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NCAA Bracket P20 /

Big Betsy Returns! P16 / Dave’s Bagels P30 / A Wrinkle in Time P34

ANDREA FENISE

OUR 1516TH ISSUE

3.15.2018

FREE

SPRING TRENDS AFRICAN PRINTS, FLORALS & STRIPES, AND BOLD ACCESSORIES


This exhibit explores the fascinating intersection between music and politics, and includes one-of-a-kind costumes, instruments, multimedia, and artifacts from an outstanding lineup of musicians.

March 15-21, 2018

SEE BONO’S JACKET NOW ON DISPLAY

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Sponsored locally by:

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Exhibit curated by:

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Little Rock, AR • (501) 374-4242


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CONTENTS

CARRIE BEASLEY Senior Art Director CHRISTOPHER MYERS Advertising Art Director JEREMIAH MATTHEWS BRYAN ROLLINS Graphic Designers

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BRUCE VANWYNGARDEN Editor SUSAN ELLIS Managing Editor JACKSON BAKER, MICHAEL FINGER Senior Editors TOBY SELLS Associate Editor CHRIS MCCOY Film and TV Editor ALEX GREENE Music Editor CHRIS DAVIS, MICHAEL DONAHUE MAYA SMITH, JOSHUA CANNON Staff Writers JESSE DAVIS Copy Editor JULIE RAY Calendar Editor

OUR 1516TH ISSUE 03.15.18 Lord knows, it’s hard to keep up these days. There’s an information overload from our information over- Stormy Daniels lords. So much distraction, so little time to process change before more change happens. Mostly forgotten in all the daily chaos coming out of Washington, D.C., is the mid-February repeal of net neutrality by Ajit Pai, the Trump-appointed head of the Federal Communications Commission. Net neutrality rules instituted during the Obama administration basically classified high-speed internet as a public utility, meaning all broadband consumers have equal access to all content from the internet — and at the same access speed. It’s similar in concept to MLGW, which, as a public utility, can’t charge more for water usage for some customers than others. Nor can it decide to provide electricity only to certain neighborhoods, based on profitability concerns. When it comes to broadband providers, all the rules are about to change. The repeal of net neutrality is another example of the Trump administration’s push to privatize pretty much everything, including our public institutions and properties. They’ve opened up thousands of acres in national monument lands to oil and timber companies. They’re pushing to allow offshore drilling in sensitive coastal waters. They’ve incentivized for-profit prison systems, turning them into a mega-billion-dollar industry. And now they’re coming for your porn. Now, that probably got your attention, but it’s true: Repealing net neutrality means that high-speed internet companies like Comcast, AT&T, and others will be allowed to block or throttle web traffic or offer priority to certain websites and services. Essentially, the providers can charge you different rates for specific content, based on profitability. And what’s more profitable than porn? On the internet? Literally nothing. Even more troubling, the net neutrality repeal also allows for increased meddling from state legislative bodies. Which is where the porn issue is likely to, er, arise. Rhode Island legislators, for example, have proposed a law, contingent on the implementation of the repeal of net neutrality, that would require content providers to block most “adult content.” In order to visit their friendly neighborhood PornHub, Rhode Islanders will be required to request in writing that they want their broadband provider to disable the state-imposed block. They’ll have to present identification verifying they are 18 and acknowledge receiving a written warning regarding the “potential danger” of deactivating the content block. And they’ll be required to pay a $20 “digital access fee.” In short, if this bill passes, the state of Rhode Island would charge residents to view adult content and create a registry of those who’ve paid to do so. And this is in Rhode Island, one of the bluest states in the country! Just imagine what our gunloving, non-fun-loving, evangelical Nashville Hillbillies will come up with. They don’t want a gun registry, but they’ll sure as hell want to know if you like to watch Busty Milfs on Broadway. In fact, 44 states are preparing one sort of legislation or another to deal with the consequences of net neutrality repeal. The possibilities are mind-boggling. Providers could charge extra for to you to watch presidential debates or the Oscars or the Super Bowl. Political content could be amplified or throttled, based on profitability or a corporation’s preferences. Most broadband providers have a monopoly already, and they have insatiable stockholders to please and profit margins to enhance. Throw a bunch of ideologues from various legislatures into the mix and what could go wrong? Better to ask, N E WS & O P I N I O N “What won’t go wrong?” THE FLY-BY - 4 The good news is that dozens of NY TIMES CROSSWORD - 5 lawsuits against net neutrality repeal have POLITICS - 7 already been filed by states and by private EDITORIAL - 8 companies. A recent New York Times VIEWPOINT - 9 story reports that there may be enough COVER - “SPRING TRENDS” votes in the Senate to repeal it, but that BY ANDREA FENISE - 10 a House majority still supports the FCC WE RECOMMEND - 14 rollback. It’s expected that the various MUSIC - 16 AFTER DARK - 18 battles over net neutrality could stave off NCAA BRACKET - 20 implementation for as much as a year, CALENDAR - 22 It’s easy to lose track of everything that’s FOOD - 30 being sold off to the highest bidder with SPIRITS - 33 so many other distractions grabbing our FILM - 34 attention, but it’s important to keep our C L AS S I F I E D S - 36 focus on the real issues. If you can’t do it LAST WORD - 39 for yourself, do it for Stormy Daniels. Bruce VanWyngarden brucev@memphisflyer.com

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THE

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ly on the wall

March 15-21, 2018

D A M M I T, G A N N E T T While your Pesky Fly on the Wall isn’t superstitious by nature, it seems likely that the good people in Iowa who edit (or fail to edit) The Commercial Appeal, are about to be haunted by a very angry ghost with a remarkable gift for creative swearing. Angus McEachran — the hypothetical ghost here — shuffled off this mortal coil Monday, March 5th. He was a lifelong newspaperman and lion of Memphis journalism who started out as a copy boy at the CA in 1960 and worked his way to the top editor’s position at The Pittsburgh Press where he led a two-time Pulitzer Prize-winning news team. In 1993, McEachran returned to Memphis to helm the CA, where his intolerance for mistakes was as legendary as his ability to turn reporters into quivering puddles of contrite goo during a process of journalistic atonement called “error court.”  Following his March 5th death, the CA honored its famously meticulous editor by spelling his name wrong in the headline of an otherwise lovely tribute.

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At least that was just the early digital version. Surely somebody caught the error and fixed it before it was immortalized in newsprint. Nope.

By Chris Davis. Email him at davis@memphisflyer.com.

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Questions, Answers + Attitude Edited by Toby Sells

W E E K T H AT W A S By Flyer staff

Water, History, & Sawyer TVA moves on, council punts in CY, & GOP just can’t with activist.

TVA WON’T USE WELLS The Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA) shifted to a contingency plan to cool its new energy plant here after test results found contamination in groundwater close to the source of the city’s drinking water. TVA will buy water from Memphis Light, Gas & Water to cool its nearly $1-billion-dollar power plant here. TVA’s original plan was to pull 3.5 million gallons of water every day from five wells drilled into the Memphis Sand Aquifer, the source of the city’s famously pure drinking water. Tests found contaminants in water about a half a mile from those wells. TVA said it wouldn’t use the wells until after a full investigation. That investigation found arsenic and other toxins in the upper Alluvial aquifer, a shelf of water above the Memphis Sand. But TVA said more investigation is necessary before it would run its wells. But TVA still plans to bring its brand-new natural gas plant online in late spring. STALWART NEWSMAN PASSES Angus McEachran, a hard-driving journalist and former editor of The Commercial Appeal, died last week at the age of 78. COUNCIL DELAYS COOPER-YOUNG VOTE The Memphis City Council delayed a vote last week to designate Cooper-Young as a historic overlay district. Council member Frank Colvett Jr. said he needed clarity on certain issues before moving forward with a vote. NO PUBLIC ART FOR FOUR MONTHS The council put a 120-day moratorium on public art so it can establish a “road map” on the issue. The move came two weeks after the council voted to remove murals by Paint Memphis that the council deemed offensive and “satanic.”

SAWYER VOTE FUMBLED IN HOUSE House GOP members struggled with Memphis activist Tami Sawyer last week. They approved a resolution honoring her for her work with #TakeEmDown901, the movement that pushed for the removal of Confederate statues in Memphis. Later, after they figured out what they’d done, they rescinded the resolution. Then, after removing most of the co-sponsors of the bill, the House approved the resolution. GROCERIES STUDIED A taxpayer-funded study will determine the sustainability of grocery stores in two former Kroger locations. Kroger closed two stores in South Memphis last month. Council members say their constituents are now forced to travel too far to go grocery shopping. Consulting firm Socially Twisted will conduct the study for $18,500. HELP DESIGN DOWNTOWN The Downtown Memphis Commission (DMC) opened two design contests last week, one to re-design the facades of the archways over Beale Street and another to reimagine Handy Park. MARKING A SLAVE MARKET A new historic marker will be placed at the site of the slave market operated by Nathan Bedford Forrest, close to the corner of B.B. King and Adams. A marker on the site now says only that Forrest had a home there and that he became wealthy from his “business enterprises.” The new marker will note that Forrest sold thousands of enslaved men, women, and children at the site. For fuller versions of these stories and even more local news, visit The News Blog at memphisflyer.com.


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Edited by Will Shortz

Crossword

Edited by Will Shortz

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Upcoming Events PUZZLE BY HOWARD BARKIN Indigo Girls SOLD OUT of 43 Features of 36 Actress Wilson John “Mrs. Hiatt & Doubtfire” The Goners, featuring Sonny Landreth Boston accents GPAC Gala: Celebrating the Culinary Arts Milieu of the 37 Sch.Roots withofthe ArtSavvy: Gypsy Jazz45 Lecture series “The George W. Bush Master Jazz Guitar Series: HowardFX Alden Americans” CyrillePresidential Aimée 46 Poetic stanza Moscow Festival Ballet: Giselle Library GPAC Youth Symphony Spring48 Concert Like government

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‘Devastating’ Development {

CITY REPORTER By Maya Smith

A new project leaves uncertain future for a Memphis institution.

March 15-21, 2018

The P&H Cafe has been a neighborhood staple in the heart of Midtown for almost 60 years, but now a neighboring infill development could limit access to the building, and the bar’s owners worry that will hurt business. On the large vacant lot to the east of the bar, where the BellSouth building once stood, developers 1544 Madison Partners want to build a gated 230-unit apartment complex spanning four buildings. Plans for the four-acre development call for parts of the public, one-way alley that runs behind the P&H to be closed and gated off. Doing that would be “devastating” for the P&H, according to co-owners, Robert Fortner and Matthew Edwards. Many of the patrons who stop by the P&H during the course of an evening use that alley to reach the bar. “Are we going to have to move?” Edwards said. “Or are we going to lose business or go out of business? You don’t know what’s going to happen.” Edwards also worries that on-street parking will become limited, while the bar’s rear parking lot on Court will be “rendered useless” because it won’t be as easily accessible with the rear alley closed. To advance their cause, an online petition to “stop the closure of public access to the P&H Cafe” was recently

launched, and as of press time, it had 1,683 supporters. Despite the petition, hearing the concerns of Edwards and Fortner, and 11 other statements of opposition to the development last week, the Memphis and Shelby County Land Use Control Board P&H parking approved the development and the alley closure with a 9-1 vote. Opposition came from owners of the decades-old self-serve car wash to the east of the development site, the venue space at 1524 Madison to the west, and Cotton Row Recording Studio on the opposite side of the street. They worried the complex could negatively impact garbage pickup and fire department access, as well as on-street parking availability and traffic flow on Madison. But, Adam Slovis with 1544 Madison Partners insists that the group has been working with surrounding business owners and residents to “make this opportunity work well for everyone.” “As an example, after many conversations and

input, we made various changes to make sure and not close any alley or street sections that run adjacent to any properties other than our own,” Slovis said. “The overall development idea here is to take the vacant lots and houses that are a part of the development site and bring back the vibrancy and activity that hasn’t been seen here since the BellSouth building was torn down.” He said this will “create new customers and an energy for the area’s neighborhood businesses” and “spur other positive development for the area.” Before the developers can move forward with the project, the Memphis City Council must approve the plans. Meanwhile, Edwards said he and Fortner will “continue to look for solutions” to allay their concerns and keep their business alive.

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POLITICS By Jackson Baker

The City Factor Amid county, state, and federal elections, Memphis issues surface.

