Page 1

02.15.18 / 1512TH ISSUE /

FREE

JESSE JACKSON IN MEMPHIS P7 CUBANISMO AT GPAC P16 DIAMOND BEAR BREWERY P25 FIFTY SHADES FREED P26

JUSTIN FOX BURKS

Puttin' Down

s t o o R

COUNTRY OUTLAW DALE WATSON’S LOVE AFFAIR WITH MEMPHIS COMES FULL CIRCLE.


MemphisRecycles.com

Fe b r u a r y 1 5 - 2 1 , 2 0 1 8

RECYCLE

Aluminum and Steel Cans empty and rinse

Food and Beverage Cartons

Bottles and Jars empty and rinse

empty and replace cap

NO!

Mixed Paper, Newspaper, Magazines, and Flattened Cardboard

Kitchen, Laundry, Bath: Bottles and Containers empty and replace cap

YUCK

Do Not Bag Recyclables

2

THESE LOOSE IN YOUR RECYCLING CART

No Garbage

No Plastic Bags (return to retail)

No Food or Liquid (empty all containers)

No Clothing or Linens (use donation programs)

No Tanglers (no hoses, wires, chains, or electronics)


JUSTIN RUSHING Advertising Director CARRIE O’GUIN HOFFMAN Advertising Operations Manager JERRY D. SWIFT Advertising Director Emeritus KELLI DEWITT, CHIP GOOGE Senior Account Executives ROXY MATTHEWS Sales Assistant DESHAUNE MCGHEE Classified Advertising Manager BRENDA FORD Classified Sales Administrator classifieds@memphisflyer.com LYNN SPARAGOWSKI Distribution Manager ROBBIE FRENCH Warehouse and Delivery Manager JANICE GRISSOM ELLISON, ZACH JOHNSON, KAREN MILAM, RANDY ROTZ, LEWIS TAYLOR, WILLIAM WIDEMAN Distribution THE MEMPHIS FLYER is published weekly by Contemporary Media, Inc., 65 Union Avenue, Memphis, TN 38103 Phone: (901) 521-9000 Fax: (901) 521-0129 www.memphisflyer.com CONTEMPORARY MEDIA, INC. KENNETH NEILL Publisher ASHLEY HAEGER Controller JEFFREY GOLDBERG Director of Business Development BRUCE VANWYNGARDEN Editorial Director KEVIN LIPE Digital Director ANNA TRAVERSE Director of Strategic Initiatives LYNN SPARAGOWSKI Distribution Manager MOLLY WILLMOTT Special Events Director JOSEPH CAREY IT Director MATTHEW PRESTON Social Media Manager CELESTE DIXON Accounting Assistant BRITT ERVIN Email Marketing Manager KALENA MCKINNEY Receptionist

National Newspaper Association

Association of Alternative Newsmedia

m e m p h i s f l y e r. c o m

CARRIE BEASLEY Senior Art Director CHRISTOPHER MYERS Advertising Art Director JEREMIAH MATTHEWS BRYAN ROLLINS Graphic Designers

CONTENTS

BRUCE VANWYNGARDEN Editor SUSAN ELLIS Managing Editor JACKSON BAKER, MICHAEL FINGER Senior Editors TOBY SELLS Associate Editor CHRIS MCCOY Film and TV Editor ALEX GREENE Music Editor CHRIS DAVIS, MICHAEL DONAHUE MAYA SMITH, JOSHUA CANNON Staff Writers JESSE DAVIS Copy Editor JULIE RAY Calendar Editor

OUR 1512TH ISSUE 02.15.18 So I’m sitting in my favorite bar last Tuesday. It’s a slow night. Just a couple of other regulars and our usual bartender, a bright, young fellow who seems to enjoy his customers’ company, despite our tendency to bloviate. On the television above the back-bar, All the President’s Men is playing silently, the dialogue running across the bottom of the screen. For a veteran journalist such as myself, it is a bloviation opportunity not to be missed. This movie is the journalism version of a Marvel superhero flick. You know the story: The impossibly pretty Robert Redford (Bob Woodward) and his shaggy sidekick, Dustin Hoffman (Carl Bernstein), play Washington Post reporters who are on the hunt for evidence that will expose the nefarious deeds of President Richard M. Nixon in the Watergate scandal. The intrepid reporters meet with their editor to discuss leads and tips and procedures. They smoke in his office. They go out to interview a source, and they smoke in the source’s house. They meet a tipster in dark parking garage, and smoke. They smoke in the newsroom as they pound out copy on their Remington typewriters. Newspapering used to be a smoky damn lifestyle, I tell you what. I’ve been writing an editor’s column for one publication or another since the mid1980s, so I remember pounding out copy on a typewriter. I remember when everyone had an ashtray on their desk. I have become that guy — as one does when one reaches a certain age — a maestro of memories, a dealer of anecdotes, a chronicler of ancient customs, and no doubt a bore. But bartenders get paid to get bored. So. “I remember when writing a column would take me all day,” I say, warming up. “Now, I can knock one out in a couple hours.” “Huh,” says the bartender, helpfully. “Why’s that?” “Why is that? Why, you young whippersnapper … you have no idea what it was like back in the 1980s. You’d come up with an idea for a column, then you’d have to verify the facts to make sure you could defend your opinion. You can’t just make shit up. You have to research stuff, and in those days, that was hard work. Why, back then, I had a whole shelf of books in my office for research — thesauruses, dictionaries, atlases, anthologies, encyclopedias, and Bartlett’s Quotations — just in case I needed a pithy quote. Here’s a tip, by the way: Quotes make you sound smart. “Anyway, sometimes, we even had to get in our primitive vehicles and drive across town to a library! When we got there, we’d have to look up book titles in card catalogues and then go search through long aisles of bookshelves with weird Dewey Decimal System numbers on the end. And then — get this — sometimes, the book we wanted was checked out! Do you even know what the Dewey Decimal System is, young fella? Well, do you? I didn’t think so. And don’t even get me started on phone booths.” “That’s really interesting,” says the bartender, helpfully. “I’ll have another glass of the red, please.” “You got it.” “Thanks. Anyway, the point is, now I don’t have to do any of that because the entire panoply of human knowledge is at my fingertips — on my computer and my phone. On my phone! Think of it, man! I have the greatest library humankind has ever created, and it’s right here on the bar. I don’t have to go anywhere. I don’t have to turn and pull a book off the shelf. Hell, I don’t even have books in my office anymore. I just google. If I need a pithy quote about, say, the newspaper business, I type in ‘quotes about newspapers,’ and I got more quotes than I can ever use.” “That’s wild,” says the bartender, as he pours a drink for another customer. N E WS & O P I N I O N “That’s why this movie is so important,” THE FLY-BY - 4 NY TIMES CROSSWORD - 5 I say. “The Fourth Estate is under attack POLITICS - 7 like never before. We need newspapers VIEWPOINT - 8 more than ever. You should watch this COVER - “PUTTIN’ DOWN ROOTS” with the sound on, sometime.” BY CHRIS DAVIS - 10 “I’ll do that,” the bartender says. WE RECOMMEND - 14 “After all, as Napoleon once noted, MUSIC - 16 ‘Four hostile newspapers are more to be AFTER DARK - 18 feared than 1,000 bayonets.’” CALENDAR - 20 “You just googled that on your phone, SPIRITS - 25 didn’t you?” FILM - 26 “Maybe.” C L AS S I F I E D S - 28 Bruce VanWyngarden LAST WORD - 31 brucev@memphisflyer.com

3


THE

f

fly-by

ly on the wall

DAM M IT, GAN N ETT Judging by the size of that type, the egregiousness of that typo, and the sheer number of mistakes like this we’ve seen since Gannett Co. moved The Commercial Appeal’s copy editing duties out of state, it would appear that there’s plenty of room for despair.

Fe b r u a r y 1 5 - 2 1 , 2 0 1 8

F UTU R E S H O C K Last week a dead body was found after decomposing inside a utility van on the city impound lot, and the Memphis Police Department was confronted with a baffling mystery from an unknown address, thousands of years in the future. Local 24’s report states that the “shooting originally occurred on December 18th, 20017 at 3084 Avenue.”

4

VE R BATI M “The girl was like, ‘My pants is tight, let me take them off,’ said the witness.” — from a WREG report titled “Tight pants prompted student to undress in viral school fight video.” The news story uncovered details about a semi-nude brawl between two West Memphis high school students. By Chris Davis. Email him at davis@memphisflyer.com.

{

Questions, Answers + Attitude Edited by Toby Sells

W E E K T H AT W A S By Flyer staff

Statues, New Neon, and Smoking Parks sale reviewed, a new sign for Beale, and smoking laws come home. STATU ES M OVE U N D E R STATE R EVI EW The transactions that allowed city leaders to remove Confederate monuments from two public parks are under review by the Tennessee Comptroller’s office. The Memphis City Council voted in December to sell two parks to a new nonprofit organization. This action allowed the nonprofit, Greenspace Inc., to remove three Confederate monuments from the parks. Several lawmakers with the Tennessee General Assembly have introduced bills to stymie any further action from the city on the monuments. Lawmakers have also asked for a full review of the sale from the state Tennessee Comptroller’s Office of Open Records Counsel. “The Comptroller’s Office and the Office of Open Records Counsel have been asked by members of the Tennessee General Assembly to review the transactions involving the sale of the parks to ensure they comply with state and local laws,” said Lee Pope, the state’s open records counsel. “Compliance with Tennessee’s open meetings laws are part of this review.” M LGW R ATE H I K ES Memphis Light, Gas & Water (MLGW) customers will soon see 2-percent increases on their gas and electricity bills, thanks to a council vote last week. The council’s MLGW committee had previously recommended a 9 percent increase in gas and roughly 6 percent increase in electric over three years. MLGW officials warned that the smaller increases will likely require more increases before 2023. AR C HWAYS O N B EALE New, neon archways will stretch across Beale Street in April. A committee comprised of Beale merchants, Beale management, and members of Mayor Jim Strickland’s adminstration picked the blue neon signs, which read, “Memphis, Tennessee” and “Beale Street.” They will be 18

feet tall and stretch 45 feet across. SMOKING IN MEMPHIS The places where smoking is permitted in the city could soon change if a new state bill passes that puts smoking policies in the control of local governments. The Local Option Bill, sponsored by Sen. Bill Ketron, R-Murfreesboro, would repeal the tobacco preemption clause, which says that state law trumps local laws pertaining to where smoking is prohibited. The new bill would allow municipal governments to create their own policies to regulate smoking in certain areas, including hotels, parks, public property, age-restricted venues, and private clubs. D EVE LO P M E NT D EVE LO P M E NTS One block west of Central Station, developers want to build a $1.6 million three-story, 7,500 square-foot building at the corner of G.E. Patterson and Front Street. An Olive Branch developer is planning a $1.9 million, 16-unit apartment building called the “Flats at Overton Square,” just west of Overton Square at the intersection of Diana and Monroe. One of Beale’s developers wants to add the historic William C. Ellis & Sons Iron Works Inc. property, along with two others, to its planned high-rise campus. A developer hopes to divide a 1.37-acre lot in South Main into 30 condos called Butler + Front Townhomes.


For Release Saturday, May 6, 2017

The New York Times Syndication Sales Corporation 620 Eighth Avenue, New York, N.Y. 10018 For Information Call: 1-800-972-3550 For Release Friday, March 31, 2017

Crossword

Edited by Will Shortz

Edited by Will Shortz

No.

No. 0224

Crossword 37 Loose, now ACROSS DOWN 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 1 Didn’t release Twitter feature ACROSS Take a while to 1 One of Astronomical the GreatSomething 40 Powerful D.C. wear off discovery pulled uphill 1 Vase style initially called Bird food Xena 14 15 16 holder Lakes lobby DOWN Ingredient in Allow through some mulled 2 Compatriot of Orientation Big dog wine 5IsMenacing cloudletters? “It Never Too File menu 41 Raiser of Orientation aid Late to Mend” 17 18 19 option Mao novelist, 1856 River that Locale of awareness, for The Fab Four Henry Miller Franklin County 10 Sony offering kicked it off … or of Aretha likened to “a Franklin’s birth: Like many great artery short 3 Noted father-orAbbr. sub-Saharan 20 21 22 running through languages 14 Saint’s home, for the human Workout area? What often son singer body” Music direction 44 Not accidental follows grace to stop playing short Golden Horde Their tops can member Celebrity produce “power 23 24 25 astrologer output” They may45 In opposition 4 Ancient New Sydney ___ be stored in 15 Place Nitrogen source for a Usually towers for plants anonymous Mexican Match noise Put in firmly barbecue newspaper 46 Guru, maybe 28 29 30 31 worker Michelangelo Darth Vader’s and others childhood They’re more important than nickname With nothing on 5 Part of a crib 16 Rich finish? quarters Title mankini Darling of47 Straightens Bavaria, per wearer in a literature 32 33 34 part of its 2006 film between 17 “Don’t givenameup” It’s official 6 Living ___ Woman often 49 Firm parts: Abbr. Navarre and depicted Seahawks Angioplasty Where the Catalonia Actor 34-Across by stadium name Linear A script Auberjonois device 29-Across 2011 Co-star of a #1 19 Rather before powerful was unearthed and others 35 36 TV show 50 for Hockey team, 7 Major Asian Like Upper class four seasons in ANSWER TO PREVIOUS PUZZLE Was immoral cartoondom’s engine the 1950s Peter Griffin or Wickerwork e.g. carrier Lawyer’s title: material Chief Wiggum Artery Abbr. Co. with the 37 38 39 40 4 Once-ler’s “Yes, agreed” 20 Brown longtime slogan opponent, Beads on X 51 Words “Live well” in children’s on a petals 8 Attire literature Waylay Were present? medieval-style jacket 21 Some plants Attacks Rush hour, on Joe Blow the airwaves 44 45 46 Things picked Spike in Broadcasts 9 Like melancholy up by the direction Their grilles perceptive have trident a ticket From one’s 23 Value 53 Risked ornaments earliest days Say 12-Down High-five musical keys go-withs, 47 48 49 Online subscriptions: Today’s puzzle and more than 7,000 past maybe 25 Spooky quality Certain white55 Construction puzzles, nytimes.com/crosswords ($39.95 a year). collar criminal 10 The poor Read about and comment on each puzzle: nytimes.com/wordplay. staples … or 28 Smoothie fruit Hoist Crosswords for young solvers: nytimes.com/studentcrosswords. 50 51 52 Pinheads a hint to this 11 Not go along 29 Popular cookie puzzle’s theme 55 56 12 Prefix with lateral 53 54 31 Taking things for 59 Famous Amos granted on April 13 Bedevil 59 60 61 60 Rocker Steve Fools’ Day and 18 Girl’s name that others 61 “Don’t go!,” e.g. 62 63 64 may precede Ann 32 “Time ___ …” 62 Obnoxious one 33 Track, in a sense 63 Subject of some 22 One may be starting in sports PUZZLE BY HOWARD BARKIN codes 34 Not wait for Mr. Right, say 36 Actress Wilson of 43 Features of 54 Autho 23 What’s shaken 64 Scandinavian wrote Boston accents “Mrs. Doubtfire” when you say capital 35 Huuuuuuuuge insan “Shake!” 45 Milieu of the 37 Sch. with the long ANSWER TO PREVIOUS PUZZLE FX series “The 24 Big letters in George W. Bush horrib Americans” electronics Presidential E P I C P O E M B R O W S E 46 Poetic stanza Library D E M O T A P E S H R E W S 25 Ones moving far 56 Burie Mike Bowen 48 Like government from home 38 Corral K E P T A T I T C ofYChampion C L Awards I C and Apparel CEO bonds MEMPHIS Plan member since 2015 O D E T S S H U S A L M A 26 Fifth in a group 39 Strips at 57 Pull ( 49 German of eight breakfast C E N A B O O Z E S I M P preposition H Give E D your P employees U D D I N G N E A 27 Saginaw-to-Flint 41 Tough, tenacious 51 Oil qtys. 58 Noted S I Z E they S Q U Oto Tthrive. E D the healthcare need sorts dir. pseud 52 They burn J You A care C U Z your I smallQbusiness, U I especially X O TyourE employees. a lotZabout in sh 29 Bit of beachwear 42 Wild blue Church A With L O N Health Z O MEMPHIS G UPlanI youDcanOprovide your uninsured yonder writin 53 Racing letters employees and their families quality, affordable healthcare through 30 ___ way N our A extensive V Anetwork F Fof volunteer A I Rproviders. E B F F I K E A F U Z Z Y W Y L E 33 It may be added Online subscriptions: Today’s puzzle and more than 7,0 to alcohol puzzles, nytimes.com/crosswords ($39.95 a year). T A R O S R E B C A G E S MEMPHISPlan.org O Z A R c aKr e Sf o r o n Te a O M A T O E S 34 Pitiful Read about and comment on each puzzle: nytimes.com nother 901-272-PLAN (7526) R A G T O P T W O P E N C E 5 35 Hit the gas pedal Crosswords for young solvers: nytimes.com/studentc S M E A R Y E L M T R E E S hard 1

