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JUSTIN RUSHING Advertising Director CARRIE O’GUIN HOFFMAN Advertising Operations Manager JERRY D. SWIFT Advertising Director Emeritus KELLI DEWITT, CHIP GOOGE, ALEX KENNER Senior Account Executives ROXY MATTHEWS Sales Assistant DESHAUNE MCGHEE Classified Advertising Manager BRENDA FORD Classified Sales Administrator classifieds@memphisflyer.com LYNN SPARAGOWSKI Distribution Manager ROBBIE FRENCH Warehouse and Delivery Manager BRANDY BROWN, JANICE GRISSOM ELLISON, ZACH JOHNSON, KAREN MILAM, RANDY ROTZ, LEWIS TAYLOR, WILLIAM WIDEMAN Distribution THE MEMPHIS FLYER is published weekly by Contemporary Media, Inc., 460 Tennessee Street, Memphis, TN 38103 Phone: (901) 521-9000 Fax: (901) 521-0129 letters@memphisflyer.com www.memphisflyer.com CONTEMPORARY MEDIA, INC. KENNETH NEILL Publisher JENNIFER OSWALT Chief Executive Officer JEFFREY GOLDBERG Director of Business Development BRUCE VANWYNGARDEN Editorial Director MOLLY WILLMOTT Special Projects Director KEVIN LIPE Digital Manager LYNN SPARAGOWSKI Distribution Manager MATTHEW PRESTON Social Media Manager BRITT ERVIN Email Marketing Manager ASHLEY HAEGER Controller CELESTE DIXON Accounting Assistant JOSEPH CAREY IT Director KALENA MCKINNEY Receptionist

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CONTENTS

BRUCE VANWYNGARDEN Editor SUSAN ELLIS Managing Editor JACKSON BAKER, MICHAEL FINGER Senior Editors TOBY SELLS Associate Editor CHRIS MCCOY Film and TV Editor ALEX GREENE Music Editor CHRIS DAVIS, MICHAEL DONAHUE MAYA SMITH, JOSHUA CANNON Staff Writers JESSE DAVIS Copy Editor JULIE RAY Calendar Editor

OUR 1502ND ISSUE 12.07.17 My wife and I were driving down Highway 307 through the Yucatan last week, on our way to a vacation in the sunny climes south of Tulum for the Thanksgiving holiday. We were passing through the region below Cancun known as the Mexican Riviera, an area that’s home to countless seaside mega-resorts that lure tourists from all over the globe. A flashy billboard caught my eye. It asked an interesting question: “When was the last time you did something for the first time?” Whoa. Let that sink in. The billboard was decorated with illustrations of people scuba diving, hanggliding, and wind-surfing — all presumably activities that one might do “for the first time.” But that question stuck with me, and it got me to thinking — because what else do you do when you’re on a long drive? One reason travel is exciting and appealing is because almost everything you do is something you’re doing for the first time — walking a fresh beach or a deep jungle trail, finding a hidden cenote, tasting street food in a tiny village, listening to a strange orange bird in the tree outside your window singing a foreign song. You are alive, open to the world, all your senses fully engaged in ways they are not when you’re in your workday routine. We crave the “new” like a drug. Travel awakens us, gives us new day after new day. Travel makes us realize how easily we fall into patterns that shorten our days into routines that pass the time but don’t accomplish much else. Most of us are tied to our phones and social media during our waking moments. Why? Because, social media offers stimulation, stuff we read “for the first time” — information we can share or respond to. It’s almost like mini-travel, an escape from work or day-to-day drudgery. It’s “news.” What’s Trump done now? They fired Fizdale? What did Roy Moore say? Garrison Keillor did what? And always, of course, What’s Trump done now? But like cheap tequila, the buzz wears off, and you’re just reading out of habit — or routine. Digital stimulation pales in comparison to the real thing. In Mexico, I took long sunrise walks on the beach. I spent hours lying in the sand, listening to the surf, smelling the sea air. I thought a lot about how to bring the sense of joy that travel brings back home, about ways to make each day a fresh adventure, even if it involves going to work five days a week and sleeping in the same bed, night after night. I kept coming back to that billboard in my mind, and the concept of doing something for the first time. I thought about the quote from Heraclitus (I was deep into my third cup of Mexican coffee and on a beach, so cut me some slack.): “No man ever steps in the same river twice, for it’s not the same river and he’s not the same man.” And I thought about the zen concept of being present in each N E WS & O P I N I O N moment, about finding enlightenment THE FLY-BY - 4 by simply being aware that everything NY TIMES CROSSWORD - 4 is new in every breath you take. POLITICS - 8 I decided the answer to the question, EDITORIAL - 10 “When was the last time you did VIEWPOINT - 11 something for the first time?” is always, COVER - “THE BIG JUMP” BY MAYA SMITH - 12 “Now.” And I resolved to keep my WE RECOMMEND - 18 senses open and look for ways to break MUSIC - 20 up my daily routine when I returned AFTER DARK - 22 to Memphis. I would get up early and CALENDAR - 24 do yoga. I would bike to work. I would BOOKS - 30 make ceviche for dinner, and learn to FOOD - 32 speak Spanish. SPIRITS - 33 Then I ordered a bloody Mary and FILM - 34 checked my Twitter feed. C L AS S I F I E D S - 36 Bruce VanWyngarden LAST WORD - 39 brucev@memphisflyer.com