IN TUNICA

PHILLIP PHILLIPS APRIL 13

SINBAD APRIL 20

Tami Sawyer receives “Happy Jones Award” from Paula Casey at Mid-South Peace and Justice Center. rumors, expressed amazement that they could be taken seriously. That in this heyday of social media, he himself relies heavily on regular messages from his office circulated through the internet is clearly something he regards as being another matter altogether. And Gatewood herself took note of the rumors, contending in a Facebook post that they were “inaccurate” and saying specifically, “Mayor Strickland has not donated a dime to my campaign nor have I had a conversation with him regarding him having a fund-raiser on my behalf.” Addressing the same matter of online credibility that seemed to astound Strickland, she would conclude her post by acknowledging “What’s funny is that perception is reality to most.” In an effort to rebut such a perception, one supporter of the mayor maintained in an online message that Strickland had gone out of his way during a presentation to the state Heritage Commission in Athens last year to cite the role of “people of grass roots” in the struggle to remove the statues, and, in so doing, had bade Sawyer to rise. Sawyer herself, when asked about the Gatewood matter, was somewhat guarded. She acknowledged that she was conversant with the rumors but declined to comment further on them except to say, “The mayor has a right to support anybody he chooses for public office.”

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m e m p h i s f l y e r. c o m

• And, as current Mayor Jim Strickland thereby learned the identity of one reelection opponent for next year, he reluctantly found himself at the center of a brewing controversy involving a candidate for the Shelby County Commission. That would be Tami Sawyer, whose urgent activism last year as a leader in the “#TakeEmDown901” drive to remove the city’s Confederate statues often seemed to put her at odds with what Strickland regarded as a more moderate and methodical pathway to that end. Sawyer is a candidate this year for Position 7 on the commission, and, among her opponents in the Democratic primary is former Shelby County Schools board member Stephanie Gatewood. Proponents of Sawyer have charged in online posts, in emails to their networks, and in other modes of an ongoing whispering campaign that Strickland is taking a behind-the-scenes role on behalf of Gatewood and against Sawyer. When queried about the rumors, Strickland responded with a categorical “No,” and, focusing on the online

ENTERTAINMENT

NEWS & OPINION

Even as the year 2018 advances, with its plethora of county, state, and federal election contests, the city election of 2019 is throwing some hints of things to come. For one thing, Mike Williams, the Memphis Police Association president who drew a substantial cadre of voters in his race for Memphis mayor in 2015, is clearly preparing the way for another mayoral race in 2019. On Saturday, Williams inaugurated a new Facebook page entitled “Michael R. Williams 2019,” and his initial text was a de facto announcement of another race next year: “I am starting this page to allow more people to follow and for me to disseminate information. I needed a public figure page that allows more than 5,000. I have almost 1,000 additional friend requests that I can not add. I will start directing people to this page. Are we getting ready for 2019, yes we are. Let’s get started early this time. Thanks, and please direct people to this page as well.” As of 8:30 a.m. Tuesday morning, the page had attracted 56 likes.

THE BEST

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E D ITO R IAL

On Doing No Harm Stand up if you’re not surprised that President Trump caved in on his resolve to “fight the NRA” if necessary to get effective public-safety legislation on guns. No, don’t, on second thought. So massive and sudden a change in the disposition of planetary weight could cause tectonic shifts

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and endanger the earth’s equilibrium in its orbit about the sun. Nobody should be surprised, any more than they were surprised when Trump backed off from a promise to sign bipartisan legislation on DACA a month earlier. Nor when he abandoned a dozen other promises of constructive action. This is a president who is on a permanent campaign swing, but in the 14 months that he has actually held office, has seemingly learned nothing about governing itself. Even those few circumstances his devotees can tout as “triumphs” — the appointment of conservative Supreme Court Justice Neil Gorsuch, the passage of a monumental tax cut favoring the wealthy — are merely services demanded by and performed for the sake of the special interests who see in Trump’s tenure an opportunity to aggrandize themselves. But the cave-in to the National Rifle Association, whose influence in the gun bill just proposed by Trump is all too obvious, is especially disheartening. The legislative package announced by Trump — the same President Trump who had the nerve to chide members of Congress for being “afraid of” the NRA — carefully avoids any particulars that would go against the wishes of the gun lobby. One of the bill’s main provisions would offer support for teachers willing to pack “defensive” weaponry at school facilities. That means more guns for sale, and that presumably suits

the NRA and the firearms industry just fine. Another provision would ostensibly firm up background checks but continue to leave the ubiquitous gun shows immune to such controls. Ideas expressed by Trump during his breast-beating “fight-the-NRA” moment e.g., raising the minimum age for firearms purchases to 21 or doing anything to curtail the sale of assault weapons — are unsurprisingly missing. Given that some of these stricter measures did end up in a bill passed at the behest of the Republican Governor and GOP-dominated legislature of Florida, it is obvious that any true relief will have to come at the state level. Is there any hope then for Tennessee, where bills friendly to the gun lobby normally have an easier time than resolutions in praise of springtime? Surprisingly, there might be. A task force on approaches to firearms control has just been appointed by Governor Bill Haslam, and, in the apparent deference to that, two gun bills — one to arm teachers, another to reduce (!) the financial penalties for unlicensed gun possession — have been put on hold. In the context of the assembly’s gunhappy recent history, doing nothing amounts to a constructive act. We don’t normally put much stock in the appointment of commissions or task forces as substitutes for action, but this one puts us in mind of the famous health-care axiom: “First, do no harm.” That may be the best we can hope for.

March 15-21, 2018

C O M M E N TA R Y b y D a n z i g e r

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Chemistry says men and women are different, and you can’t fool Mother Nature. Another day, another murder, another march against violence. When will it all end? When America decides that you cannot have both a peaceful society and cheap goods. If we cannot reverse the decline of the middle- and working-classes that started more than 30 years ago, then America’s violence will continue. If leaders around the world do not — or will not — find a way to create prosperity for their citizens, their countries will experience more violence, as well.   Violent and unstable individuals have always been with us, but gang affiliations, ethnic nationalism, and religious extremism all come from the same place: hopelessness. And when hopelessness meets testosterone, too often, there will indeed be blood. Testosterone has to have somewhere to occupy itself, and if there is no secure job with a decent wage, a young man’s endocrine system will find something else to do with it. Who thinks that poor people find manufacturing meth preferable to building cars, or that strapping on a suicide vest is more appealing than donning a Moby? Who truly believes that men with jobs and families would rather be criminals, given other choices? With or without an education, where will a young man go to feel necessary when more and more jobs are being eliminated through technology, while the wealthy and their paid-for politicians scoop up what prosperity remains?  We must acknowledge that when young men have no healthy outlet for their drives, they will seek fraternity and purpose wherever they find it. Often, the siren call of gang affiliation, racial or ethnic nationalism, or violent jihad are the only sounds alienated young men hear as an alternative to feeling worthless.  That’s why I’m skeptical that our mayor, or any political leader anywhere, can have much impact on poverty and crime in a climate where human beings, particularly young men, are becoming superfluous to society. Improving the lives of young men will also improve the lives of young women. Regardless of what industry our economic development efforts may bring to Memphis, companies of the future are creating fewer positions for people and more for robots and machines — robots who communicate with and even repair other machines. If the future means industries will be creating jobs that are done with more

technology and less labor, that’s what we’ll have to deal with. But it’s worth considering that the costs of not engaging young males in the labor pool are far greater than whatever money we think we’re saving in pursuit of an efficiency that is making human beings optional. It is inarguable that such efficiency is a snake eating its tail. Taken to its logical absurdity, it means that one day even the robots will not have enough to do, because there will be too few people who can afford to buy whatever the machines are making. As Oliver Wendell Holmes is reputed to have said: “Too many individuals … want the civilization at a discount.” We must stop worshiping at the altar of unbridled capitalism, thinking there is no human cost to be paid. 

We can continue spending billions on prisons, military intervention in global hotspots, and NSA surveillance. But wouldn’t creating jobs for alienated and idle young men be cheaper in the long run? I have said for years that without men, colonization of far-off lands would never have occurred, because women are entirely too smart to have gotten into tiny wooden boats and sailed over vast, uncharted waters. That’s where testosterone kicks in — for better or worse. But sarcasm aside, I know ascribing differences between the sexes to nature more than nurture is likely to meet with accusations of sexism. But there are immutable chemical differences between men and women. Thankfully, our concepts of gender are becoming more fluid, but that doesn’t mean we can bend the endocrine system to our societal will.  So we can continue spending billions on prisons, military intervention in global hotspots, and NSA surveillance to prevent terrorist attacks. But wouldn’t creating jobs for alienated and idle young men, both here and abroad, be cheaper in the long run? In the name of political correctness, we can continue ignoring the fact that men colonize and women civilize. But chemistry says we’re different — and you can’t fool Mother Nature. Ruth Ogles Johnson is a frequent contributor to the Flyer.

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VIEWPOINT By Ruth Ogles Johnson

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March 15-21, 2018

SPRING TRENDS AFRICAN PRINTS, FLORALS & STRIPES, AND BOLD ACCESSORIES Stylist & Photographer Andrea

10

Fenise Makeup Nikki Chanel Stylist Assistant Devin Lester Models Grace & Allanna of MEKA MODELS, Asia Rose, Jennifer Hall Burris


,

AFRICAN PRINTS African print fabric has proven to be so versatile that it is now recognized on the global fashion scene and will be seen locally in streetstyle and contemporary fashion. African print fabric has metamorphosed from cultural attire to a glamorous wardrobe must-have, and right now the spotlight is on Africa. Designers like Tanganika by Tangie inspire us to wear the print as a gown, blouse, or by mixing prints with tops and wide leg trousers. Left on Grace: Tanganika by Tangie top; Style Junkie earrings; Cheryl Pesce wicker bag Middle on Jennifer: Tanganika by Tangie top and pants; Cheryl Pesce necklace and bag Right on Asia: Tanganika by Tangie dress; Style Junkie earrings and bracelet; Cheryl Pesce bamboo bag

FLORALS & STRIPES

Far left on Jennifer: Sachi top + skort Middle left on Allanna; H&M top and skirt; Style Junkie earrings; Middle right on Asia: Sachi blouseand trousers; Style Junkie earrings Far right on Grace: Sachi dress; Style Junkie necklace

continued on page 12

COVER STORY m e m p h i s f l y e r. c o m

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continued from page 11

ACCESSORIES Accessories make a complimentary statement of their own. Take the approach of more is more, and style your looks with bold and colorful accessories. Think the bold and the beautiful! Use the color palette of your wardrobe as a source of inspiration. Jeweled and stone earrings to complement a graphic tee, ethnic necklace pieces to accentuate a flowy dress, a natural and earthy statement piece to add an edge — it all works. On Allanna: Dixie Pickers graphic tee; Style Junkie earrings; Tanganika by Tangie skirt GET SOCIAL & SHOP THE LOOKS Stylist & Photographer by andreafenise.com / @andreafenise MUA facegyrl.com / @the_facegyrl MEKA MODELS mekamodels.com Asia Rose @msasiarose Jennifer Hall Burris @travel_with_jen DESIGNERS & RETAILERS TanganikaByTangie.com / @tanganikabytangie CherylPesce.com / @cheryl.pesce SachiMemphis.com / @sachimemphis DixiePickersStore.com / @dixiepickers

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WHEN IN ROME, SPRING BREAK.

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steppin’ out

We Recommend: Culture, News + Reviews By Chris Davis

In 2017, New York Magazine investigative journalist and MacArthur fellow Nikole Hannah-Jones made a strong case that “Most white Americans were willing to ignore stark segregation and racial disparity as long as it came wrapped in so-called colorblind policy.” Her award-winning report, “The Resegregation of Jefferson County,” chronicled efforts by predominantly white towns in Alabama, to secede from their school districts and create new ones. It’s a story that may sound familiar to Memphians who remember the struggle for consolidation and fight for suburban independence. Teach for America’s Diversity and Cultural Competence Director and #TakeEmDown901 activist Tami Sawyer thinks Jones could just as easily have titled her story “The Resegregation of Shelby County.” “I feel like ‘The Resegregation of Jefferson County’ should be required reading for anybody who teaches in the South,” Sawyer says. “Because we talk so much about educational equity, and people still don’t realize that segregation isn’t just about where you choose to live. It’s about a redistribution of resources that takes us back to separate but not equal.” That’s one of the reasons why Sawyer’s excited about moderating the Center for Southern Literary Arts’ conversation between Hannah-Jones and Wendi Thomas, founder of MLK50, at the Halloran Centre. “I just want to ask a million questions about educational equity in the South,” she says. Sawyer is also excited to be part of one of the most female-centric events sporting an MLK50 hashtag. Hannah-Jones co-founded the Ida B. Wells center for investigative journalism, named for the pioneering journalist who was driven out of Memphis for her public response to the lynching of friends. “Wells doesn’t get as much love in Memphis as she should,” Sawyer says. “While we’re reflecting on 50 years past King, how about reflecting a little on almost a hundred years past Ida?”