37

60

38

61

5

1

2

3

4

14

5

6

7

8

9

15

10

11

12

13

25

26

48

49

16

17

18

39

9 14 16

1

41

2

20

21

22

23

24

27

3

43

17

19

29

30

31

28

32

33

34

19

35

44

20

38

50

21

4

41

5

44

51

27

36

39

43

45

46

50

6

28 29

7

57

8

58

9

36

40

42

52

34 35

37

59

52

47

51

53

54

57

58

59

60

55

56

61

PUZZLE BY ANDREW ZHOU

26

33

48

37

49

10

29

I R E

T A O

B A L I P E T

D U K E

A V A E R C K I I N T E R M E R P U A N E S A N

S P E N N D S C A I E R A S T T R T I A K T E

F O R T Y W I N K S

P D U R S E H

A N N A L

G E S T E

B O R E

I N O N

S S N S

39

11 12

30

53

13 15

42

31

18

32

22

52

40

45 46 47

54 55 56

23 24 25

m e m p h i s f l y e r. c o m

I T D

M G U O I T R M E N Y A S N E Y W N A I Y Q A B

NEWS & OPINION

J E T T O A H U G R I D P R O T R S K Y A R R I H O O D I N C L B A K E H I O W A T W E N Z E L D A N D S


Infill Frenzy

{

CITY REPORTER B y To b y S e l l s

Two of the city’s oldest neighborhoods are seeking protection from infill developers. Neighbors in Cooper-Young have said that, if left unchecked, developers could destroy the very thing that made the neighborhoods special in the first place. In Speedway Terrace, they want to “protect homeowners and their investments.” So, both are working to be deemed a Historic Overlay District, which would give developers a list of dos and don’ts when building there. The residential real estate market in and around the city’s inner core is white hot. Josh Whitehead, planning director with the Memphis and Shelby County Office of Planning and Development, has said market interest there “has been the most sustained and intense since the founding of the city.” New trends suggest empty-nesters, young families, millennials, and more want walkable, authentic places to live, very much like Midtown and downtown Memphis. But in their houses, they want suburban amenities like open kitchens, large master bedrooms, walk-in closets, and street-facing garages, very unlike Midtown and downtown Memphis. Recent moves show developers want to bridge the gap. They’ll find an old, available home, demolish it, and build something new in its place, something that doesn’t always look like the homes that surround it. Such was the case when JBJ Properties demolished

an old home next to Patrick Durkin’s in Cooper-Young last year. In its place, the company is building four tall-skinnies, long, two-story homes with frontfacing garages and modern architecture. “Without landmarks protection in Cooper-Young, there is no way to stop this,” said Durkin, who, thanks to his experience, started the Preserve Cooper-Young Facebook group. With landmarks protection, any new construction would have to look like the rest of Cooper-Young. If a developer wanted to demolish a home, they’d have to prove beforehand that it had a certain degree of structural damage (not just a financial advantage). Cooper-Young’s historic status has been approved by the Memphis Landmarks Commission and the Land Use Control Board. The city council is expected to begin votes on the issue later this month. Speedway Terrace lies close to downtown and just north of Crosstown Concourse, which makes it doubly ripe for development. Cheryl Hazelton, with the Crosstown Memphis Community Development Corp., told Landmarks Commission members last month that historic status would “protect homeowners and their investments.” But one man, who did not give his name for the

Blood Donors Needed Platelll

If you are between the ages of 18 and 50 and in good health, you may be eligible to donate blood products for support of research that could lead to the development of new therapies for treatment of cancer and other diseases. Financial compensation is provided. Walk-in donations are not accepted. For more information or to make an appointment contact:

Fe b r u a r y 1 5 - 2 1 , 2 0 1 8

901-252-3434 info@keybiologics.com www.keybiologics.com

6

SHELBY COUNTY GOVERNMENT

Cooper-Young, Speedway Terrace seek historic protections.

Historic districts in Memphis record of the meeting, told commissioners, simply, “this is not okay. “This overlay is nothing but taking property owners’ rights away,” he said during the meeting last month. “It’s not constitutional, and I’m not sure how — in our society — government can do this.” Speedway Terrace’s proposal would — much like Cooper-Young’s — give guidelines on new construction, exterior alterations, demolitions, and more. If approved, Cooper-Young and Speedway Terrace would join 14 other Memphis neighborhoods deemed Historic Overlay Districts. Others include South Main, Cotton Row, Central Gardens, Glenview, and Maxwelton. Cooper-Young and Speedway Terrace are among 46 neighborhoods listed on the National Register of Historic Places. However, that federal designation comes with little oversight or protection.

ADDICTION HELP? Suboxone Treatment Center for Narcotic Addiction. Patients in Tennessee, Mississippi, and Arkansas are treated. Call 901.848.2234 for info & appointment.


POLITICS By Jackson Baker

THE BEST

The Rev. Jesse Jackson, whose very presence has an inspirational quality, may have been spread somewhat thin on Sunday, when the great icon of civil and human rights made appearances in Memphis relating to both the city’s forthcoming homage to the late Dr. Martin Luther King Jr., to Operation PUSH, Jackson’s own self-empowerment initiative, and to the celebration of Black History Month. Jackson also needed to be mindful to the demands of various important local projects and causes, such as the ongoing campaign of CME Church functionaries to renovate the Collins Chapel Health and Recreational Center (aka Correctional Hospital) for African Americans with special needs, one of several community improvement projects whose aims are aligned with the purposes of Jackson’s PUSH organization. The Reverend has made repeated visits to Memphis on behalf of its renovation, the estimated price tag of which has risen from $3 million a year ago to its current projected level of $5 million.  Earlier on Sunday, Jackson participated in a press conference upon his arrival at Memphis International Airport, preached the morning service at Mississippi Boulevard Christian Church, and toured the Collins Chapel facility, after which he took part in yet another press availability. Then came an evening visit to Mt. Pisgah CME Church for what was billed as a “community town hall forum.” At Mt. Pisgah, a palpably tired Jackson (recently he announced that he had been diagnosed with Parkinson’s Disease) turned out to be essentially a guest observer, sitting at a conference table in the church’s front aisle, along with various church and school and public officials, while other officials and political candidates of various kinds sat in the congregation itself.  His role during this phase of the program was to be a witness to the proceedings, which would go on to include lengthy speeches from those sharing the conference table with him — on issues ranging from Collins Chapel to school issues, and to matters involving Kroger vacating Orange Mound and rising MLGW rates. All the while, Jackson sat silent, taking

things in. There arose one potentially controversial moment, when City Councilman Ed Ford Jr. rose to expound, first on the grocery-desert problem developing in Orange Mound and then on the issue of a forthcoming November referendum on the November ballot by the council. The referendum, backed enthusiastically by Ford, calls for the cancellation of a Ranked Choice Voting initiative approved by the city’s voters in a previous 2008 referendum and scheduled for implementation by the Election Commission during the forthcoming 2019 city election. In a nutshell, RCA would allow voters to cast as many as three votes for an office, ranking their preferences. The procedure distributes the voting results in such a way that runoffs in cases where there is no majority winners would prove unnecessary. “Ranked Choice Voting, in my eyes doesn’t help us,” Ford said, comparing RCV to poll tax procedures of the Jim Crow past. He spoke of having debated the matter against “somebody in from Minneapolis” and against University of Memphis law professor and former County Commissioner Steve Mulroy, an RCV supporter. “They must have gotten desperate,” he said, noting that his debate opponents had cited both former President Barack Obama and Jesse Jackson himself as RCV proponents. At this, Jackson, clearly determined to stay out Jesse Jackson of a local controversy, and Van evinced no response Turner join whatsoever — though it hands on the is a fact not only that he statue issue. has endorsed RCV as a progressive measure but that his son, U.S. Representative Jesse Jackson Jr., has sponsored legislation supportive of Ranked Choice Voting in Congress. When Jackson finally got his pulpit moment, he was content to lead the congregation in one of his patented self-empowerment chants. His only intervention into a local issue occurred when he joined County Commissioner Van Turner — head of the Greenspace nonprofit that had removed two Confederate memorials from parks purchased from the city — at the pulpit. The Reverend joined hands with Turner and raised both their arms overhead. Then, having soldiered on for justice one more time in Memphis, Jesse Jackson paid his respects to the congregation and left the building.

IN TUNICA

BLUES TRAVELER & JONNY LANG FEBRUARY 17

CREEDENCE CLEARWATER REVISITED FEBRUARY 23

LARRY GATLIN & THE GATLIN BROTHERS MARCH 22

PHILLIP PHILLIPS APRIL 13

BRET MICHAELS ROCKFEST

KRIS KRISTOFFERSON MAY 12

WITH SPECIAL GUEST FIREHOUSE

APRIL 27

m e m p h i s f l y e r. c o m

JACKSON BAKER

Civil rights icon pointedly stays out of a local voting controversy during a weekend visit to Memphis.

ENTERTAINMENT

UPCOMING SHOWS March 10 | Gary Allan (SOLD OUT) March 16 | Rodney Carrington (SOLD OUT) March 23 | Rhythm In The Night: The Irish Dance Spectacular May 26 | Dwight Yoakam

NEWS & OPINION

Jackson Soldiers On

Tickets available online at Ticketmaster.com or by calling 1-800-745-3000.

Must be 21 years or older to gamble or attend events. Know When To Stop Before You Start.® Gambling Problem? Call 1-800-522-4700. ©2018, Caesars License Company, LLC. All rights reserved.

11047_T3_STA_4.575x12.4_4c_Ad_V1.indd 1

7

2/8/18 4:03 PM


V I E W P O I N T B y B r y c e W. A s h b y a n d M i c h a e l J . L a R o s a

MS-13 For Dummies

FATHERS ENGAGE FATHERS SUPPORT FATHERS MATTER

The backstory on the gang that’s being used to incite fear of Hispanic immigrants.

FATHERS are essential...

901.222.9000

Fe b r u a r y 1 5 - 2 1 , 2 0 1 8

shelbytnhealth.com

True Story:

Love one another. It’s that simple.

First Congregational Church

They wanted church to be relevant, not hip.

They found a church where talk and faith are real. 8

www.firstcongo.com Phone: 901.278.6786 1000 South Cooper Memphis, TN 38104 Sunday Worship 10:30 am

The term MS-13, (Mara-Salvatrucha) is from “Mara” (gang) + Salvatrucha, which derives from a common expression in Salvadoran street Spanish, “Ponte Trucha” — an informal way of saying “stay alert!” Mara-Salvatrucha roughly translates to “a gang of young, alert Salvadorans.” The number 13 is a universal badass gang number. The common link here is El Salvador. During the late 1970s up through 1992, El Salvador was the site of a vicious civil war between conservative governments propped up by the U.S. and insurgents who aspired to a more communal society. At least 70,000 people died. Most were innocent civilians, including the Archbishop of San Salvador, Óscar Romero. He was gunned down while celebrating mass in 1980 on orders of right-wing paramilitary fighters. The war caused such disruption in such a small space — El Salvador is roughly the size of Massachusetts — that at least a million people left the country, and many headed north to the United States, where they joined family in Los Angeles and around Washington, D.C. U.S. immigration law, dating back to a comprehensive reform in 1965, offered “family reunification” as a primary objective. Recently, this policy has been rebranded as “Chain Migration” by antiimmigrant and alt-right hardliners. The term itself is sinister and purposefully pushes (some of our) thinking back to the 1967 film Cool Hand Luke and away from law-abiding families living together in American neighborhoods. Salvadorans, Nicaraguans, and Guatemalans literally ran for their lives during the decades of civil war in these three nations. Many faced harrowing journeys through Mexico — passages depicted in the classic 1984 Gregory Nava film El Norte. The southwest border was certainly more porous at that time; not exactly an open border, but analogous to the way Americans thought about airport security prior to 9/11. Between 20 to 30 percent of El Salvador’s population fled during the civil war, about half a million of whom headed to the United States. The U.S. government under Ronald Reagan referred to these people as “economic refugees,” making them ineligible for protection under the Refugee Act of 1980. However, more than 1,000 churches, organized through the “Sanctuary Movement” provided protection and community for the Central Americans during the 1980s.

Some relief came through a 1986 comprehensive immigration reform, offering amnesty to 2.7 immigrants who arrived prior to 1982, but some Salvadoran youth during this period, primarily to defend themselves on the mean streets of L.A., joined gangs. In the aftermath of the 1992 L.A. riots, hundreds of these kids were “repatriated.” Thus, a made-in-the-U.S.A. gang (the MS-13) got exported to El Salvador. There it metastasized in a society devastated by decades of war, unwilling and unable to confront the criminal organization.

The Trump administration’s fake narrative concerning immigration can be characterized as a sin (or series of sins) of omission. The immigration hardliners provide just part of the story. The Trump administration’s fake narrative concerning immigration can be characterized as a sin (or series of sins) of omission. The immigration hardliners provide just part of the story. Like all petty, tyrannical regimes, they’re expert at manipulating public opinion. The State of the Union focus on American victims of gang violence, while certainly tragic, masks a more profound, prevalent reality: There are millions of young immigrant kids in schools, not in gangs or prisons, hoping to live in America and achieve the American dream. Trump’s promise of a “big, beautiful wall” costing $20 billion or more cannot keep young, energetic people from South/Central America and Mexico from traveling to America. The opportunities here are too real and too tempting. But the contradictions of America — our helping destroy Central American nations through war, repatriating gang members there, and then constructing a wall to keep those same people out — are transparent to those who know the history. The real tragedy, however, is how seamlessly cruel intimidation, hostile tactics, and deceit link two malevolent organizations: The MS13 and the Trump administration. Bryce Ashby is a Memphis-based attorney; Michael J. LaRosa is an associate professor of history at Rhodes College.


kevin don't bluff Kevin Lipe on the Memphis Grizzlies before, during, and after the game. @FlyerGrizBlog

F E AT U R I N G B R I A N F I K K E R T & B R YA N S T E V E N S O N

F O R M O R E I N F O R M AT I O N : A G A P E M E A N S L O V E . O R G PRESENTING SPONSOR: SHARP ROBBINS & POPWELL, LLC

NEWS & OPINION

M A R C H 2, 2018 AT H OPE C H UR C H 7:00 - 9: 30PM

m e m p h i s f l y e r. c o m

memphisflyer.com/blogs/BeyondTheArc

9


COVER STORY BY

CHRIS DAVIS

PHOTOGRAPHS BY JUSTIN FOX BURKS

Fe b r u a r y 1 5 - 2 1 , 2 0 1 8

DALE WATSON

10

n w o D ' n i tt Pu n w o D ' n i tt u P

s t o o RRoots


“Help me, Merle, I’m breakin’ out in a Nashville rash It’s a-looking like I’m fallin’ in the cracks, I’m too country now for country, just like Johnny Cash” — Dale Watson, “Nashville Rash”

