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03.30.17 1466TH ISSuE

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cmt's television series tells the story of sam phillips and the little memphis studio that changed the world.

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March 30-April 5, 2017

JOIN US IN THE COURT YARD NEX T TO PANERA BREAD FOR AN EVENING WITH SOME OF MEMPHIS’ FINEST MUSICIANS. BRING YOUR FRIENDS AND ENJOY FREE LIVE MUSIC EACH THURSDAY IN APRIL 6PM-8PM.

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JUSTIN RUSHING Advertising Director CARRIE O’GUIN HOFFMAN Advertising Operations Manager JERRY D. SWIFT Advertising Director Emeritus KELLI DEWITT, CHIP GOOGE Senior Account Executives ALEX KENNER Account Executive ROXY MATTHEWS Sales Assistant DESHAUNE MCGHEE Classified Advertising Manager BRENDA FORD Classified Sales Administrator classifieds@memphisflyer.com LYNN SPARAGOWSKI Distribution Manager ROBBIE FRENCH Warehouse and Delivery Manager BRANDY BROWN, JANICE GRISSOM ELLISON, ZACH JOHNSON, KAREN MILAM, RANDY ROTZ, LOUIS TAYLOR WILLIAM WIDEMAN Distribution THE MEMPHIS FLYER is published weekly by Contemporary Media, Inc., 460 Tennessee Street, Memphis, TN 38103 Phone: (901) 521-9000 Fax: (901) 521-0129 letters@memphisflyer.com www.memphisflyer.com CONTEMPORARY MEDIA, INC. KENNETH NEILL Chief Executive Officer MOLLY WILLMOTT Chief Operating Officer JEFFREY GOLDBERG Director of Business Development BRUCE VANWYNGARDEN Editorial Director KEVIN LIPE Digital Manager LYNN SPARAGOWSKI Distribution Manager KENDREA COLLINS Marketing/Communications Manager BRITT ERVIN Email Marketing Manager ASHLEY HAEGER Controller CELESTE DIXON Accounting Assistant JOSEPH CAREY IT Director KALENA MCKINNEY Receptionist

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TUCSON SIMPSON 8PM APRIL 3

SUSAN MARSHALL AND FRIENDS 6PM APRIL 4

JOHN KILZER 7PM 2 1 1 9 M A D I S O N AV E N U E MEMPHIS, TN 38104 (901) 207-5097 L A FAY E T T E S . C O M

m e m p h i s f l y e r. c o m

CARRIE BEASLEY Senior Art Director CHRISTOPHER MYERS Advertising Art Director JEREMIAH MATTHEWS BRYAN ROLLINS Graphic Designers

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APRIL 20

CONTENTS

BRUCE VANWYNGARDEN Editor SUSAN ELLIS Managing Editor JACKSON BAKER, MICHAEL FINGER Senior Editors TOBY SELLS Associate Editor CHRIS MCCOY Film and TV Editor CHRIS DAVIS, JOSHUA CANNON, MAYA SMITH, MICAELA WATTS Staff Writers JESSE DAVIS, LESLEY YOUNG Copy Editors JULIE RAY Calendar Editor

OUR 1466TH ISSUE 03.30.17 A story came out in The Commercial Appeal this week that caused some chatter around local social media networks. The story was about a report from the Census Bureau that said the nine-county Memphis metro area gained a grand total of 888 people in the past year. That’s “growth,” but an intimate kind of growth, the kind where we could invite all the newcomers down to Loflin Yard for drinks or something. But it’s important to remember that’s not just Memphis, that’s nine counties, our entire metro area. Also relevant is the fact that, nationally, the growth rate for all major metro A areas P Rwas I L.8 percent. 2 0 Sure, there are still cities with higher-thanaverage growth rates, but the trend, at least lately, has been flat population growth for most American statistical metro areas. So how does that flat population number square with the boom in development TICKETS ON SALE NOW! in downtown and Midtown Memphis? People are moving in, obviously, or all these new apartments and condos and old buildings being built out for reuse wouldn’t be happening; all these new restaurants and entertainment districts wouldn’t be getting built. But that growth appears to be, at least for now, a function of these core areas gaining local residents at the expense of other local neighborhoods that are losing them. As I wrote a couple of weeks ago, the areas that are beginning to show decline are the vast suburban tracts that were created as a result of the area’s suburban sprawl — the housing and development boom in Memphis’ outer reaches that marked the 1990s and early 2000s. It was seen as “growth” when it was happening, but it wasn’t. We got less dense, population-wise, but we weren’t gaining residents; we were just spreading our chips on the table, instead of stacking them. We built new schools, we got new malls, but it was mostly at the expense of Midtown and downtown Memphis, which lost residents. The growth trend now is back toward the urban core, as mall culture is dying and people are seeking community again. How do we avoid making the same mistake in reverse: building up some areas while leaving other areas fallow and decaying? It will require first recognizing and accepting that we literally have spread ourselves too thin. We don’t have enough people living here to fill all the space in the metro area that we’ve built out and developed. We need to think creatively about how we recreate the inner core, making sure we avoid the mistakes made in developing our outer ring: overbuilt housing, cheap, transitory architecture, and automobile-centric design. And we need to get serious about deannexing areas that have been complaining for years about having to be part of the city. Let ’em go. See you at the next Grizzlies game. Development in the Memphis core must be smart, with an eye toward permanence and architectural cohesiveness. We need to be vigilant against overbuilding neighborhoods around entertainment districts or city parks — “popup” projects that appear destined to become obsolete in the coming years. To that end, the proposed apartments at Sam Cooper and East N E WS & O P I N I O N Parkway are a good case study. The NY TIMES CROSSWORD - 4 developers seem aware of the need to THE FLY-BY - 5 build something that is architecturally POLITICS - 8 in sync with the neighborhood, but EDITORIAL - 10 concerns have been raised about VIEWPOINT - 11 increased traffic at an already busy and COVER — “SUN RECORDS” complex intersection, one that serves BY CHRIS MCCOY - 12 as the primary gateway to the city from STE P P I N’ O UT the east. The development’s proximity WE RECOMMEND - 16 to the thoughtfully crafted and MUSIC - 18 artistically welcoming eastern entrance NCAA BRACKET - 20 to Overton Park is also a matter for AFTER DARK - 22 consideration. CALENDAR OF EVENTS - 24 BOOKS - 30 But controlling ambitious FOOD NEWS - 32 development in the urban core is SPIRITS - 33 a good problem for a city to have; FILM - 34 certainly better than the alternative. C L AS S I F I E D S - 36 Sometimes, flat is good. LAST WORD - 39 BRUCE VANWYNGARDEN brucev@memphisflyer.com

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Crossword

Where Do We Go from Here?

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Tuesday, April 4, 2017

9:00 am BREAKFAST and TEACH-IN/ TRAINING SESSION Mississippi Boulevard Christian Church. 70 North Bellevue Boulevard. Free registration at http://conta.cc/2mpkruc. 12 noon PUBLIC RALLY Mississippi Boulevard Christian Church

Rev. Dr. William Barber II

Facilitator and Speaker: Rev. Dr. William Barber II, leader of Moral Mondays and NAACP in North Carolina. 3:15pm

6:01 COMMEMORATION National Civil Rights Museum 450 Mulberry Street Featuring the changing of the balcony wreath, guest speakers, musical tributes, a Pledge for Peace and moment of silence at 6:01pm.

Dr. Gwendolyn E. Boyd

March 30-April 5, 2017

Keynote Speaker: Dr. Gwendolyn E. Boyd, a dynamic and relevant leader, prolific motivational speaker, powerful preacher and prominent advocate for STEM. *On this Tuesday, the Museum is OPEN, but admission is not included with the Commemoration event, which is free and open to the public. Rain location: Hooks Hyde Hall.

Visit mlk50.civilrightsmuseum.org

450 MULBERRY | MEMPHIS, TN 38103

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PUZZLE BY MICHAEL SHTEYMAN

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Questions, Answers + Attitude Edited by Toby Sells

W E E K T H AT W A S By Flyer staff

Raiford, Pence, and Power An icon passes, Pence punts, and politicians scrap on wind energy.

By Chris Davis. Email him at davis@memphisflyer.com.

Wharton joins “Hall of Mayors” A portrait of former Mayor A C Wharton was unveiled at Memphis City Hall, joining the 62 mayoral portraits in the Hall of Mayors. City officials, judges, past mayors, and more joined Wharton and his family to mark the event. New retail aimed for Union Loeb Properties will raze an old Valvoline shop on Union and build a “modern” shopping center to cost about $1.1 million. Demolition will begin on the project April 1st, the company said, and the new space will be completed this fall. Raiford passes Robert Raiford, the colorful downtown icon/disco owner, passed away. “People don’t realize I don’t play music like a DJ; I play music from the heart,” Raiford said in a Memphis magazine story last year. “I can watch you — you don’t even have to dance all night long, but I know good and well you’re having a good time. I watch your feet, watch your mood, read your body language, and I can tell. I’m doing something for you — I’m not just doing something for

the dance floor.” Politicians argue wind energy Tennessee Senator Lamar Alexander and Shelby County Commissioner Terry Roland publicly argued two sides of a proposed project that would bring wind energy here from Oklahoma and Texas. Clean Line Energy Partners want to build a $2 billion wind-energy network, called the Plains and Eastern Clean Line, that would connect the plains and Memphis via 720 miles of overhead electrical lines. Alexander urged Tennessee Valley Authority board members against buying power for the project, saying it would raise energy rates. Roland said Alexander’s information was “outdated and misleading” and that it would be a boon for Shelby County. The project would help “our country realize President [Donald] Trump’s vision for more infrastructure here,” Roland said. “Senator Alexander obviously didn’t take note of what happened in November,” Roland said. “The American people voted for public-private partnerships, new infrastructure, job creation, and economic opportunity.”

m e m p h i s f l y e r. c o m

NASHVILLE NOW Memphis has had its share of awkward moments in honoring African-American heroes, but even in this, Nashville had to see if they could outdo us. According to The Tennessean, families, politicians, and descendants of Frederick Douglass gathered to honor the famed social reformer, who had visited the spot a century earlier. “Together,” the newspaper reported, “they unveiled the new sign that rectified a mistake that for many years left the park with the wrong name — Fred Douglas Park.” Douglass was recently described by President Donald Trump, as an “example of somebody who’s done an amazing job and is being recognized more and more.”

Zoo threatens Greensward deal The Memphis Zoo threatened to pull out of the deal to rework its parking lot (and end Greensward parking) last week because zoo officials said the Overton Park Conservancy (OPC) could not pay its share. OPC officials said they did not have reserves to cover their half of the project — estimated to cost $3 million — and that getting the funds would be a challenge. However, they said last week they’d raise the funds. The two groups are expected to work out details of the plan before the council’s next meeting on Tuesday, April 11th.

NEWS & OPINION

Sometimes captioning goes wrong. Sometimes a line like, “Hotter than Memphis asphalt,” becomes, “Hotter than Memphis ass farm.” Okay, that only happened once, on a single episode of Sun Records. But the error was captured and shared on social media by Memphis journalist Emily Yellin, and once the internet gets ahold of something like this, magical things are sure to happen. MAF indeed.

Weirich reprimanded Shelby County District Attorney General Amy Weirich accepted a private reprimand for her conduct in the murder trial of Noura Jackson and did not face a Supreme Court hearing panel. A court board recommended discipline for Weirich in 2016 for an outburst during her closing arguments in the trial and for failing to hand over a witness statement to Jackson’s attorneys. The reprimand “admits an attorney error has occurred but … it does not unnecessarily stigmatize a lawyer from whom the public needs no protection,” Weirich said.

Pence cancels Vice President Mike Pence cancelled his trip to Memphis last week. Pence was scheduled to attend the NCAA South Regional games at the FedExForum but cancelled as lawmakers prepped a vote on a bill that would have repealed and replaced the Affordable Care Act. Cancelled, too, was a protest 5 aimed at Pence.


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Still Fighting Forrest {

CITY REPORTER B y M i c a e l a Wa t t s

their original burial site. Though the Forrests’ wishes were, according to his will, to be laid to rest in Elmwood, two civic groups in Memphis advocated for a reinterment of he and his wife to the newly established Forrest Park in 1905. Charles McKinney, associate professor of history at Rhodes College, said that historical documentation points to the multiple intentions behind the statue’s erection, the least of which not being a pointed reminder to the growing black middle class, now two or three generations removed from slavery.

“Forrest’s relocation to the center of town was an explicit reassertion of white supremacy,” McKinney said. “It was an act that put a growing black community on notice that both its presence and progress would be greatly contested.”

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The attorney for the Memphis City Council said that the city will continue to push for the relocation of the remains and statue of Nathan Bedford Forrest from the Health Sciences Park in the Medical District. Attorney Allan Wade said that the Tennessee Historical Commission failed to properly adopt the criteria of the Tennessee Heritage Protection Act of 2013, which was used to deny the city’s application for a waiver that would allow for the relocation of the statue and remains of the Confederate general, slave trader, and Ku Klux Klan founding member. “The commission’s denial of the city’s petition was invalidated due to the failure of the commission to adopt the criteria used to deny the petition in accordance with the Tennessee Administrative Procedure Act,” Wade said. The commission must now start from scratch and properly adopt criteria, Wade said, which could take until June. Meanwhile, city officials have filed a petition that identifies the grounds for voiding the commission’s decision to deny Memphis’ waiver application. Commission chairman Reavis Mitchell said in a meeting last year that the city’s application for the statue’s removal was submitted on March 7, 2016, five days before Gov. Bill Haslam signed into law the Tennessee Heritage Protection Act of 2016. Therefore, he said, the application fell under the 2013 version of the law. Also, Mitchell said that the commission adopted the updated waiver criteria. The city’s petition to the commission states otherwise. The controversy over renaming and relocating Confederate-themed parks in Memphis began in 2013, when city council passed a resolution to rename three city parks before the Tennessee state legislature could pass measures to prevent such efforts. Public pressure to remove Confederate symbols on public grounds began to swell across the Southeast states after the racially motivated killings of nine black parishioners in a Charleston church in 2015. That pressure hasn’t waned completely. The U.S. Fifth Circuit Court of Appeals recently gave the city of New Orleans the go-ahead to remove statues of Confederate leaders Jefferson Davis and Robert E. Lee. The same court is also expected to eventually issue an opinion on the Confederate battle flag portion of the Mississippi state flag. Forrest and his wife, Mary, were originally buried in Elmwood Cemetery alongside Forrest’s biological brothers and fellow officers in their family plot. That plot is still partially vacated to this day should the remains be relocated back to

The Nathan Bedford Forrest statue in the Medical District

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Memphis still trying to relocate Forrest statue.

