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CHECK YOUR PRIVILEGE P3 • DON LIFTED P18 • THE VAULT P31 THE LOST CITY OF Z P34

04.27.17 1470th Issue

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s n Gu & s e i n n Bu A close-up look at TV news in Memphis — the good, the bad, and the fluffy.


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JUSTIN RUSHING Advertising Director CARRIE O’GUIN HOFFMAN Advertising Operations Manager JERRY D. SWIFT Advertising Director Emeritus KELLI DEWITT, CHIP GOOGE Senior Account Executives ALEX KENNER Account Executive ROXY MATTHEWS Sales Assistant DESHAUNE MCGHEE Classified Advertising Manager BRENDA FORD Classified Sales Administrator classifieds@memphisflyer.com LYNN SPARAGOWSKI Distribution Manager ROBBIE FRENCH Warehouse and Delivery Manager BRANDY BROWN, JANICE GRISSOM ELLISON, ZACH JOHNSON, KAREN MILAM, RANDY ROTZ, LEWIS TAYLOR, WILLIAM WIDEMAN Distribution THE MEMPHIS FLYER is published weekly by Contemporary Media, Inc., 460 Tennessee Street, Memphis, TN 38103 Phone: (901) 521-9000 Fax: (901) 521-0129 letters@memphisflyer.com www.memphisflyer.com CONTEMPORARY MEDIA, INC. KENNETH NEILL Chief Executive Officer MOLLY WILLMOTT Chief Operating Officer JEFFREY GOLDBERG Director of Business Development BRUCE VANWYNGARDEN Editorial Director KEVIN LIPE Digital Manager LYNN SPARAGOWSKI Distribution Manager KENDREA COLLINS Marketing/Communications Manager BRITT ERVIN Email Marketing Manager ASHLEY HAEGER Controller CELESTE DIXON Accounting Assistant JOSEPH CAREY IT Director KALENA MCKINNEY Receptionist

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CONTENTS

BRUCE VANWYNGARDEN Editor SUSAN ELLIS Managing Editor JACKSON BAKER, MICHAEL FINGER Senior Editors TOBY SELLS Associate Editor CHRIS MCCOY Film and TV Editor CHRIS DAVIS, JOSHUA CANNON, MAYA SMITH, MICAELA WATTS Staff Writers JESSE DAVIS, LESLEY YOUNG Copy Editors JULIE RAY Calendar Editor

OUR 1470TH ISSUE 04.27.17 “Check your privilege.” You hear and read that phrase more and more these days, usually in reference to a white person being unaware of issues that affect people of color. Often, the response from the white person to the remark is defensive, something along the lines of “I’m not privileged. I’ve had to work for everything I’ve got.” While that may be true, that’s not the issue. Checking your privilege isn’t about being forced to acknowledge you’ve had an easy life. It’s about recognizing that there are certain struggles that you won’t ever encounter, problems and challenges that are specific to certain groups. If you’re white, you’re “privileged” in countless ways, many of which you’ve probably never thought about. You (and me) are the “norm,” the baseline. We don’t have that little frisson of tension when entering certain stores or restaurants or when being pulled over by a cop or applying for a job. We’ll seldom if ever be discriminated against for our skin tone. Acknowledging that reality won’t hurt us. It makes us better humans. In fact, there are many types of privilege, including gender, economic status, appearance, celebrity/notoriety, age, and health, to name a few. If you’re male, for example, you’re privileged in ways you’ve likely not considered, but most women could enumerate them for you: your salary, your confidence that you’ll be listened to when you speak assertively and not be considered “pushy,” the knowledge that you won’t be critiqued for your “outfit,” and that you won’t be sexually harassed or raped. If you’re straight and not aware of your privilege as measured against those in the LGBTQ community, you need to open your mind. Imagine growing up gay in a small town and keeping it a secret — from everyone. Imagine not being able to hold hands with your loved one. Imagine not being able to get married. Imagine being in fear because of who you love or how you look. You have to imagine it — acknowledge it — because you’ll never live it. Wealth is another massive kind of privilege: the privilege of never worrying about your lights being cut off or about having to eat the cheapest food available or paying the rent or getting your kids to school or getting your car fixed. You can travel, buy what you want, when you want it — live in ways poor folks can only dream about. No matter how hard you worked to gain your wealth, it’s still a privilege. Appearance can also be a kind of privilege. Observe the difference in how a beautiful woman or handsome, well-dressed man is treated when entering a business or restaurant, as opposed to how an unattractive, poorly dressed person is treated. Celebrity also has its privileges: VIP seating, no waiting in lines, the best service possible. And age ... If you’re too old, people overlook you and relegate you N E WS & O P I N I O N to insignificance. If you’re too young, NY TIMES CROSSWORD - 4 people don’t take you seriously. Even THE FLY-BY - 5 health is a privilege, and if you ever lose POLITICS - 8 it, you’ll quickly realize that. EDITORIAL - 10 VIEWPOINT - 11 So, would you rather be an attracCOVER — “GUNS & BUNNIES” tive, wealthy, black female lawyer or a BY CHRIS DAVIS - 12 poor, old white man who works wiping STE P P I N’ O UT down cars at Mr. Pride? Both have WE RECOMMEND - 16 privilege of one kind or another; both MUSIC - 18 are disadvantaged in some ways. AFTER DARK - 20 There are no easy answers, beCALENDAR OF EVENTS - 22 cause the concept of privilege itself BOOKS - 30 is complicated. It may help some FOOD NEWS - 31 folks understand if instead of saying, SPIRITS - 33 “Check your privilege,” we said “Count FILM - 34 your blessings.” C L AS S I F I E D S - 36 Bruce VanWyngarden LAST WORD - 39 brucev@memphisflyer.com

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C O N S P I R ACY TH EO RY Okay, here’s what we know for sure. In 2013 Shelby County District Attorney General Amy Weirich was attacked by the High Point Owl (AKA Murder Owl). More recently, Frayser Bear has been on the prowl and may be traveling underground, using a series of tunnels constructed by the Barksdale Beaver. The Midtown Coyote and Zimm the Escape Monkey are both keeping such a low profile it seems like only a matter of time before we find out who really killed Hugh the Memphis Manatee. MADE IT Bighearted actor Ron Gordon was laid to rest last week. The veteran stage performer was immortalized on film as a gangster in the early Judd Nelson film Making the Grade. If there was an Oscar for best performance by a man eating and appearing to enjoy an onion, Gordon, a multiple Ostrander-winner, would have taken home another prize.

By Chris Davis. Email him at davis@memphisflyer.com.

the Frayser Bear

The Memphis Airport gets a new look, Weed Day wasn’t, and many saw a bear near here.

TH E N EW, N EW AI R PO RT P LAN Officials unveiled a $214 million, four-year plan to modernize Memphis International Airport, an update to an original $114 million plan introduced in 2014. The new plan carries most of the hallmarks of the original plan, including consolidating most passenger operations to the B concourse. The concourse will get higher ceilings, more natural light, more seating, more moving walkways, a children’s play area, a stage for live music, and more. The new plan also includes related projects like building a new jet bridge and upgrades to the A and C concourses for more airline operations. These upgrades elevated the project’s price tag. However, no local tax dollars will be used. FO R M E R MATA C H I E F P LEAD S G U I LTY Ron Garrison, the former CEO at Memphis Area Transit Authority (MATA), pled guilty on an Alford plea last week to charges of prostitution. He was one of 42 people charged in a three-day sting on human trafficking in Memphis in January. Garrison, 60, was placed on six months diversion for the charge, and if he stays out of trouble, he’ll be cleared of the prostitution offense. B EAR S E E N I N N O RTH M E M P H I S State wildlife officials investigated a bear sighting in North Memphis last week. Andy Tweed, a Shelby County wildlife official with the Tennessee Wildlife Resources Agency, said four or five residents in the area said they saw the bear. Though witnesses reported a second sighting of the bear over the weekend, officials never saw nor captured a bear in the area. Though, Tweed noted that black bear sightings are reported “all the time” around Memphis, usually by hunters and fishers. (Above photo is Tweed with bear darted at Davies Plantation in 2011.)

S I LO P R OJ ECT P U LLE D The American Commercial Barge Line company pulled its application to erect two, 145-foot-tall storage silos on the bluff of the Mississippi River last week. Many residents and businesses were concerned the silos would obstruct the view of the Mississippi River. I NVESTI GATO R S EYE OAK LAN D Shifty business in Oakland, Tenn., was uncovered recently in an investigation by the Tennessee Comptroller Office. That investigation found that Oakland mayor Chris Goodman used city property and his city hall office for his private-sector job and was also frequently out of town and unavailable to city employees. The investigation also found issues with a government contract and an employee’s severance package. STO P P I N G TH E WR EC K I N G BALL Concerned citizens are trying to save the William C. Ellis & Sons Iron Works Inc. building, which is set for demolition to make way for the massive One Beale project. Those citizens, led in part by the preservation group Memphis Heritage, gathered last week to brainstorm methods — like lobbying Memphis City Council members — to possibly stop the demolition.

m e m p h i s f l y e r. c o m

D O G B ITES … N O B O DY? There’s good news out of Mississippi, but it’s married to some more ambiguous, probably not-so-good news for journalism. “Dog doesn’t bite man” is now officially considered news, according to a report in The Commercial Appeal titled “Dogs and people get along well in Mississippi, data shows.” Oh, sure, there’s still a lot of work to be done in the feline and hamster communities, and Mississippi Gov. Phil Bryant recently signed off on Confederate History month to go along with Black History Month and Native American History Month (suggesting that people are still pretty horrible to other people). But puppies!

W E E K T H AT W A S By Flyer staff

NEWS & OPINION

THE

Questions, Answers + Attitude

WE E D DAY WAS N OT LIT Weed Day coughed and didn’t get off at Overton Park this year. April 20 (4/20) has long been the meeting day for dozens around Memphis to meet on the Greensward and smoke marijuana. This year, however, Weed Day only brought out a handful of police officers and a folding table with information from the Memphis chapter of the National Organization for the Reform of 5 Marijuana Laws.


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Phone of the Spirit draws attention to overdoses.

further educate, encourage, uplift, and break the stigma and cycle of heroin addiction. Morse believes that the epidemic will not be erased until the proper resources and funding are available to addicts. “We can and do recover, and not only do we recover, we go on to help others do the same,” Morse said. “We become productive, useful members of society. We can only do that if we are alive and given a chance at treatment.” STOP Doing Heroin, a local activist group, has been working since December of last year, selling buttons and T-shirts, to raise money for addicts in the community who want to receive treatment but lack the means. The group will hold the first in a series of benefit concerts Friday at the Hi-Tone Cafe. All the benefits from the show go to community members’ treatment, like drug counseling and education, clean needles, naloxone kits, and HIV testing.

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Drug deaths are rising in Tennessee, and Memphians are raising awareness of the trend in any way they can, from benefit concerts and online support groups, to a newly installed phone booth for the bereaved. In 2015, Tennessee had the most drug overdose deaths in the state’s history. That year, 1,451 died, including 188 in Shelby County, according to the Tennessee Department of Health (TDH). “This is a disease every one of us is vulnerable to, not a moral failing,” commissioner of TDH John Dreyzehner said at the time. “Not one of these victims deserved this, and the tragedy of lives lost to overdoses becomes even more painful knowing these deaths can be prevented and are the horrible tip of the overdose iceberg.” Opioids claimed close to 72 percent of those 2015 drug deaths. One of those was Emily Harvey’s ex-boyfriend. In response to his death and the rising number of others like it, Harvey decided to install a phone booth, an art installation of sorts. Known as the Phone of the Spirit, the booth was dedicated Saturday in a community garden at St. John’s Methodist Church. The phone is not connected, but the booth is meant to encourage grieving and healing for those who have lost friends and relatives to the growing drug epidemic, Harvey said. “This project may not stop the disease, but it will spread awareness and grant others the hope of recovery,” Harvey said. “People can go to the phone booth any time to say the many things left unsaid, without judgment. The Phone of the Spirit is a visible channel where community members can express all feelings.” Bethany Morse, a recovering addict, runs a Facebook page called Memphis’ War on Heroin. The group is a closed platform meant to promote education and awareness of the epidemic. It provides a space where members of the community, whether recovering or active users of the drug, can share motivating topics, conversations, articles, and statistics in an effort to

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NEWS & OPINION

MAYA SMITH

Memphians sound the alarm on drug death epidemic.

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4/21/17 11:06 AM


POLITICS By Jackson Baker

GOP’s Lee Puts His Hat In The 2018 gubernatorial field expands, with more likely on the way. gubernatorial candidates are state Senate Majority Leader Mark Norris of Collierville, state House Speaker Beth Harwell of Nashville, and Congresswoman Diane Black of Gallatin. So far, former Nashville Mayor Karl Dean is the only declared Democratic candidate, though state House Minority Leader Craig Fitzhugh of Ripley is considered a probable entry. • This week’s Flyer editorial, (p. 10), makes reference to a press conference scheduled for Thursday at the National Civil Rights Museum on behalf of the Lynching Sites Project of Memphis, a nonprofit group whose efforts are coordinated with those of the Equal Justice Initiative, a national organization. In tandem with the press conference, which relates to the project’s plans to create memorials for victims of lynching (numbering in the neighborhood of 40, according to publicist Howard Robertson), the project has announced a memorial event for one of the victims, Ell Persons, “a 49-year-old black man accused without evidence of murdering Antoinette Rappel, a 16-year-old white girl.” That event, an “interfaith prayer

ceremony,” will take place on May 21st at 3 p.m., “near the site of Summer Avenue and the Wolf River,” where the lynching, not a hanging but a burning at the stake, took place exactly 100 years earlier. Participants will include representatives of white and black churches, the NAACP, and other individuals and institutions. The public is invited, said Robertson. • The first of six “community forums” scheduled as part of the effort to re-establish an official Shelby County Democratic Party will take place on Saturday at noon at Black Market Strategies at 5146 Stage Road. The host for that event will be state Representative Antonio Parkinson. A second event, at 6 p.m. on May 3rd, will be held at the Gallery at 1819 Madison, co-hosted by the Shelby County Young Democrats and the College Democrats. There will be a third forum at the Pickering Center in Germantown on Tuesday, May 9th, hosted by the Germantown Democrats, and a final forum will be held at 6 p.m. on May 15th, at Abyssinian Baptist Church, 3890 Millbranch, under the sponsorship of the Democratic Women of Shelby County. Bill Lee

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Shelby County got a look on Tuesday at Franklin businessman Bill Lee, who formally announced his run for the 2018 governor’s race over the weekend and embarked on what he called a “95-county, 95-day RV tour” of the state. Lee had acknowledged the likelihood of his candidacy when he appeared, along with other gubernatorial propects, at the Shelby County Republican Party’s Lincoln Day banquet in February. While in Memphis, he met with reporters and pursued a schedule that included a stop at the Memphis Shelby Crime Commission and a visit with Shelby County Schools superintendent Dorsey Hopson, among other local meetings. “Basically, I’m on a listening tour,” Lee said. His personal bio includes lifetime residence on a cattle farm and management of a company that deals in heating, air conditioning, plumbing, and home improvements. He says he wants to focus on growing jobs and paying attention to overdue rural needs, all while avoiding the expedient of raising taxes. So far, only Lee and former state director of economic development Randy Boyd, among Republicans, have made official announcements, but other likely GOP


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NEWS & OPINION

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T H E D U N C A N - W I L L I A M S S T. J U D E

E D ITO R IAL

Monumental Acts Sometimes there is an obvious synchronicity at work in human affairs. There certainly seemed to be something like that going on this week in relation to the question of monuments and memorials. Mayor Mitch Landrieu of New Orleans took decisive action to dismantle and remove three Confederate-related statuaries from places of prominence in his city and promised to complete the task by removing three more in the immediate future. He made it clear that the time had come to stop glorifying such shrines of national disunion in much the same way that then South Carolina Governor and now UN Ambassador Nikki Haley did when she removed the Confederate flag from her state Capitol building in 2015. Haley’s action was in response to the horrific murder of nine AfricanAmerican church members by an addled racist who almost literally had wrapped himself in the Stars and Bars of the Confederacy. Landrieu expressed a similar motivation by referring to the creation of the Confederacy as an attempt to “tear this country apart.” It was a blunt and arguably overdue reaction to lingering romantic fantasies regarding what was basically a last-ditch defense of human slavery. This is the same Mitch Landrieu, by the way, who in 2014 answered the inaugural “Summons to Memphis” issued by Memphis magazine, our sister publication, and came here to deliver an inspirational message about various new directions in urban policy. Clearly, he believes in

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leading by example. So, it appears, do Memphians Howard and Beverly Robertson of Trust Marketing, who this week, at the National Civil Rights Museum, were to unveil a campaign on behalf of the Lynching Sites Project of Memphis, described in their press release as “a nonprofit Tennessee organization formed to locate and mark known lynching sites.” To be sure, we write this in advance of their scheduled press conference and cannot vouch for all the details of the Lynching Sites venture. As we see it, memorializing the places where such public horrors took place during the era of Jim Crow is akin to the concept of remembering the Holocaust at the various worldwide ceremonial sites that do so. And not much different from the memorials to Pearl Harbor or 9/11, for that matter. Tragedies and misprisions of the past require our attention quite as much as do the heroics of history, real or imaginary, and it is hard to conceive of anything more directly counter to the pomp and self-deception of the numerous monuments to the Confederacy that remain. How does that famous quote from George Santayana go? “Those who do not remember the past are condemned to repeat it.”