KARSTEN MORAN

Justice & Journalism

Nikole Hannah-Jones

March 15-21, 2018

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THE CENTER FOR SOUTHERN LITERARY ARTS AND MLK50 PRESENT AN EVENING WITH NIKOLE HANNAH-JONES AT THE HALLORAN CENTRE, TUESDAY, MARCH 20TH $15 SOUTHERNLITERARYARTS.ORG

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The Wonder Bread Years at the Halloran Centre Calendar, p. 22

Dave’s Bagels — coming this summer Food, p. 30

THURSDAY March 15

FRIDAY March 16

Get Lit Book Club Ghost River Brewing, 7-9 p.m. This time around, the discussion centers on Celeste Ng’s terrific Little Fires Everywhere. The Discourse of Crime and Gang Violence in the Urban Landscape of Central America University Center, University of Memphis, 6 p.m. A talk by Susan Berk-Seligson, research professor and professor emerita of Spanish linguistics at Vanderbilt.

Booksigning by Amber Wilson Novel, 6 p.m. Booksigning and discussion by Amber Wilson of her book, For the Love of the South: Recipes & Stories from My Southern Kitchen.

The Emerald Isle & Elmwood Elmwood Cemetery, 6:30 p.m., $25 A presentation on the notable Scots and Irish in the cemetery. Includes a boiled Irish dinner and beer, wine, and other refreshments.

Talk by John Mather McNeill Concert Hall, Rhodes College, 6:30 p.m. Talk by the Nobel Prize winner titled “The History of the Universe from the Beginning to the End: Where Did We Come From, Where Can We Go?”

The Daughters of the Lone Star State TheatreWorks, 8 p.m., $15 Racism and classism are examined in this Del Shores comedy about a women’s club looking for new members.

Head Over Heels Cannon Center for the Performing Arts, 8 p.m., $49-$55 Comedy about a woman who finds the perfect boyfriend … until that perfect boyfriend starts hitting on her best friend. Emo Night 3.0 Hi-Tone, 9 p.m. A night of emo music featuring Dude Ranch. Joe Louis Walker Bartlett Performing Arts and Conference Center, 7:30 p.m. Performance from this ace blues guitarist.


Irish Eyes

By Chris Davis

Legend has it that St. Patrick, patron saint of Ireland, was undertaking a 40 day fast when he was attacked by snakes, which, according to the fossil record, never existed in Ireland. Patrick responded by chasing his non-existent attackers into the sea thus explaining why serpents that never lived in Ireland still don’t. It’s a good story. Maybe not as good as Mark Flanagan’s story about a time in the early 1980s when he, and a considerable group of St. Patrick’s Day revelers, chased the snakes off Mud Island. “It was a tongue-and-cheek-type deal,” says Flanagan, an original member of Irish Eyes, the event’s founding body. Flanagan describes how his merry band of celebrants terrorized construction workers working on the Mud Island river park by hurling 500 lifelike rubber snakes the way people on parade floats throw beads. “It looked just like something out of a movie,” he says, describing the snake-induced chaos. It should come as no surprise that Memphis’ 45-year-old St. Patrick’s Day Parade was conceived by bar owners who initially envisioned it as a pub crawl. It was veritable cabal of storied tavern keepers: Zinnie’s Gerry Wynn, Wanda Wilson from the P&H, Jimmy Robertson of Friday’s and Trader Dick’s, Huey’s Thomas Boggs, and Silky Sullivan. “Liquor by the drink had just come in in 1971, and we were a bar-crawling crowd,” says Flanagan, who spent 30 years traveling back and forth between Memphis and the Emerald Isle, doing media relations for the Lisdoonvarna Matchmaking festival. “We used to go all the way from downtown to Overton Square,” Flanagan says of the original pub crawl. “We’ve been on Beale Street for almost 20 years now, and there are going to be over 60 units in this year’s parade.” Events connected to the Beale Street parade begin Thursday when a caravan from Silky’s arrives at the airport to pick up special guests from Ireland. Music sheets are passed out and Irish songs sung as the guests arrive and are swept into cars where they are driven downtown, making single drink stops at taverns along the route. Although the caravan makes its last stop at Silky’s, this party carries on in some form or another till Saturday when the parade kicks off at 3 p.m. Without snakes, this time. ST. PATRICK’S DAY PARADE ON BEALE ST. 3 P.M. FREE.

SUNDAY March 18 “E Pluribus Unum: Out of Many, One” Art Village Gallery, 6:30 p.m. Exhibition from Ephraim Urevbu in recognition of MLK50. Laser Show: Pink Floyd The AutoZone Dome at Sharpe Planetarium, 9 p.m. Aw right! The laser shows return tonight with Pink Floyd, featuring such songs as “Breathe,” “Money,” and “Us and Them.” Other shows include the Beatles and Laser Vinyl.

Vertigo Malco Paradiso, 2 p.m. A 60th anniversary screening of this Alfred Hitchcock thriller about a detective who becomes obsessed with his friend’s wife. “Portraits in Soul: Rare Images from the API Archive” WKNO Studio, 2-4 p.m. Opening reception for this show of images of Stax artists from Allied Photography Illustrators.

95th Anniversary of St. Peter’s Casavant Pipe Organ St. Peter Catholic Church 3 p.m. Concert featuring the Wolf River Singers, who will perform “Music in the Times of Trouble,” as part of a series in recognition of the organ.

m e m p h i s f l y e r. c o m

Oprah Winfrey (left) and Storm Reid star in the adaptation of Madeleine L’Engle’s classic novel, A Wrinkle in Time. Film, p. 34

ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT

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MUSIC By Alex Greene

Big Betsy

The annual return of one of Memphis’ rowdiest bands.

A

lark is a lark is a lark, and many a band has been launched on a whim, but Big Betsy is one lark that grew legs and became a Memphis institution. After staggering on for well-nigh a quarter century, the group will once again mount the stage at Murphy’s Saturday, not to mention Celtic Crossing, and Railgarten. Having taken the city out for a jig every St. Patrick’s Day for over two decades, their dance card is full. Perhaps having roots in another band known for its gonzo antics has given Big Betsy its charm. Neighborhood Texture Jam has always been known for crunching riffs, original subject matter (“Rush Limbaugh-Evil Blimp,” anyone?), and over-the-top performances, including chainsawing an inflatable doll stuffed with dog food. They were also perhaps the first band to supply “texture” via members pounding on steel barrels and other industrial detritus. This anything-goes approach spilled over into a side project formed, as well as Big Betsy anyone can remember, on St. Paddy’s Day in 1993, by members of NTJ, sans lead vocalist and exhorter-in-chief Joe Lapsley. Founded by NTJ guitarist Tee Cloar, Big Betsy also included Greg Easterly (who can play fiddle as well as “texture”), Steve Conn, John Whittemore, and Paul Buchignani. Non-NTJ members have filled out the lineup over the years, including Charlie Yarwood, Brad Trotter, and Andy Mus. Clearly, these are players who like working together, to which both Big Betsy’s longevity and NTJ’s perennial reunions can attest. And the band’s roots in the hard-rocking NTJ give their take on Irish music a decidedly heavy edge, as does their love of one of Ireland’s most rocking groups, Thin Lizzy. “Tee was definitely the main driving force and came up with the name,” explains mandolinist Whittemore. “We all liked Thin Lizzy, and Thin Lizzy/Big Betsy are the opposite halves of the name Elizabeth. And we liked traditional Irish drinking songs, so we decided to do this thing for St Patrick’s Day. Of course, Murphy’s was the logical place to do it. The Pogues were also an inspiration. Kinda raucous. Of course, we’re a little more raucous than the Pogues.”

A healthy sense of absurdity colors the proceedings. Easterly, for example, who will often travel from Nashville or Knoxville to join in, does not always play his instrument. “Greg plays fiddle. But sometimes he holds a banjo and doesn’t play it. It’s a tradition. My old roommate Matt Johnson was the original banjo holder. We used to say that we wished we had a banjo, so he’d come and hold one.” Most of the other instruments, however, are actually played, albeit played-up for maximum visual impact. “If there’s one crowning achievement of Big Betsy,” says Whittemore, “it’s that we’re the only band to ever feature an electric mandolin shaped like a Firebird guitar. And so in recent years, Charlie has played a Firebird and I’ve played a Mando-bird, as it’s known. And then on the other side of the stage, there is a double-neck electric guitar, like the Jimmy Page thing, and a double-neck acoustic guitar. I’m pretty confident we’re the only band to have two Firebirds and two double-neck guitars on the stage at the same time. That’s probably our greatest achievement.”

For all that, much of the material is traditional. “There’s ‘Streams of Whiskey,’ ‘Whiskey in the Jar,’ ‘Whiskey You’re the Devil,’” says Whittemore. “And a lot of songs about beer. And we do several Pogues songs: ‘If I Should Fall from Grace with God,’ ‘Sally MacLennane,’ ‘Dirty Old Town.’ There’s a great song called ‘Jack’s Heroes,’ about a famous Irish soccer coach, and a song called ‘Waxies’ Dargle.’ I don’t know who Waxie was, and I don’t know what a dargle is. But it sounds good.” And to top it off, a creative wardrobe. “There are often hats,” says Whittemore. “This year, I happen to have acquired some special haberdashery that I think will play a role. The first couple of years, I played in a bustier, but I quit doing that. I don’t look quite as good as I used to.” Big Betsy can be seen and heard thrice on Saturday, March 17th: Celtic Crossing (1:30 p.m.), Murphy’s Bar (5 p.m.), and Lafayette’s (8 p.m.).


BROOKS UNCORKED Friday, March 23 | 6:30 p.m. Memphis Brooks Museum of Art $100 before March 20, $125 thereafter

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GHOST TOWN BLUES BAND FRIDAY, MARCH 16TH BLUES CITY CAFE

SUAVO J THE HIP-HOP TROMBONIST SATURDAY, MARCH 17TH GHOST RIVER BREWING CO.

DENDRONS SUNDAY, MARCH 18TH BAR DKDC

After Dark: Live Music Schedule March 15 - 21 Alfred’s 197 BEALE 525-3711

Gary Hardy & Memphis 2 Thursdays-Saturdays, 6-9 p.m.; Karaoke Thursdays, TuesdaysWednesdays, 9 p.m.-1 a.m. and Sundays-Mondays, 10 p.m.-2 a.m.; Mandi Thomas Fridays, Saturdays, 6-9 p.m.; The 901 Heavy Hitters Fridays, Saturdays, 10 p.m.-2 a.m.; Flyin’ Ryan Fridays, Saturdays, 2:30 a.m.; Memphis Jazz Orchestra Sundays, 6-9 p.m.

B.B. King’s Blues Club 143 BEALE 524-KING

Blue Note Bar & Grill 341-345 BEALE 577-1089

Queen Ann and the Memphis Blues Masters Fridays, Saturdays, 8 p.m.-midnight.

Club 152 152 BEALE 544-7011

Sean “Bad” Apple Thursdays, Sundays, 5 p.m. and Fridays, Saturdays, 4 p.m.; Live Music Thursdays-Sundays, 7-11 p.m.; DJ Ron Fridays, 11 p.m.; DJ DNyce Saturdays, 11 p.m.

Handy Bar 200 BEALE 527-2687

Blues City Cafe 138 BEALE 526-3637

7 p.m.; FreeWorld Sundays, 9:30 p.m.

Ghost Town Blues Band Friday, March 16; Blind Mississippi Morris Fridays, 5 p.m. and Saturdays, 5:30 p.m.; Brad Birkedahl Band Thursdays, Wednesdays, 8 p.m.; Earl “The Pearl” Banks Saturdays, 12:30 p.m. and Tuesdays, 7 p.m.; Brandon Cunning Band Sundays, 6 p.m., and Mondays,

The Amazing Rhythmatics Tuesdays, Thursdays-Sundays, 7 p.m.-1 a.m.

Hard Rock Cafe 126 BEALE 529-0007

Memphis Music Monday Third Monday of every month, 6-9 p.m.

Itta Bena

King’s Palace Cafe Patio

145 BEALE 578-3031

162 BEALE 521-1851

Nat “King” Kerr Fridays, Saturdays, 9-10 p.m.

King Jerry Lawler’s Hall of Fame Bar & Grille 159 BEALE

Chris Gales Solo Acoustic Show Mondays-Saturdays, noon-4 p.m.; Eric Hughes solo/acoustic Thursdays, 5-8 p.m.; Karaoke Mondays-Thursdays, Sundays, 8 p.m.; Live Bands Fridays, Saturdays, 8 p.m.