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Up in Smoke Prospects for marijuana reform were dissipated by legislative action last week. Despite heady optimism early in the current session of the General Assembly, proponents of significant reform legislation regarding marijuana were well advised not to hold their breath. Bills regarding the possible legalization of medical marijuana have been bottled up for now; the major one was pulled last week by its sponsor, East Tennessee Republican state Representative Jeremy Faison, who realized that, while prospects for House passage were fair, his bill was sure to be killed in the state Senate’s Judiciary Committee, chaired by Germantown Republican Senator Brian Kelsey, an arch-foe of marijuana reform. To keep alive the long-range prospects for medical marijuana, Faison prevailed upon the speakers of the two legislative chambers and Governor Bill Haslam to consent to the creation of a task force on the subject. Faison and other backers of legalized medical marijuana are hoping that the task force, which will meet over the summer, will help create support for legislation in the 2017-18 session. Circumstances are murkier on another marijuana-related matter. The state Senate this week put its imprimatur on a House bill restricting the rights of local governments to

pass ordinances that would reduce the penalties for possession of a half-ounce or less of marijuana. The city councils of Nashville and Memphis had passed ordinances allowing law enforcement officers the discretion to write tickets calling for modest fines as an alternative to imposing existing misdemeanor penalties involving jail time. When state Attorney General Herbert Slatery offered a non-binding opinion in November that state law prohibited such local deviation, Mayor Jim Strickland put a hold on the Memphis ordinance, but Nashville metro government continued to allow the issuance of citations to offenders. In House debate last week on the bill brought by Republican House member William Lamberth (R-Cottontown) to prohibit local marijuana-possession variations, Democratic state Representative Mike Stewart of Nashville moved to seek a waiver for Nashville, attesting that the citation alternative had proved “very popular” in his city and that there had been no problems in implementing what citizens of all stripes regarded as a “great step forward.” The courts, whose decisions would be final, should be allowed to rule on the matter, he said. That brought some harrumphing from Lamberth, who invoked the principle that “everyone should be treated the same” under law and chastised his colleague for suggesting that police officers should be allowed “to discriminate on the basis of their whim.” Further, said Lamberth, the

issue at root was “not one of constitutionality but of morals.” Stewart’s motion for a Nashville exemption was tabled as the Lamberth bill went on to easy approval, 65 to 28. It was basically a party-line vote, though a sprinkling of Republicans, including Faison and House Speaker Beth Harwell (a Nashvillian), voted no. The issue returned in the Senate on Monday, when Lamberth’s bill, co-sponsored by GOP Senator Jack Johnson of Franklin, came up for a Senate vote. Democrats Lee Harris and Sara Kyle of Memphis objected, as did Senator Jeff Yarbro, a Nashville Democrat. Harris pointed out that allowing local leeway on possession of small amounts of marijuana was one means of addressing woeful inequities of incarceration policy, while Yarbro called the roll on case after case in which local municipalities across the state were allowed to prescribe a variety of penalties that varied from those prescribed by state law. Why, he asked, “single out one particular area of criminal code for this [uniform] treatment?” “My perspective is this,” added Kyle, “Local government means local control,” with an obligation to bring “government as close as we can to the citizens.” All of this rhetoric was to no avail. The Lamberth/Johnson measure passed on a strict party-line basis, 26-5. Two more bills, one legalizing medical marijuana and another decriminalizing possession of an ounce for recreational purposes, both sponsored by Nashville state Representative Sherry Jones, a Democrat, were in the House Criminal Justice subcommittee this week. Prospects for passage were not great.

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JAN HAVLICEK | DREAMSTIME.COM

POLITICS By Jackson Baker


SHORT OPERAS. IN ENGLISH. WITH DRINKS.

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March 31-April 9 at Playhouse on the Square | operam

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E D ITO R IAL

Hail to the State As has been amply demonstrated in the Tennessee General Assembly, Memphis is often on the short end of the stick when it comes to legislative actions. One recent case in point, covered in “Politics” this week (p. 8), was the action

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Open House and Information Session Dates: Thursday, March 30, 2017 at 6 p.m. Saturday, April 8, 2017 at 10 a.m. Thursday, April 13, 2017 at 6 p.m. Saturday, April 22, 2017 at 10 a.m.

All sessions held at: Nursing, Natural Sciences, and Biotechnology Building Southwest Tennessee Community College 737 Union Avenue, Memphis, TN 38103

For more information, please call: (901) 300-0813 www.sechsmemphis.com

of both state Senate and state House in rejecting the city’s right to prescribe alternative penalties for the possession of modest amounts of marijuana for recreational use. In this case, Memphis was not alone in getting the back of the hand from the legislature. The city councils of Nashville and Memphis had passed ordinances allowing their local law-enforcement arms to exercise discretion by way of citing first-time offenders with tickets and modest fines as an alternative to misdemeanor arrests carrying punishments of up to a year in jail. To some extent, the legislative rebukes reflected a party-line reaction by the Republican super-majority that controls both chambers of the General Assembly. In a sense, both Memphis and Nashville are isolated Democratic enclaves, blue islands in a red sea. To some extent also, both cities share a cultural matrix toward which the rest of the state is unsympathetic. That fact loomed large a few years ago when the legislature struck down a Nashville ordinance prohibiting hiring and contracting discrimination by local government on the basis of sexual orientation. The legislature’s action nipped in the bud similar action then pending in the Memphis City Council and Shelby County Commission. In this instance, too, the guiding principle stated by proponents of the restrictive legislation was that state law

overrides local law, and that general claim has been stoutly defended by former Lieutenant Governor Ron Ramsey, among others, against charges of being inconsistent with a parallel insistence on states’ rights in national affairs. The retort by Ramsey and by current spokespersons for the Assembly’s GOP super-majority is that cities and counties within state lines and the federal union itself were brought into being originally by the states. Hence, the doctrine of state government über alles, which is the governing doctrine of the General Assembly at present. An even more flagrant example of the principle looms in pending legislative action — sponsored, ironically, by a Shelby Countian, state Senator Brian Kelsey — that would impose the constitutionally dubious expedient of taxpayer-funded privateschool vouchers on Shelby County alone. The bill, styled as a “pilot program,” is further limited so that its potential financial drain would apply only to existing funding for Shelby County Schools. Kelsey’s bill advanced through a House education committee last week, despite drawing protests and nay votes from local House members from both parties. In the long run, such imposition of state authority on matters of clearly local provenance deserve full testing by the courts. In the short run, they merit the stoutest resistance possible.

C O M M E N TA R Y b y G r e g C r a v e n s


VIEWPOINT By Steve Mulroy

After TrumpCare’s Fall

People who care about a humane system of universal coverage should be clear about what needs to stay. The ACA cost about one-third less than expected and decreased the budget in the process, far from the “disaster” claimed by Donald Trump and Paul Ryan. Contrary to Trump and Ryan, the ACA is not in a “death spiral.”  Enrollment last year in the ACA “health-care exchange” insurance markets was brisk and is expected to continue. True, it is possible that Republican officials can cause a death spiral if they continue to sabotage the ACA. GOP governors and HHS Secretary Tom Price can place regulatory chokeholds on the dreaded Obamacare. Real Problems: The ACA does have problems. We’ve seen health premiums rise the last few years. True, they’re lower than they would have been without Obamacare (given the out-of-control, pre-ACA inflation rate), and the ACA subsidies have absorbed most of those extra costs for most people, but it would be troubling if this trend continues. Worse, insurance companies have pulled out of the ACA health-care exchanges, such that in about one-third of U.S. counties, there is only one provider available, depriving consumers of choice and all of us the competition needed to keep health costs low. The solution to both problems is to

get more people, even healthy people, into the system. This lowers the perperson cost for everyone and incentivizes insurers to participate, increasing choice and competition.   Real Solutions: We should thus “fix it, not nix it.” Here are some possibilities: Single-Payer: We should be pushing hard for a “Medicare for all” plan.  Medicare has the lowest administrative overhead (only 2 percent) of any player in the system, including the supposedly efficient corporations, because it doesn’t have to advertise, market, or attract overpaid executives. This system could replace the ACA as we know it and solve in one fell swoop the problems of universal coverage, rising costs, and choice. Almost as good is Hillary Clinton’s proposal to expand Medicaid and reduce eligibility for Medicaid (to, say, 50). Public Option: If that’s not feasible, we can reintroduce the “public option,” which lobbyists took out of the original ACA bill.  Especially in counties with only one provider on its exchange, the government could offer competition with a public-run insurance plan — like Medicare.  Miscellaneous Tweaks: We should insist on a grab bag of adjustments which would bring in customers, reduce costs, and provide long term stability. Carrots & Sticks: Everyone’s supposed to buy health insurance or pay a penalty if they don’t. The penalty’s small enough that young, healthy people would rather pay it than sign up for insurance. This needs to change. To that “stick” we can add the “carrot” of increased subsidies to get people to buy into the system. Bargain Down Drug Prices: Thanks to a Bush-era sellout to Big Pharma, the federal government is currently barred from negotiating to reduce prescription drug prices. This should change, too. Extend the “Risk Corridors”: The parties ought to be able to agree to extend the so-called “risk corridors.” Under the “corridors,” insurers pitch into a pool, which compensates insurers who lose money on the exchanges. These “pools” are due to expire. Yes, it’s a bailout of big corporations, but it’s one way — politically, the easiest way—to keep the health exchanges functioning.  For more information (on both sides), check out this Friday’s all-day symposium on the Future of the ACA, held at the University of Memphis Law School. Former County Commissioner Steve Mulroy, the Associate Dean at the University of Memphis Law School, prepared these points for a Federalist Society symposium on health care this week.

NEWS & OPINION

Now that the thrown-together Frankenstein’s monster that was TrumpCare has failed in Congress, the time may be ripe for common sense reforms which can save the essential elements of Obamacare. People who care about a humane system of universal coverage should be very clear about what needs to stay and what needs to be added.   Keep What’s Good: We should acknowledge that the Affordable Care Act (ACA) has done far more good than harm. It’s enabled over 20 million people to get access to health care, cutting our uninsured rate in half from 20 percent to 10 percent. Insurance companies can no longer deny people coverage for preexisting conditions, kick people off for getting sick, or deny essential benefits like cancer screenings, birth control, or mental health services. Young people can stay on their parents’ policies until they’re 26.  People no longer have to go bankrupt because of an unexpected health crisis or avoid preventive care because of cost, thus making themselves sicker. 

m e m p h i s f l y e r. c o m

What should come next on the health-care front?

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PHOTOGRAPHS COURTESY OF CMT

(From left to right) Dustin Ingram as Carl Perkins, Kevin Fonteyne as Johnny Cash, Drake Milligan as Elvis Presley, and Christian Lees as Jerry Lee Lewis

March 30-April 5, 2017

sun records CMT's television series tells the story of Sam Phillips and the little Memphis studio that changed the world. cover story by chris mccoy

i

magine what the world would look like today if Sam Phillips had never started a recording business out of 706 Union. The blues would still have been a fascinating Southern musical style, but would Howlin’ Wolf have ever come to the attention of Leonard Chess’ record label? Would B. B. King have ever moved beyond his career as a radio DJ? Rock-and-roll, or something like it, might have evolved anyway, even if Ike Turner hadn’t been able to take advantage of the Memphis Recording Service’s dirt-cheap rates to bring the Delta Cats in to record his song “Rocket 88” in the spring of 1951. But Elvis Presley would have never had the opportunity to record “My Happiness” for his mom and might have died a truck driver. Deprived of its biggest star — indeed, the biggest star the world had ever seen — would rock-and-roll have spread, or would it become nothing more than a regional novelty? Without Sam Phillips or Elvis, the Beatles would have been a 12 skiffle band, if they’d ever bothered to pick up guitars at all. Without Sam Phillips, you wouldn’t know who Johnny Cash was, and country music would lack its greatest poet and its social conscience. Without Sam Phillips, Memphis would be


Drake Milligan (left) and Chad Michael Murray; Milligan, Joe Chrest, and Billy Gardell

CMT

In 2015, Leslie Greif got a call from cable network CMT. Fresh off the success of Nashville, the network was looking for another original TV property to develop. “I had just seen [Broadway musical] Million Dollar Quartet, and it just flashed in my head, wouldn’t it be great to tell the story of the birth of rock-and-roll? It all came out of Memphis. That’s what got me going.” Greif is a veteran TV producer who developed shows such as Walker, Texas Ranger and the Emmy-winning 2012 miniseries Hatfields & McCoys. Greif says his father was friends with songwriters Jerry Leiber and Mike Stoller, who penned early rock-and-roll hits such as “Hound Dog,” “Kansas City,” and “Jailhouse Rock,” and he was a huge fan of the music. “I grew up surrounded by it as a little kid, and I loved it,” he says. Greif optioned Million Dollar Quartet and started working on the project while he was in production on another show, Texas Rising, which was helmed by director Roland Joffé. “He talked about it quite a lot,” says Joffé. “I loved the area he was looking at — that wonderful time in the 1950s when all of this musical movement, which really gave birth to pop music, and therefore much of modern music as we know it, was actually happening. It was a fascinating time, and it raised really interesting issues about art and music in general.” On the West Coast, writer and producer Gil Grant needed a change after six seasons’ work on NCIS: Los Angeles. “If I was going to do another show about PTSD, I was going to get PTSD!” he says. “I was looking for something a little more interesting.” He interviewed with Greif’s ThinkFactory Media. “This was originally designed to be a four-part miniseries. Once they decided there was so much rich material here, let’s open it up and spread it out and see if we can do a series, they realized they needed a show runner who had done it before. Their experience was in miniseries and reality. So, I got the gig. I had done a musical before. Early in my career, I created a show called Hull High. It was a high school musical directed by Kenny Ortega, who went on to do High School Musical. We were only about 20 years ahead of our time. This really was up my alley.”

Meanwhile in Memphis . . .