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VI EWPO I NT By Juan Williams

Testing Trump Democrats stand back and watch, as Republicans wrangle with the realities of governing. Harry Enten tweeted earlier this month that the House GOP caucus is in the worst position of any party holding the House majority since 1954, when voters were first asked their preference for which party rules the House. That ballot question was simply, “If the election were held today, would you vote for the Republican or the Democratic candidate?” Enten’s average of polls has the Republicans down by six points. There is more than a year for the Republicans to dig out from there, but it is a big hole. That gives Republicans every reason to start distancing themselves from the Trump White House. Democrats are already standing far away. Yet Trump needs Congress’s help right now to avoid a government shutdown. After a two-week Easter recess, Congress returns to work with just four days left until funding for current government operations is set to expire on April 29th.

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The top two Senate Republicans, McConnell and Majority Whip John Cornyn (Texas), are calling for a bipartisan, stop-gap funding measure to stave off a shutdown. So, now we have leading Republicans calling on President Trump to work with the Democrats. But Democrats know that Trump’s plans for future budgets anger their base. So why would they help him? The Trump blueprint for future budgets, released last month, outlined draconian cuts to funds that support popular education, social welfare, and economic development programs. Meals on wheels for the elderly and after school programs for disadvantaged youths were two that invited public outcry. Trump recently said he remains focused on health reform and is threatening to withhold subsidies to insurance companies to force Democrats to help him pass a bill to replace Obamacare. If you are a Democrat who enjoyed the disastrous GOP civil war over their health-care bill, then you are going to love the upcoming GOP slugfest over spending and taxes. Juan Williams is an author and a political analyst for Fox News Channel.

NEWS & OPINION

This week marks President Trump’s 100th day in office. On day one, after listening to Trump’s inaugural address, former President George W. Bush reportedly said: “That was some weird s—t.” The GOP establishment still holds that view after 100 days of President Trump. Democrats are offering “we told you so” looks. Trump’s most striking achievement in his first three months is being the least popular new president in modern history. A majority of Americans — 52 percent — disapprove of his job performance as president, according to the most recent Gallup tracking poll. Even Trump’s supporters have to admit these first three months have been defined by the administration’s failure to deliver on campaign promises. For all of Trump’s talk about being a great dealmaker, the flashing lights on the political scoreboard read as follows: No repeal of Obamacare. No tax reform. No Muslim travel ban — the attempt to enact one is bogged down in the courts — and no evidence to support the incredible claim that President Obama had Trump wiretapped. There is also no wall on the southern border and no indication that Mexico will pay for it. And in the last few weeks, the reversals on campaign promises have come thick and fast. Now, Trump approves of the ExportImport Bank. Now, Trump is no longer a fan of the border adjustment tax. Now, he believes in NATO. Now, China will not be listed as a currency manipulator. Now, Janet Yellen is a good chairwoman of the Federal Reserve. Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell (R-KY) put all the flip-flops in delicate terms so as not to offend the Trump faithful: “I think President Trump is learning the job, and some of the things that were said during the campaign, I think he now knows — that’s simply not the way things ought to be.” Trump’s singular success was getting Neil Gorsuch confirmed to the Supreme Court. But the credit for that win should properly go to the Heritage Foundation and the conservative legal minds at the Federalist Society. They compiled a list of their favorite conservative judges and handed it to Trump. Now, let’s look ahead to Trump’s next 100 days. The biggest threat to Trump is the split between him and Republicans in Congress. FiveThirtyEight.com forecaster

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COVER STORY BY CHRIS DAVIS

WITH ADDITIONAL REPORTING BY SUSAN ELLIS, TOBY SELLS, AND MAYA SMITH

& s n Gu

s e i n n u B

A CLOSE-UP LOOK AT TV NEWS IN MEMPHIS — THE GOOD, THE BAD, AND THE FLUFFY.

April 27-May 3, 2017

“If it bleeds, it leads” is the conventional wisdom regarding local TV news programming. But how real is the hype? And if it’s real, just how much blood are we talking about? Buckets? Boatloads? Mother-of-All-Boatloads? The digital revolution hasn’t diminished the role TV news plays as a window to the world. For rural Americans — whose communities receive relatively little TV coverage — it’s a daily dose of urban life. For most media consumers, it’s their primary source for public affairs information. So what are they seeing? There are compelling reasons to measure the amount of crime coverage in nightly broadcasts relative to content about government, business, justice, culture, community, etc. In 1996, The Memphis Flyer ran a cheeky cover package called “Guns & Bunnies.” We watched Memphis’ TV news broadcasts for a week to 12 determine just how many minutes, on average, each station devoted to stories

about violence, criminal activity, and disaster — a category we called “Guns.” We also measured how much time each station devoted to fluffy news, such as celebrity-watching, cute animals, self-promotion, curiosities, and trivia — a category we called “Bunnies.” For this week’s issue, the Flyer staff recreated the original experiment, monitoring each of Memphis’ four news teams over four consecutive days. Minute-by-minute viewing diaries were kept, chronicling the headlines and the amount of time spent covering each story. Memphis actually has five news stations: WMC-5, WREG-3, WHBQ-13, WATN-24, and WLMT-30. The last two constitute a duopoly under the same ownership, sharing a news team and content. To avoid redundancy and to measure similar half-hour news blocks, this survey looks only at the 10 p.m. broadcasts of WMC, WREG, WHBQ, and WATN. The period between Tuesday, April

11th and Friday, April 14th was a relatively normal news week. Big national stories included the U.S. military action against Syria. Regional news included an attempt by Arkansas to step up the execution timeline for death row prisoners; a Memphis couple’s alleged racist vacation rant; and the Memphis Zoo naming its newborn hippo. If the mayhem numbers reported below seem large, they may also be

“Jesus Stolen” and “Sisters Murdered” were two stories starting Friday’s news.

misleading and a little low, since not all chaos is created equal. It doesn’t get more violent than dropping something called “the mother of all bombs,” but that story was identified as U.S. foreign affairs. Similarly, some Arkansas death row reports revisited the crimes and victims of convicted felons, while others focused on celebrity protest. These stories were treated as reporting on criminal justice, not criminal activity. Now, without further delay — A BREAKING EXCLUSIVE FROM THE MEMPHIS FLYER: GUNS AND BUNNIES HAVE BEEN SPOTTED ALL OVER THE NIGHTLY NEWS!

WREG News Channel 3 (Tribune Broadcasting)

Every night, WREG signs on with the old line “It’s 10 o’clock. Do you know where your children are?” And for good reason, given the reporting. Highlights from Tuesday’s broadcast included a


WMC Action News 5 Guns vs. Bunnies

WHBQ Channel 13 Guns vs. Bunnies

Local 24 Guns vs. Bunnies

Other News

Other News

Other News

Other News

Bunnies

Bunnies

Bunnies

Bunnies

Guns

Guns

Guns

Guns

truck crashing through apartments in Parkway Village, a woman shot while driving in Orange Mound, an Arkansas machete attack, an exploding ammo plant in Missouri, and mysterious lights in the sky over San Diego. A fourminute teen violence package covered a Binghampton murder, a shooting in Tom Lee Park, and a North Memphis shooting broadcast that was on Facebook Live. Tuesday’s broadcast also covered the story of a sick Midtown kid who’s getting a trip to Disneyworld and included the popular segment, “Pass It On,” wherein Richard Ransom gives money to people who need it. Wednesday’s broadcast began with gunshots at a North Memphis community center, followed by reports about an Arkansas man who set his wife on fire and a deadly explosion in Lakeland. Also covered: bullets in a barber shop in Arizona; microchips being installed in people in Sweden; a 9-year-old driving himself to McDonald’s in Ohio; and a fight between a horse and an alligator in Florida. (The horse won, by the way.) Thursday’s broadcast led with a young child left at home, followed by a man charged with murder in Hickory Hill, three people killed in a Benton County car crash, and a woman who was carjacked at First Congo church. On the less grim side, a miniature goat saved a family from a house fire in Arkansas, and a Wisconsin girl grew a 35-pound cabbage! Friday’s broadcast was almost half sports reporting. Other stories included an armed robbery at the Midtown TitleMax and a report about flowers in California. Based on a four-day sample, WREG devoted 43 percent of its weeknight 10 p.m. broadcast to news, 10 percent to weather, 15 percent to sports, and 3

percent to teasers. The roughly halfhour blocks were rounded out by ads (29 percent). Around 52 percent of the news content was related to crime, violence, mayhem, and disaster — earning a “guns” rating. Nearly 16 percent of news content was devoted to celebrities, trivia, novelty stories, and fluffy feelgood pieces — earning a “bunnies” rating. The remaining 32 percent of WREG’s news programming covered stories that didn’t scream, bleed, or wiggle their nose, such as government, business, development, and education.

under way with stories about a teen beaten by West Memphis police and a mother shot while driving, followed by reports on the settlement of a lawsuit against Christian Brothers High School for not allowing a student to bring his same-sex date to the prom, code violations that plagued a new Midtown hotspot, comedian Charlie Murphy’s death, an Ole Miss fan’s traffic ticket woes, and someone who was shot and carjacked in downtown Memphis. On Thursday, WMC led with a story about an infant who was left at home unattended, followed by a story on West Memphis police breaking their silence on a teen beating, police responding to reports of shots at Superlo, a family wanting answers about their son, who was found dead in a creek, “a mom” who allegedly killed two sisters in Hickory Hill, the Memphis Zoo’s new baby hippo, and a multi-vehicle crash in Durango, Texas. “Arkansas calls off executions,” led Friday night’s broadcast, followed by a Memphis couple’s alleged racist vacation rant/viral sensation, a story of a 12-year-old shot, an armed robbery, and a fatal hit-and-run

in Raleigh. Other stories included abortion restrictions, Beale Street Bucks returning, the Grizzlies giving away gear, thieves stealing an Arkansas woman’s statue of Jesus, a three-minute package about the 2011 murder of Holly Bobo, and a professional athlete surprising a young cancer patient. In our four-day sample, WMC devoted 45 percent of its weeknight 10 p.m. broadcast to news, 10 percent to weather, 7 percent to sports, and 8 percent to teasers. Advertising filled roughly 30 percent of the broadcasts. Around 47 percent of WMC’s news content was “guns” — crime, violence, mayhem, and disaster; 20 percent of its news content was “bunnies” — stories devoted to celebrities, trivia, novelty, and fluffy feel-good pieces. About 33 percent of WMC news programming covered stories that didn’t scream, bleed, or deliver candy to children on Easter.

WMC Action News 5 (Raycom)

Tuesday started with a bang: A woman was taken to the hospital after being shot on East Parkway; a recently baptized teen shot another teen; and then there was that shooting on Facebook Live. The story of Arkansas’ attempt to launch a mass execution of death row inmates took a celebrity turn, as WMC focused on former death row inmate Damien Echols. Other stories included metered parking rates going up and the death of J. Geils Band’s lead singer. WMC also reported on the Civil War’s “controversial” Fort Pillow massacre of African Americans by Confederate soldiers, without mentioning commanding officer Nathan Bedford Forrest. WMC consumer advocate Andy Wise and a group of big-hearted contractors renovated a disabled American veteran’s garage after he was ripped off by shoddy workmen. And every night, a WMC anchor pitches to Jimmy Fallon for a Tonight Show promo. Closing anchor chatter included a tease for women with “coffee problems.” WMC’s Wednesday broadcast got

When local TV news runs out of scary and adorable news stories to report, they pick up scary and adorable stories from other markets with headlines like, “Mom Charged with Running a Major Opioid Ring From Kitchen Table” and “Woman Found Wet and Nearly Naked, Claiming to Be a Mermaid.” A slideshow at memphisflyer.com collects some of our favorite recent “guns & bunnies” stories from elsewhere.

WHBQ Channel 13 (Cox Enterprises)

While Fox 13 devotes much of its onair time to mayhem, WHBQ also seems to have fewer commercials and uses the extra time to touch on a broader mix of local stories about local government and other non-crime-related news. Tuesday began with a weather update, then went right into the shooting on Facebook Live, followed by a story about a Memphis teenager facing charges after shooting another teen, Overton Park Greensward parking, MATA improvements, and a Memphis Police Department audit. Wednesday kicked off with police brutality in West Memphis, followed by a package about the planned continued on page 14

COVER STORY m e m p h i s f l y e r. c o m

WREG News Channel 3 Guns vs. Bunnies

13


continued from page 13 execution of death row inmates in Arkansas. Crime reporting continued with the rape of a minor in Arkansas, a Rutherford County shooting, and a man breaking into cars. WHBQ led off Thursday with a story about Tennessee’s weed bill, followed by pieces about adults getting free tuition for community college, the U.S. MOAB bomb in Afghanistan, a noncritical shooting in Orange Mound, the Tennessee Senate passing a new age requirement for school bus drivers, and Toyota expanding in Mississippi. “Arkansas blocks lethal drug in execution” got Friday started, followed by stories about two shootings in Tom Lee Park, a man robbed at a fraternity house, buildings on fire in Nashville, and a Murfreesboro couple charged with neglecting to feed their baby. A report on local refugees was followed by the story of a Mississippi family facing deportation. Based on our four-day sample, Fox 13 devoted 55 percent of its weeknight 10 p.m. broadcast to news, 13 percent to weather, 2 percent to sports, and 8 percent to teasers. Advertising filled the remaining 22 percent of air time. WHBQ’s “guns” rating was 48 percent: content related to crime, violence, mayhem, and disaster. “Bunnies” stories — celebrities, trivia, novelty, and feel-good fluff — comprised 8 percent of the station’s news content. Nearly 44 percent of Fox’s news programming covered stories that didn’t scream, bleed, or taste delicious when fried in a light batter and served with tangy mustard sauce.

