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The Death of Suburbia

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CONTENTS

BRUCE VANWYNGARDEN Editor SUSAN ELLIS Managing Editor JACKSON BAKER, MICHAEL FINGER Senior Editors TOBY SELLS Associate Editor CHRIS MCCOY Film and TV Editor RICHARD J. ALLEY Book Editor CHRIS DAVIS, JOSHUA CANNON, MAYA SMITH, MICAELA WATTS Staff Writers JESSE DAVIS, LESLEY YOUNG Copy Editors JULIE RAY Calendar Editor

OUR 1464TH ISSUE 03.16.17 There was a fascinating series of stories on the Business Insider website last week called “The Death of Suburbia.” That phrase will no doubt create immediate outrage among many Flyer readers, especially those living in booming Memphis ’burbs such as Germantown and Collierville. “We’re not dying; we’re thriving!” they’ll say. And they’re correct. But those towns are not so much suburbs as self-contained towns that existed long before the suburban housing boom. The BI articles document the problems facing neighborhoods that were created by urban sprawl, neighborhoods that have no real core. And the future of those communities is not bright, to say the least. The reasons behind the initial genesis of these neighborhoods that lie just outside the urban core, subdivisions comprised of winding suburban streets filled with similarly constructed houses built within a few months of each other: instant neighborhoods, more or less. These housing developments were constructed with the thinking that bigger is better. They were built around schools and malls and were designed for an automobile-centric lifestyle, dining at fast-casual restaurants, and shopping in chain and big-box stores. Now, malls are shrinking and dying as Americans increasingly turn to shopping online, or alternately, focus on “shopping local.” New developments are being designed with walkability and environmental concerns at top of mind. Instead of “subdivisions,” developers are creating “communities.” And, not so shockingly, McMansions are losing value. The real estate site, Trulia, defines a McMansion as a home built between 2001 and 2007 that has between 3,000 and 5,000 square feet of space. Trulia released data last August that showed that the premiums paid for McMansions have declined significantly in 85 of the country’s 100 biggest cities. Real estate experts told Business Insider that younger homebuyers value efficiency more than size and think that McMansions are impractical and wasteful. Speaking of impractical and wasteful … Malls are major economic generators for the suburbs, providing jobs as well as dining and shopping options. When they shutter, they leave a large empty footprint, comparable to the gutted downtowns of small-town America that resulted from Walmart-ization a couple of decades ago. That trend seems to be reversing. BI reported that commercial real estate firm CoStar estimates nearly a quarter of the malls in the U.S are at high risk of losing an anchor store. Dozens of malls, large and small, have shut down. Another trend that is hurting the suburbs is the migration of corporations and big companies back into the center city. Since 2015, McDonald’s, Kraft Heinz, Conagra Foods, UBS, and General Electric, to name just a few, have moved from suburbs into downtown office space. Here in Memphis, the same thing is happening. See ServiceMaster coming to Peabody Place and the development of Sears Crosstown as two recent examples. Other factors cited by Business Insider include the death of golf courses, a trend which has reached an epidemic level since the course-building boom of the 1990s. Most suburban courses were designed as centerpieces of housing developments. There is little charm in living in a McMansion on a dead golf course. And fast-casual restaurant chains, long the mainstay of suburban dining, are in trouble. BI cites Sbarro, Cinnabon, Jamba Juice, Panda Express, Ruby Tuesday, Outback N E WS & O P I N I O N Steakhouse, Carrabba’s Grill, and Buffalo NY TIMES CROSSWORD - 4 Wild Wings as all facing financial crises. THE FLY-BY - 5 And cities are now facing increasing POLITICS - 8 problems with how to provide services EDITORIAL - 10 to their sprawling suburban neighborVIEWPOINT - 11 hoods. As the malls shrink and die, the COVER — tax revenue shrinks. As houses are sold “YOUNG, GIFTED, AND BLACK” BY MICAELA WATTS - 12 off, the tax base decreases. Increasingly, as is happening in Memphis, de-annexSTE P P I N’ O UT ation becomes an option. WE RECOMMEND - 16 MUSIC - 18 It’s a problem that all of us — city NCAA BRACKET - 20 and suburban dwellers alike — will AFTER DARK - 22 be forced to confront in the coming CALENDAR OF EVENTS - 24 decade. The good news is, if you’ve THEATER - 30 always wanted one of those big ol’ McBAR REPORT - 32 Mansions, your odds of getting one on SPIRITS - 33 the cheap are getting better with every FILM - 34 passing year. C LAS S I F I E D S - 36 BRUCE VANWYNGARDEN LAST WORD - 39 brucev@memphisflyer.com

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ly on the wall

PO LITI CAL AN I MALS It’s almost a Jeff Foxworthy routine: If you’re a state Senator, who’s also a doctor, and you’re having an affair with a nurse, who’s considerably younger than you are and your patient, and she’s also your second cousin with a thing for painkillers, and you’re the person who’s been prescribing her painkillers ... YOU MIGHT BE FROM TENNESSEE! It’s now almost impossible to remember that brief, hopeful moment when Dr. Joey Hensley of Hohenwald defeated “don’t-say-gay” Senator Stacey Campfield, and everybody thought, at the very least, he can’t be weirder or more extreme. SIGNS, SIGNS… Church signs are an endless source of joy. Summer is an endless source of joy. That means church signs on Summer are, by definition, an endless source of joy squared, and if your Pesky Fly is reading this one correctly, it’s about time to buy more peanut butter. Or tea biscuits. Or maybe just a nice jelly spoon. “Forbidden Fruits Create Many Jams.”

N E V E R E N D I N G E LV I S Fly on the Wall regularly flags headlines about Elvis impersonators doing bizarre and sometimes terrible things, so here’s this for balance. This week, the U.K.’s Mirror reports, “Elvis Impersonator Hailed as Hero after Rescuing Woman and Young Girl Trapped Inside Burning House.” According to reports, 43-yearold taxi driver/tribute artist Drew Whedon saw a hunka burning house and turned into a hunka burning love. After rescuing the women, Whedon did exactly what the King would have done. He went back in for the dog. By Chris Davis. Email him at davis@memphisflyer.com.

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Edited by Toby Sells

W E E K T H AT W A S By Flyer staff

Suits Target Tips, Horse Massage A suit on tipped employees ends as a case on, uh, equine therapy begins.

Horse massage suit filed (you read that correctly) A lawsuit filed last week seeks to protect horse massage (and those who can legally do it) in Tennessee. The Beacon Center, a free market think tank in Nashville, filed the suit against the Tennessee Board of Veterinary Medical Examiners. The board recently dictated that horse massage can be done only by a licensed veterinarian.

“Both the U.S. Constitution and the Tennessee Constitution protect the right to earn a living, meaning individuals have a right to pursue a chosen business or profession free from arbitrary or excessive government interference.” Two Nashville-area horse trainers, Martha Stowe and Laurie Wheeler, had been practicing horse massage on Stowe’s farm in Franklin. They both got cease-and-desist letters from the state vet board in April. The Beacon Center said the two were subjected to fines and even jail time if they continued to practice horse massage. “I can’t hurt a horse by doing mayofascial release [the form of massage used on horses],” Stowe said in a YouTube video. “I’m not treating. I’m not diagnosing any kind of illness.” Officials with the center called the board’s move “unconstitutional.” Then, it gave the board two weeks to rescind the rule before filing the suit. The law is excessive, the center said, and restricts Stowe’s and Wheeler’s livelihoods. “Both the U.S. Constitution and Tennessee Constitution protect the right to earn a living, meaning individuals have a right to pursue a chosen business or profession free from arbitrary or excessive government interference,” said Braden Boucek, the Beacon Center’s litigation director. “This

regulation clearly runs afoul of that right. The vet board is now requiring a license to rub a horse. It is time we stop criminalizing compassion. What’s next, a license to pet your dog or feed your cat?” Servers can’t sue for tips Food service workers in Tennessee cannot sue their employer for illegally distributing tips to non-tipped employees, according to a ruling last week from the Tennessee Supreme Court. Kim Hardy was a server and bartender at the Tournament Players Club (TPC) at Southwind. Customers at the club were charged a mandatory tip in its bars and restaurants. Hardy noticed that the club distributed those tips to non-tipped employees, including those in the kitchen and in management. Hardy sued TPC in 2014, claiming the club owed her damages because it “knowingly, willfully, fraudulently, maliciously, and/or with reckless disregard failed to pay her and other similarly situated employees all of the tips” they were owed. A Memphis trial court dismissed her claim, noting that a private employee had no explicit right to file such a suit, according to the Tennessee Tip Statute. Hardy won an appeal in 2015, but the state Supreme Court agreed with the original ruling in its opinion last week and dismissed the case. “[The appeals court] recognized that the Tip Statute did not say directly that a food service employee such as Ms. Hardy could file a lawsuit seeking damages for violation of the law,” according to a statement last week from the Tennessee Supreme Court. However, the Supreme Court based its ruling on state law. That law was changed in 2013 to explicitly deny a private citizen, like Hardy, from filing such a lawsuit. Such matters are to be handled by the Tennessee Department of Labor and Workforce Development, according to the law. The court noted that businesses breaking the law could be 5 charged with a misdemeanor.

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Fight School Fight People Power helps locals battle Trump policies.

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country have already signed up to be a part of the movement. Amanda Killens, who attended the Memphis broadcast, said she was concerned about the Trump administration’s other actions. “My husband is a paraplegic,” Killens said. “Of course, we’re worried about what’s going to happen with health care next.” Killens previously worked for the ACLU and trusts in the union’s abilities to make structural change happen legally. “We are all motivated to do something, but now we have some direction to do it,” Killens said.

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The Trolley Stop Market turned into a resistance classroom Saturday as Memphians learned how to properly take to the streets against President Donald Trump and the actions of his administration. Locals here huddled around their smartphones and laptops to join 22,000 other Americans tuning into the introduction of People Power. The new platform from the American Civil Liberties Union (ACLU) aims to harness resistance on a local level against perceived White House injustices. “I’m here out of desperation,” said Bonnie Childest, who hosted a gathering in Memphis. “If they are going to take the time to train us, then I’m going to show up and make sure other people show up as well.” Childest and 25 others gathered at the Trolley Stop, and nearly 40 others watched from gatherings at Caritas Village. They took notes as ACLU officials broadcasted live from Miami’s town hall, informing viewers of various resistance tools when it comes to protesting, resisting authority, and the freedom of speech. The broadcast also introduced the Freedom Cities campaign, which fights for civil liberties with grassroots activism on a local level by creating cities that resist unconstitutional federal directives. The Freedom Cities campaign plans to tackle Trump’s immigration policies by organizing communities to ensure that local law enforcement officials defend — not threaten — vulnerable individuals. The ACLU is already in the process of fighting the Trump administration’s attempt to compel local jurisdictions to directly support the new federal immigration mandates that put immigrants and refugees in danger. The group outlined nine model state and local enforcement policies and rules. One example is the No Facilitation Rule, which keeps officials from arresting or detaining someone solely for immigration purposes without a judicial warrant. If adopted, these policies would protect Muslims, immigrants, and refugees. The role of local activists is to help in the creation of Freedom Cities by participating in public demonstrations and meetings with local officials in order to convince them to adopt and enforce the nine policies of the Freedom Cities blueprint. ACLU officials admit the campaign is ambitious with legally complex demands, but the group believes it can be done with local support. If successful, officials said the campaign should generate isolated, shortterm wins, perhaps leading to long-term wins nationwide. Over 170,000 people around the

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POLITICS By Jackson Baker

Partisanship vs. Solidarity? County Commission wrestles with interim House appointment and the school-voucher issue. set up machinery for the interim appointment whereby applications would be made available from March 21st to March 27th, interviews would be conducted March 29th, and an appointment made April 3rd, in time for the eventual appointee to be serving in the House for the duration of the current session. Estimates of how long that period could be range from a week to the greater part of a month, but the assumption, again, was that the interim state representative-designate would have an opportunity to vote on the voucher question. That was how matters stood until a move was initiated among various local Democratic activists to take advantage of the commission’s current composition — seven members elected as Democrats and six elected as Republicans — to appoint a Democrat as the interim state representative from District 5.  That initiative was first made public in a letter sent to the commission’s seven Democrats by Dave Cambron, president of the Germantown Democratic Club and a member also of the 13-member ad hoc group appointed recently by state Democratic chair Mary Mancini of Nashville to revive the Shelby County Democratic Party. (For a variety of reasons, including what Mancini called “many years of dysfunction,” the dissension-prone local party was formally decertified by the state Democratic executive committee last year.)

Cambron’s letter began with a clarion call: “We have a unique opportunity to send a new progressive voice to the state capitol from Shelby County.” Cambron made the case for local party activist and state Democratic committee member Adrienne PakisGillon, “a leading progressive activist, a club member, and a staunch Democrat who will not hesitate to stand up for the values that we are.” Cambron said it was “critical that Adrienne is chosen to fill the vacancy for State House District 95” and went on to contend that four of the commission Democrats had committed to support her candidacy, while three — he named Eddie Jones, Justin Ford, and current chair-

JACKSON BAKER

As is pointed out in this week’s Flyer editorial, the Shelby County Commission, the elective body entrusted with budgetary oversight over public education in the county, has made a point of voting unanimously against the school-voucher bill now moving through the General Assembly. It did so for both financial and philosophical reasons. And the commission’s unanimous vote was reached in full anticipation that the voucher bill, sponsored by state Senator Brian Kelsey (R-Germantown), would, as has been the custom in legislation on this subject, be among the last measures coming up for a final vote in the current legislative session, due to expire in April. The commission’s vote was a clear signal of its attitude toward vouchers, and it was made in anticipation of the fact that it would soon have the opportunity to designate an interim successor in state House District 95 to Mark Lovell, the Republican representative who, faced with allegations of sexual misconduct, was recently forced to resign by the leadership of his party. While a special election to replace Lovell is set to conclude on June 15th, well after the completion of the General Assembly’s work, the commission made haste to

State Senator Brian Kelsey met in Nashville on Monday with County Commissioner Heidi Shafer to discuss the county’s legislative agenda.

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NEWS & OPINION

man Melvin Burgess — had not. “This is simply not acceptable,” Cambron wrote. “Our Democrats must be unified and stand up against the radical right-wing agenda coming out of the State Capitol.” In reality, not all of the four Democrats Cambron claimed as committed to PakisGillon would confirm the fact, and at least one made it clear that he resented being put on the spot, as did one of the three Cambron mentioned as uncommitted.  The Republican members who had put themselves on the record against vouchers began to react negatively to what they saw as the introduction of an extraneous partisan factor. Several of them noted the availability of anti-voucher Republicans among potential applicants for the interim position and said they saw the move to appoint Pakis-Gillon as a conscious rebuff to the constituency of District 95, one of the more consistently Republican-voting areas in the state.  A motion by GOP Commissioner Terry Roland of Millington to forgo the previously agreed-on appointment schedule achieved only a tie vote in committee and therefore technically failed, but it picked up support from Republican David Reaves of Bartlett, a former Shelby County Schools board member who had spearheaded the commission’s move to appoint an anti-voucher interim state representative.  As of this week, the situation was fluid, with neither Democrats nor Republicans having a unified position on the matter, and with the body’s previous solidarity on the vouchers issue so riven by disagreement on the partisan issue that there is now serious doubt as to whether an interim appointment can even be made. The situation will have to be resolved on March 20th, the date of the commission’s next public meeting, or there will not be time for the appointment process to be carried out. Not only would District 95 lack a vote on a matter which is predicted to have a close final outcome, but the commission’s original intent to use the appointment to make a statement on vouchers will be surrendered as well. Only once before has the commission broken with the tradition of filling a vacancy with a member of the same party as the person being replaced. That was in 2009 when a majority of seven Democrats chose fellow Democrat Matt Kuhn as an interim commissioner to replace Republican David Lillard, who had left to become state treasurer. That move produced an immediate fallout in Nashville, where Republican legislators from Shelby County protested by imposing a stall on the commission’s legislative agenda, grudgingly relenting somewhat later when Republicans like then GOP Commissioner Mike Carpenter and then District Attorney General Bill Gibbons made public pleas for action on the agenda.

