memorialize six children who died because of abuse or neglect. Fri., April 7, 12-12:30 p.m.

ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT

Children’s Memorial Flagraising

Two Winners Each Day

27


CALENDAR: APRIL 6 - 12 continued from page 27 TWO RIVERS BOOK STORE, 2171 YOUNG (630-8088), WWW.TWORIVERSBOOKSTORE.COM.

FOOD & DR I N K E V E N TS

On the Edge: Cars & Coffee

Second Saturday of every month, 8 a.m.-noon. HIGH COTTON BREWING CO., 598 MONROE (896-9977).

FI LM

1984

In a totalitarian future society, a man whose daily work is rewriting history tries to rebel by falling in love. April 7-13. MALCO STUDIO ON THE SQUARE, 2105 COURT (725-7151), WWW.MALCO.COM.

Banned in Memphis: King of Kings

In 1928, Lloyd Binford, chairman of the Memphis Board of Censors, banned Cecil B. DeMille’s silent epic King of Kings from playing within the city limits deeming it antiSemitic and too violent. $9. Wed., April 12, 7 p.m. MEMPHIS BROOKS MUSEUM OF ART, 1934 POPLAR (544-6209), WWW.BROOKSMUSEUM.ORG.

I Am Not Your Negro

Part of the National Black Box Performing Arts Festival. Film essay examines the unholy

“Building a World Class Zoo” at Brooks Museum of Art, Friday, April 7th agglomeration of myths, institutionalized practices, and displaced white terror that have long perpetuated our nation’s history. Fri., April 7, 7 p.m., Sat., April 8, 2 p.m., and Sun., April 9, 3 p.m. MEMPHIS BROOKS MUSEUM OF ART, 1934 POPLAR (544-6209), WWW.BROOKSMUSEUM.ORG.

Undercover Brother

Spoofs blaxploitation films of the 1970s as well as a number of other films. Sat., April 8, 6:30 p.m. BAOBAB FILMHOUSE, 652 MARSHALL.

A Wider Angle Film Series: Men Go to Battle

Two struggling farmer brothers in Civil War Kentucky are more concerned with their land turning a profit than politics. Free. Wed., April 12, 6-8 p.m. BENJAMIN L. HOOKS CENTRAL LIBRARY, 3030 POPLAR (415-2726), WWW.MEMPHISTN.GOV.

Wild Africa

Reveals the striking contrast of stunning deserts beside wild oceans and the sunlit abundance of the coral reefs. See website for show schedule. Ongoing. CTI 3D GIANT THEATER, IN THE MEMPHIS PINK PALACE MUSEUM, 3050 CENTRAL (636-2362), WWW.MEMPHISMUSEUMS.ORG.

Thanks Memphis for voting us the Best Indian Restaurant! Memphis Flyer's 2016 Best of Memphis readers' poll

April 6-12, 2017

1720 Poplar at Evergreen 278-1199

28


SOUNDS OF COLOMBIA

7:30

P ORPHEUM M THEATRE

11

TICKET PRICE: $15 Charge by phone :1-800-745-3000 ticketmaster.com (For group sales call The Orpheum Box Office at (901) 525-3000)

FOR MORE INFORMATION VISIT MEMPHISINMAY.ORG

m e m p h i s f l y e r. c o m

– WORLDMUSICCENTRAL.ORG

” MAY T H U R S D AY

ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT

HERENCIA DE TIMBIQUÍ IS ONE OF THE MOST EXCITING TROPICAL MUSIC ACTS OUT OF COLOMBIA IN RECENT YEARS.

29


F O O D N E W S B y L e s l e y Yo u n g

Eat, Drink

APRIL 20

RAY WYLIE HUBBARD

TICKETS ON SALE NOW!

Coming up: Memphis Veg Fest and Bacon & Bourbon.