WATN Local 24

April 27-May 3, 2017

(Nexstar Media Group)

14

Based on our sample, WATN-24 (formerly WPTY) appears to have the highest percentage of mayhem in the Memphis market. In fact, among Memphis stations, Channel 24 seems to devote the least amount of time to news reporting. WATN begins its weeknight broadcasts with a weather update. Tuesday’s opening news roundup covered road rage and a pop-up park, a Cookeville shooting, a Memphis chocolatier appearing in British Vogue, a local salon that’s pampering kids who make good grades, and a safety alert about Tom Lee Park. Following weather and its headline roundup, Wednesday’s newscast began with a story about the identification of a body found in a car trunk, followed by the Shelby County Commission addressing sewage backups in Cottonwood, a propane tank exploding in California, and a Mississippi video of a fight at Alcorn State that went viral. Other stories included the Tennessee Department of Transportation suspending work for Easter, Ole Miss

football coach Hugh Freeze being protested by an atheist group, and a Bartlett woman who turned 100. Thursday’s broadcast began with news that violent crime is up in Memphis, and with two sisters being killed in Hickory Hill. Those stories were followed by Shelby County officials warning faith-based organizations celebrating the Passover and Easter holidays to be on high alert, a Target recall of potentially dangerous Easter toys, and Loretta Lynn’s new record. “Jesus Stolen” and “Sisters Murdered” were the two stories starting Friday’s news block, followed by the Memphis couple’s alleged racist rant, a boy recovering at Le Bonheur after being shot, Delta Airlines paying for overbooked flights, and a stay of execution for Arkansas prisoners, featuring star power mentions of Johnny Depp and Damien Echols. Based on our sample, Local 24 devoted 28 percent of its weeknight 10 p.m. broadcast to news, 13 percent to weather, 14 percent to sports, and 6 percent to teasers. The station’s ad content was 39 percent.

“If it bleeds, it leads” is the conventional wisdom regarding local TV news. Local 24 earned a 60 percent “guns” rating — news content concerning crime, violence, mayhem and disaster. Around 25 percent of the station’s news content was “bunnies” — stories about celebrities, trivia, novelty, and fluffy feel-good pieces. About 15 percent of its news programming covered stories that didn’t scream, bleed, or hop around and serve as an easy metaphor for an overactive libido. So that was the Memphis television news, as surveyed between April 11th and April 14th, 2017. To say the least, our news stations painted a rather dystopian picture of life in Memphis, focusing heavily on crime, violence, and mayhem, while stirring in lots of stories to make us say “aw” or “wow!” If all of Memphis’ major stations were rolled up into one big news broadcast, 50.6 percent of their average news content would be “guns,” and 16 percent would be “bunnies.” Only about a third of local news programming covers stories that are neither. Is it any wonder lots of people have a skewed view of life in Memphis?


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steppin’ out

We Recommend: Culture, News + Reviews By Susan Ellis

Mike Todd’s been championing the Edge District since 1994. That’s when he bought his first building in the area. “I’m not a gentrification guy. I’m a capitalist,” he says. But, he adds, “I want the Edge to maintain its coolness.” To that end, there’s The Edge Gets Lit! Alley Party set for Saturday, April 29th, noon to 11 p.m. This is a placemaking event for Floyd Alley, designed after similar events in other cities. The alley will be strung with 1,000 feet of lighting — signaling that the alley is safe and spotlighting all the businesses and stuff that’s going on. The alley party will take advantage of the Edge’s resources. The Black Farmers Association, a new tenant, will be in charge of the hay rides. Evelyn & Olive, a sponsor of the event, will be cooking on site. There will be storytelling, too — on the history of music in the Edge and Sam Phillips and Sun Records. We can’t not mention the Wacky Dog Olympics, which will include the Great American Peanut Butter Lick Off. As described by Darrin Hillis, Edge supporter and owner of event production company In the Wings, this involves dog owners, about a cup of peanut butter per, swim goggles, and (most likely excited) dogs. Of course, the highlight of the event will be the lighting of the alley. The switch gets thrown about 7:50 p.m. The ultimate goal, Hillis says joking, is to eliminate the question, “Now, where’s the Edge?” “Bottom line,” he says, “is to expose the Edge. It’s everything cool in one spot.” THE EDGE GETS LIT! ALLEY PARTY AT FLOYD ALLEY, SATURDAY, APRIL 29TH, NOON TO 11 P.M.

Guns, revenge, and paranoia in The Twelve Lives of Samuel Hawley Books, p. 30

Low on alcohol, high on taste Spirits, p. 33

SATURDAY April 29

April 27-May 3, 2017

FRIDAY April 28 STOP Doing Heroin Awareness Show Hi-Tone, 6 p.m., $10 suggested donation Benefit concert with music by Crockett Hall, J.D. Reager, Tiffany Harmon, and others. Plus guest speakers, demos, and testimonials. All proceeds go to treatment and harm-reduction services in the area. Hear 901 Music Festival The Bluff, 7-11 p.m., $8 Event planned by students enrolled in the Music Industry program at the University of Memphis.

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The Vault and Lisa’s Lunchbox Food News, p. 31

“Bluff Poem” David Lusk Gallery, 6-8 p.m. Opening reception for this show of new paintings by Don Estes. Also opening is “Line and Shadow: Estate Drawings,” work by Burton Callicott. REO Speedwagon Horseshoe Casino, 8 p.m., $42 We’re going to keep on loving you, y’all. ’80s hitmakers REO Speedwagon play tonight at the Horseshoe. Southaven Springfest BankPlus Amphitheater at Snowden Grove, 9 a.m., $10 Annual event with barbecue, rides, and music by Better Than Ezra on Friday and Craig Morgan on Saturday.

Cat on a Hot Tin Roof Theatre Memphis, 8 p.m., $25 Classic Tennessee Williams family drama. Gem of the Ocean Hattiloo, 7:30 p.m., $21-$26 August Wilson play about a man who seeks help from a 285-year-old wise woman.

Chaka Khan Gold Strike Casino, 8 p.m., $49 Concert by this R&B legend. ’90s Night AutoZone Park, 6:35 p.m., $9 A ’90s-themed Redbirds game with an appearance by Saved by the Bell’s Mr. Belding (!). Pops 3: A Salute to John Williams Cannon Center for the Performing Arts, 7:30 p.m. A tribute to this composer behind the music of such films as Star Wars, E.T., and Jaws.

COURTESY: THE EDGE GETS LIT! ALLEY PARTY

Let’s Get Lit


Welcome to Bookstock!

Book It!

By Susan Ellis

You know how at some offices they’ll have one monthly birthday party to cover the entire staff? Well, consider Memphis Public Library’s annual Bookstock event that party, only with local authors instead of cakes and candles. According to the library’s Adult Services Coordinator Wang-Ying Glasgow, the origins of Memphis Public Library’s Bookstock were purely practical. Local authors would approach the library to do a booksigning. Not having the staff to accommodate all the requests, they would turn down most of them until the idea struck them to have one large, yearly event. Now, when the library’s approached by authors, Glasgow says, “We tell them we have this event for you.” Bookstock, now in its seventh year, features 40 local authors — covering everything from nonfiction to inspirational. Different this year: Instead of one keynote speaker, they’ll have four. They are Lisa Wingate, author of Before We Were Yours; ReShonda Tate Billingsley, author of The Secret She Kept and The Perfect Mistress; Daniel Connolly, author of The Book of Isaias; and Adrienne Berard, author of Water Tossing Boulders. Flyer friends Justin Fox Burks and Amy Lawrence will be giving a cooking demo, and Otis Sanford, Geoff Calkins, and Mark Greaney are among the other authors who will be at the event. One key feature of Bookstock is the scavenger hunt. Every author’s booth has a clue. This encourages guests to talk to the authors. There will also be hat making and musical story times. Kids can get their faces painted like a storytime character. Connolly’s Book of Isaias follows a young Latino immigrant in Memphis. Berard’s Water Tossing Boulders tells the true story of a Chinese family in Mississippi fighting segregation. In a nod to those books and to draw in all of Memphis, Bookstock will feature Latino dancers and a Chinese choir and other flourishes. These are “our stories,” says Glasgow. The event, she says, is focused on community and history. BOOKSTOCK AT BENJAMIN L. HOOKS CENTRAL LIBRARY, SATURDAY, APRIL 29TH, 11 A.M.-3 P.M.

East Buntyn ArtWalk East Buntyn neighborhood, 1-7 p.m. Front lawns turn into art galleries during this annual event. Cajun Festival Saint Patrick Church, noon Includes a gumbo tasting, beer, and music by Marcella Simien and Earl Randle. Proceeds go to the programs of Saint Patrick Community Outreach. Suds for Buds Celtic Crossing, 11 a.m.-2 p.m., $12 Includes beer, a silent auction, and goody bags benefiting Passion for Pits Rescue.

Playhouse on the Square’s 40th Annual Original Art Auction Playhouse on the Square, 6:30 p.m., $40 Annual art auction and party with works from over 100 artists. Breakfast for Dinner Galloway House, 6 p.m., $10-$20 Pancakes and breakfast casseroles! Plus bloody marys and mimosas. Benefiting Room in the Inn.

Puppy Up Overton Park, noon-4 p.m., $20 A two-mile walk to raise awareness of canine cancer. Beale Street Wine Race Beale Street, 1 p.m. Debauchery on full display. Includes grape stomping and the popular Queen of the Vine contest.

ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT

SUNDAY April 30

m e m p h i s f l y e r. c o m

Based on the book of the same name, James Gray’s The Lost City of Z stars Charlie Hunnam (above right). Film, p. 34

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M U S I C F E AT U R E B y C h r i s M c C o y

In Control Don Lifted: confessional hip-hop and stunning visuals.

I

April 27-May 3, 2017

’m searching for Don Lifted’s East Memphis crib, but I’m not sure which house on the crowded street is his. Then I see the battered Oldsmobile in the driveway. It’s the trusty, midsized domestic sedan immortalized in the title of his new album, Alero. “The suburbs are a pause for me,” he says. The nine songs on Alero evoke a particular moment in his life when he didn’t have a place to pause. Before he was Don Lifted, Lawrence Matthews’ girlfriend Aleq went to college in Washington, D.C., and he enrolled in a Baltimore school to be near her. “I was on my own for the first time. I had never traveled outside of the South.” But the constant crush of people and personal turmoil threw him for a loop. “I had some demons I had to get out about that time period. It was a time that I had a lot of frustrations, but I had extreme longing for that time and

place and the experiences I had there. I wanted to relive them. The reality was, it was beautiful, but it was bad at the same time. I was poor; I got kicked out of school; I was struggling. I don’t want to say it was drugs. … I was being young and dumb about what I was putting in my body.” Matthews returned to Memphis, but Aleq stayed in D.C. to finish her schooling. For him, that meant a lot of driving back and forth. “It’s a record about the time period spent in the car.” Eventually, he got a degree in art from the University of Memphis. “I did everything. I was a photographer, painting, sculpture work, installations, everything. I decided to focus on painting because at the time, that was what people knew me the most for.” At the same time Lawrence Matthews’ visual art was gaining traction, Don Lifted’s music was struggling. At first, he was making beats for rappers, but when he heard

ADDRESS: 37 South Cooper Memphis, TN 38104 ONLINE: www.hattiloo.org

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Don Lifted


M U S I C F E AT U R E B y C h r i s M c C o y studio in Hollywood, California, with Kendrick Lamar’s engineer Mike Bozzi. For Matthews, it was a life-changing experience — and one that reinforced his determination to stay in Memphis. “When I was in Los Angeles, I thought ‘I could come out here, like everyone else is coming out here, and I could make it out here.’ But every time I do something [in Memphis], the impact is much deeper and more spiritual. They don’t need me in Los Angeles. They don’t need me in New York.”

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In mid-April, he became one of the first musical acts to play in the Brooks Museum’s downstairs theater, utilizing multiple digital projectors to create layered, moving images over the stage while he performed songs from Alero, his prior album, December, and some new material. “Art comes easier. Music is a challenge to me. … Being the guy who has to perform these lyrics I wrote, that’s hard. I get stressed about that. I have extreme doubts and extreme confidence in myself musically.” The autobiographical Alero mixes chillwave synths with twisted and chopped samples. Don’s verses are quick and staccato, sounding sometimes as if the ideas and memories are coming too fast for him to keep up. “I’ve done a lot of projects, but that was the only one that flowed out like that. It happened really quickly.” For the accompanying videos, he teamed up with Crosstown Arts’ Justin Thompson for “Harbor Hall,” and filmmaker Kevin Brooks for “It’s Your World” and “Take Control of Me.” “I want to make as many videos as I can. I want to tell the stories through great videos,” he says. “I need people who are just as maniacal and controlling about what they do as I am about what I do.” The mastering for Alero took place at Bernie Grundman’s Mastering

Friday, May 5

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ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT

the finished songs, he always was disappointed with the results. “I knew I was writing better songs than these people. So I started writing my own songs and making mixtapes,” he says. “I have to be in control. I now understand that about myself. I make decisions based on maintaining control over what I do.” These days, the control extends to the venues where he plays. The artist’s first gigs were multi-artist showcases in traditional club venues. “I always had very elaborate visions of ways I wanted to see and express my music. … It’s an all-encompassing art experience. In these group shows, you can’t really do your own thing. You just have to be a person on the stage. That’s not why I’m doing it. I’m not doing it to just be a performer. That’s just an element of the greater scheme. After a couple of bad experiences, I decided I’m never doing that again. I have to have my own stuff, to sell and curate my own performances and experiences. It started at Crosstown Arts and then branched off from there.”

19


REO SPEEDWAGON FRIDAY, APRIL 28TH HORSESHOE CASINO & HOTEL

BETTER THAN EZRA FRIDAY, APRIL 28TH BANKPLUS AMPHITHEATER AT SNOWDEN GROVE

CHAKA KHAN SATURDAY, APRIL 29TH GOLD STRIKE CASINO

After Dark: Live Music Schedule April 27 - May 3 King Jerry Lawler’s Hall of Fame Bar & Grille 159 BEALE

Alfred’s 197 BEALE 525-3711

Gary Hardy & Memphis 2 Thursdays-Saturdays, 6-9 p.m.; Karaoke Thursdays, TuesdaysWednesdays, 9 p.m.-1 a.m., and Sundays-Mondays, 10 p.m.-2 a.m.; Mandi Thomas Fridays, Saturdays, 6-9 p.m.; The 901 Heavy Hitters Fridays, Saturdays, 10 p.m.-2 a.m.; Flyin’ Ryan Fridays, Saturdays, 2:30 a.m.; Memphis Jazz Orchestra Sundays, 6-9 p.m.

B.B. King’s Blues Club 143 BEALE 524-KING

The King Beez Thursdays, 5:30 p.m.; B.B. King’s All Stars Thursdays, Fridays, 8 p.m.; Will Tucker Band Fridays, Saturdays, 5 p.m.; Lisa G and Flic’s Pic’s Band Saturdays, Sundays, 12:30 p.m.; Blind Mississippi Morris Sundays, 5 p.m.; Memphis Jones Sundays, Wednesdays 5:30 p.m.; Doc Fangaz and the Remedy Tuesdays, 5:30 p.m.

Blue Note Bar & Grill

April 27-May 3, 2017

King’s Palace Cafe 162 BEALE 521-1851

David Bowen Thursdays, 5:309:30 p.m., Fridays, Saturdays, 6:30-10:30 p.m., and Sundays, 5:30-9:30 p.m.

Silky O’Sullivan’s 183 BEALE 522-9596

Dueling Pianos Thursdays, Wednesdays, 9 p.m.-1 a.m., Fridays, Saturdays, 9 p.m.-3 a.m., and Sundays, Tuesdays, 8 p.m.-midnight.

162 BEALE 521-1851

119 S. MAIN, PEMBROKE SQUARE 417-8435

Live Music Thursdays-Saturdays, 10 p.m.