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Against Vouchers for Shelby County E D ITO R IAL

Against Vouchers Sometime in the next few weeks, before the scheduled adjournment of the Tennessee General Assembly in April, the state House of Representatives will take a deep breath and vote on an issue as crucial to the future of education in Tennessee as anything that is happening or about to happen in Washington, D.C. The issue is that of a school-vouchers bill sponsored by state Senator Brian Kelsey (R-Germantown), who has tried and failed with similar legislation for several years running. The current bill is styled as a pilot program and is written so as to single out Shelby County in general and the Shelby County Schools system in particular. As of this week, it has advanced through the state Senate Education Committee on its way to that chamber’s Finance, Ways, and Means Committee and was due for action in the House Education administration and Planning Committee. The bill has undergone some amendments already and may undergo further amendments before it is subject to floor votes in both Senate and House, but its basic provisions are clear enough. It would use taxpayer funds to provide vouchers that students might use to defray the costs of tuition at private institutions. According to state Representative John DeBerry (D-Memphis), one of the bill’s relatively few legislative supporters in the inner-city areas that presumably would be targeted by the measure, the Kelsey bill amounts to little more than “just another tool in the toolbox, just another innovation” at a time of openness to experimentation on the part of both state and federal governments. One problem is that the “tools” — i.e., education dollars — that would be handed over to participating private institutions would come directly out of the financial toolbox that would ordinarily be subject to the use of the Shelby County Schools

public school system itself. “The dollar follows the child” is the rule of thumb in allocating the state’s education funding, and every dollar that follows a child to private school is a dollar that is denied a publicschool system that is already in a nearcatastrophic financial squeeze.   The bill would multiply the number of “scholarships” year by year, increasing the number from 5,000 in 2017-18 to as many as 20,000 in 2020-21. Another major problem is that the famous — and increasingly endangered — constitutional dividing line between church and state could become porous to the point of dissolving altogether. The bill — again, subject to amendment — would allocate as much as $7,000 per student per year, and that amount, though far beneath the annual tuition requirements of Shelby County’s preeminent private institutions specializing in college preparation, is well within the tuition range of numerous parochial schools whose parent churches significantly augment the institutions’ financial base. However disguised as a “pilot program,” the bill directly challenges the state’s constitutional prohibitions against “private” (i.e., locality-specific) legislation that is not endorsed by the governing body of the locality. This bill is definitely not so endorsed. The governing body, the Shelby County Commission, made a point in its February 20th meeting of opposing this voucher bill. That vote was unanimous, including Republicans, Democrats, and the representatives of city and county alike.

March 16-22, 2017

C O M M E N TA R Y b y G r e g C r a v e n s

SATURDAY, MARCH 25 DOWNTOWN MEMPHIS

Learn more at MostAmazingRaceMemphis.org 10


Same Same VI EWPO I NT By Juan Williams

Trumpcare? Center and Kaiser Family Foundation both report record high levels of support for Obamacare, with Pew finding 54 percent of the public approving of the health-care program while 43 percent remain in opposition. A Monmouth University poll released last week also found that a majority of Americans — 51 percent — say they want Congress to keep the ACA and improve it. These polls are evidence that Republicans are so intent on damaging Obamacare that they are no longer listening to voters. Critics on the left and right have been fiercely critical of the House Republicans’ replacement plan, the American Health Care Act. And the CBO estimates on how many people it will leave uninsured are daunting.  Even among conservative hardliners, there is opposition to the House version of a new health-care plan. Tea Party pressure groups like Heritage Action and Koch brothers-funded groups like Americans for Prosperity and FreedomWorks came out swinging against the bill.  Perhaps the most important foe of the House bill is the American Association of Retired Persons (AARP), which represents over 38 million senior citizens.  “This bill would weaken Medicare’s fiscal sustainability, dramatically increase health-care costs for Americans aged 50-64, and put at risk the health care of millions of children and adults with disabilities and poor seniors who depend on the Medicaid program for long-term services and supports and other benefits,” wrote AARP senior vice president Joyce A. Rogers.  Also standing in opposition to the GOP plan are the American Medical Association (AMA), the American Nurses Association (ANA), the American Hospital Association (AHA), and the American College of Physicians (ACP).  According to exit polls, voters over the age of 65 backed Trump over Clinton, 52 percent to 45 percent. The blowback from those voters over the GOP failure to produce a better health-care plan could produce a nightmare for Republicans in the 2018 midterms. President Trump, however, is pushing the bill, and Congressional GOP leadership say they are confident that it will pass. Perhaps they have been in the right-wing media bubble so long that they can no longer discern reality from their talking points when it comes to Obamacare.  Juan Williams is an author and a political analyst for Fox News Channel.

NEWS & OPINION

How can President Trump and the GOP Congress escape the political damage from their failed pledge to produce a better health-care plan than Obamacare? If Congress can’t pass the current flawed Republican plan, Trump told leading conservative groups last week, he has a Plan B. It is to keep badmouthing the Affordable Care Act (ACA) as a “disaster” and then blame Democrats when Obamacare collapses. He is going to need a Plan C, because there is a big problem with Plan B. If the ACA ever fails, it will be because of Republicans. It was Senate Republicans, led by Senator Marco Rubio of Florida, who drained money from “risk corridors” created to protect insurance companies from losing money. And Republicans in 19 states refused to expand Medicaid, keeping about 4 million eligible Americans away from health insurance offered by Obamacare. It was Trump who cancelled advertising aimed at bringing more people into the program. Congressional Republicans also made a point of scaring away sports teams and celebrities ready to join in public service campaigns to tell people about the benefits of getting health insurance under the ACA. Who can forget all the scary claims coming from Congressional Republicans and candidate Trump about skyrocketing premiums under Obamacare? They sounded the alarm without saying that most people in Obamacare had nothing to fear because of federal subsidies. They also did not mention that premiums would have been higher without Obamacare. Despite the Republican effort, the Congressional Budget Office (CBO) projected enrollment in Obamacare would jump from 10 million in 2017 to 13 million in the next 10 years.  Actual enrollment for Obamacare in 2017, despite the nonstop GOP chorus predicting its death, came in at 9.2 million, about 500,000 less than in 2016. “Open enrollment was a success, and it would have been even higher without the Trump administration’s efforts to suppress enrollment,” Leslie Dach, director of the Protect Our Care Coalition, told CNBC in February. Standard and Poor’s investment ratings service said an increasing number of insurance companies participating in the Obamacare program would make money this year. And the CBO reported last week that Obamacare would cost one-third less than originally projected.   Opinion polls also show rising public support for Obamacare. Pew Research

m e m p h i s f l y e r. c o m

Ideology meets reality as Republicans struggle to “repeal and replace” Obamacare.

11


Young,

March 16-22, 2017

Gifted, Black AND

Three young African-American artists talk about ďŹ nding a voice in Memphis. C OVE R STO RY BY

12

M I C A E L A W AT T S

P H OTO G R AP HY C O U RTESY O F AN G I E N I C O LE, AN D R EA G UTI E R R E Z, AN D Z I G GY MAC K


Last week, we featured Memphis Black Restaurant Week in The Memphis Flyer weekly Food News column, and naturally, one intrepid newsletter reader raised a thematic question: “Really? Only way I celebrate this is if next week is Red Restaurant Week and the next Purple Restaurant Week etc……….[sic]. C’mon people, let it go.” If this reader’s lamentation strikes a chord with you, you might ought to skip over the next couple of pages. Likewise, if there’s a purple-hued restaurateur out there in Memphis, please email me, because I want that story. This story is about up-and-coming Black artists in Memphis. And when we say Black artists, we mean we are drawing attention to three of them — an ittybitty, teeny-tiny microscopic slice of the landscape of Black creativity that pulses throughout the 324 square miles comprising Memphis. And while interviewing these three young artists, we asked them what other Black artists they think we

should keep our eyes on. It’s the right thing to do — you go to the experts who are thriving and creating while juggling an existence designated as political merely because of their melanin. This isn’t the first Memphis media attempt to showcase talent springing from a demographic that makes up 63 percent of our city, and it certainly won’t be the last. But the history of ignoring African-American voices and achievements runs deep in this country, and Memphis is no exception. It’s not enough to build museums dedicated to Black progress and call it a day. One issue isn’t going to neutralize generations of silence and neglect. It’s up to Memphians of all demographics and socioeconomic standing to invest in and explore the arts, businesses, restaurants, and enterprises of Black Memphians. Because for the majority of people in our city, much of history equates to erasure, and the antidote to erasure is celebration.

Ziggy Mack: On the Zoom “I’m probably not going to sleep tonight, but that’s okay.” That’s Ziggy Mack, a native Memphian, who is currently splitting his focus between this interview and booking a flight to Atlanta, with a continuation on to Cape Town, South Africa. If you’re around Mack for more than five minutes, you might wonder if he ever sleeps at all. Words rat-a-tat-tat out of his mouth at a machine-gun pace. “I learned the trick to avoiding jet lag,” he explains, excitedly: “If you just try to match the time zone you’re headed to, you won’t get jet lag. If you go to sleep in your own time zone, then you’ll have jet lag. Mack calls it “guerilla traveling,” and it’s a skill he’s sharpened over the last few years as his career in photography has commanded a fair amount of globe trotting — Scotland, Ireland, and Peru, to name a few destinations. For this particular journey, Mack is headed to a workshop that will enhance his already specialized talent in underwater ballet photography. But before there were submerged arabesques, Mack got his start in sweaty nightclubs as a night-life photographer, commissioned to capture sweaty Memphians gyrating away, possibly fueled by Red Bulls and vodka. Mack’s employers were impressed with what he was able to capture in dimly lit clubs

amid the throes of nightlife chaos. “They kind of … saw something in me,” Mack says with a shrug. “So they gave me an opportunity and camera equipment, and I just started with that.” Clubs birthed his photography career, but it was when Mack was applying to grad school in Chicago in 2012 that he was forced to up the ante. “I was trying to get into law school, and I needed a crazy gimmick. So I thought, ‘Well, people love ballet,’ even though I didn’t particularly love ballet. But hey, I’ll get good at it,” said Mack. Mack not only got good at ballet photography, he fell in love with ballet. The element of water was added later as an homage to a past relationship. “I was definitely drowning in love,” said Mack, throwing in another shrug. Though Mack’s marriage of ballet and underwater photography has served him well, like so many other artists in Memphis, finding his bearings in a notoriously competitive field was challenging. But what does it mean to be a Black artist on the move in a town hampered by inequality and lack of access. Was it any different? “This is kinda tricky, right?” Mack said. “In terms of accessibility, I would give it a two or a three. But, the thing is — it forces you to work harder. It forces you to be

Photography from his “Underwater Ballet” series. better than where you currently are.” Mack acknowledges that there’s always an underlying thought that artists wanting to carve a career should leave Memphis, especially Black artists. Mack notes that he’s heard from Black artists of all mediums who’ve left, and they relay to him a sense of total shock. “They’ll tell me, ‘Man, people are hiring me for the absolute bare minimum.’ I’m used to working so, so hard,” said Mack. For Mack, his second break came through his friendship with Memphisbased photographer Joey Miller. “If he wasn’t there to introduce me and say,

‘Hey, he’s a good person, his work is great’, I could very well be doing the exact same thing as when I started.” Mack knows that, while he is talented, he was also fortunate to have the connections that helped propel him forward. He also knows not every Black artist in Memphis has those connections. “It’s not even a glass ceiling; it’s a glass wall,” said Mack. “You can see through it, you can make a lateral move, but you can’t go through. It’s crazy.” continued on page 14

Musician, Visual Artist

Actor, Poet, Filmmaker

Jas Watson

Brittney Bullock

COVER STORY m e m p h i s f l y e r. c o m

,

We get some choice comments here at The Memphis Flyer.

Bertram Williams

Catherine Patton

13

ARTISTS SPEAK: WHO YOU SHOULD WATCH FOR

ZIGGY RECOMMENDS:

KEVIN RECOMMENDS:

Kenneth Wayne Alexander II

Lawrence Matthews, aka Don Lifted

Graphic Design, Illustrator

Poet, Artist Actor

SIPHNE RECOMMENDS: Allyson Truly

Maker, Designer Poet


ANDREA GUTIERREZ

continued from page 13

March 16-22, 2017

Kevin Brooks: Just Keep Filming

ADDRESS: 37 South Cooper Memphis, TN 38104 ONLINE: www.hattiloo.org

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BOX OFFICE: 901.525.0009

When Kevin Brooks was about 6 years old, he watched The Matrix. Seventeen years later, as I’m trying to forget how old I was when The Matrix came out, Brooks is perched on a chair in a coffee shop explaining how that movie sparked his interest in film. When talking about The Matrix, Brooks gets excited all over again, as though he just watched Keanu don the trademark black Neo sunglasses for the first time. “It was visually inspiring, but at the same time, it had so many philosophical messages. Of course, I didn’t understand those right away, when I was 6, but over time I did,” said the Memphis filmmaker. “To this day, those are the types of films I want to make.” Brooks’ short film, Keep Pushing, is both visually enticing and has a hidden moral. While shots of soaring skateboards slice through the frame, the story’s protagonist embarks on his newfound love for skating, only to learn that he initially, well, kinda sucks. “The message is persistence through adversity,” noted Brooks. If this sounds like a common theme in storytelling, that’s because it is. But there was wizardry in the delivery, and executives at the Sundance Film Festival took notice. Keep Pushing was selected as one of five films out of 300 internationally submitted for Sundance Ignite, a program created for up-and-coming filmmakers. Since the short film’s premiere, Sundance has kept in touch with Brooks, inviting him back this year to work behind the camera, interviewing hiphop artist Common and actor/writer Jenny Slate. Brooks also interviewed Tim

Robbins and his son, Jack, who released his own movie at Sundance. Brooks just graduated in December from the University of Memphis with a degree in film, and if the pace of his career is overwhelming to him, he doesn’t show it. Following the release of Keep Pushing, his short film, Marcus, was a top 10 finalist for the Memphis Film Prize. His next short film, Myles, produced by Memphis filmmaker Morgan Jon Fox, will be released in April. He’s currently working on a full-length feature film, the details of which are very much under wraps. When I asked Brooks about how he sees Memphis as an environment for Black artists, his positivity was immediate and genuine. “I think it’s definitely getting better,” he said, as he started to tick off names of Black artists producing work that he admires. “Pay attention to Lawrence Matthews, aka Don Lifted, a 24-year-old musician and aspiring filmmaker,” he said. “Watch for Bertram Williams on stage at Hatiloo Theatre. Listen for Jas Watson’s spoken word. They’re making a difference.” Brooks’ prescription for bettering Memphis for Black artists syncs up with his personal philosophy: Just keep producing at all costs, and don’t be deterred by what the person next to you is doing. “Look, we can now shoot movies on 4K on our iPhones, and that’s just one example,” said Brooks. “Whatever you have to do, just tell your story. Showcase the human condition. That’s what I try to do, and I feel like that’s the responsibility we all have as Black artists.”