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THE

f

fly-by

ly on the wall

BETTER The sign at Las Savell makes Memphis a better place. It’s relentlessly positive space, even when the message appears to be trolling a neighboring building that’s being demolished. “Fine quality lasts forever.” Yeah, buddy.

December 7-13, 2017

S ATA N I C P A N I C The Christian devil and other demonic forces were on the minds of various Memphis City Council members last week as they fretted over zombie murals painted near the corner of Willett and Lamar. Distracted by zombies, our elected officials failed to recognize the occult implications of nearby paintings depicting a known Ghostbuster — and what appears to be the terrifying High Point Murder Owl.

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Questions, Answers + Attitude

W E E K T H AT W A S By Flyer staff

Cosby, Church, & UTHSC Orpheum star replaced, Church for Black Men, & a smoke-free UT

C OS BY STAR G O N E Bill Cosby’s gold star was removed from the sidewalk in front of The Orpheum Theatre last week but only to make way for a new star, according to a theater official. Cosby now faces years in prison on several charges of sexual assault. But before the numerous allegations surfaced, Cosby played the Orpheum four times over the course of many years, earning him the star. Kristin Bennett, press relations manager for Orpheum Theatre Group, said her organization had no comment on the allegations against Cosby. She said the decision to move the star was just to make room for another to honor the 40th anniversary of Friends of the Orpheum, a volunteer usher organization. “P R I MAR I LY B LAC K” A Black Lives Matter (BLM) activist in Georgia plans to start a new church in Memphis for African-American men. Jomo K. Johnson, a Christian pastor who co-founded BLM Savannah, will start the Church for Black Men, here in February. “The reason that black men do not connect with the American Evangelical church is because [the church refuses] to suffer with blacks and, therefore, are unable to communicate in a message by which black men can understand,” Johnson said. Johnson said the Church for Black Men is “not exclusively” for black men, “but primarily black.” “Meaning, we will ask that if you are not a black male, to come as a guest of a black male who attends the church,” Johnson said.

By Chris Davis. Email him at davis@memphisflyer.com.

Edited by Toby Sells

N OT B LOWI N G S M O K E The University of Tennessee Health Science Center (UTHSC) will prohibit the use of tobacco products and e-cigarettes across its Memphis campus starting next year.