I

n March 1998, after winning the Grammy for Best Country Album — with little support from the Nashville music establishment, and even less airplay on mainstream country radio — Johnny Cash and his producer, Rick Rubin, took out a full-page ad in Billboard magazine “to acknowledge the Nashville music establishment and country radio” for their “support.” The infamous thank you advert was constructed around a picture of Cash from his 1970 concert at San Quentin State Prison. Cash’s snarling face was twisted up like the mean-eyed cat he’d sung about back in ’55, and his defiant middle finger dominated the foreground. Three years earlier, on his 1995 debut album, Cheatin’ Heart Attack, Dale Watson, an independent-minded Texas songwriter cut from the same fabric as Texas crooner Ray Price and West Coast songster Merle Haggard, predicted this precise moment in music history. And he provided a reasonably accurate summary of his own future career trajectory, in the opening line of a song titled “Nashville Rash.” “I’m too country now for country, just like Johnny Cash,” he wailed. For Watson, who’d been honing his skills in Texas bars and dancehalls since he was a teenager, “Nashville Rash” marked the start of a decades-long beef with Music City, U.S.A. and the beginning of a honky tonk hero’s journey that’s taken him around the world, and brought him, at last, to Memphis, where he’s putting down roots. “Yep, I’m about a mile away from Graceland,” Watson says, taking a lot of pride in his new Whitehaven neighborhood. “It’s great,” he says. Watson, whom the Austin Chronicle has described as one of the biggest artists in Texas country (let that sink in), coined the term “Ameripolitan” when the genre’s modern and traditional forms grew so far apart they no longer resembled one another, and older terms like “alt-country” stopped making sense as a descriptor. He wanted to rebrand and raise the profile of contemporary music with deep, identifiable roots in living forms — western swing, honky tonk, rockabilly, and outlaw country — that have no place in today’s Nashville pop. Watson created the Ameripolitan

Music Awards in 2013 to recognize working artists as sonically diverse as vampire outlaw Unknown Hinson, TexMex rocker Rosie Flores, and lonesome troubadour Wayne “the Train” Hancock, while paying tribute to living legends such as country rock pioneer Wanda Jackson and honky tonk hit machine, Charley Pride. When Watson moved to Memphis from his longtime home in Austin, he brought the Ameripolitan Music Awards with him. It’s a small movement compared to Nashville’s Country Industrial Complex, but the move to Tennessee’s musically significant second

“Where’s your conscience, what’s the problem Speak up and say what’s wrong … Mr. DJ, could you please play a real country song.” — Dale Watson, “Real Country Song” On Saturday, February 11th, at a music showcase for Ameripolitan 2018, Watson strolled onto stage at Graceland’s new theater at The Guest House wearing clothes from Lansky Bros. and holding a can of Wiseacre Beer. If Charlie Rich was the Silver Fox, Watson’s a White Wolf, with his snowy, exploded pompadour and bushy sideburns that dip well below

Dale Watson (above) plays the Blues City Cafe; skirts swirl and dancers dance. city might still be viewed as a big middle finger to the country capital. Maybe the biggest since Cash won his Grammy. “It’s true,” Watson says with a belly laugh. “The reason Ameripolitan fits so good here is because, since the beginning, Memphis has always been the rebel kid of music. From Elvis and Jerry Lee and the honky tonk side of Johnny Cash, the music that grew here grew the same way the outlaw music in Austin grew there. Because it was fertile ground, and it wasn’t repressed. I’m not bad-mouthing Nashville; that’s just a fact.”

the jawline. Before introducing Western Swing revivalists the Farmer & Adele, he launches into a familiar routine about his abiding love for Lone Star Beer, a Texas staple Watson and his band the Lone Stars have described in their shows as “the best beer in the world.” “But we’re in Memphis,” Watson drawls, pointing to his colorful can and grinning for a crowd of grown men dressed up like cowboys and tattooed ladies in vintage dresses. “Wiseacre.” Watson’s love affair with Memphis isn’t new. He’s been a regular visitor for

30 years, booking shows at the Hi-Tone, Murphy’s, and Blues City Cafe, and recording at Sun Studio, whenever he got the chance. He recorded a complete Christmas record at Sun in 2000, in addition to a pair of LPs called Sun Sessions and Dalevis. “Something about that room is so magical,” Watson told the Flyer in a 2013 interview. “A lot of it’s because of Elvis being there, of course. But even more so, it’s because the sound you get in that room is like nowhere else. It’s just amazing.” Whenever a new band member joined the Lone Stars, Watson — who nearly graduated from truck driving school, has put out three records full of classic trucking songs, and very often pilots his own tour bus — would drive miles out of the way to take the newbie on a tour of Graceland. In fact, what began as a quest to find an Airbnb on a road trip to Nashville evolved into a hunt for an investment property in Memphis. “I thought maybe if I had a place here, I could come more often,” Watson explains, while hanging leopard-print fabric on the ceiling of his personal jungle room, complete with a tiki bar and a jukebox full of Sun records. “So I looked around for houses in the area, and I thought, ‘I want to move.’ Everything about Memphis was electrifying to me. I’ve always loved the city and its history. But having a place was never sustainable for me. Now I’ve been doing this for a long time, and I’m at a point in my career where I can live anywhere I want to live. And once I came down here and looked at the houses and the scene, I said, ‘I’m going to put down roots here.’” Putting down roots anywhere is difficult for musicians who make their living on the road playing up to 300 dates a year. “That’s true,” Watson says. “And it’s why having this place is so important to me. When I come home, like anybody, I need to get energized. Austin, which has been my home for over 25 years, has grown so much, and a lot of the personality of the town has changed. There are condos built over the old beer joints where I used to play.” “Our loss is definitely your gain,” says Whitney Rose, a Canadian-born singer/songwriter who grew up in her grandparents tavern, where she fell in love with American country music. She visited Austin to play a two-month residency at the Continental Club in 2015 and never left. Rose, who came to Memphis to perform after being nominated for an Ameripolitan Award in the Best Honky Tonk Female category, says Watson embraced her music right away, helped her discover Austin and find more opportunities for work. “He’s so generous,” she says. continued on page 12

COVER STORY m e m p h i s f l y e r. c o m

COUNTRY OUTLAW DALE WATSON’S LOVE AFFAIR WITH MEMPHIS COMES FULL CIRCLE.

11


continued from page 11

MARCH In the spirit of King and to honor the Sanitation Workers of 1968, you are invited to gather at City Hall to commemorate the I AM A MAN marches. Join us for live entertainment, speakers and fellowship at this once in a lifetime experience.

MEMPHIS CITY HALL 125 N. Main • Memphis, TN 38103

SATURDAY

FEB.

24

With special guest

ANGELA RYE

2018

CNN Political Commentator, Principal and CEO of IMPACT Strategies

Registration begins at 9 a.m. March begins 10 a.m. To register for the march, visit

iammemphis.org/reversemarch or email

iammemphis@memphistn.gov

Fe b r u a r y 1 5 - 2 1 , 2 0 1 8

A SYNCOPATED, FLAMENCO, & JAZZ-INFUSED WONDER!

RAUL MIDON MARCH 2 | HALLORAN CENTRE TICKETS: ORPHEUM-MEMPHIS.COM | 901-525-3000 Sponsored by:

12

“I’m so grateful for communities like the Ameripolitan community because it gives artists like me a home,” Rose says. “I’m not in this for the money or the commercial radio play. It’s not what’s trending or cool. Music has to progress, but the bones have to be there, too.” The “bones” Rose describes are evident on her 2017 South Texas Suite EP. Recorded at Watson’s Ameripolitan Studio in Austin, it marries her Tom T. Hall-esqe gift for storytelling with an affinity for Texas dancehall song-craft. Watson only has one rule in his band: Have fun. That directive seems to spill over into his approach to both putting together musical festivals and interior decorating. In addition to his Gracelandinspired jungle room, Watson’s Memphis home improvements include transforming another room into the bedroom set from the classic 1950s TV comedy I Love Lucy. His mid-century house has been given a radical mid-century makeover to match the airstream-style trailers he keeps out back and his ’58 Edsel and ’57 Ford Fairlane. Watson’s customizing the living spaces to suit his own eccentric taste, but hopes to Airbnb two of the rooms in his house while on the road. “Just a mile from Graceland,” he repeats, selling the concept as effortlessly as he sells his songs.

“That’s what we do,” Watson says. Of course, the trick is always to get more people to sample the product, and Watson’s answer to that mirrors his own work ethic: Take it on the road. He sometimes imagines the Ameripolitan brand as a tour, in the spirit of the Grand Ole Opry’s traveling shows, where established stars like Ernest Tubb and Hank Snow would headline package events showcasing half-a-dozen emerging artists. He thinks the awards may have to move on to seed other cities for a year or two, as the concept works its way into the nation’s consciousness. “But I think it’s going to be in Memphis for at least the next year or two,” Watson says. “The hard part is that so much of this gets done from the road. It helps to have friends who can help, and I’ve just got a whole lot of good friends in Memphis.” The last showcase before Tuesday Night’s Ameripolitan awards ceremony was held at Blues City Cafe, and the band box was packed to the edge of discomfort. Watson played this showcase himself, as

Tell ’em stick it up high, Where the sun don’t shine. Get pissed, an’ get mad, Tell ’em that’s country, my ass. — Dale Watson, “Country My Ass” By the time you read this story, the Ameripolitan Awards, 2018, which, in addition to the ceremony, included four talent-packed music showcases featuring dozens of performers and a fashion show, will have come and gone. The prizes, including a Legend Award for Sun Studio founder Sam Phillips, were handed out at about the same time these pages were rolling across the press. You can check the Flyer’s website to see results and catch some highlights from a show with appearances by artists like Sleepy LaBeef, Rev. Horton Heat, Big Sandy, Dicky Lee, and Matthew and Gunnar Nelson. This year’s big Ameripolitan event may be in the books, with more fans satisfied and more converts won, but for Watson and like-minded artists, the bigger question remains: How do you convince people that genre music can be vital and not stuck in the past. “You can build a new house with an old hammer,” Watson says, revealing an unlikely inspiration for the Ameripolitan concept — John Lennon. “When he was asked about the Beatles’ early influences — like the Crickets and Buddy Holly — he said something like, ‘Yeah, we used to do that stuff, but we were unable to imitate our influences. And in that inability, that’s where our originality lies.’

Watson’s Ameripolitan Music Awards found a new home in Memphis. did Rose and others. On stage, members of the Greenline Travelers, a throwback string band from Stockholm, Sweden, admitted to feeling a little pressure playing their set list in a city famous for its music. Then fiddles began to saw and the band launched into a pitch-perfect rendition of Ray Price’s “Please Release Me.” Ja! Memphis’ branded reputation as the home of the blues and birthplace of rock-and-roll sometimes obscures the fact that, in its infancy, rockabilly was altcountry, and from the Wilburn Brothers, Charlie Rich, and Chips Moman to the Louvin Brothers, who worked as postal clerks in Memphis before recording their hits elsewhere, the Bluff City has a deep country past. With an authentic force of nature like Dale Watson putting down roots “just a mile from Graceland,” it may also have a country present and future.


RUN • PLAY • SOLVE • WIN Saturday March 24

Start Location: Salvation Army Kroc Center 800 E. Parkway South

COMPETE

Complete specialized challenges while raising funds to help The Salvation Army Heal Memphis and enrich the lives of so many men, women and children in Memphis. Prizes for 1st, 2nd, 3rd place and special categories for most funds raised and more.

COMPETE

Enjoy a great race day with some adventurous challenges, meet people, and get to know your local Salvation Army Officers and staff.

REGISTER YOUR TEAM TODAY

COMPETITIVE DIVISION

(Start Time 8:30 a.m.) — Teams consist of 3 people. Participants must be at least 16 years of age. This Division is intended for those who want to challenge themselves and strive to be the Most Amazing Race Team! Top 3 finishing teams receive 1st, 2nd, 3rd place awards.

NEW

FAMILY DIVISION

(Start Time 8:45 a.m.) — After many requests to incorporate a family aspect in this race, we listened, and made it happen. Teams can have up to 6 members of your family. If your family has more than 6 please enter two separate teams. This Division is intended to be non-competitive: meaning we want you as a family to enjoy this time of team building, exercise, and fun all the while encouraging communication and participation by all.

COVER STORY m e m p h i s f l y e r. c o m

REGISTRATION DEADLINE TUESDAY MARCH 20

13


steppin’ out

We Recommend: Culture, News + Reviews

Now Showing

Read it, watch it — and join the club

By Susan Ellis

“Basically, it’s an excuse to watch a movie,” says Josh Thomas of the I Read That Movie book club series at the Memphis Public Library. Folks read a book and then gather monthly to watch a movie based on the book. A discussion follows. Thomas, who works in the Humanities Department at the Central Library, says there are several criteria for the book club. The most important (and obvious) is that there must be a movie made out of the book. The second, he says, is that the library must be able to obtain a free or supercheap license to screen the movie to a crowd. The last is that the library must have copies of the book. To that end, the library is looking for a community partner to help with book purchases, maybe some candy for the guests. The next screening is Hidden Figures, based on the book by Margot Lee Shetterly about black female mathematicians who helped astronauts get into space. Thomas says he looks for books that folks may not normally read. Past book/films include Divergent, Slaughterhouse-Five, and The Astronaut’s Wife. He notes that this is a series for adults, though they have dipped into YA. Regular meetings draw about 15, though popular titles like The Color Purple may get up to 30. The conversations often center around the film. Coming up are Shutter Island and The Natural. “People who are interested in borrowing books that we select should check at the Humanities Department desk on the second floor of the Central Library,” Thomas says. “I usually will collect the books there each month for people to check out.” Thomas says that despite the notion that the book is always better, there are plenty of folks who swear they prefer the movie. One more thing to note: No wine at this book club, but there is popcorn and cookies. I READ THAT MOVIE @ THE LIBRARY: “HIDDEN FIGURES” AT BENJAMIN L. HOOKS CENTRAL LIBRARY, SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 17TH AT 2 P.M.

Fe b r u a r y 1 5 - 2 1 , 2 0 1 8

The diamond standard — Diamond Bear Brewing Company Spirits, p. 25

14

We love (some of) Memphis — Cooper-Young’s “anti-trespassing program” The Last Word, p. 31

THURSDAY February 15

FRIDAY February 16

SATURDAY February 17

“Paula Kovarik” Dixon Gallery & Gardens, 6 p.m. Opening day for this exhibition of quilted works by the artist Paula Kovarik. Later, there will be the “Open Late” event to meet the artist.

Souvenir, A Fantasia Based on the Life of Florence Foster Jenkins Theatre Memphis, 8 p.m., $25 Comedy based on the famously bad singer.

Make Your Own Bitters Two Rivers Bookstore (2171 Young), 5:30 p.m., $25 Learn how to make aromatic bitters.

The Dark Note of Freedom: Episodes of Federal Power and White Democracy University Center, University of Memphis, 5:30 p.m. Talk about federal intervention in the town of Eufaula, Alabama.

Mid-South Sports & Boat Show Agricenter International, 2-8 p.m., $8 Annual boat show featuring special guest Big Jim Napier of Fishing with the Stars. Small Places Playhouse on the Square, 8 p.m., $10-$45 An evening of choreography from Stephanie Martinez, Julie Marie Niekrasz, and Brian McSween.

Anansi and the Sky God Germantown Performing Art Center, 9:30 and 10:30 a.m. Based on a West African folk tale interpreted by the New Ballet Ensemble.

Lost Roots: The Disconnect Between Africans and African Americans Art Village Gallery, 4-6 p.m. A panel discussion on the topic. The Sounds of Motown Hattiloo Theatre, 6:30 p.m., $50-$100 Fund-raiser for the theater. Includes dramatic vignettes, cocktails, and live music. Valentine’s Sweetheart Tea Chez Philippe, 1:30-3:30 p.m., $35-$45 Three-course afternoon tea with Valentine’s treats and pink Champagne.


Nikisha Williams returns to Memphis in The Color Purple.

