Memphis Flyer 12/2/2021

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Angel Castillo and Ally Castillo

OUR 1710TH ISSUE 12.02.21

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MARK SELIGER

TENNESSEE’S WATER WIN P4 RA KALAM BOB MOSES P17 THE BEATLES: GET BACK P20

“ON CHRISTOPHER STREET” The Brooks Museum’s collection of portraits by Mark Seliger is the first transgender-focused exhibit in the museum’s, Memphis’, and the Mid-South’s history.


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OUR 1710TH ISSUE 12.02.21

JERRY D. SWIFT Advertising Director Emeritus KELLI DEWITT, CHIP GOOGE, HAILEY THOMAS Senior Account Executives MICHELLE MUSOLF Account Executive ROBBIE FRENCH Warehouse and Delivery Manager JANICE GRISSOM ELLISON, KAREN MILAM, DON MYNATT, TAMMY NASH, RANDY ROTZ, LEWIS TAYLOR, WILLIAM WIDEMAN Distribution THE MEMPHIS FLYER is published weekly by Contemporary Media, Inc., P.O. Box 1738, Memphis, TN 38101 Phone: (901) 521-9000 Fax: (901) 521-0129 memphisflyer.com CONTEMPORARY MEDIA, INC. ANNA TRAVERSE FOGLE Chief Executive Officer LYNN SPARAGOWSKI Controller/Circulation Manager JEFFREY GOLDBERG Chief Revenue Officer MARGIE NEAL Production Operations Director KRISTIN PAWLOWSKI Digital Services Director MARIAH MCCABE Circulation and Accounting Assistant KALENA MATTHEWS Marketing Coordinator

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CONTENTS

JESSE DAVIS Editor SHARA CLARK Managing Editor JACKSON BAKER, BRUCE VANWYNGARDEN Senior Editors TOBY SELLS Associate Editor CHRIS MCCOY Film and TV Editor ALEX GREENE Music Editor SAMUEL X. CICCI, MICHAEL DONAHUE, JON W. SPARKS Staff Writers ABIGAIL MORICI Copy Editor, Calendar Editor LORNA FIELD, RANDY HASPEL, RICHARD MURFF, FRANK MURTAUGH, MEGHAN STUTHARD Contributing Columnists AIMEE STIEGEMEYER, SHARON BROWN Grizzlies Reporters ANDREA FENISE Fashion Editor KENNETH NEILL Founding Publisher

Last weekend, I found myself in a long conversation with my brother-in-law’s father, Art. (Is there a name for that relationship?) He’s a college professor, so we have similarly oriented jobs — we both do a lot of sitting, thinking, writing, and reading. And sitting. Lots of sitting. But he describes himself as a conservative; whereas, I typically call myself a progressive. Art lives in a small town in rural Middle Tennessee. I live in Memphis. We’re both men and we’re both white, so we have that mountain of privilege in common. Still, with our political and geographic identities being what they are, if you only listened to the national news outlets, you’d think we would be unable to have a five-minute-long conversation without smashing a wine bottle over one another’s heads. So, even though we politely disagree about some potential solutions to certain problems, we can usually agree that issues like pollution, pandemics, or disappearing newspapers are problems. One of the more frightening items on that list, as we saw it, is the devolution of political discourse into a world in which there is but one criteria — absolute, unquestioning loyalty. This week, Politico reported that Sen. Marsha Blackburn is among a list of GOP politicians being eyed as a running mate for a 2024 bid by our former president, Mr. Donald J. Trump. To which I say, “Sure. Why not?” Sen. Blackburn certainly isn’t interested in Tennessee or in any of the problems we face. She’s more often found using her platform to talk about our dealings with China or the southern border of the United States. If you made a drinking game out of her 2018 debate with former Tennessee Governor Phil Bredesen and had taken a shot every time she said “Obama” or “NRA,” you would have died of alcohol poisoning. It seems clear to me that Sen. Blackburn wants to work on a larger stage, to vie for national attention. She can’t be bothered with such pedestrian concerns as infrastructure in her own state, or gun violence, healthcare access, poverty, education, or any of the other problems plaguing Tennessee. She’s got what it takes to make it to the top, though. As Politico’s Marc Caputo reported in the aforementioned article, “Those familiar with his thinking say his selection will be determined by two factors that rate highest in Trump’s estimation: unquestioned loyalty and an embrace of the former president’s baseless claims that the 2020 election was stolen from him.” And there we have it. No wonder Marsha’s name is being floated as a potential running mate. She is, after all, happy to parrot the lie of the stolen election. In this way, Tennessee’s senior senator represents much of what I find so hard to stomach about this moment in time. We are knocking on the door of year two of a global pandemic, with the newly arisen Omicron variant presenting another cause for concern. As the Great Resignation rolls on, we find ourselves in the middle of a long-overdue reckoning about workers rights. These are national issues, yes, but they are also ones that specifically impact Tennessee. No elected official has unfettered power, but it seems that a wily politician could leverage the national zeitgeist into some sort of strategy to implement change for their constituents. But that’s not going to play well on Fox — or in Mar-a-Lago. Unquestioning loyalty is the name of the game, and under those rules, there’s no incentive to reach across the aisle. There’s not even a reason to attempt to fix problems such as healthcare access or stagnated wages and unsafe working conditions. To do so might mean admitting someone from the opposing party has the right idea, at least N E WS & O P I N I O N occasionally, and it’s a short road from THE FLY-BY - 4 there to an angry mob chanting “Hang, NY TIMES CROSSWORD - 6 POLITICS - 8 [Insert Politician’s Name]” on the lawn. FINANCIAL FEATURE - 9 I suppose it’s no wonder why Sen. COVER STORY Blackburn and her ilk ignore real “ON CHRISTOPHER STREET” problems in favor of the same list BY ABIGAIL MORICI - 10 of talking points, happily tilting at SHOP LOCAL FEATURE - 15 fantastical border walls. But it’s not WE RECOMMEND - 16 MUSIC - 17 helping any of us living in the real CALENDAR - 18 world. FOOD - 19 Jesse Davis TV - 20 jesse@memphisflyer.com C LAS S I F I E D S - 22

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THE

fly-by

MEMernet

E N V I R O B E AT B y To b y S e l l s

Water Win

SAYS WH O?

U.S. Supreme Court sides with Tennessee in years-long aquifer case.

The MEMernet was on fire last week with responses to Nike’s “Says Who?” ad featuring Memphis and Ja Morant. MAK ES S E N S E “After finding this ancient painting it makes more sense now,” wrote Reddit user dontcallmejimorjimmy. POSTED TO REDDIT BY U/DONTCALLMEJIMORJIMMY

M E M P H G IV I N G “Wishing r/ Memphis a very happy, smooth and safe Thanksgiving,” wrote Reddit user B1gR1g. POSTED TO REDDIT BY U/B1GR1G

December 2-8, 2021

Edited by Toby Sells

Memphis on the internet.