King’s Palace Cafe 162 BEALE 521-1851

David Bowen Thursdays, 5:309:30 p.m., Fridays, Saturdays, 6:30-10:30 p.m., and Sundays, 5:30-9:30 p.m.

Sonny Mack Mondays-Fridays, 2-6 p.m.; Cowboy Neil Mondays, Thursdays, 7-11 p.m. and Saturdays, Sundays, 2-6 p.m.; Sensation Band Tuesdays, Fridays, 7-11 p.m.; Fuzzy and the Kings of Memphis Saturdays, 7-11 p.m.; Chic Jones and the Blues Express Sundays, 7-11 p.m.; North and South Band Wednesdays, 7-11 p.m.

King’s Palace Cafe Tap Room 168 BEALE 576-2220

Big Don Valentine’s Three Piece Chicken and a Biscuit Blues Band Thursdays, Tuesdays, 8 p.m.-midnight.

New Daisy Theatre 330 BEALE 525-8981

Rumours: A Fleetwood Mac

Tribute Saturday, March 17, 7 p.m.; Avery*Sunshine Wednesday, March 21, 8 p.m.

Rum Boogie Cafe 182 BEALE 528-0150

Young Petty Thieves Thursdays, 8 p.m.-midnight; Pam and Terry Friday, March 16, 4:30-7:30 p.m. and Saturday, March 17, 4:30-7:30 p.m.; Sensation Band Friday, March 16, 8 p.m.-midnight, Saturday, March 17, 8 p.m.midnight and Sunday, March 18, 7-11 p.m.; Eric Hughes Band Mondays, 8 p.m.-midnight; Gracie Curran Tuesdays, 8 p.m.midnight; Plantation Allstars Wednesdays, 8 p.m.-midnight.

Rum Boogie Cafe Blues Hall 182 BEALE 528-0150

Memphis Bluesmasters Thursdays, Sundays, 8 p.m.-midnight;

March 15-21, 2018

The King Beez Thursdays, 5:30 p.m.; B.B. King’s All Stars Thursdays, Fridays, 8 p.m.; Will Tucker Band Fridays, Saturdays,

5 p.m.; Lisa G and Flic’s Pic’s Band Saturdays, Sundays, 12:30 p.m.; Blind Mississippi Morris Sundays, 5 p.m.; Memphis Jones Sundays, Wednesdays 5:30 p.m.; Doc Fangaz and the Remedy Tuesdays, 5:30 p.m.

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GRIZZLIES VS NUGGETS SATURDAY, MARCH 17

MEMPHIS 90’S BLOCK PARTY FRIDAY, MARCH 23

CHRIS TOMLIN THURSDAY, APRIL 26

FOO FIGHTERS THURSDAY, MAY 3

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After Dark: Live Music Schedule March 15 - 21 Vince Johnson and the Plantation Allstars Fridays, Saturdays, 4-8 p.m. and Sundays, 3-7 p.m.; Cowboy Neil Friday, March 16, 8:30 p.m.-12:30 a.m.; Myra Hall Band Saturday, March 17, 8:30 p.m.-12:30 a.m.; Brian Hawkins Blues Party Mondays, 8 p.m.midnight; Sensation Band Monday, March 19, 8 p.m.-midnight; Chris McDaniel Tuesdays, Wednesdays, 8 p.m.-midnight.

Silky O’Sullivan’s 183 BEALE 522-9596

Dueling Pianos Thursdays, Wednesdays, 9 p.m.-1 a.m., Fridays, Saturdays, 9 p.m.-3 a.m., and Sundays, Tuesdays, 8 p.m.midnight.

Boscos 2120 MADISON 432-2222

Sunday Brunch with Joyce Cobb Sundays, 11:30 a.m.2:30 p.m.

Canvas 1737 MADISON 443-5232

Karaoke Thursdays, 9:30 p.m.; Kyle Pruzina Live Mondays, 10 p.m.-midnight.

Celtic Crossing 903 S. COOPER 274-5151

St. Patrick’s Day Celebration Saturday, March 17, 10:30 a.m.-

Creature with Onus Sunday, March 18, 8 p.m.; pronoun with Cape Francis, Charles Fauna Monday, March 19, 8 p.m.; Parsonfield Tuesday, March 20, 8 p.m.; Crockett Hall Tuesdays with the Midtown Rhythm Section Tuesdays, 9 p.m.; Illuminati Hotties with b0lth Wednesday, March 21, 8 p.m.

Hi-Tone 412-414 N. CLEVELAND 278-TONE

States & Capitals Thursday, March 15, 9 p.m.; The Whips,

Choir: “The Road Home” tour Sunday, March 18, 8:30-9:30 and 11 a.m.-noon.

Lafayette’s Music Room 2119 MADISON 207-5097

Daryl Wayne Dasher Thursday, March 15, 6 p.m.; Dead Soldiers Thursday, March 15, 9 p.m.; Brian Johnson Band Friday, March 16, 6:30 p.m.; Almost Famous Friday, March 16, 10 p.m.; Greasy Tree Saturday, March 17, 6:30 p.m.; Almost Elton John Saturday, March 17, 10 p.m.; Joe Restivo 4 Sunday, March 18, 11

Murphy’s 1589 MADISON 726-4193

Radiation Risks Sunday, March 18.

P&H Cafe 1532 MADISON 726-0906

Rock Starkaraoke Fridays; You Look Like Comedy Show: The Rebellion with Lost Louder Than Bombs Saturday, March 17; Open Mic Music with Tiffany Harmon Mondays, 9 p.m.-midnight.

University of Memphis The Bluff 535 S. HIGHLAND

Memphis LIVE MondaysSundays, 8 p.m.-midnight; DJ Ben Murray Thursdays, 10 p.m.; Bluegrass Brunch with the River Bluff Clan Sundays, 11 a.m.

East Memphis Agavos Cocina and Tequila 2924 WALNUT GROVE

Miguel Angel Valdez Sunday, March 18, 5:30-8 p.m.

Clark Opera Memphis Center

Belle Tavern 117 BARBORO ALLEY 249-6580

6745 WOLF RIVER PARKWAY

Opera Omakase: Blarney, Ballads, and BYOB Thursday, March 15, 7 p.m.

Bourbon and Jazz with Quelude Sundays, 2:30-5:30 p.m.

Dirty Crow Inn 855 KENTUCKY

Poplar/I-240

Nancy Apple Thursdays, 8 p.m.; Hillbilly Mojo Friday, March 16, 9 p.m.; Todd Nations and Friends Saturday, March 17, 4-7 p.m.; The Po Boys Saturday, March 17, 9 p.m.; Bobbie Stacks and friends Wednesdays, 8-11 p.m.

East Tapas and Drinks 6069 PARK 767-6002

Eddie Harris Thursdays, Fridays, 6:30-9:30 p.m.; Van Duren Solo Tuesdays, 6-8 p.m.

Ghost River Brewing Co.

Neil’s Music Room

827 S. MAIN 661-4976

5727 QUINCE 682-2300

The Suburban Trunkmonkeys Thursday, March 15, 7-11 p.m.; Eddie Smith Fridays, 8 p.m.; Brad Birkedahl Saturday, March 17, 8 p.m.; Flashback Sunday, March 18, 4-7 p.m.; Debbie Jamison & Friends Tuesdays, 6-10 p.m.; Elmo and the Shades Wednesdays, 8 p.m.-midnight.

Suavo J the Hip-Hop Trombonist Saturday, March 17, 2 p.m.

St. Peter Catholic Church 190 ADAMS 527-8282

95th Anniversary of St. Peter’s Casavant Pipe Organ Sunday, March 18, 3 p.m.

Owen Brennan’s

The Vault

THE REGALIA, 6150 POPLAR 761-0990

124 GE PATTERSON

Lannie McMillan Jazz Trio Sundays, 10 a.m.-2 p.m.

Jeremy Scott Friday, March 16, 8:30 p.m.; Chris Hill Saturday, March 17, 8:30 p.m.

Bartlett

827 S. MAIN 278-0087

Sunday Evening with Misti Rae Holton Sunday, March 18, 5-7:30 p.m.

Loflin Yard 7 W. CAROLINA

Electric Church Sundays, 2-4 p.m.

Bar DKDC 964 S. COOPER 272-0830

Mighty Souls Brass Band Friday, March 16; Morgan Orion with Louise Page and Yesse Yavis Saturday, March 17; Dendrons Sunday, March 18; Devil Train Monday, March 19; Dave Cousar Tuesday, March 20.

Blue Monkey 2012 MADISON 272-BLUE

Karaoke Thursdays, 9 p.m.midnight.

12:45 p.m.; Jeremy Stanfill and Joshua Cosby Sundays, 6-9 p.m.; Candy Company Mondays.

The Cove 2559 BROAD 730-0719

Jazz with Ed Finney, Deb Swiney, and David Collins Thursday, March 15, 8-11 p.m.; J Train Friday, March 16, 9 p.m.; Bluff City Backsliders Saturday, March 17, 10 p.m.; David Collins & Frog Squad Sunday, March 18, 6-9 p.m.; Richard Wilson Tuesday, March 20, 6-9 p.m.; Ben Minden-Birkenmaier Wednesday, March 21, 6-8 p.m.; Karaoke Wednesdays, 9 p.m.

Growlers 1911 POPLAR 244-7904

St. Patty’s Day Bash with Walking on Landmines, Cassowaries, The Gloryholes, Hardaway Saturday, March 17, 10 p.m.; Vile

Cleaners Friday, March 16, 9 p.m.; Emo Night 3.0: Spring Break Sadness feat. Dude Ranch Friday, March 16, 9 p.m.; Emo night 3.0 Spring Break of Sadness Friday, March 16, 10 p.m.-2 a.m.; Green Jello’s St. Patty’s Day Music and Comedy Fest Saturday, March 17, 3 p.m.; Ohmme Sunday, March 18, 8 p.m.; Plastic Picnic, Joybomb, VIETRAHM Monday, March 19, 9 p.m.; PINK MEXICO Tuesday, March 20, 8 p.m.

a.m.; Frontier Folk Nebraska and William Matheny Sunday, March 18, 4 p.m.; Grant Garland Sunday, March 18, 8 p.m.; Volk Monday, March 19, 6 p.m.; Truett Tuesday, March 20, 5:30 p.m.; Samantha Fish Tuesday, March 20, 8 p.m.; Breeze Cayolle & New Orleans Wednesday, March 21, 5:30 p.m.; The VIP’s Wednesday, March 21, 8 p.m.

Huey’s Midtown

Dantones Band Friday, March 16, 9 p.m.-1 a.m.

1927 MADISON 726-4372

The Chaulkies Sunday, March 18, 4-7 p.m.; Dikki Du and the Zydeco Krewe Sunday, March 18, 8:30 p.m.-midnight.

Idlewild Presbyterian Church 1750 UNION INFO, 726-4681

Maryville College Concert

The Legacy Bar & Grill 11695 HWY. 70, STE. 101

Railgarten 2160 CENTRAL

Live Band Karaoke with Public Record Wednesdays, 7 p.m.

3663 APPLING 385-6440

Senses Nightclub

Cordova

2866 POPLAR 249-3739

Unique Saturday Saturdays, 10 p.m.-3 a.m.

Sounds Good Memphis 831 S. COOPER

Frank Meadows, Revenge Body, Noncannah Tuesday, March 20, 7-11 p.m.

Midtown Crossing Grill

Wild Bill’s

394 N. WATKINS 443-0502

1580 VOLLINTINE 207-3975

Natalie James and the Professor Saturdays, Sundays, 11 a.m.-3 p.m.; “The Happening” Open Songwriter Showcase Tuesdays, 6:30-9:30 p.m.

Bartlett Performing Arts and Conference Center

The Wild Bill’s Band with Tony Chapman, Charles Cason, and Miss Joyce Henderson Fridays, Saturdays, 11 p.m.-3 a.m.

Joe Louis Walker Friday, March 16, 7:30 p.m.

Huey’s Cordova 1771 N. GERMANTOWN PKWY. 754-3885

2 Mule Plow Sunday, March 18, 4-7 p.m.; Ghost Town Blues Band Sunday, March 18, 8:30 p.m.-midnight.

Raleigh Stage Stop 2951 CELA 382-1576

Blues Jam hosted by Brad Webb Thursdays, 7-11 p.m.; Open Mic Night and Steak Night Tuesdays, 6 p.m.-midnight.

ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT

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1

Virginia (31-2)

16 UMBC (24-10) 8 Creighton (21-11)

NATIO CHAMPI

CHARLOTTE March 18

9 Kansas St. (22-11)

20

5 Kentucky (24-10) 12 Davidson (21-11) 4 Arizona (27-7)

BOISE March 17

13 Bu alo (26-8)

SOUTH

6 Miami (Fla.) (22-9) 11 Loyola-Chicago (28-5) 3 Tennessee (25-8)

ATLANTA

DALLAS March 17

MARCH 24

14 Wright St. (25-9) 7 Nevada (27-7) 10 Texas (19-14) 2 Cincinnati (30-4)

NASHVILLE March 18

15 Georgia St. (24-10)

FIRST ROUND 1

SECOND ROUND

REGIONALS

Xavier (28-5)

16 NC Central/Texas So. 8 Missouri (20-12)

SEMI FINALS

CHAM

SAN AN APR

NASHVILLE March 18

9 Florida St. (20-11) 5 Ohio St. (24-8) 12 S. Dakota St. (28-6) 4 Gonzaga (30-4)

BOISE March 17

13 UNCG (27-7)

WEST

6 Houston (26-7) 11 San Diego St. (22-10) 3 Michigan (28-7)

LOS ANGELES WICHITA March 17

MARCH 24

14 Montana (26-7)

March 15-21, 2018

7 Texas A&M (20-12)

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10 Providence (21-13) 2 North Carolina (25-10)

CHARLOTTE March 18

15 Lipscomb (23-9)

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Villanova (30-4) 1 PITTSBURGH March 19

LIU Brooklyn/Radford 16

Virginia Tech (21-11) 8 Alabama (19-15) 9 West Virginia (24-10) 5

SAN DIEGO March 18

EAST

Wichita St. (25-7) 4 Marshall (24-10) 13 Florida (20-12) 6

BOSTON MARCH 25

Murray St. (26-5) 12

DALLAS March 19

St. Bonaventure/UCLA 11

Texas Tech (24-9) 3 S.F. Austin (28-6) 14 Arkansas (23-11) 7

DETROIT March 19

Butler (20-13) 10 Purdue (28-6) 2 CSU Fullerton (20-11) 15

SEMI FINALS

REGIONALS

SECOND ROUND

FIRST ROUND Kansas (27-7) 1

WICHITA March 19

Penn (24-8) 16 Seton Hall (21-11) 8 NC St. (21-11) 9 Clemson (23-9) 5

SAN DIEGO March 18

Auburn (25-7) 4 Charleston (26-7) 13

MIDWEST

TCU (21-11) 6 DETROIT March 19

Arizona St./Syracuse 11

Michigan St. (29-4) 3 Bucknell (25-9) 14 Rhode Island (25-7) 7

PITTSBURGH March 19

Oklahoma (18-13) 10 Duke (26-7) 2 Iona (20-13) 15

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SEE IT AT THE PINK PALACE

February 3 - May 6, 2018

CALENDAR of EVENTS:

March 15 - 21

Send the date, time, place, cost, info, phone number, a brief description, and photos — two weeks in advance — to calendar@memphisflyer.com or P.O. Box 1738, Memphis, TN 38101. DUE TO SPACE LIMITATIONS, ONGOING WEEKLY EVENTS WILL APPEAR IN THE FLYER’S ONLINE CALENDAR ONLY.

TO CONNECT WITH YOUR

COMMUNITY

T H E AT E R

Cannon Center for the Performing Arts

OUR 18 LOCATIONS

Head Over Heels, comical journey to find love. Zoe falls for a smooth-talking bad boy who sweeps her off her feet, but her new found love is only pretending to be the perfect mate as he hits on Zoe’s best friend. www.thecannoncenter. com. $49-$55. Fri.-Sat., Mar. 16-17, 8 p.m.

HOST EVENTS FOR EVERY AGE AND INTEREST.

HERE ARE JUST A FEW:

KIDS

MEMPHIS COOK CONVENTION CENTER, 255 N. MAIN (TICKETS, 525-1515).

HATTILOO AT THE LIBRARY March 17 | 2 p.m. – 3:30 p.m.

Circuit Playhouse

Benjamin L. Hooks Central Library 3030 Poplar Ave.

James and the Giant Peach, when James is sent by his conniving aunts to chop down their old fruit tree, he discovers a magic potion that results in a tremendous peach, which launches him on a journey of enormous proportions. www. playhouseonthesquare.org. $25-$40. Sundays, 2 p.m., and Thursdays-Saturdays, 7 p.m. Through April 8.

EASTER EGGSTRAVAGANZA March 31 | Noon – 2 p.m. Gaston Park Library | 1040 S. Third St.

COMICKERS’ CLUB WITH SPECIAL GUEST KAZU KIBUISHI March 24 | 2:30 p.m. – 3:30 p.m.

51 S. COOPER (725-0776).

East Shelby Library | 7200 E. Shelby Dr.

ADULTS FIVE FRIDAYS OF JAZZ Every other Friday, March 9 - May 4 6:30 p.m. - 8 p.m.

March 23 Hope Clayburn’s Soul Scrimmage with Joyce Cobb: Honoring National Women’s History Month

This Exhibition was organized by the University of Pennsylvania Museum of Archeology and Anthropology

Sponsored by:

3050 Central Ave / Memphis 38111

Benjamin L. Hooks Central Library

COLORCOPIA FOR SENIORS

P!NK PALACE MUSEUM

901.636.2362

March 15-21, 2018

March 20 Hollywood Library | 1530 N. Hollywood St.

March 27 South Library | 1929 S. Third St.

STRIKING VOICES: THE PORTRAITS EXHIBIT Now through April 30 Benjamin L. Hooks Central Library Goodwyn Gallery

40Watt Moon Celtic Crossing Irish Pub

#STARTHERE MEMPHISLIBRARIES.ORG

The Nether, set in a virtual reality world where everything is possible. Fridays-Sundays. Through March 25. 1705 POPLAR (274-7139).

The Halloran Centre

The Wonder Bread Years, a fresh and funny salute to Americana, a fast-paced, hilarious production that gracefully walks the line between standup and theater. www.orpheummemphis.com. $45. Fri., March 16, 2:30 & 7:30 p.m., and Sat., March 17, 2:30 p.m. 225 S. MAIN (529-4299).

Presented by the Memphis Library Foundation

22

The Evergreen Theatre

Friday • March 16 8pm (Shotgun Start)

Hattiloo Theatre

Selma: A Musical Tribute to Dr. Martin Luther King Jr., originally written in 1976 to honor Dr. King’s bravery, many of the messages still resonate with activists today. www.hattiloo.org. Through March 18. 37 S. COOPER (502-3486).

The Historic Ruffin Theater

Spamalot, comedy that follows King Arthur and his Knights on their quest for the Holy Grail. On their journey, they encounter strange places, even stranger characters. (6106076), ruffin.theater/. $10. Fri., Sat., 7-10 p.m. Through March 17. 113 W. PLEASANT (504-8889).

The Orpheum

Wicked, www. orpheum-memphis.com. $49. Through March 25. 203 S. MAIN (525-3000).

Playhouse on the Square

Laughter on the 23rd Floor, take a trip inside the writer’s room to witness the wacky antics and crazy arguments that happen on the 23rd floor. www.playhouseonthesquare. org. $25-$40. Sundays, 2 p.m., and Thursdays-Saturdays, 8 p.m. Through March 25. 66 S. COOPER (726-4656).

Theatre Memphis

The Drowsy Chaperone, a man puts on his favorite record: the cast recording of a fictitious 1928 musical. The recording “comes to life,” and a masterful madcap evening lovingly pokes fun at the musical theater genre. www.theatrememphis.org. $30. Fridays, Saturdays, 8 p.m., Sundays, 2 p.m., and Thursdays, 7:30 p.m. Through March 31. 630 PERKINS EXT. (682-8323).

TheatreWorks

The Daughters of the Lone Star State, wickedly funny, no-holds-barred look at racism and classism through the ladies of the Lowake, Texas, chapter of The Daughters of the Lone Star State. www.etcmemphistheater.com. $15. Sundays, 2 p.m., and Fridays, Saturdays, 8

p.m. Through March 25. 2085 MONROE (274-7139).

A R T I ST R EC E PT I O N S

Crosstown Arts

Artist reception for “Larger Than Life,” exhibition of charcoal portraits by Lucien Scott Croy. www.crosstownarts.org. Fri., March 16, 6-9 p.m., and Sat., March 17, 12-6 p.m. 430 N. CLEVELAND (507-8030).

Crosstown Concourse

Opening reception for “Goodnight My Love,” exhibition of photographs from the Ernest Withers collection, including works from Withers’ archive of more than one million negatives that have never been seen by the public. www.crosstownarts.org. Sat., March 17, 6-8 p.m. N. CLEVELAND AT NORTH PARKWAY.

Jay Etkin Gallery

Opening reception for Jane Keltner, exhibition of paintings. www.jayetkingallery.com. Fri., March 16, 6-9 p.m. 942 COOPER (550-0064).

Ross Gallery

Opening reception for “Looking at the World,” exhibition of paintings by Claudia TullosLeonard. www.cbu.edu/gallery. Fri., March 16, 5:30-7:30 p.m. Opening reception for “Riding the Bevel,” exhibition of work by artists from the Mid-South Woodturners Guild in the gallery foyer. www.cbu.edu/gallery. Fri., March 16, 5:30-7:30 p.m. CHRISTIAN BROTHERS UNIVERSITY, PLOUGH LIBRARY, 650 E. PARKWAY S. (321-3000).

WKNO Studio

Artist reception for “Portraits in Soul: Rare Images from the API Archive,” exhibition of 30 20 x 20 images from original promo photographs of Stax artists. www.wkno.org. Sun., March 18, 2-4 p.m. 7151 CHERRY FARMS (458-2521).

continued on page 24 The Wonder Bread Years at the Halloran Centre, Friday and Saturday, March 16th and 17th


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CALENDAR: MARCH 15 - 21 continued from page 22 OT H E R ART HAP P E N I N G S

“A Potpourri of Art”

Featuring local artists Cherie Robinson, Joy Phillips Routt, Missy George, Lynn Reed, Phyllis Boger, Libby Anderson, James Blythe, and Caroline Brown showcasing their artwork. Free. Through March 18, 10 a.m.-4 p.m. ST. GEORGE’S EPISCOPAL CHURCH, 2425 SOUTH GERMANTOWN (7547282), WWW.STGCHURCH.ORG.

Art in the Hall

A cocktail and hors d’oeuvres event with a focus on the works of seven accomplished area artists and artwork from past Mid-South Scholastic Gold Key student winners benefiting education programs. Tues., March 20, 7-10 p.m.

Opening reception for Ernest Withers’ “Goodnight My Love” at Crosstown Concourse

1500 UNION (278-6868).

Belz Museum of Asian and Judaic Art

“Chinese Symbols in Art,” ancient Chinese pottery and bronze. www.belzmuseum.org. Ongoing.

Exhibition of finds from PreColumbian cemetery of Sitio Conte in central Panama, a mysterious and complex society that thrived there more than 1,000 years ago. Ongoing.

119 S. MAIN, IN THE PEMBROKE SQUARE BUILDING (523-ARTS).

“My Kin Is Not Like Yours,” exhibition of works by Debra Edge. Ongoing. 2563 BROAD (323-3008).

Latino Memphis Design Competition

Buckman Arts Center at St. Mary’s School

Students in grades 9 through 12 are invited to showcase artistic skills of youth who can relate or are directly affected by the current immigration climate. Through March 23.

Artists’ Link Meetings

MLK50 Artwork Unveiling: “E Pluribus Unum: Out of Many, One”

“Modern Take on a Fresco and marciART,” exhibition of paintings by Lou Ann Dattilo and jewelry by Marci Margolin Hirsch. www.buckmanartscenter.com. Through April 16. 60 N. PERKINS EXT. (537-1483).

Clough-Hanson Gallery

In recognition of the tremendous legacy of Dr. Martin Luther King Jr., Ephraim Urevbu has created an original painting to commemorate MLK50 in partnership with the NCRM. Fri., March 16, 6:30-8:30 p.m.

The Rothchild Style: A Presentation by Ulrich Leben

ART VILLAGE GALLERY, 410 S. MAIN (521-0782), WWW.ARTVILLAGEGALLERY.COM.

MEMPHIS BROOKS MUSEUM OF ART, 1934 POPLAR (544-6209), WWW.BROOKSMUSEUM.ORG.

History of the Rothchild Collection including stories of the many fascinating guests who visited. Sat., March 17, 10:30 a.m.

ONGOI NG ART

Art Museum at the University of Memphis (AMUM)

“Africa: Art of a Continent,” exhibition of African art from the Martha and Robert Fogelman collection. Ongoing. 142 COMMUNICATION & FINE ARTS BUILDING (678-2224).

archive of more than one million negatives that have never been seen by the public. www. crosstownarts.org. March 17May 13. N. CLEVELAND AT NORTH PARKWAY.