MOONSHINE

ANGIE NICOLE

BALL Siphne Sylve: Art Is in the Structure now, it’s all about the structure. So, when it came time to ask her the question that I asked all artists for this story — namely how they saw Memphis as an environment for Black artists — I prepared myself for a multi-pronged answer focused through the lens of someone obsessed with the structure and history of everything in her world. I was not disappointed. “I feel like identity for artists is an ongoing thing, especially for female Black artists. The history when it comes to artists of color, especially female artists of color, as it relates to exposure. … Well, I didn’t learn about Black female artists making art until I was about 18.” At 18, Sylve was enrolled as a freshman at Memphis College of Art. There weren’t exactly chapters in textbooks dedicated to Black female artists. Their visibility wasn’t apparent. “Everything I learned about [Black female artists], I either learned from my peers or I learned on my own,” recalled Sylve. Sylve does feel like there is something happening between Black artists in Memphis, Black visual artists in particular. Something unifying. Acknowledging the local and national history where Black voices have been seldom heard (Yes, I’m looking at you Purple Restaurant Week hopeful), Sylve feels a growing sense of hope. It may take two or three years, but Sylve does sense a shift on the horizon. “While there is a lot of unity happening,” Sylve said, “the coverage is scarce.” She said that she typically find outs about Black artists almost exclusively through word of mouth. She added, “I do think that the support is growing. The awareness is growing as well. The hope is to not let our experiences go overlooked. “I think that sets Memphis apart from the larger context of Black artists in America. And through this unity and awareness that’s occurring, I think we have a whole new generation that’s willing to take this work and move forward.” Let’s hope Memphis is smart enough to take notice.

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COVER STORY m e m p h i s f l y e r. c o m

Think back for a minute to highschool biology, if you were fortunate/ cursed enough to take it. The basic function of every cell in our body is to take in nutrients and raw materials and, through a series of complicated reactions, produce life-sustaining energy and respiration. I’m convinced that somewhere in Siphne Sylve’s cellular makeup, there’s a unique structure that takes in, oh, I don’t know, smog or something equally grimy and synthesizes it into pure, raw talent. “I want to be sure that anything I do as an artist continues to ignite new paths of thought and it continues to ignite the idea of upliftment,” Sylve said. When she’s not managing a project through her position at UrbanArts Commission, the New Orleans native paints, DJs, crafts spoken-word poems, beatboxes, and busies herself with her next visual art installation. As I read off her lists of talents to her, I jokingly asked, “Is that it?” Sylve laughed and said, “Um, I’m not a dancer? I don’t claim that in any type of way.” But she does do nearly everything else, and that much was obvious to the UAC when they snatched her up in 2013. But managing projects there was not enough for Sylve. And though her own art is relatively hard to find, save for her murals along portions of the Greenline, Sylve said that this will soon change. “Right now, I’m in the process of creating a stronger portfolio and just really taking time to make more visual art.” There’s a traceable theme to Sylve’s body of work: the intricacies of design. “I love the structure of things,” Sylve said. “I like to know how things are made, how things are built. That’s the bulk of my work. And whether it’s a freelance piece or something I’m making for myself, I have to know the history of something, even if I don’t use it in the work itself.” This love of structure bleeds into the music Sylve creates as well. She thinks back to Friday nights at home as a kid, pointer finger hovering over the boombox, waiting to catch the missing track for her latest masterpiece cassette mix. Then as

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steppin’ out

We Recommend: Culture, News + Reviews

Toy Stories

By Chris Davis

BEN DAIGLE

Ben Daigle sometimes finds it easier to describe the sorts of things visitors to this weekend’s Memphis Pop Art Festival and Designer Toy Summit won’t see. “This is not run-of-the-mill comic book stuff,” he says. “Oh, we’ll have some of that, too. So people can check out the the familiar fare while checking out all the other stuff.” Daigle, who runs the Discordia Culture Shop in Pontotoc, Mississippi, organized the summit because he wanted to bring a vendor-operated custom toy festival to the middle of the country. “It’s the only designer toy event outside of California and New York right now,” he says. “These are strictly designer toys, which are limited-edition art objects, often developed and manufactured by individuals at home. Everything’s done in very small runs. So there are much higher price points than typical toys, but these are also rarer objects created by artists.” The Pop Art/Designer Toy festival isn’t the only culture casbah visiting the Agricenter this weekend. The SneakFest Sneaker Expo is also going down for sneakerheads and fans of urban fashion. SneakFest is more than just an opportunity for vendors. Visitors are encouraged to bring as many pairs of sneakers “as he or she can hold” in order to buy, sell, and trade. “It should be an event for everybody,” Daigle says. “We’ll have the designer toys, and they’ll be bringing sneaker culture.”

BILL SIMMERS

MEMPHIS POP ART FESTIVAL AND DESIGNER TOY SUMMIT AT THE AGRICENTER MARCH 18TH, 11 A.M.-7 P.M. $10. SNEAKFEST AT THE AGRICENTER MARCH 18TH, 1-6 P.M. $15 IN ADVANCE. SNEAKFEST.ORG

March 16-22, 2017

Cassette Set make musical alchemy out of a Memphis-Nashville pairing. Music, p. 18

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THURSDAY, March 16

FRIDAY, March 17

“Fiber” Orange Mound Gallery, 6-9 p.m. Opening reception for this show subtitled “A Tribute to Black Femininity,” featuring work by Brittney Bullock, Siphne A. Sylve, Felicia Wheeler, and Catherine Patton and curated by Grace Stewart and Victoria Jones.

St. Patrick’s Day Parade Cooper-Young District, 10-11 a.m. Annual parade with floats, motorcycles, bands, and more. Hosted by the Memphis Irish Society. St. Patrick’s Day Flying Saucer Cordova, 11 a.m.-2 a.m. Includes bagpipe music, rare-stout tappings, and corned beef and cabbage. At the downtown location, there’s live music and a blessing of the kegs at 5 p.m.

Playhouse on the Square’s Lord of the Flies Theater, p. 30

The Bridges of Madison County Circuit Playhouse, 8 p.m., $25 Based on the book by Robert James Waller (who passed away last week) about a woman who has an affair with a photographer. The Price Is Right Live Horseshoe Casino, 6 p.m., $27 Come on down! An interactive show based on the beloved, longtime game show.

Master Gardeners Spring Fling Agricenter International, 9 a.m.-5 p.m. Garden expo featuring lectures, demos, kids’ activities, and garden/ plant vendors. Through Saturday. The Malpass Brothers Halloran Centre, 7:30 p.m., $25 From the press release: “If you like cornbread and hush puppies, you’re gonna love the Malpass Brothers.”


web head box 1: Memphis Pop Art Festival and Designer Toy Summit

Slick Rick

Shine On

web subhead box 1:

By Chris Davis

“But tonight (on a starry mic) you’re about to hear (we swear) the best star rappers of the year. So, so, Cherrio (Yo, scream at brotha). Also, if you didn’t know, this is called the show.” — Slick Rick and Doug E. Fresh, “The Show.” You’re going to have to wait a little more than six minutes for the show to start, and Doug E. Fresh won’t be there. But there’s a new concert series kicking off in Tunica this week. The Moonshine Ball, in the Delta ballroom at the Tunica Roadhouse, gets underway with a concert by Craig Wayne Boyd, the alt-country heartthrob who launched his career on the reality show The Voice. That set’s only the appetizer in a lineup of artists that includes the legendary hip-hop innovator Slick Rick and the reigning Queen of the Blues, Denise LaSalle. Following his appearance on The Voice, Boyd’s major label single, “My Baby’s Got a Smile on Her Face,” debuted at No. 1 on Billboard’s Hot Country Charts, but its performance dropped precipitously in the first week, which may have figured into the reality star’s decision to go indie. With his oversized bling, golden eyepatch, and quirky rhymes, Slick Rick is hip-hop’s original clown prince. He got his start working out on the mic with Doug E. Fresh’s Get Fresh Crew. In 1985, that partnership changed hip-hop when they dropped the double-sided, pre-reality show single “The Show,” backed with the human beat-box classic “La Di Da Di.” Fans got it. Critics shrugged, dismissing both the musicality and lyrical content, and occasionally even describing it as a comedy record. The 77-year-old LaSalle needs no introductions. She signed on with Chess in 1967 and never looked back. Hit singles include “Trapped by a Thing Called Love” and “Man Sized Job.”

web head box 2: Moonshine Ball at Tunica Roadhouse

web subhead box 2:

SATURDAY, March 18 “City of Song” Germantown Performing Arts Center, 8-10 p.m. A staged production and the first collaboration between IRIS Orchestra and Opera Memphis. Suds & Stories Elmwood Cemetery, 1 p.m., $15 Beer, snacks, and a tour of graves of the men and women from Ireland. Reservations required: 774-3212.

WEDNESDAY, March 22 The Magic Tree Benjamin L. Hooks Central Library, 11 a.m. An African tale of identity and selflove presented by Hattiloo Theatre. Memphis Fine Craft Rendezvous Crosstown Arts, 11 a.m.-5 p.m. A maker’s market brought to you by Tennessee Craft Southwest.

Earth, Wind & Fire The Orpheum, 7:30 p.m., $64-$350 Concert by soul/funk legends Earth, Wind & Fire — “Let’s Groove,” “September,” “Shining Star,” and “Boogie Wonderland.” 94th Lenten Preaching Series and Waffle Shop Calvary Episcopal Church, 11 a.m.1:30 p.m. Aspic, everybody! Annual series for Lent featuring guest speakers and, of course, waffles.

ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT

Director Jordan Vogt-Roberts makes a monkey out of Kong: Skull Island. Film, p. 34

m e m p h i s f l y e r. c o m

MOONSHINE BALL PRESENTS CRAIG WAYNE BOYD, MARCH 18TH, SLICK RICK APRIL 21ST, AND DENISE LASALLE APRIL 22ND IN THE DELTA BALLROOM, TUNICA ROADHOUSE. TICKETS START AT $14. CAESARS.COM/TUNICA-ROADHOUSE

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M US I C By J.D. Reager

Cassette Set

A fortuitous Nashville/Memphis fusion takes flight.

March 16-22, 2017

L

18

ess than two years ago, Seth and Coco Moody — the musical power couple that fronts Cassette Set, a newish local project featuring a pair of well-known Memphis musicians, Graham Winchester and Jack Oblivian — were gearing up for a big move from Wilmington, N.C., to Nashville to pursue new jobs and musical opportunities. As luck would have it, for what would be their last night in town, one of Seth’s bands, Deadly Lo-Fi, got offered a gig opening for a touring Memphis act, Jack O and the Sheiks. “That was a pretty random card throw,” he says. “We were packed and about to move to Nashville, and Travis (Burdick, Deadly Lo-Fi frontman) hit me up to do a Monday night show, opening up for Jack and the Sheiks. We were literally driving the U-Haul on Tuesday, so my inclination was to skip it.” His wife, however, would have none of it. “Coco, I remember, said, ‘Come on, it’s Jack Oblivian. You gotta do it!’ So I did the show. [Jack O and the Sheiks] had me sit in on sax, and we had a blast of a night, musically, and those guys are a blast without the music.” A week later, when the tour rolled through Nashville, Seth sat in with the band again. Friendships and a musical bond were formed, and for six months, Seth traveled from Nashville to Memphis for gigs. “After the Nashville show, I came down and did Gonerfest with them, stayed the weekend, and played a DKDC show as well,” he says. “Then, I guess every show after that, I’d get asked to come down. I’d stay the weekend, so it was fun despite the commute.” Wary of the music industry infrastructure and unable to make connections in the local underground scene, the couple grew restless in Nashville. After only six months in “Music City,” Seth and Coco relocated to Memphis.

Cassette Set

“Every time I’d come to Memphis, I’d meet more and more oddballs like myself, who were also coincidentally good musicians and songwriters,” says Seth. “I’d stay at Jack’s, and he’d drive me around the city, showing me the good thrift stores, where to get a goat burrito, etc. So as the six-month lease on our expensive Nashville apartment started nearing renewal time, we made the decision to get ourselves here.” Winchester, one of Seth’s new bandmates, takes credit for playing at least somewhat of a role in that decision. “Every time I saw Seth, I would tell him how much more of a Memphis dude he was than a Nashville one and how we were going to steal him one day.” Seth has quickly become a local staple. In addition to playing with Jack O and the Sheiks, he’s performed live and/or recorded with Kelley Anderson, Jesse Davis, and Faux Killas, to name a few, and has two original projects — Turnstyles, a duo with Winchester, and Moped 10, a trio with Coco and Oblivian. Last year, Seth and Coco decided to start a covers band with Coco as the lead singer and Seth on guitar and keyboards. Winchester and Oblivian were quickly recruited to play bass and drums, respectively, and Cassette Set was born. “The idea of the band is to do songs from the ’70s and ’80s but not to worry about the details so much,” says Seth. “If you’re coming up to a part that’s intricate, just plow through it like the Kool-Aid guy entering a kid party.” Cassette Set has built a repertoire of over 40 revved-up versions of songs by Tears for Fears, Soft Cell, the Cure, the Cars, and Tom Petty and the Heartbreakers, adding a “Memphis garage-rock flair” to new-wave classics. “These are songs we grew up with. They’re fun,” says Seth. “We have a good time, and that’s the whole point, right?” Cassette Set, Loflin Yard, Saturday, March 18th, 10 p.m. Free.


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March 24 - 26 • Orpheum Theatre (901) 525-3000 • Orpheum-Memphis.com

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DRIVE T CHAMPI IN ST 1

901.388.8989

Villanova

16 Mt. St. Mary's 8

Wisconsin

9

Virginia Tech

5

Virginia

12 UNC Wilmington 4

Florida

3

EAST

SMU

11 Providence / USC Baylor

20

ORLANDO March 18

13 East Tenn. St. 6

NATIO CHAMPI

BUFFALO MARCH 18

NEW YORK TULSA March 19

MARCH 26

14 New Mexico St. 7 South Carolina 10

Marquette

2

Duke

15

Troy

FIRST ROUND 1

S. Dakota St.

8

Northwestern

9

Vanderbilt

5

Notre Dame

4

SECOND ROUND

REGIONALS

SEMI FINALS

CHAM

HOUS APR

Gonzaga

16

12

GREENVILLE March 19

Princeton West Virginia

13

Bucknell

6

Maryland

11

Xavier

3

Florida St.