Around the same time, Memphis Film and Television commissioner Linn Sitler got a call from a producer inquiring about Tennessee’s state film incentive program. The call came at a particularly opportune time. Sitler, with the help of State Senator Mark Norris, state film commissioner Bob Raines, and the county and city offices, had managed to gather state support for new production. There were two candidates: the crime show Quarry and a 20th Century Fox adaptation of Peter Guralnick’s Elvis biography Last Train to Memphis. “Quarry had been gung ho to base here, even though we could not match Louisiana’s incentives. What had happened was that, 20th Century Fox went away — they shelved that project, at least temporarily — and Quarry decided to shoot almost everything in Louisiana. Here we had whined and moaned and bullied, and gotten almost $4 million, and all of our projects had gone away! So when the call came in, I could say, ‘Oh, we happen to have over $4 million for qualified projects!’” Hollywood accounting is notoriously opaque, and the nuts and bolts of film

incentives are even more confusing. But the bottom line is that state film incentives can make or break a production. “It makes all the difference, because if you go to one state, you can buy a Buick for $25,000. If you go to another state, you can get the same Buick for $18,000,” says Sitler. Greif and Joffé really wanted to base the production in the city where the history had happened. “If it wasn’t for the tremendous help from all of your people in the state of Tennessee and the city of Memphis, Linn Sitler and Senator Norris and Bob Raines. … These people assembled all of the proper entities. The Chamber of Commerce chipped in; the tourism bureau chipped in. They made it possible. And we had great guys like Jack Soden from the Elvis Presley estate. They all supported this project, and once they did that, they opened up the world of the local Memphis community. Everyone in Memphis, the Peabody Hotel, the Gibson Guitar factory, Humes High — every entity was like, what can we do to be helpful? All that spirit, combined with a little good luck, made it so we were able to bring this project to Memphis.”

Searching for Sam

For months, the production searched for its Sam Phillips before calling on actor Chad Michael Murray, who had worked with Greif and Joffé on Texas Rising. “I just kind of starting looking into Sam’s life, and I fell in love with the guy,” says Murray. “I thought he was insane in the most beautiful way. He was so ahead of his time! … I call him the Wizard of Oz. He was the man behind the curtain pulling the strings for these gigantic legends and icons.” Murray’s research for the role included spending time in the Bluff City. “One person would tell you one version of the Sam Phillips story, another person would tell you another version of it. I just kind of took pieces from what people told me in Memphis, and everything that I studied and read. … Sam was a charming, sophisticated, complicated motor. He was just go, go, go, go, go. When I sat down with Roland, we really wanted to make sure these things came through in the work. That passion, that drive, that charm, and charisma.” Grant says getting the character of Sam Phillips right was crucial, particularly the love triangle between Sam, his wife, Becky, played by Jennifer Holland, and his assistant at Sun, Marion Keisker, played by Margaret Anne Florence. “Sam was a very complicated individual. He was a very flawed individual — his family will talk about that — but he was a brilliant individual. On the one hand, here was this guy who, musically, he would get whatever he could get out of you to make you better than you are. And yet at the same time, he’s fooling around on his wife with Marion. I think he had a great deal of guilt over it, but it certainly didn’t stop him. And it doesn’t end there. Yet he stayed married to Becky his entire life. It’s a tough role. You have what could be a very unsympathetic character, but Chad is naturally very charming, kind of like Sam was, and he played into that. I think you can see the conflict on his face. He loved Becky, but he loved Marion in a different way. And you also see the raw passion when he sees a musician that sparks him. Chad really prepared for the role. He took it to heart.”

Marion

Florence’s mother was born in Memphis in 1948. “My grandfather actually owned a couple of restaurants: The Riviera Grill and a place called The Old Master Says,” says the actress, now based in New York City. She says her familiarity with the city’s culture and music helped get her the part but that she was not familiar with Marion Keisker, the woman who was the first person to record Elvis. “Unfortunately, the women are not well documented in this time period. It’s been the blessing and the curse of the role. It’s nice that I don’t have that same pressure of being somebody like Elvis or continued on page 14

COVER STORY m e m p h i s f l y e r. c o m

an insignificant backwater, not the origin point for America’s greatest cultural export. Films and television shows have told the story of the birth of the music before. Elvis himself starred in Jailhouse Rock, which, on some level, was a version of his own origin story. In 1979, Halloween director John Carpenter cast Kurt Russell in a made-forTV biopic called simply Elvis. Jerry Lee Lewis got the biopic treatment in 1989, when Dennis Quaid memorably played the Killer in Great Balls of Fire!. In 2005, Walk the Line dramatized Johnny Cash and June Carter’s epic love story with Joaquin Phoenix and Reese Witherspoon. But while there have been nonfiction books and documentaries recounting Sam Phillips’ story — most notably Morgan Neville’s Sam Phillips: The Man Who Invented Rock ’n’ Roll, based on Peter Guralnick’s book of the same name — Phillips has only played a supporting role onscreen.

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continued from page 13 Johnny Cash, that people are so familiar with and have an idea of how they should be played,” she says. Keisker, who died in 1989, was a graduate of Southwestern in Memphis (now Rhodes College) and had a radio career of her own before joining Sam at Sun. “I don’t think she took a lot of flack from anybody,” says Florence. “That’s been an awesome part of the character to play. Luckily, the writers built that in to what we’re doing. I think it’s really important that you see her standing up for herself all the time, in any situation, whether it’s with Sam or with other producers who come into the studio. … That’s something the director really stressed, just to keep her as intelligent and on top of things and respectable — a woman that people could admire, even though she was maybe not doing the right thing, having this affair with Sam.” Romantic tension between Sam, Becky, and Marion is crucial to Sun Records’ drama, but the facts of the affair are unclear. “Some people believe it happened, some people say it didn’t,” says Murray. “We’ve always been very, very clear that we’re not a documentary,” says Grant. “We’re doing a show that’s inspired by true events. We try to be respectful of the characters we’re portraying. We try to get the big moments right. But within that, we’re a dramatic piece of fiction.” But there’s no doubt that the spark between Murray and Florence gives Sun Records life. “Chemistry is a very strange thing,” says Joffé. “It’s not something you can talk about. You’ve got to find a way to get those actors to sort of engage with each other. You can do that by telling them slightly different things that they want to get out of the scene, so they’re discovering what the scene is about as they go. A lot of the chemistry is discovery. When the actors are starting a scene, they don’t know where it’s going to end up. I think that keeps it very alive and helps the birth of chemistry. It also helps if the actors both have a sense of humor, because a lot of chemistry is in humor. In those little looks they exchange. They have lovely chemistry, those two.”

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Drake Milligan’s first screen role was playing Elvis Presley in the 2014 short film, Nobody. “The producers saw the short, and they brought me out to the calls in Memphis,” says the Fort Worth, Texas, native. Playing one of the most famous people who ever lived is a heavy burden for a novice actor. “My goal is to portray him as humanly as possible, and to get the feel of what it must have been like to be Elvis, coming from Tupelo and not having a lot of money,” he says. “Then all the sudden, fame hits, and it’s a roller coaster ride. He went from government housing and Memphis public high school to being the biggest star in the world in a matter of a year and a half.” “He did brilliantly,” says Joffé. “Drake is a natural. I loved working with him, because it was almost like doing a documentary. He has a natural charm and a natural Elvis shyness in him that I really like. That’s a side of Elvis that people don’t remember, the fact that the young Elvis was very shy. A lot of things he did afterwards was his way of dealing with his shyness. A lot of the pain of Elvis’ life, and there was quite a lot of it, had to do with that fact that in some ways, he was a home body, and in other ways he was an icon and a wild man.”

Memphis Makes It

According to documents provided by the film commission, the total expenditure in Shelby County exceeded $6 million. Sun Records shot in Memphis for 70 days in 2016. “That was longer than most films I have catered,” says Erik Proveaux, owner of Fuel, the restaurant, food truck, and catering firm that provided food for the mammoth production. “That’s a huge deal for the economy. Each of those days is like a big production. It’s like doing a wedding every day for 70 days. It paid for a new truck for me and allowed me to move ahead on other aspects of my business.” It was the biggest production Memphis had seen in a decade, and that had a big impact on local crew members who had been struggling. “Some crew people, I know of one for sure, had not had health insurance,” says Sitler. “Even though this guy was not a union member, he still had to receive union benefits. He was able to have surgery he had put off because of Sun Records.” Joffé, who has had a long career in film and TV and has shot all over the world, says his experiences in Memphis were unforgettable. “The show hinges on Memphis’ heritage in many ways, and I think Memphis should be very proud of it. The history of Memphis is the history of your parents and grandparents and their parents. That’s really important, when people live in a city that has a sense of past lives lived. Those lives affect the city. … I felt when I was there that this is a city that’s getting itself together, a city that’s re-finding its voice and its confidence. It has a lot to offer. I really enjoyed being there.” Grant says the city’s stock of varied architecture, much of which is still standing from the 1950s and ’60s, made it easy for the production to get the necessary vintage look. But he could tell the future was bearing down. “I feel like Memphis is ready to pop. Downtown Memphis is ready to become one of the great small cities in the United States,” he says.


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COVER STORY m e m p h i s f l y e r. c o m

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steppin’ out

We Recommend: Culture, News + Reviews

Never Forget

Memphis Cares

B y To b y S e l l s

You remember where you were on the day of the Bowling Green Massacre. Ah, well, Kellyanne Conway does. The couch-sitting media punching bag for President Donald Trump fretted about the massacre to TMZ, Cosmo, and MSNBC. Trouble was, though, there was no massacre. But that doesn’t mean we can’t still remember. “Never forget what never happened” is the motto of “Memphis Cares: A Benefit Concert for the Victims of the Bowling Green Massacre.” The fake benefit show is a blend of comedy and music, but it’s all political theater (and a real-life fundraiser for the Mid-South Peace and Justice Center). Organizer Chris Davis, a Flyer writer, musician, and raconteur, said the idea for such a show was a joke. But he posted that joke on social media, and the idea got real, really fast. Less than a month later a troupe of actors, clowns, and musicians are readying for what will be a one-of-a-kind show. It’ll begin with some loose, open-mic-style performances and launch into a 30-minute faux telethon for Massacre victims. Easy-D’s Low-Life Leakers will then play new songs about the Bowling Green Massacre and covers bent into protest songs (like Big Star’s “Don’t Lie to Me”). Davis calls it an “all-star band of local musicians” including LD Beghtol of the Magnetic Fields, J.D. Reager, Davis, and more. (But watch out for many special performances.) “This seemed like an opportunity for people … who are angry, frustrated, feel lied to, and have been out there in the trenches, to blow off some steam,” Davis says. “And who doesn’t want a little more peace and justice these days?”

JUSTIN FOX BUKRS

“MEMPHIS CARES: A BOWLING GREEN MASSACRE VICTIMS BENEFIT CONCERT” AT LOFLIN YARD, SATURDAY, APRIL 1ST, 6- 9 P.M. PAY WHAT YOU CAN. $10 DONATION SUGGESTED.

March 30-April 5, 2017

From Boss Crump to King Willie Books, p. 30

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Cafe 7/24 and Chef Tam’s Underground Cafe Food News, p. 32

THURSDAY March 30

FRIDAY March 31

SATURDAY April 1

Scotch & Soda Porcellino’s, 6:30-8 p.m., $60 A pairing of Scotches from Doc’s and sausages from Porcellino’s.

MOMIX Germantown Performing Arts Center, 8-10 p.m., $35 A performance by dance illusionists who use light, shadow, and props.

Paws for a Cause Shops of Saddle Creek, 10 a.m.-3 p.m. An event that’s gone to the dogs with pet adoptions, a pet’s artist market, treats, and a celebrity pet wash.

Do Justice Propcellar Vintage Rental, 6-8 p.m., $50-$400 An interactive experience during which participants get involved in an issue, followed by dinner and a talk by justice advocate Rev. Dr. Jo Anne Lyon. “Can a Cell Have a Sex?” University Center, U of M, 6 p.m. Can it? A talk by Harvard professor Dr. Sarah S. Richardson on the biological and social ontologies of sex.

Lantern Light Festival Agricenter International, 6 p.m.-midnight, $16-$20 Featuring some 400 lanterns and a dragon and a panda, plus acrobats! Married But Single Too Cannon Center for the Performing Arts, 8 p.m., $75-$92 “I do” becomes “I did” during this comedy production.

April Fools: Famous People Not Buried at Elmwood Elmwood Cemetery, 10:30 a.m., $20 Funny bones will be pulled during this walking tour.

Tiempro Libre Halloran Centre, 7:30 p.m., $25 Concert by this Cuban music group. Down to Earth Festival Shelby Farms, 10 a.m.-5 p.m. Annual Earth Day festival with ecofriendly vendors, local food, and other green fun.


Bring on the Midtown Opera Festival!

Operathon

By Chris Davis

Opera Memphis’ General Director Ned Canty compares Later the Same Evening to the collage-like film Love Actually. “It’s like snapshots,” he says. John Musto’s intimate operatic work is more specifically inspired by the shadowy urban landscapes of American painter Edward Hopper. It asks what brought the characters inhabiting Hopper’s nocturnal world to the places where the painter froze them in oil and time. And what happened immediately after? Later the Same Evening is one of three contemporary operas by living composers being presented at the fifth annual Midtown Opera Festival. The 10-day event also showcases performances of Jake Heggie’s epistolary family saga Three Decembers, and Peter Hilliard and Matthew Boresi’s Blue Viola tells the story of a priceless antique instrument that winds up in the hands of a junk dealer when it’s left on the street. A fantastic journey follows. “I think Three Decembers is a masterpiece, and I’m especially drawn to it,” Canty says. “It aligns with a lot of the things I care about — the most basic notions of what it means to be in a family and what it means to be human.” Season five crescendos with a production of Arnold Scheonberg’s Pierrot Lunaire, with projections by Memphis photographer Joey Miller. Canty says he’s especially looking forward to a new event called the “Operathon” — back-to-back performances of this year’s featured operas followed by workshop performances of German opera with a new libretto. He’s also excited about a libretto reading for Opera Memphis’ latest co-commission, The Rising and the Falling. With a quilted narrative by Jerre Dye, this first opera commissioned by the U.S. Army tells the story of wounded veterans coming home. The Midtown Opera Festival was created to produce great, intimate, and mostly modern and contemporary opera. It’s also a perfect tasting opportunity for the opera curious. MIDTOWN OPERA FESTIVAL AT PLAYHOUSE ON THE SQUARE, MARCH 31ST-APRIL 9TH, $100 FESTIVAL PASS. INDIVIDUAL TICKETS AVAILABLE. 202-4533

Taj Express: The Bollywood Musical Germantown Performing Arts Center, 7-9 p.m., $30 An evening of Indian entertainment featuring modern music on classical Indian instruments.

“FourSights” Gallery Ten Ninety-One, 2-4 p.m. Opening reception for this show show featuring paintings by Frederick Lyle Morris and Sandra Horton and photography by Becky Ross McRae and Jon Woodhams.

Mockstrocity Tour New Daisy Theatre, 8 p.m., $18-$22 This should be fun: Mac Sabbath is a heavy-metal band made up of McDonald’s characters. Metalachi is mariachi/heavy metal, and Okilly Dokilly is Ned Flanders-inspired.

Sunday Tea and Easter Egg Hunt Woodruff-Fontaine House, 1-4 p.m., $12 A big Easter egg hunt on the grounds and a tea party in the Gingerbread playhouse.