W KY

$7.99 LUNCH SPECIALS Monday-Friday 11am-2pm

KOUO R 3PM-7PM HO

APRIL 6

FOREST FIRE GOSPEL 9PM APRIL 7

$2E.L5L0S W WINE BEER

APRIL 5

“BREEZE” CAYOLLE & NEW ORLEANS 5:30PM

AY MONDAY-FRID

1250 N. Germantown Pkwy • Cordova 800-2453 87 S. Second St. • Memphis 578-9800 @kookycanuck

BRENNAN VILLINES 10:30PM

kookycanuck.com

APRIL 8

MEMPHIS UKELELE BAND 3PM

CODY DICKINSON 10PM APRIL 9

DAVIS COEN CD RELEASE PARTY 4PM

MARCELLA & HER LOVERS 8PM APRIL 10

PAUL KEITH & CO. 6PM APRIL 11

JOHN KILZER 7PM APRIL 12

April 6-12, 2017

JUSTIN CODY FOX 8PM APRIL 8

CODY DICKINSON

PRIVATE PARTY SPECIALISTS

FRESH FISH DAILY

HOME OF THE

CHAR-GRILLED

OYSTER

FREE PARKING • ON THE TROLLEY LINE WALKING DISTANCE TO FEDEX FORUM & BEALE ST.

30

2 1 1 9 M A D I S O N AV E N U E MEMPHIS, TN 38104 (901) 207-5097 L A FAY E T T E S . C O M

299 S. MAIN ST. OPEN DAILY AT 11AM 901-522-9070

PEARLSOYSTERHOUSE.COM

hile attending nursing school, Carolyn Mallett was moved to make a major lifestyle change while working on a special project. “I was taking a community health course, and we were each assigned a zip code,” Mallett says. “Mine was Orange Mound. I knew there was a lack of fresh fruit and vegetables, but until I actually went into the neighborhood and did field research — I was shocked at how limited their options are.” This research sent her on a course that resulted in her becoming vegan in an effort not only to lead a more healthy lifestyle but also to have an impact on her world. “I found out how much water was used in animal agriculture and all the deforestation that goes into all the land that is needed,” Mallett says. “The amount of people that livestock can feed is far less than grain or plant-based, meanwhile millions of people go hungry.” Now, she and her friend Angel Jackson, who is transitioning to a vegan diet, are taking the next step in their efforts to impact their world — they’re putting on a vegetarian festival. On Saturday, April 22nd, Memphis’ first Veg Fest will take place at the Levitt Shell, an ideal day and location for a festival celebrating animal humaneness and environmental sustainability (that’s Earth Day in Overton Park). “It was completely coincidental, and it’s awesome,” Mallett says. The festival kicks off with free yoga, presented by Sumits Yoga, at 10 a.m. followed by festival activities including food vendors, who will offer $3 sample plates, food trucks, live music, food demos, and speakers. Food vendors include Zaka Bowl, City Silo, Seasons 52, Imagine Vegan Cafe, Merge Memphis, Phillip Ashley Chocolates, Ms. Lillie’s Z-Muffins,

Nikki’s Products, Guilt-Free Pastries, Lydia’s Healthy Edibles, and others. One of the highlights of the event is a vegan cook off, which is open to anyone and offers prizes in entree to dessert. “No experience is needed,” Mallett says. “We have high schoolers doing it.” Those interested in entering the contest can sign up online at memphisvegfest.com until April 14th.

“This is to promote the elimination of nutritional disparities in our city.” “We have had people ask if this is an effort to aggressively convert people, and that is absolutely not the case,” Mallett says. “This is simply for learning about and shedding light on the benefits and the impact of incorporating even a little more plant-based food into your diet. “This is to promote the elimination of nutritional disparities in our city,” Mallett continues. The festival runs from 11 a.m. to 5 p.m. For more information, visit memphisvegfest.com. Memphis Veg Fest, Saturday, April 22nd at Levitt Shell.


presented by Athens Distributing Company of Memphis, Southern Glazer’s of Tennessee, Budweiser of Memphis, and Ghost River Brewing Co. There will also be live music and vendors, including a cigar station, as well as a cash bar for those of the craft beer or martini persuasion. All activities will take place at the Memphis Farmers Market at S. Front and G.E. Patterson from 6 to 9 p.m. Sponsors this year include Henry Turley Co., Gossett Fiat, Another Broken Egg Cafe, and Memphis Farmers Market, and a portion of the proceeds benefit the Farmers Market. And again, tickets will likely sell out, so go to memphisbaconandbourbon.com.