Brass Door Irish Pub 152 MADISON 572-1813

Live Music Fridays.

King’s Palace Cafe Tap Room

Cannon Center for the Performing Arts

168 BEALE 576-2220

MEMPHIS COOK CONVENTION CENTER, 255 N. MAIN TICKETS, 525-1515

Blues City Cafe

New Daisy Theatre

138 BEALE 526-3637

330 BEALE 525-8981

Dirty Crow Inn

Rum Boogie Cafe

Bluff City Backsliders Saturday, April 29, 9 p.m.-midnight; Bobbie & Tasha Wednesdays, 8-11 p.m.

Club 152 152 BEALE 544-7011

Live Music WednesdaysSundays, 7-11 p.m.; Live DJ Wednesdays-Sundays, 11 p.m.; Third Floor: DJ Tubbz Fridays, Saturdays, 10 p.m.

Handy Bar 200 BEALE 527-2687

Bad Boy Matt & the Amazing Rhythmatics Tuesdays, Thursdays-Sundays, 7 p.m.-1 a.m.

Itta Bena 145 BEALE 578-3031

Kayla Walker Thursdays, 67 p.m.; Susan Marshall Fridays, Saturdays, 7-10 p.m.; Nat “King” Kerr Fridays, Saturdays, 9-10 p.m.; Susan Marshall Wednesdays, 6-8 p.m.

Jesse Cook Thursday, April 27, 8-11 p.m.; Morgan Page Saturday, April 29, 10 p.m. 182 BEALE 528-0150

Young Petty Thieves Thursday, April 27, 8 p.m.-midnight; Pam and Terry Friday, April 28, 5:30-8:30 p.m.; FreeWorld Friday, April 28, 9 p.m.-1 a.m., and Saturday, April 29, 9 p.m.-1 a.m.; Jeff Crosslin Saturday, April 29, 5:30-8:30 p.m.; Sensation Band Sunday, April 30, 7-11 p.m.; Eric Hughes Band Mondays, 8 p.m.-midnight; Gracie Curran Tuesdays, 8 p.m.-midnight; Plantation Allstars Wednesdays, 8 p.m.-midnight.

Rum Boogie Cafe Blues Hall 182 BEALE 528-0150

Memphis Bluesmasters Thursdays, Sundays, 8 p.m.midnight; Vince Johnson and the Plantation Allstars Fridays, Saturdays, 4-8 p.m., and Sundays, 3-7 p.m.; McDaniel Band Tuesdays, Wednesdays, 8 p.m.midnight and Friday, April 28,

Soul Shockers Sunday, April 30, 8:30 p.m.-midnight.

Paulette’s RIVER INN, 50 HARBOR TOWN SQUARE 260-3300

Live Pianist Thursdays, 5:308:30 p.m., Fridays and Saturdays, 5:30-9 p.m., Sundays, 11 a.m.2 p.m., and Mondays-Wednesdays, 5:30-8 p.m.

Purple Haze Nightclub

Rumba Room Blind Bear Speakeasy

Queen Ann and the Memphis Blues Masters Fridays, Saturdays, 8 p.m.-midnight.

Blind Mississippi Morris Fridays, 5 p.m., and Saturdays, 5:30 p.m.; Brad Birkedahl Band Thursdays, Wednesdays, 8 p.m.; Earl “The Pearl” Banks Saturdays, 12:30 p.m. and Tuesdays, 7 p.m.; Brandon Cunning Trio Sundays, 6 p.m., and Mondays, 7 p.m.; FreeWorld Sundays, 9:30 p.m.

Canvas 1737 MADISON 443-5232

DJ Dance Music MondaysSundays, 10 p.m.

King’s Palace Cafe Patio Sonny Mack Mondays-Fridays, 2-6 p.m.; Cowboy Neil Mondays, Thursdays, 7-11 p.m. and Saturdays, Sundays, 2-6 p.m.; Sensation Band Tuesdays, Fridays, 7-11 p.m.; Fuzzy and the Kings of Memphis Saturdays, 7-11 p.m.; Chic Jones and the Blues Express Sundays, 7-11 p.m.; North and South Band Wednesdays, 7-11 p.m.

Huey’s Downtown 77 S. SECOND 527-2700

140 LT. GEORGE W. LEE 577-1139

Big Don Valentine’s Three Piece Chicken and a Biscuit Blues Band Thursdays, Tuesdays, 8 p.m.-midnight.

341-345 BEALE 577-1089

20

Chris Gales Solo Acoustic Show Mondays-Saturdays, 12-4 p.m.; Eric Hughes Thursdays, Fridays, 5-8 p.m.; Karaoke MondaysThursdays, Sundays, 8 p.m.; Live Bands Fridays, Saturdays, 8 p.m.

9 p.m.-1 a.m.; Chic Jones and The Blues Express Saturday, April 29, 4-8 p.m.; Little Boys Blue Saturday, April 29, 9 p.m.-1 a.m.; Brian Hawkins Blues Party Mondays, 8 p.m.-midnight.

Pops 3: A Salute to John Williams Saturday, April 29, 7:30-9:30 p.m. 855 KENTUCKY

Earnestine & Hazel’s

303 S. MAIN 523-0020

Salsa Night Saturdays, 8:30 p.m.-3 a.m.

The Silly Goose 100 PEABODY PLACE 435-6915

DJ Cody Fridays, Saturdays, 10 p.m.

The Peabody Hotel 149 UNION 529-4000

Star & Micey Thursday, April 27, 6-10 p.m.

South Main Ghost River Brewing 827 S. MAIN 278-0087

Sarah Rector Trio Saturday, April 29, 6-9 p.m.; Sunday Evening Slowdown with Crockett Hall & Jana Jana Sunday, April 30, 5-7:30 p.m.

Loflin Yard 7 W. CAROLINA

Electric Church Sundays, 2-4 p.m.

531 S. MAIN 523-9754

Amber Rae Dunn Hosts: Earnestine & Hazel’s Open Mic Wednesdays, 8-11 p.m.

Flying Saucer Draught Emporium 130 PEABODY PLACE 523-8536

Songwriters with Roland and Friends Mondays, 7-10 p.m.

The Halloran Centre 225 S. MAIN 529-4299

Charisse Saturday, April 29, 6 p.m.

Hard Rock Cafe 126 BEALE 529-0007

Andrew Cabigao Thursday, April 27, 7-10 p.m., The Brandon Cunning Band Friday, April 28, 9-11 p.m., Swingin’ Leroy Saturday, April 29, 9 p.m., The Skitch Sunday, April 30, 7-10 p.m.

Bar DKDC 964 S. COOPER 272-0830

The Crucial Deets Thursday, April 27; Deering and Down Friday, April 28; NOTS Saturday, April 29.

Benjamin L. Hooks Central Library 3030 POPLAR 415-2700

Five Fridays of Jazz Every other Friday, 6 p.m.

Boscos 2120 MADISON 432-2222

Sunday Brunch with Joyce Cobb Sundays, 11:30 a.m.-2:30 p.m.

Karaoke Thursdays, 9:30 p.m.; Kyle Pruzina Live Mondays, 10 p.m.-midnight.

Celtic Crossing 903 S. COOPER 274-5151

Jeremy Stanfill and Joshua Cosby Sundays, 6-9 p.m.; Candy Company Mondays.

The Cove 2559 BROAD 730-0719

Ed Finney and the U of M Jazz Quartet Thursdays, 8 p.m.; Justin White & Friends Friday, April 28, 10 p.m.; Blackwater Trio Saturday, April 29, 9 p.m.; Don and Wayde Tuesdays, 7-10 p.m.; Karaoke Wednesdays, 9 p.m.

Dru’s Place 1474 MADISON 275-8082

Karaoke Fridays-Sundays.

Growlers 1911 POPLAR 244-7904

Strong Martian, Thompson Springs, Racquets Friday, April 28; Record Breakers Reunion Party Saturday, April 29; Jungle Boogie Sunday, April 30; Music Industry Nite Monday, May 1; Pint Nite with Mo Lowda, Crockett Hall Tuesday, May 2; Hosoi Bros., Gunpowder Gray, Powers that Be, No Love for Lions Wednesday, May 3.

Hi-Tone 412-414 N. CLEVELAND 278-TONE

Coast 2 Coast Mixtapes Thursday, April 27, 8 p.m.; Stop Doing Heroin Awareness Show Friday, April 28, 6 p.m.; GGOOLLDD Friday, April 28, 9 p.m.; Doula the Right Thing Saturday, April 29, 7 p.m.; Jet Black Alley Kat, Dave Bao Bao Saturday, April 29, 8 p.m.; Stage Hypnotist Frank Lee Sunday, April 30, 7 p.m.; Every Time I Die, Wage War, ’68 Tuesday, May 2, 6 p.m.

Huey’s Midtown 1927 MADISON 726-4372

The Dantones Sunday, April 30, 4-7 p.m.; Ghost Town Blues Band Sunday, April 30, 8:30 p.m.-midnight.

Lafayette’s Music Room 2119 MADISON 207-5097

Book release party for I’m Just Dead, I’m Not Gone by Jim Dickinson Thursday, April 27, 7 p.m.; Graham Winchester and the Ammunition Thursday, April 27, 9 p.m.; Ruby Velle & the Soulphonics Friday, April 28, 10:30 p.m. and Saturday, April 29, 10 p.m.; Marcella

Simien Trio Saturday, April 29, 6:30 p.m.; Joe Restivo 4 Sundays, 11 a.m.; Brian Breeze Cayolle & New Orleans Sunday, April 30, 8 p.m.; Scott and Vanessa Sudbury Monday, May 1, 6 p.m.; John Paul Keith and Co. Mondays, 6 p.m.; John Kilzer Tuesdays, 8 p.m.; Breeze Cayolle and New Orleans Wednesdays, 5:30 p.m.; Jason D. Williams Wednesday, May 3, 8 p.m.

Midtown Crossing Grill 394 N. WATKINS 443-0502

Memphis Ukelele Meetup Tuesdays, 6-7:30 p.m.; “The Happening” Open Songwriter Showcase Tuesdays, 6:309:30 p.m.

Minglewood Hall 1555 MADISON 866-609-1744

Leela James, Daley Thursday, April 27, 8 p.m.; The Funky Knuckles Friday, April 28, 8 p.m.; Cody Jinks Saturday, April 29, 7 p.m.

Murphy’s 1589 MADISON 726-4193

Gift Shop with Kitty Dearing and Crockett Hall Wednesday, May 3.

Otherlands Coffee Bar 641 S. COOPER 278-4994

Short in the Sleeve Saturday, April 29.

Overton Park OFF POPLAR

Palestine Festival Saturday, April 29, 10 a.m.-3 p.m.

P&H Cafe 1532 MADISON 726-0906

Rock Starkaraoke Fridays; Fresh Flesh, Ten High Saturday, April 29, 9-11:45 p.m.; Open Mic Music with Tiffany Harmon Mondays, 9 p.m.-midnight; Ben Dayton, Semi-Average Joe Wednesday, May 3.

The Phoenix 1015 S. COOPER 338-5223

The Phoenix Blues Jam Tuesdays, 8-11 p.m.

The Tower Courtyard at Overton Square 2092 TRIMBLE PLACE

Acoustic Courtyard Last Thursday of every month, 6:309:30 p.m.; Stax Music Academy Spring Concert Sunday, April 30, 4-6 p.m.

Wild Bill’s 1580 VOLLINTINE 207-3975

The Wild Bill’s Band Fridays, Saturdays, 11 p.m.-3 a.m.


After Dark: Live Music Schedule April 27 - May 3 Music Tuesdays, Wednesdays, 8 p.m.-midnight.

Owen Brennan’s THE REGALIA, 6150 POPLAR 761-0990

University of Memphis The Bluff 535 S. HIGHLAND

DJ Kaz Thursday, April 27; Hear 901 Festival Friday, April 28, 8 p.m.; The River Bluff Clan Sunday, April 30.

Lannie McMillan Jazz Trio Sundays, 10 a.m.-2 p.m.

Summer/Berclair Barbie’s Barlight Lounge 661 N. MENDENHALL

Possum Daddy’s Karaoke Saturdays, 9 p.m.-2 a.m.

Arlington/Eads/ Oakland/Lakeland De Terra Vineyard & Wines of Somerville

Shelby Forest General Store 7729 BENJESTOWN 876-5770

Tony Butler Fridays, 6-8 p.m.; Highland Duo Saturday, April 29, 12-3 p.m.; Robert Hull Sundays, 12:30-3:30 p.m.

T.J. Mulligan’s Cordova

Huey’s Germantown

8071 TRINITY 756-4480

7677 FARMINGTON 318-3034

The Southern Edition Band Tuesdays.

Frayser/Millington Harpo’s Hogpin 4212 HWY 51 N. 530-0414

Live Music Saturdays, 9 p.m.

605 JOYNERS CAMPGROUND 606-3390

Forks & Corks Saturday, April 29, 6-10 p.m.

Young Petty Thieves Sunday, April 30, 8-11:30 p.m.; No Yoko Wednesday, May 3, 6-9 p.m.

Ice Bar & Grill 4202 HACKS CROSS 757-1423

Unwind Wednesdays Wednesdays, 6 p.m.-midnight.

Russo’s New York Pizzeria & Wine Bar 9087 POPLAR 755-0092

Live Music on the patio Thursdays-Saturdays, 7-10 p.m.

Ubee’s 521 S. HIGHLAND 323-0900

Karaoke Wednesdays, 9 p.m.-2 a.m.

North Mississippi/ Tunica

East Memphis

BankPlus Amphitheater at Snowden Grove

Dan McGuinness Pub 4694 SPOTTSWOOD 761-3711

6285 SNOWDEN, SOUTHAVEN, MS (662) 892-2660

Karaoke Wednesdays, 8 p.m.

Southaven Springfest featuring Better Than Ezra and Craig Morgan Friday, April 28.

Folk’s Folly Prime Steak House 551 S. MENDENHALL 762-8200

Intimate Piano Lounge featuring Charlotte Hurt Mondays-Thursdays, 5-9:30 p.m.; Larry Cunningham Fridays, Saturdays, 6-10 p.m.

The Crossing Bar & Grill 7281 HACKS CROSS, OLIVE BRANCH, MS 662-893-6242

Karaoke with Buddha Tuesdays, Thursdays, 8 p.m.-midnight.

Fox and Hound Sports Tavern

Dan McGuinness 3964 GOODMAN, SOUTHAVEN, MS 662-890-7611

5101 SANDERLIN 763-2013

Karaoke Tuesdays, 9 p.m.

Acoustic Music Tuesdays.

Huey’s Poplar

Fox and Hound Tavern

4872 POPLAR 682-7729

6565 TOWNE CENTER, SOUTHAVEN, MS 662-536-2200

The Settlers Sunday, April 30, 4-7 p.m.; The King Beez Sunday, April 30, 8:30 p.m.-midnight.

Live Music Thursdays, 5 p.m.; Karaoke Tuesdays.

T.J. Mulligan’s

test drive one today

1817 KIRBY 755-2481

Karaoke Tuesdays, 8 p.m.

The Windjammer Restaurant 786 E. BROOKHAVEN CIRCLE 683-9044

Karaoke ongoing.

GOSSETT FIAT 1901 COVINGTON PIKE • FIATUSAOFMEMPHIS.COM • 388.8989

Poplar/I-240

Cheffie’s Cafe

Rizzi’s/Paradiso Pub

East Tapas and Drinks

483 HIGH POINT TERRACE 202-4157

6230 GREENLEE 592-0344

6069 PARK 767-6002

Eddie Harris Thursdays, Fridays, 6:30-9:30 p.m.; Elizabeth Wise Tuesdays, 7-9 p.m.; Van Duren Solo Tuesdays, 7-9 p.m.