Blues 4 Prostate Cancer Education Tour Minglewood Hall, 6-9 p.m., $35-$100 A concert with blues legends Bobby Rush and Buddy Guy with Southern Avenue, Vasti Jackson, and the Bo-Keys to raise awareness about prostate cancer. Persian Festival Overton Park, 11 a.m.-5 p.m. Persian food, art, handcrafts, music, dancing, and more. 50th Annual Kite Flying Sunday Church of the River, noon-2 p.m. Bring your kite and a picnic lunch to this annual event. Or you can buy both your kite and your lunch!

ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT

SUNDAY April 2

m e m p h i s f l y e r. c o m

Elizabeth Banks plays Rita Repulsa with old-school, tokusatsu camp in the new Power Rangers reboot. Film, p. 34

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MUSIC By Chris McCoy

River King As rapper Marco Pavé preps a new album, he brings a unique collaboration with Opera Memphis to Playhouse on the Square.

March 30-April 5, 2017

M

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arco Pavé is a hip-hop artist who values live performance. “It’s literally my favorite thing to do! I’m very inspired by the soul, blues, and jazz that comes from this region, that the Mississippi created.” Artists often fear putting untested new material in front of a crowd, but for Pavé, that leap of faith is an essential part of the process. When he started out in 2010, “People told me that, as a hip-hop artist, you can’t get a show booked without a project out. I was like, what does that even mean? I just started booking shows for myself. I have music that I need to perform … I’ve tested out plenty of songs before I recorded them in the studio. That’s how I get better. I’ll test out a song live, I’ll perform it 10 times before I record it, and if it gets that same reaction every time, I hit the studio with it. If it’s not, I won’t record it. It’s not worth it. Why would I waste money on it? … Time is money. Why waste time on something that you don’t know if people want it?” The fruit of Pavé’s experimentation will be heard on May 12th (pre-orders open this week), when he drops his new album Welcome to Grc Lnd. “I called it that because the grace is broken in Memphis. It’s a metaphor for a recreated Memphis.” Recorded last year in three marathon days at American Studio, the record features guest bars from Al Kapone, Iron Mic Coalition’s Jason Da Hater, and Jamey Hatley, as well as three Memphis Black Lives Matter activists. “It was inspired by the I-40 bridge protest last year. There’s no music for this moment. There’s no music for the feelings that people have, no soundtrack to it. When the civil rights movement was in its heyday, we had music, we had a soundtrack. Stax was a part of it, a part of the story. That’s what I wanted to do with this album — I wanted to add a soundtrack to the movement, to what people were feeling.” Right now, Pavé is on out on the road with New Orleans rapper Alfred Banks. They call their self-booked sortie the River Kings II Tour. Pavé saw Banks perform at the On Location: Memphis film festival and found their styles to be a natural fit. Their second tour is more than twice the number of dates as the first. “I want people to look around, study, know about your country. Don’t live in a bubble. Go

out and touch people. That’s why this tour is so important … I’m learning, I’m on a journey. I want to know about every city I go to. What makes a city be a city? What’s the history? Who lived there? Who made it famous? Who drove these roads before we did? It’s more than performing; it’s like a pilgrimage for me. Let’s go out and learn some stuff about our country.” The River Kings’ return to Memphis on Thursday, April 6th will be an opportunity for Pavé to try out some daring new material. After his Tedx Talk in 2015, the rapper was approached by Ned Canty of Opera Memphis. “They wanted me to write a hip-hop opera for them,” he says. The full work won’t be done until next year, but Pavé and Opera Memphis have gathered an impressive and varied team of collaborators for their first big public

Marco Pavé

performance. Together with Sam Shoup conducting Opera Memphis, Pavé will be joined by DJ Wise and DJ Chris Cross spinning classic hip-hop songs and their contemporary responses, neo-soulsman Juju Bushman performing with the Opera, sets by Robin X, and River King partner Alfred Banks, and Robinson Bridgeforth from the Reach band will accompany Pavé on drums. Pavé will debut a new song called “Memphis Tragedy.” “It’s the story of a 12-year-old kid with a mother and father who have disappeared into incarceration and is trying to find a way out of this terrible situation,” he says. “It’s also an anti-gun violence song.” Pavé and Opera Memphis will bring this grand experiment in genre crossing to Playhouse on the Square. “This show will be showcasing the potential of what we’re doing together.”


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11 Providence / USC 3

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14 New Mexico St. 7 South Carolina 10

Marquette

2

Duke

15

Troy

1

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Gonzaga

16

S. Dakota St.

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Northwestern

9

Vanderbilt

5

Notre Dame

12 4

Princeton West Virginia

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BOBBY RUSH SUNDAY, APRIL 2ND MINGLEWOOD HALL

PILLOW TALK FRIDAY, MARCH 31ST HI-TONE

CHRIS ROBINSON BROTHERHOOD SATURDAY, APRIL 1ST NEW DAISY THEATRE

After Dark: Live Music Schedule March 30 - April 5 Club 152 152 BEALE 544-7011

Alfred’s 197 BEALE 525-3711

Gary Hardy & Memphis 2 Thursdays-Saturdays, 6-9 p.m.; Karaoke Thursdays, TuesdaysWednesdays, 9 p.m.-1 a.m., and Sundays-Mondays, 10 p.m.-2 a.m.; Mandi Thomas Fridays, Saturdays, 6-9 p.m.; The 901 Heavy Hitters Fridays, Saturdays, 10 p.m.-2 a.m.; Flyin’ Ryan Fridays, Saturdays, 2:30 a.m.; Memphis Jazz Orchestra Sundays, 6-9 p.m.

B.B. King’s Blues Club 143 BEALE 524-KING

The King Beez Thursdays, 5:30 p.m.; B.B. King’s All Stars Thursdays, Fridays, 8 p.m.; Will Tucker Band Fridays, Saturdays, 5 p.m.; Lisa G and Flic’s Pic’s Band Saturdays, Sundays, 12:30 p.m.; Blind Mississippi Morris Sundays, 5 p.m.; Memphis Jones Sundays, Wednesdays 5:30 p.m.; Doc Fangaz and the Remedy Tuesdays, 5:30 p.m.

Blue Note Bar & Grill 341-345 BEALE 577-1089

Queen Ann and the Memphis Blues Masters Fridays, Saturdays, 8 p.m.-midnight.

Blues City Cafe 138 BEALE 526-3637

March 30-April 5, 2017

Blind Mississippi Morris Fridays, 5 p.m., and Saturdays, 5:30 p.m.; Brad Birkedahl Band Thursdays, Wednesdays, 8 p.m.; Earl “The Pearl” Banks Saturdays, 12:30 p.m., and Tuesdays, 7 p.m.; Brandon Cunning Trio Sundays, 6 p.m., and Mondays, 7 p.m.; FreeWorld Sundays, 9:30 p.m.

22

Live Music WednesdaysSundays, 7-11 p.m.; Live DJ Wednesdays-Sundays, 11 p.m.; Third Floor: DJ Tubbz Fridays, Saturdays, 10 p.m.

Handy Bar 200 BEALE 527-2687

Bad Boy Matt & the Amazing Rhythmatics Tuesdays, Thursdays-Sundays, 7 p.m.-1 a.m.

Hard Rock Cafe 126 BEALE 529-0007

Terry Greene Saturday, April 1, 6:30 p.m.

King’s Palace Cafe Tap Room 168 BEALE 576-2220

Big Don Valentine’s Three Piece Chicken and a Biscuit Blues Band Thursdays, Tuesdays, 8 p.m.-midnight.

p.m.; Little Boys Blue Saturday, April 1, 9 p.m.-1 a.m.; Brian Hawkins Blues Party Mondays, 8 p.m.-midnight; McDaniel Band Tuesdays, Wednesdays, 8 p.m.-midnight.

Silky O’Sullivan’s 183 BEALE 522-9596

Dueling Pianos Thursdays, Wednesdays, 9 p.m.-1 a.m., Fridays, Saturdays, 9 p.m.-3 a.m., and Sundays, Tuesdays, 8 p.m.midnight.

New Daisy Theatre

Belle Tavern

330 BEALE 525-8981

Itta Bena 145 BEALE 578-3031

Kayla Walker Thursdays, 67 p.m.; Susan Marshall Fridays, Saturdays, 7-10 p.m.; Nat “King” Kerr Fridays, Saturdays, 9-10 p.m.; Susan Marshall Wednesdays, 6-8 p.m.

King Jerry Lawler’s Hall of Fame Bar & Grille 159 BEALE

Chris Gales Solo Acoustic Show Mondays-Saturdays, 12-4 p.m.; Eric Hughes Thursdays, Fridays, 5-8 p.m.; Karaoke MondaysThursdays, Sundays, 8 p.m.; Live Bands Fridays, Saturdays, 8 p.m.

King’s Palace Cafe 162 BEALE 521-1851

David Bowen Thursdays, 5:309:30 p.m., Fridays, Saturdays, 6:30-10:30 p.m., and Sundays, 5:30-9:30 p.m.

King’s Palace Cafe Patio 162 BEALE 521-1851

Thursdays, 7-11 p.m., and Saturdays, Sundays, 2-6 p.m.; Sensation Band Tuesdays, Fridays, 7-11 p.m.; Fuzzy and the Kings of Memphis Saturdays, 7-11 p.m.; Chic Jones and the Blues Express Sundays, 7-11 p.m.; North and South Band Wednesdays, 7-11 p.m.

Sonny Mack Mondays-Fridays, 2-6 p.m.; Cowboy Neil Mondays,

Dead Soldiers Friday, March 31, 9 p.m.; Chris Robinson Brotherhood Saturday, April 1, 9 p.m.; Mockstrocity Tour! Sunday, April 2, 8 p.m.

117 BARBORO ALLEY 249-6580

Rum Boogie Cafe

Bobbie & Tasha Wednesdays, 8-11 p.m.

182 BEALE 528-0150

Young Petty Thieves Thursday, March 30, 8 p.m.-midnight; Jeff Crosslin Saturday, April 1, 5:308:30 p.m.; Ghost Town Blues Band Saturday, April 1, 9 p.m.-1 a.m.; Sensation Band Sunday, April 2, 7-11 p.m.; Eric Hughes Band Monday, April 3, 8 p.m.midnight; Gracie Curran Tuesday, April 4, 8 p.m.-midnight; Plantation Allstars Wednesday, April 5, 8 p.m.-midnight.

Rum Boogie Cafe Blues Hall

The Rusty Pieces Sunday, April 2, 6-9 p.m.

Dirty Crow Inn 855 KENTUCKY

Earnestine & Hazel’s 531 S. MAIN 523-9754

Amber Rae Dunn Hosts: Earnestine & Hazel’s Open Mic Wednesdays, 8-11 p.m.

Flying Saucer Draught Emporium 130 PEABODY PLACE 523-8536

Songwriters with Roland and Friends Mondays, 7-10 p.m.

The Halloran Centre

182 BEALE 528-0150

Memphis Bluesmasters Thursdays, Sundays, 8 p.m.-midnight; Vince Johnson and the Plantation Allstars Fridays, Saturdays, 4-8 p.m., and Sundays, 3-7

225 S. MAIN 529-4299

Tiempo Libre Saturday, April 1, 7:30 p.m.

GRIZZLIES VS MAVERICKS FRIDAY, MARCH 31

PANIC! AT THE DISCO SATURDAY, APRIL 8

KFC GameNight! Plus, join us for a post-game gospel concert featuring William Murphy. 901.888.HOOP · grizzlies.com

Death of a Bachelor Tour is set to hit FedExForum, with special guests Misterwives and Saint Motel. Tickets Available!

Huey’s Downtown 77 S. SECOND 527-2700

The Chaulkies Sunday, April 2, 8:30 p.m.-midnight.

Mollie Fontaine Lounge 679 ADAMS 524-1886

Yesse Yavis Thursday, March 30, 9 p.m.-midnight; All the Colors of the Dark Saturday, April 1.

Paulette’s

Benjamin L. Hooks Central Library

Dim the Lights First Saturday of every month, 10 p.m. RIVER INN, 50 HARBOR TOWN SQUARE 260-3300

Live Pianist Thursdays, 5:308:30 p.m., Fridays and Saturdays, 5:30-9 p.m., Sundays, 11 a.m.2 p.m., and Mondays-Wednesdays, 5:30-8 p.m.

Purple Haze Nightclub 140 LT. GEORGE W. LEE 577-1139

DJ Dance Music MondaysSundays, 10 p.m.

3030 POPLAR 415-2700

Rhodes Jazz Band Performance at #FiveFridaysofFreeJazz featuring Joyce Cobb and the Stax Music Academy Jazz Band Friday, March 31, 6:30-8:30 p.m.

Boscos 2120 MADISON 432-2222

Sunday Brunch with Joyce Cobb Sundays, 11:30 a.m.2:30 p.m.

Rumba Room

Canvas

303 S. MAIN 523-0020

1737 MADISON 443-5232

Salsa Night Saturdays, 8:30 p.m.-3 a.m.

The Silly Goose 100 PEABODY PLACE 435-6915

DJ Cody Fridays, Saturdays, 10 p.m.

South Main Loflin Yard 7 W. CAROLINA

Memphis Cares: A Bowling Green Massacre Victims Tribute Concert for Freedom Saturday, April 1, 8-10 p.m.; Electric Church Sundays, 2-4 p.m.

JEFF FOXWORTHY & LARRY THE CABLE GUY FRIDAY, APRIL 14 Superstar comedians reunite on We’ve Been Thinking Tour. Tickets Available!

Get tickets at FedExForum Box Office | Ticketmaster locations | 1.800.745.3000 | ticketmaster.com | fedexforum.com

Bar DKDC 964 S. COOPER 272-0830

Karaoke Thursdays, 9:30 p.m.; Kyle Pruzina Live Mondays, 10 p.m.-midnight.

Celtic Crossing 903 S. COOPER 274-5151

Jeremy Stanfill and Joshua Cosby Sundays, 6-9 p.m.; Candy Company Mondays.

The Cove 2559 BROAD 730-0719

Ed Finney and the U of M Jazz Quartet Thursdays, 9 p.m.; Faith Evans Ruch Friday, March 31, 10 p.m.; The Penny Kings Saturday, April 1, 10 p.m.; David Collins Jazz Sunday, April 2, 6 p.m.; Justin White Mondays, 7 p.m.; Don and Wayde Tuesdays, 7-10 p.m.; Karaoke Wednesdays, 10 p.m.

FUTURE THURSDAY, MAY 4 The multi-platinum, record-setting hip-hop innovator is bringing the Nobody Safe tour to FedExForum. Tickets Available!