The new policy will include sidewalks, parking lots adjacent to university buildings, other university property, and even cars parked on university property. However, tobacco products will be allowed under controlled circumstances for “research purposes with prior approval from the dean or director of the facility where the research is conducted.” HAM M E R E D BY J USTI C E Milton Cleve Collins, 54, was working for justice and got hammered by justice. Collins pleaded guilty last week to one count of major fraud against the United States. He had a $1.5 million federal government contract to replace the roof and the air conditioning system at the Ed Jones Federal Courthouse and Post Office in Jackson, Tennessee. He sub-contracted the work to a small Memphis-area business but did not pay the business in full. Then, Collins lied about it in documents to federal officials. Collins now faces up to 10 years in prison, a fine of no more than $5 million, three years of supervised release, and a special assessment of $100. A sentencing hearing for him is set for March 2018. Q U I C K H ITS • The Memphis Brooks Museum of Art has teamed up with Lisa Toro, the owner of City & State and The Liquor Store, to redesign and relaunch the museum’s gift shop. • Memphis Zoo monkey, Benjamin, got a CT Scan in Cordova last week in hopes of identifying a condition that’s giving him nose bleeds and leaving him off balance. For fuller versions of these stories and even more local news, visit The News Blog at memphisflyer.com.


For Release Saturday, May 6, 2017

The New York Times Syndication Sales Corporation 620 Eighth Avenue, New York, N.Y. 10018 For Information Call: 1-800-972-3550 For Release Tuesday, March 21, 2017

Crossword

Edited by Will Shortz

Edited by Will Shortz

No.

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Church Health Christmas Card 2017 GLORY TO GOD

I N T H E H I G H E S T, AND ON EARTH

PEACE AND GOOD WILL TOWARD ALL. LUKE 2:14

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NEWS & OPINION

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Let the Sun Shine MLGW explores community solar. You’d love to off-grid your house, but going solar seems, like, really hard and expensive. Memphis Light, Gas & Water (MLGW) is working now to, perhaps, make solar more approachable in the future. The utility launched a survey this week, asking its customers if they’d be interested in community solar, or sharing a solar array with a group of other customers. In community solar projects, a bunch of energy users all chip in to buy a solar array. Imagine something like the field of dark panels aimed skyward at the Solar Farm on I-40 but much smaller. The arrays are not on people’s individual homes or businesses. Instead, they’re installed together on a different site, but the community members all draw their power from them. Community solar is pretty new. The first project in the country was installed in 2006, but it’s growing rapidly. In 2014, 66 megawatts of power were generated through community solar projects, enough to power about 43,000 homes, according to the Solar Energy Industry Association. Projects underway now in 29 states could boost that figure to 3 gigawatts of electricity by 2021, according to GTM Research, which said, community solar “is on the cusp of becoming a mainstream driver of U.S. solar market growth.” Solar is still pretty small in Shelby County. Becky Williamson, strategic marketing coordinator for

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CITY REPORTER B y To b y S e l l s One of MLGW’s solar arrays.

MLGW, said just more than 90 customers have installed small-to-mid-sized solar systems on their homes or businesses since its Green Power Providers program started in 2007. Many customers are still interested, she said. But here, the money has to be right, and community solar could help. “That’s one of the advantages of community solar,” Williamson said. “Instead of a bunch of individual people putting a bunch of small systems at a higher price per watt, you could get larger system at a lower price per watt, and everyone could share in that col-

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lective, community aspect of it.” MLGW’s survey hopes to count how many people are interested in community solar, of course. But the utility also wants to know how customers would want to pay for it. Would you want to pay up front? Or, monthly? If so, how much would you be willing to pay for solar energy? Community solar projects pay for themselves in about 12-15 years, Williamson said. So, it wouldn’t be a short-term, on-again-offagain commitment. But you have some time to make up your mind. The utility is still very much in the exploratory phase of community power, and a program would not be available for at least another couple of years, Williamson said. MLGW is working closely on the project with the Smart Electric Power Alliance (SEPA), which helps the electric power sector transition to a cleanenergy future. In its latest market snapshot, SEPA noted that “community solar continues to boom,” and outside of traditional markets like California, Hawaii, and Arizona. “We now have thriving solar markets in the Southeast, and we’re seeing growth in states such as Utah and Arkansas — another sign that solar really is a competitive, mainstream power,” said SEPA research analyst Brenda Chew.