E AT , D R I N K

Memphis is nothing if not diverse. On the other end of the spectrum of celebrating and promoting plant-based foods and living a healthy lifestyle there is The Memphis Flyer’s Bacon and Bourbon festival. It’s just what it sounds like — a celebration of pairing two of the South’s best exports — meat candy and whiskey. Saturday, April 15th will mark the Flyer’s second annual festival, and if last year is any indication, it will sell out. “It’s always a happy day at Bacon and Bourbon,” Molly Willmott, chief

20

DON PERRY

DRAFT beers

Bring on the bourbon (and bacon).

m e m p h i s f l y e r. c o m

@29o

ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT

operating officer of the Flyer’s parent company, Contemporary Media Inc., says. A $35 ticket will get you 15 bourbon tastings and free food samplings. Bacon experts include Central BBQ, The Casual Pint Highland Row, Maximo’s on Broad, Spindini, Tops Bar-B-Q, Pete & Sam’s, Memphis Pizza Cafe, Celtic Crossing Memphis, Marco’s Pizza, Kooky Canuck — Memphis, Pimento’s Kitchen + Market, and others. Think bacon-topped pizza, bacon soufflé, bacon-wrapped bacon. ... Some of the bourbon being offered to taste and learn about includes Eagle Rare Bourbon, Stillhouse American Whiskey, American Born Moonshine, Four Roses Bourbon, Bird Dog Whiskey, Chattanooga Whiskey Co., Wild Turkey Bourbon, 1792 Bourbon, Buffalo Trace Bourbon, Belle Meade Bourbon, Coopers’ Craft Bourbon, Jim Beam, as well as other adult beverages

800.467.6182 • West Memphis, AR southlandpark.com See Player Rewards for details. Players must be 21 years of age or older to game and 18 years of age or older to bet at the racetrack. Play responsibly; for help quitting call 800-522-4700.

SOUTHL-56381 Memphis Flyer Sammy's 4/6/17 29º Beer.indd 1

31 3/9/17 11:05 AM


SHARE THE RIDE

April 6-12, 2017

Less Fuel….Less Pollution….Less Stress

GRAND OPENING

Wednesday, April 5, 5pm

The McStays and Cassette Set

OPEN DAILY STARTING APRIL 6

John Paul Keith

diner 7am pong 11am

cones Noon

THURSDAY, 4/6 (SUNDOWN)

Pixl

Midnight

Deering & Down

Midnight

PROGRAM

WEDNESDAY, 4/5 (SUNDOWN)

2am

(2am on FRIDAY and SATURDAY)

32

OPENING LIVE MUSIC SCHEDULE

FRIDAY, 4/7 (9–11PM) SATURDAY, 4/8 (9–11PM)

Graber Bluegrass Jam SUNDAY, 4/9 (4–7PM)

SHELBYTNHEALTH.COM / (901) 222-9000


S P I R ITS By Richard Murff

Big Beer Is Back Corporate breweries are buying out craft beers.

Your destination for fresh, flavorful favorites Dine-In . Grab-N-Go . Online Ordering

Memphis-Highland 431 S. Highland Street, #105 901-207-4421 Talk with our Catering Mgr. for any catering needs.

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What this figure doesn’t include is that 1.2 million barrels that were considered craft beer in 2015 were not considered as such in 2016. That number represents the small brewers who sold out to Big Beer. The Brewers Association defines a craft brewery as producing less than 6 million barrels a year and no more than a 25 percent ownership by a non-craft brewer. So, those flattening craft beer numbers have more to do with ownership than production or sales. Bart Watson, the Brewers Association’s chief economist, said, “As the overall beer market remains static and large global brewers lose volume, their strategy has been to focus on acquiring craft brewers.” As a business tactic, buying up successful rivals certainly makes more sense than Budweiser’s awkward attempt to remarket itself as a Macro beer. If Anheuser-Busch

InBev was trying to make me nostalgic for college, it worked. Not in the blissful cheap-domestic-beer-at-a-lake-party memories, so much as flashbacks to an economics class that was the academic equivalent of waterboarding. So which of your craft brews are no longer craft? You might be surprised. Through a company called Craft Brew Alliance, InBev owns a 32 percent stake in Widmer, Kona, and Redhook. Heineken owns 50 percent of Lagunitas, and one of my personal favorites, Founders, is 30 percent owned by Spanish brewer Mahou San Miguel. Purists argue that the quality can’t be maintained if the owners aren’t the brewers. There may be something to that, but it’s a slippery charge. The more concrete issues aren’t in the barrel, but the ongoing, behind-the-scenes battles that small brewers, no matter how great their product, are ill-equipped to fight. Before the buying spree, the big four brewers caught a lot of blowback for trying to strong-arm beer distributors into dropping small brewers from their product lists. They are still trying to muscle the little guy off the shelf, but because they’re doing it with a lineup of craft beers, it’s not so obvious. Using massive economies of scale everywhere from ingredient sourcing to distribution, huge brewers can offer their “craft” selections at lower prices to edge out the small brewers in shelf space and on the tap line. In short, by simply brewing a better product, the craft brewers have been a victim of their own success. Or have they? One of the founders of Birmingham’s Good People Brewing told me that he couldn’t afford to drink his own beer. In the tech sector, a huge buyout from corporate America is, more or less, the accepted endgame for most start-ups. Users don’t care who owns Snapchat, but the good people of Richmond, Virginia, were miffed when local Devil’s Backbone sold out to InBev. The owners, I understand, were delighted. If their goal was to make great beer on a national scale and ultimately make a lot of money, then they aren’t a victim of anything. It’s just really hard to win and remain the underdog.

ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT

A

s anyone who is likely to be reading this knows, the craft beer industry has been on one of the greatest underdog winning streaks in the history of corporate capitalism. Way back in 2010, craft brewers were hoping against hope to take — on some far off sunny day — a 20 percent cut of the domestic beer market. Most industry experts thought the craft brewers might have done a little too much product sampling before setting that goal. Yet, craft beer continued to boom, growing year over year: 18 percent in 2014, 15 percent in 2015. Last year, the numbers got a little more sobering with 6 percent growth. But the stats can be misleading. According to the Brewers Association, craft brewers churned out 24.6 million barrels of beer in 2016, that’s up 1.4 million from the year before. This figure is around 22 percent of the beer market. So, naysayers vanquished; mission accomplished.

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FILM REVIEW By Chris McCoy

Blurred Lines Groundbreaking anime Ghost in the Shell gets lost in the live-action translation.

D

id Blade Runner see the future, or does the future just want to look like Blade Runner? Ridley Scott’s 1982 adaptation was a flop at the time, but its imagery, particularly its dark cityscapes and culturally hybrid inhabitants, have been reimagined time and again. Did Scott have a vision of the future, or is it just that industrial designers and sci-fi movie art directors loved his movie and wanted to emulate it? My guess is it’s a little bit of both. One of the earliest Blade Runner emulators was the manga Ghost in the Shell by Masamune Shirow, which told the story of Section 9, an elite counterterrorism task force operating in a fictional Japanese city of the near future. Prosthetic technology and mind-machine interfaces blurred the lines between human and robot. The members of the team all fall along a spectrum of cybernetic enhancement, from Togusa, who is completely human, to Major Motoko Kusanagi, who is basically a human brain inside a robot body. Ghost in the Shell’s 1995 animated feature film

Scarlett Johansson is Motoko Kusanagi in the new, live-action Ghost in the Shell.

adaptation was a big hit in Japan and proved to be hugely influential to Western filmmakers, particularly the Wachowskis. The cascade of green computer code in The Matrix; Neo and Trinity’s mixture of l33t skillz, kung fu, and extreme gunplay; as well as their generally flat emotional aspect were all mainlined from Ghost in the Shell. Batman may have lurked on rooftops for decades, but when the camera swooped around Christian Bale swooping from a Hong Kong skyscraper in Batman Begins, Christopher Nolan was channeling Major Kusanagi’s emotionless leap of faith. The franchise spawned several big-screen sequels of diminishing returns and a much more rewarding anime series, Stand Alone Complex, which got a lot of airplay on American TV. Ghost in the Shell began as an ensemble piece, but Major Kusanagi quickly emerged as the lead character. For one thing, she’s a walking, talking, gun-toting existential crisis. For another thing, when the Major wears her adaptive camo outfit, she kinda looks like she’s naked. Ghost in the Shell’s $110 million live-action adapta-

tion turns out to be a solution in search of a problem. First, there already was a live-action adaptation of this material: It was called The Matrix. Second, the casting of New Yorker Scarlett Johansson as the Japanese cyborg Motoko Kusanagi caused a backlash amongst the netsavvy target audience who are currently consumed with questions of identity. Critics saw this as yet another case of whitewashing, where Asian actors are passed over in favor of Caucasians (See: Mickey Rooney’s cringeworthy appearance in Breakfast at Tiffany’s). The irony is, Ghost in the Shell has always been obsessed with identity; it’s just a different kind of identity. The Major is a living example of Plutarch’s Ship of Theseus. If you gradually replace and repair every part of a ship, is it still the same ship? How much of Motoko Kusanagi can you replace with superior cybernetics before she ceases to be human? If, like the antagonist known as Kuze (Michael Pitt), you could upload your consciousness into multiple bodies at once, are you still a single individual? If you can hook your brain into the net, your