After Dark: Live Music Schedule March 30 - April 5 Growlers

P&H Cafe

1911 POPLAR 244-7904

1532 MADISON 726-0906

412-414 N. CLEVELAND 278-TONE

WGM, Axis, Outside Source Thursday, March 30, 8 p.m.; Pillow Talk LP Release Show with Wicker, Monticello, Racquets Friday, March 31, 6 p.m.; Morgan Orion, Crockett Hall Friday, March 31, 8 p.m.; The Heavy Eyes, Dirty Streets, Stone Rangers Saturday, April 1, 8 p.m.; Bleeding Love: The Flow Must Go On Saturday, April 1, 8 p.m.; The High Divers, Young Mister, Drew Erwin Monday, April 3, 9 p.m.; Don’t Be Afraid of the Comedy Tuesday, April 4, 8 p.m.; the Bolos Wednesday, April 5, 9 p.m.

Playhouse on the Square 66 S. COOPER 726-4656

INSIDE THE RUDI E. SCHEIDT SCHOOL OF MUSIC 678-5400

The 5th Memphis International Guitar Festival Friday, March 31, 6:30-8:30 p.m., Saturday, April 1, 7:30-9 p.m., and Sunday, April 2, 7:30-9 p.m.

Midtown Opera Festival March 31-April 9.

Summer/Berclair

St. George’s Independent School

Cheffie’s Cafe

1880 WOLF RIVER 457-2000

Greater Harvest Church of God in Christ’s Department of Women’s Affairs

483 HIGH POINT TERRACE 202-4157

Songwriter Night Saturdays, 5-8 p.m.

3509 BOXDALE

Memphis Soul Goes Gospel III Sunday, April 3, 6-8 p.m.

Lenten Midweek Worship: Music, Song, & Silence — Drawing Closer to God Wednesdays, 7-7:45 p.m.

Cordova Chuckles Comedy Club 1700 DEXTER

Uncensored Live- A Variety Show Mondays-Sundays, 7 a.m.-7 p.m.

Huey’s Cordova

1771 N. GERMANTOWN PKWY. 754-3885

Brad Birkedahl Band Sunday, April 2, 8:30 p.m.-midnight.

T.J. Mulligan’s Cordova 8071 TRINITY 756-4480

The Southern Edition Band Tuesdays.

Frayser/Millington

Huey’s Midtown

Old Millington Winery

1927 MADISON 726-4372

6748 OLD MILLINGTON 873-4114

Deering and Down Trio Sunday, April 2, 4-7 p.m.; Royal Blues Band Sunday, April 2, 8:30 p.m.midnight.

Drew McLillie Sunday, April 2.

Shake Rag Bar 8902 RANKIN BRANCH 876-5255

Lafayette’s Music Room

Drivin’ Sideways Band Friday, March 31, 8 p.m.-midnight.

2119 MADISON 207-5097

Idle and Wild Thursday, March 30, 6 p.m.; Julie Rhodes Thursday, March 30, 9 p.m.; Forever Abbey Road Friday, March 31, 10:30 p.m.; Scott and Vanessa Sudbury Saturday, April 1, 6:30 p.m.; The B.B. King’s All-Stars Band Saturday, April 1, 8:30 p.m.; Joe Restivo 4 Sundays, 11 a.m.; Rewind of Memphis Sunday, April 2, 4 p.m.; Tucson Simpson Sunday, April 2, 8 p.m.; Jana Misener, Susan Marshall, David Cousar, Peewee Jackson, and McKenna Bray Monday, April 3, 6 p.m.; John Paul Keith and Co. Mondays, 6 p.m.; John Kilzer Tuesdays, 8 p.m.; Breeze Cayolle and New Orleans Wednesdays, 5:30 p.m.; Rod Melancon Wednesday, April 5, 8 p.m.

Midtown Crossing Grill 394 N. WATKINS 443-0502

Memphis Ukelele Meetup Tuesdays, 6-7:30 p.m.

Minglewood Hall 1555 MADISON 866-609-1744

Germantown Huey’s Southwind 7825 WINCHESTER 624-8911

Charley Mac’s Six String Lovers Sunday, April 2, 8:30 p.m.-midnight.

All New 2017 Fiat 124 Spider test drive one today

GOSSETT FIAT 1901 COVINGTON PIKE • FIATUSAOFMEMPHIS.COM • 388.8989

The Tower Courtyard at Overton Square

East Memphis

Poplar/I-240

2092 TRIMBLE PLACE

Folk’s Folly Prime Steak House

East Tapas and Drinks

NF - Therapy Session Tour Thursday, March 30, 7 p.m.; The Heavy Pets and Backup Planet Thursday, March 30, 9 p.m.; Johnnyswim Friday, March 31, 8 p.m.; The Bo-Keys, Southern Avenue, Vasti Jackson, Buddy Guy Sunday, April 2, 6 p.m.; Dylan LeBlanc Wednesday, April 5, 8 p.m.

Acoustic Courtyard Last Thursday of every month, 6:309:30 p.m.

Mulan Asian Bistro

Casual Pint

2149 YOUNG AVE 347-3965

Chris Gales Sunday Brunch First Sunday of every month, 12-3 p.m.

University of Memphis 395 S. HIGHLAND

Karaoke Saturday, April 1, 9 p.m.-midnight; Lovebird Wednesday, April 5.

Murphy’s

Lost Pizza

1589 MADISON 726-4193

2885 POPLAR 572-1803

Hauteur, FTS, Rotten Snitches Friday, March 31; Sanguine, Spline Saturday, April 1; Eric Lewis Wednesday, April 5, 6-8 p.m.

JB Whalen & Brent Matseas Every other Thursday, 6-8 p.m.

551 S. MENDENHALL 762-8200

Intimate Piano Lounge featuring Charlotte Hurt MondaysThursdays, 5-9:30 p.m.; Larry Cunningham Fridays, Saturdays, 6-10 p.m.

Huey’s Poplar 4872 POPLAR 682-7729

Young Petty Thieves Sunday, April 2, 8:30 p.m.-midnight.

Mortimer’s 590 N. PERKINS 761-9321

Van Duren Solo Thursdays, 6:30-8:30 p.m.

6069 PARK 767-6002

Eddie Harris Thursdays, Fridays, 6:30-9:30 p.m.; Van Duren Solo Tuesdays, 7-9 p.m.; Elizabeth Wise Tuesdays, 7-9 p.m.

Neil’s Music Room 5727 QUINCE 682-2300

Jack Rowell’s Celebrity Jam Thursdays, 8 p.m.; Eddie Smith Fridays, 8 p.m.; Reba Russell Band Saturday, April 1, 8 p.m.; Earl “the Pearl” Sunday, April 2, 6-10 p.m.; Debbie Jamison & Friends Tuesdays, 6-10 p.m.; Elmo and the Shades Wednesdays, 8 p.m.-midnight.

Owen Brennan’s THE REGALIA, 6150 POPLAR 761-0990

Lannie McMillan Jazz Trio Sundays, 10 a.m.-2 p.m.

Bartlett Bartlett Performing Arts and Conference Center 3663 APPLING 385-6440

Bartlett Community Concert Band Saturday, April 1, 7 p.m. Shelby Forest General Store 7729 BENJESTOWN 876-5770

Tony Butler Fridays, 6-8 p.m.; Rodney Nash Saturday, April 1, 12-3 p.m.; Cecil Yancy Sunday, April 2, 12:30-3:30 p.m.

Collierville Huey’s Collierville 2130 W. POPLAR 854-4455

Heart Memphis Band Sunday, April 2, 8:30-11:30 p.m.

Huey’s Germantown 7677 FARMINGTON 318-3034

Vintage Sunday, April 2, 8-11:30 p.m.

North Mississippi/ Tunica Hollywood Casino 1150 CASINO STRIP RESORT, TUNICA, MS 662-357-7700

Seeing Red Friday, March 31, 8 p.m.-midnight, and Saturday, April 1, 8 p.m.-midnight; Seeing Red at Hollywood Casino Friday, March 31, 8-11:45 p.m., and Saturday, April 1, 8-11:45 p.m.; Live Entertainment Fridays, Saturdays, 9 p.m.-1 a.m.

Huey’s Southaven 7090 MALCO, SOUTHAVEN, MS 662-349-7097

JoJo and Ronnie Sunday, April 2, 8 p.m.-midnight.

Thirsty Lizard 6541 US-51 662-536-6054

Dantones Band Friday, March 31, 8 p.m.-midnight.

Raleigh Stage Stop 2951 CELA 382-1576

Blues Jam Thursday Night Thursdays, 7-11 p.m.; Brian Johnson Band Friday, March 31, 9 p.m.-1 a.m.; Open Mic Night and Steak Night Tuesdays, 6 p.m.-midnight.

m e m p h i s f l y e r. c o m

Hi-Tone

Rock Starkaraoke Fridays; Trevor Collum, Ben Ricketts Saturday, April 1; Open Mic Music with Tiffany Harmon Mondays, 9 p.m.-midnight.

Parkway Village/ Fox Meadows

ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT

Chinese Connection Dub Embassy Friday, March 31; Ben Ricketts Saturday, April 1; Crockett Hall Tuesdays with the Midtown Rhythm Section Tuesdays, 9 p.m.

University of Memphis, Harris Concert Hall

23


CALENDAR of EVENTS: THE March 30 April 5 PINK PALACE IS OPEN! TH EAT E R

Cannon Center for the Performing Arts Married But Single Too, enjoy the ever-entertaining JeCaryous Johnson experience and find out what happens when “I do” turns into “I did,” and a couple conveniently become married but single. www.memphistravel.com. $72-$92. Fri., March 31, 8 p.m., and Sat., April 1, 3 & 8 p.m. MEMPHIS COOK CONVENTION CENTER, 255 N. MAIN (TICKETS, 525-1515).

Circuit Playhouse

The Bridges of Madison County, based on the best-selling novel about a beautiful Italian woman who married an American soldier to flee war-torn Italy. A ruggedly handsome photographer seeking direction changes her life forever. www.playhouseonthesquare.org. $25-$40. Thursdays-Saturdays, 8 p.m., and Sundays, 2 p.m. Through April 9.

EXHIBIT

51 S. COOPER (725-0776).

The Evergreen Theatre Produced by Evergreen Exhibitions in collaboration with the Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution

January 21 - May 7, 2017

Mind Games, contemporary drama using a combination of dialogue and spoken-word vignettes to tell the story of the Owens family when a family member tries to hide being diagnosed with bipolar disorder. www.innercitysouth.com. $20. Sun., 3 p.m., Sat., 3 & 7 p.m., and Fri., 7 p.m. Through April 2.

TheatreWorks

Someday for a Crown, when Alzheimer’s disease changes a loved one’s personality, do we try to get them to “come back” or do we try to “meet them where they are?” Semi-autobiographical account of a close family’s struggles. www.theatreworksmemphis.org. $15. Sundays, 2 p.m., and Fridays, Saturdays, 8 p.m. Through April 9. 2085 MONROE (274-7139).

A R T I ST R E C E PT I O N S

LM Gallery 363

Artist reception for Beth Okeon, www.bethokeonart.com. Fri., March 31, 6:30-8:30 p.m. 363 S. MAIN.

Germantown Performing Arts Center Artist reception for “Earth Music,” exhibition of works by Kathleen Stern. www.gpacweb.com. Tues., April 4, 4:30-6:30 p.m. 1801 EXETER (751-7500).

Peddler Bike Shop (Downtown Memphis) Opening reception for Memphis in May Olympic Triathlon Art Poster Exhibit, Fri., March 31, 6-9 p.m. 517 SOUTH MAIN (522-9757).

Stock&Belle

1705 POPLAR (274-7139).

Artist reception for Dana Finimore, (515-7849), www.stockandbelle.com. Fri., March 31, 6-10 p.m.

Hattiloo Theatre

387 S. MAIN (442 222-8972).

Crowns the Gospel Musical, church hats become a springboard for an exploration of Black history and identity as seen through the eyes of a young Black woman who has come down South to stay with her aunt after her brother is killed in Brooklyn. www. hattiloo.org. $22-$28. Sun., 3 p.m., Sat., 2 & 7:30 p.m., and Thurs., Fri., 7:30 p.m. Through April 2. 37 S. COOPER (502-3486).

Theatre Memphis

Side Show, musical based on the lives of conjoined twin women, Violet and Daisy Hilton, who became famous stage performers in the 1930s. Conflict separates the two emotionally. Heartbreak brings them together. www. theatrememphis.org. $30. Fri., Sat., 8 p.m., Sun., 2 p.m., and Thurs., 7:30 p.m. Through April 2. 630 PERKINS EXT. (682-8323).

WKNO Studio

Closing reception for “Autobiography,” exhibition of works in oil, prints, and letterpress by Martha Kelly. Fri., March 31, 6-8 p.m. Opening reception for “FourSights,” paintings by Frederick Lyle Morris and Sandra Horton and photography by Becky Ross McRae and Jon Woodhams. www.wkno.org. Sun., April 2, 2-4 p.m. 7151 CHERRY FARMS (458-2521).

OT H E R A R T H A P P E N I N G S

“1,000 Pardons: Art as Social Grace”

Evening sale on Thursday will feature artist talk. With 1,000 unique handmade crosses for sale, the show will benefit Advance Memphis and support their work in the 38126 community. $15 donation. Thurs., March 30, 9 a.m.-4 p.m. & 4-9 p.m. CROSSTOWN ARTS, 430 N. CLEVELAND (590-9257).

Art Trolley Tour

Tour the local galleries and shops on South Main. Last Friday of every month, 6-9 p.m.

March 30-April 5, 2017

SOUTH MAIN HISTORIC ARTS DISTRICT, DOWNTOWN.

P!NK PALACE MUSEUM

$2.50 LB

CRAWFISH BY THE BAG STRAIGHT FROM LOUISIANA

RESERVE YOUR BAG! BY THURSDAY BY NOON FOR THE WEEKEND

24

547-7997

“Artangel Everywhere” Open Call for Ideas

Networked space sought to commission and produce a major project that can be experienced anywhere in the world. Through April 30. WWW.ARTANGEL.ORG.UK.

Artist talk for “Memphis”

Exhibition of new paintings by Dwayne Butcher, Sat., April 1, 11 a.m.

DAVID LUSK GALLERY, 97 TILLMAN (767-3800), WWW.DAVIDLUSKGALLERY.COM.

Aura Portraits by John Madsen

Unique paintings of aura and chakras in watercolor, with each color symbolizing an aspect or issue of your life. Call for appointment. Due to the energy needed to do the paintings, no walk-ins. $40. Sat., April 1, 11 a.m.-3 p.m. THE BROOM CLOSET, 546 S. MAIN (497-9486), WWW.THEBROOMCLOSETMEMPHIS.COM.