Neil’s Music Room

Songwriter Night hosted by Leigh Ann Wilmot and Dave “The Rave” Saturdays, 5-8 p.m.

Maria’s Restaurant 6439 SUMMER 356-2324

Karaoke Fridays, 5-8 p.m.

5727 QUINCE 682-2300

Jack Rowell’s Celebrity Jam Thursdays, 8 p.m.; Eddie Smith Fridays, 8 p.m.; Glory Dayz Reunion feat. Royal Blues Band Friday, April 28, 8 p.m.; Dantones Saturday, April 29, 8 p.m.; Benefit for West Tennessee Veterans Home Sunday, April 30, 3 p.m.; Eddie Harrison Mondays, 610 p.m.; Debbie Jamison & Friends Tuesdays, 610 p.m.; Elmo and the Shades Wednesdays, 8 p.m.-midnight.

Live Music Thursdays, Wednesdays, 7-10 p.m.; Karaoke and Dance Music with DJ Funn Fridays, 9 p.m.

Bartlett Hadley’s Pub 2779 WHITTEN 266-5006

Whitehaven/ Airport Marlowe’s Ribs & Restaurant 4381 ELVIS PRESLEY 332-4159

Karaoke with DJ Stylez Thursdays, Sundays, 10 p.m.

Furious George Friday, April 28, 9 p.m.; Thump Daddy Saturday, April 29, 9 p.m.; Almost Famous Sunday, April 30, 5:30 p.m.

Old Whitten Tavern 2800 WHITTEN 379-1965

Live Music Fridays, 9 p.m.-1 a.m.

RockHouse Live 5709 RALEIGH-LAGRANGE 386-7222

Live Bands Fridays, Saturdays, 8 p.m.; Open Mic Mondays Mondays, 8 p.m.-midnight; Live

Collierville Huey’s Collierville 2130 W. POPLAR 854-4455

Charley Mac’s Six String Lovers Sunday, April 30, 8:30-11:30 p.m.

Cordova Fox and Hound Sports Tavern 819 EXOCET 624-9060

Karaoke Tuesdays, 9 p.m.

Huey’s Cordova 1771 N. GERMANTOWN PKWY. 754-3885

Heart Memphis Band Sunday, April 30, 8:30 p.m.-midnight; Tuesday Tunes on the Terrace Tuesdays, 5-8:30 p.m.; The Pistol and the Queen Tuesday, May 2, 5:30-8 p.m.

Haystack Bar & Grill

Chaka Khan Saturday, April 29, 8 p.m.

Hollywood Casino 1150 CASINO STRIP RESORT, TUNICA, MS 662-357-7700

Live Entertainment Fridays, Saturdays, 9 p.m.-1 a.m.

Horseshoe Casino & Hotel AT CASINO CENTER, SOUTH OF MEMPHIS, NEAR TUNICA, MS 1-800-303-SHOE

6560 HWY. 51 N. 872-0567

REO Speedwagon Friday, April 28.

Old Millington Winery

7090 MALCO, SOUTHAVEN, MS 662-349-7097

Dantones Band Friday, April 28, 9 p.m.-1 a.m. 6748 OLD MILLINGTON 873-4114

901 Blues Band Sunday, April 30.

Germantown Germantown Performing Arts Center 1801 EXETER 751-7500

IRIS Orchestra: A Passion for Dance Saturday, April 29, 810 p.m., and Sunday, April 30, 2-4 p.m.

Huey’s Southwind 7825 WINCHESTER 624-8911

The Sensations Sunday, April 30, 8:30 p.m.-midnight.

Huey’s Southaven Vintage Sunday, April 30, 8 p.m.-midnight; Karaoke Night Mondays, 9-11 p.m.

Tunica Roadhouse 1107 CASINO CENTER, TUNICA, MS 662-363-4900

Live Music Fridays, Saturdays.

Raleigh Stage Stop 2951 CELA 382-1576

Blues Jam Every Thursday Night hosted by Brad Webb Thursdays, 7-11 p.m.; Open Mic Night and Steak Night Tuesdays, 6 p.m.-midnight.

m e m p h i s f l y e r. c o m

All New 2017 Fiat 124 Spider

Van Duren Solo Thursdays, 6:30-8:30 p.m.

Gold Strike Casino 1010 CASINO CENTER IN TUNICA, MS 1-888-245-7829

ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT

Mortimer’s 590 N. PERKINS 761-9321

21


SEE IT CALENDAR of EVENTS: AT THE April 27 - May 3 PINK PALACE!

Send the date, time, place, cost, info, phone number, a brief description, and photos — two weeks in advance — to calendar@memphisflyer. com or P.O. Box 1738, Memphis, TN 38101. DUE TO SPACE LIMITATIONS, ONGOING WEEKLY EVENTS WILL APPEAR IN THE FLYER’S ONLINE CALENDAR ONLY.

TH EAT E R

Circuit Playhouse

Dearly Departed, in the backwoods of the Bible Belt, the Turpin family has just suffered the loss of their father. Problems keep overshadowing the solemn occasion. Living and dying in the South are seldom tidy and always hilarious. www.playhouseonthesquare.org. $25-$40. Thursdays-Saturdays, 8 p.m., and Sundays, 2 p.m. Through May 14.

51 S. COOPER (725-0776).

Crosstown Arts

The Emperor’s New Clothes, theatrical performance by the New Hope Christian Academy drama club. www.crosstownarts.org. Fri., April 28, 6-9 p.m.

EXHIBIT January 21 - May 7, 2017 Produced by Evergreen Exhibitions in collaboration with the Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution

430 N. CLEVELAND (507-8030).

Germantown Community Theatre

www.theatredehootenanny.com. $10. Fri., Sat., 7-9 p.m. Through April 29.

3037 FOREST HILL-IRENE (453-7447).

TheatreWorks

Hattiloo Theatre

Gem of the Ocean, takes place in 1904 in the Hill District of Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania. The play unfolds in the home of Aunt Ester, a 285-year-old wise woman. Citizen Barlow has come for her soulcleansing powers. www.hattiloo.org. April 28-May 14.

St. Timothy’s Episcopal Church

A R T I ST R E C E PT I O N S

Theatre Memphis

April 27-May 3, 2017

CRAWFISH BY THE BAG STRAIGHT FROM LOUISIANA

RESERVE YOUR BAG! BY THURSDAY BY NOON FOR THE WEEKEND

22

547-7997

Call for Writers: ETC second annual 10-Minute Play Festival, eight-10 vignettes will be performed at Theatreworks in early September. Three playwrights will win cash prizes. For more information and guidelines, visit website. www.etcmemphistheater.com. $10 entry fee. Through June 30. 2085 MONROE (274-7139).

8245 GETWELL (662-393-3100).

$2.50 LB

INSIDE FIRST CONGREGATIONAL CHURCH, 1000 S. COOPER (726-0800).

37 S. COOPER (502-3486).

Noir Suspicions Dinner Theatre, comic mystery sequel about exprivate eye Rick Archer, now the confused manager of Cafe Noir. Confronted with a corpse on the dock, it is up to the audience to convince the magistrate that he is innocent. www.kudzuplayers.com. Fri.-Sun., Apr. 28-30.

P!NK PALACE MUSEUM

Art by Design at Propcellar, Thursday, April 27th through Saturday, April 29th

The Glass Menagerie, classic written by Tennessee Williams about the Wingfield family living in a St. Louis tenement in the 1930s. www. gctcomeplay.org. $24. Fri., Sat., 8 p.m., and Sun., 2:30 p.m. Through April 30.

Cat on a Hot Tin Roof, literary classic explores the family relationships of a wealthy Southern tycoon with recurring motifs of social mores, greed, mendacity, decay, sexual desire, repression, and death in the Mississippi Delta. www. theatrememphis.org. $25. Sundays, 2 p.m., and Fridays, Saturdays, 8 p.m. Through May 14. Auditions for Fences. Set in the 1950s, the evolving AfricanAmerican experience is explored as a former star of the Negro baseball league is excluded from the major leagues during his prime. See website for audition details. www. theatrememphis.org. Sun., April 30, 5-5:15 p.m. 630 PERKINS EXT. (682-8323).

TheatreSouth

Auguste: A Family Drama, after the tragic death of her parents, a girl must decide whether the family business was a family dream or her own. Her name? Sprinkles the Clown. Underneath the makeup, she faces the same struggles as the rest of us. (773-613-9477),

David Lusk Gallery

Opening reception for “Bluff Poem,” exhibition of new work by Memphis painter Don Estes. www.davidluskgallery.com. Fri., April 28, 6-8 p.m. Opening reception for “Line and Shadow: Estate Drawings,” exhibition of lithographs, charcoal, and graphite works on paper from the late ’60s to the early ’80s by Burton Callicott. Fri., April 28, 6-8 p.m. 97 TILLMAN (767-3800).

Metal Museum

Opening reception for “Implements of Grandeur,” exhibition of handmade tools by metalsmiths throughout the United States including Jack Brubaker, David Court, Dennis Dusek, Jeffrey Funk, Seth Gould, Tom Latané, Timothy Miller, and others. www.metalmuseum.org. Sun., April 30, 12-2 p.m. 374 METAL MUSEUM DR. (774-6380).

Salon 387

Artist reception for Chloe York, exhibition of objects and forms deemed ugly or untouchable by society to suit its standard of what beauty is. www.stockandbelle.com. Fri., April 28, 6-9 p.m. 387 S. MAIN (734-2911).

Stock&Belle

Artist reception for Mary Ellen Kelly, exhibition of retro and vintage mixed-media works. www.stockandbelle.com. Fri., April 28, 6-9 p.m. 387 S. MAIN (734-2911).

Tom Johnston Gallery

Closing reception for 2017 MCA Art Education Thesis Exhibition, www.mca.edu. Fri., April 28, 6-8 p.m. 148 TUCKER (272-5113).

Webz Media

Artist reception for “Splendor of Spring,” exhibition of mixedmedia paintings exploring a love affair of beautiful florals, rustic churches and barns, and textured things of nature by Deanna. www. tourcollierville.com. Fri., April 28, 5-8 p.m. 185 N. MAIN (451-9329).

West Memorials

Artist reception for “Killin’ It,” exhibition of photography by MCA seniors. www.mca.edu. Fri., April 28, 6-8 p.m. 2481 BROAD (767-0026).

OT H E R A R T HAPPE N I NGS

40th Annual Original Art Auction

Over 150 professional artists donate their prize works of original art for auction, featuring hors d’oeuvres, beverages, all day silent action, and live auction at 6:30 p.m. $40-$100. Sat., April 29, 4:30 p.m. PLAYHOUSE ON THE SQUARE, 66 S. COOPER (726-4656), WWW.PLAYHOUSEONTHESQUARE.ORG.

Art by Design

Designer showcase featuring 13 teams of designers creating vignettes in exciting varieties of style and art. Benefiting ArtsMemphis to support over 60 local art organizations. $20$250. Thurs., April 27, 6 p.m., Fri., April 28, 7-9 p.m., and Sat., April 29, 10 a.m.-5 p.m. PROPCELLAR, 4726 POPLAR (341-0403), WWW.ARTSMEMPHIS.ORG.

“Artangel Everywhere” Open Call for Ideas

Networked space sought to commission and produce a major project that can be experienced anywhere in the world. For more information, visit website. Through April 30. WWW.ARTANGEL.ORG.UK.

East Buntyn ArtWalk

Featuring regional artists in an open-air bazaar of galleries set up in the front yards and porches of the historic East Buntyn neighborhood to celebrate art and community. Free. Sat., April 29, 1-7 p.m. EAST BUNTYN NEIGHBORHOOD, 461 S. PRESCOTT, HTTPS://EASTBUNTYNARTWALK.COM/.

Forging on the River Dinner + Auction

Evening of festivities including dinner by Draper’s Catering and art auction featuring some of the best fine metalwork in the country, benefiting Metal Museum programming throughout the year. $65 members, $75 nonmembers. Sat., April 29, 6-10:45 p.m. METAL MUSEUM, 374 METAL MUSEUM DR. (774-6380), WWW.METALMUSEUM.ORG.

Local Veterans’ Art Exhibit

Local veterans and relatives have created a unique collection of paintings for display and auction to help build the first State Veterans Home. Fri., April 28, 6-10 p.m. ART VILLAGE GALLERY, 410 S. MAIN (410-0655), WWW.VETERANS-HOME.COM.

Small Shop Saturday

Featuring a weekly local vendor in the tap room. Meet the artist and learn about their craft. Saturdays, 1-4 p.m. GHOST RIVER BREWING, 827 S. MAIN (278-0087), WWW.GHOSTRIVERBREWING.COM.

Stark Pottery Show and Sale

Fri., April 28, 10 a.m.-5 p.m., Sat., April 29, 10 a.m.-5 p.m., and Sun., April 30, 12-5 p.m. AGNES STARK’S STUDIO, 12675 DONELSON (458-2354).

Student Art Exhibit

The public is invited to vote for a favorite piece of artwork by students in grades K-12 from school districts including Forrest City, Palestine/ Wheatley, Brinkley, Hazen, Beebe, and others. Thurs., April 27, 6 p.m. EACC FINE ARTS CENTER GALLERY, EAST ARKANSAS COMMUNITY COLLEGE, 1700 NEWCASTLE, FORREST CITY, AR, WWW.EACC.EDU.

continued on page 25


MOONSHINE

BALL

Saturday, September 16

MUD ISLAND AMPHITHEATRE Tickets on sale Friday, April 28 at 10 am

KID N PLAY MAY 20

Ticketmaster.com • Charge by phone at 1-800-745-3000

this week Star & Micey special guest performance by

5.4 Frankie Hollie and the Noise 5.11 Aquanet 5.18 Ghost Town Blues Band 5.25 Luke Wade 6.1 Voodoo Gumbo 6.8 Seeing Red 6.15 Crusin’ Heavy

JOSH KELLEY JUNE 17

TICKETS AVAILABLE AT TICKETMASTER.COM OR BY CALLING 1-800-745-3000.

#PBodyRoof peabodymemphis.com

ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT

Thursday Nights • April 13—August 17 6pm-10pm $10-15 • LADIES FREE ‘TIL 7pm

m e m p h i s f l y e r. c o m

Ocean Park Standoff

Must be 21 years or older to gamble or attend events. Know When To Stop Before You Start.® Gambling Problem? Call 1-800-522-4700. ©2017, Caesars License Company, LLC. All rights reserved.

23


Consignment Music NEW XXS

PA GEAR JUST ARRIVED!

4040 PARK 901-458-2094

STORE HOURS: MON-SAT 10AM-6PM

BUY SELL TRADE. WE DO IT ALL!

POWERED MONITORS SALE $575

REG $699 (BLUE TOOTH AND SD CARD INCLUDED) ADD ON SALTELITE SPEAKERS ON SALE FOR $199.

COME SEE JOE, EVAN LEAKE OR DYLAN FOR THE BEST DEAL IN TOWN!

April 27-May 3, 2017

24 HOUR VENDING MACHINE AT FRONT DOOR

For All Your Emergency Accessory Needs! Strings, Straps, Picks, Batteries & Much Much More! Professional Guitar Teachers Available 7 Days a Week for the Best Rates in Town!

WE TAKE TENNCARE

FREE IUDs

CHO CES

Memphis Center for Reproductive Health

1726 Poplar Avenue Memphis, TN 38104 901/274-3550 www.memphischoices.org 24


C A L E N DA R: A P R I L 2 7 - M AY 3 continued from page 22 O N G O I N G ART

The Dixon Gallery & Gardens

“Scent and Symbolism: Perfumed Objects and Images,” exhibition considering the role of scent in the history of art through a collection of 140 scented bottles. Regular Admission. Through July 2. “Made in Dixon,” exhibition showcasing the colorful and joy-filled artwork created by artists of all ages in the Dixon’s educational programs. www.dixon.org. Ongoing. 4339 PARK (761-5250).