She’s Here By Chris Davis Memphians got to know Nikisha Williams at the beginning of her career. She was one of the dynamite Dynamites in Hairspray at Playhouse on the Square. When POTS staged its award-winning production of Memphis the Musical, she starred as Felicia, the woman who made poor little Huey go “Hockadoo!” But Williams, who’s currently touring as the female swing and understudy for Celie in a critically acclaimed revival of The Color Purple, left her mark in other, more lasting ways as director of choirs for White Station High School. “After my third year teaching, I decided I wanted to perform,” says Williams, who describes her decision to step down from her faculty position and move to New York as a “step in the dark.” The ex-teacher took a job as a singing waitress at Ellen’s Stardust diner in Times Square and started auditioning. “It’s been a crazy ride but a great ride,” she says of her journey from the Bluff City to a Broadway tour. “Teaching in Memphis taught me a lot of things about business in general and also about my own work ethic. And you learn so much from the people around you.” Director John Doyle’s revival of The Color Purple is as minimal and actor-focused as the original Broadway production was overstuffed. “Instead of seeing all these people on stage and all the set changes and everything, you’re literally just seeing the core of these characters and listening to the wonderful music that was created for the show,” says Williams, who believes the show has a lot to say to and about women. “Every woman in the audience can see themselves in these characters,” she says. “The show represents every kind of woman, which is great especially in this day and time. I think that’s why so many people are still so interested in this story.” “THE COLOR PURPLE” AT THE ORPHEUM THROUGH FEBRUARY 18TH. ORPHEUM-MEMPHIS.COM

9HALF

$

LUNCH

SPECIALS

POBOY CHOOSE A SIDE:

FRIES, CHIPS, or SIDE SALAD Drink Included

Upgrade the side to a cup of gumbo or etouffee for $1.

or

PLATE LUNCH CHOICE OF MEAT & TWO SIDES

Globe-Trotting Family Day Dixon Gallery & Gardens, 10 a.m.-2 p.m. Event with activities, games, music, and more with the theme of traveling around the world.

The Philadelphia Story Malco Paradiso, 2 p.m. A screening of the 1940 film starring Katharine Hepburn and Cary Grant as exes with incredible chemistry.

Piece of Mind Crosstown Arts, 6-10 p.m., $10 Pop-up art show featuring the works of Erica Elle.

Valentine’s Love Jam Landers Center, 7:30 p.m., $61-$101 Concert with Tyrese, Joe, Ginuwine, and Next.

Hummus! The Movie Memphis Jewish Community Center, 5 p.m., $5-$30 Part of the Jewish Film Festival, following three people with a thing for hummus. Dinner follows the screening, and there will be a demo by Israel chef Abe Haak. We Wrote an Episode of Boy Meets World The Wine Cave (1208 North Parkway), 7-9 p.m. Comedians Tommy Oler, KC Shornima, and Nick Cox read their episode of Boy Meets World.

901-454-7771

THEBLUFFMEMPHIS.COM

Thanks Memphis for voting us the Best Indian Restaurant! Memphis Flyer's 2017 Best of Memphis readers' poll

1720 Poplar at Evergreen 278-1199

m e m p h i s f l y e r. c o m

SUNDAY February 18

535 SOUTH HIGHLAND AVE.

MEMPHIS, TN 38111

ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT

In Fifty Shades Freed, Dakota Johnson (left) and Jamie Dornan model accoutrements of wealth and status. Film, p. 26

with roll and drink included

15


M U S I C F E AT U R E B y M a r k R i c h e n s

Cuba, Si! Jesus Alemany and Cubanismo pay tribute to deep music roots.

O

Fe b r u a r y 1 5 - 2 1 , 2 0 1 8

MIDWIFERY

FREE IUDs

CHO CES

Memphis Center for Reproductive Health

16

1726 Poplar Avenue Memphis, TN 38104 901/274-3550 www.memphischoices.org

ne of the leadtraveling to Havana to teach and perform ing purveyors of for students there. the rich musi“Then that stopped for a while,” he cal heritage of says, “and we have to reopen this musiCuba will lead his cal bridge.” 14-piece orchestra Alemany, 55, began his professional in concert Saturday at the Germantown career at age 15 with Sierra Maestra, a Performing Arts Center. And he expects band that sought to revive the classic to get people moving. Cuban musical style from the 1920s called “I like to see people dancing, and I like son, considered the foundation of modern to see people listening,” says Jesus AlemaLatin American music. As a Cuban music ny, trumpeter and leader for more than 20 revival was sweeping the English-speaking years of the band Cubanismo. “Don’t even world, they recorded the 1994 album think we are gonna play in Memphis and Dundundanza in London. with producer people aren’t gonna jump up and dance. I Nick Gold for his World Circuit label. like people to be part of the show.” American producer Joe Boyd then apAlemany is an ambassador for the proached Alemany about putting together music of his home country and the a new band in Havana to record for his influence it has left around the world. own label, Hannibal Records. This was the “The essence of the band is just to give the audience ¡Cubanismo! the very wide history of the Cuban music,” he says. “Going back to different periods with the music. Playing some original compositions and also some traditional standards of the Cuban music, we try to show a variety of rhythms — rhumba, cha cha cha, mambo, descarga. Also going to the most recent style of the Cuban beginning of Cubanismo, and the sessions popular music, which is called timba — yielded two well-received live albums, what people internationally call ‘salsa.’ But Cubanismo (1995) and Malembe (1996). always focusing on the Cuban music.” Meanwhile, Gold was putting together Alemany spoke by phone from Merida, his own Havana sessions, featuring aging capital city of the Mexican state of Yucatan, musicians from the pre-revolution period where he has lived for four years after 23 along with American guitarist Ry Cooder. years based mostly in London. Living away The resulting album, Buena Vista Social from Cuba allows him and his band memClub (1997), sold more than 5 million copbers to travel more easily to the United ies, won a Grammy Award, and became an States, which still restricts travel and trade international phenomenon. with the island nation. Two decades after Cubanismo and “In 2004, we had a huge series of Buena Vista Social Club, Alemany and concerts throughout the United States, 40 his band continue to perform around the concerts, but it was canceled because the world, but he admits that interesting a new State Department didn’t give permission to generation of Cubans in this music has go to the U.S.,” Alemany says. “That was in been a challenge. a period when we were all living in Cuba. “We are all struggling in a way with That was a really bad experience, and we how there might be a new generation of had to make the hard decision to change people that consume this kind of music,” some of the musicians and work with he says. “Because it is the original music, people who live outside of Cuba.” the most typical music that represents Despite such obstacles, Alemany is our culture, but now there is a different committed to maintaining a cultural thing happening with reggaetón and exchange between the United States and timba and all that. The new generation Cuba. He recalls Cubanismo being booked of people are more into reggaetón. That’s in the late 1990s for a series of concerts in just the way it is.” Jesus Alemany and Cubanismo perform New Orleans that culminated in the 2000 at 8 p.m. Saturday, February 17th, at the album project Mardi Gras Mambo, as well Germantown Performing Arts Center. as American trumpeter Wynton Marsalis


FREE YOUR MIND WITH

EN VOGUE!

Tonya came to the Renewal Place program suffering from alcohol and drug addiction with with her 3 children. Days before entering the program, she delivered and left a baby girl at Methodist Hospital. Working with her counselors she was able to overcome the fear and shame she felt and be reunited with her 4th child. Tonya is now a successful high school chemistry teacher, finishing her PhD. Renewal Place, a signature Salvation Army of Memphis program, works in concert with the Shelby County drug court as an intensive-treatment alternative to incarceration for nonviolent drug offenders - and those charged with crimes motivated by drug dependency. All while providing wrap-around care and counseling for mothers and their children. The Renewal Place program has had more than 180 graduates, 78% remain clean and sober long-term.

Come see the ladies who were born to sing take the stage at Resorts Tunica on Saturday, February 17 as they perform hits like “Hold On,” “Free Your Mind” and “Don’t Let Go.” Tickets are available now at www.resortstunica.com/entertainment.

IN THE US THE INFANT MORTALITY RATE 5.8 PER 1,000 DEATHS IN MEMPHIS AT 14.2 DEATHS PER 1,000 BIRTHS, THE INFANT MORTALITY RATE IN MEMPHIS ARE THE WORST IN THE US.

RESORTSTUNICA.COM ©2017 Resorts Casino Tunica. Must be 21 years or older. Promotion only valid at Resorts Casino Tunica. See Player Services for complete details. Gambling problem? Call 1-888-777-9696.

m e m p h i s f l y e r. c o m

SATURDAY • FEBRUARY 17

ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT

INVEST IN TONYA

17


WILL KIMBROUGH THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 15TH RAILGARTEN

BLUES TRAVELER SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 17TH HORSESHOE CASINO

LIZ BRASHER FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 16TH FOLK ALL Y’ALL

After Dark: Live Music Schedule February 15 - 21 Alfred’s 197 BEALE 525-3711

Gary Hardy & Memphis 2 Thursdays-Saturdays, 6-9 p.m.; Karaoke Thursdays, TuesdaysWednesdays, 9 p.m.-1 a.m., and Sundays-Mondays, 10 p.m.-2 a.m.; Mandi Thomas Fridays, Saturdays, 6-9 p.m.; The 901 Heavy Hitters Fridays, Saturdays, 10 p.m.-2 a.m.; Flyin’ Ryan Fridays, Saturdays, 2:30 a.m.; Memphis Jazz Orchestra Sundays, 6-9 p.m.

B.B. King’s Blues Club 143 BEALE 524-KING

The King Beez Thursdays, 5:30 p.m.; B.B. King’s All Stars Thursdays, Fridays, 8 p.m.; Will Tucker Band Fridays, Saturdays, 5 p.m.; Lisa G and Flic’s Pic’s

Band Saturdays, Sundays, 12:30 p.m.; Blind Mississippi Morris Sundays, 5 p.m.; Memphis Jones Sundays, Wednesdays 5:30 p.m.; Doc Fangaz and the Remedy Tuesdays, 5:30 p.m.

Blue Note Bar & Grill 341-345 BEALE 577-1089

Queen Ann and the Memphis Blues Masters Fridays, Saturdays, 8 p.m.-midnight.

Blues City Cafe 138 BEALE 526-3637

Blind Mississippi Morris Fridays, 5 p.m. and Saturdays, 5:30 p.m.; Brad Birkedahl Band Thursdays, Wednesdays, 8 p.m.; Earl “The Pearl” Banks Saturdays, 12:30 p.m., and Tuesdays, 7 p.m.; Brandon Cunning Band Sundays, 6 p.m., and Mondays, 7 p.m.; FreeWorld Sundays, 9:30 p.m.

Club 152

Itta Bena

King’s Palace Cafe Patio

152 BEALE 544-7011

145 BEALE 578-3031

162 BEALE 521-1851

Live Music WednesdaysSundays, 7-11 p.m.; Live DJ Wednesdays-Sundays, 11 p.m.; Third Floor: DJ Tubbz Fridays, Saturdays, 10 p.m.

Handy Bar 200 BEALE 527-2687

The Amazing Rhythmatics Tuesdays, Thursdays-Sundays, 7 p.m.-1 a.m.

Hard Rock Cafe

Nat “King” Kerr Fridays, Saturdays, 9-10 p.m.

King Jerry Lawler’s Hall of Fame Bar & Grille 159 BEALE

Chris Gales Solo Acoustic Show Mondays-Saturdays, noon-4 p.m.; Eric Hughes solo/acoustic Thursdays, 5-8 p.m.; Karaoke Mondays-Thursdays, Sundays, 8 p.m.; Live Bands Fridays, Saturdays, 8 p.m.

126 BEALE 529-0007

Tuscan Simpson Friday, Feb. 16, 8-11 p.m.; The Tribal Saturday, Feb. 17, 9 p.m.-midnight; Memphis Music Monday Third Monday of every month, 6-9 p.m.

King’s Palace Cafe David Bowen Thursdays, 5:309:30 p.m., Fridays, Saturdays, 6:30-10:30 p.m., and Sundays, 5:30-9:30 p.m.

182 BEALE 528-0150

Sonny Mack Mondays-Fridays, 2-6 p.m.; Cowboy Neil Mondays, Thursdays, 7-11 p.m. and Saturdays, Sundays, 2-6 p.m.; Sensation Band Tuesdays, Fridays, 7-11 p.m.; Fuzzy and the Kings of Memphis Saturdays, 7-11 p.m.; Chic Jones and the Blues Express Sundays, 7-11 p.m.; North and South Band Wednesdays, 7-11 p.m.

Young Petty Thieves Thursdays, 8 p.m.-midnight; Chubby Carrier Friday, Feb. 16, 8 p.m.midnight and Saturday, Feb. 17, 8 p.m.-midnight; Eric Hughes Band Mondays, 8 p.m.-midnight; Cowboy Neil Tuesday, Feb. 20, 7-11 p.m.; Gracie Curran Tuesdays, 8 p.m.-midnight; Plantation Allstars Wednesdays, 8 p.m.-midnight.

King’s Palace Cafe Tap Room

Rum Boogie Cafe Blues Hall

168 BEALE 576-2220

162 BEALE 521-1851

Rum Boogie Cafe

Big Don Valentine’s Three Piece Chicken and a Biscuit Blues Band Thursdays, Tuesdays, 8 p.m.-midnight; Cowboy Neil Friday, Feb. 16, 8 p.m.-midnight; Juke Joint Allstars Saturday, Feb. 17, 8 p.m.-midnight.

182 BEALE 528-0150

Memphis Bluesmasters Thursdays, Sundays, 8 p.m.-midnight; Vince Johnson and the Plantation Allstars Fridays, Saturdays, 4-8 p.m. and Sundays, 3-7 p.m.; Delta Project Friday, Feb. 16, 8 p.m.-12:30 a.m.; Little Boy Blues Saturday, Feb. 17, 8:30 p.m.-12:30

Supported in part by a generous grant from

305 South Front Street, 38103

Thursday Feb. 22nd Mar. 8th Mar. 22nd

JIM LAUDERDALE

Talibah Safiya Luther Dickinson

Doors open at 6:30PM || Music starts at 7:30PM Tickets available at OldDominick.com/Events Fe b r u a r y 1 5 - 2 1 , 2 0 1 8

Ticket includes an Old Dominick house cocktail.

18

WINTER JAM SATURDAY, MARCH 3

MEMPHIS 90’S BLOCK PARTY FRIDAY, MARCH 23

CHRIS TOMLIN THURSDAY, APRIL 26

MARTIN LAWRENCE SATURDAY, JUNE 16

Christian music’s largest tour featuring Skillet, Hollyn, Kari Jobe & Cody Carnes, building 429, KB, Jordan Feliz and Newsong. Suggested donation of $15 at the door.

Headlined by Guy featuring Teddy Riley, Jagged Edge, 112, Dru Hill and Faith Evans at FedExForum. Tickets available!

Join thousands of fellow believers for an unforgettable night of worship and prayer. Tickets available!

Join Martin Lawrence along with comedians JB Smoove, Jay Pharorah, Bruce Bruce, Adele Givens and more. Tickets on sale Friday, February 23 at 10am!

Get tickets at FedExForum Box Office | Ticketmaster locations | 1.800.745.3000 | ticketmaster.com | fedexforum.com


After Dark: Live Music Schedule February 15 - 21 a.m.; Brian Hawkins Blues Party Mondays, 8 p.m.-midnight; Chris McDaniel Tuesdays, Wednesdays, 8 p.m.-midnight.

Silky O’Sullivan’s 183 BEALE 522-9596

Dueling Pianos Thursdays, Wednesdays, 9 p.m.-1 a.m., Fridays, Saturdays, 9 p.m.-3 a.m., and Sundays, Tuesdays, 8 p.m.midnight.

Boscos 2120 MADISON 432-2222

Sunday Brunch with Joyce Cobb Sundays, 11:30 a.m.2:30 p.m.

Canvas 1737 MADISON 443-5232

Karaoke Thursdays, 9:30 p.m.; Kyle Pruzina Live Mondays, 10 p.m.-midnight.

Celtic Crossing 903 S. COOPER 274-5151

Jeremy Stanfill and Joshua Cosby Sundays, 6-9 p.m.; Candy

Friday, Feb. 16, 8 p.m.; Epoch of Unlight, Gringos, Hellthrasher, Hormonal Imbalance Naildriver Saturday, Feb. 17, 8 p.m.; Alexander Fre$co Saturday, Feb. 17, 9 p.m.; Dylan LeBlanc Sunday, Feb. 18, 8 p.m.; Mariner, Geist, Onus Sunday, Feb. 18, 8 p.m.; Cricket Orchestra Wednesday, Feb. 21, 8 p.m.