SALT LAKE CITY March 18

BUFFALO March 18

WEST

SAN JOSE ORLANDO March 18

MARCH 25

14 Fla. Gulf Coast

March 16-22, 2017

7

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TO THE IONSHIP TYLE MILWAUKEE March 18

KANSAS CITY MARCH 25

SACRAMENTO March 19

8

Michigan St.

9

Iowa St.

5

Nevada

12

Purdue

4

6

Rhode Island

11

Oregon

3

Michigan Oklahoma St. Louisville

GOSSETTMOTORS.COM

13

Creighton

Iona

INDIANAPOLIS March 19

16

Miami

Vermont

MIDWEST

1

14 7 10 2

Jacksonville St. 15

REGIONALS

SECOND ROUND

FIRST ROUND North Carolina

GREENVILLE March 19

MILWAUKEE March 18

SOUTH MEMPHIS MARCH 26

SACRAMENTO March 19

INDIANAPOLIS March 19

1

Texas Southern 16 Arkansas

8

Seton Hall

9

Minnesota

5

Middle Tenn. Butler

12 4

Winthrop

13

Cincinnati

6

Kansas St./Wake Forest11

UCLA

3

Kent St.

14

Dayton

7

Wichita St. Kentucky Northern Ky.

10 2 15

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21


THE RUSTY PIECES THURSDAY, MARCH 16 BAR DKDC

MATISYAHU WEDNESDAY, MARCH 22 MINGLEWOOD HALL

BON JOVI THURSDAY, MARCH 16 FEDEXFORUM

After Dark: Live Music Schedule March 16 - 22 Tuesdays, 7 p.m.; Brandon Cunning Trio Sundays, 6 p.m., and Mondays, 7 p.m.; FreeWorld Sundays, 9:30 p.m.

Alfred’s 197 BEALE 525-3711

Gary Hardy & Memphis 2 Thursdays-Saturdays, 6-9 p.m.; Karaoke Thursdays, TuesdaysWednesdays, 9 p.m.-1 a.m., and Sundays-Mondays, 10 p.m.-2 a.m.; Mandi Thomas Fridays, Saturdays, 6-9 p.m.; The 901 Heavy Hitters Fridays, Saturdays, 10 p.m.-2 a.m.; Flyin’ Ryan Fridays, Saturdays, 2:30 a.m.; Memphis Jazz Orchestra Sundays, 6-9 p.m.

B.B. King’s Blues Club 143 BEALE 524-KING

The King Beez Thursdays, 5:30 p.m.; B.B. King’s All Stars Thursdays, Fridays, 8 p.m.; Will Tucker Band Fridays, Saturdays, 5 p.m.; Lisa G and Flic’s Pic’s Band Saturdays, Sundays, 12:30 p.m.; Blind Mississippi Morris Sundays, 5 p.m.; Memphis Jones Sundays, Wednesdays 5:30 p.m.; Doc Fangaz and the Remedy Tuesdays, 5:30 p.m.

Blue Note Bar & Grill 341-345 BEALE 577-1089

Queen Ann and the Memphis Blues Masters Fridays, Saturdays, 8 p.m.-midnight.

Blues City Cafe 138 BEALE 526-3637

King’s Palace Cafe 162 BEALE 521-1851

Club 152 152 BEALE 544-7011

Live Music WednesdaysSundays, 7-11 p.m.; Live DJ Wednesdays-Sundays, 11 p.m.; Third Floor: DJ Tubbz Fridays, Saturdays, 10 p.m.

FedExForum 191 BEALE STREET

Bon Jovi Thursday, March 16, 7:30 p.m.; Joel and Victoria Osteen Friday, March 17.

Handy Bar 200 BEALE 527-2687

Bad Boy Matt & the Amazing Rhythmatics Tuesdays, Thursdays-Sundays, 7 p.m.-1 a.m.

David Bowen Thursdays, 5:309:30 p.m., Fridays, Saturdays, 6:30-10:30 p.m., and Sundays, 5:30-9:30 p.m.

King’s Palace Cafe Patio 162 BEALE 521-1851

Sonny Mack Mondays-Fridays, 2-6 p.m.; Cowboy Neil Mondays, Thursdays, 7-11 p.m., and Saturdays, Sundays, 2-6 p.m.; Sensation Band Tuesdays, Fridays, 7-11 p.m.; Fuzzy and the Kings of Memphis Saturdays, 7-11 p.m.; Chic Jones and the Blues Express Sundays, 711 p.m.; North and South Band Wednesdays, 7-11 p.m.

Hard Rock Cafe

King’s Palace Cafe Tap Room

126 BEALE 529-0007

168 BEALE 576-2220

Swingin Leroy Friday, March 17, 9 p.m.; Memphis Music Monday Third Monday of every month, 6-9 p.m.

Itta Bena 145 BEALE 578-3031

Kayla Walker Thursdays, 67 p.m.; Susan Marshall Fridays, Saturdays, 7-10 p.m.; Nat “King” Kerr Fridays, Saturdays, 9-10 p.m.; Susan Marshall Wednesdays, 6-8 p.m.

King Jerry Lawler’s Hall of Fame Bar & Grille 159 BEALE

Chris Gales Solo Acoustic Show Mondays-Saturdays, 12-4 p.m.; Eric Hughes Thursdays, Fridays, 5-8 p.m.; Karaoke Mondays-

Big Don Valentine’s Three Piece Chicken and a Biscuit Blues Band Thursdays, Tuesdays, 8 p.m.-midnight; Cowboy Neil Friday, March 17, 8 p.m.midnight; North and South Band Saturday, March 18, 8 p.m.-midnight.

midnight and Sunday, March 19, 7-11 p.m.; FreeWorld Saturday, March 18, 8 p.m.-midnight; Eric Hughes Band Monday, March 20, 8 p.m.-midnight; Gracie Curran Tuesday, March 21, 8 p.m.-midnight; Plantation Allstars Wednesday, March 22, 8 p.m.-midnight.

Rum Boogie Cafe Blues Hall 182 BEALE 528-0150

Memphis Bluesmasters Thursdays, Sundays, 8 p.m.midnight; Vince Johnson and the Plantation Allstars Fridays, Saturdays, 4-8 p.m., and Sundays, 3-7 p.m.; Timo Arthur Friday, March 17, 9 p.m.-1 a.m., and Saturday, March 18, 9 p.m.1 a.m.; Chic Jones and the Blues Express Saturday, March 18, 4-8 p.m.; Brian Hawkins Blues Party Mondays, 8 p.m.-midnight; McDaniel Band Tuesdays, Wednesdays, 8 p.m.-midnight.

182 BEALE 528-0150

Pam and Terry Thursday, March 16, 5-8 p.m.; Ghost Town Blues Band Thursday, March 16, 8:30 p.m.-12:30 a.m.; Sensation Band Friday, March 17, 8 p.m.-

Bobbie & Tasha Wednesdays, 8-11 p.m.

Earnestine & Hazel’s 531 S. MAIN 523-9754

Amber Rae Dunn Hosts: Earnestine & Hazel’s Open Mic Wednesdays, 8-11 p.m.

Flying Saucer Draught Emporium 130 PEABODY PLACE 523-8536

225 S. MAIN 529-4299

The Malpass Brothers Friday, March 17, 7:30 p.m.

Huey’s Downtown 77 S. SECOND 527-2700

After Dark Sunday, March 19, 8:30 p.m.-midnight.

The Orpheum

Center for Southern Folklore 123 S. MAIN AT PEABODY TROLLEY STOP 525-3655

Guilt Free Pastries 344 S. MAIN

Objekt 12 Digital Album Release Thursday, March 16, 1-5:45 p.m., and Friday, March 17, 1-5:45 p.m.

Loflin Yard 7 W. CAROLINA

Electric Church Sundays, 2-4 p.m.

The Halloran Centre

203 S. MAIN 525-3000

Dueling Pianos Thursdays, Wednesdays, 9 p.m.-1 a.m., Fridays, Saturdays, 9 p.m.-3 a.m., and Sundays, Tuesdays, 8 p.m.midnight.

South Main

Songwriters with Roland and Friends Mondays, 7-10 p.m.

183 BEALE 522-9596

330 BEALE 525-8981

Rum Boogie Cafe

855 KENTUCKY

Silky O’Sullivan’s

New Daisy Theatre Reverend Horton Heat Friday, March 17, 8 p.m.

Dirty Crow Inn

Experience Hendrix 2017 Tour Thursday, March 16, 8-11 p.m.

The Silly Goose 100 PEABODY PLACE 435-6915

Bar DKDC 964 S. COOPER 272-0830

The Rusty Pieces Thursday, March 16, 10 p.m.-1 a.m.; Deering and Down Friday, March 17; Rev. John Wilkins Saturday, March 18; City Champs Sunday, March 19; Devil Train Monday, March 20; The Head Tuesday, March 21; Some Sons of Mudboy Wednesday, March 22.

Benjamin L. Hooks Central Library 3030 POPLAR 415-2700

DJ Cody Fridays, Saturdays, 10 p.m.

Five Fridays of Jazz Every other Friday, 6 p.m.

Visible Music College

Binghamton UMC

200 MADISON 381-3939

The 901 Lip Sync Battle and Talent Showcase Saturday, March 18, 6:30-9 p.m.

Todd Nations and Friends Saturday, March 18, 8-11 p.m.

258 N. MERTON

The Neo Soul Effect Wednesday, March 22, 7:15 p.m.

Celtic Crossing 903 S. COOPER 274-5151

Jeremy Stanfill and Joshua Cosby Sundays, 6-9 p.m.; Candy Company Mondays.

March 16-22, 2017

Blind Mississippi Morris Fridays, 5 p.m., and Saturdays, 5:30 p.m.; Brad Birkedahl Band Thursdays, Wednesdays, 8 p.m.; Earl “The Pearl” Banks Saturdays, 12:30 p.m., and

Thursdays, Sundays, 8 p.m.; Live Bands Fridays, Saturdays, 8 p.m.

22

GRIZZLIES VS SPURS SATURDAY, MARCH 18

JOEL OSTEEN FRIDAY, MARCH 17

NCAA® 2017 MARCH 24 & 26

PANIC! AT THE DISCO SATURDAY, APRIL 8

Presented by Bud Light. Wrestling Night! Z-Bo Wrestling Buddy for first 4,000 fans. 901.888.HOOP · grizzlies.com

The pastors of the largest church in America are coming to Memphis to hold A Night of Hope at FedExForum. Tickets Available!

Sweet Sixteen & Elite Eight 2017 NCAA Division I Men’s Basketball Championship South Regional. Tickets Available!

Death of a Bachelor Tour is set to hit FedExForum, with special guests Misterwives and Saint Motel. Tickets Available!

Get tickets at FedExForum Box Office | Ticketmaster locations | 1.800.745.3000 | ticketmaster.com | fedexforum.com


After Dark: Live Music Schedule March 16 - 22 The Cove

Murphy’s

Wiseacre Brewery

Huey’s Poplar

2559 BROAD 730-0719

1589 MADISON 726-4193

2783 BROAD

4872 POPLAR 682-7729

430 N. CLEVELAND 507-8030

Parlor Walls, Nonconnah, and Ihcilon Monday, March 20, 9:30 p.m.-12:30 a.m.

Eternal Peace Missionary Baptist Church

Off the Square Catering

Jeff the Brotherhood with Yesse Yavis Free Show Friday, March 17, 7-10 p.m.

Bluff City Soul Collective Sunday, March 19, 8:30 p.m.-midnight.

Young Avenue Deli

Mortimer’s

2119 YOUNG 278-0034

590 N. PERKINS 761-9321

The Goldie Dee Show Saturday, March 18.

Van Duren Solo Thursdays, 6:30-8:30 p.m.

TJ Mulligan’s

19 S. FLORENCE 728-6085

Nashville Songwriter’s Assn. Intnl. (NSAI) Memphis Chapter Third Tuesday of every month, 6:30-8:30 p.m.

1817 KIRBY 755-2481

Dantones Band Friday, March 17, 9 p.m.-1 a.m.

Huey’s Collierville

South Memphis Centenary United Methodist Church 584 E. MCLEMORE 774-7604

Dillard University Annual Spring Tour 2017 Tuesday, March 21, 7-9 p.m.

Youth and Young Adult Spring Revival: A Perfect Word to Revive the Soul Tues.-Thur., Mar. 14-16, 7-10 p.m.

T.J. Mulligan’s Cordova 8071 TRINITY 756-4480

The Southern Edition Band Tuesdays.

Hi-Tone

Frayser/Millington

412-414 N. CLEVELAND 278-TONE

Rock Bottom String Band Thursday, March 16, 9 p.m.; Wild Pink, Movie Night Friday, March 17, 8 p.m.; Jucifer, Jack the Giant Killer Friday, March 17, 9 p.m.; Mayday, Higher Class Saturday, March 18, 8 p.m.; Spoon Fed Tribe Sunday, March 19, 9 p.m.; Weedeater Monday, March 20, 8 p.m.; Ne-Hi Tuesday, March 21, 9 p.m.; Thelma and the Sleaze Tuesday, March 21, 9 p.m.; North by North, Airside Wednesday, March 22, 8 p.m.

Shake Rag Bar 8902 RANKIN BRANCH 876-5255

Midnite Train St. Patty’s Day Party Friday, March 17, 9 p.m.3 a.m.

Germantown Germantown Performing Arts Center 1801 EXETER 751-7500

IRIS Orchestra: City of Song Saturday, March 18, 8-10 p.m. and Sunday, March 19, 2-4 p.m.

Huey’s Midtown 1927 MADISON 726-4372

All New 2017 Fiat 124 Spider

The Royal Hounds with Libby Knowlton Sunday, March 19, 47 p.m.; The Brian Johnson Band Sunday, March 19, 8:30 p.m.midnight.

394 N. WATKINS 443-0502

Memphis Ukelele Meetup Tuesdays, 6-7:30 p.m.

Minglewood Hall 1555 MADISON 866-609-1744

Matisyahu Wednesday, March 22, 8 p.m.

Lenten Midweek Worship: Music, Song, & Silence-Drawing Closer to God Wednesdays, 7-7:45 p.m.

2 Mule Plow Sunday, March 19, 4-7 p.m.; The Chaulkies Sunday, March 19, 8:30 p.m.-midnight.

Crockett Hall Tuesdays with the Midtown Rhythm Section Tuesdays, 9 p.m.

Midtown Crossing Grill

1880 WOLF RIVER 457-2000

Huey’s Cordova

Growlers

2119 MADISON 207-5097

St. George’s Independent School

1771 N. GERMANTOWN PKWY. 754-3885

1911 POPLAR 244-7904

Amy LaVere and Will Sexton Thursday, March 16, 6 p.m.; John Kilzer Thursday, March 16, 9 p.m.; Blackwater Trio Friday, March 17, 6:30 p.m.; Brennan Villines Friday, March 17, 10 p.m.; The Third Man Saturday, March 18, 11:30 a.m.; Heath N’ Justin Saturday, March 18, 6:30 p.m.; Joe Restivo 4 Sundays, 11 a.m.; McKenna Bray w/ Will Tucker Sunday, March 19, 8 p.m.; John Paul Keith and Co. Mondays, 6 p.m.; John Kilzer Tuesdays, 8 p.m.; Breeze Cayolle and New Orleans Wednesdays, 5:30 p.m.; Dewy Star Wednesday, March 22, 8 p.m.

