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OUR 1469TH ISSUE

04.20.2017

THE SCIENCE AND POLITICS OF CLIMATE CHANGE IN THE MID-SOUTH.

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CONTENTS

BRUCE VANWYNGARDEN Editor SUSAN ELLIS Managing Editor JACKSON BAKER, MICHAEL FINGER Senior Editors TOBY SELLS Associate Editor CHRIS MCCOY Film and TV Editor CHRIS DAVIS, JOSHUA CANNON, MAYA SMITH, MICAELA WATTS Staff Writers JESSE DAVIS, LESLEY YOUNG Copy Editors JULIE RAY Calendar Editor

OUR 1469TH ISSUE 04.20.17 NRA types like to say “an armed society is a polite society.” To which I add, “... with lots of dead and wounded people.” But there is a corollary to that philosophy that occurred to me last week in the wake of the United Airlines “pulled passenger” fiasco, the two cops getting fired for hitting a suspect during a traffic stop in Georgia, and the sex-scandal-induced resignation of Alabama Governor Robert Bentley. The fact is everybody’s armed now, after a fashion; not with guns (at least, not most of us) but with video cameras and recorders — the ones on our phones. And like guns, cellphones can be used for good or for mischief. And they can backfire, big time. It calls to mind the adage, “The pen is mightier than the sword.” Updated, it might read, “The cellphone is mightier than your bullsh*t.” With more than a billion smartphone users worldwide, the odds of an event — or an incident — being captured on camera or video have never been better. The video evidence of United Airlines’ unseemly treatment of a passenger was online and available to the public — and to the media — within seconds. The combination of digital camera technology and social media’s ability to transmit images almost instantly to a global audience, has made citizen journalists of us all. The two officers in Georgia gave a false report of an incident in which they pulled over a motorist, claiming the driver got out and attacked one of the officers. Two videos of the incident shot by onlookers made it clear the citizen had gotten out of his car with his hands up and had been struck in the face by the officer without provocation. The officers were fired. As has been amply demonstrated in recent years, video evidence of police misbehavior doesn’t always end in justice being served, but it sure is better than the old days, when police officers’ reports were the only accounts available of such incidents. And Governor Bentley was outed by his own cellphone, which posted his text messages to his mistress to the Cloud, where his wife could read them in real time on her iPad. Oops. And speaking of oops ... Memphis social media went berserk last weekend over a recording of racial slurs and insults allegedly made by a Memphis couple who were vacationing in the Turks and Caicos. The recording was put on a local TV station’s website and went viral from there. Since the alleged callers were from a prominent Memphis family, social media posts went up proposing boycotts of the family’s business interests and demanding actions and retribution for past — and current — racial injustices. The couple’s attorney denied the allegations, N E WS & O P I N I O N claiming the phone had been stolen and NY TIMES CROSSWORD - 4 that the voices that had been recorded THE FLY-BY - 5 were not those of his clients. But the POLITICS - 8 damage had been done. EDITORIAL - 10 Since there is no video of the VIEWPOINT - 11 incident and no crime was committed, COVER — “STORMY WEATHER” it is unlikely it will be investigated BY CHRIS MCCOY - 12 further, and it is doubtful we will STE P P I N’ O UT ever know the truth. If the couple WE RECOMMEND - 16 did it, they’ll probably get away with MUSIC - 18 it. But even if they didn’t do it, their LOCAL BEAT - 20 reputation has taken a massive hit. AFTER DARK - 22 CALENDAR OF EVENTS - 24 There are lessons here for all of us: Be BOOKS - 36 good to your customers. Do the right FOOD NEWS - 38 thing when serving the public. Don’t be FOOD FEATURE - 39 a moron and cheat on your spouse. SPIRITS - 41 And be polite. Someone nearby is FILM - 42 probably “armed.” C L AS S I F I E D S - 44 Bruce VanWyngarden LAST WORD - 47 brucev@memphisflyer.com

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fly-by

Edited by Toby Sells

f l y o n t h e w a l l Greensward, Railgarten, {

ON INSTAGRAM Elvis might not have ever been on Facebook, but Justin Timberlake is certainly on Instagram. His famous voting-booth selfie brought Tennessee legislators one step closer to making Tennessee votingbooth selfies the next big thing. The Timberlake-inspired bill, legalizing regulated use of smartphones and cameras in polling places, passed in the Senate 30-0 and will be addressed by the House this week.

ON EASTER WalletHub, the personal finance website, said Memphis is the 12th best city in America for celebrating Easter. We’re not really sure what to do with that information, but if a good Easter experience is key to your company’s potential relocation to the Bluff City, we’re No. 12! ON SOMETHING Fly on the Wall gets a lot of mail from public relations specialists who hope I’ll write about them in my column. Take for example this highly effective press release advertising “explosive sales” for the new Samsung Galaxy. Bless their hearts, they mean well.

By Chris Davis. Email him at davis@memphisflyer.com.

& a Dog Park

Zoo parking plan is on (again), Railgarten hits some snags, and a dog park draws protests.

OPC RACES TO RAISE GREENSWARD FUNDS The Overton Park Conservancy (OPC) started a two-month sprint to raise $1 million last week to meet a new, Memphis City Council deadline for a project that would end parking on the Greensward. City council members approved a plan last July that would add parking for the Memphis Zoo and end its use of the Greensward for overflow parking. That plan started to fall apart a month ago as zoo leaders said they wouldn’t fund the design of the project because OPC did not have the money to ever build it. The council approved a plan last week that would mandate both OPC and the zoo to come up with $1 million for construction by June 11th. In a compromise move, council member Reid Hedgepeth agreed to shrink the size of the zoo parking spaces, freeing up about an acre of the Greensward from the project. As of Friday, OPC had raised more than $250,000. RAILGARTEN ON A BUMPY TRACK Parts of Railgarten, the newly opened entertainment spot in Cooper-Young, were closed by code officials last week as those areas were not yet deemed safe to occupy. Railgarten’s Ping-Pong bar and an outdoor tiki bar were closed Friday. Code officials said the two buildings had not yet passed final inspections and hung “do not occupy” signs on the buildings. Railgarten owners will also face questions about their use of shipping containers on the site during a Board of Adjustment meeting next week. DOG PARK DRAWS PROTEST A new dog park planned for Mud Island drew the ire of some who said city officials treat dogs better than the homeless here. The aptly named Mud Island Dog Park got the go-ahead from a council committee last week. Its price tag of about $475,000 drew protestors to City Hall.

“A place for dogs to s*#!%? but nowhere for our citizens to rest!?” read a Facebook post from a local group called Homeless Organizing for Power & Equality. RIVERPLAY WILL POP UP A pop-up park called RiverPlay is coming to the Memphis riverfront early next month and will stay through August. RiverPlay, part of the Fourth Bluff project, will be a gathering and recreational space with playing fields, basketball courts, a skating rink, and spots for food trucks at Mississippi River Park. ALSAC, FARM BURGER READY CROSSTOWN SPACES Crosstown Arts, American Lebanese Syrian Associated Charities (ALSAC), and Farm Burger pulled nearly $6 million in building permits for their spaces inside Crosstown Concourse last week. Construction continues at the massive Midtown complex ahead of its new planned grand opening of August 19th. Residents are already living in the space, and much is already open there including the YMCA, Church Health, Mama Gaia, and more. Crosstown Arts is a codeveloper of the building. ALSAC is the fund-raising arm of St. Jude Children’s Research Hospital. Farm Burger is an Atlanta-based burger joint offering grass-fed beef.

m e m p h i s f l y e r. c o m

ON FACEBOOK Australian journalist Paul Ewart recently asked Elvis’ ex-wife, Priscilla Presley, if she thought the King would be active online today. Here’s what she had to say: “I could not see him doing that at all ... He just never got into the fame thing … He did what he was supposed to do, but he wasn’t into it. “He was a very private person. We joked about this before with some of the inner circle, saying that ‘Elvis would never be on Facebook.’” Seems like more of a Twitter guy.

W E E K T H AT W A S By Flyer staff

NEWS & OPINION

THE

Questions, Answers + Attitude

FCC CONTINUES BAN ON IN-FLIGHT CELL CALLS U.S. Senator Lamar Alexander (R-Tenn.) lauded a move last week by the Federal Communications Commission (FCC) to continue the ban on in-flight cell phone calls, calling the stance “common sense.” Alexander filed legislation to formalize the ban. “Imagine 2 million passengers, hurtling through space, 5 trapped in 17-inch-wide seats, yapping their innermost thoughts,” Alexander said.


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French Fort area residents and institutions are raising concern over two proposed silos that they say will pierce the skyline and interrupt one of the most well-known vistas of the Mississippi River, specifically the view from the ceremonial mounds at Chickasaw Heritage Park. The American Commercial Barge Line (ACBL) applied to the Shelby County Board of Adjustment to erect two silos along the Mississippi River bluffs that would top out at 145 feet in height. The allowed height for such a structure is 100 feet in an area zoned heavy industrial, provided the structure is more than 100 feet from a residential area. Lauren Crews owns the historic Marine Hospital in the French Fort area. Crews said while he respects the right of any company to invest in their properties, he’s urging the public to consider the integrity of the park and the surrounding area. “I’ve canoed the Mississippi River starting from Lake Itasca in Minnesota, all the way down to New Orleans,” Crews said. “I can tell you, through all my years of studying this river, that this spot is hands down one of the most historic spots on the Mississippi.” Crews can rattle off the history of the French Fort area with ease, beginning with the inhabitants of the Chickasaw nation, through the Fort Pickering era, the Union Army occupation, and the influx of Irish and French immigrants at the turn of the 20th century. “I think this area has become so isolated from an accessibility standpoint, that people are forgetting

not only the history here, but the assets we currently have,” said Crews, who added that interstate infrastructure has isolated the area to an extent. Crews felt that the renderings submitted by ACBL to the Board of Adjustment lacked representation from all angles of view. So, he commissioned his own renderings. In those renderings, which are true to specifications outlined in ACBL’s application, the silos surpass the bluff line and the ceremonial mound line. In spite of the French Fort area having less than ideal access from I-55, the area is still fully appreciated by many. Crews knows that, and so does the executive director of the National Ornamental Metal Museum, Carissa Hussong. Hussong said that the view and ambience of the Metal Museum will be somewhat compromised should the silos go up, but it’s the Chickasaw Park she is most concerned about. “I’ve seen buses of tourists stop by just to take in the view,” she said. “People come here every day to eat lunch in the park or watch the sunset. Having those silos built would completely change the feel of the area.” ACBL’s proposal will go before the Board of Adjustment on April 26th. Some technicalities have yet to be sorted out, such as the exact distance of one proposed silo from Metal Museum Drive, which signals the beginning of a residential area, thus capping the allowed height at 60 feet. Until then, French Fort residents and business owners said they will continue to raise awareness of the issue.


In Memoriam

{

S TAT E W AT C H B y To b y S e l l s

Some state bills that died (again) this year. Every year, for years now, that hope has been dashed. This year, Rep. Jon Lundberg (R-Bristol) brought the “pass the bottle” bill to his colleagues on Capitol Hill. The rule died in a sub-committee after its chairman, Rep. Bill Sanderson (R-Kenton), said he did not want to “punish the person sitting in the back seat drinking a glass of wine.”

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That bill also died in the committee system. Pass the Bottle Bill: This zombie bill was raised from the dead once again this year and killed once again in what feels now like an annual ceremony. For years, some well-meaning legislator has sought to stop passengers from drinking in the state’s moving automobiles.

NEWS & OPINION

No, it ain’t over in Nashville until the last gavel falls, but as the Republicanled Tennessee Legislature begins to wind down, let us remember some bills that have died this session. The Bathroom Bill: Yes, this old bill came back this year, sponsored by Rep. Mark Pody, (R-Lebanon) and Sen. Mae Beavers, (R-Mt. Juliet), and it died not on any moral grounds but because of money. If passed, the bill would have mandated that public school students use the bathroom that corresponded with the sex assigned them on their birth certificates. So, a boy who identifies as a girl would have to go to the boys’ room at school (and vice versa). New guidance from Washington on the issue led many legislators to believe that further state action was unnecessary. But the bill also got a big black eye from government financial analysts who said, if passed, the Bathroom Bill would have cost Tennessee about $1.2 billion in federal education funding. The “Natural Marriage” Bill: Yes, this old bill came back this year, sponsored by Rep. Mark Pody, (R-Lebanon) and Sen. Mae Beavers (R-Mt. Juliet), and it died not on any moral grounds but because of money. If the bill passed, marriages in Tennessee would have only been legally recognized if they were between a man and a woman. The proposal came after a 2015 Supreme Court ruling legalized same-sex marriage across the country. Beavers and Pody walked out of a news conference they called on the matter as the crowd was filled with protestors who got quickly vocal on the matter. But the lawmakers pulled the bill after those same state finance analysts determined the move would have put in jeopardy nearly $9 billion in federal funding. The Open Carry Freedom Act: This legislation would have allowed Tennesseans to carry handguns openly and without a permit. (Concealed carry would have still required a permit.) East Tennessee Rep. Micah Van Huss (R-Jonesborough) introduced the bill and has introduced other versions of it in the past. This year, he got Beavers to sign on as its Senate sponsor. The measured died quietly in a House committee. The Constitutional Carry Bill: Rep. Andy Holt (R-Dresden) upped the ante on Van Huss’ bill with stripped-down legislation that took gun laws back to their Constitutional roots. The bill would have allowed anyone who is not otherwise prohibited from owning a gun to possess and carry that gun “either openly or concealed.”

7 4/10/17 4:39 PM


POLITICS By Jackson Baker

Two Takes Corker and Herenton try to get their messages across to different audiences. Bob Corker made one thing clear at a town meeting in suburban Arlington on Tuesday — that the venue, Crave Coffee Bar and Bistro, was not yet “the time and the place” for him to express his future plans, rumors about which run from a governor’s race in 2018 to a possible presidential bid two years later. The Arlington event was set up in much the manner of a meet-and-greet, and other dignitaries present included Mayor Mike Wissman of Arlington, Shelby County Republican chair Lee Mills, and 8th District Congressman David Kustoff. It was the first step of what the senator’s office billed as a “Travel Across the Volunteer State” and was to be followed by his attendance at a noon event at the Hilton Memphis, where kudos were to be administered to several worthy individuals at the 14th Annual Dunavant Public Servant Award Luncheon. On the basis of the reception he got from a standingroom-only audience, one that was rather more a contentious town meeting in the current style, you had to wonder how much more of his current job the junior senator from Tennessee would be willing to stand for. He was asked if he intended to run for a third Senate

term in 2018, and he gave the answer cited above. The immediate result was a challenge or two from the crowd as to whether Chattanoogan Corker hadn’t pledged, back in 2006, when he was first elected in a tight race with Democrat Harold Ford Jr., to quit after two terms. He gave a soft answer, that both he and Ford had said only that they “couldn’t imagine” serving more than two terms, and that seemed to turn away any further potential wrath on that matter. But Corker had every reason to remain on edge for most of the hour-long encounter in Arlington. The questions he got were rapid-fire, mainly on issues of domestic controversy, and they were evenly mixed between the inquisitive and the downright challenging. On some of the latter, he seemed to satisfy most of the crowd with his expression of confidence that the pending Senate inquiry into a Trump-Russian connection would go forth to good result. He had less success defending his support for charter-school enthusiast Betsy DeVos as secretary of education. Corker was also hard-pressed on issues ranging from the prospective defunding of Planned Parentood, the uncertain future of health care, and the shape of tax reform. He did his best to hit a middle distance. At the end of it all, someone said the obvious, that he, as Senate Foreign Relations Committee chairman, had not

been asked about the current crises in Korea and Syria. He shook his head slowly but gave an indulgent smile. “Unbelievable,” he said. • Mere hours later, a few miles away in Midtown, former mayor Willie Herenton was having an easier time with his audience, the Rotary Club of Memphis. The luncheon speaker was welcomed as what he was, a public dignitary from the past. That, in his time as mayor from 1991 to 2009, Herenton caught his share of flack was a fact no one mentioned, save the ex-mayor himself. Herenton’s subject was his current project, which goes by the name of New Path Campus of Restoration. “Campuses,” actually, because Herenton’s original concept of a single dormitory/instructional facility for troubled African-American youth in north Shelby County has grown to include the idea of three campuses — in downtown Memphis, in Frayser, and in Millington. As Herenton has explained on earlier occasions, these facilities would be alternatives to the severe and geographically remote locations available to house youthful detainees at the moment. The centers would be financed by savings from traditional incarceration and by state funding for the detainees as students. More about the appearances of Corker and Herenton at memphisflyer.com.

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Even as it gets ready to take on what could be a contentious fight over the forthcoming county budget and tax rate, a potential slugfest that all principals hope can be resolved and headed off at a May 7th summit retreat, the Shelby County Commission and the administration of county Mayor Mark Luttrell remain locked in a power struggle over access to and control over surplus county revenues. The battle was first joined a couple of budget seasons back, when the commission, long after it had locked its planned expenditures in place, got ex post facto information from the administration regarding a hitherto unannounced $20 million surplus. That discovery was the proximate cause of an ongoing power struggle between commissioners and the administration, one that flared up in several of the matters on the agenda of Monday’s public meeting of the commission. Pervading the meeting from item to item were two clear and obvious themes, one having to do with the commission’s efforts to get its own procedures — and those of county government — in line with recent resolves to eliminate a variety of disparities in hiring, contracting, and employee relations. In the process, the gulf between the commission and the administration widened a bit further. The first case in point was a dispute that arose over what seemed to be a routine federal pass-through grant awarding just under $2 million to Sasaki Associates, Inc. for “various National Disaster Resilience … design projects.” The question was raised, first from the audience, and then from various commission members, whether sufficient allowance had been

made for minority subcontracting on the project. Public Works director Tom Needham repeatedly insisted that the issue was moot and implied broadly that any further delay on awarding the grant might result in its being lost to the county. Questioning from commissioners, and especially an unrelenting point-bypoint interrogation from Commissioner Heidi Shafer, commenting that Needham’s reluctance to answer was “yet another case of the administration keeping us in the dark,” finally elicited the fact that no such ill fate was in store. The commission would end up endorsing the grant — along with an add-on clause prepared by Commissioner Van Turner regarding the minority contracting issue. There were other matters of similar import involving the question of whether the county was seriously undertaking equality of opportunity with women as well as racial minorities, but the pièce de résistance of Monday’s discussion was a resolution that would establish what amounted to a set-aside fund for any unspent surplus — one accessible to and subject to the oversight of the commission. At present, surpluses have been under the exclusive purview of the administration, and county CAO made a point of objecting to the resolution as “unacceptable.” In the final analysis, the matter was referred back to committee, where it may or may not be resolved. Which is to say, the power struggle goes on.

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Trump’s war against immigrants is taking us back to a bleaker time. skeptical judges, has been enjoined once more by skeptical judges. The President’s executive order on immigration seeks to fulfill an unfulfillable campaign promise: to deport all “illegals.” Given that the administration is determined to win somewhere, sanctuary status for cities — and a few states — has reappeared in the media, with Trump threatening to pull federal grant money in retaliation for these cities’ noncompliance with federal mandates. The current sanctuary movement is about city leaders protecting the people within their jurisdictions from federal overreach; the central concern involves trust and public safety. For example, police departments need support from people living in cities and communities who witness crimes; their job is not to enforce federal (and, in this case, politically motivated) immigration executive orders, but to protect people from petty and more serious crimes. When the police are seen as potential agents of deportation, police work and public safety collapse. U.S. Attorney General Jeff Sessions doesn’t seem to understand any of this and has reacted by bullying local officials, reminiscent of the mid-19th-century Alabama leadership style that defines him. Trump has already made it clear that raids and deportations will occur as America cracks down on the undocumented. Unlike his predecessor, Mr. Obama, who deported a lot of people, Trump wants to round up everyone who is not in the country with proper documentation — including women and children. People who cross a border without permission, or overstay a tourist visa, have committed a civil code violation, not a crime. Only a cruel cynic could accuse a child who crosses a border with parents or relatives of having committed any type of legal violation. But this administration, unfortunately, is bringing new meaning to cruel and unusual. We need collaboration between federal and local officials. We don’t need a mass roundup of innocents to appease the political positions of a few fanatics. A showdown between some states/ many cities and the federal government is approaching, but given the path this administration is charting, we might be heading back not to the 1980s, but way back to the 1860s. Bryce Ashby is a Memphis-based attorney and board chair at Latino Memphis. Michael J. LaRosa is an associate professor of history at Rhodes College.