Send the date, time, place, cost, info, phone number, a brief description, and photos — two weeks in advance — to calendar@memphisflyer.com or P.O. Box 1738, Memphis, TN 38101. DUE TO SPACE LIMITATIONS, ONGOING WEEKLY EVENTS WILL APPEAR IN THE FLYER’S ONLINE CALENDAR ONLY.

Call to Artists for Curb Couture Trashion Show

Fashion designs must be comprised of at least 75 percent recycled or reused materials. Event date is June 4. For more information email trashion. show@memphistn.gov. Through May 12.

Crosstown Arts Digital Lab

Six-station computer lab supports Memphis’ creative community by providing artists and musicians full access to industry-standard art- and musicmaking technology. Tuesdays-Thursdays, 10 a.m.-9 p.m., and Fridays, Saturdays, 10 a.m.-6 p.m. CROSSTOWN ARTS, 430 N. CLEVELAND (507-8030), WWW.CROSSTOWNARTS.ORG.

Hello Holland: 23,000 Spring Bulbs Photo Contest

At the end of the exhibit, winners will be selected from certain categories who have posted photos on social media with the hashtag #dixonblooms. Through April 29. THE DIXON GALLERY & GARDENS, 4339 PARK (761-5250), WWW.DIXON.ORG.

Kudzu Playhouse Scholarships

Two awards are available to graduating high school seniors, as well as current and rising college freshmen and sophomores. Applications available on website. Through April 1. WWW.KUDZUPLAYERS.COM.

Small Shop Saturday

Featuring a weekly local vendor in the tap room. Meet the artist and learn about their craft. Saturdays, 1-4 p.m. GHOST RIVER BREWING, 827 S. MAIN (278-0087), WWW.GHOSTRIVERBREWING.COM.

O N G O I N G ART

Orange Mound Gallery

“Fiber: A Tribute to Black Femininity,” exhibition of work by Brittney Bullock, Siphne A. Sylve, Felicia Wheeler, and Catherine Patton. Through April 16. 2232 LAMAR.

OPERA

Midtown Opera Festival

Have dinner while enjoying the Opera Prelude Talk, or attend any number of Opera productions. See website for more information. $100 festival pass. March 31-April 9. PLAYHOUSE ON THE SQUARE, 66 S. COOPER (726-4656), WWW.OPERAMEMPHIS.ORG.

DAN C E

Dance Night

Evening of dancing with music provided by the Jim Mahannah Band or Wally and Friends. $5. First Tuesday of every month, 7-10 p.m. BAKER COMMUNITY CENTER, 7942 CHURCH, MILLINGTON, WWW.MILLINGTONTN.GOV.

MOMIX

Company of dance illusionists known for presenting work of exceptional inventiveness and physical beauty with nothing more than light, shadow, props, and the human body. $35. Fri., March 31, 8-10 p.m. GERMANTOWN PERFORMING ARTS CENTER, 1801 EXETER (751-7500), GPACWEB.COM.

Shrine Tea Dance

Featuring Noble Sounds Orchestra and the Bankers. Semi-formal attire. BYOB. $10. First Sunday of every month, 2-6 p.m. AL CHYMIA SHRINE CENTER, 5770 SHELBY OAKS (377-7336), WWW.SHRINE-DANCE-MEMPHIS.COM.

Superstar Talent Search 2017 Fri., March 31, 7-10 p.m.

B.B. KING’S BLUES CLUB, 143 BEALE (404-449-5587).

MOMIX at Germantown Performing Arts Center, Friday, March 31st

continued on page 26


JB R2

MOONSHINE

BALL SLICK RICK

98.9 THE VIBE’S BIRTHDAY BASH WITH SPECIAL GUEST AL KAPONE

APRIL 21

JAYE HAMMER & DENISE LASALLE APRIL 22

MAY 22

True Story:

ON SALE THIS FRIDAY AT 10AM

Love one another. It’s that simple.

First Congregational Church

She never had a church. He’d never missed a Sunday. They found a church that speaks to both of them.

Together.

TICKETS AVAILABLE AT TICKETMASTER.COM OR BY CALLING 1-800-745-3000.

www.firstcongo.com Phone: 901.278.6786 1000 South Cooper Memphis, TN 38104 Sunday Worship 10:30 am

ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT

KID N PLAY

m e m p h i s f l y e r. c o m

tickets starting at $7

Must be 21 years or older to gamble or attend events. Know When To Stop Before You Start.® Gambling Problem? Call 1-800-522-4700. ©2017, Caesars License Company, LLC. All rights reserved.

25

3610_STA_4.575x12.4_4c_Ad_V2.indd 1

3/27/17 4:33 PM


CALENDAR: MARCH 30 - APRIL 5 continued from page 24 Taj Express: The Bollywood Musical

$30. Sun., April 2, 7-9 p.m. GERMANTOWN PERFORMING ARTS CENTER, 1801 EXETER (751-7500), GPACWEB.COM.

C O M E DY

Chuckles Comedy Club

D R AW I N G , PA I N T I N G , P H OTO G R A P H Y, , S C U L P T U R E , I L LU ST R AT I O N , P O RT FO L I O D E V E LO P M E N T A N D M O R E !

JUNE 5-9 JUNE 12-16 JUNE 19-23

I

JUNE 26-30 JULY 10-14 JULY 17-21

CAMP PREVIEW DAY Saturday, April 1, from 2 to 4 p.m.

COMMED@MCA.EDU

March 30-April 5, 2017

1700 DEXTER.

OUTMemphis: The LGBTQ Center of the Mid-South

OUTLoud Comedy Showcase. www.outmemphis.org. Thurs., March 30, 9-11 p.m.

10

% OFF

EARLYBIRD REGISTRATION ONLY IN MARCH

1930 Poplar Ave. | Overton Park | Memphis, TN 38104 901.272.5116 | mca.edu |

892 S. COOPER (278-6422).

P&H Cafe

Open Mic Comedy, Thursdays, 9 p.m. 1532 MADISON (726-0906).

B O O KS I G N I N G S

Booksigning by James McCafferty

Author discusses and signs The Bear Hunter: The Life and Times of Robert Eager Bobo in the Canebrakes of the Old South. Fri., March 31, noon, and Sat., April 1, 5 p.m. THE COTTON MUSEUM, 65 UNION (531-7826), WWW.MEMPHISCOTTONMUSEUM. ORG.

Artist reception for Dana Finimore at Stock&Belle, Friday, March 31st Booksigning by Otis Sanford

Author discusses and signs From Boss Crump to King Willie: How Race Changed Memphis Politics. Please RSVP by phone to attend. Thurs., March 30, 5:30-7:30 p.m. CLAYBORN TEMPLE,

294 HERNANDO (495-5572), WWW.OTISSANFORD.COM.

Booksigning by Tony Kail

Author discusses and signs A Secret History of Memphis Hoodoo: Rootworkers, Conjurers & Spirituals. Fri., March 31, 6-9 p.m. SOUTH MAIN BOOK JUGGLER, 548 S. MAIN (249-5370).

continued on page 28

APRIL 1-2, 2017

"Honoring" the Republic of TOGO

Wednesday, April 19 at 11:30 AM - 1:00 PM International Business & Economic Trade Luncheon

26

Uncensored Live: A Variety Show. (503-3242), www.chucklescomedyhouse.com. $10. Mondays-Sundays, 7 a.m.7 p.m. Through April 6.

Holiday Inn University of Memphis @ 3700 Central Ave RSVP By contacting 901-947-2133 or aiafest@bellsouth.net Ticket Prices: Individual $60/Table $600

africainapril.org • aiafest@bellsouth.net • 901.947.2133

A JURIED FINE ARTS FESTIVAL

Featuring artists from across America, Weekend live music and includes SANTÉ SOUTH children’s art WINE FESTIVAL activities. & OBO TANDEM RALLY 800-468-6078 RidgelandArtsFest.com Renaissance at Colony Park

M I S S I S S I P P I


2017 BEALE STREET MUSIC FESTIVAL May 5-7, 2017 • Memphis, TN

KINGS OF LEON

SOUNDGARDEN

WIDESPREAD PANIC

SNOOP DOGG

STURGILL SIMPSON

DEATH CAB FOR CUTIE

WIZ KHALIFA

MGMT

JILL SCOTT

BEN HARPER AND THE INNOCENT CRIMINALS

TORI KELLY

GROUPLOVE

ZIGGY MARLEY

BUSH

GRIZ

JIMMY EAT WORLD * THE REVIVALISTS * SILVERSUN PICKUPS * MIDNIGHT OIL * THE STRUMBELLAS TAKING BACK SUNDAY * ALTER BRIDGE * SUM 41 * DRIVE-BY TRUCKERS * GREENSKY BLUEGRASS MACHINE GUN KELLY * HIGHLY SUSPECT * ANI DIFRANCO * MUTEMATH * MAYER HAWTHORNE * DAWES KONGOS * CHARLES BRADLEY & HIS EXTRAORDINAIRES * THE RECORD COMPANY * BOOKER T. JONES JOHN PAUL WHITE *DEER TICK * PETER WOLF * BIG HEAD BLUES CLUB * RONNIE BAKER BROOKS * LIL WYTE POPA CHUBBY * AMY LAVERE * TORONZO CANNON * DEAD SOLDIERS * PRESTON SHANNON * FREEWORLD CARLOS ELLIOT JR. * GHOST TOWN BLUES BAND * COREY HARRIS BAND * SUPER CHIKAN * BLIND MISSISSIPPI MORRIS DADDY MACK BLUES BAND * MARCELLA & HER LOVERS * TAS CRU * EDEN BRENT * AND MANY MORE!

$115 THREE $50 SINGLE DAY PASS

DAY TICKETS

TICKETS VIA

www.memphisinmay.org

m e m p h i s f l y e r. c o m

X AMBASSADORS

ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT

LUDACRIS

27


CALENDAR continued from page 26 LECT U R E /S P EA K E R

Baldwin Now Symposium

Dwight McBride delivers keynote address celebrating life and legacy of writer and social critic James Baldwin. Thurs., March 30, 6 p.m. RHODES COLLEGE, MCCALLUM BALLROOM OF THE BRYAN CAMPUS LIFE CENTER, 2000 N. PARKWAY (843-3000), WWW.RHODES.EDU.

C O N F E R E N C ES/ C O NVE NT I O N S

Gandhi-King Conference 2017: Know Justice, Know Peace

Fri., March 31, 8:30 a.m.-7 p.m., and Sat., April 1, 8:30 a.m.-7 p.m. CHRISTIAN BROTHERS UNIVERSITY, 650 E. PARKWAY S. (321-3335), WWW.GANDHIKINGCONFERENCE.ORG.

Memphis Women’s Summit

Keynote address from Susan Packard. $175. Thurs., March 30, 8 a.m.-5 p.m. UNIVERSITY OF MEMPHIS, UNIVERSITY CENTER, WWW.MEMPHISWOMENSSUMMIT.ORG.

Mid-South Autism Conference

Speakers include Jed Baker and Carol Kranowitz. $50-$150. Thurs., March 30, 8 a.m.-5 p.m. GUEST HOUSE AT GRACELAND, 3600 ELVIS PRESLEY (379-8827), MIDSOUTHAUTISMCONFERENCE.COM.

E X POS/SA LES

Hope House Yard Sale

Benefiting the Hope House Emergency Fund, providing financial support to men and women affected by HIV in emergency situations. Fri., March 31, 8 a.m.-2 p.m., and Sat., April 1, 7 a.m.-2 p.m. HOPE HOUSE, 15 S. IDLEWILD (INFO, 272-2702, EXT 216), WWW.HOPEHOUSEMEMPHIS.ORG.

F EST IVA LS

8th Annual Shelby County History Festival

Twenty local history organizations will display their heritage and present activities including free carriage rides on the grounds. Free. Sun., April 2, 12-4 p.m. HILLWOOD AT DAVIES MANOR, 3570 DAVIESHIRE, WWW.JIMMYOGLE.COM.

Down to Earth Festival

Celebrate Earth Day with clean, green fun in Heart in the Park. Sat., April 1, 10 a.m.-5 p.m. SHELBY FARMS, 500 N. PINE LAKE (767-PARK), WWW.SHELBYFARMS.ORG.

Lantern Light Festival Memphis

Featuring over 400 lanterns, 400-foot dragon, 30-foot-tall panda, and entertainment including acrobats from China and live music. $16-$20. Fridays-Sundays, 6 p.m.-midnight. Through May 7. AGRICENTER INTERNATIONAL, 7777 WALNUT GROVE (651-504-2000), WWW.LANTERNLIGHTFESTIVAL.COM.

Persian Festival March 30-April 5, 2017

Free. Sun., April 2, 11 a.m.-5 p.m. OVERTON PARK, OFF POPLAR (654-6869), IRANIANSOFMEMPHIS.ORG/FESTIVAL/.

Consignment Music ANNUAL SPRING SALE

EVERYTHING ON SALE 25%-50% OFF.

S PO R TS / F IT N ES S

4040 PARK 901-458-2094

STORE HOURS: MON-SAT 10AM-6PM

BUY SELL TRADE. WE DO IT ALL!

FENDER ACOUSTIC GUITAR PACKAGES $125 STARTING AT

(INCLUDES GIG BAG, PICKS, STRAP, AND STRINGS)

COME SEE JOE , EVAN LEAKE OR DYLAN FOR THE BEST DEAL IN TOWN! 28

24 HOUR VENDING MACHINE AT FRONT DOOR

For All Your Emergency Accessory Needs! Strings, Straps, Picks, Batteries & Much Much More! Professional Guitar Teachers Available 7 Days a Week for the Best Rates in Town!

“Battle of the Birds”

St. Louis Cardinals exhibition game. Thurs., March 30, 7 p.m. AUTOZONE PARK, THIRD AND UNION (721-6000), WWW.MILB.COM.

Go Ape Treetop Adventure

Course in Shelby Farms Park open for its second season. Ongoing. SHELBY FARMS, 500 N. PINE LAKE (767-PARK), WWW.GOAPE.COM.

Opening Day Baseball: Chicago Cubs vs. St. Louis Cardinals Sun., April 2, 7:30 p.m.

CASUAL PINT, 395 S. HIGHLAND.

Sista Strut Memphis 2017

3K breast cancer charity walk. $15-$30. Sat., April 1, 8 a.m.-noon. TIGER LANE, 335 SOUTH HOLLYWOOD (259-1300), WWW.MYV101.IHEART.COM.