Huey’s Midtown 1927 MADISON 726-4372

Burris Sunday, Feb. 18, 4-7 p.m.; The Natchez Brothers Sunday, Feb. 18, 8:30 p.m.-midnight.

Lamplighter Lounge

Neil’s Music Room

1702 MADISON 726-9916

5727 QUINCE 682-2300

Lamplighter 2: My Heart Will Go On Tuesday, Feb. 20, 9-10:30 p.m.

Midtown Crossing Grill 394 N. WATKINS 443-0502

Natalie James and the Professor Saturdays, Sundays, 11 a.m.-3 p.m.; “The Happening” Open Songwriter Showcase Tuesdays, 6:30-9:30 p.m.

University of Memphis The Bluff 535 S. HIGHLAND

DJ Ben Murray Thursdays, 10 p.m.; Bluegrass Brunch with the River Bluff Clan Sundays, 11 a.m.; Memphis LIVE MondaysSundays, 8 p.m.-midnight.

Jack Rowell’s Celebrity Jam Thursdays, 8 p.m.; University of Memphis Jazz Orchestra Friday, Feb. 16, 7-8:30 p.m.; Eddie Smith Friday, Feb. 16, 8:30 p.m.-midnight; Trouble No More Saturday, Feb. 17, 8 p.m.; Flashback Sunday, Feb. 18, 4-7 p.m.; Land Divided Sunday, Feb. 18, 8-10 p.m.; Debbie Jamison & Friends Tuesdays, 6-10 p.m.; Elmo and the Shades Wednesdays, 8 p.m.-midnight.

Cannon Center for the Performing Arts MEMPHIS COOK CONVENTION CENTER, 255 N. MAIN TICKETS, 525-1515

Arlington/Eads/ Oakland/Lakeland

Tchaikovsky’s Fifth Saturday, Feb. 17, 7:30-9:30 p.m. and Sunday, Feb. 18, 2:30-4:30 p.m.

Rizzi’s/Paradiso Pub 6230 GREENLEE 592-0344

Love and All That Jazz Sunday, Feb. 18, 11 a.m.-noon.

Live Music Thursdays, Wednesdays, 7-10 p.m.; Karaoke and Dance Music with DJ Funn Fridays, 9 p.m.

Dirty Crow Inn

Bartlett

Church of the River 292 VIRGINIA 526-8631

855 KENTUCKY

Hadley’s Pub

Nancy Apple Thursdays, 8 p.m.; The Po Boys Friday, Feb. 16, 9 p.m.; Eric Hughes Saturday, Feb. 17; Bobbie Stacks and friends Wednesdays, 8-11 p.m.

2779 WHITTEN 266-5006

Twin Soul Friday, Feb. 16, 9 p.m.; The Superfive Saturday, Feb. 17, 9 p.m.; Cruisin’ Heavy Sunday, Feb. 18, 5:30 p.m.; The No Hit Wonders Wednesday, Feb. 21, 8 p.m.

Earnestine & Hazel’s 531 S. MAIN 523-9754

Amber Rae Dunn Hosts: Earnestine & Hazel’s Open Mic Wednesdays, 8-11 p.m.

Collierville Huey’s Collierville

Huey’s Downtown

2130 W. POPLAR 854-4455

Fingertrick Sunday, Feb. 18, 8-11:30 p.m.

77 S. SECOND 527-2700

Vintage Sunday, Feb. 18, 8:30 p.m.-midnight.

Germantown

The Vault 124 GE PATTERSON

Germantown Performing Arts Center

South Main

PB & J: Anansi and the Sky God Saturday, Feb. 17, 9:30 a.m.; ¡Cubanismo!, Saturday, Feb. 17, 8 p.m.

Chris Hill Saturday, Feb. 17, 8:30 p.m.

North Mississippi/ Tunica

11 W. HULING AVE

Memphis Love: An Evening with Liz Brasher Friday, Feb. 16, 7:30-10 p.m.

Ghost River Brewing 827 S. MAIN 278-0087

Sunday Evening with Josh Waddell Sunday, Feb. 18, 5-7:30 p.m.

Loflin Yard 7 W. CAROLINA

Electric Church Sundays, 2-4 p.m.

Bar DKDC 964 S. COOPER 272-0830

Mighty Souls Brass Band Friday, Feb. 16; Steve Selvidge Saturday, Feb. 17; Detective Bureau Sunday, Feb. 18; Devil Train Monday, Feb. 19; Dave Cousar Tuesday, Feb. 20; Some Sons of Mudboy Wednesday, Feb. 21.

Horseshoe Casino & Hotel Company Mondays.

The Cove 2559 BROAD 730-0719

Jazz with Ed Finney, Deb Swiney, and David Collins Thursday, Feb. 15, 8-11 p.m.; The Burners Friday, Feb. 16, 9 p.m.; Bluff City Backsliders Saturday, Feb. 17, 10 p.m.; David Collins & Frog Squad Sunday, Feb. 18, 6-9 p.m.; Russell Lee Wheeler Monday, Feb. 19, 6 p.m.; Karaoke Wednesdays, 9 p.m.

Growlers 1911 POPLAR 244-7904

Crockett Hall Tuesdays with the Midtown Rhythm Section Tuesdays, 9 p.m.

Hi-Tone 412-414 N. CLEVELAND 278-TONE

The White Buffalo, Arum Rae

Lafayette’s Music Room

Minglewood Hall

2119 MADISON 207-5097

1555 MADISON 866-609-1744

Blue Day Thursday, Feb. 15, 6 p.m.; Roxy Roca Thursday, Feb. 15, 9 p.m.; Bluff City Bandits Friday, Feb. 16, 6:30 p.m.; Almost Famous Friday, Feb. 16, 10 p.m.; Terry Wall & the Wallbangers Saturday, Feb. 17, 6:30 p.m.; Mississippi Moonlight Saturday, Feb. 17, 10 p.m.; Joe Restivo 4 Sunday, Feb. 18, 11 a.m.; Reba Russell Sunday, Feb. 18, 4 p.m.; Ladies of Seeing Red Sunday, Feb. 18, 8 p.m.; School of Rock Memphis – 5 Year Anniversary Student and Staff Show Monday, Feb. 19, 6 p.m.; Turnstyles Tuesday, Feb. 20, 5:30 p.m.; 5 O’Clock Shadow Tuesday, Feb. 20, 8 p.m.; Breeze Cayolle & New Orleans Wednesday, Feb. 21, 5:30 p.m.; Deborah Swiney Trio Wednesday, Feb. 21, 8 p.m.

Brent Cobb & Them Friday, Feb. 16, 8 p.m.

P&H Cafe 1532 MADISON 726-0906

Rock Starkaraoke Fridays; Open Mic Music with Tiffany Harmon Mondays, 9 p.m.-midnight.

Railgarten 2160 CENTRAL

Will Kimborough Thursday, Feb. 15, 8 p.m.; Paul Taylor & PRVLG Friday, Feb. 16, 8 p.m.; Amy LaVere & Will Sexton Sunday, Feb. 18, 12-2 p.m.; Live Band Karaoke with Public Record Wednesdays, 7 p.m.

Young Avenue Deli 2119 YOUNG 278-0034

Devil Train Friday, Feb. 16, 9 p.m.

East Memphis Huey’s Poplar 4872 POPLAR 682-7729

Amy LaVere Band Sunday, Feb. 18, 8:30 p.m.-midnight.

Wang’s East Tapas 6069 PARK 685-9264

Lee Gardner Fridays, 6:30-9 p.m.; Eddie Harrison Tuesdays, 6:30-9 p.m.

Poplar/I-240 East Tapas and Drinks 6069 PARK 767-6002

Eddie Harris Thursdays, Fridays, 6:30-9:30 p.m.; Van Duren Solo Tuesdays, 6-8 p.m.

AT CASINO CENTER, SOUTH OF MEMPHIS, NEAR TUNICA, MS 1-800-303-SHOE

Blues Traveler and Jonny Lang Saturday, Feb. 17.

Raleigh Stage Stop 2951 CELA 382-1576

Blues Jam hosted by Brad Webb Thursdays, 7-11 p.m.; Open Mic Night and Steak Night Tuesdays, 6 p.m.-midnight.

West Memphis/ Eastern Arkansas EACC Fine Arts Center Gallery EAST ARKANSAS COMMUNITY COLLEGE, 1700 NEWCASTLE, FORREST CITY, AR

Shirelles, America’s Original Dream Girls Saturday, Feb. 17, 7:30 p.m.

ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT

Folk All Y’all Listening Room

m e m p h i s f l y e r. c o m

1801 EXETER 751-7500

19


SEE IT AT THE PINK PALACE

February 3 - May 6, 2018

CALENDAR of EVENTS: FEBRUARY 15 - 21

Send the date, time, place, cost, info, phone number, a brief description, and photos — two weeks in advance — to calendar@memphisflyer.com or P.O. Box 1738, Memphis, TN 38101. DUE TO SPACE LIMITATIONS, ONGOING WEEKLY EVENTS WILL APPEAR IN THE FLYER’S ONLINE CALENDAR ONLY.

Eurydice at Theatreworks, through February 25th TH EAT E R

Circuit Playhouse

Perfect Arrangement, inspired by the true story of the American gay rights movement. Classic sitcom-style laughs give way to provocative drama as two “All-American” couples are forced to stare down the closet door. Adult situations and language. www.playhouseonthesquare.org. $35. Thurs.-Sat., 8 p.m., and Sun., 2 p.m. Through Feb. 18. 51 S. COOPER (725-0776).

The Evergreen Theatre This Exhibition was organized by the University of Pennsylvania Museum of Archeology and Anthropology

Sponsored by:

The Law(s) of Attraction, original work by Q&A, Queer Youth Theatre Troupe, based on the experiences of local queer youth. This production takes a Tumblr post about what is “natural” and turns it on its head. www.theatreworksmemphis.org. $10 donation. Fri., Feb. 16, 8 p.m., Sat., Feb. 17, 8 p.m., and Sun., Feb. 18, 2 p.m. 1705 POPLAR (274-7139).

Germantown 3050 Central Ave / Memphis 38111 Community Theatre “FOR MUSIC LOVERS” Who’s Afraid of Virginia Woolf?, ?FOR MUSIC? >>PIC<< ?Through www.gctcomeplay.org. LOVERSFeb. ? 25. Fe b r u a r y 1 5 - 2 1 , 2 0 1 8

P!NK PALACE MUSEUM

20

901.636.2362

FOR MUSIC

LOVERS 2160 YOUNG AVE. | 901.207.6884 HALFORDLOUDSPEAKERS.COM

3037 FOREST HILL-IRENE (453-7447).

Hernando High School Performing Arts Center

1984, adaptation of George Orwell’s ultimate dystopian novel. www.kudzuplayers.com. $17. Fri., Sat., 7 p.m., and Sun., 2 p.m. Through Feb. 18. 805 DILWORTH LANE, HERNANDO, MS.

New Moon Theatre Company

Eurydice, myth of Orpheus reimagined through the eyes of its heroine. Dying too young on her wedding day, Eurydice journeys to the underworld, reunites with her father, and struggles to remember her lost love. www.newmoontheatre.org. $20. Fridays, Saturdays, 8-9:30 p.m., and Sundays, 2-3:30 p.m. Through Feb. 25. AT THEATREWORKS, 2085 MONROE (484-3467).

The Orpheum

The Color Purple, re-imagining of an epic story about a young woman’s journey to love and triumph in the American South. www.orpheum-memphis.com. $25-$125. Thurs., Feb. 15, 7:30 p.m., Fri., Feb. 16, 8 p.m., Sat., Feb. 17, 2 & 8 p.m., and Sun., Feb. 18, 1 & 6:30 p.m. 203 S. MAIN (525-3000).

Theatre Memphis

Souvenir, A Fantasia Based on the Life of Florence Foster Jenkins, comedy about a wealthy eccentric, self-promoted performer who was incapable of producing two notes in tune consecutively. www.theatrememphis. org. $25. Sundays, 2 p.m., Fridays, Saturdays, 8 p.m., and Thursdays, 7:30 p.m. Through Feb. 25. 630 PERKINS EXT. (682-8323).

Piece of Mind: Pop-Up Art Show

Erica Elle will be showcasing all original artwork including signature styles of mixed medium abstract and wood stain portraits. Featuring music, art raffles, signature drinks, and appetizers. $10. Sat., Feb. 17, 6-10 p.m. CROSSTOWN ARTS, 430 N. CLEVELAND (336-9164), WWW.CROSSTOWNARTS.ORG.

O N G O I N G ART

Clough-Hanson Gallery

“Supreme Being: The Symmetry of What You Saw and What You Say,” exhibition of “undisciplinary” works by Rashayla Marie Brown using a diverse array of media including writing, photography, voiceover acting, and an installation. Through Feb. 16.

A R T I ST R E C E PT I O N S

RHODES COLLEGE, 2000 N. PARKWAY (843-3000).

The Dixon Gallery & Gardens

Crosstown Concourse

Opening reception for Paula Kovarik, exhibition of quilted art. www.dixon. org. Thurs., Feb. 15, 6-8 p.m. 4339 PARK (761-5250).

Eclectic Eye

Opening reception for “Spirit Animal,” exhibition series of wildlife portraits and silhouettes captured by acrylic paint on canvas by Karen Mulford. www.eclectic-eye. com. Fri., Feb. 16, 6-8 p.m. 242 S. COOPER (276-3937).

OT H E R A R T HAPPE N I NGS

Casting Demonstration Saturdays, Sundays, 3 p.m.

METAL MUSEUM, 374 METAL MUSEUM DR. (774-6380), WWW.METALMUSEUM.ORG.

Globe-Trotting Family Day

Explore places near and far with hands-on activities, games, music, and more. Your journey will also include special performances and refreshments. Free. Sat., Feb. 17, 10 a.m.-2 p.m. THE DIXON GALLERY & GARDENS, 4339 PARK (761-5250), DIXON.ORG.

“Don’t Look for My Heart,” exhibition of a canopy of black garments that loom over a pond of demolished confections, evoking a scene of quiet despair and a state of ruin by Terri Phillips. Through March 11. “Imprismed,” exhibition of paintings, sculpture, and digital objects that constructs a dialectic between the repression and cultivation of psycho-sexual energies through the ages by Emily C. Thomas. Through March 11. “Material Equivalence,” exhibition of new work by Memphis-based artist Pam McDonnell. Curated by Anna Wunderlich. Through March 11. “Two Stories of Iceland,” exhibition of small paintings and drawings, a narrative exploration of Icelandic stories and landscape by Elizabeth Alley. www.crosstownarts.org. Through March 11. N. CLEVELAND AT NORTH PARKWAY.

David Lusk Gallery

“Talk Talk Talk: Late ’70s,” exhibition of wood sculpted canvas paintings and woodcuts from 1970s by Ted Faiers. www. davidluskgallery.com. Through March 17. 97 TILLMAN (767-3800).

The Dixon Gallery & Gardens

“The Real Beauty: The Artistic World of Eugenia Errázuriz,” exhibition traces the life of the influential Chilean expatriate patron of the arts and her impact on 20th-century design through her belief in high-quality minimalism. Through April 8. “Dixon Dialect: The Susan and John Horseman Gift,” exhibition of 28 works donated to the Dixon’s permanent collection by Susan and John Horseman. Showcases each work in the gift. Through April 1. Paula Kovarik, exhibition of fiber art. www.dixon.org. Through April 1. 4339 PARK (761-5250).

Fratelli’s

“Local Color,” exhibition of paintings of local landmarks by students under the direction of Fred Rawlinson. www.memphisbotanicgarden.com. Through Feb. 28. 750 CHERRY (766-9900).

Jack Robinson Photography Gallery

Barry Buxbaum and Ray Vunk, exhibition of mixed media on panel. Through Feb. 23. 44 HULING (576-0708).

Java Cabana

“The Good. The Bad. The Ugly,” exhibition of mixed-media works and paintings not previously displayed from Memphis College of Art BFA show. Through April 4. 2170 YOUNG (272-7210).