David Lusk Gallery

“Talk Talk Talk: Late ’70s,” exhibition of wood sculpted canvas paintings and woodcuts from 1970s by Ted Faiers. www. davidluskgallery.com. Through March 17. 97 TILLMAN (767-3800).

Bingham and Broad

MEMPHIS PINK PALACE MUSEUM, 3050 CENTRAL (636-2362), WWW.MEMPHISMUSEUMS.ORG.

WWW.LATINOMEMPHIS.ORG.

JASON’S DELI, 3473 POPLAR (324-3181).

“Gentle Gestures,” exhibition of new works by Don DuMont. www.anfa.com. Through April 5.

“Beneath the Surface: Life, Death, & Gold in Ancient Panama”

HOWARD HALL, 2282 MADISON

Speakers include, March: Marc Young, manager of the Frame Corner, how to frame art; April: Jack Kenner, nature photographer; May: Fred Rawlinson, critique session. Third Monday of every month, 6:30 p.m.

ANF Architects

“The CLTV,” exhibition motivated by the question, “What does liberation mean for a young black artist in Memphis?” www.rhodes.edu. Through March 23.

RHODES COLLEGE, 2000 N. PARKWAY (843-3000).

Crosstown Concourse

“Goodnight My Love,” exhibition of photographs from the Ernest Withers collection, including works from Withers’

The Dixon Gallery & Gardens

“The Real Beauty: The Artistic World of Eugenia Errázuriz,” exhibition traces the life of the influential Chilean expatriate patron of the arts and her impact on 20th-century design through her belief in highquality minimalism. Through April 8. “Dixon Dialect: The Susan and John Horseman Gift,” exhibition of 28 works by 25 American and European artists donated to the Dixon’s permanent collection by Susan and John Horseman. Showcases each work in the gift. Through April 1. Paula Kovarik, exhibition of fiber art. www.dixon.org. Through April 1. 4339 PARK (761-5250).

Eclectic Eye

“Spirit Animal,” exhibition

continued on page 27

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CALENDAR: MARCH 15 - 21 continued from page 24 series of wildlife portraits and silhouettes captured by acrylic paint on canvas by Karen Mulford. www. eclectic-eye.com. Through April 11.

Slavehaven Underground Railroad Museum

“Images of Africa Before & After the Middle Passage,” photography by Jeff and Shaakira Edison. Ongoing.

242 S. COOPER (276-3937).

826 N. SECOND (527-3427).

FireHouse Community Arts Center

Stax Museum of American Soul Music

“I Am Here,” exhibition of work by Najee Strickland, Immon Johnson, Rahn Marion, and Naima Peace. www.mbaafirehouse.org. Through April 30. Mosal Morszart, exhibition of works by Black Arts Alliance artist. www.memphisblackartsalliance.org. Ongoing. 985 S. BELLEVUE (948-9522).

“The Chaos and the Cosmos: Inside Memphis Music’s Lost Decade, 1977-1986,” exhibition of photography by Patricia Rainer. www.staxmuseum. com. Through July 31. 926 E. MCLEMORE (946-2535).

Village Frame & Art

“20th Century Memphis Photographs,” exhibition of work by Charlie Ivey and Virginia Schoenster, Wednesdays, 10 a.m.-6 p.m. Gallery Artists, exhibition of work by Charlie Ivey, Virginia Schoenster, Lou Ann Dattilo, and Matthew Hasty. Ongoing. 540 S. MENDENHALL (767-8882).

OPERA

Opera Omakase: Blarney, Ballads, and BYOB

Operatic drinking songs, ballads by prominent Irish poets, and a preview the upcoming Opera 901 Showcase feature, Kayfabe. Free-$10. Thurs., March 15, 7 p.m. CLARK OPERA MEMPHIS CENTER, 6745 WOLF RIVER PARKWAY, WWW.OPERAMEMPHIS.ORG.

WKNO Studio

“Portraits in Soul: Rare Images from the API Archive,” exhibition of 30 20 x 20 images from original promo photographs of Stax artists. www.wkno.org. Through March 30. 7151 CHERRY FARMS (458-2521).

Germantown Performing Arts Center

DAN C E

SuicideGirls: Blackheart Burlesque

Sexiest, smartest, geekiest, and most fun definitive pop-culture burlesque show. $20-$135. Thurs., March 15, 8 p.m. MINGLEWOOD HALL, 1555 MADISON (866-609-1744), WWW.MINGLEWOODHALL.COM.

“The Weathered South,” exhibition of textured acrylic on canvas paintings by Lacey Lee Walt. www.gpacweb.com. Through April 3.

continued on page 28

1801 EXETER (751-7500).

“The Good. The Bad. The Ugly,” exhibition of mixed-media works and paintings not previously displayed from Memphis College of Art BFA show. Through April 4. 2170 YOUNG (272-7210).

Jay Etkin Gallery

Jane Keltner, exhibition of paintings. www.jayetkingallery.com. March 16-April 14. 942 COOPER (550-0064).

L Ross Gallery

“Glimpses of the Space Between,” exhibition of paintings and drawings by Anne Davey and Jil Evans. www.lrossgallery.com. Through March 31. 5040 SANDERLIN (767-2200).

Marshall Arts Gallery

“Love of Art” and “Memphis,” exhibition of work by Nikki Gardner and Debra Edge by appointment only. (647-9242), Ongoing. 639 MARSHALL (679-6837).

Memphis Botanic Garden

2018 MGAL Star Artist Juried Exhibition, www. memphisbotanicgarden.com. Through March 28. 750 CHERRY (636-4100).

Memphis Brooks Museum of Art

“Black Resistance: Ernest C. Withers and the Civil Rights Movement,” exhibition focuses on and commemorates the 50th anniversary of the events from March 27 through April 8, 1968. Through Aug. 19. “African-Print Fashion Now! A Story of Taste, Globalization, and Style,” exhibition of dynamic traditions of African dress featuring colorful, boldly patterned printed cloth highlighting the interplay between regional preferences and cosmopolitanism. Through Aug. 12. “Rotunda Projects: Lisa Hoke,” exhibition of overthe-top installation of recycled and repurposed materials reflecting aspirations for the work and fears of expecting too much. Through June 3. “About Face,” exhibition located in the Education Gallery highlighting the different ways artists interpret the connection between emotion and expression. Ongoing. “Drawing Memory: Essence of Memphis,” exhibition of works inspired by nsibidi, a sacred means of communication among male secret societies in southeastern Nigeria by Victor Ekpuk. www. brooksmuseum.org. Ongoing.

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“Art of Science,” exhibition showcasing the beauty of science and the power of art. Featuring scientific imagery reinterpreted by local area fine artists. www.mca.edu. Through April 18. 1930 POPLAR (272-5100).

Metal Museum

“Alchemy4,” exhibition of contemporary enamels produced in the last two years with 150 objects created by 98 students in accredited degree programs throughout the world. Through April 29. “Everyday Objects: The Evolution and Innovations of Joseph Anderson,” exhibition of works by artist-blacksmith and sculptor highlighting utensils and functional objects. www.metalmuseum.org. Through April 22.

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CALENDAR continued from page 27 B O O KS I G N I N G S

Booksigning by Amber Wilson

Author discusses and signs For the Love of the South: Recipes & Stories from My Southern Kitchen. Thurs., March 15, 6 p.m. NOVEL, 387 PERKINS EXT. (922-5526), WWW.NOVELMEMPHIS.COM.

Booksigning by Gregory Boyle

Author discusses and signs Barking to the Choir. Tues., March 20, 6 p.m. NOVEL, 387 PERKINS EXT. (922-5526), WWW.NOVELMEMPHIS.COM.

Booksigning by Jenny Rose Carey

Author discusses and signs Glorious Shade. Fri., March 16, 10:30 a.m. THE DIXON GALLERY & GARDENS, 4339 PARK (761-5250), WWW.DIXON.ORG.

Booksigning by Marc Shell

Author discusses and signs Islandology, his recent book on islands, from More’s Utopia to Shakespeare’s Tempest, from Plato’s Republic to contemporary politics. Thurs., March 15, 7 p.m. RHODES COLLEGE, BLOUNT AUDITORIUM IN BUCKMAN HALL, 2000 N. PARKWAY (843-3000), WWW.RHODES.EDU.

Booksigning by Woody Skinner

Author discusses and signs A Thousand Distant Radios. Sun., March 18, 2 p.m. NOVEL, 387 PERKINS EXT. (922-5526), WWW.NOVELMEMPHIS.COM.

Booksigning by Father Greg Boyle

Author and Jesuit priest in Los Angeles ministering to reformed gang members through Homeboy Industries, discusses and signs Barking to the Choir: The Power of Radical Kinship free. Mon., March 19, 7-9 p.m. CHURCH OF THE HOLY COMMUNION, 4645 WALNUT GROVE (767-6987).

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What else was happening in Memphis in 1968? Join local scholars and historians Charles Hughes, Earnestine Jenkins, and Otis Sanford for a lively discussion of Memphis in 1968. Free. Wed., March 21, 7-9 p.m. STAX MUSEUM OF AMERICAN SOUL MUSIC, 926 E. MCLEMORE (261-6338), WWW.SOULSVILLEFOUNDATION.ORG.

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South Main St. Patrick’s Day Bar Crawl Bounce between Ghost River, Loflin Yard, Carolina Watershed, and Dirty Crow. Don’t forget to wear green. Sat., March 17, 11-2 a.m. GHOST RIVER BREWING, 827 S. MAIN (278-0087).

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Live music, Irish dancers, face painters, authentic Irish fare, and Guinness galore beginning at 10:30 a.m. Sat., March 17. CELTIC CROSSING, 903 S. COOPER (274-5151).


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29


FOOD By Michael Donahue

MICHAEL DONAHUE

The Perfect Bagel

Coming soon — Dave’s Bagels

The expansion of Dave’s Bagels.

B

March 15-21, 2018

rick and mortar soon will be added to Dave Scott’s successful recipe for Dave’s Bagels. This summer, Scott, 27, is slated to open a main store in Midtown, which will carry his bagel, bialy, and pretzel items. He eventually may branch out to satellite stores in other locations. Scott, who has been working out of a shared commercial kitchen, will continue to sell his baked goods at farmers markets and other locations. The main store would be the flagship store, where all his items will be made. “Then maybe a couple of little satellites that we can deliver the fresh baked product to, but we won’t need all the equipment on the premises.” A native of Morristown, New Jersey, Scott began making bagels when he was living in Las Vegas. He missed the bagels he used to get in New Jersey and New York. After much trial and error, he created

30

what he — and, apparently, many others — consider the perfect bagel. Scott, who moved to Memphis in 2016, began selling his bagels at the Curb Market and branched out to other locations. Later, he began thinking, “Well, they don’t have any good Jewish delis or, really, like an old school bagel shop. I wanted something like that down here, which was kind of why I went with the bagels in the first place. ’Cause I couldn’t get one in town. I couldn’t find a decent one. Now, I’m thinking, ‘I want a store.’ Using a shared-space kitchen is great, but I’m missing out on a lot of retail opportunities. “I just put a lot of feelers out there, let everybody know what I was looking for and hopefully somebody would come back and tell me some good news, eventually.” He got the good news last September. A man came by Scott’s commercial kitchen to check out his products. “I was baking that day, so I had fresh stuff out of the oven. I said, ‘Hey, man. You look hungry. Here,

grab a bagel. I got some cream cheese in the back if you want it.’” The man loved it. He loved it so much he continued to buy Scott’s bagels and, eventually, became his silent partner. Scott wants the store to be a “grab-andgo-style bakery.” The satellite locations “will give us more room to experiment with the menu. The plan is to do breakfast and lunch. And, again, we’ll have your classic bagel stuff, bagel combos there. Your bacon, egg, and cheese. That kind of thing. I’m trying to work in some veggie options on there, too, because bagels inherently are a vegan item.” Scott also is thinking “kosher.” “One of the things that I was making a point to do with this store that I can’t do with my current location is be completely kosher. So, I’ve been throwing out some feelers with rabbis in town seeing what I’ll be needing to do. And once we start construction on the building, we will work with a rabbi so we can get at least the bagel

process and all that kosher. So, everything in back of the house will be kosher. I just have to work out details when it comes to front-of-the-house stuff.” Scott wants to keep the business simple at first “and probably get a little experimental with having some more deli items.” He already figured out what the decor will look like. “I’ve always been really into like a rustic-modern mesh.” As for the name, Scott says, “We’re probably going to stay at ‘Dave’s Bagels.’” Scott’s ultimate goal? “I want to be in every grocery store, every major grocery store in the country. You got all 50 states in there. And/or have franchises.” So, what makes a perfect bagel? “The long-term fermentation. I could make a batch and bake them off and everything in two hours if I wanted to. But 18 to 24 hours fermation. It allows all the ingredients to work together.” Making a bagel, says Scott, is “a two-day process, or it’s not good.”