POSTED TO TWITTER BY @KATRINALCOLEMAN

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Questions, Answers + Attitude

CAS H SAVE R HAWK Reddit user Hungry-Influence3108 caught this hawk posted above the eggs at the Midtown Cash Saver last week. The best comment, by triple_rectum_fryer, read, “I’m sure he’ll get jumped by Cash Saver pigeons.” Other users identified the bird as either a red-shouldered hawk, a Cooper’s hawk, a sharp-shinned hawk, or a big ass hawk. POSTED TO REDDIT BY U/HUNGRY-INFLUENCE3108

Tennessee won a 16-year legal battle over water rights in the U.S. Supreme Court on Monday, November 22nd. Lawyers for the state of Mississippi have argued for more than a decade that Tennessee is stealing its water from the Middle Claiborne Aquifer, an expansion of underground water that flows beneath eight states. Oral arguments in the case went before the Supreme Court in early October. Mississippi sought $615 million in damages. Justices were unanimous in their verdict issued Monday morning. “Mississippi’s complaint is dismissed without leave to amend,” reads the opinion, which means officials there cannot change their argument and bring the issue back to court. Should lawyers bring the case back to the court, they’ll have to file a new case. In its latest argument, Mississippi lawyers told justices that water pumping in Tennessee sucks up water from Mississippi under the state line. Mississippi claimed an absolute ownership right to all groundwater beneath its surface — even after that water has crossed its borders. Lawyers claimed Tennessee’s wells violated Mississippi’s sovereign ownership rights to the water. Justices agreed that pumping in Tennessee “clearly” has effects on water levels in Mississippi. Memphis Light, Gas and Water pumps about 120 million gallons from the aquifer each day from more than 160 wells in and around Memphis, according to the court. “Tennessee’s pumping has contributed to a cone of depression that extends miles into northern Mississippi, and Mississippi itself contends that this cone of depression has reduced groundwater storage and pressure in northern Mississippi,” reads the opinion. However, instances like these are a “hallmark,” justices said, of similar cases remedied by equitable apportionment, meaning the states have to share the water equally. Though, the Mississippi case is the first time equitable apportionment laws would be applied to aquifers. But Chief Justice John Roberts, writing for the court, said the rule should not be different for aquifers, and when water is shared between two states, “each one has an interest which should be respected by the other.” “Mississippi suggests the Middle Claiborne Aquifer is distinguishable from interstate rivers and streams because its natural flow is ‘extremely slow,’” reads the opinion by Roberts. “But we

PHOTO: U.S. SUPREME COURT

Visual representation of the Middle Claiborne Aquifer, subject of the Mississippi-Tennessee water dispute have long applied equitable apportionment even to streams that run dry from time to time. “And although the transboundary flow here may be a mere ‘one or two inches per day,’ that amounts to over 35 million gallons of water per day, and over 10,000,000,000 gallons per year. So, the speed of the flow, at least in the context of this case, does not place the aquifer beyond equitable apportionment.” If Mississippi returned the case to the court, it would be to ask for terms of equitable apportionment and it “must prove by clear and convincing evidence some real and substantial injury for damage.” In October oral arguments, Justice Sonia Sotomayor reminded Mississippi’s attorneys of the case’s long legal history. “You came here in 2010,” Sotomayor said. “We tell you the same thing. Now this is the third time you’ve done this. This time you explicitly disclaim any claim for equitable apportionment. When is enough enough?”


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Seeking Blood & Cell Donors December 2-8, 2021

Memphis City Council member claims ignorance on insults.

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Memphis City Council member Edmund Ford Sr. said he did not understand gender identification in a statement meant to ease the bellicose insults and threats he issued at citizens during a recent council meeting. Ford berated Alex Hensley, an aide to Shelby County Mayor Lee Harris, and George Boyington, who leads intergovernmental relations and special projects for Shelby County Assessor of Property Melvin Burgess. Hensley listed “she/they” in her signature on a letter given to council members about an ordinance before the council. In referencing the letter, Ford called the pronouns “so irrelevant” before asking Hensley, “Who is she and they?” Hensley said, “Me … that’s a letter from me.” Ford did not continue the conversation. Later in the meeting, Boyington came to Hensley’s defense. Ford invited him to speak only to “blow you out of the water back across the street” to the county administration building. Boyington called Ford’s behavior “unprofessional.” The Shelby County Committee of the Tennessee Equality Project (TEP) said Ford’s actions were “bullying, trolling, and abusive” and called for action by other council members. For his gender comments, Ford said the use of she/they on the letter was unfamiliar and he meant “no disrespect” to Hensley. However, it was clear the topic was not new to him as he accused Boyington of wishing to speak about what Ford called “gender mess.” Ford’s statement reads:“It has been

PHOTO: CITY OF MEMPHIS YOUTUBE

Ford reproaches public servant for their use of she/they pronouns. suggested to me that my position on matters might be better received if my remarks were more tempered. I will keep this in mind in the future. “I could have been less harsh in my delivery and tone. Unfortunately, the Shelby County staffer presenting on the Unified Development Code ordinance received the brunt of my frustrations. “In seeking clarification on who exactly authored the letter that was presented to the Council by the County, I asked the representative who was ‘she/ they’ in the signature line. The term ‘they’ suggested to me that there was perhaps an additional author of the letter. “Once the Shelby County representative clarified that she was both ‘she’ and ‘they,’ I supported her answer and right to specify her gender and pronouns without further inquiry. “My time on the council has meant that I have gained knowledge and understanding on a variety of unfamiliar topics. The use of gender pronouns in the letter was unfamiliar to me so I had a lack of knowledge of this practice when I made the query. My asking about the use of ‘she/they’ had nothing to do with gender identity, because I had no familiarity with this as a means of self-identification. “I now know about this practice and hope people understand that no disrespect toward the Shelby County representative’s gender identity was meant by my question.”


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Lang Wiseman, the Memphis native who announced weeks ago that he would be leaving his post as deputy governor to Republican Governor Bill Lee, dropped the other shoe on Monday, when he declared his departure officially as of this coming Friday, December 3rd. Wiseman, a former University of Tennessee basketball star who went on to get a law degree from Harvard and served for a spell as chairman of the Shelby County Republican Party, announced that he would not be returning to Memphis but would remain in Nashville (suburban Brentwood, actually) to pursue future opportunities. Once considered a possible candidate for a now-vacant seat on the state Supreme Court, Wiseman is also rumored to be interested in a possible future appointment as state attorney general. In any case, what he’ll end up doing will be done in Nashville. That kind of one-way ticket is a fairly customary thing for Memphians who enter the vale of state politics. Perhaps the most famous emigre to the state capital is former Governor Winfield Dunn, who was a Memphis dentist and local Republican activist before his surprise election as Tennessee’s chief executive in 1970. Dunn would serve a single term before absenting the governor’s office (at the time, the state constitution prohibited Tennessee governors from seeking consecutive terms) and was succeeded in 1974 by Adamsville Congressman Ray Blanton, a Democrat, whose administration would be plagued by scandal. After waiting out the two terms of fellow Republican Lamar Alexander, Dunn would make another try for the governor’s office in 1986, losing to Democrat Ned McWherter of Dresden. Dunn had meanwhile become a resident of Nashville, where he would remain, making only an occasional return trip to Memphis. Another Memphian who settled in

Nashville was more avid about touching base locally and made several back-andforth trips on Interstate 40, culminating in an ill-fated one. This was Bill Giannini, a former chairman of both the Shelby County Republican Party and the Shelby County Election Commission. Giannini, who was then serving as deputy commissioner of the state Department of Commerce and Insurance, was returning to Nashville in 2017 from attending a political fundraiser in Memphis when he was killed in a car crash in Decatur County. Two other one-time Memphians turned Nashvillians are Tre Hargett and David Lillard, formerly a state representative and a county commissioner, respectively. For the past several years, Hargett has held the office of Secretary of State and Lillard that of state Treasurer.