L Ross Gallery

“The Familiar and the Sublime,” exhibition of drawings and paintings by regional landscape artists Jeanne Seagle and Pam Hassler. www.lrossgallery.com. Through Feb. 24. 5040 SANDERLIN (767-2200).

Memphis Botanic Garden

“Escape Into Illusions,” exhibition of paintings incorporating unconventional materials — objects and items that would otherwise be discarded — to add texture and life by Sandra Horton. www.memphisbotanicgarden.com. Through Feb. 28. 750 CHERRY (636-4100).

continued on page 23


IPA. SEASONAL. DARK. LIGHT.

Join us as the world’s best Elvis tribute artists pull out their jumpsuits, black leather and blue suede shoes for two nights of concert performances.

WHO

ELVIS: THE GREATEST HITS Friday, March 2 at 7:00 pm A concert tribute to Elvis’ chart-topping hits from studio, stage and screen, starring Justin Shandor, Cody Slaughter and Dwight Icenhower. ELVIS: THE CONCERT YEARS Saturday, March 3 at 7:00 pm A concert salute to Elvis’ Vegas performances and concert tours, starring David Lee, Jay Dupuis and Shawn Klush.

WILL BE

HOME OF THE

CHAR-GRILLED

OYSTER NOW OPEN IN

CORDOVA PRIVATE PARTY SPECIALISTS

Our Speakers:

FRESH FISH DAILY

8106 CORDOVA CENTER DRIVE 901-425-4797 OPEN DAILY AT 11AM

299 S. MAIN ST. • OPEN DAILY AT 11AM 901-522-9070

PEARLSOYSTERHOUSE.COM

CROWNED? Vote for your favorite craft beer as they face off head to head! Cast your vote on memphisflyer.com. VOTING IS FROM FEBRUARY 22 TO MARCH 1.

Winner announced LIVE at Aldo's Pizza Pies Downtown on March 7. PA R T I C I PAT I N G B R E W E R I E S

m e m p h i s f l y e r. c o m

© EPE. Graceland is a trademark of EPE. Elvis Presley™

ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT

For tickets and more information, visit Graceland.com or call 800-238-2000.

21


PRESENTS

A STROLL DOWN

BLACK BROADWAY F E AT U R I N G

THE SOUNDS OF

MOTOWN

Fe b r u a r y 1 5 - 2 1 , 2 0 1 8

Three soulful vignettes supporting Hattiloo and its programs.

SATURDAY

FEB 17 2018

22

HATTILOO.ORG

HATTILOO THEATRE

6:30 p.m. / VIP 7:00 p.m. / General Admission $100 — VIP (open bar, private lounge, and buffet) $50 — General Admission (Hors d’oeuvre & 1 cocktail)


C A L E N DA R: F E B R UA RY 1 5 - 2 1 continued from page 20 Memphis Brooks Museum of Art

“Black Resistance: Ernest C. Withers and the Civil Rights Movement,” exhibition focuses on the 50th anniversary of the events from March 27 through April 8, 1968. Through Aug. 19. “Rotunda Projects: Lisa Hoke,” exhibition of over-thetop installation of recycled and repurposed materials reflecting aspirations for the work and fears of expecting too much. Through June 3. “About Face,” exhibition highlighting the connection between emotion and expression. Ongoing. “Drawing Memory: Essence of Memphis,” exhibition of works inspired by nsibidi, a sacred means of communication among male secret societies in southeastern Nigeria by Victor Ekpuk. www.brooksmuseum. org. Ongoing. 1934 POPLAR (544-6209).

DAN C E

In The Mood

Unique combination of the sensational String of Pearls Big Band Orchestra, the In The Mood Singers and Dancers as choreographed by Broadway veteran Alex Sanchez. $30-$60. Tues., Feb. 20, 2 p.m. CANNON CENTER FOR THE PERFORMING ARTS, MEMPHIS COOK CONVENTION CENTER, 255 N. MAIN (TICKETS, 5251515), WWW.THECANNONCENTER.COM.

Small Places

Choreographer showcase introducing Stephanie Martinez, award-winning dance artist and dancemaker paired with thoughtful work from dancer Julie Marie Niekrasz and ballet master Brian McSween. $10-$45. Fri., Feb. 16, 8-10 p.m., Sat., Feb. 17, 2-4 & 8-10 p.m., and Sun., Feb. 18, 2-4 p.m. PLAYHOUSE ON THE SQUARE, 66 S. COOPER (737-7322), WWW.BALLETMEMPHIS.ORG.

C O M E DY

Lamplighter Lounge

Lamplighter 2: My Heart Will Go On, the second installment of the themed showcase. Comics include Will Loden, Kate Lucas, Judaea Driscoll. $5 - $15 suggested donation. Tues., Feb. 20, 9-10:30 p.m. 1702 MADISON (726-9916).

The Wine Cave

F ES TI VA LS

A Walk for Education 2018

M E ETI NGS

Morris and Mollye Fogelman International Jewish Film Festival

A variety of genres from all over the world. Visit website for additional film schedule and locations. $5 members, $7 nonmembers. Through Feb. 27. WWW.JCCMEMPHIS.ORG/FILM.

Impact America-Tennessee: Free Tax Service

Services are provided to working families and individuals making up to $54,000/year. Interested individuals should call or visit website to schedule a free appointment. Through April 15. (1-844-TAXES-TN), WWW.IMPACTAMERICA.COM/FREE-TAXSERVICES.

S P O R TS / F IT N E S S

33rd Annual “Bowlin’ on the River” Bowl-A-Thon

Local organizations and thousands of bowlers in teams of five are asked to raise a minimum of $350. Saturdays, Sundays. Through Feb. 25. BILLY HARDWICK ALLSTAR LANES, 1576 S. WHITE STATION (366-7800), WWW.JUNIORACHIEVEMENT.ORG.

Tournées French Film Festival

Programmed by The Collective (The CLTV), featuring poetry presented in response to two Withers photographs on exhibition. Wed., Feb. 21, 6-8 p.m. MEMPHIS BROOKS MUSEUM OF ART, 1934 POPLAR (544-6209), WWW.BROOKSMUSEUM.ORG.

CRAIGMONT HIGH SCHOOL, 3333 COVINGTON PIKE (416-4312), WWW.NSBEMEMPHIS.ORG.

F I LM

S P E C IA L E V E N TS

Café Conversations: Black Resistance

Join NSBE Memphis Professionals for an morning of hands-on engineering activities, a college fair, and networking with local Memphis engineers. Sat., Feb. 17, 10 a.m.-2 p.m.

Featuring five recent French films, and one classic of French cinema. The program is sponsored by the Cultural Services of the French Embassy in the United States. Free. Thurs., Feb. 15, 7-9 p.m., Tues., Feb. 20, 7-9 p.m., and Wed., Feb. 21, 7-9 p.m. UNIVERSITY OF MEMPHIS, UNIVERSITY CENTER (678-3148), WWW.MEMPHIS.EDU.

y a d i r F y er v E Night CRAB LEGS ARE back! Along with

BBQ Ribs

$20 Promo Cash for each cash paid Friday Night all-you-can-eat buffet! Redeem this coupon and your Friday Night Riverview Buffet cash receipt at the Cashier•Players Club on the 1st floor. Valid until 2/16/2018 (mf21518) Valid at Fitz Casino & Hotel Tunica only. Must be 21 with valid ID, and a Key Rewards member. Limit one coupon per Friday night “CASH” paid buffet purchase. Not valid with any other coupon offer. Management reserves the right to change or discontinue this coupon at any time. Coupon has no cash value. Gambling problem? Call 1-800-522-4700.

We Wrote an Episode of Boy Meets World, comedians Tommy Oler, KC Shornima, and Nick Cox wrote an episode of Boy Meets World for the podcast and now they read it to you live. (423714-6852). Free. Sun., Feb. 18, 7-9 p.m. 1208 N. PARKWAY (423-714-6852).

P O ET RY/ S PO K E N W O R D

Hattiloo Theatre

37 S. COOPER (502-3486).

L E CT U R E /S P EAK E R

The Dark Note of Freedom: Episodes of Federal Power and White Democracy This lecture will focus on Eufaula, Alabama, as it confronts four episodes of federal intervention: Indian removal, Reconstruction, the “Age of Reform,” and Civil Rights. Thurs., Feb. 15, 5:30 p.m. UNIVERSITY OF MEMPHIS, UNIVERSITY CENTER, 255 UNIVERSITY CENTER, PARIS THEATER, WWW.MEMPHIS.EDU/MOCH.

“From ’68 to ’18: Perspectives on Memphis Music + Activism”

Following the assassination of Dr. King, Stax Records artists advocated for social justice and economic equality. Moderated by Dr. Zandria Robinson Free. Tues., Feb. 20, 7-9 p.m. STAX MUSEUM OF AMERICAN SOUL MUSIC, 926 E. MCLEMORE (261-6338), SOULSVILLEFOUNDATION.ORG.

“Lost Roots: The Disconnect Between Africans and African Americans”

Panel discussion on topic, coordinated by University of Memphis African Student Association President, Chol Rambang. Sat., Feb. 17, 4-6 p.m. ART VILLAGE GALLERY, 410 S. MAIN (521-0782), WWW. ARTVILLAGEGALLERY.COM.

FitzgeraldsTunica.com • 1-662-363-LUCK (5825) • Must be 21 and a Key Rewards member. See Cashier•Players Club for rules. While supplies last. Tax and resort fee not included in listed price. Advance hotel reservations required and subject to availability. $50 credit or debit card is required upon hotel check-in. Arrivals after 6pm must be guaranteed with a credit card. Management reserves the right to cancel, change and modify the event or promotion. Gaming restricted patrons prohibited. Gambling Problem? Call 1-800-522-4700.

ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT

m e m p h i s f l y e r. c o m

Mono-Slam, open to all performers. Select your own or choose from a list of monologues. Visit website for more information. www.hattiloo.org. $5. Mondays, 7 p.m. Through March 5.

23


Fine diningâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s best kept secret is closer than you think.

FOOD / DRINKS / PATIO

855 Kentucky St

Color and model may vary.

Wednesday thru Saturday 5pm til 10pm Sunday 4pm til 9pm Make your reservation today by visiting southlandpark.com or opentable.com See Player Rewards for details. Players must be 21 years of age or older to game and 18 years of age or older to bet at the racetrack. Play responsibly; for help quitting call 800-522-4700.

Presented by KONICA MINOLTA

Fe b r u a r y 1 5 - 2 1 , 2 0 1 8

SOUTHL-59257 Flyer 12/28/17 Bourbon Street.indd 1

24

Feb. 25

11am to 2pm at

12/14/17 3:25 PM

FedExForum

Come enjoy delicious soups, breads, desserts and other signature dishes served by more than 50 popular restaurants, caterers, and food trucks. BUY EARLY TICKETS FOR SOUP SUNDAY OR THE VIP SOUPER PARTY ONLINE FOR SPECIAL PRICING.

SoupSunday.org

11AM-3AM

901.207.5111


S P I R ITS By Richard Murff

Diamond Bear An Arkansas brewery wanders into Memphis with some tasty beers.

Its flagship brew, a traditional English Pale Ale, has won heaps of golds and silvers in the Great American Beer Festival and the World Beer Cup. The Irish Red has placed in both as well. These days, it’s hard to run a brewery without an IPA, and ever the Arkansas loyalists, the Presidential IPA was named in honor of the opening of the Clinton Presidential Library. The Double IPA I called Two Term, obviously (biting political commentary withheld at insistence of the longsuffering Mrs. M.). Tradition is great, but you do have to step out, from time to time. We’ll never know Duke Wilhelm’s thoughts on the subject, but Diamond Bear has partnered with French Truck Coffee to create a limited coffee stout using French Truck’s Le Grand Coq Rouge coffee … and we’ll just let you translate that name for yourself.

CASHSAVER A COST PLUS FOOD OUTLET

LOCALLY OWNED

OAKHAVEN

MIDTOWN

3237 Winchester Rd.

1620 Madison Ave.

4049 Elvis Presley Blvd.

729 N. White Station Rd.

WHITEHAVEN

MEMPHISCASHSAVER.COM

EAST MEMPHIS

@MADISONGROWLER

PLEASE DRINK RESPONSIBLY

MADISONGROWLER

m e m p h i s f l y e r. c o m

Soul Fish, and Loflin Yard. Or, if you want to go take it home, you can find it at the Madison Growler Shop in Cash Saver. Their Oatmeal Stout has been one of their best-selling dark beers since the Growler Shop added it to the lineup a few months ago. And it’s easy to see why: This stout is solid. What it lacks in hep-cat innovation, it makes up by simply being an outstanding example of the style. What more can I say? It’s got hints of toasty oatmeal and chocolate exactly where those sort of things are supposed to be. Diamond Bear brewery follows that least hipster of all rule books, the Reinheitsgebot, or German Beer Purity Law, first introduced by Duke Wilhelm IV of Bavaria in 1516. To put this in perspective, the United States didn’t pass the Pure Food and Drug Act until 1906 – some 390 years later. The German law stipulates that only water, hops, yeast, and barley can be used in beer. Still, there is a lot a clever brewer can do with only four ingredients. When you drink Diamond Bear’s Southern Blonde lager, you can tell.

ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT

W

hen Diamond Bear brewing company was started in 2000 by Russ and Sue Melton, it was the first commercial brewery in Arkansas in 15 years. It was so named because Arkansas is the only state in which diamonds are found naturally, as opposed to on flashy jewelry. And Arkansas was once known as “The Bear State” for its high incidence of its citizens being mauled by one. While the brewery continues to expand regionally, those Arkansas roots are still thick and tangled: The company’s motto is “Beer in its natural state.” Which they seem to actually take to heart. Although Memphis can also claim a little hometown pride, since the company’s canning operation takes place at the Blues City Brewery on Raines Road. Co-founder Russ Melton first discovered this passion for regional beers while stationed with the army in Germany and living in Bavaria. “I certainly was a beer enthusiast. I started home brewing, but I definitely had the intention of starting a brewery, he says.” Apparently, living in Germany gives a fella strong opinions on beer, so Diamond Bear focused on solid traditional methods of European brewers. The brewery opened on a strong note, and as generally happens when a craft beer market opens right, the company has grown to about 18 breweries and brewpubs throughout the state — all while Diamond Bear has moved from one expanded facility to the next to meet growing demand. Since prohibition, though, beer distribution across state lines has always been something of a headache. While available widely in Alabama, Diamond Bear had never broken into the Memphis market in any significant way. All of that changed about a year ago, when the company decided to self-distribute in Shelby County, focusing on the many beer festivals in this half-in-the-bag town of ours. It’s been a lively push, and sales tripled (from an admittedly low entry point). Now Diamond Bear beer can be found on draft or in cans in Memphis goto places like Corky’s and Central BBQ,

25


F I L M R E V I E W B y E i l e e n To w n s e n d

Money Talks Is Fifty Shades Freed a feature-length commercial for luxury goods or a chilling glimpse into the post-human future?