DAN C E

APRIL 27 BOOK RELEASE PARTY FOR

Dance Night

Evening of dancing with music provided by the Jim Mahannah Band or Wally and Friends. $5. First Tuesday of every month, 7-10 p.m.

Racially diverse dance artists perform an eclectic repertoire using the language of ballet to celebrate African-American culture. $25-$79. Sat., April 29, 8 p.m., and Sun., April 30, 2 p.m. THE ORPHEUM, 203 S. MAIN (525-3000), WWW.ORPHEUM-MEMPHIS.COM.

C O M E DY

Memphis Made Brewing Company

Drafts and Laughs: The Anniversary Show, craft beer, the best comedians in town, original sketches, and benches made from real wood. The York entrance doors open at 8 p.m. (917-912-0389). Free. Thurs., April 27, 8:30-9:30 p.m. 768 S. COOPER (207-5343).

New Daisy Theatre

Dirty Movies Presents: He Man: Masters of the Universe, comics roast your favorite terrible movies. Gil Worth, Kyle Kordsmeier, and Cole Bradley will be on the couch. Katrina Coleman opening with her biting stand-up. $5. Sat., April 29, 7-9:30 p.m. 330 BEALE (525-8981).

P&H Cafe

Open Mic Comedy, Thursdays, 9 p.m. 1532 MADISON (726-0906).

P O ET RY/ SPOKE N WOR D

Amurica World Headquarters

Dear Diary, witness the third installment of Spillit’s collaboration with Crosstown Arts: PechaKucha night as presenters bust out their old diaries from childhood and adolescence and share golden entries. www. crosstownarts.org. Thurs., April 27, 6:30-9:30 p.m. 410 CLEVELAND.

LECTU R E / S P EA K E R

Diabetes Undone

Participants learn to prevent or reverse diabetes, pre-diabetes, and other chronic health conditions through simple lifestyle habits such as nutrition, exercise, and sleep. $80. Through May 25, 6:30-8 p.m. SEVENTH-DAY ADVENTIST CHURCH, 4204 JACKSON (731-798-1106).

Road Safety Luncheon: An Open Discussion About Distracted Driving In honor of National Distracted Driving Awareness Month and growing issues surrounding distracted driving and traffic safety in the Mid-South with innovative approaches to engage successful programs. Free. Fri., April 28, 12-2 p.m.

UT STUDENT-ALUMNI CENTER, 800 MADISON (493-2478), HTTPS:// CLIFROADSAFETYLUNCHEON. EVENTBRITE.COM.

C O N F E R E N C ES / C O N VE N TI O N S

“I Matter” Conference

Probate Judge Kathleen Gomes and attorneys Ruby Wharton, Deborah Brooks, Robert Donati, and Craig Barnes will discuss legal options that youths with disabilities will have during transition into adulthood. $25. Sat., April 29, 10 a.m.-1 p.m. UNIVERSITY OF MEMPHIS, UNIVERSITY CENTER (327-2473), WWW. THEARCMIDSOUTH.ORG.

Forging on the River 2017

Metalsmiths and enthusiasts have the opportunity to network, exchange ideas, work collaboratively on projects, and learn from an internationally recognized master blacksmith. $100-$375. Thurs., April 27, 10 a.m.-5 p.m., Fri., April 28, 10 a.m.-5 p.m., Sat., April 29, 10 a.m.-9 p.m., and Sun., April 30, 12-5 p.m.

Artist reception for Chloe York at Salon 387, Friday, April 28th

APRIL 26

THE SEXTONES 8PM APRIL 27

TO U R S

Old Forest Hike

Walking tour of the region’s only urban old-growth forest. Last Sunday of every month, 10 a.m. OVERTON PARK, OFF POPLAR (276-1387).

Scandals & Scoundrels

$20. Sat., April 29, 1 p.m. ELMWOOD CEMETERY, 824 S. DUDLEY (774-3212), WWW.ELMWOODCEMETERY.ORG.

E X PO S/ SA L E S

Crosstown Concourse Job Fair

Sixty jobs need to be filled. Sat., April 29, 10 a.m.-2 p.m. SEARS CROSSTOWN, N. CLEVELAND AT NORTH PARKWAY, WWW. CROSSTOWNCONCOURSE.COM.

Memphis National College Fair

Attendees will have the opportunity to meet one-on-one with admission representatives. Thurs., April 27, 9-11:30 a.m. MEMPHIS COOK CONVENTION CENTER, 255 N. MAIN (703-299-6825), WWW.NACACFAIRS.ORG.

Pop-Up Seasonal Crosstown Market

BOOK RELEASE PARTY FOR “I’M JUST DEAD, I’M NOT GONE” BYEDITED JIMBY DICKINSON EARNEST SUAREZ ENTERTAINMENT BY LUTHER & CODY DICKINSON 7PM APRIL 28

RUBY VELLE AND THE SOULPHONICS 10:30PM APRIL 29

MARCELLA SIMIEN TRIO 6:30PM RUBY VELLE AND THE SOULPHONICS 10PM APRIL 30

BRIAN BREEZE CAYOLLE & NEW ORLEANS 8PM M AY 1

SCOTT & VANESSA SUDBURY 6PM M AY 2

GRACE ASKEW CD RELEASE PARTY 5:30PM APRIL 28 & 29

RUBY VELLE AND THE SOULPHONICS

Locally made goods. Sat., April 29, 11 a.m.-4 p.m. MIDTOWN CROSSING GRILL, 394 N. WATKINS (443-0502).

F E ST IVA LS

April in Arlington

Celebrate the town of Arlington with over 90 vendors on site, arts and crafts, and family fun. Sat., April 29, 10 a.m.-4 p.m. HISTORIC DEPOT SQUARE, ARLINGTON, TN.

METAL MUSEUM, 374 METAL MUSEUM DR. (774-6380), WWW.METALMUSEUM.ORG/FOTR.

2 1 1 9 M A D I S O N AV E N U E MEMPHIS, TN 38104

(901) 207-5097 L A FAY E T T E S . C O M

m e m p h i s f l y e r. c o m

Dance Theatre of Harlem

EDITED BY EARNEST SUAREZ

ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT

BAKER COMMUNITY CENTER, 7942 CHURCH, MILLINGTON, WWW.MILLINGTONTN.GOV.

“I’M JUSTBY JIM DEAD,DICKINSON I’M NOT GONE”

25 continued on page 26


C A L E N DA R: A P R I L 2 7 - M AY 3 continued from page 25

FULL CUP SWIMWEAR

TRUNK SHOW A P R I L 2 8 & 2 9, 2 0 1 7

Bookstock 2017

Featuring four keynote authors, 40 local authors, book signings, author talks, live music, food trucks, cooking demonstrations, door prizes, face painting, arts and crafts, and more. Free. Sat., April 29, 11 a.m.-3 p.m. BENJAMIN L. HOOKS CENTRAL LIBRARY, 3030 POPLAR (415-2700), WWW.MEMPHISLIBRARY.ORG.

Cajun Festival

Featuring Marcella Simien, Earl Randle, gumbo tasting (vegetarian options will be available), beer tasting, and more, benefiting Saint Patrick Community Outreach Inc. Sat., April 29, noon. SAINT PATRICK COMMUNITY OUTREACH CENTER AND COURTYARD, 297 SOUTH FOURTH (543-9924).

The Edge Gets Lit Alley Party

Celebrate the Floyd Alley renovation between Madison and Monroe with music, dancing, kids zone, art, fireworks, and more. Dogs are welcome to bring their well-behaved humans. Sat., April 29, 12-11 p.m.

A full range of sizes will be on hand for fitting purposes. A brand representative will be here to assist and answer any questions. Sizes 30D-44K | All styles are not available in all sizes. 408 Perkins Ext | Memphis, TN 38117 | 901-682-7575 | trousseau.com |

THE EDGE DISTRICT, MADISON, MARSHALL, AND MONROE, WWW.THEEDGEGETSLIT.COM.

Heber Springs Spring Fest 2017

Swing into spring with a weekend stay for the 30th annual Springfest. Free. Fri., April 28, 12-7 p.m., and Sat., April 29, 9 a.m.-7 p.m. SPRINGS PARK, 301 EAST SUGARLOAF (501-362-2444), WWW.HEBER-SPRINGS.COM.

Better Outcomes You’re Invited to Join Us! for Your Friday, September 16, 2016 Career 11:00 a.m. – 2:00 p.m.

Lantern Light Festival Memphis

Now Hiring

ited to Join Us!

Join Memphis musicians Airside, Blind Mississippi Morris, Mighty Souls Brass Band, and Brennan Villines Trio in the courtyard. Thurs., 6-8 p.m. Through April 30.

April 27-May 3, 2017

S PO R TS / F IT N E S S

4100 Austin Peay Hwy, Memphis, TN 38128

26

35th Annual Memphis in May Triathlon Swim Clinics

One-time classes that require 4100 Austin Peay Hwy  Memphis, TN 38128  901 213 5400

Visit: healthsouthnorthmemphis.com to apply

 Memphis, TN 38128  901 213 5400

An Equal Opportunity Employer

SHELBY FARMS, 500 N. PINE LAKE (767-PARK), WWW.SHELBYFARMS.ORG.

Go Ape Treetop Adventure

Course in Shelby Farms Park open for its second season. Ongoing.

SHELBY FARMS, 500 N. PINE LAKE (767-PARK), WWW.GOAPE.COM.

Memphis Redbirds Home Games

For more information, visit website. Through May 1. AUTOZONE PARK, THIRD AND UNION (721-6000), WWW.MEMPHISREDBIRDS.COM.

The Wesberry Golf Classic

Four-person scramble including lunch, awards, flight contests, and giveaways, benefiting SRVS and honoring the late Dr. Fred Wesberry, longtime supporter of SRVS. For more information, visit website. $175. Mon., May 1, 10:30 a.m.-5 p.m. RIDGEWAY COUNTRY CLUB, 9800 POPLAR (312-6801), WWW.SRVS.ORG.

WWW.JUSTICEFORALLTN.COM/ HELP4TNDAY.

es, Medical Records, etc. ty Employer

Multiple options for the whole family to get fit, stay active, and enjoy being in nature, including boot camps, Zumba, dance, yoga, and more. For more information and registration, see website. Ongoing.

AGRICENTER INTERNATIONAL, 7777 WALNUT GROVE (651-5042000), WWW.LANTERNLIGHTFESTIVAL.COM.

Registered Nurses █

Get Outside! Fitness Programs

M E ETI N G S

Open to the Public tember 16, 2016 Clinical and Non-Clinical Job Opportunities LAURELWOOD SHOPPING CENTER, S. GROVE PARK (682-8436), Tour of HealthSouth Rehabilitation Hospital 422 m. – 2:00 p.m. WWW.LAURELWOODMEMPHIS.COM. Meet & Greet with the CEO, CNO, Therapy Director, & Give-Aways Palestine Festival Featuring authentic PalestinSign OnHR Bonus up to $5,000 Director & other Senior Leaders ian cuisine, live music, dabke nical Job Opportunities performance (dancing), fashion  Bring & Submit Resume Weekdays 7p – 7a Weekender 7p – 7a h Rehabilitation Hospital show, henna and traditional clothing photo booth, along  On-the-Spot Application Completion the CEO, CNO, Therapy Director, Health / Medical Benefit Package can begin as with other cultural activities Senior Leaders rst Openings for Nursing, for CNA, Environmental and vendors. Free. Sat., April early as the fi day of employment full-time ume 10 a.m.-3 p.m. & Nutritional Medical Records, etc.29, and part-time eligibleServices, employees OVERTON PARK, OFF POPLAR, ation Completion WWW.901PALESTINEFEST.COM.  An &Equal Opportunity Employer g, CNA, EnvironmentalLoan Forgiveness Tuition Reimbursement offered    

MEMPHIS JEWISH COMMUNITY CENTER, 6560 POPLAR (761-0810), WWW.PR-EVENTMANAGEMENT.NET.

Featuring over 400 lanterns, 400-foot dragon, 30-foot-tall panda, and entertainment including acrobats from China and live music. $16-$20. Fridays-Sundays, 6 p.m.-midnight Through May 7.

Laurelwood Unplugged

Free Food & Give-Aways

swim coach and aquatic director with the Memphis Jewish Community Center, will be the coach. First Tuesday of every month, 6-7 p.m. Through May 2.

participants be able to swim at least 100 yards freestyle nonstop. Danny Fadgen, master

HELP4TNDAY

Free legal clinics and counseling for Tennessee residents. See website for more information including locations and specific dates. Through April 30.

Just For ToGay: LGBTQ Narcotics Anonymous Meeting

Closed meeting of Narcotics Anonymous. Thursdays, 7 p.m. CATHEDRAL OF THE IMMACULATE CONCEPTION, 1695 CENTRAL, WWW.OUTMEMPHIS.ORG.

KIDS

Open Nominations for the 2017 Beat the Odds Awards

Nominate an extraordinary and deserving youth overcoming challenges. Through May 31. WWW.MEMPHISBEATTHEODDS.ORG.

PRIZM Camp Registration

Visit website for more information and registration for June Music Camp & International Chamber Music Festival. $375$700. Through May 15. WWW.PRIZMENSEMBLE.COM.

Registration for Kidzu Playhouse 2017 Summer Camps

For camp information and registration, see website. $75-$350. Through July 1.

HERNANDO HIGH SCHOOL PERFORMING ARTS CENTER, 805 DILWORTH LANE, HERNANDO, MS, WWW.KUDZUPLAYERS.COM.

Registration for Memphis College of Art Summer Art Camp

For children ages 3-18. Scholarships available. Through May 4. MEMPHIS COLLEGE OF ART, 1930 POPLAR (272-5100), WWW.MCA.EDU.

Registration for Memphis Public Libraries Summer Camps

Students learn skills like coding, music production, and STEAM. Through May 31. WWW.MEMPHISLIBRARY.ORG.

Storytime

Free. Tues., Sat., 11-11:30 a.m. Through April 30. BARNES & NOBLE, 2774 N. GERMANTOWN (386-2468).

Registration for Summer Performance Workshop/Call for Paid Interns

For youth ages 6-18. Participants will have the chance to perform and help create a show. Interns will serve as both actors and teachers. For more information, registration, and performance dates, call, visit website, or email showagon@ theatrememphis.org. Through May 31. THEATRE MEMPHIS, 630 PERKINS EXT. (682-8323), WWW.THEATREMEMPHIS.ORG.

S P EC IA L EVE NTS

12th Annual Trivia Night and Silent Auction Trivia, silent auction, costume contest, prizes, wine pull, and food and dessert bar benefiting Alzheimer’s & Dementia Services of Memphis, Inc. Sat., April 29, 6 p.m. TEMPLE ISRAEL, 1376 E. MASSEY (761-3130).

Amazing Scavenger Hunt Adventure

Guided from any smartphone, teams see the sights while solving clues, completing challenges, and learning local history. Available 365 days, sunrise to sunset. Use promo MEMPHISFLYER for special discount. Ongoing. VARIOUS LOCATIONS, SEE WEBSITE FOR MORE INFORMATION (805-6035620), WWW.URBANADVENTUREQUEST.COM.

“Back to the Moon for Good”

Fifty years ago, the U.S. was in a heated race to the moon. This program reflects on that legacy and looks to the future, motivated by the Google XPRIZE. $7. Through June 2. SHARPE PLANETARIUM, MEMPHIS PINK PALACE MUSEUM, 3050 CENTRAL (636-2362), MEMPHISMUSEUMS.ORG.