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A looming battle is building between United States cities, some states, and the federal government. The issue involves sanctuary status for communities reluctant to cooperate with officials of ICE (Immigration and Customs Enforcement), given the Trump administration’s stated goal of detaining and deporting all undocumented persons. The modern sanctuary movement began in the 1980s when perhaps a million people from Central America fled their war-torn homelands (the wars, in all cases, partially financed by the United States). Reagan-era (198088) policy referred to these folks as economic migrants. (According to this logic, the migrants were fleeing poverty, not the wars we promoted.) President Ronald Reagan refused to acknowledge the political dimension of the conflict, and thus, migrants were ineligible for protection under the 1980 Refugee Act. Against this backdrop, some cities with significant Hispanic populations organized a “sanctuary” movement to provide shelter (mostly in religious houses of worship), protection, and aid for people who, literally, were running for their lives. So we go, historically, from bad to worse. Back in the 1980s, our nation actively pursued Cold War proxy wars in Central America, the arms industry profited from those wars, we helped destroy infrastructure in three Central American nations displacing multitudes, and then we shut our doors to fleeing refugees. All of this seems, when looked at holistically, especially cruel, written not in conformity with reality but for a modern, tragic Italian opera. Now we have Mr. Trump, a Reagan redux but without the charm, affability, or charisma of the great communicator. The two presidents share one important characteristic: cluelessness. Given Trump’s recent executive orders, we see a rapid descent back to the ’80s, but this time, thanks to technology, the world can watch the tragedy in real time. Trump’s executive order regarding refugees seeks to ban people from some majority Muslim nations and is especially unkind, given that one of the nations on the original list, Iraq, was completely destroyed by the U.S. in the illegal (but profitable) war of 2003 that never really ended. Syria is on the list, a country we’ve begun bombing with cruel consequences for a civilian population stuck in a sectarian civil war. Trump’s order, rewritten to pass constitutional muster in the eyes of

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THE SCIENCE AND POLITICS OF CLIMATE CHANGE IN THE MID-SOUTH. C OVE R STO RY BY C H R I S M C C OY

” CLOUDS ARE

April 20-26, 2017

gathering over the campus of the University of Memphis as I arrive at the office of Dorian J. Burnette, professor of meteorology, climatology, and extreme weather. The Wichita, Kansas, native grew up in the heart of tornado alley. “That’s how I got into it, running from tornados,” he says. “Now, I take students, and I run toward tornados.” Burnette’s the kind of person who sweats the details — you have to be if you want to be a successful scientist. When he talks about combing through 150-year-old documents for historical weather data, his enthusiasm is infectious. It helps to be passionate when your job involves looking deeply into the greatest existential threat human civilization has ever faced. “Anthropogenic climate change — global warming — really shows itself 12 from 1950 to the present,” he says. Since the Industrial Revolution, the

burning of coal, natural gas, and oil for energy generation and transportation has been subtly changing the chemistry of our atmosphere. The carbon dioxide released from tailpipes and smokestacks absorbs heat more efficiently than does the nitrogen and oxygen that makes up most of our atmosphere. As we add more CO2 to the air, it gets hotter. Burnett’s specialty is dendroclimatology. He spends a lot of time examining tree rings under a microscope. “We see a pattern of wide and narrow rings. The wide ring is when the tree liked the environment. A thin ring — or maybe no ring at all — is when the tree hated the environment and was really super stressed. Those matching patterns of wide and narrow rings are consistent over large areas.” Examine enough trees over a large enough area, and you can reconstruct the history of the climate. “Here is the Southeast, and we can get back several

hundred years to potentially a thousand years, depending on what part of the Southeast you’re talking about. There are some kinds of trees that can go back 2,000 years in the Southwest.” The evidence for man-made climate change, Burnette says, is clear, and not only in the tree rings. He sees it in daily weather observations made by Army officers dating back to 1821, in the National Weather Service records from the 20th century, and in NASA satellite observations from the 1970s. “Each one of these separate metrics have their own strengths and weaknesses, and they’re not necessarily the same. And yet we get a similar answer when we carefully evaluate all of the data. But the most compelling evidence that the Earth is undergoing change is to just observe the natural world itself. Most of the glaciers are retreating. There are non-migratory species who are moving … 90 percent

of physical and biological systems are responding in a direction that is associated with warming.”

TENNESSEE IN 2099

Across town, at Rhodes College, Sarah Boyle, chair of the Environmental Studies and Sciences program, is grading projects from students in her Geographic Information Systems (GIS) class. Dr. Boyle is a biologist; her speciality is deforestation. “When I was younger, I was primarily interested in primates — monkeys and apes. When I was in college, I pursued my interest in that area. I lived in the Amazon for a couple of years and tracked monkeys through areas that had been deforested and through areas that were not as impacted by humans to see what the differences were in tree species composition, which primates were there, which ones had gone locally


extinct, which ones remained. How did their behavior and biology change?” Like all plants, trees breathe in carbon dioxide and breathe out oxygen. To absorb the excess CO2 we’re releasing into the atmosphere, we need more trees. Instead, humans are cutting down forests at an alarming rate. “Deforestation reduces the available carbon sinks,” she says. “Sometimes people burn [the forests], which releases a massive amount of carbon dioxide.” The students in Boyle’s GIS class come from all majors, not just STEM fields. “Just recently, they were looking at different climate predictions for the state of Tennessee in terms of, under different scenarios, what would the temperature and precipitation look like in 2099?” Giovanni Boles is one of Boyle’s students. “I was born and raised in the Netherlands, so climate change has always been a topic of discussion,” he says. “The Netherlands has always been threatened by the rising sea levels,

Dr. Sarah Boyle in the Amazon

especially considering that a third of the country is below sea level. Climate change has to be on the agenda for everybody, regardless of their location.” Boles and the others fed a trove of historical climate data into a computer model that used realistic estimates from the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) about future population and economic growth, land use, technological advancement, and, most crucially, oil and gas consumption. “They went through and modeled it out in all the areas of Tennessee to see overall what the changes would be. Based on this model, you do have a rise in temperature and a rise in precipitation. But it’s not uniform across the state. … They could see immediately that the southwestern areas of the state are quite different than the eastern part of the state.” Boles’ results indicated an almost seven-degree-Fahrenheit rise in average temperature, both minimum and maximum over the course of the century. “Looking at the gradient, some of them were shocked to see the huge range,” says Boyle. Burnette says this pattern is consistent with predictions made by climate scientists for decades. “We have high uncertainty with certain aspects of anthropogenic climate change, but there are things that are really robust in the literature. Depending on what part of the globe you’re in, your average annual total rainfall may not change too much, but you’re liable to get more rainfall in heavier amounts, with longer, dryer spells in between. The fact that heat waves will become worse, that keeps coming out in the literature as well. Winters are not going to be as bad, because winters are warming faster than summers are.”

back to full glacial conditions in as little as 10 to 50 years. … There are tipping points, but you can’t really see one until, oops, you’ve moved across it already. Now, it’s too late to deal with it.”

FALSE SPRING

So it will get warmer. So what? Maybe more rain and shorter winters will extend the growing season and give us more crops. Not so fast, says Burnette. “You put yourself in danger of a ‘false spring.’ We saw that this year. It gets

warm really, really early — like January and February — and refuses to cool back down. Then, all of a sudden, in March, you get a late-season shot of cold air. That’s damaging to the plants that are starting to bloom. You can see it on the trees right outside. The leaves are kind of sickly looking in spots. That’s a function of the hard freeze we had after the trees had already started developing their leaves.” The chaotic climate will stress food crops. “The tropics are going to get hit the hardest, right away,” says Burnette. “If you warm up the temperature just a little bit, it will make it unsuitable for crops. There will have to be a shifting of the growing belts down there. Up here, there will be a little more room for warming. That’s where that 1.5- to 2-degree shift starts popping out. Once you get above that, you start seeing declines in yield. That implies that, if we warm up the planet a little bit, we can initially see some increases in yields in certain crops because of a longer growing season. But once we pass a certain key threshold, you start to lose the gains. Then if you warm up a little bit more, you have to shift. Do we want to take some crops that are relevant to the state budget and give them to another state? That’s where the rubber meets the road in terms of politics.” The scientific consensus is that we need to prevent global average temperatures from rising more than 2.0 degrees C on average (about 3.6 degrees F). “The reason we chop it off right there is because we start seeing some issues with the planet itself, the biosphere of the planet, once you reach that threshold.” Beyond the 2-degree threshold, the climate models lose coherence. Burnette says there is potential for disaster of unimaginable scale. “The Younger Dryas event has been studied significantly. It happened about 12,000 years ago. There was an abrupt cooling phase and then an abrupt warming phase at its start and end points. Some of the indications suggest that you can go from general warming conditions

PHOTOGRAPHY BY DAVID KABELIK

DECEPTION + DENIAL

“I find the political aspect really interesting,” says Boyle. “In cities where people have been really impacted by these extreme climate effects and changes, the general populace says, yes, this is an issue. Insurance companies think this is an issue. But at the [political] party level, it’s this ‘yes or no’ fight, which is really unfortunate.” The landmark Paris Agreement of 2015 set out goals and methods for each country to meet the crucial 2-degree target. But the 2016 election of climate-change denier President Donald Trump has thrown that process into chaos and uncertainty. “Trump’s belief that climate change is a Chinese hoax should alarm everyone and epitomizes his proclivity for baseless conspiracy theory,” says Scott Banbury, Conservation Program Director for the Tennessee Sierra Club. “In fact, China is making enormous investments in clean energy, and Trump’s threatened abandonment of the Paris Climate Accords will result in the U.S. being less competitive in the future.” It’s not just Trump. In March, Tennessee Senator Lamar Alexander went on a 12-minute tirade in the Senate, railing against TVA’s plans to buy wind power — which does not add any carbon dioxide to the atmosphere — from Clean Line Energy Partners, operators of a wind farm in Oklahoma. He claimed that the deal would impose an unnecessary $1 billion cost on Tennesseans over a 30-year period. “TVA should not agree to buy more wind power, which is comparatively unreliable and expensive,” he said. Banbury and the Sierra Club disagree. “Senator Alexander’s opinions on wind ” continued on page 14

COVER STORY m e m p h i s f l y e r. c o m

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Dr. Burnette coring a bristlecone pine tree in Colorado for a tree-ring project.

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” continued from page 13

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power are based on very outdated information. Clean Line is offering fixed, long-term rates that are cheaper than the current cost of generating electricity from coal, will undoubtedly be cheaper than natural gas in the near future, and free of the financial and environmental risks of nuclear.” Denying the reality of climate change has become an article of faith among most Republicans. Fossil fuel industries have thrown big money into sowing doubt among the conservative flock. Burnette says a favorite Fox News tactic is to exploit scientists’ unwillingness to speak in absolutes. “You listen to a scientist, and they’re going to caveat themselves constantly. We allow for these little probabilistic things that could technically happen.” But on TV news programs, “They’ll bring on a climate scientist, and then they’ll bring on another person who may be a Ph.D., but he’s not necessarily super credentialed, and if you look at his publication record, he hasn’t contributed to the peer-reviewed literature at all. They bring these two head to head, and the audience sees one scientist arguing against another and think there’s discrepancy between the scientists.” This creates the impression that 50 percent of scientists think one way, and 50 percent of the scientists think another way. “It’s somewhere in the 90 percent range that think anthropogenic climate change is real, it’s a threat, and it’s us,” says Burnette.

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“I was shocked. I didn’t see it coming,” says Nour Hantouli, of the election of Donald Trump. “I was hoping that Hillary was going to get into office so we could talk about how we needed to go even farther than that. Now, we’re starting from absolute ground zero with Trump.” Hantouli is one of the founders of the Memphis Feminist Collective, a three-year-old organization active in community organization before and after the election. “Activism in Memphis is getting a lot more traction. I’ve never seen anything like it. There was the Women’s March, the Immigration March, they had thousands of people. We haven’t seen that in decades.” Hantouli is one of the Memphis organizers of the March for Science, a national movement to push back against Trump Republicans’ proposed gutting of government science research. First on the chopping block are the EPA and NASA’s climate science programs. “Our goal is to highlight the national goal of bringing science to the public, by reaching out and bringing them in,” says Hantouli. “We want to let folks know why these intersections are important and why we have to unite

against these policy changes and the toxic cultural climate that’s going on.” Scientists prize objectivity above all else. Politicization of science is a major taboo, and for some, that even extends to taking political action in self-defense. “You say you’re not into politics, but politics is into you,” says Hantouli. The initial March for Science organization was done by a coalition between scientists and academics, who had little experience in the field of direct political action, and experienced social justice organizations such as Hantouli’s Memphis Feminist Collective. Tensions mounted over methods and priorities, and the internal conflict came to a head with a proposal to rally in Health Sciences Park adjacent to the University of Tennessee medical campus. Unfortunately, that is also the site of the grave and statue of Ku Klux Klan founder Nathan Bedford Forrest. The debate split the group, and as a result, there will be two separate March for Science demonstrations in Memphis on April 22nd. One, a march from Gaston Park to LeMoyne Owen College, and the other a rally at Civic Center Plaza. “If your life has been touched by science, if you want to meet Memphis STEM professionals and educators, or if you want to discover and contribute to the inclusivity of the Memphis STEM community, this is a first of its kind event in our lifetime to make that connection,” says Rally for Science Memphis spokesman Colin Kietzman. “The problems we’ve been seeing here in Memphis are not unfamiliar to everyone else. The scientific community and their relationship to the public has been an issue. That’s something we have to work on,” Hantouli says.

KEEPING HOPE FOR THE FUTURE

“People ask me, ‘How can you study what you study without being horribly depressed?’ I think as you work toward the problems, you have to have some optimism that the work you’re doing will provide some positive changes in the future,” says Boyle. “I see that in the students. They know how dire the issues are, but I think they have that optimism to work toward a goal for a better future.” “We’ve had some good news of late,” says Burnette. “Emissions are not as high. That’s good. That’s buying us a little bit more time. That’s the encouraging thing. I try to look at it from an optimistic point of view. It’s certainly not too late, and that’s not just optimism talking. But the problem is, the longer we wait, the correction is going to have to be much more draconian to fix the problem. That’s the reason why I wish a certain group would stop arguing about the science and start talking about policy.”


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steppin’ out

We Recommend: Culture, News + Reviews

Smokin’ Joints

Leo Bud Welch By Chris Davis

Pig races? Monkeys riding dogs? Slide guitar, with somebody singing about the devil and hard, hard times? No, it’s not some hophead dream I’m describing here — these are just a few of the featured attractions at Saturday’s annual Juke Joint Festival in Clarksdale, Mississippi. But the music festival with a town-fair feel (and monkeys riding dogs) is just one eccentric opportunity for Delta folks to consider an endangered species: the American juke joint. When’s the last time you went to see a dance performance, and an Earnestine & Hazel’s Soul Burger was included in the price of admission? These Walls: Tales from a Juke Joint blends dance and theater to tell the story of Memphis’ favorite gentrified bordello, the girls who worked there, and artists who pounded out songs on the old piano. Dancer/choreographer Erin Walter describes These Walls as a night full of ghosts, and the evening includes a haunted performance set to a cello arrangement of Michael Jackson’s “Human Nature,” narrated by Memphis industrialist Abe Plough, who once operated a pharmacy on the site. “He manufactured this antiseptic oil called Plough’s Antiseptic Oil that was 46 percent alcohol and sold it all over the Southeast, kind of like a snake oil salesman,” Walter says, running down high points from the notorious nightspot’s colorful history. “My goal was to produce a show anybody would enjoy. Not so much dance lovers, but to make something the average Joe might find interesting or cool.” In an early visit to see if a show might be feasible in the space, the jukebox came on by itself. “It was playing, ‘Human Nature,’” Walter says. “It seems like Earnestine & Hazel’s kinda wanted us to use it,” she says. “They say it’s the original owners making the jukebox play. That’s their way of still trying to manage the place.”

April 20-26, 2017

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Punk-rock pioneers and proto alt-rockers Redd Kross play Growlers. Local Beat, p. 20

Changes at LYFE Kitchen and Jim’s Place Food News, p. 38

THURSDAY April 20

FRIDAY April 21

SATURDAY April 22

“Conspiracy, Vice, & Virtue” Bar DKDC, 3-5 p.m. This one’s intriguing: Show organized by students in Rhodes’ Curation in Context class involving works about conspiracy and urban legend.

Hoedown for Hope Propcellar Vintage Rental, 7:30-10:30 p.m., $75 Fund-raiser for Hope House featuring music by Six String Lovers, MemPops, and a mechanical bull.

Scandals & Scoundrels Elmwood Cemetery, 1 p.m., $20 Popular tour featuring some of the cemetery’s most infamous residents, from madams to mayors. Registration required: 774-3212.

Don Quixote Germantown Performing Arts Center, 7:30 p.m. Ballet from the Russian National Ballet based on the Cervantes novel.

Dearly Departed Circuit Playhouse, 8 p.m., $25 Play about living and dying in the South.

Memphis Brewfest AutoZone Park, 4-7:30 p.m., $45 Annual craft beer festival benefiting Parent Project Muscular Dystrophy.

Stax @ 60 Concert Series Stax Museum of American Soul Music, 7-8:30 p.m. The Bo-Keys perform early-years Stax songs from the Barracudas, the Triumphs, Prince Conley, and more. Includes Q&A and preconcert discussion. “Lady Monsters” The Rozelle Warehouse, 7-9 p.m. Opening reception for reflective works by Lexi Perkins. Booksigning by David Baldacci Barnes & Noble Wolfchase, 7-8 p.m. David Baldacci signs and discusses the third in his Amos Decker series The Fix.

MIFA/MLGW Lip Sync Plus Hard Rock Cafe, 7-10 p.m. Contestants and local celebrities show off their lip-syncing skills, benefiting MLGW’s Plus-1 program, which helps families in crisis.