H

ow can we understand Fifty Shades Freed, the final installment of the Fifty Shades Trilogy? The usual method would be for me to rehash leading parts of the plot, rate actor performances, reference the director, and then offer some sort of comparative survey with other movies. You’d gain an understanding of the movie’s context, make an informed decision about viewing, I’d get paid, and we’d live to see another day. I wish I could go about writing my review in the normal way. If Fifty Shades Freed were a normal movie, by which I mean a movie made by and for humans, I might be able to. But unfortunately our usual critical tools are useless here. Allow me to explain. In the early 1970s, a batty anthropologist and cyberneticist named Gregory Bateson wrote a weird little book called Steps to an Ecology of the Mind, which you may have encountered had you spent your undergrad-

uate years haunting underfunded departments of a liberal arts college. Bateson contemplates what it is truly like for a gorilla to communicate with another gorilla. How, he asks, might we think about this ape-to-ape exchange without corrupting it through our own perception of communication? In thinking about how animals communicate, is it possible to illuminate the limits of our own consciousness? I thought of Bateson while I sat in the theater, looking at a “movie” called Fifty Shades Freed. This sequence of intentionally crafted visual stimuli bears coincidental aesthetic similarity to a movie. Humans say things to each other. Images of objects appear to move through space. It is rated R for Strong Sexual Content. But I believe Fifty Shades Freed is nonetheless not a movie at all, but something far more pure — a pristine document of the market economy, a kind of visual after-image created as an incidental side effect of the exchange of large sums of capital. I don’t think I need to delve at

Dakota Johnson (left) and Jamie Dornan interact with expensive products in Fifty Shades Freed. length into the plot to tell you that the true motion of the film — what dictates the script, what encourages the change of scene — is branded content. When Christian Grey (Jamie Dornan), billionaire sadist, escorts his nubile wife, Anastasia (Dakota Johnson) toward the Learjet that will whisk them away on their honeymoon, she gawks: “You own this?” He offers a reassuring smirk: “We own this.” Then there are a lot of scenes where sports cars are driven, fancy butt plugs utilized, smartphones consulted, modernist houses displayed, grand pianos panned over, Aspen visited, and so forth. Dornan and Johnson are entirely flat, less emotionally developed than clydesdales in a Budweiser ad. There are some winky moments that suggest machine learning has reached a point where computers can emulate humor. But basically the point is just sports cars.

Platelet Donors Needed Platelll

The Midtowner

If you are between the ages of 18 and 50 and in good health, you may be eligible to donate platelets for support of important research activities. Eligible donors can donate every two weeks. Donations require about two hours of your time and you will receive $150 in compensation. Walk-in donations are not accepted.

We’re not only delivering excellence in service but also in living. We offer amenities like: - Bike Racks - Free Wifi

- New Kitchen Appliances and Kitchen Cabinets - New Hardwood Floors and Countertops

The Midtowner ThenotMidtowner We’re only delivering excellence in service but also in living.

199 S McLean Blvd | Memphis, Tennessee 38104

A Very Tasteful Food Blog

We offernot amenities like: excellence in service but also in living. We’re only delivering - We Bikeoffer Racks amenities like: - -Free BikeWifi Racks

For more information or to make an appointment contact:

- -New FreeKitchen Wifi Appliances and Kitchen Cabinets

- -New Floors andand Countertops NewHardwood Kitchen Appliances Kitchen Cabinets 199 S McLean Blvd | Memphis, Tennessee 38104 - New Hardwood Floors and Countertops 199 S McLean Blvd | Memphis, Tennessee 38104

The Midtowner

901-252-3434 info@keybiologics.com www.keybiologics.com

By Susan Ellis

Dishing it out at .com.

Fe b r u a r y 1 5 - 2 1 , 2 0 1 8

We’re not only delivering excellence in service but also in living. We offer amenities like: - Bike Racks - Free Wifi - New Kitchen Appliances and Kitchen Cabinets - New Hardwood Floors and Countertops

199 S McLean Blvd | Memphis, Tennessee 38104

199 S McLean Blvd Memphis, TN 38104 We’re not only delivering excellence in service but also in living. We offer amenities like: - Bike Racks - Free Wifi - New Kitchen Appliances and Kitchen Cabinets - New Hardwood Floors and Countertops

MIDTOWNER

The 26

NOW TAKING RESERVATIONS

Marilyn

The

on MONROE

We’re delivering all the perks of apartment living, with the extra added features that make renting easier and accessible. The Marilyn on Monroe

We offer amenities like: We’re delivering all the perks of apartment living, with the extra ad Free Utilities • Free WiFi • Fully Remodeled Inside & Outeasier and accessible. We offer amenities like: Marilyn on Monroe Onsite Laundry • All New Appliances • Courtyard with The - Free Utilities  We’re delivering - Free WiFi  all the perks of apartment living, with the extra add Outdoor BBQ • Gated Parking easier and accessible. We offer amenities like:  1639 Monroe Ave | Memphis, Tennessee 38104

Text or Call Chelsea @ 461.2090 or Tom @ 483.7177

-

Fully Remodeled Inside & Out

-

- Free Utilities - Onsite Free Laundry  WiFi 

-

New Remodeled Appliances Inside & Out  - All Fully

-

with Outdoor BBQ - Courtyard Onsite Laundry 

-

Parking - Gated All New Appliances 

- Courtyard with Outdoor BBQ 38104 1639 Monroe Ave | Memphis, Tennessee -

Gated Parking

The Marilyn on Monroe

1639 Monroe Ave | Memphis, Tennessee 38104 @ 461.2090 or To Now Taking Reservations. Text or Call Chelsea We’re delivering all the perks of apartment living, with the extra added features that​ m ​ ake renting easier and accessible. We offer amenities like:  -

Free Utilities

-

Fully Remodeled Inside & Out

The Marilyn Monroe - Freeon WiFi

Now Taking Reservations. Text or Call Chelsea @ 461.2090 or Tom


F I L M R E V I E W B y E i l e e n To w n s e n d The extent to which objects star and humans are repressed in Fifty Shades Freed is incredible. It’s like Jeff Koons directed Toy Story. It’s like a live action Brave Little Toaster on mute. It’s like one of those gothic romances where a nervous housewife becomes convinced that the curtains are haunting her, only without any of the haunting, and the curtains are very expensive. When we, humans with eyeballs, look at Fifty Shades Freed, what we see is an incidental record of money doing as money does, moving as money must move within the dictates of capitalism. We literally cannot perceive the truest form of Fifty Shades Freed because, to do so, we would have to be money ourselves. We’re as helpless at trying to decode it as if we were trying to guess what gorillas

Black Panther PG13 Fifty Shades Freed R The Shape of Water R I, Tonya R

are saying to each other. Understanding is not possible for us. Per Bateson, our only recourse is to use this experience as a way to explore the outer banks of our own ability to understand. When you see Fifty Shades Freed, and I hope you will, I think the best thing to do is to make note of where, exactly, it departs from your humanity. In what manner, exactly, do you feel crippling, debilitating alienation? In so doing, you will have a better record of what it means to be human. Hold onto that humanity. You’ll need it for whatever comes next. Fifty Shades Freed Now playing Multiple locations

Film Stars Don’t Die in Liverpool R Fifty Shades Freed R The Post PG13 The Darkest Hour PG13

Collierville Towne Cinema Grill NOW FEATURING LUXURY RECLINER SEATING Hostiles R 12 Strong R Den of Thieves R Forever My Girl PG

Black Panther (IMAX) PG13 (check malco.com for times) Maze Runner: The Death Cure Black Panther PG13 PG13 Black Panther (3D) PG13 Three Billboards Outside Ebbing Early Man PG Missouri R Samson PG13 Den of Thieves R Fifty Shades Freed R Proud Mary R Peter Rabbit PG The 15:17 to Paris PG13

Jumanji: Welcome to the Jungle PG13 The Greatest Showman PG

m e m p h i s f l y e r. c o m

Peter Rabbit PG The 15:17 to Paris PG13 The Darkest Hour PG13 Maze Runner: The Death Cure PG13

ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT

Black Panther PG13 Black Panther (3D) PG13 Early Man PG Samson PG13 Fifty Shades Freed R

Jumanji: Welcome to the Jungle PG13 The Greatest Showman PG

TICKETS AT

INDIEMEMPHIS.COM

27


EMPLOYMENT • REAL ESTATE Employment COPELAND SERVICES, L.L.C. Hiring Armed State Licensed Officers/Unarmed Officers. Three Shifts Available. Same Day Interview. 1661 International Place 901-258-5872 or 901-818-3187 Interview in professional attire. _____________________ EMPIRE ROOFING OF TENNESSEE Now Hiring Estimators and Salesmen. - Paid Medical Insurance - Paid Holidays - Paid Vacation. Fax Resumes to (901)346-4388 or apply in person at 1300 Lincoln St., Memphis, TN 38114. _____________________ EMPIRE ROOFING OF TENNESSEE Now Hiring Commercial Roofer and Laborers. Roofer minimum 3yrs experience in single plies. Laborer no experience necessary. - Drivers license a plus - Paid Medical Insurance- Paid Holidays After 90 Days- Paid Vacation 1yr of Employment. Submit application at 1300 Lincoln St., Memphis, TN 38114 or fax Resume to (901) 346-4388

Engineering SYSTEMS ENGINEER needed at AutoZone in Memphis, TN. Must have Bachelor’s in Comp. Sci or related. 5 yrs of PeopleSoft admin. exp., including: Installing, configuring, setting up & managing Databases, PeopleSoft Process Scheduler Servers, App & Web Servers. Utilizing Application Designer, Data Mover, Configuration Manager, Process Monitor, Integration Broker, Process Scheduler, TUXEDO, Application Server, Web Logic Web Server, PeopleSoft Security, Change assistant, PeopleTools (Version 8 & higher), Product Update Manager (PUM), PeopleSoft Internet Architecture (PIA), Secure Enterprise Search, Change Assistant, UPK Tool, & PeopleSoft Testing Framework (PTF). Fax resumes to Barbara Orr (SE1) at 901-495-8207. AutoZone is an EOE M/F/D/V.

RAFFERTY’S We are looking for service minded individuals, that don’t mind working hard. We work hard, but make $. Apply in the store. 505 N Gtown Pkwy

Volunteer Opportunities IF YOU’RE A GOOD READER and can volunteer to do so please call 901-832-4530

Midtown Homes 276 MALVERN 3BR/2BA + bonus room, basement, needs kitchen over hall, paint, other cosmetic work. Handy person special. In the shadow of the Sears Crosstown building.$99,900.Email: 276malvern@gmail.com

East Memphis Apt 983 JUNE ROAD #6 Great E. Memphis 2 BR, 1.5 BTH, 2nd flr. rental in gated Poplar East Apartments 1Min from Starbucks & I-240. Pool & Clubroom incld. $895/mo. Call 508-0639.

Midtown Apts CENTRAL GARDENS 2BR/1BA, hdwd floors, ceiling fans, french doors, all appls incl. W/D, 9ft ceil, crown molding, off str pking. $750/mo. Also Large 1BR, $720/mo. 833-6483 or 569-0847.

MIDTOWN APARTMENTS 669 Adams “The Moose” Studio Apt - $475/mo Section 8 Vouchers Accepted Move-In Special! No Security Deposit ----------------685 Adams “The Horse” 1BR - $450/mo Section 8 Vouchers Accepted Move-In Special! No Security Deposit ----------------1029 Peabody “The Bears” 1BR - $500/mo 2BR - $600/mo Move-In Special! No Security Deposit ----------------1017 Peabody 2BR - $675/mo $300 Security Deposit Gated, 1000 sq.ft. Apt in Victorian Home 4-plex ------------------347 Pauline 1BR - $500/mo Move-In Special! No Security Deposit ----------------For more information call 901.521.1617 Office: 360 Camilla Memphis, TN 38104 fpmemphis@att.net fpmemphis.com OVERTON SQUARE Walk to all events, Great 2BR/1BA on Diana St. New full size W/D, CH/A, walk in closet. Beautiful! $850-$975/mo. +dep. Also Midtown 1BR staring at $625. Kevin @ 901-482-4262

Shared Housing MIDTOWN AREA ROOM For Rent: 1466 Jackson Avenue. Bus line, quiet, no pets, clean rooms, all utilities included, renovated rooms, furnished. Price range $65-95 per week plus deposit. 3 blocks from Sears Crosstown Building.Call or text me at 901-570-3885. If no answer leave a message. _____________________ MIDTOWN ROOM XL XL room for rent near medical district. Very safe, private entrance. Fully furnished. Wifi. $120/wk + dep. Utilities included. 901-725-0895.

Fe b r u a r y 1 5 - 2 1 , 2 0 1 8

Services DENIED CREDIT?? Work to Repair Your Credit Report With The Trusted Leader in Credit Repair. Call Lexington Law for a

Laurie Stark • 28 Years of Experience

• Life Member of the Multi Million Dollar Club

• Call me for your Real Estate Needs

ON BEALE

is looking for

Servers & Barbacks

www.hobsonrealtors.com

(901)761-1622 • Cell (901)486-1464

Come in and fill out an application!

183 Beale St 3707 Macon Rd. • 272-9028 lecorealty.com Visit us online, call, or office for free list.

Restaurant/ Hospitality

28

Non smoker. $400/mo, includes utilities, cooking/laundry privileges. Must be employed or retired. 901-405-5755 or 901-518-2198.

• From Downtown to Germantown

EVERGREEN DISTRICT/ SQUARE XL Studio $395 and/or 1BR $495-$545, remodeled, hardwood floors, W/D, pets ok. Great neighbors. 25 cc fee. 452-3945

CAMY’S IS NOW HIRING ALL POSITIONS: Asst. Managers, Drivers, Cooks. Apply in person 2886 Walnut Grove Rd. Anytime. No Phone Calls.

NICE ROOMS FOR RENT S. Pkwy & Wilson. Utilities and Cable included. Fridge in your room. Cooking and free laundry privileges. Some locations w/sec. sys. Starting at $435/mo. + dep. 901.922.9089 _____________________ SOUTH MEMPHIS 1 furnished room for mature ladies in Christian home. Nice area on bus line, near expressway.

RES TAU R A N T SU PPLY

FREEZER ASSOCIATES, STOCKERS, & CASHIERS

Houses & Duplexes for Rent ALL AREAS Visit us @ www.lecorealty.com come in, or call Leco Realty, Inc. @ 3707 Macon Rd. 272-9028

POSITIONS AVAILABLE

If you have a strong work ethic and a good attitude, we would like to hear from you.

570

Ellsworth

• Charming 4BR/2BA bungalow in East Buntyn. • 9 ft.+ smooth ceilings, ceiling fans, hardwood floors, den, very spacious, carport with storage. • New roof, new paint and siding. Fenced back yard. Jane W. Carroll Wadlington, Realtors 674-1702 or 458-0988

$219,500

Apply in person or send email to jobs@litsupply.com LIT ON UNION 309 Union Avenue, Memphis, TN 38103 LIT JR. ON SUMMER 2965 Summer Avenue, Memphis, TN 38112 LIT JR. ON WINCHESTER 1665 Winchester Road, Memphis, TN 38116 LIT JR. ON AUSTIN PEAY 3292 Austin Peay Highway Memphis, TN 38128

NEWLY RENOVATED

STUDIOS, 1 & 2 BR APARTMENTS ••• ALL UTILITIES INCLUDED FREE BASIC CABLE INCLUDED MEDICAL DISTRICT ••• MANAGEMENT THAT CARES 901-523-0068

$630-$925/mo


REAL ESTATE • SERVICES

TAXES

901-575-9400 classifieds@memphisflyer.com FREE credit report summary & credit repair consultation. 855-620-9426. John C. Heath, Attorney at Law, PLLC, dba Lexington Law Firm. (AAN CAN) _____________________ PERSONAL ASSISTANT w/15yrs. exp. looks to help you with shopping, Dr.’s visits, errands, etc. 7a.m.-1p.m. 901-494-0340 Reliable, honest. $25/hr. One hour minimum.

*2018 Tax Change Benefits* Personal/Business + Legal Work By a CPA-Attorney Practicing in Midtown & Memphis Since 1989

(901) 272-9471 1726 Madison Ave

Bruce Newman | newmandecoster.com Midtown Friendly!

Announcements

Massage

DISH NETWORK Satellite Television Services. Now Over 190 channels for ONLY $49.99/ mo! HBO-FREE for one year, FREE Installation, FREE Streaming, FREE HD. Add Internet for $14.95 a month. 1-800-373-6508 (AAN CAN) _____________________ PREGNANT? CONSIDERING ADOPTION? Call us first. Living expenses, housing, medical, and continued support afterwards. Choose adoptive family of your choice. Call 24/7.877-362-2401 (AAN CAN)

TOM PITMAN, LMT Massage The Way You Like It. Swedish/Deep Tissue - Relaxation, Hot Stones. Credit Cards. Call 761-7977. tompitmanmassage. com, tom@tompitmanmassage.com _____________________ WILLIAM BREWER Massage Therapist (Health & Wellness offer) 377-6864

MAKE THE CALL TO START GETTING CLEAN TODAY. Free 24/7 Helpline for alcohol & drug addiction treatment. Get help! It is time to take your life back! Call Now: 855-732-4139 (AAN CAN) _____________________

M.E Seeking SINGERS WANTED For recording R&B and Pop demos. Send tape or demos to Quince Records, P.O. Box 751082, Memphis, TN 38141. 901-363-4322

Dating Services LIVELINKS - CHAT LINES Flirt, chat and date! Talk to sexy real singles in your area. Call now! 844359-5773 (AAN CAN)

Need Rental Property Management?