The Black & White Social III

Tickets include three complimentary cocktails and hors d’oeuvres. Black and/or white attire required. $25. Sat., April 29, 8 p.m.-1 a.m.

continued on page 28


Memphis, TN

MEMPHIS IN MAY INTERNATIONAL FESTIVAL

7:30

P M

11

Thursday

MAY

MEMORIAL DAY WEEKEND

MAY 28, 2017

REGISTER.

RUN.

PARTY. BEST POST-RUN PARTY EVER. DRINKS, FOOD & MUSIC. Cash prize money for fastest finishers!

VISIT MEMPHISINMAY.ORG FOR MORE INFORMATION

REGISTER ONLINE AT MEMPHISINMAY.ORG

m e m p h i s f l y e r. c o m

Orpheum Theatre

PRESENTED BY

ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT

SOUNDS OF COLOMBIA

PRESENTED BY

27


C A L E N DA R: A P R I L 2 7 - M AY 3 continued from page 26

Miles for Maddie & Gracie Cystic Fibrosis Fundraiser

MEMPHIS COLLEGE OF ART, 1930 POPLAR (334-7490), WWW.THECOCKTAILPARTYNETWORK.COM.

Night of food and live music in the vineyard benefitting Fayette Cares. Wine tastings available or bring your cooler. $35. Sat., April 29, 6-10 p.m.

Free. Sat., April 29, 1-10 p.m.

FLYING SAUCER, 1400 N. GERMANTOWN PKWY. (755-5530).

Exclusive Evening with Author, Journalist, and Filmmaker Richard Grant

DE TERRA VINEYARD & WINES OF SOMERVILLE, 605 JOYNERS CAMPGROUND (465-3802 X223), WWW.FAYETTECARES.ORG.

Peabody Rooftop Party

Meet on the roof for music and fun. $10$15. Thursdays, 6-10 p.m. Through Aug. 17.

Special event in private home benefiting Memphis Library Foundation. Location revealed after ticket purchase. $150. Thurs., April 27, 7 p.m.

Peabody Master Taster’s Club

$25. First Wednesday of every month, 5:30-7 p.m.

THE PEABODY HOTEL, 149 UNION (529-4000), WWW.PEABODYHOTEL.COM.

WWW.MEMPHISLIBRARYFOUNDATION.ORG.

CORNER BAR AT THE PEABODY, 149 UNION (529-4000), WWW.PEABODYMEMPHIS.COM.

Protect Our Aquifer (and Our Beer)

Extreme Deep: Mission into the Abyss

Offers opportunities for hands-on exploration of life at the bottom of the sea. Interactive exhibit that highlights the adventure of deep-sea exploration and discovery. Through May 6.

Giveaways of advance reading copies, Burke’s Book Store bags, drawings for special prizes, kids’ activities, cookies, and more. Sat., April 29.

PuppyUp fund-raiser at Overton Park, Sunday, April 30th

Kendra Gives Back Party

Volunteer in as little as 60 seconds. Fri., April 28, 11 a.m.-1 p.m. VOLUNTEER ODYSSEY, 60 SOUTH MAIN, HTTPS://GIVEPUL.SE/MEYB4.

DOROTHY DAY HOUSE, 1429 POPLAR (726-6760).

Bring a dessert to this event and get to know families who are working to rebuild. Sun., April 30,

Speciality beer of the month, goody bags, and silent auction benefiting Passion for Pits Rescue. $12. Sat., April 29, 11 a.m.-2 p.m. CELTIC CROSSING, 903 S. COOPER (274-5151).

F I LM

Bolshoi Ballet: A Hero of Our Time

Sun., April 30, 12:55 p.m., and Tues., May 2, 7 p.m. MALCO PARADISO CINEMA, 584 S. MENDENHALL (6821754), WWW.MALCO.COM.

F O O D & D R I N K E V E N TS

Indie Wednesday

Proceeds benefit Women’s Foundation grant making. $125. Thurs., April 27, 11:30 a.m.-1:15 p.m.

See independent films at various locations. Wednesdays, 7 p.m. Through May 31.

MEMPHIS COOK CONVENTION CENTER, 255 N. MAIN (578-9346), WWW.WFGM.ORG.

WWW.INDIEMEMPHIS.COM.

Volunteers will read to and entertain the kids in the waiting rooms of St. Jude. Thurs., April 27, 12-1 p.m.

Beale Street Wine Race

TED Cinema Experience

ST. JUDE CHILDREN’S RESEARCH HOSPITAL, 262 DANNY THOMAS PLACE (495-3300), HTTPS://GIVEPUL.SE/LUD7V.

BEALE STREET, DOWNTOWN MEMPHIS (529-0999).

MALCO PARADISO CINEMA, 584 S. MENDENHALL (682-1754), WWW.MALCO.COM.

Memphis Volunteer Week: Spruce the Line

Memphis Volunteer Week: Prayer & Dessert

Suds and Buds

RACQUET CLUB OF MEMPHIS, 5111 SANDERLIN (278-2947), WWW.BGCM.ORG.

2017 Annual Tribute Luncheon

6-7 p.m.

Memphis Volunteer Week: Read to Me at St. Jude

Memphis Volunteer Week: Pop-Up Volunteer Party

WISEACRE BREWERY, 2783 BROAD.

Tues., May 2, 6 p.m.

OVERTON PARK, OFF POPLAR (619-2286), WWW.PUPPYUPWALK.ORG.

BURKE’S BOOK STORE, 936 S. COOPER (278-7484), WWW.BURKESBOOKS.COM.

SHOPS OF SADDLE CREEK, 7509 POPLAR AVENUE, SUITE 1 (753-4264).

Steak n’ Burger

Two-mile walk to promote awareness of canine cancer, raising funds for education, awareness, and research that benefits pets and people. $20. Sun., April 30, 12-4 p.m.

Independent Book Store Day

Enjoy a night of delicious sweets, sips, and jewels with 20 percent of sales benefiting Harwood Center. Wed., May 3, 5-8 p.m.

Enjoy a Wiseacre beer and help support the Sierra Club Chickasaw Group in safeguarding our drinking water in Shelby County. Discuss beer and water. Yard signs and T-shirts available. Thurs., April 27, 5-9 p.m.

PuppyUp Memphis Walk

MEMPHIS PINK PALACE MUSEUM, 3050 CENTRAL (636-2362), WWW.MEMPHISMUSEUMS.ORG.

Spruce the Line by picking up litter on the Greenline. Sat., April 29, 9 a.m.-noon. CLEAN MEMPHIS, 1859 MADISON (235-2416), HTTPS://GIVEPUL.SE/549FB.

HOME OF THE

CHAR-GRILLED

ENU

OYSTER

FREE PARKING • ON THE TROLLEY LINE WALKING DISTANCE TO FEDEX FORUM & BEALE ST. PRIVATE PARTY SPECIALISTS

Forks & Corks

FRESH FISH DAILY

299 S. MAIN ST. OPEN DAILY AT 11AM 901-522-9070

Sun., April 30, 3 p.m.

Sun., April 30, 1 p.m.

Breakfast for Dinner: A Benefit for Room in the Inn

Benefiting Memphis-wide network of churches serving people experiencing homelessness. $20. Sat., April 29, 6-9 p.m. THE GALLOWAY HOUSE, 1015 COOPER ST.

True Story:

Love one another. It’s that simple.

First Congregational Church

They’d forgotten how much fun church could be. Good music. Great art. Fun people. Connection. Inspiration.

Church like it oughta be.

www.firstcongo.com Phone: 901.278.6786 1000 South Cooper Memphis, TN 38104 Sunday Worship 10:30 am

April 27-May 3, 2017

PEARLSOYSTERHOUSE.COM

28

GRIZZLIES VS. SPURS THURSDAY, APRIL 27

FUTURE THURSDAY, MAY 4

Game 6 Grizzlies Growl Towel to all fans in attendance. Plaza Party featuring live music & more starting two hours before tip-off! grizzlies.com

The multi-platinum, record-setting hip-hop innovator is bringing the Nobody Safe tour to FedExForum. Tickets Available!

TOM PETTY & THE HEARTBREAKERS MONDAY, MAY 8 Performing with special guests Joe Walsh. Tickets available!

Get tickets at FedExForum Box Office | Ticketmaster locations | 1.800.745.3000 | ticketmaster.com | fedexforum.com

THE CHAINSMOKERS FRIDAY, MAY 19 Performing with special guest Kiiara and featuring Emily Warren. Tickets available!


Now Open Memphis

NO CREDIT REQUIRED

Collierville

2858 Poplar Ave Memphis, TN 38111 (901) 623-3520

640 W Poplar Ave Collierville, TN 38017 (901) 854-4550

Mon.-Fri. 9:30 AM-7:00 PM | Sat. 9:00 AM - 6:00 PM Sun. 12:00 PM - 5:00 PM

Celebration Senior Day Sale Event FEB 6th Fri & Sat: April 28 & 29

FREE CONCERT! PRESENTED BY SPONSORED BY

ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT

Memphis

m e m p h i s f l y e r. c o m

“LEASE IT, LOVE IT, OWN IT”

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B O O KS By Richard J. Alley

Bang Bang

An outlaw seeks to save his daughter from his legacy.

April 27-May 3, 2017

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he Twelve Lives of Samuel Hawley (The Dial Press) is a violent book. It’s a book about guns and gun culture, revenge, paranoia, and murder. It’s a book about family. The story of a father and daughter, a wife lost too soon, and a grandmother who wants to be nearer to her granddaughter to keep a sense of that lost daughter. It’s these two worlds that make Hannah Tinti’s first novel in 10 years so compelling. It is the world we live in today, one consumed by compassion and devotion, anger and violence. Her storyline can be so authentic at times that I had to put the book down and walk away. As the news and social media fed me a steady diet of all that is wrong with our society, I didn’t want it from a novel I’d chosen for escape. But I’d go back to it because the pull of the story of Hawley and his daughter, Loo, as they struggle to survive as a team in the world he’s made for them is too strong. Sam works as a collector, traveling the country taking back merchandise or cash from those who have stolen from powerful and corrupt people. That merchandise is collected by any means necessary, most often violently. It’s the sort of life that leaves in its wake grudges and vendettas like a map of stars across the night sky. The structure of the book breaks every other chapter into the story of a bullet in Hawley’s life — 12 in all. As a writer, when I first began reading this book, I thought, “Why 12? Why not make it easier on yourself with, say, six bullets?” But Hawley’s life is measured by these bullets as they pass through his body. And Hawley passes through his life the same way — messily, violently, bloody. He tears at flesh and the fabric of a decent society as he moves from one job to the next. He and Loo move from place to place, often at a moment’s notice, taking along whatever they can fit in a piece of luggage. There are other ways to measure time — a shampoo bottle, lipstick, a handwritten shopping list, a bathrobe, snapshots. Hawley carries these items of his wife’s, long dead now, from place to place, scraps of memory he arranges into a shrine at every stop along the way. This is how Hawley finds his way back to Lily. Hawley’s longtime friend and

partner in crime tells Loo, “Watches used to be important. When you got your first, it was special. A reminder of the days you had left, ticking away right there on your arm.” Hawley knows from the beginning that his days are numbered, ticking away, and he wants to quit for his daughter’s sake. Violence begets violence. But simply retiring isn’t an option, and he works backward through time, tracing his wounds to the men who caused them like following the constellations to eradicate any future threat. Tinti writes: “What a mess he’d made, Hawley thought. He wished he could erase his entire life, starting with his father’s death and then every step that had led him here to this crap motel room, every bullet, every twisted turn of the road he’d followed — even meeting Lily, even having Loo. Hawley wanted it all gone.” I want to finish by saying that, while Samuel Hawley is violent — and let’s make no bones about it, he is a bad dude — his devotion to his daughter is without question. And because he loves his daughter so much, he’s raising her to be a strong and independent woman. He may be going about it in the extreme — the book opens with Hawley teaching a 12-year-old Loo how to shoot a rifle — but it’s a lesson for all of us: If we love and respect our daughters, we must raise them to resist when society seeks to undermine their strength. Sam gets that, flawed though he may be.


Let’s Eat

Aaron Winters (right) is now at The Vault. JUSTIN FOX BURKS

F O O D N E W S B y L e s l e y Yo u n g

New to downtown: The Vault and Lisa’s Lunchbox.

S

ay you want to grab a nice meal and glass of wine, and your boyfriend wants to watch the game. Or you’re looking for some good music. Or you want to bring the kids along. Business partners Michael O’Mell, Tyson Bridge, and John Kalb have spent the last four months putting all the right bells in all the right places and all the right whistles in the other right places so that you may do any or all of these things. The three men purchased the property at 124 GE Patterson, formerly the site of the Double J Smokehouse, back in November and debuted the redesigned spot as The Vault mid-March. “We were looking to do something, and we love the South Main area. You can tell it’s growing, and they’ll have the new movie theater and hotel coming in,” O’Mell says. “This space became available, and it was the right opportunity at the right time.” After acquiring the space, which was originally a bank in the ’50s, complete with a still-standing vault, they stripped everything down to its bare bones, even taking out some columns and resupporting the building. They completely redid the kitchen, extended the bar six feet, repainted, and amped up the stage with new lights and new sound. They installed TVs with their own remotes at every custom-made booth, made available an app to listen to the television on personal devices, installed charging stations along the bar, and offer the only Frost Rail in Memphis — a three-inch trough full of snow-like frost for to keep your beer cold. And yes, they still have that killer upstairs patio in the back. But their real secret weapon is the man behind their made-to-order pork rinds,

their Cornish Game Hen, their Bacon Wrapped Chicken Roulade, and their Steak and Pommes Frites. That would be Aaron Winters, of Porcellino’s and Miss Cordelia’s fame. “I tried to come up with an eclectic menu with roots in Southern cuisine,” Winters, who was classically trained as a butcher in Italy, says. He brings in produce from Wilson Farms, beef from Claybrook Farms, and catfish from Lakes Catfish. “We’re so close to the farmers market, they’ll swing by here when they’re done, and I shop off the back of their trucks,” Winters says. In addition to the entrees mentioned above, he offers a flat breads menu, sandwiches, starters including a daily selection of charcuterie, and an oyster menu. “We’re getting in some really good oysters from around the country,” Winters says. Plans include hosting crawfish boils during season and pig roasts in the fall, as well as Memphis’ favorite meal — brunch. “Brunch is forthcoming,” O’Mell says. “We want to make sure we do a few things really well, then add more.” Look for the building with a silver vault door on the front. The Vault, 124 GE Patterson, 591-8000, vaultmemphis.com. Open 11 a.m. daily for lunch; dinner 5 to 10 p.m.; late-night menu 10 p.m. to close. What’s that quote about “The day I got sacked was the best thing that ever happened to me”? continued on page 32

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ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT

m e m p h i s f l y e r. c o m

MIDTOWN 725-PIES (7437)

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COME RIDE WITH US!

HIRING FOR AN EXPERIENCED FOH MANAGER AT MIDTOWN’S FAVORITE NEIGHBORHOOD HANGOUT A dependable candidate with strong communication skills is needed to roll into our 6th summer of business on a patio that is always jam-packed. We are a casual food driven bar that strives to offer quality in service, dining, and hospitality in order to create a unique guest experience. We are on the search for the right leader that can inspire the strongest crew in the history of our restaurant. Bar and management experience is required along with the availability to work weekday nights and weekend day shifts. Pay is competitive with potential for company growth, bonus incentive, and paid vacation.