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POLITICS By Jackson Baker

Busting Some Moves Democrats work the suburbs; Reginald Tate withdraws from ALEC; commission hires Allan Wade to combat Luttrell suit. Shelby County Democrats are continuing with their efforts to spread their party’s influence. The most recent instance was a fund-raising dinner Sunday night at the 148 North Restaurant in Collierville featuring several speakers — including state Representative Craig Fitzhugh, the state House minority leader and currently a candidate for governor; James Mackler, candidate for U.S. Senator; Floyd Bonner, candidate for sheriff; state Senator Lee Harris, now running for Shelby County mayor; John Boatner Jr., candidate for the District 8 congressional seat; and Sanjeev Memula, candidate for state House District 95. • Another local gathering attracting a sizeable number of political figures was the Christmas party of the Tennessee Nurses Association, held Monday night at Coletta’s in Cordova. A good mix of Republicans and Democrats was on hand, including District 33 state Senator Reginald Tate, an inner-city Democrat who confided that he had felt compelled to resign his longstanding affiliation with the American Legislative Exchange Council (ALEC), a national organization, largely funded by conservative donors, which grinds out sample bills and disseminates

them to state legislatures. Tate, who had been listed as a member of ALEC’s Tax and Fiscal Policy Task Force, told the Flyer he had been pressured by fellow Democrats to sunder his ties with the organization, for which he expressed no particular ideological affinity. • The confrontation between a Shelby County Commission majority and County Mayor Mark Luttrell over the circumstances of proposed litigation against distributors of opioids went up another notch on Monday.  An eight-member commission majority — Republicans Heidi Shafer (the current commission chair) and Terry Roland, and Democrats Van Turner, Willie Brooks, Justin Ford, Reginald Milton, Melvin Burgess, and Eddie Jones — are supporting a Shafer initiative to force Luttrell’s hand on proposed litigation by the county against an extensive network of physicians, pharmacists, and others involved, both legally and illegally, in distribution of opioids, which, in the estimation of Shafer and the commission, have resulted in damaging levels of addiction in Shelby County. Chancellor Jim Kyle recently ruled that Luttrell, who sued to block Shafer’s unilateral engaging of a law firm, had rightful authority over litigation by the county but

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declined to intervene in the lawsuit itself, now in limbo in Circuit Court. The chancellor suggested that the suit was in the public interest but recommended mediation between the commission and the mayor. Meanwhile, Luttrell, who has floated the alternative idea of deferring to a statewide legal action against the opioid network, is still in formal (if suspended) litigation in Chancery Court against the commission. The eight-member coalition at odds with the mayor on the matter voted Monday to hire Allan Wade, who represents the Memphis City Council, as its “special legal counsel” in the matter. That action carried, but it aroused opposition among a five-member commission minority consisting of Democrat Walter Bailey and Republicans Mark Billingsley, George Chism, Steve Basar, and David Reaves. Typical of this group’s sentiments were Billingsley’s complaints that outside attorneys were enriching themselves at county expense and that the proposed ongoing action against the alleged opioid-distribution network was too extensive, involving well-established name-brand companies like Johnson & Johnson. Roland, among others, responded that the proposed legal actions against opioid distributors were pro bono and would cost the county nothing, while Luttrell’s action did in fact “cost the county.”

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For tickets or package options, visit Graceland.com/Holiday or call 800-238-2000.

© EPE. Graceland and its marks are trademarks of EPE. All Rights Reserved.

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E D ITO R IAL

The Public Will We live in a time when elected officials and bodies seem determined to ignore the will of the populations they have been elected to represent. This phenomenon is observable in every governmental sphere — state, local, and national — and it threatens the democratic principle in the abstract and strikes at the core of our functioning democratic machinery at all the aforementioned levels. We have just seen the House of Representatives and Senate in Washington, D.C., willfully ignore public sentiment, expressed in virtually every imaginable kind of opinion sampling, by passing an unpopular taxcut giveaway for corporations and the wealthy few that will be paid for at the expense of the middle class — in the loss of accustomed deductions now, in the raising of future insurance premiums due to a provision of the bill weakening the mandates of the Affordable Care Act, and in the probable reduction of entitlement benefits down the line in the name of “economy.” Similarly, during the past decade, we have often seen the Tennessee legislature behave with contemptuous indifference to the public’s unmistakeable disapproval of a plethora of gun bills that have ended up being enacted at the behest the NRA and other like-minded interests in the firearms industry. At the same time, the General Assembly, for naked partisan reasons, has turned its back on the expressed needs of individuals and the state’s financially distressed hospitals by refusing billions in federal aid for Medicaid expansion. And now we find Memphis city government flouting public need and citizen opinion with a series of proposals, some of which directly contravene the results of referenda carried out at the ballot box. There is