PHOTO: WISEMAN BRAY

Lang Wiseman In addition to the aforementioned, there are numerous other former residents of the Bluff City who have lingered in the capital city, serving as lobbyists or state functionaries or whathave-you. And, without mentioning any names, there have been instances of an elected Memphis representative or two who basically ended up as more or less fulltime residents of Nashville, making only occasional toe-tap visits — generally at election time — back to a Memphis home address of record. In state politics, “Go West, Young Man” is effectively reversed more often than not.


F I N A N C I A L F E AT U R E B y G e n e G a r d

Don’t Take This Advice Not all advice is good advice — really. Here are four so-called tips that the wise investor will ignore.

PHOTO: JP VALERY | UNSPLASH

Cash is king. This is one of those old-fashioned aphorisms that has some truth to it but can be devastating to long-term financial performance. Cash can be comforting in the face of extreme market dislocations. Also, cash can be important if you’re extremely leveraged up or have unreliable or inconsistent employment income. Even so, cash is almost always a terrible “investment,” especially now, with low interest rates and relatively high inflation. Cash is a place to keep money that is likely to be needed soon, not to plan for the future. Absent a deflationary spiral, it’s hard to imagine an attractive (or even adequate) return on cash in the coming years.

Invest in what you know. Investor Peter Lynch, legendary manager of Fidelity’s Magellan Fund between 1977 and 1990, popularized a style of investing focused on buying stocks associated with products you know and love. This certainly worked for Peter during the time he was active, but probably isn’t the best way to construct a diversified portfolio. Closely related to the Lynch style of investing is the well-documented matter of home bias: Investors tend to prefer positions in their home countries or even smaller geographic regions. Academic research has demonstrated that the only “free lunch” in investing is diversification, meaning that diversification can reduce risk without reducing expected returns. Some professionals have been wildly successful with concentrated positions, but diversification is a good friend of typical investors. Your friends and neighbors who hit home runs with a single stock in their portfolio are probably more lucky than good. Gene Gard is Chief Investment Officer at Telarray, a Memphis-based wealth management firm that helps families navigate investment, tax, estate, and retirement decisions. Ask him your question at ggard@ telarrayadvisors.com or sign up for the next free online seminar on the Events tab at telarrayadvisors.com.

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Wait for a dip. For many investors, their biggest fear is buying into the market and seeing the value drop a few percent in the next days and weeks. This is true even for investments like IRAs where the account most likely won’t be touched for decades. A lot of money has been lost over the years due to the opportunity cost of not buying into the market as early as possible and compounding over time — there’s no reason to wait. Retirees today seeing the S&P 500 at 4600 aren’t concerned if they bought in in the 1980s when it was at 350 vs. 400. They’re just glad they bought in.

Nobody ever lost money taking profits. Closely related to “cash is king,” this sentiment has lost a lot of money in opportunity costs over the years. Let’s say you or your advisor carefully consider an investment choice and buy it. If it goes up 5 percent the next day, you might be inclined to sell it to lock in your gains. But then what will you do? Keep the proceeds in cash? Buy your second-best investment idea in that asset class? When stocks or funds consistently reach 52-week highs (or all-time highs!) it can be unsettling. But as long as GDP is rising, productivity growth remains positive, and inflation continues to tick up, the nominal value of a country’s equity market generally should consistently rise as time goes on. In such an environment, markets “should” be setting all-time highs relatively frequently.

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PHOTOS: MARK SELIGER

(left to right) Adrian Torres and Carmen Carrera, kids Leeah Guiterez and Ahsia Lee Torres; Jamel Young and Leiomy Maldonado

“ON CHRISTOPHER STREET” The Brooks Museum’s exhibit of portraits by Mark Seliger is the first transgender-focused exhibit in the museum’s, Memphis’, and the Mid-South’s history. COVER STORY BY ABIGAIL MORICI

“T

December 2-8, 2021

he whole city is a dark closet, with entrapment, harassment, and copying of license plate numbers from cars parked outside bars,” wrote a visitor to Memphis in 1969 — his words meant to shock his audience with the reality lying below the Mason-Dixon line for LGBTQ individuals, even as the effects of the Stonewall Riots ricocheted and spurred the gay liberation movement throughout the nation. But such a statement would shock no Memphian half a century ago and even today. Just the other week, councilman Edmund Ford Sr. berated Alex Hensley, Shelby County Mayor Lee Harris’ special assistant, for their use of she/they pronouns. A few weeks prior to that, Briarcrest Christian School promoted a class titled “God Made Them Male and Female and That Was Good: a Gospel Response to Culture’s Gender Theory.” Meanwhile, the state of Tennessee actively legislates against 10 trans people, having introduced five antitrans bills into law this year alone.

It’s a saddening reality that, even in our blue oasis of a city, transgender — nonbinary and gender diverse — individuals lack the community support and representation they need and deserve. As recently as this September, Memphis witnessed its first trans-focused art exhibition at the Memphis Brooks Museum of Art: “On Christopher Street: Transgender Portraits by Mark Seliger.” Transgender individuals have always been here in Memphis, but this exhibit in 2021 marks the first time they have been truly celebrated in Memphis and the MidSouth by an institution as historically and culturally significant as the Brooks. Why Christopher Street? Christopher Street in New York City is home to the Stonewall Inn — the site of the 1969 Stonewall Riots. Today, though, the street that was once sanctuary to queer and trans folk is slowly losing its identity as gentrification seeps in over the city — a sadly familiar phenomenon. Photographer Mark Seliger noticed this pattern and set out to document the street in 2016 before it completely lost its

vibrancy. Seliger, who has photographed for GQ, Vanity Fair, Rolling Stone, to name a few, began this project by photographing people he found interesting along the street. Before long, as he got to know his subjects, particularly his trans subjects, he realized the through-line of his story was not just that of gentrification but that of the trans community. “Once I started to hear their stories, their struggles and triumphs, it turned into a bigger body of work,” he says. “This was the first time for many of them to be photographed, I think, in what they consider to be their real identity.” Angelique Piwinski sat for one of the portraits after being connected to Seliger through one of her friends. Piwinski had worked in advertising for 41 years and was an executive vice-president for the last 20 before retiring in 2018. “I had heard of Mark from the ad point of view,” she says. “I’ve never needed portrait stuff done [for myself]. … When they said Mark Seliger is going to shoot it, I was like, what? I was in awe of the guy. “You look at the photographs; you see

the use of lighting. He captured the essence of me in the picture,” she continues. “Is it a glamor shot? No, it’s not the selfie I would take, but I think he captured a certain essence.” Since retirement, Piwinski has advocated for LGBTQ+ rights and has led diversity and inclusion lectures and trainings in the corporate environment. “If I can change a couple of lives, I’ll be happy doing that — even one life would be a super reward. I’m putting a face to a group of people,” she says. “People need to come into a museum and be comfortable and see themselves somewhere. If you don’t represent as many different types of life stories, you’re going to miss the mark.” From New York to Memphis In 2018, Rosamund Garrett, the curator for this exhibition, moved to Memphis from London with her wife Lucy, a photojournalist. “I didn’t know what it was going to be like to be queer in Memphis, and sometimes, I think, the South doesn’t always sound like the friendliest for queer people from the outside,” she says. “But when I came here, I found that there was this very