JoJo and Ronnie Sunday, March 19, 8-11:30 p.m.

Cordova

1251 S. WILLETT

Lafayette’s Music Room

2130 W. POPLAR 854-4455

test drive one today

GOSSETT FIAT 1901 COVINGTON PIKE • FIATUSAOFMEMPHIS.COM • 388.8989 Poplar/I-240

P&H Cafe 1532 MADISON 726-0906

Rock Starkaraoke Fridays; Open Mic Music with Tiffany Harmon Mondays, 9 p.m.midnight; Kristin Ford Tuesday, March 21.

The Phoenix 1015 S. COOPER 338-5223

The Phoenix Blues Jam Tuesdays, 8-11 p.m.

RockHouse Live Midtown 2586 POPLAR

Slamhound Friday, March 17.

Wild Bill’s 1580 VOLLINTINE 207-3975

The Wild Bill’s Band Fridays, Saturdays, 11 p.m.-3 a.m.

6069 PARK 767-6002

University of Memphis Lost Pizza 2885 POPLAR 572-1803

JB Whalen & Brent Matseas Every other Thursday, 6-8 p.m.

East Memphis Folk’s Folly Prime Steak House 551 S. MENDENHALL 762-8200

Intimate Piano Lounge featuring Charlotte Hurt Mondays-Thursdays, 5-9:30 p.m.; Larry Cunningham Fridays, Saturdays, 6-10 p.m.

Neil’s Music Room 5727 QUINCE 682-2300

Jack Rowell’s Celebrity Jam Thursdays, 8 p.m.; Suburban Trunkmonkeys Friday, March 17; Eddie Smith Fridays, 8 p.m.; Midnight Train Saturday, March 18, 8 p.m.; Flashback Sunday, March 19, 4-7 p.m.; Debbie Jamison & Friends Tuesdays, 6-10 p.m.; Elmo and the Shades Wednesdays, 8 p.m.midnight.

Prime Cut Sunday, March 19, 8:30 p.m.-midnight.

Huey’s Germantown 7677 FARMINGTON 318-3034

Charlie Mac’s Six String Lovers Sunday, March 19, 8-11:30 p.m.

North Mississippi/ Tunica Horseshoe Casino & Hotel AT CASINO CENTER, SOUTH OF MEMPHIS, NEAR TUNICA, MS 1-800-303-SHOE

East Tapas and Drinks Eddie Harris Thursdays, Fridays, 6:30-9:30 p.m.; Elizabeth Wise Tuesdays, 7-9 p.m.; Van Duren Solo Tuesdays, 7-9 p.m.

Huey’s Southwind 7825 WINCHESTER 624-8911

Bartlett Hadley’s Pub 2779 WHITTEN 266-5006

Thump Daddy Friday, March 17, 9 p.m. and Saturday, March 18, 9 p.m.; Shotgun Billys Sunday, March 19, 5:30 p.m.; Charlie and Juno All Star Experience Wednesday, March 22, 8 p.m.

Shelby Forest General Store 7729 BENJESTOWN 876-5770

Tony Butler Fridays, 6-8 p.m.; Reel McCoy Saturday, March 18, 12-3 p.m.; Cecil Yancy Sunday, March 19, 12:30-3:30 p.m.

Side Car Cafe 2194 WHITTEN 388-0285

Brian Johnson Band Saturday, March 18, 9 p.m.-midnight.

Aaron Lewis Sunday, March 19.

Huey’s Southaven 7090 MALCO, SOUTHAVEN, MS 662-349-7097

Vintage Sunday, March 19, 8 p.m.-midnight.

Raleigh Stage Stop 2951 CELA 382-1576

Blues Jam Every Thursday Night hosted by Brad Webb Thursdays, 7-11 p.m.; Rustenhaven Friday, March 17, 9 p.m.-1 a.m.; Led Zeppin Saturday, March 18, 9 p.m.-1 a.m.; Open Mic Night and Steak Night Tuesdays, 6 p.m.-midnight.

m e m p h i s f l y e r. c o m

Crosstown Arts

40th Annual St. Patrick’s Day Celebration Friday, March 17; Future Losers with Glorious Abhor and Doranovox Tuesday, March 21; Eric Lewis Wednesday, March 22, 6-8 p.m.

ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT

Ed Finney and the U of M Jazz Quartet Thursdays, 9 p.m.; Justin White Mondays, 7 p.m.; Don and Wayde Tuesdays, 7-10 p.m.; Karaoke Wednesdays, 10 p.m.

Collierville

23


THE PINK PALACE IS OPEN!

CALENDAR of EVENTS:

March 16 - 22

TH EAT E R

Benjamin L. Hooks Central Library

Hattiloo at the Library: The Magic Tree, an African tale of identity, self-love, family, and determination. Ola ventures across Yoruba, where she discovers new lands, meets new people, and uncovers her inner strength and beauty. www. memphislibrary.org. Sat., March 18, 11 a.m. 3030 POPLAR (415-2700).

Circuit Playhouse

The Bridges of Madison County, based on the best-selling novel about a beautiful Italian woman who married an American soldier to flee war-torn Italy. A ruggedly handsome photographer seeking direction changes her life forever. www.playhouseonthesquare.org. $25$40. Sundays, 2 p.m., and Thursdays-Saturdays, 8 p.m. Through April 9. 51 S. COOPER (725-0776).

EXHIBIT

The Evergreen Theatre

Produced by Evergreen Exhibitions in collaboration with the Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution

January 21 - May 7, 2017

The Dragnificent Variety Show 2017, original skits, production numbers, and more featuring some of Memphis ’ favorite drag personalities, benefiting Planned Parenthood. www.friendsofgeorges.org. $25. Fri., Sat., 8 p.m. Through March 18. 1705 POPLAR (274-7139).

Germantown Community Theatre

Violet, as a girl, Violet was struck by a wayward axe blade, leaving her with a visible scar across her face. She travels across the 1964 South toward a miracle — the healing touch of a TV evangelist that will make her beautiful. www. gctcomeplay.org. $28. Through March 26. 3037 FOREST HILL-IRENE (453-7447).

Hattiloo Theatre

Crowns the Gospel Musical, church hats become a springboard for an exploration of Black history and identity as seen through the eyes of a young Black woman who has come down South to stay with her aunt after her brother is killed in Brooklyn. www.hattiloo.org. $22-$28. Sundays, 3 p.m., Saturdays, 2 & 7:30 p.m., and Thursdays, Fridays, 7:30 p.m. Through April 2. 37 S. COOPER (502-3486).

Playhouse 51

Both Sides, a young mysterious woman shows up and turns Andrew Mitchell’s quiet, uneventful, unassuming life living with his mother topsyturvy. www.playhouse51.com. $12. Fri., Sat., 7:30 p.m. Through March 18. 8077 WILKINSVILLE (872-7170).

Playhouse on the Square

P!NK PALACE MUSEUM

Lord of the Flies. Adult situations advisory. www.playhouseonthesquare. org. $35-$40. Thursdays-Saturdays, 8 p.m., and Sundays, 2 p.m. Through March 26.

March 16-22, 2017

66 S. COOPER (726-4656).

Theatre Memphis

$2.50 LB

CRAWFISH BY THE BAG STRAIGHT FROM LOUISIANA

RESERVE YOUR BAG! BY THURSDAY BY NOON FOR THE WEEKEND

24

Send the date, time, place, cost, info, phone number, a brief description, and photos — two weeks in advance — to calendar@memphisflyer.com or P.O. Box 1738, Memphis, TN 38101. DUE TO SPACE LIMITATIONS, ONGOING WEEKLY EVENTS WILL APPEAR IN THE FLYER’S ONLINE CALENDAR ONLY.

547-7997

Side Show, musical based on the lives of conjoined twin women, famous stage performers in the 1930’s. www.theatrememphis. org. $30. Fridays, Saturdays, 8 p.m., Sundays, 2 p.m., and Thursdays, 7:30 p.m. Through April 2. 630 PERKINS EXT. (682-8323).

TheatreWorks

Dupont Mississippi. Meet the folks of Dupont, Mississippi, and hear their stories as to why the death of the evil and dictatorial matriarch of the small town is a cause for celebration. www.etcmemphistheater.com. $15. Sundays, 2 p.m., and Fridays, Saturdays, 8 p.m. Through March 26. 2085 MONROE (274-7139).

Universal Parenting Place

PlayBack Memphis, bringing stories to life in a safe space to unlock healing, transformation, and joy. Families welcome. (207-3694), Free. Third Thursday of every month, 4:30-6 p.m. LEMOYNE-OWEN COLLEGE, 990 COLLEGE PARK.

Opening reception for “New Work by Rana Rochat” exhibition at David Lusk Gallery, Friday, March 17th, 6-8 p.m. A R T I ST R E C E PT I O N S

David Lusk Gallery

Opening reception for “New Work by Rana Rochat,” exhibition of encaustic paintings on panel or paper. www.davidluskgallery.com. Fri., March 17, 6-8 p.m. Opening reception for “Memphis,” exhibition of new paintings by Dwayne Butcher, www.davidluskgallery.com. Fri., March 17, 6-8 p.m. 97 TILLMAN (767-3800).

Fogelman Galleries of Contemporary Art, University of Memphis

Opening reception for 11th Annual Art Education Alumni Juried Exhibition: “Tolerance,” www.memphis.edu. Fri., March 17, 3:30-5 p.m. Opening reception for “Heavy-Laden,” exhibition MFA thesis of carved concrete and steel sculptures by Desmond Lewis. (678-2216). Fri., March 17, 5-7 p.m. 3715 CENTRAL.

OT H E R A R T H A P P E N I N G S

“Drawing Memory”

Live mural painting by Victor Ekpuk, a Nigerian-born, Washington D.C.-based artist, Through March 17. MEMPHIS BROOKS MUSEUM OF ART, 1934 POPLAR (544-6209), WWW.BROOKSMUSEUM.ORG.

The Garden and Culture, Lecture by James F. Caughman

Presentation looks at the development of European gardens from the High Renaissance through the 18th century. Explore not only the garden but furniture, architecture, and fine art during the Golden Age of Creativity. Sat., March 18, 10:30 a.m. MEMPHIS BROOKS MUSEUM OF ART, 1934 POPLAR (544-6209), WWW.BROOKSMUSEUM.ORG.

Hustle: Successful Studio Visits

Presentation with Q&A to follow. Complimentary food and drinks. Series will provide visual artists with information, resources, and opportunities to

support them in the development of their professional careers. Tues., March 21, 6-8 p.m. CROSSTOWN ARTS, 430 N. CLEVELAND (507-8030), WWW. CROSSTOWNARTS.ORG.

Islamic Art & Calligraphy

Attendees will be able to try their hand at Islamic calligraphy. Free. Wed., March 22, 5-6:30 p.m. CORDOVA BRANCH LIBRARY, 8457 TRINITY (754-8443).

Memphis Pop Art Festival/Designer Toy Summit

Art, culture, and designer toys. $10. Sat., March 18, 10 a.m.-5 p.m. AGRICENTER INTERNATIONAL, 7777 WALNUT GROVE (551497-8714), MEMPHISPOPARTFEST.COM.

DAN C E

“Dance In His Name” Praise Dance Showcase & Competition

Dance teams from all across the nation honor the spirit of dance, worship, and praise. Prizes will be awarded to the first-, second-, and thirdplace winners. $15. Sat., March 18, 4-6 p.m. SOUTHWIND HIGH SCHOOL, 7900 E. SHELBY (870-4348), WWW.BALLETONWHEELS.ORG.

C O M E DY

Cafe Eclectic

The Wiseguys Present: Storytellers Unplugged, combines fast-paced improv, guest storytellers, and scenic improv. $5. Third Saturday of every month, 9:30 p.m. 603 N. MCLEAN (725-1718).

Midtown Crossing Grill

Freaky Friday Comedy Show, comedians from Memphis and abroad hit the stage and perform each other’s jokes. $5. Fri., March 17, 9-11 p.m. 394 N. WATKINS (443-0502).

continued on page 26


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3/3/17 5:15 PM


CALENDAR: MARCH 16 - 22 continued from page 24 P&H Cafe

Open Mic Comedy, Thursdays, 9 p.m. 1532 MADISON (726-0906).

PO ET RY/S PO K E N WOR D

Amurica World Headquarters

Spillit Center Stage: Ladies, enjoy an evening of true stories. The theme is Ladies. www.spillitmemphis.org. $10. Sun., March 19, 7 p.m. 410 CLEVELAND.

Binghamton UMC

The Neo Soul Effect, night of entertainment and enlightenment. Partake in the festivities. All poets, spoken word, singers, and rappers welcome. $7. Wed., March 22, 7:15 p.m. 258 N. MERTON.

FireHouse Community Arts Center

Voices: Open Mic/Variety Show, compete for cash prizes, studio time, and more. www. memphisblackartsalliance.org. $5. Fri., March 17, 7 p.m.

THE DIXON GALLERY & GARDENS, 4339 PARK (761-5250), WWW.DIXON.ORG.

Booksigning by Crystal Sanders

“A Night of Hope” with Joel and Victoria Osteen

NATIONAL CIVIL RIGHTS MUSEUM, 450 MULBERRY (521-9699), WWW. CIVILRIGHTSMUSEUM.ORG.

FEDEXFORUM, 191 BEALE STREET, WWW.FORUMMEMPHIS.COM.

LECTU R E / S P EA K E R

This year’s Memphis Heritage’s Preservation Series focuses on music-rich buildings, people, and history. Mondays, 7 p.m. Through March 27.

“All the Single Ladies”

Dr. Cookie Woolner speaks on the experiences and representations of unmarried women throughout American history. Pizza served. Fri., March 17, 12:45-1:45 p.m. UNIVERSITY OF MEMPHIS, MITCHELL HALL, WWW.MEMPHIS.EDU/WHM.

Conversations about Local Food Policy

Panel series that addresses how policy affects our food system, addressing topics such as sustainable agriculture, land use, access, farm to school and child nutrition, and food access and security. Thursdays, 6-7 p.m. Through March 30. (443-7623), WWW.MEMPHISTILTH.ORG.

B O O KS I G N I N G S

“The History of Islam in the New World”

Author discusses and signs The Great Dixter Cookbook: Recipes from an English Garden. Tues., March 21, 10:30 a.m.-noon.

RHODES COLLEGE, BLOUNT AUDITORIUM IN BUCKMAN HALL, 2000 N. PARKWAY (843-3000), WWW.RHODES.EDU.

Author discusses and signs A Chance for Change. Thurs., March 16, 6-8 p.m.

985 S. BELLEVUE (948-9522).

Booksigning by Aaron Bertelsen

March 16, 7-9 p.m.

Nabil Bayakly will speak on topic touching on Islam before Columbus, Muslim Melungeons, Islam through slavery, Islam in recent history, and the present. Free. Thurs.,

$15. Fri., March 17, 6 p.m.