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FILM REVIEW By Chris McCoy brain can be hacked. If your behavior is controlled by someone else, are you responsible for your actions? Before the Major was a cyborg, she was a lesbian. What use does a robot have for sexuality? What if you found out your memories are fake, implanted by someone trying to manipulate you? Whitewashing or not, Johansson is terrific as the Major. Her body language reads as a confident swagger, but it gradually becomes clear that it’s her cybernetic body executing an awkward walk-loop subroutine. Like Leonard Nimoy, she can wring pathos out of near emotionlessness. Unfortunately, to appreciate her performance, you’d have to be paying attention. This version of Ghost in the Shell shares the franchise’s Achilles’ heel: Despite the fascinating ideas swirling

in the background, the foreground can be deathly dull. The urban gun-fu that seemed so fresh in the 1990s is old hat now, and the John Wick crowd is just not going to sit still for the sci-fi politics and transhumanist philosophy. The producers could have spent half as much money making a state-of-theart anime Ghost in the Shell reboot that played up the material’s strengths and avoided the identity politics trap they blundered into. Like Disney’s live-action adaptations of its animated classics, this film is frequently beautiful but utterly fails to justify its existence. Ghost in the Shell Now playing Multiple locations

Going in Style PG13 The Zookeeper’s Wife PG13 The Last Word R Beauty and the Beast (2017) PG

Smurfs: The Lost Village PG Going in Style PG13 The Case for Christ PG Your Name PG Ghost in the Shell PG13 The Boss Baby PG Power Rangers (2017) PG13 Life R

Beauty and the Beast (2017) PG The Belko Experiment R Kong: Skull Island PG13 Logan R The Shack PG13 Get Out R Lego Batman Movie PG John Wick: Chapter 2 R

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Bolshoi Ballet: A Contemporary Evening Sun. 4/9 -12:55pm & Tue. 4/11 -7:00pm @ Paradiso

Samaritan’s Purse: Facing Darkness Mon. 4/10 -7:00pm @ Paradiso

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LEGAL NOTICE • EMPLOYMENT

901-575-9400 classifieds@memphisflyer.com LEGAL NOTICE AUTO AUCTION Whites wrecker will auction off the following cars on Thursday, 4/13/17 4828 Elmore Rd. Memphis, TN 38128: ‘06 Ford Five Hundred 1FAFP24196G126836 ‘10 Dodge Challenger 2B3CJ5DT5AH313250 ‘99 Toyota Camry 4T1BG22K4XU409745 ‘04 Ford Mustang 1FAFP40694F204225 ‘00 Mercury Marquis 2MEFM75W1YX665571 ‘04 Buick Rendezvous 3G5DA03E94S546839 ‘03 Ford Mustang 1FAFP42X03F326685 ‘99 Cadillac Escalade 1GYEK13R2XR414493 ‘96 Chevy S-10 1GCDT19X7T8185832 ‘05 Nissan Altima 1N4AL11DX5N401798 ‘00 Dodge Intrepid 2B3HD46R0YH353836 ‘00 Toyota Camry 4T1BG22K5YU700305 ‘05 Infiniti G35 JNKCV51E05M211798 ‘02 Infiniti I30 JNKDA31A42T021649 ‘07 Chevy Silverado 2GCEC13ZX71177683 ‘06 Chevy Silverado 2GCEC13T261101613 ‘10 Ford Fusion 3FAHP0HA2AR297789 ‘05 Chevy Equinox 2CNDL73F956138809 ‘02 Honda Accord 1HGCG22582A004180 ‘08 Ford Mustang 1ZVHT80N095104635 ‘98 Nissan 200 1N4AB42DXWC511525 ‘16 Chevy Camaro 1G1FH1R79G0153343 ‘05 Infiniti G35 JNKCV54E05M420289 ‘07 Nissan Maxima 1N4BA41E17C818911 ‘08 Dodge Challenger 2B3LJ74W68H302273 ‘08 Dodge magnum 2D4FV37V98H188249

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RAFFERTY’S We are looking for service minded individuals, that don’t mind working hard. We work hard, but make $. Apply in the store. 505 N Gtown Pkwy