rich and diverse selection of LGBTQ+ cultural organizations and that there are huge numbers of queer and gender-diverse people here. Which was a really wonderful discovery — that I can hold Lucy’s hand in the street.” But Garrett soon discovered that the Brooks had yet to do an exhibit with an LGBTQ+ focus. “I felt it was a moral imperative to do something,” she says, so she took to searching online for inspiration and found a website that listed Seliger’s collection, which was originally compiled in a book, as being available for exhibition. “It had been listed on the website for several years, and no one in a U.S. art museum had taken it. I was surprised; these photographs are beautiful.” Curating this exhibit of 34 portraits, Garrett says, has changed the way the museum works. For the first time in its history, the museum formed and paid advisory groups, consisting of local LGBTQ+ organizations and the portrait sitters. “We used their feedback to build everything — to build the interpretation, the labels, the education space that we got in the exhibition, the programming that we got,” Garrett says. “And from this emerged two close community partners, OUTMemphis and My Sistah’s House.” Alex Hauptman, the transgender services manager at OUTMemphis, was a part of one of these advisory groups. “We talked about what elements could be incorporated

into the exhibit to make it feel like it wasn’t exploitive and that there was purpose to the exhibit,” he says. “That was really refreshing. I really appreciate the intentionality, and I think a big piece of that is owed to Dr. Garrett.” Garrett, however, is humble in that regard. “Although I’m the curator,” she says, “in this sense, it was a lot more like a facilitation role.” Usually, the curator writes all the wall text and the labels, but in this instance, Garrett wrote only the introductory wall text while the labels beside the portraits are in the words of the portrait sitters. “The idea is really for me to melt in the background and to let their voice come through.” At the exhibit’s entrance, a documentary film featuring several of the portrait sitters plays, giving the viewer a chance to meet the person before seeing their photo. The exhibit also has an accompanying audio tour on SoundCloud, where visitors can hear the portrait sitters’ voices — the inflections, the pauses, the emotions — as they stare directly into the camera lens, directly at the viewer, with an intense vulnerability that begs the observer to listen to their story and take time to witness them as the individuals they are. “A lot of times the sort of dislike or distrust or gross-out, sideshow factor of the trans community that the mainstream population might have is because they don’t have a close interaction or a close connection to a trans person or the trans

community,” Hauptman says. “So like, they only see it on TV or in the punch line on comedy shows, so they only have a very specific lens that they view trans people through that’s not humanizing and usually pretty one-dimensional. “Part of me just hopes that maybe people who don’t have a lot of exposure to trans folks go to this exhibit and see this human side and read the stories on the walls or even just look at the people in the portraits and make a connection that was missing for them that helps see them as human people,” Hauptman continues. “Trans people have very unique experiences, but they’re still relatable.” A Beginning “We’ve thought a lot about the legacy of the show,” Garrett says. “One key part of that is making sure that the trans community is always represented in this museum.” So, to add to the Brooks’ permanent collection, the Hyde Foundation purchased one of Seliger’s portraits — that of ShayGaysia Diamond, a musician who was born in Little Rock, Arkansas, and raised in Memphis. “That portrait is the first portrait that you’ll see,” Garrett says. “And it’s the first portrait — that we know of — of someone who self-identifies as trans to enter the permanent collection, and since then we’ve bought five historic press photographs of trans women from the ’50s and ’70s, including the American icon Christine Jorgensen and the British equivalent, I would say, April Ashley.” These five photographs are along the exterior wall of

the exhibit. The actual exhibition space isn’t square; the walls are faceted, so the portraits surround the viewer from every angle. “Because of this odd shape,” Garrett says, “it kinda feels like a hug.” “It’s funny — I’m not an overly emotional person,” Hauptman says. But during opening weekend in mid-September, when he was alone in the exhibit for the first time and surrounded by the portraits, he says, “it just kinda hit me that this is the first time I’ve gone to a legit museum — I’ve been to art shows, galleries, stuff like that — but this was the first time I’ve ever walked into a museum and saw people that had experiences similar to mine that were part of a community that I was a part of, surrounding me on the walls, and celebrated in a way that they were displayed beautifully and with pride. “It hit me. I can see people who are a part of my community reflected on the walls back at me. I can see different pieces of myself told back to me, which doesn’t happen often in a museum. It was a lot more impactful than I thought it was going to be. I kinda got choked up for a second. I’m 37 years old; trans people have been around for a really long time. It shouldn’t be this big of a deal, but it was. I’m not trying to diminish the exhibit.” Similarly, Garrett adds, “It’s never enough but it’s the beginning. … Museums reflect the society in which we live, and that’s why they’re not always equitable places. However, continued on page 12

COVER STORY m e m p h i s f l y e r. c o m

(clockwise) M. David Soliven; ShaGasyia Diamond; Mahayla McElroy; Benjamin Melzer; and Ni’Tee Spady

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continued from page 11 museums can also try to help shape the society in which we live because people’s stories, which is culture, can change things like policy by winning over people’s minds and hearts first. Small exhibitions like this can just start to nudge people in a little bit of a kinder, more loving, more respectful direction.” Before leaving the exhibition space, visitors have the opportunity to write down comments in a spiral notebook stationed near the entrance. Inside it are an overwhelming number of messages of gratitude, from guests young and old, gender-non-conforming and cisgender, thanking the Brooks for their commitment, intentionality, and education behind this exhibit. Memphis’ Christopher Street When visiting this exhibition, Garrett encourages the viewer to consider where or what your Christopher Street might be. “To me,” she says, “Memphis is like the Christopher Street of the South. Both places are complicated, but I think Memphis is a beacon in a region that can otherwise be difficult for many communities.” Like Christopher Street, Memphis is undergoing its own bout of gentrification,

making areas that have affordable housing become smaller and smaller, displacing more and more people. “I hope that this show helps people to question who you’re consulting when you’re building,” Garrett says. “Are you bringing the community with you? What are the processes by which we’re evolving our communities? How can you keep what is integral to Memphis?” Even though he moved to Memphis just under two years ago, Hauptman says, “I can see the economical impact [gentrification] is having. There was already a big gap in socioeconomic stability with the trans community and LGBTQ community; I think it’s driving a wedge, the rent is going up, so the people who were already struggling with rent are struggling more. The housing options are less and less livable.” As part of his many responsibilities as the transgender services manager at OUTMemphis, Hauptman oversees the nonprofit’s OUTLast Emergency Assistance fund, which provides immediate resources for trans people of color, LGBTQ+ seniors, people living with HIV, and undocumented LGBTQ+ individuals. “A lot of people in OUTLast are unhoused. They stay in hotels, stay with friends,” he says. “Through the OUTLast program, we see a lot of trans people who don’t have stable housing, don’t have

consistent income, aren’t able to get secure jobs, and have to resort to underground economies. There’re a lot of folks who struggle every day here.” Organizations like OUTMemphis seek to alleviate some of that struggle, and Hauptman also points to My Sistah’s House, run by Kayla Gore, which provides emergency housing for gender-nonconforming people of color. “But there’s never as much resource as there needs to be,” he says. “Trans people are statistically underemployed,” Hauptman says. “They don’t make as much money as even cis individuals in the LGBTQ community. People don’t want to hire them; they get fired. This is a state that has no gender equality protections for employees so they can be fired for coming out or being trans. They can be discriminated against for housing. They can be denied rental applications for being trans. There are no protections. People can deny them basic opportunities just for being trans.” All this is in addition to the mental health struggles perpetuated by stigma and lack of access to resources — not to mention the rising violence against transgender people. Forbes called 2021 the “deadliest year” for transgender people since records of such violence began.