Southern Hot Wing Festival Mississippi River Park, 11 a.m.-7 p.m., $20 If wings are your thing, then fly right down to Mississippi River Park for this huge annual festival. Benefiting the Ronald McDonald House.


web head box 1:

Peter Bagge

On Fire!!

web subhead box 1: By Chris Davis

Alternative comic artist and public libertarian Peter Bagge has made an unexpected career move. Bagge — best known for his ’90s-era slacker satires Hate and Neat Stuff — has shifted his attention from autobiography to biography and taken it upon himself to chronicle the lives of unique women in the 20th century. His first was Woman Rebel, the story of Planned Parenthood founder Margaret Sanger. Fire!!, his second, and most exclamation mark-laden title, tells the story of African-American author and folklorist Zora Neale Hurston. “I kept coming across life stories of women writers and/or activists from the early 20th century — particularly the years between the two world wars — who led incredibly free, independent lives, which made me very curious about them,” Bagge says. “This was a full generation before the women’s rights movement of the late ’60s, yet you’d never know it was based on how these women went about things. They were shockingly un-self-conscious about it, too.” So the artist started reading more about these women, identifying with them, and eventually drawing their stories in his distinctive, rubber-boned style. “I like the way I draw,” Bagge says. “It suits my purposes. It’s very expressive. I’m also sadly well aware that some people have a hard time with my art, particularly with these non-fiction books. But then I think about the type of art these critics prefer — which is very straight, mainstream, and BORING-looking — and come to the conclusion that they just have bad taste.” Fire!! follows Hurston from her rural roots through her time as a student, poet, playwright, author, and cultural documentarian. It touches on her complicated relationship with Langston Hughes and constant economic struggle. “What I hope people take away from Fire!! primarily is what a unique and creatively fearless person Hurston was,” Bagge says. “She literally had no predecessors. A truly remarkable person for countless reasons.”

web head box 2:

web subhead box 2:

A CONVERSATION WITH PETER BAGGE AT THE BROOKS MUSEUM OF ART, WEDNESDAY, APRIL 26TH, 7-8:30 P.M. $9/$5 MEMBERS AND STUDENTS WITH VALID ID. BROOKSMUSEUM.ORG

V&E Artwalk V&E Greenline, 11 a.m.-6 p.m. Annual event with works from local artists and craftspeople. Includes a children’s area, live music, craft beer, and more. Benefiting the greenline. Rally for Science Civic Center Plaza, 10 a.m.-noon Facts matter, y’all. Held in conjunction with the March for Science in D.C. Memphis Veg Fest Levitt Shell, 11 a.m.-5 p.m. Festival devoted to a plant-based diet. Includes demos, vendors, speakers, and more.

Book Event Cooper-Young Gazebo, 1-3 p.m. Event in honor of the release of the Jim Dickinson book I’m Just Dead, I’m Not Gone. Dickinson’s widow Mary Lindsay Dickinson will read from the book, and there will be music by Some Sons of Mudboy. 14th Annual Maria Montessori School Regatta and Duck Race Maria Montessori School, 9 a.m.-5 p.m. A rubber duckie race, plus games for the kids, kayak rides, and more.

The Graduate Malco Paradiso Cinema, 2 p.m. A 50th-anniversary screening of this groundbreaking film with Dustin Hoffman, Anne Bancroft, and Katharine Ross. Rajun Cajun Crawfish Festival Wagner at Riverside, 11 a.m.-7 p.m. The big one, folks. Massive festival dedicated to the crawfish, featuring some 16,000 pounds of crawfish, a gumbo cook-off, and music by Black Oak Arkansas and others. Benefiting Porter-Leath.

ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT

SUNDAY April 23

m e m p h i s f l y e r. c o m

An arms deal goes south and bullets fly in Ben Wheatley and Amy Jump’s Free Fire. Film, p. 42

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pril 22nd may be the busiest Saturday this spring for Memphis music 7:57 AM lovers and vinyl hounds. ShangriLa Records and Goner Records are both opening early to participate in the 10th anniversary celebration of Record Store Day [RSD]; Burke’s Book Store is hosting a reading and concert for Jim Dickinson’s I’m Just Dead, I’m Not Gone in the CooperYoung gazebo; and Lucero’s annual Block Party closes out the festivities in the Minglewood parking lot. I’ve done the math, and it seems like, with determination and careful planning, it’s possible to see Tall David, Some Sons of Mudboy (twice), and end the day on a blanket in front of Minglewood, counting a stack of rare 7-inchers to the sounds of Son Volt. The official list of RSD exclusives is nine pages long and includes rarities from Link Wray, Emmylou Harris, Prince, Ramones, Spoon, and the Kinks, not to mention a previously unreleased Diamond Dogs-era David Bowie concert. As if that isn’t enough to get any music junkie out of bed early, Waxploitation Records is releasing a “literary mixtape” of stories written by Nick Cave, Jim James, and others. And I haven’t even mentioned the children’s record by Johnny Cash or the third and final installment in Big Star’s three-part release for Complete Third. “We’re participating in a huge

way,” says Shangri-La owner Jared McStay. “We ordered more stuff than we ever have.” McStay says he’s not allowed to let slip which of the RSD exclusives he ordered for the store, but he’s excited about what’s coming in. The store cleared out some space with their Fool Fest sale, and McStay says they have been stockpiling some special rarities as well as local records to put out on Saturday alongside the RSD exclusives. “We’re open early,” McStay says. “And we’ve got a band playing at 2 p.m.” Last year, while waiting for a show to begin at the Mercy Lounge in Nashville, I watched as David Johnson, the leader of Tall David, led the crowd — or at least the Memphis contingent of it — in an enthusiastic sing-a-long rendition of Harry Nilsson’s “Without You.” (I don’t want to add fuel to the feud, but no one from Nashville joined in the sing-a-long.) This year, fresh from an opening slot at Dead Soldiers’ album-release show, Tall David will lead the festivities at Shangri-La with an afternoon performance in the store’s parking lot. “Come expecting to see the world’s tallest rock-and-roll crooner. Come early,” Johnson says of the free show. However, most Memphis music junkies will split time between the Madison record shop and its CooperYoung counterpart, the holy grail of garage rock, Goner Records. “One year we had a memorable guitar shred-off with some people playing their best licks back and


forth,” Goner guru Eric Friedl says, but this year, Goner is letting Burke’s Book Store take over the performance duties with a reading from Jim Dickinson’s memoir by Mary Lindsay Dickinson and a performance by Some Sons of Mudboy. “That seemed like enough [live music],” Friedl says, but guest DJs will spin soul and punk records in the store throughout the day. And the store will have coffee and donuts for the early birds. “We’ve got the usual batch of exclusive RSD releases that everybody’s scrambling to get,” Friedl says. The store is also releasing Golden Pelicans’ Disciples of Blood LP on red vinyl. “We do have a secret release from NOTS that’s only going to be available in the store and from the band,” Friedl continues. “We were trying to figure out the best way to leak the word, but the NOTS Live at Goner [LP is being released for RSD]. We wanted to find a good way to release it, and tying it into RSD from the record store where it was recorded seemed pretty good.”

friend Julien Baker on there. We knew she would kill it,” Daniel Quinlan says. With live music and new and exclusive releases from every genre, Memphis is primed to celebrate the 10th anniversary of Record Store Day. Whether it’s the new NOTS or the new Spaceface, the pop perfection of Tall David, or the country-punk attack of Lucero, there’s something to satisfy every listener. For a list of all Record Store Day releases, visit www.recordstoreday.com. Tall David at Shangri-La Records, Saturday, April 22nd at 2 p.m. Free.

That’s right; Goner’s dropping a new, used-to-be-secret NOTS record this Saturday. And it’s not the only new Memphis LP coming just in time for RSD. A smorgasbord of spring releases by groups with Memphis roots is bolstering the RSD exclusives. Valerie June’s The Order of Time led the blitz of spring releases, but hot on her heels were Dead Soldiers with The Great Emptiness, Chris Milam with Kids These Days, and Cory Branan’s Adios. At the time of this writing, Milam and Branan’s LPs are barely a week old, but Memphis-based psychedelic rockers Spaceface are dropping their debut LP Sun Kids on colored vinyl the day before RSD. Though the band strived to record something that felt organic and could be replicated live, there were a few guest appearances — the band invited Flyer favorite Julien Baker to give a guest vocal performance. “[It] has our

m e m p h i s f l y e r. c o m

Valerie June’s The Order of Time led the blitz of spring releases, but hot on her heels were Dead Soldiers with The Great Emptiness, Chris Milam with Kids These Days, and Cory Branan’s Adios. Memphis-based rockers Spaceface are dropping their debut LP the day before RSD.

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Redd Kross Pioneers who inspired Nirvana, Sonic Youth, and Melvins remain vital. At just 11 and 14, brothers Steven and Jeff McDonald began to morph their middleschool band into the stuff of punk, pop, and glam/indierock legend. In the Los Angeles suburb of Hawthorne where they were born and raised, the band’s first show — an eighth-grade graduation house party — was played with their friends in the punk band Black Flag. In the years that followed, Nirvana, Sonic Youth, and Melvins would all cite Redd Kross as a core sonic and visual inspiration. Now in their fourth decade, Redd Kross have released a total of nine full-length albums and over two dozen EPs and singles. After joining seminal hardcore band Melvins as their bassist in 2015, Steven is currently playing bass on three projects — Redd Kross, Melvins, and OFF! — all while being a devoted husband and father. The band stops in Memphis on Friday, April 22nd, for a show at Growlers. I talked with Steven about the tour, teaming with Dale Crover, dad life, and Goner Fest. I understand you were at Goner Fest a few years back. Yeah, I worked for a bunch of record labels over the years, and in 2009, I went to Goner Fest to see some bands. There’s this phenomenal band from Omaha called Box Elders. When they found out the dude from Redd Kross was there, they invited me on stage to play, and we played pretty much all the songs off our first EP. When I think of Memphis, I still think fondly of Jay Reatard, who we were friends with. And Jeffrey Novak, too.

4/7/2017 3:01:56 PM

It’s been five years since you released Researching the Blues, and yet you have a mammoth tour schedule ahead. It’s just one of those things where everyone was available and could do it, so I seized the opportunity. It seems like it could be the beginning of something. Your relationship with Melvins goes way back. Well, Dale and Buzz were early supporters. They were excited that there was another band coming from the punk world referencing all this other music that they loved, too, like KISS. And unapologetically doing so.

Is there a new Redd Kross album coming? Well, there’s Octavia. … That got started because the Melvins put me to task to make a solo record, and they had their solo records in the 1990s. They were inspired by the KISS solo records. And they very graciously asked me if I’d be interested in participating in that reissue and doing a solo record of my own for the Melvins. They used the KISS solo records as their templates — and they never did the blue one, which was the Ace Frehley. They kind of saved that for me. I know you and Anna (Waronker) have been busy being parents. ... Dad life is great. I love it, and it’s definitely a hard trade-off about making the decision to do more road work, because I miss out on some stuff. It’s daunting, because these human beings, they’re not simple creatures. And from day one, you’re responsible for them. Crazy details like, “Should you circumcise their penis?” From that point on, it only gets more complex. Andrew Earles lists your 1982 album, Born Innocent, in his book Gimme Indie Rock as one of the 500 essential underground rock albums of punk/indie rock. But I read that you picked your 2012 album Researching the Blues as Redd Kross’ best album. [K Records founder] Calvin Johnson told me I peaked at age 12. The fact that any of this is notable in the annals of rock history is cool and fun. I can’t take it very seriously. But in terms of some things being dismissed and others being infantilized, you can’t please everybody. That’s been a learning experience for me, to realize that I don’t necessarily know how this is gonna turn out. Redd Kross (with Viva L’American Death Ray Music) play Growlers Friday, April 22nd.


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After Dark: Live Music Schedule April 20 - 26 Alfred’s 197 BEALE 525-3711

Gary Hardy & Memphis 2 Thursdays-Saturdays, 6-9 p.m.; Karaoke Thursdays, TuesdaysWednesdays, 9 p.m.-1 a.m., and Sundays-Mondays, 10 p.m.-2 a.m.; Mandi Thomas Fridays, Saturdays, 6-9 p.m.; The 901 Heavy Hitters Fridays, Saturdays, 10 p.m.-2 a.m.; Flyin’ Ryan Fridays, Saturdays, 2:30 a.m.; Memphis Jazz Orchestra Sundays, 6-9 p.m.

B.B. King’s Blues Club 143 BEALE 524-KING

The King Beez Thursdays, 5:30 p.m.; B.B. King’s All Stars Thursdays, Fridays, 8 p.m.; Will Tucker Band Fridays, Saturdays, 5 p.m.; Lisa G and Flic’s Pic’s Band Saturdays, Sundays, 12:30 p.m.; Blind Mississippi Morris Sundays, 5 p.m.; Memphis Jones Sundays, Wednesdays 5:30 p.m.; Doc Fangaz and the Remedy Tuesdays, 5:30 p.m.

Blue Note Bar & Grill 341-345 BEALE 577-1089

Queen Ann and the Memphis Blues Masters Fridays, Saturdays, 8 p.m.-midnight.

Blues City Cafe 138 BEALE 526-3637

King’s Palace Cafe Patio 162 BEALE 521-1851

Live Music WednesdaysSundays, 7-11 p.m.; Live DJ Wednesdays-Sundays, 11 p.m.; Third Floor: DJ Tubbz Fridays, Saturdays, 10 p.m.

Handy Bar 200 BEALE 527-2687

Bad Boy Matt & the Amazing Rhythmatics Tuesdays, Thursdays-Sundays, 7 p.m.-1 a.m.

Sonny Mack Mondays-Fridays, 2-6 p.m.; Cowboy Neil Mondays, Thursdays, 7-11 p.m., and Saturdays, Sundays, 2-6 p.m.; Sensation Band Tuesdays, Fridays, 7-11 p.m.; Fuzzy and the Kings of Memphis Saturdays, 7-11 p.m.; Chic Jones and the Blues Express Sundays, 711 p.m.; North and South Band Wednesdays, 7-11 p.m.

King’s Palace Cafe Tap Room

Hard Rock Cafe 126 BEALE 529-0007

MIFA/MLGW Lip Sync Plus Finalist Contest Thursday, April 20, 7-10 p.m.; Laughing at the Rock Comedy Show Saturday, April 22, 10 p.m.

Big Don Valentine’s Three Piece Chicken and a Biscuit Blues Band Thursdays, Tuesdays, 8 p.m.-midnight.

Itta Bena

New Daisy Theatre

168 BEALE 576-2220

330 BEALE 525-8981

145 BEALE 578-3031

Kayla Walker Thursdays, 6-7 p.m.; Susan Marshall Fridays, Saturdays, 7-10 p.m.; Nat “King” Kerr Fridays, Saturdays, 9-10 p.m.; Susan Marshall Wednesdays, 6-8 p.m.

George Porter J.R. Friday, April 21, 7 p.m.; Society Memphis Saturday, April 22, 9 p.m.-2 a.m.; Boondox - The Murder Tour Sunday, April 23, 7 p.m.-midnight.

King Jerry Lawler’s Hall of Fame Bar & Grille

Rum Boogie Cafe

159 BEALE

Chris Gales Solo Acoustic Show Mondays-Saturdays, 12-4 p.m.; Eric Hughes Thursdays, Fridays, 5-8 p.m.; Karaoke MondaysThursdays, Sundays, 8 p.m.; Live Bands Fridays, Saturdays, 8 p.m.

King’s Palace Cafe 162 BEALE 521-1851

David Bowen Thursdays, 5:309:30 p.m., Fridays, Saturdays, 6:30-10:30 p.m., and Sundays, 5:30-9:30 p.m.

182 BEALE 528-0150

Plantation Allstars Thursday, April 20, 8 p.m.-midnight; Young Petty Thieves Thursday, April 20, 8 p.m.-midnight; Pam and Terry Friday, April 21, 5:308:30 p.m., and Saturday, April 22, 5:30-8:30 p.m.; Ghost Town Blues Band Friday, April 21, 9 p.m.-1 a.m.; Sensation Band Saturday, April 22, 9 p.m.-1 a.m., and Sunday, April 23, 7-11 p.m.; Eric Hughes Band Monday, April 24, 8 p.m.-midnight; Gracie Curran Tuesday, April 25, 8 p.m.midnight.

Rum Boogie Cafe Blues Hall

Flying Saucer Draught Emporium

South Main

182 BEALE 528-0150

130 PEABODY PLACE 523-8536

Ghost River Brewing

Memphis Bluesmasters Thursdays, Sundays, 8 p.m.-midnight; Vince Johnson and the Plantation Allstars Fridays, Saturdays, 4-8 p.m., and Sundays, 3-7 p.m.; Nick Hern Band Friday, April 21, 9 p.m.1 a.m.; Chic Jones and the Blues Express Saturday, April 22, 48 p.m.; Little Boys Blue Saturday, April 22, 9 p.m.-1 a.m.; Brian Hawkins Blues Party Mondays, 8 p.m.-midnight; McDaniel Band Tuesdays, Wednesdays, 8 p.m.-midnight.

Silky O’Sullivan’s 183 BEALE 522-9596

Dueling Pianos Thursdays, Wednesdays, 9 p.m.-1 a.m., Fridays, Saturdays, 9 p.m.-3 a.m., and Sundays, Tuesdays, 8 p.m.-midnight.

Dirty Crow Inn

Songwriters with Roland and Friends Mondays, 7-10 p.m.

The Halloran Centre 225 S. MAIN 529-4299

Straight Outta Oz Wednesday, April 26, 7:30 p.m.

Harbor Town Amphitheater 740 HARBOR BEND ROAD

Rev. John Wilkins, Crystal Shrine Sunday, April 23.

Earnestine & Hazel’s 531 S. MAIN 523-9754

Amber Rae Dunn Hosts: Earnestine & Hazel’s Open Mic Wednesdays, 8-11 p.m.

Loflin Yard 7 W. CAROLINA

Presenting Bozwell + Lily Sunday, April 23, 12-10 p.m.; Electric Church Sundays, 2-4 p.m.

Huey’s Downtown 77 S. SECOND 527-2700

The Pistol and the Queen Sunday, April 23, 8:30 p.m.-midnight.

Paulette’s RIVER INN, 50 HARBOR TOWN SQUARE 260-3300

Live Pianist Thursdays, 5:308:30 p.m., Fridays and Saturdays, 5:30-9 p.m., Sundays, 11 a.m.2 p.m., and Mondays-Wednesdays, 5:30-8 p.m.

Bar DKDC 964 S. COOPER 272-0830

CATL Thursday, April 20; Mighty Souls Brass Band Friday, April 21; Marcella and Her Lovers Saturday, April 22; Devil Train Monday, April 24; Disco DJ Night Tuesday, April 25; Sean Murphy’s 1Breath Quartet Wednesday, April 26.

Rumba Room

Boscos

303 S. MAIN 523-0020

2120 MADISON 432-2222

855 KENTUCKY

The Po’ Boys Friday, April 21, 9 p.m.-midnight; The Tinglers Saturday, April 22, 9 p.m.midnight; Bobbie & Tasha Wednesdays, 8-11 p.m.

827 S. MAIN 278-0087

Bobbie & Tasha Saturday, April 22, 6-9 p.m.; Sunday Evening Slowdown with Crockett Hall & Tall David Sunday, April 23, 5-7:30 p.m.

Salsa Night Saturdays, 8:30 p.m.-3 a.m.

Sunday Brunch with Joyce Cobb Sundays, 11:30 a.m.-2:30 p.m.

The Silly Goose

Canvas

100 PEABODY PLACE 435-6915

1737 MADISON 443-5232

DJ Cody Fridays, Saturdays, 10 p.m.

The Peabody Hotel 149 UNION 529-4000

Almost Famous Thursday, April 20, 6-10 p.m.

Karaoke Thursdays, 9:30 p.m.; Kyle Pruzina Live Mondays, 10 p.m.-midnight.

Celtic Crossing 903 S. COOPER 274-5151

Jeremy Stanfill and Joshua Cosby Sundays, 6-9 p.m.; Candy Company Mondays.

April 20-26, 2017

Blind Mississippi Morris Fridays, 5 p.m., and Saturdays, 5:30 p.m.; Brad Birkedahl Band Thursdays, Wednesdays, 8 p.m.; Earl “The Pearl” Banks Saturdays, 12:30 p.m., and Tuesdays, 7 p.m.; Brandon Cunning Trio Sundays, 6 p.m., and Mondays, 7 p.m.; FreeWorld Sundays, 9:30 p.m.

Club 152 152 BEALE 544-7011

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THE CHAINSMOKERS FRIDAY, MAY 19 Performing with special guest Kiiara and featuring Emily Warren. Tickets available!


After Dark: Live Music Schedule April 20 - 26 The Cove

The Phoenix

2559 BROAD 730-0719

1015 S. COOPER 338-5223

Wild Bill’s 1580 VOLLINTINE 207-3975

The Wild Bill’s Band Fridays, Saturdays, 11 p.m.-3 a.m.

Young Avenue Deli 2119 YOUNG 278-0034

The Stolen Faces Friday, April 21, 9 p.m.