IT/COMPUTER RAYMOND JAMES & ASSOCIATES, INC. Memphis, TN. Fixed Income Programmer. Design, code, test, implement, maintain & support financial apps s/w throughout entire systems life cycle. Master’s degree in Comp Sci, Bioinformatics, or related. 6 months exp w/ SQL Server/C#/ SSIS/SSRS & performing reqs & specs analysis. Other specific exp required. Resumes to: www.rjf.com/ professional_opportunities.htm. SMITH & NEPHEW, INC. (Cordova, TN) seeks Infrastructure Engineer, Server Systems w/ M.S. in com. sci., tech., engg. or related + 1 year as systems engineer. Must have experience with each of the following: 1. Matlab, Powershell; 2. VMware Vsphere Architecture, design and implementation; 3. Storage, Backup and Disaster recovery; 4. Windows server and VMware technologies, system administration and configuration, and performance optimization and monitoring; 5. Applications packaging using VMWare ThinApp and Citrix XenApp; and 6. Active Directory and Group Policies. Apply online at www.smith-nephew.com

PROFESSIONAL/ MANAGEMENT SEEKING MEDICAL TECHNOLOGIST Supervisor for American Esoteric Laboratories, Inc. (AEL), Memphis, TN. Responsible for shift work within the Microbiology Department. Oversight of Lab Assistants, Lab Technicians & Lab Technologist. Position requires: Bachelor’s degree in Biology, Chemistry, Clinical Laboratory Science, or related field, & 5+ yrs microbiology exp. Exp to include: Mycobacteriology, Bacteriology & Molecular testing. Must possess a State of Tennessee Clinical

Laboratory Supervisor license as a Generalist or Microbiologist & have national certification as a laboratory generalist or microbiologist from a CLIA approved entity. Must have ability to lift or carry objects weighing up to 25 pounds. Ability to manipulate tools, objects, & equipment using the following physical motions: pushing, pulling, lifting, reaching above shoulder height, grasping with both hands, pinching with thumb & forefinger, twisting with hand & wrist, climbing under, lifting up, lifting down, & reaching under. Ability to hear audible alarms on temperature monitored equipment & automated analyzers. Work schedule: 11pm to 7am, 5 days per week. This position will also work every 3rd week-end & some holidays. Work schedule may vary. Willingness to work in temperature controlled environment with constant exposure to biological & chemical hazards. Send your resume to J. Wayne Sanders, American Esoteric Laboratories, 1701 Century Center Cove, Memphis, Tennessee, 38134.

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SENIOR PROJECT LEAD - SAP Production/Logistics sought by Aicomp Consulting, Inc. in Memphis, TN. Req a Master’s or foreign equiv degr in Bus Adm, Itntl Bus or rel field, & 3yrs of exp managing & supporting implementation of SAP ERP & SAP PP within paper & packaging industry; leading supply chain optimiz, IT implementation, SAP ECC & variant configuration proj; modeling, customizing, testing & implementing solutions for SAP appl. Pos req ext

LOCAL DRIVERS WANTED! Be your own boss. Flexible hours.

PANCHO’S

IS NOW HIRING Cooks • Servers • Host/Hostess

for the East Memphis (White Station & Summer) location Part time & Full Time available. Must be able available to work weekends days and nights. Servers must have TABC and at least 1 year of experience. If hired all candidates must complete training first. We call back for interviews from submitted applications and/or resumes. Host/Hostess positions are part time only and must be available to work weekends. Apply in person, Mon - Fri, between 2-4 at PANCHO’S MEXICAN RESTAURANT 717 North White Station at Summer Ave.

WE ARE HIRING ALL HOSPITALITY & CULINARY POSITIONS Babalu, a full-service casual/upscale concept, is OPENING IT’S 2ND LOCATION IN MEMPHIS EAST [6450 Poplar Ave, Suite 101, Memphis, TN 38119] and is NOW HIRING ALL POSITIONS!!!

Are you passionate about working in a fun and exciting environment? Do you have a GUEST FIRST attitude? At Babalu, we take great pride in putting together the highest quality creations from scratch using locally sourced products when available. We work hard, but we also enjoy having fun at the same time. Join our team today!