To shift this narrative, Hauptman encourages people to vote, donate, advocate for trans rights, share information on social media, hire trans people, rent apartments to them, be aware of and correct language and misconceptions. “I do encourage people to do their own education around trans issues. Start in that corner of the museum, where there are educational resources,” Hauptman says. “Look at where you’re at and look at where your power lies and your privilege — how can you use that to help people and make a difference? “I think, for a lot of people, they might not see the value in a museum doing an exhibit like this,” he continues. “The more spaces that do things like this, that show trans people in a bold, unapologetic way, it helps spread the message that it shouldn’t be a bold move to do this. For the Brooks, it should just be a beautiful portrait exhibit of beautiful people, but we’re not there yet. But the more areas of life in general where we can have the presence, it starts to shift the space in terms of what’s safe.” “On Christopher Street: Transgender Portraits by Mark Seliger” is on display at the Brooks Museum of Art until January 2, 2022. For more information on the exhibition, visit brooksmuseum.org/christopherstreet. For LGBTQ+ resources, visit outmemphis.org or call 901-278-6422.

Discover the Holiday Magic of the Vesta Home Show! Explore five multi-million-dollar homes that redefine excellence in architecture, interior design, and new home construction. The 2021 Vesta Home Show features the latest trends in furnishing, fixtures, appliances, and technology. Each home is beautifully bedecked with Christmas trees, ribbons, and garland, and is enchanted by the glow of candles, fireplaces, and thousands of twinkling lights.

December 2-8, 2021

Celebrate with Family & Friends at these Special Vesta Events:

Forest Bend Acres

off Forest Hill Irene in Germantown

ENDS DEC 12th GENERAL ADMISSION WEEKENDS WEEKDAYS Adults: $15 Adults: $25 Under 12: $5 Under 12: $10 Each child must be accompanied by an adult. No strollers allowed inside the homes. Credit card only. No cash accepted. Closed Monday.

For more information, visit

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vestahomeshow.com

December 2nd

December 7th

December 9th

5:00 PM to 8:00 PM

11:00 AM to 1:00 PM Beat the crowds and explore the homes an hour before the gate opens to the public. Then enjoy a delicious lunch and an enlightening chat-back with our talented team of designers.

Try some of the area's best locally brewed craft beers, all paired with pub food favorites! Get a sneak-peek of the Home Expo, met homebuilding pros, and see the homes, all lit up!

Sample fine wines, perfectly paired with nuts, fruits, olives, cheeses, charcuterie, and chocolates. Linger into the evening to discover the holiday magic of this year's Vesta!

5:00 PM to 8:00 PM

Special advanced ticket purchase required for all Special Vesta Events. Must be 21 or older.


5off

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• N TIC a s LI K k N E a E T bo th S u t e 90 fa a 1 m tr . i e 68 ly m 2 p e . ak m 8 s p 32 • hi 3 s. o rg

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a Full Price Adult Ticket with Promo Code MFLYMUCC (Valid for tickets DECEMBER 3-12 only.) Limit Four

PRESENTING SPONSOR

THEATRE MEMPHIS presents “A CHRISTMAS CAROL” Based on the novel by CHARLES DICKENS • Staged by JEFFREY POSSON Supported by WINSTON WOLFE, A Christmas Carol Chair of Excellence Media Sponsors WKNO 91.1FM, MEMPHIS FLYER and THE BEST TIMES

DECEMBER3-23 Generous support provided by

in the

LOHREY THEATRE

THURSDAYS 7:30PM | $5

11/29/21 10:56 AM

DECEMBER 2, 2021

CHUNGKING EXPRESS DECEMBER 9, 2021

BLOOD AND BLACK LACE DECEMBER 16, 2021

A TREE GROWS IN BROOKLYN JANUARY 6, 2021

THE APARTMENT JANUARY 13, 2021

WALKING TALL

JANUARY 20, 2021

THE MIRROR

JANUARY 27, 2021

THE HOLY MOUNTAIN FEBRUARY 3, 2021

FOXES

The Crosstown Arthouse Film Series showcases a diverse collection of independent, international, historically significant, artistic, experimental, cult, underground and documentary features.

CROSSTOWN THEATER at CROSSTOWN CONCOURSE 1350 Concourse Avenue / Memphis, TN 38104 / crosstownarts.org

COVER STORY m e m p h i s f l y e r. c o m

C ROS S TOWN TH E ATE R

C R O S S T O W N A R T S presents its weekly film series at

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© 2021

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S H OP 8 0 + LOCAL MAKER S

A RR OW C R EATIVE PR ESENTS

NOV 20 - DEC 23 ARROWCREATIVE.ORG JEWEL RY, PAI NT I N G S , HAND M AD E G I F TS 653 Philadelphia St. • Near Central BBQ on Central Ave.

December 2-8, 2021

For your appointment call (901) 361-1403 www.edharrisjewelry.com

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Celebrate the holidays with Afternoon Tea at 17 Berkshire. Reservations can be made online. For more information, please call: (901) 729-7916 • 17berkshire.com 2094 Trimble Place - Overton Square


F E AT U R E B y F l y e r s t a f f

Shop Local

Quality Art & Crafts Supplies!

MIDTOWN This holiday season, we’re asking readers to support local and consider these and others for their gift-giving needs.

WEDNESDAY, DECEMBER 8 • 8 PM

Pictured here, Posca Paint Markers, a customer favorite! Sets and open stock make great Stocking Stuffers. Come see all the great gifts we have for the holiday season. We have stocked up!

276-6321 1636 Union Ave • Memphis, TN 38104 Open Every Day

The Best Gift Shop in Memphis! Memphis’ Leading Metaphysical Shop WINNER! f Bmeesmtpohis 2020

901.497.9486 552 S Main St.

Gemstones ◊ Singing Bowls Jewelry ◊ Incense ◊ Books Tarot, Aura & Chakra Readings Sound Therapy Sessions Workshops ◊ Gifts and More!

RING IN THE NEW YEAR! FT. RADIOMAZE AND ALMOST FAMOUS VIP PACKAGES ON SALE NOW!

MARC BROUSSARD THUR MARCH 3 7 PM

m e m p h i s f l y e r. c o m

Oothoon’s This metaphysical shop offers a variety of items for your spiritual needs: candles, crystals, oils, and more. We love The Southern Gothic Oracle Deck by Stacey Williams-Ng ($54). The cards feature handpainted images recognizable in Southern traditions, myths, and culture. Plus, the deck comes with an interpretation book that will guide you through how to use it. Visit Oothoon’s at 410 N. Cleveland, 816 S. Cooper, or oothoons.com. Ounce of Hope This aquaponic cannabis farm and shop has you covered with its oils, gummies, and more. If your giftee is a dessert enthusiast, put the delta-8 brownie bites ($15) on your list. Moist and chocolatey, they conceal the taste of the hemp extract while not taking away from the alluring side effects that make you smile from ear to ear. Visit Ounce of Hope at 553 Cooper, 5101 Sanderlin, or ounceofhope.com.

TUESDAY, DECEMBER 14 • 7PM

ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT

Arrow Creative Arrow is back in action in their new space with a full schedule, and they know that some of the greatest pride comes from being able to say, “I made that.” So why not give someone admission to one of their classes ($65-$85)? Ceramics, jewelry making, paint nights — you name it, they have a class for it. Visit Arrow Creative at 653 Philadelphia or arrowcreative.org.