551 S. MENDENHALL 762-8200

Intimate Piano Lounge featuring Charlotte Hurt MondaysThursdays, 5-9:30 p.m.; Larry Cunningham Fridays, Saturdays, 6-10 p.m.

Huey’s Poplar 4872 POPLAR 682-7729

Brad Birkedahl Band Sunday, April 23, 8:30 p.m.-midnight.

Lannie McMillan Jazz Trio Sundays, 10 a.m.-2 p.m.

Summer/Berclair

Whitehaven/ Airport Guest House at Graceland 3600 ELVIS PRESLEY 332-3322

Dreamgirls Allstars Saturday, April 22, 7-9 p.m.

Hadley’s Pub 2779 WHITTEN 266-5006

Twin Soul Friday, April 21, 9 p.m.; Full Circle Saturday, April 22, 9 p.m.; Swingin’ Leroy Sunday, April 23, 5:30 p.m.; East Memphis Trio Wednesday, April 26, 8 p.m.

Shelby Forest General Store

Cheffie’s Cafe

7729 BENJESTOWN 876-5770

483 HIGH POINT TERRACE 202-4157

Tony Butler Fridays, 6-8 p.m.; Gary Keith Saturday, April 22, 12-3 p.m.; Robert Hull Sundays, 12:30-3:30 p.m.

Songwriter Night hosted by Leigh Ann Wilmot and Dave “The Rave” Saturdays, 5-8 p.m.

Collierville

1911 POPLAR 244-7904

Jason Eady Thursday, April 20; Red Cross Saturday, April 22; Crockett Hall Tuesdays with the Midtown Rhythm Section Tuesdays, 9 p.m.

2130 W. POPLAR 854-4455

Hi-Tone

Cordova

Huey’s Collierville Memphis All Stars Sunday, April 23, 8:30-11:30 p.m.

412-414 N. CLEVELAND 278-TONE

Huey’s Cordova

The Octopus Project Thursday, April 20, 9 p.m.; Penny and Sparrow, Lowland Hum Friday, April 21, 7 p.m.; Norml Memphis Saturday, April 22, 8 p.m.; Capgun, Jackknife Stiletto, Abisha Uhl, Indeed, We Digress Saturday, April 22, 8 p.m.

1771 N. GERMANTOWN PKWY. 754-3885

The Chaulkies Sunday, April 23, 8:30 p.m.-midnight; Tuesday Tunes on the Terrace Tuesdays, 5-8:30 p.m.; Carson and Brewer Tuesday, April 25, 5:30-8 p.m.

T.J. Mulligan’s Cordova

Huey’s Midtown

8071 TRINITY 756-4480

1927 MADISON 726-4372

Seeing Red Saturday, April 22, 9:30 p.m.-1:30 a.m.; The Southern Edition Band Tuesdays.

Joe Restivo 4 Sunday, April 23, 4-7 p.m.; Breeze Cayolle and New Orleans Sunday, April 23, 8:30 p.m.-midnight.

Frayser/Millington

Lafayette’s Music Room

Old Millington Winery

2119 MADISON 207-5097

Ray Wylie Hubbard Thursday, April 20, 8 p.m.; Brennan Villines Friday, April 21, 10:30 p.m.; Nick Black Saturday, April 22, 10 p.m.; Joe Restivo 4 Sundays, 11 a.m.; McKenna Bray Sunday, April 23, 4 p.m.; Chris Monteverde Sunday, April 23, 8 p.m.; John Paul Keith Mondays, 6 p.m.; John Kilzer Tuesdays, 8 p.m.; Breeze Cayolle and New Orleans Wednesdays, 5:30 p.m.; Sextons Wednesday, April 26, 8 p.m.

Midtown Crossing Grill 394 N. WATKINS 443-0502

Memphis Ukelele Meetup Tuesdays, 6-7:30 p.m.; “The Happening” Tuesdays, 6:309:30 p.m.

6748 OLD MILLINGTON 873-4114

Susie and Bob Salley Sunday, April 23.

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Minglewood Hall

Mortimer’s

1555 MADISON 866-609-1744

590 N. PERKINS 761-9321

Rayland Baxter Thursday, April 20, 7 p.m.; Lucero Family Block Party with Son Volt Saturday, April 22, 2 p.m.; Gov’t Mule, Eric Krasno Band Wednesday, April 26, 7 p.m.

Murphy’s 1589 MADISON 726-4193

Hex and Hell Friday, April 21.

Overton Park Golf Shack 2080 POPLAR

Van Duren Solo Thursdays, 6:30-8:30 p.m.

University of Memphis The Bluff 535 S. HIGHLAND

DJ Kaz Thursday, April 20; URI Friday, April 21; DJ Ben Murray Saturday, April 22; Bluegrass Brunch Sunday, April 23.

Park Friends Spring Music Series Wednesday, April 26, 6-8 p.m.

East Memphis

P&H Cafe

Buckman Arts Center at St. Mary’s School

1532 MADISON 726-0906

Rock Starkaraoke Fridays; Whetherman Saturday, April 22; Open Mic Music with Tiffany Harmon Mondays, 9 p.m.-midnight; Music4Pina Wednesday, April 26.

60 N. PERKINS EXT. 537-1483

Fathers and Daughters: An Evening with Loudon Wainwright, III and Lucy Wainwright Roche Saturday, April 22, 8 p.m.

Poplar/I-240

Pubapalooza with Stereo Joe Every other Wednesday, 8-11 p.m.

Neil’s Music Room 5727 QUINCE 682-2300

Jack Rowell’s Celebrity Jam Thursdays, 8 p.m.; Eddie Smith Fridays, 8 p.m.; Rusten Haven Saturday, April 22, 8 p.m.; Rock 316 Showcase Sunday, April 23, 2-5 p.m.; Mo Boogie Sunday, April 23, 6-10 p.m.; Debbie Jamison & Friends Tuesdays, 6-10 p.m.; Elmo and the Shades Wednesdays, 8 p.m.-midnight.

Arlington/Eads/ Oakland/Lakeland 6230 GREENLEE 592-0344

6069 PARK 767-6002

Eddie Harris Thursdays, Fridays, 6:30-9:30 p.m.; Elizabeth Wise Tuesdays, 7-9 p.m.; Van Duren Solo Tuesdays, 7-9 p.m.

South Memphis

Live Music Thursdays, Wednesdays, 7-10 p.m.; Karaoke and Dance Music with DJ Funn Fridays, 9 p.m.

Stax Museum of American Soul Music

Bartlett

926 E. MCLEMORE 946-2535

Bartlett Performing Arts and Conference Center

Stax @ 60 Concert Series: The Bo-Keys Thursday, April 20, 7-8:30 p.m.

Universal Parenting Place LEMOYNE-OWEN COLLEGE, 990 COLLEGE PARK

Tunes & Tales Wednesday, April 26, 4-5 p.m.

Gary Escoe’s Atomic Dance Machine Sunday, April 23, 8:30 p.m.-midnight.

Huey’s Germantown 7677 FARMINGTON 318-3034

Heart Memphis Band Sunday, April 23, 8-11:30 p.m.; Gerry Finney Wednesday, April 26, 6-9 p.m.

2425 SOUTH GERMANTOWN 754-7282

Rizzi’s/Paradiso Pub

East Tapas and Drinks

Huey’s Southwind 7825 WINCHESTER 624-8911

St. George’s Episcopal Church

High Point Pub 477 HIGH POINT TERRACE 452-9203

Germantown

3663 APPLING 385-6440

Always a Bridesmaid Thursday, April 20, 7 p.m., Friday, April 21, 7 p.m., Saturday, April 22, 7 p.m., and Sunday, April 23, 2:30 p.m.

Memphis ChoralArts in Concert Saturday, April 22, 4-6 p.m.

North Mississippi/ Tunica Clarksdale, Mississippi CLARKSDALE, MISSISSIPPI

Cat Head Mini Blues Fest Sunday, April 23, 10 a.m.-5 p.m.

Huey’s Southaven 7090 MALCO, SOUTHAVEN, MS 662-349-7097

Delta Rain Sunday, April 23, 8 p.m.-midnight.

Tunica Roadhouse 1107 CASINO CENTER, TUNICA, MS 662-363-4900

Live Music Fridays, Saturdays; Moonshine Ball Friday, April 21 and Saturday, April 22.

m e m p h i s f l y e r. c o m

Growlers

The Phoenix Blues Jam Tuesdays, 8-11 p.m.

Owen Brennan’s THE REGALIA, 6150 POPLAR 761-0990

ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT

Ed Finney and the U of M Jazz Quartet Thursdays, 9 p.m.; Three Generation Jug Band Friday, April 21, 9 p.m.; Ari Vas Saturday, April 22, 9 p.m.; David Collins Jazz Saturday, April 22, 10 p.m., and Sunday, April 23, 6 p.m.; Justin White Mondays, 7 p.m.; Don and Wayde Tuesdays, 7-10 p.m.; Karaoke Wednesdays, 10 p.m.

Folk’s Folly Prime Steak House

23


SEE IT AT THE PINK PALACE!

CALENDAR of EVENTS:

April 20 - 26

Send the date, time, place, cost, info, phone number, a brief description, and photos — two weeks in advance — to calendar@memphisflyer. com or P.O. Box 1738, Memphis, TN 38101. DUE TO SPACE LIMITATIONS, ONGOING WEEKLY EVENTS WILL APPEAR IN THE FLYER’S ONLINE CALENDAR ONLY.

March 4 - June 23, 2017

Russian National Ballet’s Swan Lake at EACC Fine Arts Center, Sat., April 22nd, 7:30 p.m. TH EAT E R

Circuit Playhouse

Dearly Departed, in the backwoods of the Bible Belt, the Turpin family has just suffered the loss of their father. Problems keep overshadowing the solemn occasion. Living and dying in the South are seldom tidy and always hilarious. www.playhouseonthesquare.org. $25-$40. Sundays, 2 p.m., and Thursdays-Saturdays, 8 p.m. Through May 14. 51 S. COOPER (725-0776).

3050 Central Ave / Memphis 38111

901.636.2362

Germantown Community Theatre

The Glass Menagerie, classic written by Tennessee Williams about the Wingfield family living in a St. Louis tenement in the 1930s. www. gctcomeplay.org. $24. Fridays, Saturdays, 8 p.m., and Sundays, 2:30 p.m. Through April 30.

April 20-26, 2017

3037 FOREST HILL-IRENE (453-7447).

$2.50 LB

CRAWFISH BY THE BAG STRAIGHT FROM LOUISIANA

RESERVE YOUR BAG! BY THURSDAY BY NOON FOR THE WEEKEND

24

547-7997

Guest House at Graceland

Dreamgirls Allstars, 35th anniversary celebration of preservation and advancement of African-American arts, literature, and culture featuring the full-concert version of the Broadway smash hit. (948-9522), www.mbaafirehouse.org. $25-$30. Sat., April 22, 7-9 p.m. 3600 ELVIS PRESLEY (332-3322).

The Orpheum

The Sound of Music, the spirited, romantic, and beloved musical story of Maria and the Von Trapp family. See website for show times. www. orpheum-memphis.com. $20-$125. Through April 23, 7:30 p.m. 203 S. MAIN (525-3000).

Theatre Memphis

Rasheeda Speaking, tense workplace thriller examines the realities of office politics when two female

coworkers, one black, one white, are driven apart by the implications and suggestions of their boss. www. theartrememphis.org. $25. Fri., Sat., 8 p.m., Sun., 2 p.m., and Thurs., 7:30 p.m. Through April 23. 630 PERKINS EXT. (682-8323).

TheatreSouth

Auguste: A Family Drama, after the tragic death of her parents, a girl must decide whether the family business was a family dream or her own. Her name? Sprinkles the Clown. Underneath the makeup, she faces the same struggles as the rest of us. (773-613-9477), www. theatredehootenanny.com. $10. Fridays, Saturdays, 7-9 p.m. Through April 29. INSIDE FIRST CONGREGATIONAL CHURCH, 1000 S. COOPER (726-0800).

TheatreWorks

Call for Writers: ETC 2nd Annual 10-Minute Play Festival, eight-10 vignettes will be performed at Theatreworks in September. Three playwrights will win cash prizes. $10 entry fee. Through June 30. Auditions for The Pulse Project, cold readings from script for performance in June about the Orlando shootings. Casting for for ethnic and transgender roles. For more information on roles and casting, visit website. www. etcmemphistheater.com. Mon., April 24, 6 p.m. 2085 MONROE (274-7139).

Universal Parenting Place

PlayBack Memphis, bringing stories to life in a safe space to unlock healing, transformation, and joy. Families welcome. (207-3694), Free. Third Thursday of every month, 4:30-6 p.m. LEMOYNE-OWEN COLLEGE, 990 COLLEGE PARK.

University of Memphis, Department of Theatre & Dance

Spring Awakening, rock musical that explores the journey from adolescence to adulthood with poignancy and passion that is illuminating and unforgettable. Fusion of morality, sexuality, and rock-and-roll. www. memphis.edu/theatre. $20. Thurs.Sat., 7:30-9:30 p.m. Through April 22. 3745 CENTRAL (678-2576).

A R T I S T R EC E PT I O N S

Bar DKDC

“Vice & Virtue,” exhibition of work by students of the Curation in Context class at Rhodes College, exploring the themes of conspiracy and urban legends, age-old human vices, and the contrasting nature of virtue. Free. Thurs., April 20, 3-5 p.m. 964 S. COOPER (272-0830).

The Rozelle Warehouse

Artist reception for “Lady Monsters,” exhibition of reflective works composed by Lexi Perkins. Enjoy free snacks and refreshments. (489-2733). Thurs., April 20, 7-9 p.m. 822 ROZELLE ST.

OTHER ART HAPPENINGS

“Messages”

An exploration of bird signs and omens with work by Lizi BeardWard and Darla Linerode-Henson. Reception on Friday, viewing on Saturday. Fri., April 21, 5:309 p.m., and Sat., April 22, 10:30 a.m.-4 p.m. CROSSTOWN ARTS, 430 N. CLEVELAND (507-8030), WWW.CROSSTOWNARTS.ORG.

Orpheum 22nd Annual Art Sale

Patrons are invited to purchase great works of art while supporting Mid-South artists. Free. Sun., April 23, 5 p.m. THE HALLORAN CENTRE, 225 S. MAIN (529-4299), WWW.ORPHEUM-MEMPHIS.COM.

Photographer & Author Jerry Park

Guest speaker and author of Slow Roads Tennessee. Free. Thurs., April 20, 7-8:30 p.m. MEMPHIS CAMERA CLUB, 5959 PARK (NA), WWW.MEMPHISCAMERACLUB.COM.

Southern Literary Salon: Flannery O’Connor Georgia Gothic

A literary party featuring writerspecific libations, light fare, and at least 30 Southern-inspired minutes of writers in a private, gracious home. Address released after ticket purchase. $55. Fri., April 21, 6 p.m. WWW.TNSHAKESPEARE.ORG.

V&E Artwalk

Featuring over 65 artists from the greater Memphis area selling their crafts, silent auction, children’s area, local musicians, food, local craft beer, wine, and soft drinks benefiting Midtown Memphis’ V&E Greenline. Sat., April 22, 11 a.m.-6 p.m. V&E GREENLINE, AVALON AND TUTWILER, WWW.VEGREENLINE.ORG.

O N G O I N G ART

Art Museum at the University of Memphis (AMUM)

“War in Words: The Art of Propaganda,” exhibition of propaganda

continued on page 26


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APRIL 21

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JAYE HAMMER & DENISE LASALLE APRIL 22

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TICKETS AVAILABLE AT TICKETMASTER.COM OR BY CALLING 1-800-745-3000.

m e m p h i s f l y e r. c o m

Charge by phone at 1-800-745-3000

ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT

Tickets on SALE NOW at Ticketmaster.com

Must be 21 years or older to gamble or attend events. Know When To Stop Before You Start.® Gambling Problem? Call 1-800-522-4700. ©2017, Caesars License Company, LLC. All rights reserved.

25

3958_STA_4.575x12.4_4c_Ad_V1.indd 1

4/10/17 10:41 AM


CALENDAR: APRIL 20 - 26 continued from page 24

created with acrylic paint on canvases by Lynn Whitson. www.eclectic-eye. com. Through May 31.

works from the museum’s permanent collection. Through April 29. “Africa: Art of a Continent,” permanent exhibition of African art from the Martha and Robert Fogelman collection. Ongoing.

242 S. COOPER (276-3937).

Fogelman Galleries of Contemporary Art, University of Memphis

“Synecdoche,” exhibition of Spring 2017 BFA thesis work by graduating seniors Jarvis Boyland, DeAnna Brown, Stephanie Cain, McKenna Chalifoux, Gene Duncan, LaKendra Harris, Jessie James, and Le Marquee La Flora. www. memphis.edu. Through April 28.

142 COMMUNICATION & FINE ARTS BUILDING (678-2224).

ANF Architects

Debbie Likley Pacheco, www.anfa.com. Through May 11. 1500 UNION (278-6868).

Circuitous Succession Gallery

3715 CENTRAL.

Carol Buchman, exhibition of landscape works. www.circuitoussuccession.com. Through April 22. “Into a Birdless Sky,” exhibition of new paintings and drawings by Jason Stout. www.circuitoussuccession.com. Through April 22.

Fratelli’s

“Beautiful, Green, and Urban,” exhibition of drawing, photography, printmaking, and papercutting by Gillian Furniss. www.memphisbotanicgarden. com. Through April 28. 750 CHERRY (766-9900).

500 S. SECOND.

Jay Etkin Gallery

Clough-Hanson Gallery

“The Mirth That Exists Between Everything Else,” exhibition by graduating students Emma Barr, Dylan Boutwell, McKenzie Drake, Jill Fredenburg, Shelby Glass, Bryan Martin, Malerie McDowell, Haley Rushing, Mimi Shepley, Margaret Tronsor, and Jean Xiong. April 21-27, 11 a.m.-5 p.m. RHODES COLLEGE, 2000 N. PARKWAY (843-3000).

Crosstown Arts

“The Moonpie Project: New Mural by Kevin Bongang,” mural series featuring Nashville-based artist. www.crosstownarts.org. Through May 31. 430 N. CLEVELAND (507-8030).

David Lusk Gallery

“Memphis,” exhibition of new paintings

“Beyond,” exhibition of work by John Torina, David Nakabayashi, Jan Hankins, Alla Bartoshchuk, Nathan Yokum, Mickey Bond, Roy Tamboli, Stephanie Brody-Lederman, Keith Rash, and Mary Long. www.jayetkingallery.com. Through May 2.

Dearly Departed at Circuit Playhouse, Sundays, 2 p.m., and Thursdays-Saturdays, 8 p.m. Through May 14th. by Dwayne Butcher. Through April 22. “New Work by Rana Rochat,” exhibition of encaustic paintings on panel or paper. Through April 22. “Bluff Poem,” exhibition of new work by Memphis painter Don Estes. April 25-May 19. “Line and Shadow: Estate Drawings,” exhibition of lithographs, charcoal, and graphite works on paper from the

late ’60s to the early ’80s by Burton Callicott. www.davidluskgallery.com. April 25-May 19. 97 TILLMAN (767-3800).

The Dixon Gallery & Gardens

“Made in Dixon,” exhibition showcasing the colorful and joy-filled artwork created by artists of all ages in the Dixon’s educational programs. Ongoing.

942 COOPER (550-0064).

“Scent and Symbolism: Perfumed Objects and Images,” exhibition considering the role of scent in the history of art through a collection of 140 scented bottles. www.dixon.org. Regular Admission. Through July 2. 4339 PARK (761-5250).

Eclectic Eye

L Ross Gallery

“Lady Portraits,” exhibition of mixedmedia acrylics/papers/graphite/oil pastels by Leslie Barron. www.lrossgallery.com. Through April 29. 5040 SANDERLIN (767-2200).