CALENDAR: MARCH 30 - APRIL 5 Down to Earth Festival in Heart of the Park at Shelby Farms, Saturday, April 1st

Swing Fore the Kids

All greens fees benefit St. Jude Children’s Research Hospital. $75. Fri., March 31, 8 a.m.-8 p.m. MIRIMICHI GOLF COURSE, 6195 WOODSTOCK-CUBA, MILLINGTON (259-3800), MIRIMICHI.COM.

MicroCinema Club

Best of the 2016 Ottawa International short films. Wed., April 5, 6:30-9 p.m.

YV5K & 10 Miler

Benefiting Youth Villages. Sat., April 1, 8:15 a.m.

CROSSTOWN ARTS, 430 N. CLEVELAND (507-8030), WWW.CROSSTOWNARTS.ORG.

RIDGEWAY CENTER, 5865 RIDGEWAY CENTER PKWY., SUITE 300 (820-4600), WWW.YVRACES.ORG.

Shoot & Splice: Stage to Screen with Katori Hall Katori Hall will discuss her work. Tues., April 4, 6:30-9 p.m.

KIDS

CROSSTOWN ARTS, 430 N. CLEVELAND (507-8030), WWW.CROSSTOWNARTS.ORG.

2017 Cover Kids Contest

Wild Africa

Winners will be featured in the May 2017 issue of Memphis Parent and receive a four-pack of movie passes from Malco Theatres. All contest entrants have a chance to win a Grand Prize Package. $20. Through April 10.

See website for show schedule. Ongoing. CTI 3D GIANT THEATER, IN THE MEMPHIS PINK PALACE MUSEUM, 3050 CENTRAL (636-2362), WWW.MEMPHISMUSEUMS.ORG.

WWW.MEMPHISPARENT.COM.

S P EC IAL EVE N TS

Saturday, April 8 • Noon – 6pm

94th Lenten Preaching Series and Waffle Shop

Serving up all traditional favorites, including homemade waffles, salads, and daily specials benefiting support outreach ministries across the city of Memphis. Through April 2.

Live music featuring O.B. Buchana FREE admission and parking

CALVARY EPISCOPAL CHURCH, 102 N. SECOND (525-6602), WWW.CALVARYMEMPHIS.ORG.

• Over 200 Hot Corvettes & Camaros

“Back to the Moon for Good”

• Live Bands & DJs

Fifty years ago the U.S. was in a heated race to the moon. This program reflects on that legacy and looks to the future, motivated by the Google XPRIZE. $7. Through June 2.

• Mouthwatering Crawfish & Barbeque • Refreshing Beer Garden • Strolling Entertainers

SHARPE PLANETARIUM, MEMPHIS PINK PALACE MUSEUM, 3050 CENTRAL (636-2362), WWW.MEMPHISMUSEUMS.ORG.

• Festival Vendors • Family Fun Including FREE Face Painting and Balloon Making

Extreme Deep: Mission into the Abyss

Offers opportunities for hands-on exploration of life at the bottom of the sea. Interactive exhibit that highlights the adventure of deep-sea exploration and discovery. Through May 6.

• Live Radio Remotes: KIX 106 Noon–2pm I 98.1 The Max 2pm–4pm 103.5 WRBO 4pm–6pm

MEMPHIS PINK PALACE MUSEUM, 3050 CENTRAL (636-2362), WWW.MEMPHISMUSEUMS.ORG.

Sponsored By:

MLK50

Tues., April 4, 9 a.m.-5 p.m. NATIONAL CIVIL RIGHTS MUSEUM, 450 MULBERRY (521-9699), WWW.MLK50.CIVILRIGHTSMUSEUM.ORG.

Paws 4 A Cause

Celebrate all things dog, featuring pet adoption and activities to enjoy with the dogs you already have including games, demonstrations, pet artists’ market, puppy treats, and more. Food trucks and celebrity pet wash. Sat., April 1, 10 a.m.-3 p.m.

CASINO PROMOTIONS Tuesdays in April 4pm & 8pm

SHOPS OF SADDLE CREEK, POPLAR AND WEST FARMINGTON RD.

Two Winners Each Day

Fridays & Saturdays in April • 6pm - 10pm

MEMPHIS BROOKS MUSEUM OF ART, 1934 POPLAR (544-6209), WWW.BROOKSMUSEUM.ORG.

If the last three digits of your Key Rewards card match the three selected numbers in the exact order, you win a guaranteed minimum of $500 cash! 5X entries on Sundays, 10X entries on Mondays, and 20X entries on Tuesdays.

25th anniversary of the wine series kicks off with a disco ball. $125. Fri., March 31, 7-10 p.m.

Latte Art Throw Down #2

Cheer for your favorite local baristas featuring drink specials. Free-$10. Fri., March 31, 6-10 p.m. TAMP & TAP, 122 GAYOSO (207-1053), WWW.TAMPANDTAP.COM.

Scotch & Sausage

Range of Scotches paired with succulent sausages curated by Porcellino’s. $60. Thurs., March 30, 6:30-8 p.m. PORCELLINO’S, 711 W. BROOKHAVEN (249-7928).

FI LM

Facing Darkness

Thurs., March 30, 7 p.m. MALCO PARADISO CINEMA, 584 S. MENDENHALL (682-1754), WWW.MALCO.COM.

(Excludes April 29) Win a half side of beef and an 8-cubic foot freezer. Receive one entry for every 20 points earned each Tuesday.

FEATURED ENTERTAINMENT

SATURDAY, APRIL 29 7 pm

$189 Hotel Package Includes a deluxe room and two reserved show tickets. Call 1-662-363-LUCK (5825) and mention code CPMMA

Tickets starting at $30

Kallen Esperian: Visse D’arte

Join filmmaker Steve Ross, lyric soprano Kallen Esperian, and her accompanist Gary Beard for this special screening. All three will take part in a Q&A after the film. $9. Wed., April 5, 7 p.m. MEMPHIS BROOKS MUSEUM OF ART, 1934 POPLAR (544-6209), WWW.BROOKSMUSEUM.ORG.

FitzgeraldsTunica.com • 1-662-363-LUCK (5825) • Must be 21 and a Key Rewards member. See Cashier • Players Club for rules. Tax and resort fee not included in listed price. Advance hotel reservations required and subject to availability. $50 credit or debit card is required upon hotel check-in. Arrivals after 6pm must be guaranteed with a credit card. Management reserves the right to cancel, change and modify the event or promotion. Gaming restricted patrons prohibited. Gambling Problem? Call 1-800-522-4700.

ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT

Brooks Uncorked: A Disco Ball

m e m p h i s f l y e r. c o m

FO O D & D R I N K EVE N TS

29


MIDTOWN 725-PIES (7437)

BOOKS By Jackson Baker

Grand Sweep Otis Sanford’s From Boss Crump to King Willie.

B DELIVERS DOWNTOWN 5-777-PIE (743)

March 30-April 5, 2017

WWW.ALDOSPIZZAPIES.COM

30

etween the two giant pillars of Edward Hull Crump, the white Mississippian who established an enduring political dominion over Memphis in the early 20th century, and Willie Herenton, the five-timeselected black mayor whose seeming invincibility concluded that century, lies a tumultuous story worth telling. And Otis Sanford, the former managing editor of The Commercial Appeal and now holder of the Hardin Chair of Excellence in Economic/Managerial Journalism at the University of Memphis, tells it with accuracy and grace in From Boss Crump to King Willie: How Race Changed Memphis Politics, hot off the University of Tennessee Press. In a way unusual for a work of history, this book reads like a novel — its facts accounted for both in concise summaries of events and circumstances and in key moments that are rendered as scenes. Among the latter is an account of how a chance encounter in 1991 between then Congressman Harold Ford and the Rev. Ralph White at a Union Avenue video store resulted in White’s church, Bloomfield Baptist Church, becoming the venue for Ford’s long-postponed “summit meeting” to determine the identity of a consensus black candidate for mayor. Sanford follows up that revelation with choice reportage of the upstairs meeting at the church involving Ford, Herenton, and disappointed contender Otis Higgs while an auditorium of Herenton supporters, whose energetic wall-to-wall presence had basically called the congressman’s hand, waited impatiently in the church auditorium to hear Ford’s inevitable anointment of Herenton as the people’s choice. Sanford’s book is a textbook case of how to handle the black-and-white realities of Memphis’ political evolution with appropriate shadings of gray. His narrative concludes before the lengthy period, after Herenton’s ascension to power, of the often grim public and private struggles for preeminence between the African-American mayor and the African-American congressman stemming from the implicit rivalry of these two monumental egos. But that feud, after all, belongs to a

different historical era, post-1991, which has been intermittently post-racial. Consider the overwhelming white support for A C Wharton, an African American, first as Shelby County mayor and, in 2009, as Herenton’s immediate successor as Memphis mayor, or Steve Cohen’s serial victories over black opponents in a 9th Congressional District that is at least two-thirds African American in population, and the comfortable win of Jim Strickland, another white, in 2015 over Wharton in a city whose increasingly black complexion is unmistakable. Consider the consistent ability of white Republican candidates to prevail over black Democrats in all the Shelby County elections that have taken place in the 21st century, a period when the county at large, like the city, has had a majority-black electorate. From the standpoint of Sanford’s narrative, such anomalies might be regarded as signals of a modus vivendi between the two dominant races, of a political balance of sorts that required both the deconstruction of white supremacy and the liberation and triumph of an erstwhile black underclass. A viable new order may somehow have been achieved, though undeniable inequalities of various sorts persist and just plain differences endure. Sanford’s story is one of transformation — from an urban landscape under the domination of Crump, a de facto plantation boss whose quasi-benevolent attitude toward a black population enabled both his own immediate power and the stirrings of that population’s own ultimate abilities and ambitions. The giant-sized convulsions that belong to the intermediate stages of this saga — the strikes and assassinations and political showdowns — are not overlooked. They are covered in satisfying detail, as are the more nuanced encounters between winners and losers in the chess games of our political history. Sanford, whose astonishing objectivity as reporter and analyst continues to be featured in his weekly columns in the Sunday CA, knows not heroes and villains. His characters, both black and white, are presented with all the roundness and complex motivations they owned as real live people.


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F O O D N E W S B y L e s l e y Yo u n g

Family Matters

March 30-April 5, 2017

C

harisse Gooden works in the health insurance industry. Her sister, Shan, is a teacher. Her father, Charles, is a retired firefighter. Now, they’re all restaurateurs. The three of them plus Charisse’s brother, Charles, decided to open a restaurant after the matriarch, Charisse’s mother Rosalind Martin, passed away in early 2015. “The inheritance was taxed so heavily, my sister said we need to do something,” Charisse says. Her sister also noticed the old Prohibition Lounge space at 94 S. Front was up for lease and urged Charisse to go look at it. A meeting with Prince Mongo and his bare feet and the Zambodia Ambassador’s rapport with the Chief (Charisse’s dad’s nickname), and they were signing a lease. The family debuted the restaurant, named Cafe 7/24 in honor of Martin’s birthday, in December of last year with its grand chandeliers, its New Orleansstyle balcony, and its old-world exposed brick and ironwork and the kind of fanfare it, and Martin, deserve. “We had a pop-up shop downstairs and a DJ,” Charisse says. “It was packed out. It was beautiful to see so many people come out and support us.” They built the menu around the Chief ’s experience cooking in the station house. “Dad has always been a griller,” Charisse says. “He would grill stuff for

people for the holidays and call it Chief Gooden’s Smokin ’Cue.” They added his knock-out catfish, burgers, fried chicken, a sampler platter, and Charisse’s creation, Loaded BBQ Fries — crinkle fries topped with chopped pork, the Chief ’s barbecue sauce, cheese sauce, and a dusting of dry rub ($9). They offer a menu of signature drinks and a special for Grizzlies games, the GrindTime Grub, served from 6 p.m. to close during Grizzlies home games which includes their special Delta burger, fries, and a domestic bottled beer for $10. Charisse looks forward to hosting poetry slams in the downstairs area, which is also available for rent, as well as trivia nights and karaoke. Most of all, she’s glad she’s found a way for the whole family to honor the woman a whole community looked up to. “My mom was a principal for Memphis City Schools for 30 years,” Charisse says. “When she was in Frayser, which was run by gangs, she turned it around in one year. She was a boss.” Cafe 7/24, 94 S. Front, 590-3360, cafe724.com. Open Monday through Saturday, 11 a.m. to 8 p.m. It’s all about family for Tamra Eddy, too. She had been looking to branch out and open her own restaurant, putting feelers out with family and friends, and someone suggested she take a look at

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Charisse Gooden and family debuted Cafe 7/24 in the old Prohibition Lounge space. the old Imagine vegan restaurant space on Young. She did, and decided against it, but one more trip to the houseturned-restaurant space and a carsitting session, and something sort of miraculous happened. “I looked up, and at the cross street I saw my father’s name,” Eddy, known as Chef Tam, says. Chef Tam’s Underground Cafe sits at the corner of Young and Bruce, at 2299 Young, and has hit the ground running. “We opened a day and a half before Memphis Black Restaurant Week, and we took on that beast,” Eddy says. “We had cars parked all the way back down the street and 30 or 40 people standing waiting on a table.” They were waiting to get their hands, and mouths, on Deep Fried Ribs ($15), the Donut Burger (yes, that’s a burger on a glazed donut, $10), and her signature Deep Fried Muddy Balls, macaroni and cheese with crawfish, crab, and shrimp, deep fried for $8. Or her butter rum cake that’s “ridiculous” and her honey butter yeast rolls that “everybody goes crazy for.”

Eddy has taken the spot and made it her own, repainting the walls, redoing the electricity, and recently updating the patio, and she’s looking forward to offering curbside service as well as delivery, by the end of April for the former and the end of the summer for the latter. Her favorite feature is the community table in the front room, which is covered and sealed with her grandmother’s handwritten recipes. “I had that built with the thought that nobody sits and talks to each other any more,” Eddy says. “It has happened that people ended up sharing food, and they didn’t even know each other.” She learned from the best. Her grandmother was a baker, her grandfather a barbecue pit master, and her father a chef with his own restaurant. “My slogan is Legacy Is Intentional,” she says. “If we can just bring everybody together, we have the opportunity to change the world.” Chef Tam’s Underground Cafe, 2299 Young, 207-6182, cheftam.com. Hours are Tuesday through Saturday, 11 a.m. to 9 p.m.