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Live music at

steppin’ out (& stayin’ in)

We Recommend: Culture, News + Reviews December 2nd - 7:00pm 40 Watt Moon

December 3rd - 7:00pm Queen Ann Hines

12/2 - 7pm

40 Watt Moon

12/3 - 7pm

Queen Ann Hines

12/4 - 7pm Dottie

12/9 - 7pm

Steve Selvidge

12/10 - 7pm

Third Coast December 2-8, 2021

12/11 - 7pm

Memphis All Stars

12/16 - 7pm Jad Tariq

12/17 - 8pm

The Soul Rebels

12/18 - 7pm

Thumpdaddy

railgarten.com

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2 1 6 6 C e n t r a l Av e . Memphis TN 38104

Juke Joint Joy

PHOTO: GREG SOLOMAN

Hattiloo Theatre as a juke joint

By Abigail Morici Say goodbye to Hattiloo Theatre and hello to the Hattiloo Juke Joint, where tables and barstools and booths have replaced the traditional rows of chairs. A spotlight shines on a single semicircle platform stage, large enough for one performer (maybe two), while overhead lights glow blue. A run-down jukebox leans against the wood-paneled wall upon which black-and-white photos hang in frames. You enter through a set of rustic metal doors. You’re in the Delta now, ready to take in A Holiday Juke Joint. Developed by Ekundayo Bandele, CEO and founder of Hattiloo, this show is a montage of holiday jokes and stories, rap, singing, dancing, and so much more. “The story is these four people who get together and enjoy Christmas,” Bandele says. “For one of them, it’s her club, and the others are her regulars. There’s not really an arc in the traditional sense; it’s just fun.” And, Bandele emphasizes, the show is interactive. “What we’re missing in theater is the interactive spirit — having audiences not just sit there watching something but being an active participant,” he says. “I’ve always loved spoken word things, and when you go to these spoken word shows, you snap and you hoot and you’re a part of the performance as opposed to just a spectator. I wanted to create something that gave the audience permission to enjoy themselves.” That’s why the juke-joint set extends into the crowd, why there’s no separation between what is scripted and what isn’t, why the performers address the audience and walk from table to table. “You’re laughing with your friends and shouting at the stage because there’s no fourth wall,” Bandele says. The family-friendly performances are about an hour and 10 minutes long, and the show will run through December 19th. Tickets are available to purchase online at hattiloo.org. A HOLIDAY JUKE JOINT, HATTILOO THEATRE, 37 COOPER, THURSDAY-SUNDAY, DECEMBER 2ND-5TH, VARIOUS TIMES, $30.

VARIOUS DAYS & TIMES December 2nd - 8th Flip The Switch: Delight at the Concourse Crosstown Concourse, 1350 Concourse, Fri., Dec. 3rd, 5-7 p.m., free Take in the holiday lights as Crosstown Concourse flips the switch on the massive lighting installation inside the building and outside on the plaza. Music will start at 5 p.m., and the lights go on at 5:30 p.m. Afterward, enjoy even more musical performances, kids’ crafts, and seasonal refreshments to kick off this holiday season in style. Later, Crosstown Arts will host two music events — An Evening of Sacred Soul with Elizabeth King and Elder Jack Ward as well as a performance by electronic artist Qemist and singersongwriter NICOTHEGODDESS.

John Crist: Fresh Cuts Comedy Tour Orpheum Theatre, 203 S. Main, Sat., Dec. 4th, $29.75-$149.75 Widely known for viral videos like “Honest Football Coach,” “Every Parent at Disney,” “Brands that need to be CANCELLED,” plus hundreds more, John Crist is one of today’s fast-rising stand-up comedians, with more than one billion video views, four million fans on social media, and sold out shows from coast to coast. Memphis miniFEST Hi Tone, 412 N. Cleveland, Sat., Dec. 4th, 5:45 p.m., $20 Bridging The Music is headed to Memphis for an evening of music, art, and community in a festival-style atmosphere. Support top-notch local and touring acts, visual artists, and more.

“Naming” Opening Reception Arkwings, 2034 James Road,Sun., Dec. 5th, noon-4 p.m. Opening for the movable public sculpture by Colin Kidder, intended to memorialize those people who lost their lives while walking in Memphis in 2020, a record year for traffic violence in our city and country. The Concert to Protect Our Aquifer First Congregational Church, 1000 S. Cooper, Sun., Dec. 5th, 7 p.m., $50 Acoustic Sunday Live, the concert series, will benefit Protect Our Aquifer. Don’t miss an incredible night of music featuring awardwinning artists Shemekia Copeland, Will Kimbrough, Jim Lauderdale, and Livingston Taylor, with special guest Al Kapone.


MUSIC By Alex Greene

PHOTO: DANIEL PORTAL

Ra Kalam Bob Moses

Moses in Memphis Master drummer Ra Kalam Bob Moses moves to the Bluff City. “It’s not about entertainment; it’s about inner attainment.” When you’re sitting with someone who’s lived and breathed jazz history, the kernels of wisdom fall freely. You’d best pay attention. On this day, I’m with none other than jazz drummer Ra Kalam Bob Moses, whose stories range from New York to Kathmandu. “I grew up in the same building as Art Blakey, Max Roach, Abbey Lincoln, Elvin Jones, Rahsaan Roland Kirk. 415 Central Park West. Rahsaan, I was in his house every day. From my window, I could watch Eric Dolphy play flute on a rock in Central Park. He’d sit there and play with the birds.” That image captures the spirit of inner attainment that Moses speaks of. And he wasn’t a mere spectator. “Charles Mingus used to come over and play duets with me when I was 13. He used to live across the park on 5th Avenue — that’s mostly rich white folks. And Mingus didn’t think they would rent to a Black man, so my dad went in and pretended to be Mingus to sign the lease.” All the while, young Moses was absorbing lessons from these neighbors and friends. “Mingus said, ‘Bobby, you gotta learn how to play sloppy, man! You don’t want to be one of them white studio drummers.’ I said, ‘Mingus, I’m 13. I don’t even know how to play clean yet!’ But later I knew exactly what he meant. If

it’s too clean, it doesn’t sound right. It sounds antiseptic. We need to keep the human imperfection in the music.” Connecting individual notes and beats to broader principles comes naturally to Moses, who has a decidedly philosophical approach to music. One indication of that is his devotion to his teacher and musical collaborator, Tisziji Muñoz, who coined the phrase about inner attainment and bestowed the name Ra Kalam on Moses many years ago. “That’s a spiritual name given to me by Tisziji. My teacher, my guru. It’s really about getting beyond karma. Sometimes being Bob Moses has really been a drag. So Ra Kalam represents your highest aspect. It means ‘the inaudible sound of the invisible sun.’ So he gave me a very powerful name. And it’s a bitch to live up to! I’m still working on it.” Indeed, Moses is working on a lot of things, always pushing himself to venture into strange territory. It’s certainly kept him on the cutting edge of fusion and free jazz since he was a teenager, starting with The Free Spirits, “the first jazz rock group,” as he says, founded by Moses and guitarist Larry Coryell. From there, it was a natural step to join The Insect Trust, the free jazz-influenced, genre-

busting New York group that sometimes played Memphis in the late ’60s. “That was an amazing band of people,” Moses recalls. “Everybody in that band was very unique and wide-ranging. We had Trevor Koehler on saxophone. We had Bob Palmer, who was from Arkansas and talked like Deputy Dawg. But of all the people, the one who I resonated the most with was Ed Finney.” With the mention of Finney’s name, Moses brings us back to the present: The local virtuoso guitarist is largely responsible for convincing Moses to make Memphis his new home. The two have been close ever since their Insect Trust days, often traveling the world together. “We became traveling companions,” says Moses. “Finney’s still doing it. I stopped a while ago. It’s hard to step out of your life. But I’d go to a place with maybe a flute or a log drum, with no plan, not knowing anybody.” It’s that venturesome spirit that brought Moses to Memphis. “One thing I learned from Tisziji is, all culture is bondage. Though there’s beauty and greatness within all the cultures. One reason why I could relate to Memphis is, this is a soul town. I’m a Memphibian now. I’m comfortable on the ground and in the air. So I can play some grounded shit but also can play some airy stuff too. A sky drummer who started as an earth drummer. And happy to be an earth drummer, with the right people.” Ra Kalam Bob Moses joins Deborah Swiney, Ed Finney, Bob Buckley, and Chris Parker at The Green Room, Crosstown Concourse, Thursday, December 9th, 7:30 p.m.