Marshall Arts Gallery

2017 MCA Spring MFA Thesis Exhibi-

“Elements,” exhibition of small works

continued on page 28

Singer/Songwriter

April 20-26, 2017

MICHAEL GRIMM Winner of Season 5 “America’s Got Talent”

FRIDAY MAY 19TH, 2017 Whispering Woods Convention Center Olive Branch, MS

Pre-sale tickets ONLY VIP - $50 G/A - $20 26

662-403-3600


27

ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT

m e m p h i s f l y e r. c o m


CALENDAR: APRIL 20 - 26

UPCOMING SPRING

continued from page 26

Ekpuk. www.brooksmuseum. org. Ongoing.

tion, www.mca.edu. Through April 28. “Love of Art” and “Memphis,” exhibition of work by Nikki Gardner and Debra Edge by appointment only. (647-9242), Ongoing.

1934 POPLAR (544-6209).

Memphis College of Art

2017 Spring BFA Exhibition, www.mca.edu. April 22-May 13. 1930 POPLAR (272-5100).

Metal Museum

639 MARSHALL (679-6837).

Memphis Botanic Garden

APRIL

17

APRIL

26

South Main Recycles!

Recycling returns to the neighborhood! Drop-off location is at 78 W Carolina Ave.

750 CHERRY (636-4100).

downtownmemphiscommission.com/news/southmainrecycles

“Art Builds Creativity,” exhibition of student artwork created by Brooks Museum’s 2016-17 Art Builds Creativity participants. Through May 21. Rotunda Projects: Nnenna Okore, exhibition of works with burlap to fashion abstract objects inspired by textures, colors, and landscapes. Through Sept. 10. Selections from William Eggleston’s Portfolios, exhibition of 18 photographs from most of the portfolios in the Brooks Museum’s collection. Through May 31. “Drawing Memory: Essence of Memphis,” exhibition of works inspired by nsibidi, a sacred means of communication among male secret societies in southeastern Nigeria by Victor

The Artery Alley Party Phase 1 Celebration

6 - 9 p.m. @ Barboro Alley (next to Local, between Gayoso and Union) Celebrate Downtown’s latest murals under new string lights in the alley with a free concert from Southern Avenue, craft beer, ping pong tables, cornhole, and Amurica Photobooth! Featured artists: Chris Reyes with Birdcap, Emily Miller, Lawrence Matthews, Chester Treasure, Joseph Boyd, Eszter Szisk & Stephanie Cosby downtownmemphis.com/barboroalleyparty

APRIL

29

The Edge Gets Lit Alley Party

Noon - 11 p.m. @ Floyd Alley Artistic overhead lighting, live music, food trucks, a Redbirds game, firework show, hayride tours, games, a dog show vendors and somehow more! downtownmemphis.com/edgegetslitalleyparty

APRIL - MAY

“Fusion,” exhibition of works representing artist Lauren Pigford’s life in Memphis and her experience of the outdoors. www.memphisbotanicgarden. com. Through April 28.

#BuskingInMemphis

Feel the vibes of Memphis music as you walk along Main Street with live music up and down the mall!

Memphis Brooks Museum of Art

“Guns, Violence, & Justice,” by various artists using guns and gun references in their artwork to address issues impacting our lives and explore concepts of militia consciousness. Through April 30. “F.I.R.E. James Wade Jr.,” exhibition of cast metal works and drawings by James Wade Jr. that investigate the meaning of place by referencing industrial, agrarian, and vernacular landscapes. www.metalmusuem. org. April 23-July 16. 374 METAL MUSEUM DR. (774-6380).

National Civil Rights Museum

“Los Angeles Uprising 1992,” exhibition of photographs by José Galvez and installation by Lawrence Matthews III commemorating the 25th anniversary of the L.A. riots. www.civilrightsmuseum.org. Through April 29. 450 MULBERRY (521-9699).

Peddler Bike Shop (Downtown Memphis)

Memphis in May Olympic Triathlon Art Poster Exhibit. Through May 21. 517 SOUTH MAIN (522-9757).

Ross Gallery

“Fused Expression,” exhibition of studio glass by John Littleton and Kate Vogel. www.cbu.edu. Through May 17. CHRISTIAN BROTHERS UNIVERSITY, PLOUGH LIBRARY, 650 E. PARKWAY S. (321-3000).

Slavehaven Underground Railroad Museum “Images of Africa Before & After the Middle Passage,” exhibition of photography by Jeff and Shaakira Edison. Ongoing. 826 N. SECOND (527-3427).

St. George’s Episcopal Church

“Tomorrow’s Promise,” exhibition of work by 25 young members, ages 3-17, who attended workshops to create for the exhibit. (754-7282), www. stgchurch.org. Through April 23. 2425 SOUTH GERMANTOWN (754-7282).

Stax Museum of American Soul Music

“Portraits in Soul: Rare Images from the API Archive,” exhibition of photographs by Bill Carrier Sr. and his team at Allied Photography Illustrators (API). www.staxmuseum.com. Through June 20. 926 E. MCLEMORE (946-2535).

Tom Johnston Gallery

2017 Art Education Thesis, exhibition of work by two graduate art education candidates, Dare Harcourt and Elizabeth Bass. www.mca.edu. Through April 28. 148 TUCKER (272-5113).

EAST BUNTYN ART WALK 2017

downtownmemphis.com/busking

April 20-26, 2017

Food Truck Thursday Concert Series

Take your lunch break in Court Square Park and enjoy 15+ food trucks, picnic tables, live music and an amazing ambiance in the heart of Downtown. downtownmemphis.com

MAY

3*

Sunset Yoga Series

6-7:30 p.m. @ Memphis Park Enjoy FREE yoga in the park the *First Tuesday of every month through September! Bring a picnic to enjoy with free libations after class. Yoga classes taught by Downtown Yoga. downtownmemphis.com/sunsetyogaseries

28

LEARN MORE AT DOWNTOWNMEMPHIS.COM

ART • MUSIC • FOOD • FUN • OUTDOORS

SATURDAY, APRIL 29TH FROM 1 TO 7PM

EastBuntynArtwalk.com The 2017 East Buntyn ArtWalk is funded in part by an Arts Build Communities grant — a program funded by the Tennessee General Assembly & administered in cooperation with the Tennessee Arts Commission & ArtsMemphis.


CALENDAR: APRIL 20 - 26 TOPS Gallery

“The Invert,” exhibition of works by Jonathan VanDyke. www.topsgallery.com. Through May 20. 400 S. FRONT.

WKNO Studio

“FourSights,” exhibition of paintings and photography by Becky Ross McRae, Frederick Lyle Morris, Jon Woodhams, and Sandra Horton. www.wkno. org. Through April 28. 7151 CHERRY FARMS (458-2521).

DAN C E

Russian National Ballet Swan Lake Sat., April 22, 7:30 p.m.

EACC FINE ARTS CENTER GALLERY, EAST ARKANSAS COMMUNITY COLLEGE, 1700 NEWCASTLE, FORREST CITY, AR, WWW.EACC.EDU.

charmed life of the world-famous Peabody Ducks. $5-$10. Ongoing, 11:30 a.m.

TO U R S

Evening Stroll at Elmwood

THE PEABODY HOTEL, 149 UNION (529-4000), WWW.PEABODYHOTEL.COM.

$20. Fri., April 21, 6 p.m.

ELMWOOD CEMETERY, 824 S. DUDLEY (774-3212), WWW.ELMWOODCEMETERY.ORG.

Judge D’Army Bailey Courthouse Tour

Garden Design and Plants Tour

Visit a specific garden and learn about its design and plants. Each month, garden docents will give you the details of the featured space. Visit all nine gardens, get your card signed, and receive a special gift in the New Year. Saturdays, 10 a.m.-noon. THE DIXON GALLERY & GARDENS, 4339 PARK (761-5250), WWW.DIXON.ORG.

Hotel History Tours with The Peabody Duckmaster

Meet historian Jimmy Ogle at courthouse steps on Adams and Second for tour. Free. Thurs., April 20, noon. SHELBY COUNTY COURTHOUSE, ADAMS AND SECOND STREET (604-5002), WWW.JIMMYOGLE.COM.

Scandals & Scoundrels $20. Sat., April 22, 1 p.m.

ELMWOOD CEMETERY, 824 S. DUDLEY (774-3212), WWW.ELMWOODCEMETERY.ORG.

Hear stories from The Peabody’s nearly 150-year history and learn behind-the-scenes details about the

E X POS/SA LES

Choose901 Pop-Up Shop Fri., April 21, 4-9 p.m., and Sat., April 22, 11 a.m.-3 p.m. RAILGARTEN, 2160 CENTRAL, WWW.CHOOSE901.COM.

Employment and Community First Services Career Fair

Staff will be present to conduct on-site interviewing and hiring of personal support staff and job coaches for ECF Services. Wed., April 26, 9 a.m.-2 p.m. LIPSCOMB AND PITTS COMMUNITY ROOM, 2670 UNION AVE, WWW.SRVS.ORG.

continued on page 31

Don Quixote

Resplendent with glittering costumes, lavish sets, and Leon Minkus’ sweeping score, this colorful production is Russian ballet at its most powerful and thrilling, transporting audiences to a make-believe Spain. $35. Thurs., April 20, 7:30-9 p.m. GERMANTOWN PERFORMING ARTS CENTER, 1801 EXETER (751-7500), GPACWEB.COM.

These Walls: Tales From a Juke Joint

Guests will receive a menu of the evening’s offerings and have a chance to enjoy a famous Soul Burger as they embark on a journey through the building’s past, as interpreted by dancers, actors, and musicians. $18-$24. Fri.-Sat., April 21-22, 6:30 p.m.

Fridays & Saturdays in April • 6pm – 10pm

EARNESTINE & HAZEL’S, 531 S. MAIN (523-9754), WWW.BRAVADANCECOMPANY.COM.

(Excludes April 29)

C O M E DY

If the last three digits of your Key Rewards card match the three selected numbers in the exact order, you win a guaranteed minimum of $500 cash!

Hi-Tone

NORML Memphis Annual Fund-raiser: Jokes and Jams, jokes by Richard Douglas Jones, Kyle Kordsmeier, Ross Turner, and Josh McLane. Jams by HEELS, Ashton Riker, and Amelia Eisenhauer. (305-7070), www.normlmemphis.org. $12. Sat., April 22, 7-11:45 p.m.

Earn entries every day by playing with your Key Rewards card. 5X ENTRIES ON SUNDAYS • 10X ENTRIES ON MONDAYS 20X ENTRIES ON TUESDAYS

412-414 N. CLEVELAND (278-TONE).

P&H Cafe

Open Mic Comedy, Thursdays, 9 p.m. 1532 MADISON (726-0906).

B O O KS I G N I N G S

CASINO PROMOTIONS

Booksigning by David Baldacci

Author discusses and signs The Fix. Thurs., April 20, 7-8 p.m.

Author reads and signs I’m Just Dead, I’m Not Gone. The event will kick off at the Cooper-Young gazebo with a reading followed by music with Some Sons of Mudboy. Sat., April 22, 1-3 p.m. BURKE’S BOOK STORE, 936 S. COOPER (278-7484), WWW.BURKESBOOKS.COM.

4pm & 8pm Two Winners Each Day

Saturday, April 29 Win your choice of a 2017 Bass Tracker Pro 160 Boat or a complete set of 7 GE Stainless Appliances. Earn entries now through April 29. Earn 10X entries every Friday, Saturday and Sunday!

Win a half side of beef and an 8-cubic foot freezer. Receive one entry for every 20 points earned each Tuesday.

L E CT U R E / S P EAK E R

Social Justice Evening: “English as a 2nd Language & Literacy”

Presented by Chip Jermyn, ESL volunteer, retired educator, and Peace Corps and literacy volunteer. Free. Wed., April 26, 6:30-8 p.m. NESHOBA UNITARIAN UNIVERSALIST CHURCH, 7350 RALEIGHLAGRANGE (266-2626), WWW.NESHOBACHURCH.ORG.

Taste of Science Memphis

Come get a taste of what the science in Memphis is all about at your favorite hangouts. Topics include cancer, the science of biomaterials, and the effect of music in our minds. Visit website for more information. $5. Sun.-Tue., Apr. 23-25, 7-9 p.m. HTTPS://TASTEOFSCIENCE.ORG/MEM-EVENT/.

C O N F E R E N C ES/C O N VE N TI O N S

FEATURED ENTERTAINMENT

TOE-TO-TOE TUESDAYS

SATURDAY, APRIL 29 7 pm

Tuesday, April 25

General Admission $20

Tickets starting at $30

Purchase tickets at Fitz Gift Shop or Ticketmaster.com or call 1-800-745-3000.

$189 Hotel Package Includes a deluxe room and two reserved show tickets. Call 1-662-363-LUCK (5825) and mention code CPMMA

WATCH LIVE AT FITZ!

Forging on the River 2017

Metalsmiths and enthusiasts have the opportunity to network, exchange ideas, work collaboratively on projects, and learn from an internationally recognized Master Blacksmith. $100-$375. Wed., April 26, 10 a.m.-5 p.m. METAL MUSEUM, 374 METAL MUSEUM DR. (774-6380), WWW.METALMUSEUM.ORG/FOTR.

FitzgeraldsTunica.com • 1-662-363-LUCK (5825) • Must be 21 and a Key Rewards member. See Cashier • Players Club for rules. Tax and resort fee not included in listed price. Advance hotel reservations required and subject to availability. $50 credit or debit card is required upon hotel check-in. Arrivals after 6pm must be guaranteed with a credit card. Video Poker play earns 25% of the stated amount. Management reserves the right to cancel, change and modify the event or promotion. Gaming restricted patrons prohibited. Gambling Problem? Call 1-800-522-4700.

m e m p h i s f l y e r. c o m

Booksigning by Mary Lindsay Dickinson

Tuesdays in April

ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT

BARNES & NOBLE, 2774 N. GERMANTOWN (386-2468), WWW.STORES.BARNESANDNOBLE.COM.

29


Sunday Sunday

April 2017 April23rd 23rd 2017 1pm to 5topm 1 PM 5 PM

The SPRING 2017 Bridal Show! Learn everything you need to know    to plan the perfect wedding     

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• Must be atbeleast 18 years old Background and drug screen required •• Must ablecheck to lift 75 pounds • Must beminimum able to lift 75 pounds • No education requirements in Person • No•Apply minimum education requirements Background check and drug screen required FedEx Express Memphis World Hubrequired Recruitment Center • Background check and drug screen

Apply in Person 2874 Business Park Dr., Building D

Memphis, TN 38118 Apply Person FedExin Express Memphis World Hub Recruitment Center

2874 Business Park Dr.,World Building D Recruitment Center FedEx Express Memphis Hub Business Hours TN 38118 2874Memphis, Business Park Dr., Building D 8:30 AM to 3:00 PM - Monday through Friday Memphis, TNto38118 Business 6:30 PM 8:00Hours PM - Monday and Tuesday evenings 8:30 AM AM to to 3:00 NoonPM - Saturday mornings 8:30 - Monday through Friday Business Hours

6:30 PM to 8:00 PM - Monday and Tuesday evenings

30

more, go to careers.fedex.com/express 8:30To AMlearn to 3:00 PM -- Saturday Monday through 8:30 AM to Noon morningsFriday 6:30 PM to 8:00 PM - Monday and Tuesday evenings more, go to mornings careers.fedex.com/express 8:30To AMlearn to Noon - Saturday EOE, M/F/D/V To learn more, go to careers.fedex.com/express EOE, M/F/D/V

EOE, M/F/D/V

SundayApril April23rd 23rd2017 2017 Sunday

   The Whispering Woods Hotel & Conference Center 73007300 Hacks South East Memphis inBranch, Olive Branch MS HacksCross Cross Road, Road, South East Memphis in Olive MS

Save $3 per per ticket at the pre-registering at Save $3.00 ticket at door the by door by pre-registering at

MidSouthWeddingShow.com 


CALENDAR: APRIL 20 - 26

APRIL 20

RAY WYLIE HUBBARD

TICKETS ON SALE NOW!

Bicycle Storytime & How to Ride Class, on Sat., April 22nd, 2-3:30 p.m. at Cossitt Library

Over 50 dealers and exhibitors of rocks, fossils, gems, and minerals including kids areas with gem and fossil dig, geode bowling, and 901Rocks with free rocks and paint. $5, $8 two-day pass. Sat., April 22, 9 a.m.-6 p.m., and Sun., April 23, 10 a.m.-5 p.m. AGRICENTER INTERNATIONAL, 7777 WALNUT GROVE (490-3575), WWW.THEEARTHWIDEOPEN.COM.

Memphis National College Fair

Students and parents are invited to dive into the college search process. Attendees will have the opportunity to meet one-on-one with admission representatives. Wed., April 26, 6-8 p.m. MEMPHIS COOK CONVENTION CENTER, 255 N. MAIN (703-299-6825), WWW.NACACFAIRS.ORG.

Spring’s Best Plant Sale

Garden’s largest plant sale of the year featuring assortment of perennials, annuals, tropicals, herbs, shrubs, and trees, plus specialty garden items by local artisans. Expert garden staff and master gardeners on hand to assist. Fri.-Sat., Apr. 21-22, 9 a.m.-5 p.m. MEMPHIS BOTANIC GARDEN, 750 CHERRY (636-4100), WWW.MEMPHISBOTANICGARDEN.COM.

Volunteer Plant Sale

Volunteers have grown several thousand native and wildlife-friendly plants for this once-a-year sale. Experts will be on hand to answer questions about the plants offered, as well as other gardening topics. Fri.Sat., Apr. 21-22, 9 a.m. LICHTERMAN NATURE CENTER, 5992 QUINCE (636-2211), WWW.MEMPHISMUSEUMS.ORG.

Who’s Hiring Memphis Career Fair

Attendees should bring copies of their resume, dress business professional, and be prepared for interviews. There will be over 50 employers. Preregistration is not required but is recommended. Free. Tues., April 25, 10 a.m.-3 p.m. THE ESPLANADE,

F ES TI VA LS

13th Annual Maria Montessori School Regatta and Duck Race

Featuring children’s games, art making, treats, kayak rides, and more. Sponsor a duck for $5, or enter the Boat Builders Race for $25. See website for more information. Sat., April 22, 9 a.m.-5 p.m. MARIA MONTESSORI SCHOOL, 740 HARBOR BEND (527-3444), WWW.MARIAMONTESSORISCHOOL. ORG/REGATTA.

2nd Annual Sultana Heritage Festival

Commemorates the sinking of the Sultana Steamboat in 1865. Local and national historians participate in a lecture series, and living historians will be in attendance throughout the day. Free. Sat., April 22, 9 a.m.-6 p.m. MARION COURTHOUSE SQUARE, DOWNTOWN MARION (870-7396041), WWW.SULTANAHERITAGEFESTIVAL.COM.

Caritas Village Bizarre Bazaar and Cookout

Spring cookout and rummage sale featuring face painting for the little ones. Sat., April 22, 8 a.m.-1 p.m. FIRST BAPTIST CHURCH, 200 EAST PARKWAY NORTH (327-5246).

Cat Head Mini Blues Fest

Held in the street near Cat Head blues store with Rev Peyton’s Big Damn Band, Big George Brock, and more. Free. Sun., April 23, 10 a.m.-5 p.m. CLARKSDALE, MISSISSIPPI (662-624-5992), WWW.CATHEAD. BIZ/MUSIC-CALENDAR.

Chick-Fil-A Bluff City Field Day 2017

Featuring games like four square, tug of war, potato sack relays, trivia, and more. Also enjoy food, music, and prizes. $200 for team of four. Sat., April 22, 1:30-6:30 p.m. OVERTON SQUARE, MIDTOWN, WWW.MYTOWNMIRACLES.ORG.