APPLY IN PERSON AT 2117 PEABODY AVE OR EMAIL RESUME TO PACKEDHOUSEPRODS@GMAIL.COM

L E T ’ S E AT continued from page 31 Whatever it is, it rings true for Lisa Clay Getske. After working for Houston’s for 14 years, she went on to manage a chain restaurant that, after two years, ended up letting her go “for a less expensive, younger model.” Clay Getske took it upon herself to leverage her experience and do her own thing. That thing has grown into the empire that is Lisa’s Lunchbox. And in mid-March, the empire spread to the downtown area into the former Tuscany Italian Eatery at 116 S. Front. “It’s fantastic,” she says. “AutoZone is a big customer that’s right across the street, and it’s been fun being down here during all the festivals.” The move had everything to do with a ServiceMaster devotee, her managing business partner, and a little luck. “At my original location at the Ridgeway Business Center, ServiceMaster is across the street,” Clay Getske says. “My friend works at the ServiceMaster downtown, and he kept saying, ‘Hey, there’s this spot downtown.’” That spot was Front Street Deli, which didn’t work out for Clay Getske, but thanks to her business partner, Matt Reisinger’s, thirst for water, they found the space at 116 S. Front. “We had the keys to the Front Street Deli, but we hadn’t signed the lease,” Clay Getske says. “They were feeling a little nostalgic, and didn’t want to change the name. When Matt was down there, he went into Tuscany for a bottle of water and got to talking to [owner] Jeremy Martin, and he said, ‘Why don’t you buy this place?’” Lisa’s Lunchbox specializes in “really good, fresh, real food,” such as her Chicken Club Panini, her “massive” BLT “with real bacon, and we’re not stingy with it,” and her spicy pimento and cheese. She also offers frozen meals to go, which will be included in the new location in May, and breakfast sandwiches and smoothies. “We go before the beer board this week, and I think that’s something I want to offer downtown for the tourists who are walking around and want something to eat and a beer,” she says. She also plans on staying open later eventually. Lisa’s Lunchbox, 116 S. Front, 729-7277, lisaslunchbox.com. Open 7:30 a.m. to 3 p.m. Mon.-Fri.

TICKETS April 27-May 3, 2017

ON SALE

NOW!

SATURDAY It's Tequila June 17 3-6 PM Time! Join Memphis Flyer for the 3rd annual Margarita Festival. Sample from the city's best margo-makers. vote on your favorite, and a winner will be crowned at the end of this best 'rita fest.

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@ Overton Park Greensward

memphismargaritafestival.com


S P I R ITS By Andria Lisle

Grownup Drinks liqueur that weighs in at around 20 percent ABV (alcohol by volume). Around since 1880, the distinctive red liqueur is created by infusing fruits and herbs in an alcohol and water blend. In Italy today, you can even buy a premixed Campari Soda, which has a very low ABV of 10 percent. Slightly bitter, Campari is always a sophisticated choice when you need to take it easy on the booze but still want to join in the fun. Prosecco — Italian sparkling wine — also has a low ABV of under 12.5 percent. Spring and summer are the prefect times to drink it, whether you enjoy a glass on its own or add fruit for a cocktail. When peaches are in season, I always go for a Bellini, named for 15th-century Renaissance painter Giovanni Bellini and first mixed at the legendary Harry’s Bar in Venice, Italy, 72 years ago. The Basque cocktail Kalimotxo is also easy on your liver. I was first introduced to this drink, a simple mix of equal parts Coca-Cola and cheap red wine, by a Basque guy who arrived in Memphis by way of Boise, Idaho, which has a Basque population some 15,000 strong. The Coke and wine blend makes for an overly sweet but quite sippable cocktail that I like to nurse in a red Solo cup at all-day festivals or sporting events. Also worth drinking: the unsung work dog of cocktails, vermouth. The low-alcohol white wine, originally a “wormwood wine” devised as a cure for intestinal issues, comes in at about 18 percent ABV and makes for an interesting cocktail base on its own. Ask your bartender to serve you ginger ale and dry vermouth with a squeeze of lemon. Or order an Addington, a jazz-age cocktail that consists of both sweet and dry vermouth, sparkling water, and an orange twist. Served in a martini glass, it can hold its own against any vodka cocktail. If that’s too fancy for you, go for the Americano. Not the coffee drink, but a cocktail created with equal parts sweet vermouth and Amaro liqueur, served on the rocks in a lowball glass and topped with soda.

ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT

A

s I’ve “grown up” careerwise, I’ve had to do quite a bit of on-thejob drinking. Of course, I drink for this gig — but I’m talking about my day job, the one that covers the majority of my bills, health insurance, and the like. I’m currently in transition, which has got me thinking about what it means to drink responsibly with coworkers, which is much different than being an ethical drinker at large. Thankfully, I’ve never gotten smashed and photocopied body parts at a work party, made an untoward pass at a fellow employee, or woken up with any real regrets about how I’ve handled myself. I have, however, had to quickly transition from sitting at my desk to standing at a cocktail party with nothing but lunch in my stomach to pad the alcohol. I still haven’t mastered noshing on passed appetizers while juggling a wine glass and my purse, so I typically just sip one glass of white wine (okay, maybe two) and then excuse myself for dinner elsewhere. When attending a work event, I’ve learned to pay close attention to company culture. At the end of the 1990s, I worked at a company that regularly rolled kegs into the employee cafeteria on Friday afternoons. Everyone would dutifully go a few rounds and then leave work to enjoy the weekend. I’ve also worked places where I didn’t trust my coworkers or my mouth, so I eschewed drinking and extricated myself from the conversation as quickly as possible. Now, most invitations to imbibe come at nighttime work events or when entertaining out-oftown visitors. On those occasions, I’ve learned to observe my immediate superior and never outpace them. I make it a point to eat before drinking, even if it’s a vending machine snack. I’ve also discovered low-alcohol cocktails, a delicious way to keep your wits and still enjoy a good drink. Let’s start with what should be the obvious go-to: Campari and soda, made from the Italian

m e m p h i s f l y e r. c o m

Low-alcohol beverages: when work and play intersect.

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FILM REVIEW By Chris McCoy

Jungle Love The Lost City of Z is a mesmerizing story of obsession in the Amazon.

April 27-May 3, 2017

I

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n the beginning of The Lost City of Z, Percy Fawcett (Charlie Hunnam), an officer in the British Army, gets notice that he is being called from his sleepy post in Ireland to an uncertain mission of exploration in South America. “It will be a grand adventure,” he is told. Fawcett had experience as a cartographer and had traveled “all around the empire,” sometimes as a spy. Bolivia and Brazil were on the verge of war over a border dispute, so, to keep the peace, the British were sending Fawcett to map out the full extent of the border by finding the source of the Rio Verde. The catch was the “green river” got its name because it ran straight through the heart of the Amazon jungle. He and his team of surveyors were being sent where no man had ever gone before. Once he’s in country with his team, Corporals Costin (Robert Pattinson) and Manley (Edward Ashley), Fawcett discovers that the part about going where no man has gone before is not strictly true. At best, he’s going where no white man has ever gone before. As he and his crew struggle up the river, an Amazonian guide tells him that the jungle was once home to an ancient civilization that was, in its day, the equal of the great cities of Europe. It was a place of “gold and maize” now lost to the encroaching jungle. Fawcett soon learns the harshness of the jungle. Almost immediately, the confident Englishman starts losing members of his expedition to native arrows, piranhas, and, worst of all, infection and disease. But Fawcett was more stubborn than the jungle,

In a tale of obsession in the Amazon, Charlie Hunnam plays Percy Fawcett in James Gray’s The Lost City of Z.

and he finds the idyllic falls where the river begins. While they’re surveying the site, he stumbles across a cache of pottery shards in what should be a trackless forest. He takes the artifacts to be proof the tribesman was telling the truth. Thus begins an obsession that will last the rest of Fawcett’s life, bringing him fame and fortune but costing him everything. In a raucous meeting of the Royal Geographical Society, he proclaims that the “savages” of the jungle are “made from the same clay” as white men. He will return to the Amazon to find evidence of the ancient lost city, which he calls Z — only he pronounces it “zed,” because he’s English and all. That the meetings of geographical societies used to be such animated affairs is one of the revelations of James Gray’s film. Another revelation is that Gray has amazing classical chops. Old school film grammar evolved for a reason, to tell complex stories visually with emotional heft. The Lost City of Z is a testament to the contributions of masters like David Lean. His visual compositions import information clearly and efficiently while also being quite beautiful in the process. Other recent obsessive, man-vs.nature stories, such as Iñárritu’s The Revenant, are hyper-focused on the details of the task and toll of surviving in the wilderness. Gray, who also wrote the screenplay, lets us know not only the harrowing difficulties Fawcett


FILM REVIEW By Chris McCoy

Free Fire R The Fate of the Furious PG13

The Circle PG13 My Entire High School Sinking Into the Sea PG13

The Lost City of Z Now playing Multiple locations

Their Finest R Gifted PG13 Going in Style PG13 The Zookeeper’s Wife PG13

The Fate of the Furious PG13 (Giant Screen 1:00 4:00 7:00 10:00) The Fate of the Furious PG13

The Circle PG13 How to Be a Latin Love (subtitled) PG13 Sleight R Unforgettable R Phoenix Forgotten PG13 The Promise (2017) PG13 Born in China G Grow House R Free Fire R

SHARE THE RIDE Less Fuel….Less Pollution….Less Stress

Unforgettable R Phoenix Forgotten PG13 Gifted PG13 Personal Shopper R

The Fate of the Furious PG13 Smurfs: The Lost Village PG Going in Style PG13 The Case for Christ PG The Boss Baby PG Power Rangers (2017) PG13 Beauty and the Beast (2017) PG Get Out R

m e m p h i s f l y e r. c o m

The Circle PG13 Colossal R The Lost City of Z PG13

story is the English establishment’s unquestioned philosophy of white supremacy and how that clashes with Fawcett’s observations. The issue comes to a head when World War I breaks out just as the explorer is returning from an unsuccessful expedition, and Fawcett is drafted to lead a battalion into battle. Next to the scenes of industrialized slaughter in the Somme, the kindly cannibals of the Amazon seem pretty civilized.

PROGRAM

SPECIAL EVENTS:

Bolshoi Ballet: A Hero of Our Time

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ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT

faced in the jungle, but also the man he was back home. Our hero spends almost as much time with his wife Nina Fawcett (Sienna Miller) in England as he does in the Amazon. Nina is the long-suffering mother of three who keeps the hearth warm through her husband’s long absences. Fawcett is obsessed with finding the lost city but also acutely aware of the emotional toll his obsession has on his family and himself. Gray wants to make Fawcett into T. E. Lawrence — trapped between worlds, driven by impulses he doesn’t fully understand — and Hunnam rises to the occasion as best he can. Peter O’Toole’s Lawrence of Arabia wore his heart on his sleeve, while Hunnam’s Fawcett is a strictly stiff-upper-lip type. The subtext running through the

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EMPLOYMENT • REAL ESTATE

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EDUCATION LOCAL STAFFING Agency: Hiring Immediately (Teachers, Teachers Assts and Substitute Teachers.) Contact: Lisa@901.487.5814

GENERAL ANIMAL LOVERS Bring Your Dog to Work. Carriage Drivers needed downtown. Valid license required. UptownCarriages.com 901-496-2128

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Memphis, TN 38128  901 213 5400

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To learn more, go to careers.fedex.com/express

4100 Austin Peay Hwy  Memphis, TN 38128  901 213 5400

An Equal Opportunity Employer

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THE LAST WORD by Randy Haspel

Stop Saying That!

Since spring is the time for renewal and new beginnings, the occasion is ripe for the annual list of words and phrases that I just can’t stand hearing anymore. And I stand behind that statement 110 percent. Any such list would be derelict without including the annoying phrase of the year: “alternative facts.” Popularized by the vapid Kellyanne Conway, the term can easily be translated as “bullshit.” So. When asked a question, it seems everyone from pundits to pandits begins their answer with the word “so,” as in: “Explain why are you in jail?” “So, I was running naked through Wal-Mart and got tackled by a security guard.” This should be acceptable only at the beginning of a joke, i.e., “So, this giraffe walks into a bar and says, ‘The highballs are on me.’” There’s no there there. Nothing to see here folks. Just keep moving. Air quotes. If I see one more goober claw the sky with two fingers on each hand, there’s a chance that I may get violent. Or at least violently sick. Please use your words instead, like “so-called” president or the “alleged” attorney general. Nothing burger. I’ll gladly pay you Tuesday for a hamburger today. No beef, no bun, no condiments, no garnishment. No prob./No worries. This is a phrase popularized by restaurant waitstaff when you ask for something like unsweetened tea. It shouldn’t be a problem if it’s their job. Breaking News. The original sin of all local newscasts. Now, everything is “Breaking News,” even if it’s already broken. A wreck on the interstate is not really “breaking news,” unless it was an oil tanker and the highway’s on fire. And while we’re at it, a “severe thunderstorm watch” is no reason to preempt Jeopardy! 6:00 a.m. in the morning. An agonizing redundancy. Everyone knows a.m. means morning. Use one or the other, or risk using needless words with ample abundance. No-brainer. This one’s really a no-brainer. Use “foregone conclusion” instead. It makes you sound smarter. Cray. I get it. I just wish my wife would stop using this expression in reference to me. Alt-right. Let’s just call them what they are: Nazis. America First. Speaking of Nazis, this expression was popularized during WWII and became the name of the national, anti-Semitic, isolationist organization whose purpose was to appease Hitler. Dog whistles or ignorance? Game-changer. To have one’s course altered, as in: That bout with syphilis was a real game-changer for Al Capone. Non-usage of the consonant “T.” When did this catch on? Examples: “No you di’nt, Bill Clin’on,” or, “I have something impor’nt to tell you.” Used by all races and levels of education, this trend is irrita’ng for errbody. Baby bump. Such an unbelievable trivialization of the term “preggers.” Make America Great Again. Ronald Reagan used this slogan in the ’80s and it still makes me gag. Let’s go ahead and include, Bigly, many people say, the liberal media, this I can tell you, classy, and radical Islamic terrorism. The mother of all... and blank “gate.” We just dropped the mother of all bombs in Afghanistan to retaliate for the mother of all wars in Iraq. At home, Chris Christie gave us “Bridgegate,” and we’re about to enter a phase called “Kremlin-gate.” We’re not even going to mention “Pee-gate.” Drop. As in: Beyonce’s new single will drop this week. Now, even Rachel Maddow is saying, “New legislation drops tomorrow.” And while we’re at it, let’s include the mic drop. Obama out. Walk it back and misspoke. These terms will become increasingly commonplace during the tenure of Press Secretary Sean Spicer. They are Washington colloquialisms for “lying.” LOL. Enough already. Stop laughing at your own jokes. And finally: Bill O’Reilly. So long, sucker. Now, let’s take this thing to the next level. Randy Haspel writes the “Recycled Hippies” blog.

m e m p h i s f l y e r. c o m

Kellyanne Conway

THE LAST WORD

REUTERS ︱ MIKE THEILER

Phrases and words that need to be retired permanently.

39


MINGLEWOOD HALL

ON SALE FRIDAY: In This Moment [6/21] Steve Earle [7/8] 4/26 Gov’t Mule w/ Eric Krasno Band 4/27: Leela James w/ Daley 4/29: Cody Jinks w/ Ward Davis 5/5: PC Band tribute to R. Kelley 5/16: Korn w/ Animals as Leaders and DED 5/18: Mastodon w/ Eagles of Death Metal 5/28: Trey Songz 6/3: THE SHINS 6/23: Eddie B Comedy Show (SOLD OUT) 7/1: Too Short w/ Playa Fly & Gangsta Blac 8/1: Foster the People

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Memphis Flyer 4.27.17  

This week: Guns & Bunnies: What's really on Memphis TV news? Also: Don Lifted, our visit to The Vault, Chris McCoy on The Lost City of Z, an...