HOME FOR SALE: 1239 Driver Street 3 Bedroom/ 1 Bath

Reedy and Company Realtors, LLC is now managing single-family homes and multi-family properties in Midtown!

Great curb appeal. Hardwood flooring, central heating and fenced backyard. All appliances stay. $27,000. Contact 901-268-8515.

Call Today 901.842.0805

VW • AUDI

The Midtowner

MINI•PORSCHE

We’re not only delivering excellence in service but also in living. We offer amenities like:

German Car Experts

- Bike Racks

- Free Specializing Wifi

Nutrition/Health

STRUGGLING WITH Drugs or Alcohol? Addicted to Pills? Talk to someone who cares. Call the Addiction Hope & Help Line for a free assessment. 800-978-6674 (AAN CAN)

in VW & Audi Automobiles

- New Kitchen Appliances and Kitchen Cabinets

Also - New Hardwood Floors and Servicing Countertops

The Midtowner Mini • Porsche ThenotMidtowner We’re only delivering excellence in service but also in living.

199 S McLean Blvd | Memphis, Tennessee 38104

Factory Trained Experience We offer amenities like: We’re not only delivering excellence in service but also in living. Independent Prices

- We Bikeoffer Racks amenities like:

4907 Old Summer Rd.

- -Free BikeWifi Racks

- -New Appliances and Kitchen Cabinets FreeKitchen Wifi (Corner of Summer & Mendenhall) - -New Floors andand Countertops NewHardwood Kitchen Appliances Kitchen Cabinets

(901) 761-3443

199 S McLean Blvd | Memphis, Tennessee 38104 - New Hardwood Floors and Countertops

www.WolfsburgAuto.com

199 S McLean Blvd | Memphis, Tennessee 38104

The Midtowner

Call today for an appointment!

We’re not only delivering excellence in service but also in living. - Bike Racks - Free Wifi - New Kitchen Appliances and Kitchen Cabinets - New Hardwood Floors and Countertops 199 S McLean Blvd | Memphis, Tennessee 38104

199 S McLean Blvd Memphis, TN 38104 We’re not only delivering excellence in service but also in living. We offer amenities like: - Bike Racks - Free Wifi - New Kitchen Appliances and Kitchen Cabinets - New Hardwood Floors and Countertops

MIDTOWNER

The

NOW TAKING RESERVATIONS

Marilyn

The

on MONROE

We’re delivering all the perks of apartment living, with the extra added features that make renting easier and accessible. The Marilyn on Monroe

CLASSIFIEDS memphisflyer.com

We offer amenities like:

We offer amenities like: We’re delivering all the perks of apartment living, with the extra added fea Free Utilities • Free WiFi • Fully Remodeled Inside & Outeasier and accessible. We offer amenities like: Marilyn on Monroe Onsite Laundry • All New Appliances • Courtyard with The - Free Utilities  We’re delivering - Free WiFi  all the perks of apartment living, with the extra added feat Outdoor BBQ • Gated Parking easier and accessible. We offer amenities like:  1639 Monroe Ave | Memphis, Tennessee 38104

Text or Call Chelsea @ 461.2090 or Tom @ 483.7177

-

Fully Remodeled Inside & Out

-

- Free Utilities - Onsite Free Laundry  WiFi 

-

New Remodeled Appliances Inside & Out  - All Fully

-

with Outdoor BBQ - Courtyard Onsite Laundry 

-

Parking - Gated All New Appliances 

29

- Courtyard with Outdoor BBQ 38104 1639 Monroe Ave | Memphis, Tennessee -

Gated Parking

The Marilyn on Monroe

1639 Monroe Ave | Memphis, Tennessee 38104 @ 461.2090 or Tom @ 48 Now Taking Reservations. Text or Call Chelsea We’re delivering all the perks of apartment living, with the extra added features that​ m ​ ake renting easier and accessible. We offer amenities like:  -

Free Utilities

The Marilyn Monroe - Freeon WiFi

Now Taking Reservations. Text or Call Chelsea @ 461.2090 or Tom @ 483


DATING

1 Month

FREE

with promo code:

Playmates and soul mates...

MEMPHIS

Your place or mine? The mobile hookup site for gay and bi men

Memphis:

901-612-2969 Visit Squirt.org on your mobile to hookup today

18+ MegaMates.com

Real hot chat now.

Fe b r u a r y 1 5 - 2 1 , 2 0 1 8

30 MINUTES FREE TRIAL FREE TRIAL

Safe & Honest. Trusted & Discreet.

Private, Personal Adult Entertainers 901.527.2460 30

901-896-2433

Discreet Chat Guy to Guy

901.896.2438

Real Singles, Real Fun... 30 MINUTES FREE TRIAL

1-844-725-7467

A.Aapris/Best Entertainment Agency

18+

Vibeline.com 18+


TH E LAST WO R D by Aylen Marcado

A Future for All We Love (Some of) Memphis. That’s the message I got after reading about recent developments from the Cooper-Young Neighborhood Watch. Earlier this year, the Cooper-Young Business Association partnered with the Shelby County District Attorney’s office in its “anti-trespassing program.” The program, which started from the DA’s office to “discourage incidents of loitering and criminal trespass” in apartment complexes, has expanded to cover commercial properties and now has over a dozen businesses signed up in the Cooper-Young area. For businesses who participate in the program, this means that the police are given authorization of agency. Authorization of agency would typically require businesses to fill out a form against specifically named persons outlining that they are not allowed on property or else they will be charged with criminal trespassing. This program throws all of that out the window. Without warning, people can be arrested for criminal trespassing on first offense. Anyone can use their judgment to deem someone of trespassing, and the police can make arrests with or without a complaint made. Does that sound familiar? Targeting a person because you think they might commit a crime. Anyone? What is profiling? Correct. Programs like these that have been implemented around the country and in our city result in assuming certain behaviors are criminal behaviors. We then don’t see people as people, rather we assign them a role as criminals. Take the humanity out of a person and it becomes easier to isolate and incarcerate the body. Black and brown folks, especially men, are often targeted because the pigment in their skin does not fall within the spectrum of the predominantly white demographic of Cooper-Young. If you aren’t aware of this pattern of implicit, and sometimes explicit, bias, then you probably haven’t checked what your neighbor down the road has been posting on Nextdoor.com. A couple of “shady” folks standing near your favorite coffee-yoga-organic-craft brewery during your happy hour? Sit down, Carol. There’s nothing incriminating about standing or talking. In fact, they probably know the neighborhood better than you. It’s this simple judgment that can now have severe results for folks of color engaging with police. This isn’t the first time that such programs and ordinances regulating urban space have been enforced. We’ve seen it happen in almost every corner of “revitalized” Memphis space — from downtown, Crosstown, and Overton Square to the Edge District and University District. It doesn’t stop at the moving or closing of local businesses owned by people of color who attract the “wrong” crowd. It spreads to a structural separation of people and communities. Just take a look at how we’ve cut bus lines and frequency and don’t fix bus shelters but yet we paint our street lanes green for the urban cyclist. There is nothing proactive about this as an approach to address crime. A proactive approach would be one that would assess and address the needs of the population that is facing chronic hunger and/or homelessness. It would challenge loitering prohibitions as restrictions to people’s right to move freely in public space. It would critically engage with solutions to address homelessness and its causes (low wages, lack of affordable housing, etc.). A proactive approach would be not just speaking on these issues when they hit the news, but actively investing in programming that would support individuals as they work to find stable jobs and housing. While Memphis is a city with one of the lowest costs of living, people cannot make it on $7.25 an hour. Programs such as these ultimately reflect a neglect in the framing of the future for Memphis. When we are creating this Memphis, who is it for? And at whose expense? Are we prioritizing certain people’s comfort and in exchange suppressing the freedom and autonomy of others? The decisions made in Cooper-Young as well as in Overton Square and the Crosstown neighborhood give us a peek into some of these answers. How we police public streets and how we decide who gets to walk on those same roads will show the world whether we are moving forward or backward, and once we put up these signs claiming land for a certain group of people and intimidating others with criminal charges, we send a clear message. As we reimagine and reshape urban space, we need to be critical of ourselves and our practices that exclude and literally push out people to the margins. Our actions are all connected, and what decisions we choose to support and call out will put us in history as community-builders or as complacent agents in the uprooting of communities. We cannot convince ourselves that we are uplifting the city when we are simultaneously destroying opportunities for some and denying fellow Memphians access to a space in our envisioned future. Aylen Mercado is a brown, queer, Latinx chingona and Memphian pursuing an Urban Studies and Latin American and Latinx Studies degree at Rhodes College. A native of Argentina, she is researching Latinx identity in the South.

m e m p h i s f l y e r. c o m

Cooper-Young

THE LAST WORD

GREG CRAVENS

CALVIN LEAKE | DREAMSTIME.COM

Revitalizing our neighborhoods shouldn’t mean criminalizing those who are already there.

31


MINGLEWOOD HALL

JUST ANNOUNCED: Hannibal Buress [3/27] Cody Johnson [3/23]

2/22: Magic Men LIVE! 3/3: Wild N’ Memphis 3/9: Blac Youngsta w/ Lil Boosie & YFN Lucci 3/15: SuicideGirls Blackheart Burlesque 3/24: V3Fights 4/14: Lucero Family Block Party 20th Anniversary w/ Turnpike Troubadours, Deer Tick, John Moreland & more! 4/18: Nightwish 6/1: Gary Clark Jr.

Live LIVE! in 2018 JUST ANNOUNCED:

Wed Mar 21 - Avery*Sunshine Tue May 8 - Black Veil Brides / Asking Alexandria UPCOMING:

Thu Mar 1 - George Clinton & Parliament Funkadelic Fri Mar 2 - The SteelDrivers Sat Mar 3 - Beth Hart Sat Mar 17 - Rumours: A Fleetwood Mac Tribute Thu Mar 29 - Ty Dolla $ign Sat Mar 31 - Downtown Live! w/ Euge Groove & Chris Standring Wed April 4 Big Krit Thu April 5 Dweezil Zappa Fri April 13 RED w/ Lacey Sturm Sun April 29Parkway Drive Mon May 7 Todrick Hall Sun May 13 - Jimmy Eat World Wed May 23 - Stone Temple Pilots NEW DAISY THEATRE | 330 Beale St Memphis 901.525.8981 • Advance Tickets available at NewDaisy.com and Box Office

MURPHY’S Pool Table • Darts • WI-FI • Digital Jukebox Visit our website for live music listings or check the AfterDark section of this Memphis Flyer KITCHEN OPEN LATE, OPEN FOR LUNCH! 1589 Madison • 726-4193 www.murphysmemphis.com

1884 LOUNGE

2/16: Brent Cobb w/ Savannah Conely 2/24: Drivin N’ Cryin w/ Travis Linville 2/28: The Lone Bellow 3/2: J.I.D. & Earthgang 3/4: Ron Pope

MORE EVENTS AT MINGLEWOODHALL.COM

Dugouts

se Incen Shisha Hookahs ipes Water P

Vaporizers

Jewelry T-shirts

Ecigs & Liquid

Rolling Papers es Tapestri

Hand Pipes

Coco & Lola’s

MidTown Lingerie Happy Valentines Day!! www.cocoandlolas.com

Finest lace - Coolest place 710 S. Cox|901-425-5912|Mon-Sat 11:30-7:00

TUT-UNCOMMON ANTIQUES 421 N. Watkins St. 278-8965 Every Pin in stock is 50% OFF throughout February.

1500 sq. ft. of Vintage & Antique Jewelry. Retro Furniture and Accessories. Original Paintings, Sculpture, Pottery, Art & Antiques. We are the only store in the Mid-South that replaces stones in costume jewelry.

YOUNGAVENUEDELI.COM 2119 Young Ave • 278-0034

2/14: $3 Pint Night! 2/15: Memphis Trivia League! 2/16: Devil Train 3/3: UFC 222 Holloway vs. Edgar 3/10: FREE Music Saturday’s w/ Steven King Band 3/30: Three Star Revival

GROWLERS 1911 Poplar | 901growlers.com

Kitchen Open Late! Now Delivering All Day! 278-0034 (limited delivery area) whatevershops.com

MEMPHIS MADE BREWING

2/16- PXLS w/ Stoic Automation 2/17- Bad Blood & Big Reputation 2/19- Doomstress, Beerwolf, Native Blood 2/21- Jadewick w/ Voyage in Coma 3/2- Kofi Bakers Cream Experience 4/5- Rev Horton Heat

Taproom hours:

Antiques & Collectibles

Mon 4 - 7 p.m., Thurs & Fri 4 - 10 p.m., Sat 1 - 10 p.m., Sun 1 - 7 p.m.

768 S. Cooper • 901.207.5343 FREE BREWERY TOURS 4 P.M. SATURDAY & SUNDAY

GONER RECORDS

AL

U CAN ST O Y EW L

New/ Used LPs, 45s & CDs.

We Buy Records! 2152 Young Ave 901-722-0095

PERSONAL ASSISTANT

w/15yrs. exp. looks to help you with shopping, Dr.’s visits, errands, etc. 7am - 1pm. 901-494-0340 Reliable, honest. $25/hr. One hour minimum.

FABULOUS CARPET CARE Steam Clean 3 Rooms For $99. “It’s Thorough, Dries Quickly & Stays Clean Longer - Or It’s Free.” Call 901.282.5306

CHIP N’ DALE’S ANTIQUES 3457 Summer Avenue • Memphis, TN 38122 EVERYTHING ON SALE! Open Tues-Sat | 901-452-5620 “Celebrating 30 years in Business”

PRESSURE WASHING Patios, Siding, Decks, Sidewalks, Driveways, Fences ans More!

Call or text Steve 901-277-2442

BOTTOMLESS BEEF STEW EVERY THURSDAY ADD A HOUSE SALAD f ONLY $2 Dine in only CELTICCROSSINGMEMPHIS.COM 903 S. COOPER | 274-5151

21,000 sq ft. 100 + booths 5855 Summer Ave. (corner of Summer and Sycamore View) exit 12 off I-40 | 901.213.9343 Mon-Sat 10a-6p | Sun 1p-6p

SUBOXONE TREATMENT Center for Narcotic Addiction. Patients in Tennessee, Mississippi, and Arkansas are treated. Call 901-848-2234 for info & appointment

EASY MUSIC LESSONS Sax, Flute, and Piano Contact Mr. Music at 901-245-0011

Wed 2/14 - Live Band Karaoke, The Valentines Edition w/Public Record, 8p Thur 2/15 - Will Kimborough, 8p Fri 2/16 - Paul Taylor & PRVLG, 8p Sat 2/17 - Chinese New Year Celebration of Year of the Dogg with DJ Eggroll, 8p Sun 2/18 - Old Dominick “Pure Memphis” brunch series featuring Amy LaVere & Will Sexton - Brunch 11a - 3p, Music 12 - 2p. Fri 2/23 - Carson McHone, 8p Sat 2/24 - Star & Micey, 9p railgarten.com • 2166 Central Ave • 231-5043

I Buy Old Windup Phonographs & Records

Esp. on labels: Gennett, Paramount, Vocalion, QRS, Superior, Supertone, Champion, OKeh, Perfect, Romeo, Sun, Meteor, Flip; many others. Also large quantities of older 45’s. Paul. 901-435-6668

Memphis Flyer 2.15.18  

This week: Country outlaw Dale Watson is puttin' down roots in Memphis. Also: Jesse Jackson's trip to town, our review of Fifty Shades Freed...

Memphis Flyer 2.15.18  

This week: Country outlaw Dale Watson is puttin' down roots in Memphis. Also: Jesse Jackson's trip to town, our review of Fifty Shades Freed...