Juke Joint Festival

Featuring 13 daytime stages, 20 nighttime venues, 100 blues music acts, monkeys riding dogs, 5K, and more. See website for schedule of events and fun for the whole family. Free-$25. Thur.-Sun., Apr. 20-23. CLARKSDALE, MISSISSIPPI, WWW.JUKEJOINTFESTIVAL.COM.

Lantern Light Festival Memphis

Featuring over 400 lanterns, 400-foot dragon, 30-foot-tall panda, and entertainment including acrobats from China and live music. $16-$20. Fridays-Sundays, 6 p.m.-midnight Through May 7. AGRICENTER INTERNATIONAL, 7777 WALNUT GROVE (651-504-2000), WWW.LANTERNLIGHTFESTIVAL.COM.

Laurelwood Unplugged

Join Memphis musicians Airside, Blind Mississippi Morris, Mighty Souls Brass Band, and Brennan Villines Trio in the courtyard. Thursdays, 6-8 p.m. Through April 30. LAURELWOOD SHOPPING CENTER, 422 S. GROVE PARK (682-8436), WWW.LAURELWOODMEMPHIS.COM.

Memphis Brewfest

155+ beers featuring live entertainment by Aquanet. $45. Sat., April 22, 4-7:30 p.m.

APRIL 19

“BREEZE” CAYOLLE & NEW ORLEANS 5:30PM APRIL 20

RAY WYLE HUBBARD 8PM APRIL 21

JOHNNY MAC TRIO 6:30PM BRENNAN VILLINES 10:30PM APRIL 22

DEERING AND DOWN 6:30PM NICK BLACK 10PM APRIL 23

MCKENNA BRAY W/ SPECIAL GUESTS 4PM APRIL 24

JOHN PAUL KEITH & CO. 6PM APRIL 25

JOHN KILZER UNPLUGGED 7PM

AUTOZONE PARK, THIRD AND UNION (721-6000), WWW.MEMPHISBREWFEST.COM.

Rajun Cajun Crawfish Festival

Featuring 18,000 pounds of crawfish plus art, music, drinks, other food, and more benefiting Porter-Leath. Sun., April 23, 11 a.m. MISSISSIPPI RIVER PARK (FORMERLY JEFFERSON-DAVIS PARK), OFF RIVERSIDE DRIVE, WWW. PORTERLEATH.ORG.

Rally for Science

Join together with a rally in Memphis that will fully coexist with the non-partisan national March for Science taking place in Washington, D.C., for Earth Day. Sat., April 22, 10 a.m.-noon. CIVIC CENTER PLAZA, MAIN STREET MALL, WWW.MARCHFORSCIENCEMEMPHIS.COM.

continued on page 32

APRIL 27

BOOK RELEASE PARTY FOR “I’M JUST DEAD, I’M NOT GONE” BY JIM DICKINSON EDITED BY EARNEST SUAREZ

2 1 1 9 M A D I S O N AV E N U E MEMPHIS, TN 38104 (901) 207-5097 L A FAY E T T E S . C O M

m e m p h i s f l y e r. c o m

Memphis Mineral, Fossil, Jewelry Show

901 CORDOVA STATION (729-9469), WWW.WHOSHIRINGMEMPHIS.COM.

ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT

continued from page 29

31


CALENDAR: APRIL 20 - 26 S PO R TS / F IT N E S S

M E ETI NGS

Bad Dog 5K

HELP4TNDAY

Benefiting Ronald McDonald House. $35. Sat., April 22, 8 a.m. OVERTON SQUARE, MIDTOWN, WWW.FACEBOOK.COM/BADDOG5K/.

Get Outside! Fitness Programs

Multiple options for the whole family to get fit, stay active, and enjoy being in nature including boot camps, Zumba, dance, yoga, and more. For more information and registration, see website. Ongoing. SHELBY FARMS, 500 N. PINE LAKE (767-PARK), WWW.SHELBYFARMS.ORG.

Course in Shelby Farms Park open for its second season. Ongoing. SHELBY FARMS, 500 N. PINE LAKE (767-PARK), WWW.GOAPE.COM.

Grizzlies Prep Mini-Golf Classic

continued from page 31 Saint Joseph Community Festival

Family festival environment with games, entertainment, food, dance, and music. Sat., April 22, 10 a.m.-7 p.m. SAINT JOSEPH CATHOLIC CHURCH, 3825 NEELY (396-9996).

Southern Hot Wing Festival

Celebration of the chicken hot wing, the drummie, the flat, flap, and everything in between featuring 70+ teams, music, and fun benefiting the Ronald McDonald House. Sat., April 22, 11 a.m.-7 p.m. MISSISSIPPI RIVER PARK (FORMERLY JEFFERSON-DAVIS PARK), OFF RIVERSIDE DRIVE, WWW.SOUTHERNHOTWINGFESTIVAL.COM.

GRIZZLIES PREP CHARTER SCHOOL, 168 JEFFERSON (474-0955), WWW.GRIZZLIESPREP.ORG.

Memphis Agricultural Club

Meet in the C Wing of the Expo Building. Lunch provided for $10. Fourth Monday of every month, noon. AGRICENTER INTERNATIONAL, 7777 WALNUT GROVE (452-2151), WWW.AGRICENTER.ORG.

Be part of the Memphis creative community and AIGA Memphis. Third Thursday of every month, 7:30 a.m. CAFE ECLECTIC, 603 N. MCLEAN (725-1718), WWW.AIGA.MEMPHIS.ORG.

Bicycle Storytime & How to Ride Class

Memphis Roller Derby’s competitive season continues followed by an Earth Day-themed mashup. $10. Sat., April 22, 6-10 p.m.

PIPKIN BUILDING, MID-SOUTH FAIRGROUNDS (355-2002).

Bicycle-themed storytime before heading outside to learn how to ride. Bring kids, bikes, and helmets. For K-2nd graders, but older kids who want to learn are welcome. Free. Sat., April 22, 2-3:30 p.m.

Character Storytime with Corduroy Bear

Read a story, do some coloring, and meet a beloved character from a favorite book. Free. Sun., April 23, 3-3:30 p.m.

SHELBY FARMS, 500 N. PINE LAKE (767-PARK), WWW.SHELBYFARMS.ORG.

Family Hoop Jam

Learn how to hula hoop with the family or practice some new moves with the expert hoopers of Co-Motion Studio! All ages, any level. Borrow a hoop or bring your own. Sat., April 22, 1-3 p.m. MEMPHIS BOTANIC GARDEN, 750 CHERRY (636-4100), MEMPHISBOTANICGARDEN.COM.

PRIZM Camp Registration

Visit website for more information and registration for June Music Camp & International Chamber Music Festival. $375-$700. Through May 15.

Registration for Memphis College of Art Summer Art Camp For children ages 3-18 featuring discount for children registered by March 31. Offering full- and half-day options for six weeklong sessions beginning June 5. Preview day, April 1. Scholarships available. See website for more information and registration. Through May 4. MEMPHIS COLLEGE OF ART, 1930 POPLAR (272-5100), WWW.MCA.EDU.

BARNES & NOBLE, 2774 N. GERMANTOWN (386-2468), WWW.STORES.BARNESANDNOBLE.COM.

continued on page 34

True Story:

Love one another. It’s that simple.

First Congregational Church

She wanted her retirement years to be her best years. As a volunteer at First Congo

she’s creating the legacy she dreamed of.

www.firstcongo.com Phone: 901.278.6786 1000 South Cooper Memphis, TN 38104 Sunday Worship 10:30 am

4.27 Star & Micey 5.4 Frankie Hollie and the Noise 5.11 Aquanet 5.18 Ghost Town Blues Band 5.25 Luke Wade LUNCH ME NU 6.1 Voodoo GumboNG NEW TI 6.8 Seeing Red 6.15 Crusin’ Heavy

HOME OF THE

CHAR-GRILLED

EXC I

OYSTER

#PBodyRoof peabodymemphis.com

FREE PARKING • ON THE TROLLEY LINE WALKING DISTANCE TO FEDEX FORUM & BEALE ST. PRIVATE PARTY SPECIALISTS

32

Overnight adventure family-friendly campout in the Woodland Discovery Playground including a guided nocturnal nature hike, earth science activities, sustainable arts and crafts, breakfast with the buffalo, and more. $8 members, $10 nonmembers. Fri.-Sat., Apr. 21-22.

WWW.PRIZMENSEMBLE.COM.

COSSITT LIBRARY, 33 S. FRONT (726-6409), WWW.REVOLUTIONSMEMPHIS.COM.

Memphis Roller Derby v. Cape Girardeau Roller Derby

Thursday Nights • April 13—August 17 $10-15 • LADIES FREE ‘TIL 7pm 6pm-10pm

April 20-26, 2017

WWW.JUSTICEFORALLTN.COM/HELP4TNDAY.

KIDS

Downtown campus will be transformed into a nine-hole custom championshiplevel course and tournament featuring food trucks, rooftop party, and $300 grand prize benefiting the young men at Grizzlies Prep. $10-$60. Sat., April 22, 10 a.m.-8 p.m.

this week Almost Famous

Free legal clinics and counseling for Tennessee residents. See website for more information including locations and specific dates. Through April 30.

Morning Buzz

Go Ape Treetop Adventure

“The Mirth That Exists Between Everything Else,” exhibition at Rhodes College, April 21st-27th, 11 a.m.-5 p.m.

Earth Day Family Camp Out

FRESH FISH DAILY

299 S. MAIN ST. OPEN DAILY AT 11AM 901-522-9070

PEARLSOYSTERHOUSE.COM


Memphis, TN MEMPHIS IN MAY INTERNATIONAL FESTIVAL

PRESENTED BY

BEST POST-RUN PARTY EVER. DRINKS, FOOD & MUSIC. PLUS $6,700 in total prize money for fastest finishers and King/Queen of the Hill! For more information visit memphisinmay.org

REGISTER ONLINE AT MEMPHISINMAY.ORG

ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT

MAY 28, 2017 REGISTER. RUN. PARTY.

m e m p h i s f l y e r. c o m

MEMORIAL DAY WEEKEND

33


CALENDAR: APRIL 20 - 26 continued from page 32 Registration for Memphis Public Libraries Summer Camps Camps are free and held at various library branches for students between the ages of 10 and 18, from June 12 -August 3. Students learn skills like coding, music production, and STEAM. For more information, see website. Through May 31. WWW.MEMPHISLIBRARY.ORG.

Registration for Summer Performance Workshop/Call for Paid Interns

For youth ages 6-18. Participants will have the chance to perform and help create a show. Interns will serve as both actors and teachers. For more information, registration, and performance dates, call, visit website, or email showagon@theatrememphis.org. Through May 31. THEATRE MEMPHIS, 630 PERKINS EXT. (682-8323), WWW.THEATREMEMPHIS.ORG.

Featuring live music from Six String Lovers, food by Heart & Soul catering, pops from MEMpops, silent auction, photo booth, and a mechanical bull benefiting Hope House. $75. Fri., April 21, 7:30-10:30 p.m.

SHARPE PLANETARIUM, MEMPHIS PINK PALACE MUSEUM, 3050 CENTRAL (636-2362), WWW.MEMPHISMUSEUMS.ORG.

PROPCELLAR VINTAGE RENTAL, 2585 SUMMER (272-2702), WWW.HOPEHOUSEMEMPHIS.ORG.

Black and White Party

Memphis Area Veterans: 2nd Annual Silkies Memphis Hike

Featuring silent auction, heavy hors d’oeuvres served by In a Pinch, cash bar, and entertainment by DJ Funn, benefitting the Alzheimer’s Association. $75. Sat., April 22, 7-11 p.m. VISIBLE MUSIC COLLEGE, 200 MADISON (381-3939).

Extreme Deep: Mission into the Abyss

Offers opportunities for hands-on exploration of life at the bottom of the sea. Interactive exhibit that highlights the adventure of deep-sea exploration and discovery. Through May 6.

Veterans, active duty military, and reserves make stops at various participating bars across Memphis while hiking 22km with 22kg of weight on their backs for the 22 veterans that commit suicide each day. Free. Sat., April 22, 8 a.m.-4 p.m.

Put on your best Uptown Funk attire and enjoy a full bar with signature cocktails, Memphis music, live and silent auction items, and gourmet meal served on the GPAC stage benefiting GPAC. $250. Sat., April 22, 6 p.m. GERMANTOWN PERFORMING ARTS CENTER, 1801 EXETER (751-7500), WWW.GPACWEB.COM.

City of Memphis Mulch Giveaway at the Liberty Bowl Memorial Stadium, Sat.-Sun., Apr. 22nd-23rd.

BASS PRO PYRAMID, 1 BASS PRO (291-8200), MEMPHISAREAVETERANS.ORG.

Tues., April 25, 8:30 a.m.-12:45 p.m.

Memphis Volunteer Week: Bouquets of Hope

Volunteers can make flower arrangements for seniors in nursing homes. Free. Mon., April 24, 9-10:30 a.m. CATHOLIC CHARITIES, 1325 JEFFERSON (722-4700), HTTPS://GIVEPUL.SE/57N7U.

GPAC Gala Celebrating Memphis Music

In celebration of Hooks Institute’s 20th anniversary, celebrate the institute’s work over the last two decades. This year’s honoree and featured keynote will be civil rights pioneer Ambassador Andrew J. Young. $125. Thurs., April 20, 7-9 p.m. UNIVERSITY OF MEMPHIS HOLIDAY INN, 3700 CENTRAL (678-3974), WWW.MEMPHIS.EDU/BENHOOKS.

Fifty years ago the U.S. was in a heated race to the moon. This program reflects on that legacy and looks to the future, motivated by the Google XPRIZE. $7. Through June 2.

MEMPHIS PINK PALACE MUSEUM, 3050 CENTRAL (636-2362), WWW.MEMPHISMUSEUMS.ORG.

S P EC IAL EVE NTS

2017 Join Hands for Change Gala: Pursuing the Dream to Reality

Hoedown For Hope

“Back to the Moon for Good”

Peabody Rooftop Party

Meet on the roof for music and fun. $10-$15. Thursdays, 6-10 p.m. Through Aug. 17. THE PEABODY HOTEL, 149 UNION (5294000), WWW.PEABODYHOTEL.COM.

Memphis Volunteer Week: Burrito Prep with UBFM

Volunteers will be making burritos to be delivered to the hungry on the streets by bike. Wed., April 26, 6-7 p.m. FIRST UNITED METHODIST CHURCH, 204 N. SECOND (527-8362), HTTPS://SERVE.VOLUNTEERODYSSEY.COM/RECURRING/77476.

Memphis Volunteer Week: World of Plants

MEMPHIS BOTANIC GARDEN, 750 CHERRY (636-4100), HTTPS://GIVEPUL.SE/U4FCC.

Volunteers will be working “discovery stations” where they will teach kids about different kinds of plants. Free.

The Phone of the Spirit Dedication Ceremony

Plant a Seed Save a Life

H.A.V.E., 4044 SUMMER (949-2989), WWW.HAVE.GODADDYSITES.COM.

Presenting Bozwell + Lily

Community project to raise awareness about the heroin epidemic in Memphis. The ceremony will mark the opening of the phone booth for public use to help grieve the loss of loved ones. Sat., April 22, 10-10:30 a.m. ST. JOHN’S UNITED METHODIST CHURCH, 1207 PEABODY (870-761-4779).

Plant seeds of freedom from the chains of addiction by participating in plant sale and fellowship. All proceeds go toward helping those who are suffering from the addiction of a loved one. Sat., April 22, 1-4 p.m.

On April 23rd from 6-10 p.m., Bozwell and Lily are throwing a special event at Loflin Yard in downtown Memphis. It’s an introduction of sorts, so let’s swap stories in-real-life instead of digitally. Music, apparel, vintage goods, good times. Free. Sun., April 23, 12-10 p.m. LOFLIN YARD, 7 W. CAROLINA (413-8996), WWW.BOZWELLANDLILY.COM.

Sunday at Shacksdale Motel Cheep cold beer and great music in

kevin don’t

bluff Kevin Lipe on the Memphis Grizzlies before, during, and after the game. @FlyerGrizBlog

April 20-26, 2017

memphisflyer.com/blogs/BeyondTheArc

THANKS MEMPHIS! The City of Memphis would like to thank you for recycling in our new CART program. In the coming months, all single-family homes (and dwellings with four or fewer units) will receive a new recycling cart. Let’s make our City a greener place to live, work, and play. Let’s recycle more of the items below!

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memphisrecycles.com

Bathroom Bottles

Detergent Container

Kitchen Jugs, Bottles and Tubs

Aluminum and Steel

Mail and Cardboard

Food and Beverage Cartons


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Walk the Vine

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Walk to six area restaurants and receive 3 oz. pours of featured wines, hear music, and support efforts for Johnny Cash statue bringing Cash back to Cooper-Young. $25. Sat., April 22, 4-7 p.m.

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Earth Day Event: City of Memphis Mulch Giveaway

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Load your own free mulch from sunrise to sunset in the parking lot of Liberty Bowl Stadium off Hollywood between the stadium and the Children’s Museum. Sat.-Sun., Apr. 22-23.

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4th Annual Crawfish Boil

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Enjoy crawfish, sodas, local beer from TapBox will be available, live bands all morning long, performances, demonstrations, and more. $25. Sat., April 22, 10 a.m.-1 p.m.

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COOPER-YOUNG FARMERS MARKET, CORNER OF COOPER AND WALKER (288-4894), WWW.CYCFM.ORG.

Footprints in Motion Wine Tasting, Dinner, and Auction Benefiting The Campbell Foundation

Held in FedEx Event Center at Shelby Farms Park, enjoy a selection of old world European wines from countries such as Italy, France, and Spain. $125. Fri., April 21, 6:30 p.m. SHELBY FARMS, 500 N. PINE LAKE (767-PARK), WWW.CAMPBELL-FOUNDATION.ORG.

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Memphis Veg Fest

Festival filled with people enjoying vegan and vegetarian foods, demonstrations, and speakers. Free. Sat., April 22, 11 a.m.-5 p.m. LEVITT SHELL, OVERTON PARK (249-8621), WWW.MEMPHISVEGFEST.COM.

Vine to Wine: Conserve Water

Celebrate Earth Day with a selection of eco-friendly and biodynamic wines. Call for reservations by phone or purchase tickets online. $30 members, $45 nonmembers. Tues., April 25, 6-8 p.m. MEMPHIS BOTANIC GARDEN, 750 CHERRY (636-4100), WWW.MEMPHISBOTANICGARDEN.COM.

Tues., April 25, 7 p.m.

MALCO PARADISO CINEMA, 584 S. MENDENHALL (682-1754), WWW.MALCO.COM.

The Grateful Dead Movie Thurs., April 20, 7 p.m.

MALCO PARADISO CINEMA, 584 S. MENDENHALL (682-1754), WWW.MALCO.COM.

Kabaneri of the Iron Fortress Wed., April 26, 7 p.m.

MALCO PARADISO CINEMA, 584 S. MENDENHALL (682-1754), WWW.MALCO.COM.

Metropolitan Opera 2017: Eugene Onegin

Sat., April 22, 11:55 a.m., and Wed., April 26, 6:30 p.m. MALCO PARADISO CINEMA, 584 S. MENDENHALL (682-1754), WWW.MALCO.COM.

TED Cinema Experience

Mon., April 24, 7 p.m., and Tues., April 25, 7 p.m. MALCO PARADISO CINEMA, 584 S. MENDENHALL (682-1754), WWW.MALCO.COM.

The Graduate (1967)

Sun., April 23, 2 p.m., and Wed., April 26, 7 p.m. MALCO PARADISO CINEMA, 584 S. MENDENHALL (682-1754), WWW.MALCO.COM.

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ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT

Chonda Pierce: Enough

m e m p h i s f l y e r. c o m

F I LM

35


B O O KS By Richard J. Alley

Wayback

Today and tomorrow in Elan Mastai’s debut novel.