BABA - REQUIREMENTS:

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• Ability to work flexible shifts including nights, weekends, and holidays • Ability to effectively implement the three Cs: coordination, consolidation, and communication

• Now hiring permanent part-time Handlers, day and night, at $12.62 per hour for the Memphis, TN location • Medical coverage starting as low as $5 per month • Tuition assistance • Nationwide training and opportunities

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• Possess organizational and time management skills

Apply in Person

• Prior experience in a full-service restaurant preferred [but not required]

• Demonstrate good judgment, problem solving, and decision making skills • Must have a courteous, friendly and professional demeanor • Ability to stand, walk, and carry food for prolonged periods of time

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APPLY ONLINE TODAY! www.eathere.com/careers 36

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TH E LAST WO R D by Susan Wilson

What So Proudly ... A few weeks ago, I was at a Grizzlies game, dreading my most loathed part of every sporting event in this country: the singing of the “Star-Spangled Banner.” I say “singing” because I can handle even the worst instrumental rendition of our anthem with dignity and aplomb, but even the best a cappella versions are generally wobbly and interminable and leave me wishing we could just all agree to listen to a recorded version of Whitney singing at Super Bowl XXV. I appreciate the cobbled-together aspect of our anthem. It’s a poem set to a drinking song from an English gentlemen’s club. Learning that, I have to say, made me almost like our anthem. In the same way that enough single malt makes me like listening to “Scotland the Brave.” What I don’t appreciate is the bone-headedness of having a song that everyone in the country is expected to sing span almost two octaves. And who knows what a rampart is anyway? No one. That’s why half the time the lyrics become something like, “What so proudly we hailed at the rampart’s early light.” I also find something distinctly surreal about starting out a game of seven-foot millionaires running around in shorts chasing a ball with a song whose lyrics read in part, “Their blood has wash’d out their foul footstep’s pollution.” Was the blood British? Was it slaves’ blood? Moreover, I find the anthem to be too much like the War of 1812. It rather fizzles out, and no one can remember why it started in the first place. It’s not catchy like “O Canada” or stirring like “Gimn Rossijsko,” nor does it have simple lyrics like “God Save the Queen.” If you’re a natural-born American, it’s easy to take it for granted. If you’re an immigrant, it’s confusing. You just have to commit to it and plod through. In that way, I’d say it’s the most American song we could possibly have. There was something that night that particularly struck me about our anthem. As I sat there at halftime watching three human-sized, velour ribs race each other to the finish line of a foot race, and as the person next to me gleefully licked barbecue nacho sauce off his fingers, I realized the anthem is very Memphis. It’s anachronistic. It’s a little old-fashioned. When you try to gussy it up and modernize it, people make a stink. We built a Chick-fil-A inside a church, bringing a whole new spin on the second verse of the anthem, “What is that which the breeze/o’er the towering steep/As it fitfully blows, half conceals, half discloses?” Little did Key know one day that would apply to the chicken franchise flag flying o’er Union Avenue. “Then conquer we must/when our cause is just” is the perfect rallying cry for the pro-annex caucus. “Now it catches the gleam of the morning’s first beam/In full glory reflected, now shines on the stream” reminds me of the light hitting the Pyramid. “In God is our trust” is the prayer of every woman who has had to figure out where to go for birth control when funding for Planned Parenthood is cut yet again. I see little difference in telling me that I’m going to be the one to sing the anthem at all Tigers games and telling me I’d be the one to come up with a plan for the Crosstown building. Both overwhelm me. The thing is that no one would deride me for not having the vision to repurpose Crosstown, but that I find the idea of starting a Little League game with the anthem ridiculous makes me an American-hating pinko. I’m okay with that, by the way. Anyone who wishes to measure my patriotism by my dislike of our anthem is really jumping the gun, because I haven’t even told you how I feel about pledging allegiance to a flag. I was impressed with the singer the night of the game. Her voice was as well suited to the song as any voice could be. She didn’t force it or do that weird thing so many women do when we sing using our head voice when we need to be giving our diaphragm a workout. Her version was Memphis in spring. There’s no doubt I’d make a mess of the damn thing, so I have a huge amount of respect for anyone who would publicly put themselves through that torture. I feel the same way about running for a Shelby County school board seat or city council. But for what it’s worth, I think the giant, plush man-ribs should sing the anthem at Grizzlies home games. Susan Wilson also writes for yeahandanotherthing.com and likethedew.com. She and her husband, Chuck, have lived here long enough to know that Midtown does not start at Highland.

m e m p h i s f l y e r. c o m

“Giant, Plush Man-Ribs”

THE LAST WORD

Sometimes you get the National Anthem you deserve.

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Memphis Flyer 4.6.17  

This week: The Tennessee General Assembly brushes aside fringe matters and gets down to business, MLGW is buying up land, Chris Milam's new...