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S P I R ITS By Andria Lisle

Liquor Before Beer …

indicate that you need water. In her investigation for the BBC’s “Medical Myths” column, journalist Claudia Hammond studied congeners — the non-ethanol substances produced via the fermentation process, such as acetone and tannins. Dark liquors have high levels of congeners; clear liquors like gin and vodka have much lower levels. Like ethanol, congeners have a major effect on hangovers. Add a shot of whisky to that round of beers, and you’re likely to feel the effect the following morning. Hammond also astutely observed that hard liquor — particularly shots, be it whisky, tequila, or any other variety — goes down much faster than a bottle of beer. So when you mix drinks, chances are high that you’re consuming more alcohol overall. And, Hammond writes, “The higher the alcohol content, and the faster you drink it, the worse the hangover. … If combining three or four measures of spirits alongside other ingredients, a throbbing head and dry throat is probably just the result of consuming more alcohol in total.” When The New York Times’ Anahad O’Connor weighed in on the discussion, he added to the digestive theories espoused on Quora. Carbonation irritates the lining of the stomach, which can increase alcohol absorption rates, O’Connor noted, and therefore, switching from beer to liquor might make you drunker quicker. The experts, however, took Hammond’s side. No matter what you drink, according to what NYU gastroenterologist Roshini Rajapaksa told O’Connor, you can get a debilitating hangover if you drink too much of it. Practice moderation, and eat to slow down the absorption process, or you’ll pay the price.

KEEP MORE OF YOUR MONEY m e m p h i s f l y e r. c o m

L

ast weekend, I did a lot of eating and drinking. I had friends visiting from out of town, and we tore our way through Midtown and downtown with a stop at Andy Ticer and Michael Hudman’s East Memphis enclave for good measure. Drink-wise, I had a Moscow Mule at Loflin Yard, gin and tonics at Second Line, Miller High Life at Earnestine and Hazel’s — followed by whisky shots procured from Nate at the upstairs bar — cups of Budweiser poured from a quart bottle at the Big S Grill and Lounge, and another Moscow Mule at DKDC. There was also wine: a few glasses of pinot grigio served at the Young Collectors Contemporary show at Clayborn Temple and rosé, poured into Mardi Gras cups at a North Memphis recording studio. Thankfully, all that alcohol was consumed with plenty of food. I never really got drunk and so never really felt hungover, although I was definitely sluggish by the time my company headed to the airport. But I did worry a few times — particularly when those whisky shots showed up at our table at Earnestine’s, too soon after a few rounds of Miller High Life accompanied our Soul Burgers downstairs. The adage “Liquor before beer, you’re in the clear. Beer before liquor, never been sicker” ran through my head, and I eschewed a second shot and went for a glass of water instead. Scientifically, there are a lot of theories behind the physiological after-effects of mixing alcoholic drinks. On the group-think question-andanswer website Quora, the opinion is that because hard liquor has much more alcohol per volume than beer, it takes longer for your liver to detoxify the ethanol in your system. If you drink beer first, then switch to vodka, your body is preoccupied with processing the beer, which means that the higher concentrated vodka is present in your bloodstream for a longer period of time. Eventually, of course, it will diffuse through your muscles, fat, and central nervous system, but all that higher-concentrated alcohol causes major dehydration. And because, hey, you’re drunk, you’re more likely to ignore the signals that

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33


FILM REVIEW By Chris McCoy

All the Colors of the Rainbow

It had to happen eventually — the color-coded, high school-aged heroes are back.

The cheapest heroes of the ’90s return to save the Krispy Kreme in Power Rangers.

T

he endless parade of toy commercial cartoon nostalgia reboots has reached the 1990s. That’s a kind of progress, right? Anyway, if nothing else good comes out of the Power Rangers movie, at least I learned a new word. (Yes, dear reader, I do research. Shocking, I know.) The word is tokusatsu, a Japanese term that literally means “special filming.” It refers to a genre of live-action, effects-heavy fantasy and sci-fi films and TV shows, including the Toho Studios kaiju films from the 1950s and ’60s like Mothra, Ghidorah, and Destroy All Monsters. TV tokusatsu includes Ultraman and the incredibly long-running Super Sentai series, which has been serving up color-coded super-team action since 1975. The Mighty Morphin Power Rangers, which became an American kids TV sensation in 1993, was originally an adaptation of season 16 of Super Sentai, which reused all of the original Japanese special-effects sequences with new English-language teen-drama scenes filling in the

gaps. (This is the same scam that turned Gojira, a dark, angsty film that recalled the horrors of Hiroshima and the firebombing of Tokyo, into Godzilla, a silly monster movie where Raymond Burr stands around passively watching things blow up.) One of the defining features of tokusatsu is people in rubber suits playing monsters. For a movie like Ghidorah, the Three-Headed Monster, the man in the suit would go tromping through miniature cityscapes to create the flimsy illusion of a giant monster on the rampage. By the time the 16th season of Super Sentai rolled around, they weren’t bothering with the little buildings any more. The Mighty Morphin Power Rangers usually fought the monster of the week in a quarry, or perhaps a state park. Tokusatsu is all about doing it on the cheap. If it sounds like I’m making fun of this stuff, well, I am. But it’s respectful mockery. There’s certain integrity in cheap, gonzo monster movies. The appeal of the Mighty Morphin Power Rangers was all about what outrageous villain our teen heroes would fight each week. From Scor-

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pina, the human-scorpion hybrid, to Lokar, the floating blue demonic head, the poor saps with no budget tasked with creating increasingly weird rubber suits carried the show for a decade. Sadly, in this, the third Power Rangers movie, the crass exploitation is in full effect, but the anything-goes spirit is nowhere to be found. Our color-coded heroes are played by moderately priced TV actors, or, in the case of the Yellow Ranger by Becky G., a 20-year-old YouTube star. At least she’s vaguely age appropriate. The Black Ranger, Ludi Lin, is a 29-year-old playing a high school kid. Naomi Scott, the Pink Ranger, is the Jean Grey to Dacre Montgomery, the Red Ranger’s Cyclops, if I may mix my super-team metaphors. The only actor to leave any sort of impression is Me and Earl and the Dying Girl’s RJ Cyler as the Blue Ranger, the autistic brainiac whose nighttime excursions to the small town of Angel Grove’s gold mine uncover the alien power coins buried during the Cenozoic era, transforming our Breakfast Club of misfits into all the colors of the wuxia rainbow. Their chief antagonist is

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FILM REVIEW By Chris McCoy fallen Power Ranger Rita Repulsa, played all the way to the katana hilt by Elizabeth Banks. Subtlety was never a Power Ranger virtue, and Banks seems to be the only person on screen who understands how camp works. After her 65 million-year-old corpse is dredged up from the sea bottom by the Red Ranger’s dad (Angel Grove apparently being that rare town that has both an open-pit gold mine and a deep sea fishing fleet), Rita Repulsa’s plan is to collect enough gold to build her giant monster Goldar and dig up the long dormant Zeo Crystal, a mystical artifact she will use to destroy all life on Earth, or something. In the most brazen act of product placement in recent memory, the crystal is located beneath a Krispy Kreme. Instead of leaning into the tokusatsu and challenging our heroes with a wide

MOVIES

array of modestly budgeted yet totally outrageous monsters, Power Rangers opts for the Marvel Third Act (TM) move of throwing a bunch of identical, grayish cannon-fodder aliens at them. Even Goldar, the boss fight, is a letdown, looking like he was stolen from the virtual set of Gods of Egypt. I know this is exploitation, and that means cheap knockoffs of whatever is popular in the big budget world right now, but I think that fat, Krispy Kreme money would have been better spent putting the stunt men in better costumes. This is not the time for restraint. This is Power Rangers. Power Rangers Now playing Multiple locations

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EMPLOYMENT • LEGAL NOTICE

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ENGINEERING SR. SYSTEMS ENGINEER needed at AutoZone in Memphis, TN. Must have Bachelor’s in Comp. Sci. or related. 3 years exp in the development, maintenance, & support of software & network systems in the retail auto parts industry, including: Utilizing Spring,Struts, Qt, jQuery, Angular JS, SVN, Dimensions, Maven & Gradle, Qt Creator, Eclipse, IntelliJ, Qt Signals, Slots, C interoperability, Cppunit and Powermock Framework; Using Spring remoting & Hessian binary web service protocol; Using SQL to manage data stored in a Relational Database Mgmt System for DB2, Informix, Oracle, Mysql andPostgresql; and Building and using Continuous Integration Environments with Jenkins and static code analysis tools. Fax resumes to Maria Vallecillo (ref SSE1) at 901-495-8207. AutoZone is an EOE M/F/D/V.

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and coworkers, Possess organizational and time management skills, Demonstrate good judgment, problem solving, and decision making skills, Must have a courteous, friendly and professional demeanor, Ability to stand, walk, and carry food for prolonged periods of time. Does this sound like the opportunity you have been looking for? Apply online today! www.eathere. com/careers. Eat Here Brands is an Equal Opportunity Employer.

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THE LAST WORD by Randy Haspel

Trumpscare

Donald Trump

m e m p h i s f l y e r. c o m

Now that the farce called Trumpcare has imploded into finger pointing and recriminations, you can bet the insurance companies, aided by the GOP congress, will do everything in their power to assure the final destruction of Obamacare. Since the health-care industry is in turmoil, may I ask a basic question? What in God’s name is the insurance business doing in the heart of health care in the first place? Why should anyone profit from the misery of others? I roughly understand the basics of life insurance. People come together as a group and pay continual premiums into a general account. Miss a payment, and they keep your money. Just ask me. Everybody’s premiums are invested, making the insurance companies grandly prosperous, so they can afford to pay death benefits to the beneficiaries of the dearly departed who had the courtesy to die within the allotted time frame. In other words, you’re making a bet on when you’ll buy the farm. The insurers even have mortality tables that provide odds on your death, sort of like a human expiration date. Should you win your bet, your family gets paid, only you’re dead. If you live past the 20 or 30 years usually proscribed in an insurance contract, you lose and get squat. And they keep your money — all of it. The whole thing is purposely vague so that you need to hire an agent, or one will surely find you. The same principles apply to other insurance instruments, like car, home, travel, or personal accident. The difference is that not everyone will be involved in a car wreck, or have their travelers’ checks stolen, or their house burn down, but sooner or later, everybody is going to get sick. The purpose of Obamacare was to spread the risks of health-care costs among a large group of people in order to pay the extortion rates of the medical and pharmaceutical industries. For instance, a bottle of Excedrin at Walgreen’s costs six dollars, but in the hospital, it’s six bucks a tablet. It’s all a scam assembled by the institutions that stand to reap the profits from the treatment of the sick and elderly. That’s why Obama asked for the mandate, so that younger people who tend to be healthier join the pool of the insured. Just as everyone is required to buy auto insurance, even if you never use it, everyone’s purchase of health insurance would pay the costs of colossal, backbreaking hospital bills and prescription medications. The plan faltered because young people weren’t interested in another monthly note, and the bill had Barack Obama’s name on it. Still, 20 million people were able to take advantage of the Affordable Care Act, even if many didn’t know it was Obamacare by another name. The mistake was allowing the insurance companies to remain in place to continue fleecing the populace, but that would require a public option, and you know how those free marketeers love their capitalism. It’s well known that the United States is the only country in the civilized world that doesn’t offer health care to its citizens as a right and not a privilege. A study by the Commonwealth Fund of the health-care systems in 11 developed countries found America dead last, despite our health care being the world’s most expensive. By contrast, just across the river from Detroit is the nation of Canada — less than half a mile away, but light years away in the care of its citizens. Health care in Canada works like Medicare for everyone, advocated by Bernie Sanders during his presidential campaign. All medical expenses are free except dental and prescription drugs. The government keeps drugs cheap by negotiating with the pharmaceutical companies on a federal level. Bringing that model to this country would bring peace of mind to patients, free doctors from endless paperwork, and since the profit motive would be removed, there would be no need for fraud or superfluous hospital tests to run up Medicare bills that benefit someone’s bottom line. Of course, that would require that hospitals be funded by the public as part of the national budget. Now that the Jolly Orange Giant has turned his back on the health-care issue, he has focused his gaze on tax cuts for the wealthy. So there will be no universal health care during Trump’s tenure — however long that may be. The reactionary Republicans voted to repeal Obamacare more than 60 times. They had seven years to come up with a replacement, and they couldn’t do it. Speaker Paul Ryan’s hastily constructed American Health Care Act couldn’t pass muster with the GOP Freedom Caucus, the group formerly known as the Tea Party. Although health-insurance lobbyists helped shape the bill that slashed funding for Medicaid so the poor would suffer first, it still wasn’t cruel enough for the hard-right zealots. Last-minute revisions intended to throw raw meat to the jackals included turning the funding of Medicare over to the states, giving “health-care tax credits” to the elderly, the immediate repeal of Obama’s taxes on the rich, and the instituting of a test for all “able-bodied adults” to pass a work requirement before being enrolled in Medicaid. Herr Trump blamed the Democrats for not voting to destroy President Obama’s signature achievement. Trumpcare went up in flames because of the activism of millions of people who opposed it and transformed town hall meetings into episodes of The Oprah Winfrey Show. As it turns out, the public seems to like their Obamacare, which was formulated by the ultra-conservative Heritage Foundation in the early 1990s and enacted into law by Mitt Romney in Massachusetts. The Affordable Care Act remains the law of the land and a bruising defeat for the “Art of the Spiel.” Donald Trump rose to prominence by appearing in a reality TV show called The Apprentice. He should return to a career in reality television, only this time, Trump could be the host of The Biggest Loser. Randy Haspel writes the “Recycled Hippies” blog, where a version of this column first appeared.

THE LAST WORD

AMERICANSPIRIT | DREAMSTIME.COM

The battle over health care has left lots of wounded behind.

39


MINGLEWOOD HALL

ON SALE FRIDAY: Trey Songz [5/28] Funky Knuckles [4/28]

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Est. 1942 Upcoming Shows Mar 31 - Dead Soldiers Album Release Show Apr 1 - An Evening with Chris Robinson Brotherhood Apr 2 - Mockstrosity Tour w/ Mac Sabbath, Metalachi, and Okilly Dokilly Apr 16 - JoJo Mad Love Tour Apr 22 - Society Memphis: Remy Ma and DJ Self Apr 23 - Boondox, Blaze Ya Dead Homie, Lex the Hex Master Apr 27 - Jesse Cook Apr 29 - Daisyland w/ Morgan Page May 4 - Amon Amarth w/ Goatwhore May 20 - Daisyland w/ Paul Oakenfold May 21 - Twiztid Psychomania Tour May 26 - Wake the Nation 2017 Jun 14 - J.Cole SOLD OUT Jul 15 - Daisyland w/ Eptic NEW DAISY THEATRE | 330 Beale St Memphis 901.525.8981 • Advance Tickets available at NewDaisy.com and Box Office

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2

TUESD R O AY F

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Memphis Flyer 3.30.17  

This week: an inside look at CMT's SUN RECORDS, which tells the story of how one Memphis studio changed the world. Also: the fight over Forr...