O Hep C

April 20-26, 2017

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From Sartoris Literary Group, the debut novel by Frank Murtaugh.

Pre-order eBook ($8.95) now at Amazon.com. Paperback ($19.95) available June 15th.

ur society’s obsession with youth and technology is widely apparent. When it comes to the simplest and easiest ways to roll back the hands of time, technology has given us space-age unguents to smear on the skin and eradicate wrinkles, dyes for our hair, pills to slough the pounds, pills for our cholesterol, pills for our poop, and pills for our peckers. Technology might be the true fountain of youth. And if science will be the means to one day turn back time, then science fiction is the way we can do it today. Ever since H.G. Wells urged us to consider time travel in 1895, we’ve hoped each technological advance might get us there with the flip of a switch. But without that portal available to us, we take Wells’ lead and look to the arts to transport us. The muse, it seems, travels back and forth through time, showing up in the writing desks of authors and on the soundstages of filmmakers. Those artists have given us Hank Morgan, Billy Pilgrim, Dr. Who, Kyle Reese, Marty McFly, and Henry DeTamble. And we can now add to that roster Tom Barren, the protagonist of All Our Wrong Todays (Dutton), the debut novel by Elan Mastai. Barren lives in a utopian world, a world of the future, though it exists in a dimension parallel to ours, rubbing up against our own reality. In his world, there is no competition, no war, no stress. The easy decisions are already made as people of this alternate Earth merely think of what they want to wear and a new outfit forms on their body. Likewise, outdoor advertisements are pinpointed to each individual consumer as he traverses along moving sidewalks. There are flying cars (finally!), and landscapes change with the push of a button for viewing from one’s apartment, which is outfitted, of course, with the latest gadgets. The source of all of these conveniences is the Goettreider Engine. It’s John Galt’s kinetic motor, Dr. Emmett Brown’s plutonium,

and Hot Tub Time Machine’s energy drink, Chernobly, rolled into one. The Goettreider Engine was turned on by Lionel Goettreider on July 11, 1965, at 2:03:48 p.m. and never turned off again. That’s the exact moment the world changed forever, suddenly infused with a clean, self-perpetuating energy. No more coal, no more diesel fumes, no more war over oil, just whatever technology the mind could dream up. Barren’s father is Victor Barren, Ph.D., whose offering on the altar of advancement is — you guessed it — a time machine. It’s been in the planning and building and testing stages when we enter the story in 2016. A team of chrononauts trains to be the first to go back in time, to the moment Goettreider flipped the ON switch in 1965, because the only way Victor’s wayback machine can find its way is to follow the engine’s tau radiation signal. Anyway, it all sounds very technical — and it is — but it’s also very human, and the humanity is what makes this book so engaging and entertaining. It’s that rubbing together of technology and heart, emotion and theory jumping back and forth in the same way Barren’s world and ours coexist. What’s the first thing we learn as sci-fi consumers when it comes to traveling back in time? That’s right: Don’t change anything! Well, Barren ends up in 1965 and — spoiler — he changes some stuff. It’s not his fault, time travel is glitchy, but this glitch keeps the world on a trajectory that sees the only technology being smart phones, remote car door locks, internet porn, and drip coffee. Boring. Barren has to figure out how to make it all right again. The thing is, he likes portions of our world. His mother’s still alive and he likes his father better, he has a sister who didn’t exist back in utopia, and there’s a girl, Penny, whom he lost in his world. So what does our hero do? Well, you’ll have to jump into tomorrow when you can go to the bookstore and get your own copy of All Our Wrong Todays to find that out. I suggest you don’t waste any time in doing so; there’s no telling what might happen.


37

ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT

m e m p h i s f l y e r. c o m


F O O D N E W S B y L e s l e y Yo u n g

web head: Changes at LYFE

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April 20-26, 2017

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ccording to Patrick Noone, LYFE Kitchen is more of a collection of neighborhoodspecific restaurants rather than a chain. “We have 14 restaurants across the country, and we try to serve each community in which we are located,” Noone, head of brand and marketing for the Memphis-based company, says. Recently, the Carlisle Corp. collection turned their eyes on their downtown Chisca location and asked themselves where they could improve. “We did a little soul-searching,” Noone says. The answer came in the form of offering full service, an improved menu, a full bar, and a ramped-up patio. “People wanted full service, a great bar atmosphere, and a great patio,” Noone says. As far as their menu, Noone points to items such as the Cucumber Bites appetizer as a new favorite, offering seared tuna atop their edamame hummus balanced on a cucumber slice ($6); their barbecue chicken flatbread ($8); and their Turkey Meatball Martini — ground turkey covered in Pomodoro sauce and Asiago cheese, served in a martini glass ($6). “We took a lot of dishes we were told our customers loved and tweaked them a little, and we added a lot of new dishes,” Noone says. “We made a big effort to offer a more upscale experience but keep it in the same price range.” They now offer a full bar complete with specialty cocktails, most with names inspired by the historic space in which they are served. “Most of the people on our staff are into hand-crafted cocktails, so they all collaborated on the drink menu,” Noone says. In addition to offering full service — the only location in the country as of now (the East Memphis site will offer it, as well as the new menu, in August) — perhaps the most significant change they have made is leveraging their greatest asset — the killer patio. Starting Thursday, the Chisca site will host Thursday Patio Parties with live music, drink specials, and free tacos with the purchase of beer, wine, or a cocktail as well as their very own farmers market. “That is the other part of regionalism and serving our

communities,” Noone says. The first patio party, which runs from 6 to 8 p.m., will include complimentary hors d’oeuvres. The Chisca LYFE Kitchen closed for a couple of months beginning in December and recently debuted its reimagined concept on March 9th after a series of friends and family openings to test-run the new model. “We listened, and people have been tremendously responsive,” Noone says. LYFE Kitchen, 272 S. Main, 526-0254, lyfekitchen.com. Open 10 a.m to 9 p.m. daily. Alex Grisanti considers himself lucky to have a millennial for a son. “They’re the ones holding the cards,” the veteran restaurateur says. His ace of spades, Elfo, comes in especially handy after the fatherson duo joined forces with the other century-old restaurant family, the Taras, who have been serving up Greek cuisine mixed with American standbys in the form of Jim’s Place since 1921. You read that right. Two families of Memphis restaurant lore have joined forces. With Alex Grisanti as head chef, adding some of his delectable darlings to an already appetizing menu, Jim’s Place is holding a royal flush. In early 2016, Alex closed the popular Elfo’s in Germantown and has been working in the restaurant consulting business ever since. He had begun to look for a new space when he was told that Jim’s Place was looking to make a major change. “We talked, and they weren’t ready to get out of the restaurant business yet,” Alex says. “They wanted to keep

swinging, and I’m here to help do that.” He brought in his team of consultants and watched and tallied numbers for a while, looking at what on the menu sold and what didn’t, and began implementing some new dishes where necessary, tweaking some others, and leaving some exactly the same. “They have some of the best gumbo I’ve ever had,” Alex says. They kept the jumbo shrimp and souflima and added the signature Grisanti Gorgonzola filet, Miss Mary’s salad, Italian spinach, and toasted ravioli. He also kept some of the longtime Jim’s Place people, including the 30plus veteran Wayne Scott, who hand cuts all of the steaks and is the genius behind that gumbo. “They have unbelievable steaks,” Alex says. They have daily specials, including soup, pasta, seafood, and beef, and Alex intends to have the best hamburger in Memphis. “My son says it’s all about the bread,” Alex says. They have new beers on tap, exotic and local, and Alex is working on building up their bourbon and Scotch collection and has already had his way with the wine list. Another big change is the hours. No longer open for brunch, they now offer only dinner starting at 4 p.m. Monday through Saturday. They’re closed on Sunday. “They’re really great guys. They’re restaurateurs, like my family,” Alex says. “I’m here to give 100 percent.” Jim’s Place, 518 Perkins Extd., 766-2030, jimsplacememphis.com. Open Mon.-Sat. 4 p.m. until.


F O O D B y A r i L e Va u x

’Tis the Season How to deal with your egg yolk obsession. Literally, you drill a little hole, by twisting a thumb tack or small finish nail between your fingers (or with a real drill) into the wide end of the egg, where there’s an air pocket between the shell and the sac that holds the egg. As long as you don’t go more than an 1/8-inch past the edge of the shell, you won’t poke the inner membrane.

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Take your newly drilled, fresh eggs, or your non-drilled, old eggs (at least three weeks old), and carefully place them into a pot of boiling water for six minutes. Immediately transfer them into a bowl of ice water for five minutes. Peel them in water, carefully, as the eggs will be soft beneath the shell. If you’ve ever had a fancy bowl of ramen noodle soup with a half-cooked egg inside, that’s kind of what we are going for. The dark marinade stains the outside of the egg white, while the inner part of the white remains bright white and the yolk stays golden and gooey. Here are my two favorite marinades: For a more Japanese-style: three tablespoons soy sauce; pinch each garlic powder and black pepper; 3/4 cup of water. Optional and recommended: 1 tablespoon dried bonito flakes; 1 sheet of nori, crumbled into little pieces; a few drops of sesame oil. The Chinese-style marinade that makes me squeak like Padre Xantes: 3 tablespoons soy sauce; 1 tablespoon each bean sauce and hoisin sauce; 2 tablespoons sugar; 1 cup water. Bring briefly to a boil, and then let cool. In your marinade of choice, submerge the eggs for at least six hours, in a plastic bag or a cup. Eat plain or on hot rice. You can also gussy up your softboiled egg Italian style, with truffle oil and shavings of hard cheese. Or with less flourish, Padre Xantesstyle, with just a pinch of salt.

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ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT

ARI LEVAUX

W

e egg snobs have it good in spring. Whether we get our eggs from a farmers market, a farmer friend, or one’s own backyard flock, we get them fresh. Especially these days. Most hens slow down or even take an all-out laycation during winter. But when spring hits and the world wakes up, the girls get happy and productive. Freshly laid eggs will elevate any egg-based dish, but the best way to appreciate a quality egg is going to be the simplest. For me, it’s all about the yolk, so I take mine softboiled. To the fictional Padre Xantes, from Peter Matthiessen’s At Play in the Fields of the Lord, his daily egg yolk was a temporary reprieve from the pious life he had chosen. Padre Xantes kept a special spoon that he used to open his daily soft-boiled egg, “... taking great pains, for the egg was so little cooked that its white was scarcely clouded.” Carefully, with his tongue, Padre Xantes would work the flaccid sphere to the back of his mouth and then try to relax for a moment, “... until, unable to restrain himself a moment longer, he clamped it savagely twixt tongue and palate, uttering as he did so a tiny squeak of pleasure; the yolk exploded in abandon, mounting deliriously toward his sinuses, then sliding past the roots of his tongue into his throat.” Many Asian cultures have a way with barely cooked egg yolks and enough tricks to keep Padre Xantes perspiring through centuries in purgatory. Today, I will discuss how to soft-boil eggs with the brightest, most custardy, molten creamy yolks inside and float them in a dark umami marinade. Fresh eggs, as usual, are preferable for this job, but in this case they do have a liability: When boiled, they are impossible to peel. The shell breaks into little pieces that stick to the white, pulling chunks of fleshy albumen and leaving a pockmarked moonscape. There is a fix for this predicament, a process in which all chicken keepers and their associates should be drilled.

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4/10/17 4:43 PM


It's Tequila Time!

April 20-26, 2017

Join Memphis Flyer for the 3rd annual Margarita Festival. Sample from the city's best margo-makers. vote on your favorite, and a winner will be crowned at the end of this best 'rita fest.

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3-6 PM SATURDAY

June 17

@ Overton Park Greensward Tickets go on sale

wednesday 4/19

memphismargaritafestival.com


BBQ & Brew Finding the perfect beer for your ribs.

It doesn’t sound like anything you’d drink with barbecue, but the name is misleading. Unlike a milk stout, cream ales are neither heavy nor milky. They are a New World invention, similar to the American-style lager but brewed like an ale (top-fermented) then lagered (cold-conditioned). Cream ales are light, with a “creaminess” that comes from being heavily carbonated. Stick it with a plate of ribs, and you have something that is light without being watered down. Because of the carbonation, it is also filling, which might not be what you want.

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Wiseacre’s Tiny Bomb is another local favorite. It’s their Pilsner “with a twist.” The twist is a touch of honey. And it works. Those who think that there is a right answer to these pairings, however, miss the best part of the puzzle: that messy grab bag of personal inclinations that is you. I was in London as a young man — eyeballing some colorful punk rockers — when I had my first bitter. It was my first beer that wasn’t churned out by Miller or Budweiser. Half a lifetime later, I was eyeballing the tap of the High Cotton’s ESB thinking, “Well, here is an ale light enough to let the smoked meat have the right of way but has enough flavor on its own to not be overwhelmed by it.” Deep. But was it wishful thinking? Could I marry childhood comfort food with that first discovery of the wide world beyond? And is that asking too much from the good people at Central BBQ? Or should I just be satisfied with Mrs. M.’s physics-defying hair flip? Turns out the ESB was a good choice, not just wishful thinking. And Central doesn’t charge for “circle of life” epiphanies. Which isn’t bad for a Tuesday.

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ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT

I

t’s hard not to love a Southern belle — especially after witnessing one execute a precise head flip that sends a loose strand of hair back where it’s supposed to be without having to take the barbecued rib out of her hand. It’s hard not to love barbecue, for that matter. And while we’re on the subject, it’s hard not to see that the marriage of barbecue and beer is a timeless love story unto itself. Back when two enormous breweries held nearly the entire market and all their beers tasted exactly alike, that beautiful relationship didn’t require much thought. Now that we’ve got the entire pantheon of beerdom available — as well as an evolving library of innovative experiments from brewers who can’t leave well enough alone — the relationship, well, it’s gotten complicated. First, you’ve got to decide on the barbecue. I tend to haul out-oftown guests down to the Rendezvous, and everyone always loves it. On a pleasant Tuesday evening in the spring, however, it’s hard to find a better low-key barbecue joint than the original Central BBQ. There is generally a line, but you can get a beer at the to-go window and the people are friendly. Then comes the significant other … The Charming Mrs. M. is a devotee of cheap domestic beer and opted for a Budweiser (no Bud Light). If you can get over your sneer at the macros, Bud isn’t a bad choice: It’s light, refreshing, and the taste will politely go away before the next bite. It’s what you want to drink when you want to focus on your ribs. Those light lagers work so well because even the mildest barbecue is a bold proposition for the palate and the digestive system. I’ve seen a brave and short-sighted man drink a milk stout with pulled pork, but I couldn’t tell you what logic he was using. You’ve got two heavy flavors wrestling on the palate. Further down the line, the pair will get along like a 2 a.m. bar fight. But to each their own. Even if you shoot for something with a bigger flavor, keep it light when dining on ’cue. One of the more popular drafts at Central is the Ghost River Cream Ale, called Grindhouse.

Call Now: 888-329-9529

Their Price

S P I R ITS By Richard Murff

41


FILM REVIEW By Ben Siler

Man With Gun Lives Here Free Fire presents slapstick gunplay as art film.

T

April 20-26, 2017

he only time I ever fired a gun, I did so at the behest of coworkers on a lunch break. Terrified of holding something that could accidentally kill, I immediately pointed in the direction of the target, fired until it was empty so I could hand it back, and took no joy. Guns are primarily a filmic thing for me. They are how a character declares dominance over another or mastery over the plot. They deliver tragedy, finality, and twists. Ben Wheatley and Amy Jump’s Free Fire is squarely in the canon of purely cinematic bulletry. In a rundown 1970s American warehouse, gun dealers and IRA members meet to facilitate a sale of M16s. The deal goes bad, and all parties become trapped in the warehouse shooting at each other. They’re character actors (Sharlto Copley, Noah Taylor), at first expressive in outdated slang and hair and then, as everyone is nicked and becomes woozy from loss of blood, through increasingly odd pronouncements. They tease each other across the way, laugh, call timeouts, forget which side they’re on, and generally behave like little kids at play. The gunfight is the entire film. Like other action movies, it doesn’t lead to much more than murder, but Wheatley and Jump’s art-film care is evident. The fun is in how intricately far gone the situation can become. Each person gets pinned down in his own little corner of the warehouse. Geography-wise, we often can’t tell who is aiming at whom, but the lack of clarity adds to the tension. I worried every talking head onscreen would explode. Free Fire is an improvement over the couple’s previous High-Rise, which also concerned slow entropy toward murder in a ramshackle space. Adapting J.G. Ballard’s novel about a societal collapse occurring only within one 1970s apartment building, they never found a way to make its absurdity more than clinical and detached, full of beautiful images but airless. Here there is mood and momentum, but the visuals are less intricate.

42

Caption

The warehouse starts as a color-corrected swath of yellow and black, but as the fight goes on, the colors open up: the red of a van, the brown of Armie Hammer’s scruff, the various liquids and solids that come out of and fall onto everyone. Hammer’s Ord (probable surname Nance) stands out for his goofy self-regard. As bullets weaken him, he goes from broad-shouldered alpha male to chummy raconteur using a crowbar for a cane. Lounge lizard Vern (Copley) is also memorable, a

more insecure showboat. Blood loss leads him to dress in cardboard armor to protect against sepsis, and the various substances that coat him eventually make him look like a gray-headed werewolf. As their arms and legs start failing, I took it as metaphor for old age felling cocks of the walk. Brie Larson and Cillian Murphy, the prettiest and with the least disagreeable traits, play the nominal audience-identification figures. Wheatley and Jump care about the plot a little in regard to Larson’s


FILM REVIEW By Ben Siler

The Fate of the Furious PG13 T2 Trainspotting R

Free Fire Opens Friday Multiple locations

Gifted PG13 Going in Style PG13 The Zookeeper’s Wife PG13

Their Finest R

The Fate of the Furious PG13 (Giant Screen 1:00 4:00 7:00 10:00) Gifted PG13 The Fate of the Furious PG13 Unforgettable R Personal Shopper R Phoenix Forgotten PG13 Frantz PG13

Unforgettable R Phoenix Forgotten PG13 The Promise (2017) PG13 Born in China G Grow House R Free Fire R The Fate of the Furious PG13 Smurfs: The Lost Village PG SPECIAL EVENTS:

Metropolitan Opera: Eugene Onegin Sat. 4/22-11:55am & Wed. 4/26 -6:30pm @ Paradiso

TCM: The Graduate Sun. 4/23 -2:00pm & Wed. 4/26 –7:00pm @ Paradiso TED Cinema Experience: Opening Night Mon. 4/24 -7:00pm @ Paradiso TED Cinema Experience: Prize Event Tue. 4/25 -7:00pm @ Paradiso Chonda Pierce: Enough Tue. 4/25-7:00pm @ Paradiso Kabaneri of the Iron Fortress Wed. 4/26 – 7:00pm @ Paradiso

Going in Style PG13 The Case for Christ PG The Boss Baby PG Power Rangers (2017) PG13 Beauty and the Beast (2017) PG Kong: Skull Island PG13 Get Out R

m e m p h i s f l y e r. c o m

The Lost City of Z PG13 Free Fire R Kedi NR

for the period and misfires, costing its owner his life. Cinema is love of image, and a man with a gun is a conductor with a baton, calling the world to his will. It is important to be able to call him a buffoon. The men dying in this fictional warehouse are venal, squabbling, and manic. Their anthem is an ironic John Denver eight-track left playing in a van. There is nothing ennobling about their violence. But there is humanity in the mistakes that bump them off, and black comedy in the stupid, small ways life can drain from us all.

ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT

femininity versus all the boys, who forego shooting at her for a while out of gentlemanly courtesy. But the bro-hood that develops among the shooters, the sense of comradeship and childlike play, is the film’s best note. Free Fire is more successful than the recent Belko Experiment, which used a Battle Royale template to satirize the workplace and rang hollow. Here we have Reservoir Dogs crossed with the comedic fights from Pineapple Express. What the tone does is undermine action like the lionized shootout in Heat, where the accurate, deafening gunfire sounds and military precision of the bank robbers subconsciously celebrate their form and machismo. Free Fire brings to mind a nice moment in The Assassination of Jesse James, when an 1800s gun behaves accurately

43


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M.E SEEKING

BRISTOL GARDENS APTS 3803 Given Ave. 1BRs $425 2BRs $475 Call 272-8658 or cell 281-4446 Kismet Property

SINGERS WANTED For recording R&B and Pop demos. Send tape to Quince Records, P.O. Box 751082, Memphis, TN 38141.

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Classic apartment community featuring 1 & 2-bedroom high-rise units; 1, 2 & 3-bedroom garden units, & 2 and 3-bedroom townhomes. Conveniently located: Easy access to premier retailers, chic eateries, fresh markets & live entertainment venues that are just minutes away.

• Close to UTHSC

(901) 761-3443

Small •••• 1BR $575-$615 1Petsdiscounts &welcome 2-br high-riseReduced units Student Great views of$635-$685 downtown deposit of •••• 2BR 1, 2 Covered parking& 3-br garden units $100 ••3BR $755-$785 2 and 3-br townhomes

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45


EMPLOYMENT • REAL ESTATE • SERVICES

USIC LOCATE TECHNICIAN Daytime, full-time Locate Technician positions available! •100% PAID TRAINING •Company vehicle & equipment provided •PLUS medical, dental, vision & life insurance

Requirements: Must be able to work outdoors, HS Diploma or GED, Ability to work OT and weekends, Must have valid driver’s license with safe driving record. Apply today: www.usicllc.com EEO/AA

TAXES *2017 Tax Change Benefits* Personal/Business + Legal Work By a CPA-Attorney Practicing in Midtown & Memphis Since 1989

(901) 272-9471 1726 Madison Ave

Bruce Newman | newmandecoster.com Midtown Friendly!

HOSPITALITY/ RESTAURANT BELMONT GRILL Now Hiring Cooks. Must be able to work days. Apply in person Mon-Fri, 2-4pm. 4970 Poplar @ Mendenhall. No phone calls please.

TRUCKING

MIDTOWN APT

ANNOUNCEMENTS

LOCAL DRIVERS WANTED! Be your own boss. Flexible hours. Unlimited earning potential. Must be 21 with valid U.S. driver’s license, insurance & reliable vehicle. 866-329-2672 (AAN CAN)

CENTRAL GARDENS 2BR/1BA, hdwd floors, ceiling fans, french doors, all appls incl. W/D, 9ft ceil, crown molding, off str pking. $720/mo. Also 1BR, $610/mo. 833-6483.

PREGNANT? CONSIDERING ADOPTION? Call us first. Living expenses, housing, medical, and continued support afterwards. Choose adoptive family of your choice. Call 24/7. 877-362-2401 (AAN CAN)

DOWNTOWN APTS RAFFERTY’S We are looking for service minded individuals, that don’t mind working hard. We work hard, but make $. Apply in the store. 505 N Gtown Pkwy

SALES/MARKETING SALES OPPORTUNITY •Base pay $800 per month •Plus generous 20% commission. •New business just starting up Contact abscottmcc@gmail.com or call 901-406-5258 to schedule an interview.

MINUTES FROM DOWNTOWN Come visit the brand new Cleaborn Pointe at Heritage Landing. Located just minutes from historic Downtown Memphis. 2BR Apts & Townhomes $707; 3BR Apts & Townhomes $813. Community Room, Computer Room, Fitness Room. A smoke free community. 440 South Lauderdale Memphis, TN 38126 | 901-254-7670.

EAST MEMPHIS HOMES FOR RENT WHITESTATION Close to Park. 3BR/2BA, CH/A, fenced back yard. $850/mo. 407-718-6391

Advanced Concert Ticket Sales Nationwide Promotion and Production Company is seeking individuals to staff our Memphis, TN office. We Offer: • Monday-Friday 12-9pm • Hourly Pay + Bonus • Benefits include: Dental, Vision & Life • Paid Vacation, Holidays, Sick Days! • Management Opportunity Looking for Highly Motivated, Career Oriented People With Good Communication Skills!

EVERGREEN HISTORIC DISTRICT XLG 1BR $650, W/D, hdwd flrs, Pets ok, porch. Approx 1000 sq ft. $25 credit ck fee. 901.452.3945 MIDTOWN APARTMENTS 1 and 2 BR units available. $595-$750 Per Month 129 Stonewall #3 & 25 N Idlewild #10 CALL or TEXT Chris 901-282-5445 ENTERPRISE REALTORS INC. 901-867-1000

SHARED HOUSING ALL AREAS Free Roommate Service @ RentMates. com. Find the perfect roommate to complement your personality and lifestyle at RentMates.com! (AAN CAN)

Discover Overton Garden Apartments

Historic living units surrounding the vibrant food and art mecca Overton Square District in Midtown with rents from $595 - $1,350/month. 1985 Madison Avenue #3 • Memphis, TN 38104

Call (901) 808-0144 x102 or visit overtongardensmemphis.com to schedule a showing.

FURNISHED ROOMS Bellevue/McLemore, Airways/Park, North Memphis, W/D, Cable TV/ Phone. 901-485-0897 MIDTOWN ROOM Small room, private, furnished with utilities. Fridge, microwave, AC, Wifi. Bus line. $100/wk + dep. Safe area. Call 901-725-3892. NICE ROOMS FOR RENT S. Pkwy & Wilson. Utilities and Cable included. Fridge in your room. Cooking and free laundry privileges. Some locations w/sec. sys. Starting at $435/ mo. + dep. 901.922.9089

...I’m a handsome 1 year old male. I love other dogs and people. I have a few dog friends at the shelter that I play with. But I need a real home. I have been waiting patiently for almost a whole month for someone to rescue me. Please come meet me!”

CALL SAM 901-347-3557

NOEL!

“Hi I’m

Call Ranise at 815-228-0511 or email her at ranise.aliverescue@gmail.com to find out about adopting me. Ranise Coppens ALIVE Rescue Memphis President aliverescuememphis.org facebook.com/aliverescuememphis

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MIND, BODY, SPIRIT IF YOU HAD HIP OR KNEE REPLACEMENT SURGERY AND SUFFERED AN INFECTION between 2010 and the present time, you may be entitled to compensation. Call Attorney Charles H. Johnson 1-800-535-5727

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Mention this ad and get your application fee waived

For An Interview Now,

3707 Macon Rd. • 272-9028 lecorealty.com Visit us online, call, or office for free list.

DISCOVER OVERTON GARDEN Apartments - Historic living units surrounding the vibrant food and art mecca Overton Square District in Midtown with rents from $595-$1,350/ month. Call (901) 808-0144 x102 or visit overtongardensmemphis.com to schedule a showing. Mention this ad and get your application fee waived.

M.E SEEKING

BRISTOL GARDENS APTS 3803 Given Ave. 1BRs $425 2BRs $475 Call 272-8658 or cell 281-4446 Kismet Property

SINGERS WANTED For recording R&B and Pop demos. Send tape to Quince Records, P.O. Box 751082, Memphis, TN 38141.

DATING SERVIES LIVELINKS - CHAT LINES Flirt, chat and date! Talk to sexy real singles in your area. Call now! (877) 609-2935 (AAN CAN)

VW • AUDI MINI•PORSCHE

Houses & Duplexes for Rent ALL AREAS Visit us @ www.lecorealty.com come in, or call Leco Realty, Inc. @ 3707 Macon Rd. 272-9028

German Car Experts

Specializing in VW & Audi Automobiles

Also Servicing

Mini • Porsche Factory Trained Experience Independent Prices

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(Corner of Summer & Mendenhall)

The Edison The Edison Premier retailers, chic eateries, fresh markets & live entertainment venues • Townhouse, garden or high-rise units areto trolley justlineminutes away! • Adjacent • Located near historic Beale Street and AutoZone Park Call • Beautiful park-like setting today!

Classic apartment community featuring 1 & 2-bedroom high-rise units; 1, 2 & 3-bedroom garden units, & 2 and 3-bedroom townhomes. Conveniently located: Easy access to premier retailers, chic eateries, fresh markets & live entertainment venues that are just minutes away.

• Close to UTHSC

(901) 761-3443

Small •••• 1BR $575-$615 1Petsdiscounts &welcome 2-br high-riseReduced units Student Great views of$635-$685 downtown deposit of •••• 2BR 1, 2 Covered parking& 3-br garden units $100 ••3BR $755-$785 2 and 3-br townhomes

Call today for an appointment!

567 Jefferson Ave Phone: (901) 523-8112 567 Jefferson Ave | Memphis, TN 38105-5228 Email: edison@mrgmemphis.com Phone: (901) 523-8112 | Email: edison@mrgmemphis.com

www.WolfsburgAuto.com

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THE LAST WORD by Jen Clarke

Promenade Stand

Andrew Jackson

m e m p h i s f l y e r. c o m

Last week, Friends for Our Riverfront indicated its intention to fight the development of a new convention center hotel downtown, citing its location on land allocated by city cofounder John Overton as a public promenade. Seeing only “public promenade,” my reflex was to be outraged. Are we really going to start this up again, as Riverfront Funtime Season cranks up? Good grief. I remember the battle between the FfOR and the Riverfront Development Corporation over the promenade in 2004 that resulted in the Cossitt Library, the fire station, and the hideous parking garage at the corner of Front and Monroe being “saved.” I saw both sides, but ultimately, an ugly fire station is still useful. Though the riverwalk doesn’t connect to the promenade because of the aforementioned buildings, the path along the bluffs and network of little parks is well utilized. Some of the city’s best views originate along the riverwalk, where I spend many evenings jogging off workday stress. The proposed high-rises might have altered or even obstructed those views. This is different, though. A little history: In 1818, Andrew Jackson, in his postWar of 1812, pre-Trail of Tears era, negotiated a land deal with the Chickasaw tribe. For $300,000 (equivalent to about $5.5 million today) he and Isaac Shelby “convinced” the Chickasaw to relinquish their claim to west Tennessee and southwestern Kentucky to the United States. This was known as the Jackson Purchase. The next year, Jackson and two of his friends, James Winchester and John Overton, went in on a city together. That means we’ve got a big birthday coming up: May 22, 2019. Next time I feel like a screw-up, I’ll remind myself Memphis is 200 years old and still doesn’t have its life in order. The city’s original survey had a public landing, four public squares — Auction, Exchange, Court, and Market — and a public promenade between the Chickasaw Bluff, what is now Front Street, Jackson, and Union. An argument can be made for protecting the city’s original public spaces, until you realize the space in question is the derelict Mud Island parking deck currently occupying the land at Front and Poplar. Last year, Denver developer Bob Swerdling proposed the location for a new convention center hotel. For now, while Swerdling arranges private financing, the hotel is just an idea. Others are reported to have inquired about submitting plans, prompting the city to issue a request for qualifications (RFQ) for “consulting services including analysis of a proposed additional convention center hotel in downtown Memphis, and the feasibility of such a hotel being successful.” The 16-page document is available at memphistn.gov. Y’all almost got me all fired up to save a parking lot. Mud Island is in disrepair and the north end of downtown is practically a ghost town, but I guess John Overton was just that passionate about preserving the view of the tangle of interstate ramps over the river that leads to West Memphis and beyond. Now, street lighting near the convention center is inadequate after dusk. Cars speeding off the I-40 ramp and poor visibility at garage exits create pedestrian hazards. If that’s a “promenade,” either Overton’s vision was lost a long time ago, or I don’t understand the definition of the word. Though Winchester’s son, Marcus, was the city’s first mayor, none of the three founders lived in Memphis. Jackson, as anyone who spent their K-12 years in Tennessee can tell you, grew his fortune in cotton at The Hermitage. Overton, the Nashvillian who wrote the 1828 document outlining the promenade’s parameters, was said to have owned more than 65,000 acres of land. The fact that Memphis was home to one of the country’s biggest slave markets is not a coincidence. The city was founded so rich landowners could use the area’s resources — cotton and the river — to get even richer. So forgive me if I’m unmoved by the notion that 200 years later, their wishes should dictate the economic future of the city, particularly if they involve preserving that space in its ugly and dangerous state. I don’t know how anyone who has seen the Convention Center in its current condition can dispute the need for an overhaul. Maintaining the city’s character and ensuring citizens come first are essential, and there are valid reasons to be concerned about a massive project. This time, opponents will need a better reason than the promenade. Jen Clarke is an unapologetic Memphis and a digital marketing specialist.

THE LAST WORD

© GEORGIOS KOLLIDAS | DREAMSTIME.COM

Another battle over development on the riverfront looms.

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MINGLEWOOD HALL

4/22: Lucero Family Block Party w/ Son Volt, Sons of Mudboy, Mighty Souls Brass Band, William Matheny 4/26 Gov’t Mule w/ Eric Krasno Band 4/27: Leela James w/ Daley 4/29: Cody Jinks w/ Ward Davis 5/16: Korn w/ Animals as Leaders and DED 5/18: Mastodon w/ Eagles of Death Metal 5/21: SCM Awards 5/28: Trey Songz 6/3: THE SHINS 8/1: Foster the People 10/7: Judah & The Lion

Est. 1942 Upcoming Shows Apr 21 - George Porter Jr. Apr 22 - Society Memphis: Remy Ma and DJ Self Apr 23 - Boondox, Blaze Ya Dead Homie, Lex the Hex Master Apr 27 - Jesse Cook Apr 29 - Daisyland w/ Morgan Page May 4 - Amon Amarth w/ Goatwhore May 5 - Zoogma Late Night #BSMF Afterparty May 6 - Daisyland w/ Feed Me May 19 - In Flames May 20 - Daisyland w/ Paul Oakenfold May 21 - Twiztid Psychomania Tour May 26 - Wake the Nation 2017 Jun 14 - J.Cole SOLD OUT Jun 20 - Russ The Wake Up Tour Jul 15 - Daisyland w/ Eptic NEW DAISY THEATRE | 330 Beale St Memphis 901.525.8981 • Advance Tickets available at NewDaisy.com and Box Office

1884 LOUNGE

4/20: Rayland Baxter w/ Chrome Pony 4/28: Funky Knuckles 5/27: 10 Years ìAutumn Effect Anniversay Tourî 7/12: John Moreland

MORE EVENTS AT MINGLEWOODHALL.COM

EBRATION CEL

FABULOUS CARPET CARE Steam Clean 3 Rooms For $99. “It’s Thorough, Dries Quickly & Stays Clean Longer - Or It’s Free.” Call 901.282.5306

MURPHY’S

I Buy Old Windup Phonographs & Records

Pool Table • Darts • WI-FI • Digital Jukebox Visit our website for live music listings or check the AfterDark section of this Memphis Flyer KITCHEN OPEN LATE, OPEN FOR LUNCH! 1589 Madison • 726‑4193 www.murphysmemphis.com

Esp. on labels: Gennett, Paramount, Vocalion, QRS, Superior, Supertone, Champion, OKeh, Perfect, Romeo, Sun, Meteor, Flip; many others. Also large quantities of older 45’s. Paul. 901-435-6668

PROFESSIONAL INTERIORS

YOUNGAVENUEDELI.COM 2119 Young Ave • 278‑0034

GONER RECORDS New/ Used LPs, 45s & CDs. We Buy Records! 2152 Young Ave 901‑722‑0095

DACH ORIENTAL IMPORTS

Painting, Wallpapering, Wallpaper Removal & Drywall Repair. Call 318-499-1779

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4/19: $3 Pint Night! 4/20: Memphis Trivia League! 4/28: The Stolen Faces > Grateful Dead Tribute Band 5/1: Drag Queen Bingo for Memphis Pets Alive 5/11: Cooper Young Pup Crawl for Humane Society 5/13: UFC 211 Miocic vs. Dos Santos 2 5/27: Change the Atlantic 6/10: MovieNight Album Release Show 6/17: The Latest 6/24: Native Blood Kitchen Open Late! Now Delivering All Day! 278-0034 (limited delivery area)

ING

CHIN

CHINESE CONNECTION DUB EMBASSY

www.cocoandlolas.com Finest lace ‑ Coolest place 710 S. Cox|901‑425‑5912|Mon‑Sat 11:30‑7:00

April 21 - Forest Fire Gospel Band - 9pm April 22 - Papa Top’s West Coast Turnaround April 28 - Graham Winchester and The Ammunition April 29 - Jason Lee McKinney Album Release Show - 9pm May 12 - The City Champs - 9pm May 13 - The Love Light Orchestra - 9pm May 19 - John Nemeth Album Release Show

at our

HIGHLAND SHOP 555 S Highland 7 PM til close

New Taproom hours:

Lingerie = Cosabella

1500 sq. ft. of Vintage & Antique Jewelry. Retro Furniture and Accessories. Original Paintings, Sculpture, Pottery, Art & Antiques. We are the only store in the Mid-South that replaces stones in costume jewelry.

The Coach House @ Loflin Yard

Fun, food, and music by

Kung Fu DVD’s $10.00 www.dach.us • 4491 Summer•901.685.3224 Tues – Sat 11:00 – 6:00

Coco & Lola’s MidTown Lingerie

S

COME CELEBRATE 4.20 WITH US!

Largest Martial Arts Supplier Since 1979

Mon 4 - 7 p.m. Thurs & Fri 4 - 10 p.m. Sat 1 - 10 p.m. Sun 1 - 7 p.m. 768 S. Cooper 901.207.5343 MENTION AD & GET FREE HI-5 FROM VANESSA

BE U ESE CO D NNECTION

A MB

TUT‑UNCOMMON ANTIQUES 421 N. Watkins St. 278‑8965

LOOK FOR SPECIAL 4.20 SALE TAGS! GOOD THRU 4.23 @ ALL 3 SHOPS You will find the very best in pipes, tshirts, water pipes, tapestries, vaporizers, hookahs, rolling papers, hand-blown glass, incense, posters, candles, locally-made products and so much more at

CAPTAIN DAN’S STEAMIN’ HOT LOUISIANA CRAWFISH FOR SALE FRI SAT & SUN 1-7 • $4.50 per lb. Corner of Madison & Morrison “COME GET YOU SOME!”

HEAR 901 MUSIC FESTIVAL Featuring: The Band CAMINO, Aaron James, Kyndle McMahan, Sonic Pulse, Haley Daniels, and Flirting with Sincerity. April 28, 8 PM at The Bluff 535 S Highland St, Memphis, TN 38111 www.bluetomrecords.com/hear901

15th ANNUAL SOUTHERN HOTWING FESTIVAL

‘The 2nd Line Jazz Band’ presents’ “When the Hens Come Marchin In” Parade 10:45 am north entrance Adults with kids enter free April 22: Mississippi River Park & Riverside Dr.

RAIN OR SHINE!

Benefiting the Ronald McDonald House. www.southernhotwingfestival.com

I BUY RECORDS! Call 901.359.3102

THREE SHOPS

MORGAN AC & HEATING

HIGHLAND STRIP

CORDOVA

MIDTOWN

555 S HIGHLAND 901 452 4731

981 N GERMANTOWN PKWY 901 654 3678

2027 MADISON AVE 901 590 0048

Floor Furnace, Wall & Central Heat. Call 901‑774‑COOL

SPORTS TALK RADIO whatevershops.com

Join our texting club and get 10% off your next purchase! Text WHATEVER to 51660 . Message & data rates may apply*

Advertising/Sponsorship Sales Excellent part-time income. Earn up to $1,800 1st month. Great Opportunity. Call 901-527-2460

Memphis Flyer 4.20.17  

This week: Stormy Weather: the science and politics of how climate change affects the Mid-South. Also Record Store Day, changes at Jim's Pla...

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