Landmarks in Memphis Music

HOWARD HALL, 2282 MADISON.

Monthly Botany Talks: A Casual Discussion of Plant Families

Suggested book: Botany in a Day by Thomas J. Elpel. Participate in group discussions on a particular plant family led by an enthusiast of that family. Supplemental pages and refreshments provided. $5 per month/$50 per year for members, $8 per month/$70 per year for nonmembers. Thurs., March 16, 5-6 p.m. THE DIXON GALLERY & GARDENS, 4339 PARK (761-5250), WWW.DIXON.ORG.

E X PO S/ SA L E S

The Annual Health, Wellness, and Legal Advice Community Services Fair

Indie Wednesday Film Series: Trivia Night at Crosstown Arts, Wednesday, March 22, 6-9 p.m. Family event featuring health screenings, consultations with health and legal experts, children’s entertainment, and healthy refreshments. Free. Sat., March 18, 10 a.m.-2 p.m. HOLLYWOOD COMMUNITY CENTER, 1560 N. HOLLYWOOD (458-4084).

Jobs & Careers Week at Whitehaven

Whitehaven Library seeks to connect employers with potential employees and link people up with organizations interested in sharing information and services that will help a person’s chances of gaining employment. Free. Mon.-Fri., Mar. 13-17, 10 a.m.-4 p.m.

17-18, 9 a.m.-5 p.m.

WHITEHAVEN BRANCH LIBRARY, 4120 MILLBRANCH (415-2781).

March Industry Madness

Learn about career opportunities in the barbering industry, application process, and financial aid opportunities. Complimentary snacks to attendees and March Madness-themed games available. Mondays-Fridays, 9 a.m.-2 p.m. Through March 31. THE BARBER SCHOOL, 1309 JACKSON (726-4247), WWW.THEBARBERSCHOOL.EDU.

Master Gardeners Spring Fling

Garden expo featuring lectures, demos, children’s activities, and vendors. Free. Fri.-Sat., Mar.

AGRICENTER INTERNATIONAL, 7777 WALNUT GROVE (752-1207), WWW.MEMPHISAREAMASTERGARDENERS.ORG.

Sneakfest Sneaker Expo $15. Sat., March 18, 1-6 p.m. AGRICENTER INTERNATIONAL, 7777 WALNUT GROVE (452-2151), WWW.SNEAKFEST.ORG.

S PO R TS / F IT N ES S

Daffodil Dash

Three-mile MRTC certified run, followed by a one-mile Family Fun Run through the garden. Wind down after the

continued on page 29

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CALENDAR: MARCH 16 - 22 continued from page 26 race with live music by Movie Night, food trucks, concessions, and beer bar. $10-$25. Sat., March 18, 8 a.m.-noon. MEMPHIS BOTANIC GARDEN, 750 CHERRY (636-4100), WWW.MEMPHISBOTANICGARDEN.COM.

Go Ape Treetop Adventure

Course in Shelby Farms Park open for its second season. Ongoing. SHELBY FARMS, 500 N. PINE LAKE (767-PARK), WWW.GOAPE.COM.

Silky O’Sullivans St. Patrick’s Day Parade

Enjoy special holiday events including Raising of the Goat on Friday and parade on Saturday. Through March 17. BEALE STREET, DOWNTOWN MEMPHIS (529-0999), WWW.BEALESTREETMERCHANTS.COM.

F I LM

Concoct

Indie Wednesday Film Series: Trivia Night

Make a drink and a masterpiece. For ages 21+. Register online. $40-$75. Sat., March 18, 5 p.m. SHELBY FARMS, 500 N. PINE LAKE (767-PARK), WWW.SHELBYFARMS.ORG.

Go Green at Ghost River

St. Patrick’s Day Parade

Memphis Irish Society supported by Celtic Crossing will host floats, bands, motorcycles, and lots of green parading down Cooper from York to Young. Fri., March 17, 10-11 a.m. COOPER-YOUNG DISTRICT, CORNER OF COOPER AND YOUNG (274-5151), WWW.CELTICCROSSINGMEMPHIS.COM.

KIDS

F O O D & D R I N K E V E N TS

Hula Hoop with Co-Motion

Hula hoops provided. Sat., March 18, 11 a.m.

Drink on St. Patrick’s Day, and be green about it with Wolf River Conservancy special event. Fri., March 17, 5-10 p.m. GHOST RIVER BREWING, 827 S. MAIN (278-0087).

Meritan Spirit Night

Drop your receipt in a box near the register, and Pyro’s will donate 20 percent of the proceeds to Meritan. Wed., March 22, 5-9 p.m. PYRO’S FIRE FRESH PIZZA, 1199 RIDGEWAY (766-0600).

BENJAMIN L. HOOKS CENTRAL LIBRARY, 3030 POPLAR (4152700), WWW.MEMPHISLIBRARY.ORG.

An underground trivia legend in New York City faces an unbeaten game show from his past to reclaim the greatness he once had. Trivia competition will precede the film. Q&A will follow the film. Wed., March 22, 6-9 p.m. CROSSTOWN ARTS, 430 N. CLEVELAND (507-8030), WWW.CROSSTOWNARTS.ORG.

The Space in Between: Marina Abramovic

The documentary brings an unprecedented approach of the intimate creative process of one of the most important artists of our time. $9. Wed., March 22, 7 p.m. MEMPHIS BROOKS MUSEUM OF ART, 1934 POPLAR (544-6209), WWW.BROOKSMUSEUM.ORG.

S P E C IAL EVE N TS

CALVARY EPISCOPAL CHURCH, 102 N. SECOND (525-6602), WWW.CALVARYMEMPHIS.ORG.

“Rise Against Hunger”

Volunteers representing non-profit organizations around the city will meet to package meals that ship out to hunger relief centers around the world. Sun., March 19, 12-2 p.m. PLEASANT VIEW SCHOOL, 1888 BARTLETT (380-0122).

“Back to the Moon for Good” $7. Through June 2.

SHARPE PLANETARIUM, MEMPHIS PINK PALACE MUSEUM, 3050 CENTRAL (636-2362), WWW.MEMPHISMUSEUMS.ORG.

Essential Oils with Pets

Proceeds from any purchase of doTERRA essential oils after the demonstration benefit heartwormpositive dogs at MAS. Sat., March 18, 2 p.m.

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PROMO CASH

Interactive exhibit that highlights the adventure of deep-sea exploration and discovery. Through May 6. MEMPHIS PINK PALACE MUSEUM, 3050 CENTRAL (636-2362), WWW.MEMPHISMUSEUMS.ORG.

The Price Is Right Live

Interactive stage show that gives eligible individuals the chance to “Come on Down” to win. $27. Fri., March 17, 6 p.m. HORSESHOE CASINO & HOTEL, AT CASINO CENTER, SOUTH OF MEMPHIS, NEAR TUNICA, MS (1-800-303-SHOE), WWW.CAESARS.COM.

Youth and Young Adult Spring Revival: A Perfect Word to Revive the Soul

Featuring guest speaker Pastor Tim Rogers and gospel vocalist. Tues.-Thur., Mar. 14-16, 7-10 p.m. ETERNAL PEACE MISSIONARY BAPTIST CHURCH, 1251 S. WILLETT (662-367-3949).

H O L I DAY EVE N TS

Cooper-Young St. Patrick’s Day Parade Floats, bands, motorcycles, and lots of green will parade from York to Young beginning at Memphis Made and ending at First Congregational Church. Fri., March 17, 10 a.m.

COOPER-YOUNG HISTORIC DISTRICT, WWW.COOPERYOUNGFESTIVAL.COM, WWW.COOPERYOUNG.BIZ.

Lenten Midweek Worship: Music, Song, & Silence-Drawing Closer to God Epiphany Lutheran Church is offering a very special Lenten worship series incorporating a mix of Taizé songs. Free. Wednesdays, 7-7:45 p.m. Through April 5. ST. GEORGE’S INDEPENDENT SCHOOL, 1880 WOLF RIVER (861-6227), WWW.EPIPHANYLU.ORG.

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FitzgeraldsTunica.com • 1-662-363-LUCK (5825) • Must be 21 and a Key Rewards member. See Cashier • Players Club for rules. Tax and resort fee not included in listed price. Advance hotel reservations required and subject to availability. $50 credit or debit card is required upon hotel check-in. Arrivals after 6pm must be guaranteed with a credit card. Management reserves the right to cancel, change and modify the event or promotion. Gaming restricted patrons prohibited. Gambling Problem? Call 1-800-522-4700.

m e m p h i s f l y e r. c o m

Serving up all traditional favorites, including homemade waffles, salads, and daily specials benefiting support outreach ministries across the city of Memphis. See website for more information and lecture schedule. Through April 2.

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94th Lenten Preaching Series and Waffle Shop

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web head: Memphis theaters

confront a variety of hideous creatures.

T H E AT E R B y C h r i s D a v i s

Monsters

Memphis theaters confront a variety of hideous creatures.

March 16-22, 2017

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D

There are moments in Playhouse on the Square’s chillingly austere take on William Golding’s classic Lord of the Flies when the story’s opposing gangs threaten to stage a Pat Benatar video or square off in a Jets vs. Sharks dance-off. The sequences — impressive as they are — create tonal inconsistencies in a strong show. It works but never as cohesively as it might. Lord of the Flies is the definition of an ensemble show. Director Jordan Nichols brought together an age-appropriate cast of (mostly) teens, capable of addressing the story’s heart and its horror. Golding’s violent parable of tribalism and unraveling democracy is encumbered by a bit of postcolonial savage vs. civilization bias, but its story of marooned British schoolboys playing naked dominance politics rings as true as ever. The kids nail it. In one of the evening’s more effective movement numbers, the cast becomes a living, breathing evolution chart going one way first, then full on reverse. It’s too brutal and too beautiful and probably too on the nose. It’s also a perfect bullseye. Lord of the Flies at Playhouse on the Square through March 26th Violet’s the best Tony-nominated musical nobody’s ever heard of. Based on Doris Betts’ short story The Ugliest Pilgrim and buoyed by a collage of authentic Americana sounds, Violet tells the story of a hardened young woman who’s pinned her hopes and dreams on a Tulsa faith healer. It’s a road trip story prominently featuring one hot, transformative night in Memphis. In a short-feeling 90 minutes, Violet tackles big ideas about race, class,

Lord of the Flies

BILL SIMMERS

web subhead:

aylight saving time may have sprung us forward Sunday, but even so, it’s getting darker out there all the time. Almost every production on stage in Memphis right now toys in some way with concepts of ugliness, scars, and deformity. In Lord of the Flies, schoolboys turn into murderous beasts when they’re marooned on an island. Violet’s about a girl whose face was scarred by an axe. Based on the true story of the conjoined Hilton twins, Side Show tells a circus story populated by a cast of “human oddities.” Blackbird’s a tiny piece of chamber theater subjecting audiences to 90 painfully awkward real-time minutes as a victim of child sexual abuse confronts her abuser at his workplace. Everything’s ugly, and beautifully done.

beauty, and faith with none of the usual “put it on Jesus” cliches. Germantown Community Theatre’s production of Violet boasts some extraordinary voices and some not-so-extraordinary voices, but it’s all honesty and heart. Nichol Pritchard’s Violet is someone everybody knows. Hers is a standout performance. Violet composer Jeanine Tesori (Fun Home, Caroline, or Change) dove deep into American roots music and delivered an unpretentious country-, blues-, and bluegrass-laden score, where Bo Diddley beats meet big Broadway ballads. Violet at Germantown Community Theatre through March 26th If you like good acting, go see Blackbird. If you like stories that are so overloaded with emotional twists, you’ll spend the rest of the night unpacking it all, go see Blackbird. This first production by Memphis’ Quark Theatre is one hell of an introduction. Tony Isbell and Fiona Battersby play Ray and Una — a sexual predator and his one known victim. Their unexpected reunion in Ray’s workplace keeps audiences squirming, cringing, and trying very hard to look away (and failing) for 90 intense minutes. Blackbird at TheatreSouth through March 26th Side Show’s got it all — great voices, great design, and a great story to tell. It doesn’t really capture the hell conjoined twins Violet and Daisy Hilton lived through and only hints at a life where every relationship is abusive, reducing a horrible existence to so much irony and failed romance, but for all of its missed opportunities, this circus musical cuts to the core of everyday insecurity. Who hasn’t felt like everybody was staring at them and asked “Who will love me as I am?” With the simplest gestures, Theatre Memphis’ designers have turned the entire main stage space into a big top. The effect brings everybody into the same big tent for the show’s duration. Side Show at Theatre Memphis through April 2nd


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Elevating your drinking game at Bass Pro.

W

hen it comes to drinking, I typically don’t need things to be made too difficult. I like my bartenders like I like my enemies: close and familiar with my bad habits. But I stepped out of my comfort zone to visit The Lookout, the steampunk/fish tankthemed bar at the top of the Bass Pro Pyramid. I had been only once, when it first opened, and while impressive, I assumed it was a novelty space and not one I would frequent regularly, if at all. The first obstacle that I don’t like standing between a bar and me is a free-standing elevator. The Pyramid itself is 32 stories tall and the elevator covers a solid 28 of them, but I’ve overcome greater obstacles for whiskey. I visited on a Tuesday right around sunset, where I was surprised to find a pretty good crowd for early in the week. Most were the professional sort. The folks dining at The Lookout tables looked like the type of people that don’t want to pay for the Affordable Care Act but are totally okay with paying $10/person to ride in an elevator while a recorded greeting from Bill Dance plays. The bartender working that evening, Jay, has been at The Lookout since it opened. He was full of useful information, but that can wait. Let’s get to drinking. I had the Blood and Sand, a spin on an Old Fashioned made with Maker’s 46. My friend had the Memphis Mule’shine, made with Tito’s vodka and Ole Smoky Peach Moonshine. The specialty drinks were strong and ranged in price from $10-$12, so while it’s not the cheapest bender you’ll go on this week, it gets the job done. Jay said that one of the more popular cocktails is the Uncle Buck, a less-sweet margarita made with tequila and Chartreuse. We tried that next, and it was delicious, although I caution against drinking multiples of it before stepping back on that elevator. The main draw of The Lookout, of course, is the view. The sides of the restaurant open on both the west and south sides, where visitors can take a selfie on a sprawling observation deck overlooking the river and downtown

Memphis. Though the walls may not be completely open every day, the decks are always accessible. I’ve always wanted to see what it would be like up there for a lightning storm (try the Quiet Storm, $10!). The other draw is the massive fish tank in the middle of the bar. The bar encircles it, assuring you a great view of a 70-pound catfish and its smaller friends. Jay calls the catfish Priscilla, though he said everyone has their own name for her. If fish in captivity aren’t your thing, there are TVs to watch Grizzlies games. This isn’t a bucket-of-beer type place, though, so prepare to pay $5 a beer for domestics and $6 for specialty beers to cry into during the third quarter.