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32

March 15-21, 2018


S P I R ITS By Richard Murff

How ’Bout Them Apples? store. When you first enter, you think: “Well, of course, this is a cidery.” What you notice after you’ve ordered a flight (because you know nothing about cider) is how light they are. In a world of double and triple IPAs and chocolate coffee stouts, there doesn’t seem to be much heft to it. I think this is what makes the ciders so refreshing. The folks at Long Road are mercifully unpedantic about this: There is always a local beer on tap, in case you simply don’t care what the Romans do. It is a drive, but not that long, and worth more than one trip to sample the revolving selections. We had the Bourbon Slingshot, which is made like any other cider, then stored in used barrels from the Jack Daniel’s Distillery. It works well. The cider starts with a light taste, and the whiskey barrel storage gives it an interesting bite. We also tasted a very dry and tart number called Applerater, and a subtle Rhonissippi — a traditional cider that tastes exactly like you imagine that stuff John Adams was knocking back must have tasted like.

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Be warned though, even though the cider is very light tasting, these drinks have plenty of alcohol. The “lite” cider, for example, is 5.8 percent ABV. The others run around 8 percent. (In a world before modern sanitation and heavy machinery, our forebears would put away a lot of alcohol.) Fortunately, it’s easy to remember to eat something while you’re there. The menu is solid. I “split” the Ploughman’s Plate — a board of nuts, olives, meats, and cheeses — with the short-changed Mrs. M. John Adams could relate, no doubt.

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RICHARD MURFF

L

et’s just start with the meathook reality that anyone who starts a conversation with, “Hey gang, let’s drive out to the country and get some cider!” is going to sound a bit daft. However, if your aspiration is to out-hipster the craft beer crowd, it may be your only course. And cider is really old school. Even if you don’t care about any of that and just want something a little different, it’s still a pretty good option. The Long Road Cider Company in Barretville, on the slightly far side of Bartlett, is worth the drive. And that drive is long enough for you to contemplate America’s protracted history with cider. The settlers of Jamestown planted an orchard in 1607. The Mayflower had in its hold apple tree saplings, as well as a cider press for its 1620 voyage to the New World. The press was dismantled en route after a rough storm damaged the ship and they used its giant screw to keep the ship from breaking apart — thus, ensuring that America’s first batch of wellarmed religious lunatics arrived safely. The true-life legend Johnny Appleseed wasn’t planting orchards everywhere because frontier moms needed something to wrap up with the kid’s lunch. He was planting apples because our Founding Mothers (and Fathers) — just like their descendants — need a drink sometimes. John Adams, for example, was noted for quaffing two tankards of cider a day. Cider remained a common drink in the U.S. until prohibition was established in 1920. The legal dry spell lasted until 1933, and liquor and beer bounced back immediately after repeal. But it took wine until the 1970s or so to really re-enter the American mainstream. Cider never seemed to find its legs again. (And to be honest, I’d always mentally put it in the same category as those godawful wine coolers.) Long Road Cider Co., Tennessee’s first, wants to change that. And there is a decidedly old-school method to their madness, a “Methode Champenoise” to be exact. Which means that there is a third fermentation in the bottle, creating a natural carbonation. (Like champagne, if you hadn’t guessed.) All the ciders are made in-house, as is the non-alcoholic root beer. The suppliers are family-run businesses, and they add nothing artificial; what happens in their barrels and bottles is just the product of Mother Nature and time. Long Road is located in an old general

The Long Road Cider Company is worth the drive.

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33


FILM REVIEW By Chris McCoy

Mindy Kaling

Head Trip Not even a 30-foot-tall Mega Oprah can save A Wrinkle in Time.

I

n situations such as we find ourselves in now, I like to remind readers of Alfred Hitchcock’s attitude toward literary adaptations. When asked by François Truffaut if he would ever make a movie of a great novel such as Crime and Punishment, he said no. “In Dostoevsky’s novel there are many, many words, and all of them have a function.” A great book does more than just tell a story. The writer’s use of language is itself a part of the magic. Having the voice of the author whispering in your head is an entirely different experience than sitting in a theater watching a moving image with an audience. What works very well in one medium will not be as effective when translated into another medium. The best books for adaptations are tightly edited page turners with strong stories. Hitchcock’s observation is boiled down to the dictum “Mediocre books make the best movies.” A Wrinkle in Time is not a mediocre book. Therein lies the problem with the Disney-produced, Ava DuVernay-directed screen adaptation. A Wrinkle in Time was a Harry Potter-sized literary sensation when it was first published in 1962. Author Madeleine L’Engle drew on her own experiences as

The Midtowner

an awkward late bloomer to create Meg Murry, the 13-year-old protagonist. Meg begins the novel in the midst of a hurricane of sadness and self doubt that seems to have become an actual hurricane outside the cozy old house where she lives with her brother Charles Wallace and her scientist mother. Her father has been missing for four years, which is the source of much of her angst. The neighbors and the kids at school gossip that he was a deadbeat who ran out on his young family, but, given that he was a rogue NASA scientist who was studying higher dimensional physics, the Murry family hopes that he went somewhere more otherworldly — and might one day return. DuVernay’s casting instincts are good. Storm Reid plays Meg with a confidence that belies her age. The otherworldly trio of Mrs. Whatsit (Reese Witherspoon), Mrs. Who (Mindy Kaling), and Mrs. Which (Oprah Winfrey), proto-Time Lord, alien/angel hybrids who travel the cosmos by folding space with their minds, are all spot on. But much of their work in this visually dense film was done in solitude against green screens, and it shows. The same goes for former

Peter Pan, Levi Miller, who plays Meg’s companion Calvin, and Deric McCabe, who plays Charles Wallace. Faring much better is Zach Galifianakis as The Happy Medium, the oracle the children consult on their search for their missing father, who is played by the ever versatile Chris Pine. The Medium’s world of precariously balanced crystals is one of several compelling visual moments DuVernay and her crew conjure, but the film is so disjointed that it cannot sustain any momentum for long. L’Engle’s prose is masterfully compact and often lyrical. She never talks down to her young audience, but uses the limitations of the children’s book to her advantage. But the novel is very much of its time. She was a devout Christian with the education to understand cutting-edge science; one way to look at A Wrinkle in Time is as her attempt to reconcile the

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CATCH US BEFORE WE FLY AWAY

FILM REVIEW By Chris McCoy revelations of cosmology and quantum mechanics with old-fashioned American transcendentalism. Her philosophy and imagery were absorbed by the kids of the early ’60s, resurfaced when those kids got psychedelicized after the Summer of Love, and later incorporated into New Age mysticism. The root of her vision of evil is the false happiness of enforced conformity, and that’s not a can of worms the capitalist Disney corporation wants to open. Instead, L’Engle’s admonitions to embrace your weirdness come across as forced whimsey. Her descriptions of the rolling fields of the planet Uriel are rewards themselves. But when they’re rendered as Disney-fied CGI, and characters just stand there and look at them, they’re not so interesting. L’Engle’s strength is the internal

struggles of her young characters, but that’s not something that translates well to the screen, which is all about external appearances. While I have no doubt the message is needed by America’s young women of color, there’s only so much empowering affirmation you can take in one sitting, even when it’s coming from a 30-foot Mega Oprah. A Wrinkle in Time was long thought to be unfilmable, and this version suggests that conventional wisdom was right. A Wrinkle in Time Now playing Multiple locations

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PAID IN ADVANCE! Make $1000 A Week Mailing Brochures From Home! No Experience Required. Helping home workers since 2001! Genuine Opportunity. Start Immediately! www.AdvancedMailing.net (AAN CAN)

Education AIRLINE CAREERS begin here - Get started by training as FAA certified Aviation Technician. Financial aid for qualified students. Job placement assistance. Call Aviation Institute of Maintenance 800-725-1563 (AAN CAN)

Employment

TUESDAY, MAR 20 IN BETWEEN

@MALCO RIDGEWAY

Three Palestinian women living in an apartment in Tel Aviv try to find a balance between traditional and modern culture.

COPELAND SERVICES, L.L.C. Hiring Armed State Licensed Officers/Unarmed OfficersThree Shifts AvailableSame Day Interview1661 International Place901-258-5872 or 901-818-3187Interview in Professional Attire _____________________ EMPIRE ROOFING OF TENNESSEE Now Hiring Estimators and Salesmen.- Paid Medical InsurancePaid Holidays- Paid VacationFax Resumes to (901)346-4388 or apply in person at 1300 Lincoln St., Memphis, TN 38114. _____________________ EMPIRE ROOFING OF TENNESSEE Now Hiring Commercial Roofer and Laborers. Roofer minimum 3yrs experience in single plies. Laborer no experience necessary. - Drivers license a plus - Paid Medical Insurance- Paid Holidays After 90 Days- Paid Vacation 1yr of EmploymentSubmit application at 1300 Lincoln St., Memphis, TN 38114 or fax Resume to (901) 346-4388

March 15-21, 2018

General

WEDNESDAY, MAR 21 MARVIN BOOKER WAS MURDERED

@CROSSTOWN ARTS

The case of Marvin Booker, a homeless street preacher originally from Memphis, who was beaten to death by five jail guards for wanting to retrieve his shoes.

ANIMAL LOVERS Bring Your Dog to Work. Carriage Drivers needed downtown. Valid license required. UptownCarriages.com 901-496-2128

Hospitality/ Restaurant

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Hiring Full Time and Part Time CALL CENTER MAKING OUTBOUND CALLS FOR NON-PROFIT ORGANIZATIONS. Pay Rate Full Time: Starts at $9 an hour $10 with perfect attendance plus commission. Pay Rate Part Time: $9 an hour plus commission. Full Time Pay with Bonus: $500 - $700 weekly. You MUST BE willing to listen and learn during training period.

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YOUNG AVE DELI is looking for experienced cooks. Part time and full time opportunity available. Must be able to work in the evenings. Must be able to work on Sunday. Pay will be based on experience. Come by the Deli to fill out an application. 2119 Young Avenue 38104

Full time hours available: M-F 11 am to 7:30 pm (30 min lunch). Part time hours available: M-F 3:30 pm to 7:30 pm. Experienced in sales is a requirement. Please call and leave message: New Number 901.310.9609 Veterans Welcome.


EMPLOYMENT • REAL ESTATE • SERVICES RAFFERTY’S We are looking for service minded individuals, that don’t mind working hard. We work hard, but make $. Apply in the store. 505 N Gtown Pkwy

Sales/Marketing D&T CONNECTION IS HIRING NOW! 15 Motivated People Needed Immediately! Earn Money And Travel. Commission, Bonuses, Cash Advance, Lodging Provided. Apply Now: 678-571-0896.

IF YOU’RE A GOOD READER and can volunteer to do so please call 901-832-4530

East Memphis Apt 983 JUNE ROAD #6 Great E. Memphis 2 BR, 1.5 BTH, 2nd flr. rental in gated Poplar East Apartments 1Min from Starbucks & I-240. Pool & Clubroom incld. $895/mo. Call 508-0639

Midtown APTS

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CENTRAL GARDENS 2BR/1BA, hdwd floors, ceiling fans, french doors, all appls incl. W/D, 9ft ceil, crown molding, off str pking. $750/mo. Also Large 1BR, $720/ mo. 833-6483 or 569-0847.

FURNISHED ROOMS Bellevue/McLemore, Jackson/ Watkins, Airways/Park. W/D, Cable TV/Phone. 901-485-0897 _____________________ HOUSE SHARING Bartlett Area. 1 private bedroom and full bath, big back yard, quiet area, $350/mo + utils. Call 901-314-9734 _____________________ MIDTOWN ROOM for rent near Medical District. Fridge, utilities, wifi, $100/week + dep. No Drugs. 901-725-0895. _____________________ NICE ROOMS FOR RENT S. Pkwy & Wilson. Utilities and Cable included. Fridge in your room. Cooking and free laundry privileges. Some locations w/sec. sys. Starting at $435/mo. + dep. 901.922.9089

DENIED CREDIT?? Work to Repair Your Credit Report With The Trusted Leader in Credit Repair. Call Lexington Law for a FREE credit report summary & credit repair consultation. 855-620-9426. John C. Heath, Attorney at Law, PLLC, dba Lexington Law Firm. (AAN CAN)

TOM PITMAN, LMT Massage The Way You Like It. Swedish/Deep Tissue - Relaxation, Hot Stones. Credit Cards. Call 761-7977. tompitmanmassage. com, tom@tompitmanmassage.com _____________________ WILLIAM BREWER Massage Therapist (Health & Wellness offer) 377-6864

EVERGREEN HIST. DIST. XL Studio $395 and/or 1BR $495$545, remodeled, hardwood floors, W/D, pets ok. Great neighbors. $25 cc fee. 452-3945 1882 JEFFERSON 1st mo. discount of $280. 2BR/1BA, all appls inclding WD, AC & central air, ceiling fans. off street pking. $780/mo. Dep $700. 1 yr. lease.