PROTECT ACOUSTIC SUNDAY LIVE! THE 3RD CONCERT TO AQUIFER VACCINATION REQUIRED. PROTOCOLS FOLLOWED. LIVE AND STREAM

SUNDAY DECEMBER 5 7:00P FIRST CONGREGATIONAL CHURCH 1000 COOPER STREET MEMPHIS, TN 38104

FEATURING SHEMEKIA COPELAND WILL KIMBROUGH JIM LAUDERDALE LIVINGSTON TAYLOR WITH SPECIAL GUEST, AL KAPONE PRODUCED BY BRUCE NEWMAN FOR PROTECT OUR AQUIFER TICKET INFO (901) 237-2972

ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT

TICKETS AVAILABLE AT ACOUSTICSUNDAYLIVE21.EVENTIVE.ORG.

m e m p h i s f l y e r. c o m

OUR

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CALENDAR of EVENTS:

December 2 - 8

ART AN D S P EC I A L E X H I B ITS

“Everything That Rises”

be a St. Jude hero. Saturday, Dec. 4, 7 a.m.

F I LM

OFF THE WALLS ARTS

Chungking Express

Exhibition of paintings by Jared Small. Through Dec. 23. DAVID LUSK GALLERY

C O M E DY

Todd Oliver & Irving

The funniest comedian on four legs and his ventriloquist friend. Saturday, Dec. 4, 7:30 p.m. BARTLETT PERFORMING ARTS AND CONFERENCE CENTER

COM M U N ITY

LECT U R E

Champions of the Lost Causes Panel

BEALE STREET

Photography by Jenn Brandt. Friday, Dec. 3-Dec. 29.

“FADED”

Champions of the Lost Causes podcast will host a panel discussion for its first live-audience episode on what new things are being done to elevate Memphis’ current music scene. Saturday, Dec. 4, 6 p.m.

Two heartsick Hong Kong cops cross paths at a take-out restaurant stand. $5. Thursday, Dec. 2, 7:30 p.m.

MEMPHIS LISTENING LAB

CROSSTOWN ARTS AT THE CONCOURSE

T H EAT E R FOOD AN D DR I N K

A Christmas Carol

Take the journey with Ebenezer Scrooge as he goes from disgruntled miser to a joyful benefactor. Friday, Dec. 3-Dec. 23.

17th Annual Stumbling Santa Pub Crawl

Collect toys for Porter-Leath preschool children while touring the best Downtown bars. Saturday, Dec. 4, 7-11 p.m.

THEATRE MEMPHIS

Cabaret Noel Six: Step into Christmas

FLYING SAUCER DRAUGHT EMPORIUM

The Concert to Protect Our Aquifer

H O LI DAY EV E N TS

FIRST CONGREGATIONAL CHURCH

Flip the Switch: Delight at the Concourse

Drew & Ellie Holcomb’s Neighborly Christmas

Tree Lighting at Chimes Square

CROSSTOWN CONCOURSE

ORPHEUM THEATRE

OVERTON SQUARE

An incredible night of music. $50. Sunday, Dec. 5, 7 p.m.

St. Jude Memphis Marathon Weekend

Run in person or virtually and

Send the date, time, place, cost, info, phone number, a brief description, and photos — two weeks in advance — to calendar@memphisflyer.com or P.O. Box 1738, Memphis, TN 38101. DUE TO SPACE LIMITATIONS, ONGOING WEEKLY EVENTS WILL APPEAR IN THE FLYER’S ONLINE CALENDAR ONLY.

Take in the festivities at Crosstown Concourse’s holiday lighting event. Friday, Dec. 3, 5 p.m.

Performances of Christmas standards and original holiday tunes. $34-$169. Friday, Dec. 3, 8 p.m.

Benefiting Le Bonheur Children’s Hospital. Friday, Dec. 3, 6-8 p.m.

Join Crosstown Concourse as they turn on the holiday lights on a night of music, crafts, and seasonal refreshments.

Join ETC’s resident elves, Topsy and Turvey, as they continue their tradition of bringing Memphis audiences the holidays’ best medleys and slapstick entertainment. $15. Friday, Dec. 3, 8 p.m. THEATREWORKS

Bene�iting Le Bonheur Children’s Hospital

Nov. 20 - Dec. 31

December 2-8, 2021

WWW.MOSHMEMPHIS.COM

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Holiday Movies & Planetarium Shows Get your photo made with Santa.


FOOD By Michael Donahue

LIVE!

Tim Quinn doubled down Downtown.

PHOTO: MICHAEL DONAHUE

Tim Quinn at Memphis Clover Club He took over the lease of Local from Jeff Johnson, who still owns Local on the Square. Quinn put in a downstairs bar and plans on doing “a rebrand at some time,” but, he says, “It was already an existing business. It had been there almost 15 years, going well, made money. I didn’t have to change much at all.” Quinn overheard Indigo’s manager and the former manager of the hotel’s restaurant/bar talking one afternoon at Local. “I heard them say they needed someone to fill the spot where 3rd & Court had been.” After looking at the place, Quinn said, “I’m sold. I can definitely do something with this.” The manager didn’t want the new place to look like a diner, but he wanted “something retro, mid-century, ’50s, ’60s, ’70s to go along with the theme of the hotel.” Quinn was surprised to discover the basement area, which had been The Lounge and, earlier, Memphis Sounds: “Holy shit! There’s a whole other place down there!” Quinn, his wife Tarrah, and his brother Jason Quinn went into partnership. Memphis Clover Club, which opened

October 8th, focuses on craft cocktails, particularly gin drinks. The food is “from all over the world. Different street foods or small plates you might see Downtown in large cities where you’re grabbing a bite to eat. “We cut our own fries and all that stuff. As much as we can, everything is from scratch. We don’t order anything in a number 10 can. We make our own sauces, all our syrups for the bar.” They feature live music upstairs and downstairs. The decor still has “that same retro feel. Just a different color scheme, different furniture.” Quinn’s using a “burnt orange,” which he describes as “almost reminiscent of the GE appliance color,” and a turquoise “like you would have seen in the interior of a car in the ’70s.” Quinn began working in restaurants in high school when he realized Jason, who was working at a Perkins, made more money than he did. “He was making as much on a Sunday morning as I was making in an entire week working at Blockbuster.” He got a job waiting tables at Perkins, but a week later he began cooking. Three years later, Quinn went to work at the old Pete & Sam’s on Appling Road and, later, at the Park location. He also worked at Molly’s La Casita, Club 152, and TJ Mulligans, where he met his wife. And he worked for a brief time for Steve Cooper at the old City Hall nightspot in Cordova. In late 2017, Johnson asked Quinn to manage Local on the Square. Quinn took over the lease of the Downtown Local in January 2021. “A blizzard hit the week after we bought it and all the places Downtown started closing and all the water pipes started busting. We bought that thing at the worst time possible. My wife and I had to stay at a hotel for a week so we could make it to work ’cause the roads weren’t predictable.” He spent his free time helping people whose cars were stranded in the snow and ice. “I took my four-wheeler Downtown with an axe and a shovel and pulled them out when they were stuck and handed them business cards.” Quinn told them, “I’m the new guy at Local. Come and have a drink.” Memphis Clover Club is at 24 N. B.B. King; Local on Main Street is at 95 S. Main.