I’ve lived here 11 years, so I’m guessing that makes me enough of a Memphian to have the “Let’s size this situation up and see what could go wrong” attitude, which is how it came to be that I asked Jay about what we do in case of a fire. I looked for emergency stairs on the ride up and couldn’t find any. Jay explained that along the inside of the Pyramid, cleverly disguised and encased, are nearly horizontal “staircases,” horizontal enough that they turn a 28-story trek into a 56-story one. Next question? “They have the weight capacity for all staff and guests,” Jay said. That settled, I moved on to the wine. Their extensive wine list featured many by the glass, all $8$16. They also had a list of regional whiskeys and bourbons, ranging from $10-$25. The Lookout serves a full lunch and dinner menu to help absorb multiple Duck Blind Sunrises, a boozy rum cocktail that is also popular with the clientele. There is also live music a couple of times a week. It might not ever be my go-to neighborhood bar, but a post-work cocktail high above the city? It might as well be at The Lookout with Jay.


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sherry, grenadine, lemon juice, and simple syrup with champagne, while Cork County Bubbles blends Jameson, Chartreuse, lemon juice, and honey water with champagne. As mentioned above, I’ll eschew whiskey entirely. My favorite St. Patrick’s Day indulgence is a homemade version of McDonald’s seasonal favorite, the Shamrock Shake. The mint-flavored concoction, first introduced in 1970 and once introduced by the character Uncle O’Grimacey, is now making a comeback. Bypass the drive-thru and go straight to KitchenTreaty. com (after a stop at the liquor store) to make your own. The recipe calls for three pints of vanilla ice cream, four ounces of crème de menthe liquor, three ounces each of vodka and Baileys Irish Cream liqueur, and vanilla extract. Toss all the ingredients into a blender, then serve it up in two tall glasses for you and a friend. Topped with whipped cream and maraschino cherries, the boozy Shamrock Shake is fit for, well, the High Kings of Ireland. If that’s too cold for you, celebrate with an Irish coffee, which hails from County Limerick, where, according to legend, it was concocted by chef Joe Sheridan and served to a group of Americans disembarking from a Pan Am flying boat one winter night in the mid-1940s. A travel writer from the San Francisco Chronicle helped import the drink to our shores a decade later, making Irish coffee a mainstay on the West Coast. Older variations abound in Austria, Denmark, and France, but the Irish made it official in 1988, when the National Standards Authority of Ireland introduced regulatory controls on the recipe. Start with black coffee, and then stir in Irish whiskey and a level teaspoon of sugar until fully dissolved. Pour in thick cream over the back of a spoon so that it floats atop the coffee. Drink, and if you don’t have much planned for the day, repeat.

ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT

B

ring on the amateur whiskey drinkers — St. Patrick’s Day is this Friday. The city’s annual pub crawl is a thing of the past, but there are still dozens of options for wetting your whistle with uisce beatha (Gaelic for “the water of life”) in Memphis this weekend. I must confess that I’m not a whiskey drinker, myself, thanks to an unpleasant experience I had after drinking most of a bottle on my own in my early 20s. Today, I can hardly touch the brown stuff, but I do take note of which bars stock good whiskey. In addition to my usual Midtown haunts (the Cove, Alchemy, and Beauty Shop/ DKDC), Blind Bear, Mollie Fontaine Lounge, Flight, the Slider Inn, and Dirty Crow Inn have a wide variety of whiskies and bartenders who are well-versed in serving it. Celtic Crossing, Memphis’ epicenter for Irish whiskey, imports dozens of liquors from across the pond, with price points that range from a few dollars a shot to over $150 per bottle. And if whiskey’s not your thing, beer — green, Guinness, and other varieties — will be flowing at Flying Saucer and Ghost River Brewery downtown, at the Casual Pint on South Highland, and at Patrick’s Restaurant out East. If you prefer to toast St. Paddy at home, I suggest that you move beyond a simple whiskey on the rocks. Finesse a drink like the Bitter Irishman, made with equal parts Bushmills single malt whiskey and Amaro Averna (a Sicilian herbal liqueur), lemon juice, and simple syrup. Or stir and strain the Emerald, which includes two ounces of whiskey (Jameson is recommended), an ounce of sweet vermouth, and a few dashes of orange bitters. Specifics for both cocktails can be found at SeriousEats.com. Food & Wine magazine’s website features recipes for two tantalizing whiskey-and-champagne cocktails. The Lady Irish combines Bushmills,

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FILM REVIEW By Chris McCoy

Apepocalypse Now Lessons from the failure of Kong: Skull Island.

I

’m just gonna go ahead and say it: Kong: Skull Island is a bad movie. That doesn’t really tell you much, because movies can be bad for many different reasons. Unlike the cynical cash grab of Independence Day: Resurgence, I got the impression that director Jordan Vogt-Roberts was attempting to make an enjoyable film. So rather than just lambasting everyone involved, I’ve decided to use this as a teachable moment. Here are five lessons to take home from Skull Island. 1. There’s a difference between a screenplay and a list of things that would be cool to put in a movie. Granted, a screenplay is, on some level, a list of things that would be cool to put in a movie. But a good screenplay must put the cool things in the correct order, something that does not seem to have been a priority here. Effect should follow cause, and then each effect should become a cause for another effect,

Tom Hiddleston and Brie Larson

and so on. Emotions should ebb and flow, and the screenplay’s job is to map out those beats. A lot of stuff happens on Skull Island, but none of it makes much sense, so there’s no emotional movement. It’s 1973, and as the Vietnam War winds down and Nixon’s grip on power is failing, Bill Randa (John Goodman), director of a shadowy group called Monarch, is eager to get to Skull Island. He sees his chance in the chaos (“There will never be a more screwed-up time in Washington,” he says in the film’s only real laugh line.) to piggyback on an expedition to the South Pacific mounted by Landsat. Which brings us to … 2. Suspension of disbelief is a gift from the audience. Don’t abuse it. King Kong is a giant monster, but monsters don’t really exist. (Insert your own Trump joke here.) People going to see a King Kong movie know this, but they are willing to accept the existence of cryptids for a couple of

hours in exchange for some entertainment. But just because they’ve accepted one impossible thing doesn’t imply permission to just throw a bunch of other unbelievable stuff at them without some background work. Take the Landsat expedition, for example. Why are a bunch of space scientists humping it halfway across the planet to look at an island? Why introduce them at all when you’ve got a perfectly serviceable secret government agency to mount the expedition — led by national treasure John Goodman, no less! Which leads to … 3. Good casting will not save you. Kong: Skull Island has a great cast. There’s Goodman, 2015’s Best Actress winner Brie Larson as a photographer, the legendary Samuel L. Jackson as an Air Cavalry officer who is none too thrilled about losing ’Nam, comedic genius John C. Reilly as a World War II aviator whose been stuck on the island for 28 years, and Loki himself, Tom Hiddleston, looking buff as a jungle guide. Dozens of people of questionable utility tag along on the expedition to deliver a couple of quips before being eaten by Skull Island’s spectacular collection of megafauna. Not that you’ll care about any of them, because they’re not characters, just loose assemblies of traits pulled out of a hat marked “Hollywood cliches.” Even the marquee star, King Kong, lacks depth, having somehow overcome his two greatest weaknesses — pretty girls and military aircraft.

March 16-22, 2017

4. Movie references are harder than they look. Quentin Tarantino has made an entire career out of stringing together borrowed scenes from other movies, so why not Kong? But here’s the thing: QT isn’t just throwing stuff in there to look cool (see #1). He knows the emotional beats he wants to hit and chooses a scene to reference that evokes the desired emotions. Thus, his references work on two levels at once. Kong: Skull Island throws out references left and right, most notably to

34


FILM REVIEW By Chris McCoy Apocalypse Now. But director VogtRoberts does not seem to understand that. For example, the scene where Robert Duvall’s air cav cowboys attack a village to the tune of “Ride of the Valkyries” is meant to evoke horror at kids with guns treating battle as a lark. Nor does he understand that when Kubrick used the song “We’ll Meet Again” over images of detonating atomic bombs at the end of Dr. Strangelove, it was the blackest irony — nobody is meeting anybody again, because we’re all dead in a nuclear holocaust. When Vogt-Roberts uses the song as our surviving heroes ride to safety, the movie’s not even over yet. 5. It’s probably not the director’s fault. According to Hollywood Reporter, Kong: Skull Island will have

to make $500 million just to break even. With half a billion bucks on the line, why did Warner Bros. choose an unprepared director whose only credits are a cheap Sundance comedy and Nick Offerman’s stand-up concert? Was it because he had a unique vision? No. It’s because he’s a rookie with no power whom the producers know they can steamroll, and he’ll make a good scapegoat if and when the whole thing blows up in a giant ball of red flame. I suspect Vogt-Roberts is about to learn that lesson. Kong: Skull Island Now playing Multiple locations

Saturday April 15 • 6-9PM

Join us as we celebrate two commonly appreciated Southern traditions:

Hearty food & distilled spirits. −

MOVIES

SINCE

1915

We’ll be bringing together a variety of Memphis’ best restaurants and an array of distilled spirits brands as we savor a night of bacon, BBQ, and all the good things that come from old oak barrels!

Beauty and the Beast (2017) PG Kong: Skull Island PG13 Logan R Get Out R

FULL MENU • IMPORTED BEER & WINE LUXURY SEATING

SPONSORED BY:

Beauty and the Beast (2017) PG The Sense of an Ending PG13 A United Kingdom PG13 Table 19 PG13

IMPORTED BEER & WINE • EXPANDED CONCESSIONS • LUXURY SEATING • ALL DIGITAL CINEMA •

2017 BACON PARTICIPANTS: Beauty and the Beast (2017) PG The Belko Experiment R Kong: Skull Island PG13 Logan R The Shack PG13 Get Out R Lego Batman Movie PG

SPECIAL EVENTS: Metropolitan Opera: Indomeneo

John Wick: Chapter 2 R Split PG13 Hidden Figures PG 2017 BOURBON PARTICIPANTS:

MALCO THEATRES CORPORATE EVENTS • MEETINGS CHURCH RENTALS • GROUP RATES

Sat. 3/25 – 11:55am & Wed. 3/29-6:30pm @ Paradiso

EMAIL GROUPSALES@MALCO.COM

Exhibition On Screen: The Artist’s GardenAmerican Impressionism

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ORDER ONLINE AT MALCO.COM OR GROUPSALES@MALCO.COM

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m e m p h i s f l y e r. c o m

CAFE • IMPORTED BEER & WINE • LUXURY SEATING

PRESENTED BY:

ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT

Ridgeway Cinema Grill

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EMPLOYMENT • REAL ESTATE

901-575-9400 classifieds@memphisflyer.com BUSINESS OPPORTUNITIES PAID IN ADVANCE! Make $1000 A Week Mailing Brochures From Home! No Experience Required. Helping home workers since 2001! Genuine Opportunity. Start Immediately! www.IncomeStationl.Net (AAN CAN)

EDUCATION AIRLINE CAREERS begin here - Get started by training as FAA certified Aviation Technician. Financial aid for qualified students. Job placement assistance. Call Aviation Institute of Maintenance 800-725-1563 (AAN CAN) IRELAND HOME BASED Services has openings to provide home-based social services in several INDIANA cities, including Evansville, Bloomington and Indianapolis. If you have at least 5 years-experience working with children and/or families, please apply! Bachelor’s degree in Social Work, Sociology, Psychology or related field preferred, but not required. Therapists are required to license eligible.We offer full and part time positions. After 90 days, full time employees are eligible for paid time off, use of a company car, and medical/dental/vision insurance. We also provide 7 paid holidays including your birthday. All staff receive a company phone and tablet.To learn more information about openings and to apply: www.ihbs.us/jobs EOE M/W/ Vets/Disabled VISION PREPARATORY Charter School is looking to fill an ?ELEMENTARY LEAD TEACHER position for the 2016-2017 school year. Only TN fully-licensed, elementary certified applicants should apply. Email your resume and letter of interest to Megan Salemi at msalemi@visionprep.org

GENERAL ANIMAL LOVERS Bring Your Dog to Work. Carriage Drivers needed downtown. Valid license required. UptownCarriages.com 901-496-2128

March 16-22, 2017

LIT RESTAURANT SUPPLY Driver positions available. Fantastic Opportunity with Established Memphis Company! If you are a goal-driven person with strong leadership skills, please email your resume to: pboxer@ litsupply.com

CLEAN AND PINK Is a upscale residential cleaning company that takes pride in their employees & the clients they serve. Providing exceptional service to all. The application process is extensive to include a detailed drug test, physical exam, and background check. The training hours are 8am-6pm Mon-Thur. 12$-19$hr. Full time hours are Mon-Thu & rotating Fridays. Transportation to job sites during the work day is company provided. Body cameras are a part of the work uniform. Uniform shirts provided. Only serious candidates need apply. Those only looking for long term employment need apply. Cleaning is a physical job but all tools are company provided. Send Resume to cleannpink@msn.com

proficient in Microsoft Office, CMS and LMS. Must be able to obtain and maintain a MS Gaming Commission Work Permit, pass a prescreening including but not limited to background and drug screen. To apply, log on to boydcareers.com and follow the prompts to Tunica. Boyd Gaming Corp is a drug free workplace and equal opportunity employer. Must be at least 21 to apply.

Requirements: Must be able to work outdoors, HS Diploma or GED, Ability to work OT and weekends, Must have valid driver’s license with safe driving record Apply today: www.usicllc.com EEO/AA

USIC LOCATE TECHNICIAN Daytime, full-time Locate Technician positions available! •100% PAID TRAINING •Company vehicle & equipment provided •PLUS medical, dental, vision & life insurance

BELMONT GRILL Now Hiring Cooks. Must be able to work days. Apply in person Mon-Fri, 2-4pm. 4970 Poplar @ Mendenhall. No phone calls please.

COPELAND SERVICES, L.L.C. Hiring Armed State Licensed Officers/ Unarmed Officers. Three Shifts Available. Same Day Interview. 1661 International Place 901-258-5872 or 901-818-3187 Interview in Professional Attire

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The BMG Family Physicians Group Foundation Aesthetix department is looking for a full-time experienced, licensed esthetician/laser technician to join our team. We are looking for an exceptional individual who is team oriented, highly professional, reliable, goal oriented, outstanding clinical skills, and who has experience with sales and customer service. The candidate must have the following experience, skills, and education: • Minimum of 2 years aesthetics/laser experience with current TN licensure • Willing to work flexible hours to meet client’s needs • On time for their shifts and for client appointments • Top notch clinical skills • Knowledge of appropriate products for different skin types and the ability to sell packages and retail products • Maintain cleanliness of treatment room and equipment

Mid-Town Apartments For Rent

129 Stonewall Street # 3

36

HELP WANTED

1 & 2 BRs UNITS AVAILABLE $595-$750 Per Month

• Responsible for charges/payments and daily deposits • Two years minimum experience with lasers is required *Note* Candela Laser experience is a plus Ideal relevant experience include: facials, peels, microdermabrasion, chemical peels, laser hair removal, laser skin tightening and experience with consultations including, anti-aging, acne, make-up, skin care, fillers, and Botox.