TAXES

Buy, Sell, Trade MISC. ITEMS Electric stove, $100, Fridge, $100, King size mattress, $100. Call Lemont @ 901-789-3860 _____________________ USED FURNITURE Apartment furniture, appliances, desks, dinette sets w/chairs, etc. 901-650-4400

Laurie Stark

*2018 Tax Change Benefits* Personal/Business + Legal Work By a CPA-Attorney Practicing in Midtown & Memphis Since 1989

94 DODGE VAN 250 $1000 as is. Call Lemont @ 901-789-3860

• Life Member of the Multi Million Dollar Club • From Downtown to Germantown

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199 S McLean Blvd | Memphis, Tennessee 38104

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TH E LAST WO R D by Aylen Mercado

On the evening of the Mid-South Peace and Justice Center’s 36th annual Living the Legacy of Nonviolence, Tami Sawyer accepted the Happy Jones Award on behalf of #TakeEmDown901. As the masses of people stood and applauded, Sawyer said, “Everyone in here … was a part of #TakeEmDown901. The reason it was so successful as a movement is because it was a people-centered movement. It gathered the voices and sentiment of our entire community.” Sawyer’s words were a reminder of the power of widespread participation in collective political action. When members of the community are in conversation and they collaborate and strategize together, social change is more impactful and long-lasting. #TakeEmDown901 demonstrated how community dialogue with differing opinions on how to address local issues helps complicate and strengthen resistance to not only racial inequality but also symbols of racial violence. The approach of a people-centered movement is reminiscent of Ella Baker’s grassroots leadership philosophy. In 1957, along with Bayard Rustin and Stanley Levison, Baker co-founded the Southern Christian Leadership Conference (SCLC). As a field organizer for the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People (NAACP), she traveled extensively throughout the South to organize local NAACP chapters. From her travels, Baker came to recognize the collective power of communities and the importance of their participation in decision-making processes that affect their lives. These methods of organizing did not sit well with the other leaders of the SCLC, who were accustomed to a “top-down” approach. Baker challenged this practice with her understanding of how individuals can find empowerment through direct participation. Thus, they do not depend on the direction of a larger, outside institution but they find the resources within themselves first to address injustice in their community. Baker found that the SCLC’s hierarchies within its organizational leadership conflicted with her philosophy. She said “In organizing a community, you start with people where they are.” She believed that individuals and communities already had resources and strengths that could be harnessed for collective liberation. Additionally, Baker had disagreements with Martin Luther King Jr.’s leadership, because the SCLC relied so heavily on him as a sole leader. She knew the dangers of having a singular person portrayed as the face of a movement. Many of her ideas and suggestions, which called for the engagement of youth and women in organizing, were also overlooked, because they were voices of a black woman in a male-dominated space. In the 1960s, Baker witnessed the organizing power of students in North Carolina. Following the example of 1940s and 1950s sit-ins in cities such as Chicago, Baltimore, and St. Louis, black students in Greensboro, North Carolina, used nonviolent protest to desegregate Woolworth lunch counters. The four college freshmen, now known as the Greensboro Four, were joined by other college students in daily sit-ins which drew national attention to the segregation in the South. They unveiled the curtain to the violence that white people would inflict to maintain segregation and racial inequality. The grassroots organizing that these students were engaging in drew Baker to them and led to the formation of the Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee (SNCC). Baker supported the student organizers working independently of SCLC because she knew that the youth needed to have agency in the direction of their organizing. Her advising influenced SNCC’s major role in the civil rights movement. Using Baker’s framework, SNCC was able to do much of the radical work that SCLC could not. As we reflect on the legacy of Ella Baker, one of the most influential people in civil rights movement, we must consider how her framework exists today. The Black Lives Matter movement is strategic in moving away from single, national leaders. Rather, the movement encourages black communities to address issues that are affecting them locally. As such, black communities can have more agency in how they address injustices in their neighborhoods. This group-centered leadership where members work together to assess how they respond and organize is one of the main elements of Baker’s framework of participatory democracy. Similarly, we can look to United We Dream as another example of an immigrant, youth-led movement. It includes a network of immigrantrights organizations across the country that uses localized systems of political action to push for a comprehensive immigration reform. They, too, engage in decentralization and collective decision-making by training young people to organize in their communities through an intersectional analysis of immigrant and LGBTQ+ struggles. We are also seeing the activism of the Parkland survivors and the obvious pressure they have placed on elected officials and corporations. They have helped mobilize another wave of young organizers. In various cities and states, Memphis included, students are coordinating with the National School Walkout to call for gun control. The mobilization is happening at a local level, with groups deciding on their own what type of demonstration suits them best. For this generation of organizers, I offer the advice that was offered to me: Find and work from the strengths within you and your community; seek guidance when you need to, but trust yourself; do not be pacified, do not be co-opted, and do not give up. In the words of Ella Baker, “Strong people don’t need strong leaders.” We are all agents of change. Adelanté. Aylen Mercado is a brown, queer, Latinx chingona pursuing an Urban Studies and Latin American and Latinx Studies degree at Rhodes College. A native of Argentina, she is researching Latinx identity in the South.

m e m p h i s f l y e r. c o m

CENTER FOR CONSTITUTIONAL RIGHTS

People-centered movements are the most powerful agencies of change.

Ella Baker

THE LAST WORD

Participate!

39


MINGLEWOOD HALL

JUST ANNOUNCED: Roots of a Rebellion 420 show! 3/15: SuicideGirls Blackheart Burlesque 3/23: Cody Johnson 3/24: V3Fights 3/27: Hannibal Buress 4/5: Lil Skies 4/14: Lucero Family Block Party 20th Anniversary w/ Turnpike Troubadours, Deer Tick, John Moreland & more! 4/18: Nightwish 6/1: Gary Clark Jr. 6/14: Ledisi w/ Melanie Fiona & Tweet 6/28: Trixie Mattel

Celebrating 75 Years Just Announced:

Sun April 8 - YBN Nahmir Thu April 12 - Karl Denson’s Tiny Universe Fri May 11 - MoneyBagg Yo Fri May 25 - Butcher Babies w/ Cane Hill and Sumo Cyco Upcoming:

Sat Mar 17 - Rumours: A Fleetwood Mac Tribute Thu Mar 22 - Up N’ Smoke Wed Mar 21 - Avery*Sunshine Thu Mar 29 - Ty Dolla $ign Sat Mar 31 - Downtown Live! w/ Euge Groove & Chris Standring Wed April 4 - Big Krit Thu April 5 - Dweezil Zappa Fri April 6 - Gunna Fri April 13 - RED w/ Lacey Sturm Fri April 27 - The Dixie Dregs Sun April 29 - Parkway Drive Mon May 7 - Todrick Hall Tue May 8 - Black Veil Brides / Asking Alexandria Sun May 13 - Jimmy Eat World Mon May 14 - Fifty Shades Male Revue Wed May 23 - Stone Temple Pilots Sat May 26 - Sevendust Tue June 5 - Big Boi

1884 LOUNGE

4/5: Martin Sexton 4/10: The Sword w/ King Buffalo 5/11: Of Montreal 6/29: The Steel Woods

MORE EVENTS AT MINGLEWOODHALL.COM

Coco & Lola’s

MidTown Lingerie Fixin’s for Vixens !!

www.cocoandlolas.com

Finest lace - Coolest place 710 S. Cox|901-425-5912|Mon-Sat 11:30-7:00

NEW DAISY THEATRE | 330 Beale St Memphis 901.525.8981 • Advance Tickets available at NewDaisy.com and Box Office

TUT-UNCOMMON ANTIQUES 421 N. Watkins St. 278-8965

16th ANNUAL SOUTHERN

All Earrings in stock are 50% OFF throughout March.

HOTWING FESTIVAL Location TIGER LANE-2 Stages 18 acts April 21, 2018 over $7,500.00 cash prizes

1500 sq. ft. of Vintage & Antique Jewelry. Retro Furniture and Accessories. Original Paintings, Sculpture, Pottery, Art & Antiques. We are the only store in the Mid-South that replaces stones in costume jewelry.

YOUNGAVENUEDELI.COM

GROWLERS 1911 Poplar | 901growlers.com

corn hole tournament, wing eating contest, kids korner VOLUNTEERS NEEDED! Military, Veterans & kids 12 under freewww.southernhotwingfestival.com

2119 Young Ave • 278-0034 3/14: $3 Pint Night! 3/15: Memphis Trivia League! 3/30: Three Star Revival 4/7: UFC 223 Tony Furguson vs. Khabib Nurmagomedov 4/28: White Animals and Walrus

whatevershops.com

Kitchen Open Late! Now Delivering All Day! 278-0034 (limited delivery area)

3/14- Comedy 3/15- Hip-Hop Open Mic/ Showcase 3/16- Spring Breakdown (Local music) 3/17- Walking on Landmines, Casiowaries & More 3/18- Vile Creature 3/19- Pronoun 3/20- Parsonsfield 3/23- Soulfly as Nailbomb 3/29- Twin Peaks 4/5- Rev Horton Heat

THE BEST CELEBRATION k MEMPHIS

MEMPHIS MADE BREWING Taproom hours:

Mon 4 - 7 p.m., Thurs & Fri 4 - 10 p.m., Sat 1 - 10 p.m., Sun 1 - 7 p.m.

768 S. Cooper • 901.207.5343 FREE BREWERY TOURS 4 P.M. SATURDAY & SUNDAY

GONER RECORDS

New/ Used LPs, 45s & CDs.

We Buy Records!

2152 Young Ave 901-722-0095

ST. PATRICK’S 2018 COOPER-YOUNG

Sunday March 25, 12PM-6PM

LIVE MUSIC ALL DAY

STAGE HANDS NEEDED

FESTIVITIES KICK OFF WITH THE PARADE b 11AM

BAGPIPERS IRISH DANCERS a FACE PAINTING

EPL SOCCER 6 NATIONS RUGBY Antiques & Collectibles

St. Patrick’s Day Sale Fri-Sun 10% OFF Store Wide! Refreshments & Individual Vendor Sales

Antiques & Collectibles 21,000 sq ft. 100 + booths 5855 Summer Ave. (corner of Summer and Sycamore View) exit 12 off I-40 | 901.213.9343 Mon-Sat 10a-6p | Sun 1p-6p

CHIP N’ DALE’S ANTIQUES 3457 Summer Avenue • Memphis, TN 38122 EVERYTHING ON SALE! Open Tues-Sat | 901-452-5620 “Celebrating 30 years in Business”

IRISH PUB & RESTAURANT 903 S. COOPER

|

274-5151

|

C E LT I C C R O S S I N G M E M P H I S . C O M

High Cotton Brewing Co. 598 Monroe Ave, 38103 Proceeds from 901 Popper Throwdown benefit Memphis Paws, Inc., The free, family-friendly event will feature jalapeÒo popper cook-offs, a jalapeÒo eating competition, live music, and High Cotton brews. For more info, visit: jalapenothrowdown.com or the Facebook event page.

For Low Down. Call 901.327.4994 Leave Contact Information.

Thur 3/15- Chuck Mead, 8p Sat 3/17- Get Lucked Up at RG!, DJ L’il Leprechaun (Eggroll), Graham O’Winchester, Big Betsy, RG Pub Crawl - 7p Sun 3/18- Roosters & Railcars Brunch Series w/Marcella & Her Lovers, 11a Sat 3/24- Walrus, 8p Fri 3/30- Motel Mirrors and John Paul Keith record release, 7p Fri 4/6- Paul Thorn, 8p

I Buy 45RPM Records & Old Windup Phonographs And Old 78 RPM’s on labels: Paramount, Okeh, Gennett, Vocalion, Champion, Supertone, Superior, QRS, Black Patti, Perfect, Romeo, Conqueror, Victor, Columbia, Edison, Sun, Meteor, Flip Many others. Call Paul: 901-435-6668

Memphis Flyer 3.15.18  

This issue: Spring Trends! What you should be wearing as the weather gets warmer. Also: Dave's Bagels, the return of Big Betsy, our review o...

Memphis Flyer 3.15.18  

This issue: Spring Trends! What you should be wearing as the weather gets warmer. Also: Dave's Bagels, the return of Big Betsy, our review o...