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ou might remember Tim Quinn when he was a server at Pete & Sam’s. Or maybe when he was waiting tables at Perkins Restaurant & Bakery. Or Molly’s La Casita. Well, he now owns two restaurants: Memphis Clover Club at Hotel Indigo and Local on Main Street. He bought both of them in 2021. “I wanted to own a restaurant and a bar by the time I was 35,” says Quinn, 39. “I figured I was four years late and I had to double up one year.”

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TV By Chris McCoy

Hanging With The Fab Four The Beatles: Get Back is an epic document of the creative process.

I

n the new Beatles documentary Get Back, when we see Paul McCartney, frustrated because his bandmate John Lennon is late for rehearsal, plop down on a chair in the corner of a soundstage and pound out “Get Back” off the top of his head, it’s kind of like watching a tape of yourself being conceived: profound, moving, and also a little icky. Paul, it turns out, was just a band geek like the rest of us. Let It Be was recorded in January 1969. Having spent 1966-1968 revolutionizing studio recording, the plan was to get back to their bar band roots by writing a new album’s worth of songs and premiering them with their first live concert in three years. Crucially, they were going to do it all in front of director Michael LindsayHogg’s cameras, in a soundstage at Twickenham Studios, where A Hard Day’s Night and Help! had been filmed. That meant they had essentially three weeks to write 14 songs, whip them into shape, and record them in front of an audience. This was difficult, but not out of the question for the band who had changed pop music in one day with the 10-song session that produced Please Please Me. Legend has it that the sessions ended in acrimony, with George Harrison briefly quitting,

and the band trying to salvage the project with an impromptu live show on the roof of their Apple records studio. The album was shelved, and the band returned to the studio for Abbey Road. After they broke up in early 1970, Let It Be was finally released, and Lindsay-Hogg’s feature documentary became notorious for capturing the “breakup of The Beatles.” A few years ago, Lord of the Rings director Peter Jackson acquired the rights to the Let It Be sessions footage, which encompassed more than 60 hours of film and more than 180 hours of audio. He spent four years editing the chaotic mess down to a “crucial” 468 minutes. If your first reaction is, maybe he could have gotten a little more crucial than eight hours, you’re right. This is not a film with a punchy narrative; in part three,

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TV By Chris McCoy band rules. First, the rehearsal space is sacred. Don’t record the writing process, or the frank discussions that take place there. Second, no significant others in the studio. This is known as the “Yoko Rule,” which Get Back shows is unfair. Yoko Ono is omnipresent and clingy, sitting next to John in the early going, before getting bored and leaving as the sessions drag on. She’s a non-factor in the lads’ conflict, which largely stems from trying to do the delicate mental work of composing songs while under the camera’s gaze. The Beatle who is up to the challenge

of working in the spotlight is Paul. In one stunning moment, while John is meeting with Lindsay-Hogg to plan the ill-fated concert, Paul is in the background, noodling around on the piano, and “Let It Be” emerges. When he takes it to the group, and The Beatles’ eyes light up, it’s like watching Leonardo da Vinci sketching The Last Supper. Get Back shows that The Beatles, often reduced to cartoon characters, were human after all — and that makes their art even more extraordinary. The Beatles: Get Back is now streaming on Disney+.

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THE LAST WORD By Andrew Moss

Which Immigration Story Will Prevail?

THE LAST WORD

Like a gravitational field, there’s a narrative that exerts a powerful pull on U.S. immigration policy. It features hordes of migrants besieging our southern border, bringing crime, and lured (as the latest version goes) by erratic border enforcement and a lenient Biden administration. It’s a narrative as powerful as it is untrue, and it needs to be countered, not just for the sake of immigrants but for the nation as a whole. On November 19th, when House Democrats passed a $2.2 trillion social safety net and climate bill, they left out a signature Biden administration commitment: a path to citizenship for the 10.2 million undocumented immigrants living in the U.S. Instead, they included in the budget bill a provision for a temporary status called “parole,” a five-year protection from deportation along with eligibility for work permits. If the provision is passed in the Senate, it will also give immigrants an opportunity to renew the protected status for another five years. But even that development is iffy. Senate negotiations on the budget bill, particularly on immigration, may be more grueling than in the House. While some immigration advocates hail parole as a step forward, others decry it as a betrayal: an endorsement of a second-class status for millions of individuals, including DACA recipients, who have been contributing to their communities and working in essential fields (e.g. agriculture, construction, and healthcare) for many years. Clearly a narrative of menacing migrants held sway, as House Democrats in swing districts got PHOTO: NITISH MEENA | UNSPLASH nervous about being associated with “expansive immigration reform.” Asking for a more democratic, more inclusive narrative How can such a narrative hold so much power, particularly when opinion surveys show that Americans strongly support a path to citizenship for DACA recipients and millions of essential workers? One reason is that the story serves the interests of influential politicians, commentators, think tanks, and private detention companies, all of whom profit from it in one respect or another. When prominent individuals and organizations repeat the story often enough and loudly enough, its influence grows exponentially. Early in November, 39 Republican Congress members representing border state districts wrote House Speaker Nancy Pelosi and Senate Majority Leader Chuck Schumer, urging them not to incorporate any immigration provisions, including parole, into the social safety net and climate bill. Citing the large numbers of border encounters recorded this year by U.S. Customs and Border Protection officials, they sought to paint the migrants’ presence in ominous terms, associating the migrants with criminality and arguing that “we cannot afford to create new incentives to illegal migration in the midst of this crisis.” In painting such a picture, the 39 Republicans ignored numerous studies showing conclusively that immigrants, including unauthorized immigrants and immigrant youth, have lower crime rates than nativeborn citizens. These studies make clear that harsh anti-immigrant policies, including detention and expulsion, have little value in fighting crime. The 39 also ignore the powerful “push” factors that cause people to leave their homes in search of safety, freedom, and livelihood. Their negative narrative says nothing about the Haitians who fled their country after a 2010 earthquake that left 217,000 people dead and 1.5 million homeless, nor about the political instability and violence that have racked the country after its president was assassinated this year. Nor do they reference the Hondurans left devastated and desperate by the back-to-back hurricanes Eta and Iota last year, as well as by food insecurity, corruption, and extortion by gangs. Nor is there any mention of peoples from other countries where war, corruption, destitution, and climate-related drought and flooding have made life untenable. It’s not in the interest of these 39 Congressional representatives, and their allies in the media and other institutions, to recognize another immigration story entirely: a narrative rooted in law, a narrative that sees immigrants as essential to revitalizing entire regions and to maintaining a robust economy as U.S. population growth declines. It is in the nation’s interest to lift up that other story, for it is in this narrative that the seeds of another kind of nation are found: a country less fearful, more inclusive, more democratic, and more encouraging of human possibility and reinvention. Andrew Moss, syndicated by PeaceVoice, is an emeritus professor (English, Nonviolence Studies) at the California State Polytechnic University, Pomona.

m e m p h i s f l y e r. c o m

If the United States is to live up to its full potential, it’s important to work to counter the narrative that immigrants harm, rather than help, the communities in which they settle.

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