25 N Idlewild Street #10

Call or Text Chris 901-282-5445 Enterprise Realtors Inc. 901-867-1000

Please fax resumes to 901-751-5541 or email to jobs.fpgf@yahoo.com


EMPLOYMENT • REAL ESTATE • SERVICES

RAFFERTY’S We are looking for service minded individuals, that don’t mind working hard. We work hard, but make $. Apply in the store. 505 N Gtown Pkwy

SILKY O’SULLIVAN’S On Beale is looking for food runners & servers. Come in and fill out an application. 183 Beale St

TRUCKING

MIDTOWN APT

LOCAL DRIVERS WANTED! Be your own boss. Flexible hours. Unlimited earning potential. Must be 21 with valid U.S. driver’s license, insurance & reliable vehicle. 866-3292672 (AAN CAN)

CENTRAL GARDENS 2BR/1BA, hdwd floors, ceiling fans, french doors, all appls incl. W/D, 9ft ceil, crown molding, off str pking. $720/mo. Also 1BR, $610/mo. 833-6483. EVERGREEN HISTORIC DISTRICT 1BR $495-$545, XLG 1BR $650, W/D, hdwd flrs, Pets ok, porch. $25 credit ck fee. 901.452.3945

DOWNTOWN APTS

JOSH!

Hi I’m

I’m a medium-sized lovable guy, who adores people and does great with other dogs. I’m perfect if you are looking for a low energy dog who can take walks and then spend the night snuggling. I’m ready to get out of this kennel and into a real home.

MINUTES FROM DOWNTOWN Come visit the brand new Cleaborn Pointe at Heritage Landing. Located just minutes from historic Downtown Memphis. 2BR Apts & Townhomes $707; 3BR Apts & Townhomes $813. Community Room, Computer Room, Fitness Room. A smoke free community. 440 South Lauderdale Memphis, TN 38126 | 901-254-7670.

Ranise Coppens ALIVE Rescue

MIDTOWN APARTMENTS 1 and 2 BR units available. $595-$750 Per Month 129 Stonewall #3 & 25 N Idlewild #10 CALL or TEXT Chris 901-282-5445 ENTERPRISE REALTORS INC. 901-867-1000

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• 28 Years of Experience

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• Life Member of the Multi Million Dollar Club

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Georgian Woods offers a versatile apartment layout that can be utilized as either a 1BR with a den or a 2BR apartment home.

• Off Street Parking • CH/A • French Doors • • Original Hardwood Floors • Dishwasher • • Multiple closets in each unit • Walk In Closets • Walking distance to Fresh Market, CBU & Overton Square

2451 Union Avenue #2, Memphis, TN 38112 (901) 458-7052 • M-F, 9-5 by appt only LiveAtGeorgianWoods.com

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SERVICES TREAT THE CONDITION Transform your life! Are you dependent or addicted to painkillers, opiates, methadone or heroin? SUBOXONE, ZUBSOLV, BUNAVAIL: Introduction, maintenance, medical withdrawal & counseling. Opiate dependence exists in all walks of life. Private, confidential, in-office treatment. Staffed by a suboxone certified physician. Call (901) 761-8100 for more information.

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American Dreams These, too, are American stories. She must constantly remind people that she was born here, born in the same land that her ancestors had occupied centuries before, during the time when America’s forefathers were striding Westward. Her ancestors had remained standing in opposition to the divine mandate of the no-longer-quite European colonizers, but they were not a match for the systems arrayed against them. Many years later, she was born where they’d once stood, but her parents realized that the Dream she’d been sold wasn’t for people like them. They’d retreated South, and she spent her days after school feeding chickens alongside her grandmother or watching music videos on an ancient TV, the screen and speakers distorting the words and images she consumed. Something draws her back. Perhaps it is her ancestors, calling through time removed, imploring her to understand that borders are man-made but birthright is forever. She returns, the lyrics she’s learned from American pop stars serving as her language training. She is born to lead; in a fairer world she would be a freedom fighter or a business leader. Instead, she works tirelessly to better the lives of her neighbors, her community. She spends long days on the phone with unfriendly agency representatives, completes applications for schools and benefits, translates medical instructions that somehow manage to be utilitarian and gibberish. She meets a man whose smile sets her heart ablaze. They decide that the struggle is sweeter together than apart, and their destiny leads them away from the land of her ancestors. He was not born here. His forebearers do not call to him from America’s soil, but he is a hard worker. He loves her and wants the best for them, loves that she dedicates so much of herself to those who need her. Thirteen years pass, bringing with them two children and, now, a new reality that threatens to upend her family. Clarity: She has become her mother, with complete understanding. The Dream has withered; is reviving it worth the battle? He carries fear alongside him always and wonders if the constant companion is just the burden of fatherhood. The fear bleeds through his skin, announces itself in the twitch of his fingers, makes itself apparent in the sprinkle of sweat across his forehead and his upper lip. He is allowing himself a rare moment of excited joy: His son is very close to arriving to the United States, the culmination of a series of plans that he set in motion nearly 30 years prior. He himself had landed on these very shores in the days leading up to his son’s birth, missing the sight of his firstborn son’s emergence into this world. A small price to pay. At least he could leave the boy a name, the same name as his grandfather. He hoped it would bring the boy good fortune. His life in pursuit of the Dream was work. Sweat was the great equalizer in the land of the free, and he was hearty, hale, and driven. Every day since his inauspicious arrival in New York City, he had worked. Long hours, thankless jobs. Sometimes he drove, contorting his lips and tongue to make jokes in English despite the distrustful stares and indifferent nonchalance of the corporate-styled passenger sprawled across the back seat. Money that he’d worked for but somehow wasn’t quite his to spend or save traveled across his palm, but he wrapped himself in the Dream. Work would see him through. He remained steadfast. He prayed. He skipped meals. He left New York because the rent was too damn high and the casual indifference had become outright hatred since The Attack. A friend had mentioned that the living was easier down South. Somehow he knew that this was best, knew that this move would bring him that much closer to his dream, to his son’s dream. After 30 years of sweat, he finally embraces his son, who has become a man: He carries along with his luggage broad shoulders and a patchy beard. Twenty days after this embrace, chaos: a list, seven countries, a ban. His old burden — a gigantic wave of fear — slams into his chest as if to punish him for the audacity of joy; he feels as if he has been thrown into a freezing ocean. After a strained breath, he settles into the one thing that he knows will save him, save his son. He gets to Work. They tell her that she’s crazy to try for college when everything is falling apart around them. They say that it is not becoming for a woman to be so selfish, that she needs to dedicate herself to a family, that there are more pressing issues. That she doesn’t have what it takes. They say, they say, they say, but there is always a they and there is only one chance to follow your dreams, so she leaps and lands, all praise due to God, on her feet in a new country, the Dream in her sights. She is 20, faithful, and unafraid. In this, she is not so different from the women who have made this leap before her. The theys are different when she arrives. They’re bowed beneath the impossible weight of the Dream: her brother, her cousin’s wife, a friend of a friend. Their message is more foreboding, their attitudes more urgent. It is different here, they say. It has never been easy, but it has always been possible. Something wicked is in the air. They have only ever tolerated her family, but now they were whipped to hateful frenzy, removed from even the semblance of the love that they claimed to give to their neighbors. Had she heard about the man out West who had been shot and killed for simply existing near an ignorant and fearful man? Most of them think like the murderer, beloved. She was not a black American (despite the incorrect assumptions of those who read her skin and lips), but she knew of their art. She had read their poets. She knew of Langston Hughes and his question that had been asked by the children of slaves well before he had articulated it clearly enough for all to understand. What happens to the Dream deferred? She would not give up. There was nothing to do but try. She had been warned. They had explained. But she would persist. These, too, are American stories. These, too, are Memphis stories. Troy L. Wiggins is a Memphian and writer whose work has appeared in the Memphis Noir anthology, Make Memphis magazine, and The Memphis Flyer.

m e m p h i s f l y e r. c o m

Three American stories, three Memphis stories.

THE LAST WORD

© LES CUNLIFFE | DREAMSTIME.COM

T H E L A S T W O R D b y Tr o y L . W i g g i n s

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MINGLEWOOD HALL ON SALE FRIDAY: The Shins [6/3]

3/22: Matisyahu 3/25: V3Fights Live MMA 3/29: Railroad Earth w/ Billy Strings 3/30: NF – Therapy Sessions Tour 3/31: Johnnyswim 4/2: Two Blues Legends for 1 Great Cause w/ Bobby Rush, Bo-Keys, Southern Avenue, Buddy Guy 4/7: Jim Breuer (Comedy) 4/13: SoMo 4/22: Lucero Family Block Party w/ Son Volt, Sons of Mudboy, Might Souls Brass Band, William Matheny 4/26 Gov’t Mule w/ Eric Krasno Band 4/27: Leela James w/ Daley 4/29: Cody Jinks w/ Ward Davis

Est. 1942 Upcoming Shows Mar 17 - Reverend Horton Heat Mar 25 - Daisyland w/ Boombox Cartel Mar 30 - Jim Dandy’s Birthday Bash Mar 31 - Dead Soldiers Album Release Show Apr 1 - An Evening with Chris Robinson Brotherhood Apr 2 - Mockstrosity Tour w/Mac Sabbath, Metalachi, and Okilly Dokilly Apr 16 - JoJo Mad Love Tour Apr 23 - Boondox, Blaze Ya Dead Homie, Lex the Hex Master Apr 27 - Jesse Cook Apr 29 - Daisyland w/ Morgan Page May 4 - Amon Amarth w/ Goatwhore May 20 - Daisyland w/ Paul Oakenfold Jun 14 - J.Cole SOLD OUT Jul 15 - Daisyland w/ Eptic NEW DAISY THEATRE | 330 Beale St Memphis 901.525.8981 • Advance Tickets available at NewDaisy.com and Box Office

1884 LOUNGE

3/17: The Band Camino w/ The Wldlfe, Northern National & Brother Moses 3/28: Margo Price w/ Colter Wall 3/30: Backup Planet & The Heavy Pets 4/5: Dylan LeBlanc 4/6: TAUK w/ Soul Mechanic3/30: Backup Planet & The Heavy Pets

MORE EVENTS AT MINGLEWOODHALL.COM

MURPHY’S

The Coach House @ Loflin Yard

Pool Table • Darts • WI-FI • Digital Jukebox Visit our website for live music listings or check the AfterDark section of this Memphis Flyer KITCHEN OPEN LATE, OPEN FOR LUNCH! 1589 Madison • 726-4193 www.murphysmemphis.com

March 17 - MEMPHIS LEGEND DON BRYANT w/ THE BOKEYS!!!! - 9pm March 18 - The Cassette Set - 10pm March 21 - SURPRISE SHOW - Robert Cray w/ Hi Rhythm - 8pm tickets available online March 24 - WAKER - 10pm March 25 - Star and Micey w/ Pig Star - 10pm

YOUNGAVENUEDELI.COM 2119 Young Ave • 278-0034

3/15: $3 Pint Night! 3/16: Memphis Trivia League! 3/18: The Goldie Dee Show 3/25: Graber Grass 4/8: UFC 210: Cormier vs. Johnson 2 4/21: The Stolen Faces > Grateful Dead Tribute Band Kitchen Open Late! Now Delivering All Day! 278-0034 (limited delivery area)

Coming Soon!!!

HIGHLAND STRIP 555 S Highland 901 452 4731

GONER RECORDS

Kung Fu DVD’s $10.00 www.dach.us • 4491 Summer•901.685.3224 Tues – Sat 11:00 – 6:00

+ EVERY THURSDAY

Taproom hours: Mon 4-7, Thurs 4-10, Friday 4-10, Saturday 1-10, Sunday 1-7

Coco & Lola’s MidTown Lingerie

Spring Break Lingerie Headquarters! www.cocoandlolas.com Finest lace - Coolest place 710 S. Cox|901-425-5912|Mon-Sat 11:30-7:00

I Buy Old Windup Phonographs & Records

Esp. on labels: Gennett, Paramount, Vocalion, QRS, Superior, Supertone, Champion, OKeh, Perfect, Romeo, Sun, Meteor, Flip; many others. Also large quantities of older 45’s. Paul. 901-435-6668

TUT-UNCOMMON ANTIQUES 421 N. Watkins St. 278-8965 1500 sq. ft. of Vintage & Antique Jewelry. Retro Furniture and Accessories. Original Paintings, Sculpture, Pottery, Art & Antiques. We are the only store in the Mid-South that replaces stones in costume jewelry.

TORTURED ARTIST Art and jewelry made by local artists 629 S Cooper Wednesday-Sunday 10-6

I BUY RECORDS! 901.359.3102

ST. PATRICK’S A

W E E K E N D

L O N G

17

2017

C E L E B R AT I O N

903 SOUTH COOPER | 274-5151

$15 COVER STARTING AT 2PM

COOPER

YOUNG

PARADE 10A-12P

BAGPIPERS a

IRISH DANCERS FACE PAINTING

LEPRECHAUN

ON THE LOOSE

18

DYLAN WALSHE 7-9

WINK SPALON Special on the Classic Lashes $99 ($150 value) Volumation Lashes for $199 ($250 value) Offer Ends March 31,2017 follow us on facebook & Instagram @Winkspalon9015696929 764 E Brookhaven Circle | Memphis, TN 38117 Call 901.569.6929

15th ANNUAL SOUTHERN HOTWING FESTIVAL

LIVE MUSIC

Largest Martial Arts Supplier Since 1979

loflinyard.com • 7 W. Carolina Ave • 249-3046

whatevershops.com

MAR

DACH ORIENTAL IMPORTS

MIDTOWN

2027 Madison Ave 901 590 0048

Join our texting club and get 10% off your next purchase! Text WHATEVER to 51660 . Message & data rates may apply*

MAR

New/ Used LPs, 45s & CDs. We Buy Records! 2152 Young Ave 901-722-0095

CORDOVA 981 N GTown Pkwy 901 654 3678

April 6 - Chris Milam Album Release Show - 9pm April 15 -Loflin Yard 1 Year Anniversary Party Southern Avenue- 9pm May 12 - City Champs Reunion Show - 9pm May 13 - The Lovelight Orchestra - 9pm

F RON T

ROSIE’S HAULING SERVICE

PATIO

DYLAN WALSHE 10A JIM & LARKIN 1:30P THE BACKSLIDERS 4:30P PAR T Y

• Delivery & pick Up Service • Light Debris & Junk Removal • Call 901.512.7686

BOOK REPAIR Have an old book or bible that needs repair? Call Art, Friends of the Library at 901.483.0478.

TE NT

REEL McCOY 11A DANCING JIMMY’S 3P DYLAN WALSHE 6:30P MOSES CROUCH 8P MAIN

$5000 Cash Prize to Grand Champion! Sat. April 22, 2017 at Mississippi River Park & Riverside Dr. Benefiting the Ronald McDonald House. Kids Get in Free! Follow us @ southernhotwingfest www.southernhotwingfestival.com

B AR

DJ KO b 5P | DJ TREE b 9P

WALRUS

PARTY TENT 9

MORGAN AC & HEATING Floor Furnace, Wall & Central Heat. Call 901-774-COOL

SPORTS TALK RADIO

Advertising/Sponsorship Sales Excellent part-time income. Earn up to $1,800 1st month. Great Opportunity. Call 901-527-2460

Memphis Flyer 3.16.17  

This week: Three young African-American artists talk about finding a voice in Memphis. Also: horse massages, People Power, a trip to The Loo...

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