a questionable ordinance proposed by Councilman Reid Hedgepeth, reportedly favored by the Strickland administration, as well, that would restrict the rights of public assembly under cover of assuring “order.” There is the proposal by Councilman Ed Ford and others that would revoke the public’s right, already expressed via referendum, to a fair trial of instant runoff voting (IRV) in the next city election, and there is an effort by Councilman Berlin Boyd on behalf of replacing a two-term limit for council members that was only recently approved by the voters. There is room for concern, too, in county government, where a power struggle currently rages between a majority of the Shelby County Commission and the administration of county Mayor Mark Luttrell. The issues here are not as clear-cut, though the core matter of the moment is the need to sue for damages resulting from the over-proliferation of opioids in Shelby county. Sadly, all that is being litigated in Chancery Court is the incidental question of who has the authority to direct such legal efforts. A suit challenging the distributors of opioids is on file in Circuit Court but cannot go forward until the two branches of county government mediate an end to their jurisdictional dispute. Meanwhile, the public continues to suffer. Surely, it is no big thing to ask the various governments we elect to represent the public will, but it seems a tenuous prospect just now.

C O M M E N TA R Y b y G r e g C r a v e n s


VIEWPOINT By Jackson Baker

We Are They ...

SPEND THE NIGHT WITH

... as they are us, and we are all together, as John Lennon once told us, and as experiences abroad will confirm. did so to the tune of a friendly chatter in pidgin-English that put us at ease. More typical was the faithfully honest Uber driver who spoke no English at all but proudly managed, upon our arrival for a brunch at Le Café des Chats, where rescued felines prance among the patrons, “Here it ees — ze Coffee of ze Cats!” A mistranslation, but an endearing one. This kind of vin ordinaire is as instructive to the visitor as a pilgrimage to the Louvre or the Eiffel Tower. A pride of place should not be mistaken for haughtiness, and, in any case, we experienced none of the latter. I have previously written (“Russia: Riddles and Realities” June 8th issue) of the unexpected abundance of familiar American commercial enterprises in Moscow, including the ever-busy McDonald’s at the very gates of the Kremlin, and of such cognate phenomena there as the superfluity of jeanswearing millennials glued to iPhones. Nothing confirms basic human kinship like encountering it first-hand.

And, if travel is clearly one highly effective way of learning this, it isn’t the only way for us in Memphis, a tourist magnet in its own right. The visitors from abroad who come here — for Elvis, for Beale Street, for barbecue, or whatever — are, we end up discovering, slightly different versions of ourselves. As it happens, our city maintains several organized programs that maintain a pipeline to the outer world. One is the Friendship Force of Memphis, which, in conjunction with the Convention Visitors Bureau, recently played host to a group of civil servants from Central Asia. The life of that party was a highly companionable gent from Uzbekistan, the very week that a co-national of his was receiving wide publicity as a perpetrator of terror in New York. I may be naive, but I prefer to think of the guy I joked with at the Little Tea Shop as more typical of Uzbekis. And of humanity. Jackson Baker is a Flyer senior editor.

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NEWS & OPINION

I have just returned from a week-long visit to Paris, France, made in the company of my two grown daughters, one of whom had never been abroad at all, while the other had previously been limited to a single instance of foreign travel — to Italy, where she had a summer scholarship at the University of Bologna. The point of my taking them both to the City of Light was to provide the kind of timely exposure to parts of the outer world that I myself had largely had to forgo until my dotage. While working as a congressional aide in the 1980s, I had spent some fact-finding time in several Central American hotspots, and, nearly a quarter of a century ago, I had fellowtraveled on a Memphis in May tour of the Ivory Coast in west Africa, courtesy of my then and current employer, Contemporary Media, Inc. But that was it. And, like most people everywhere who are confined to their own immediate circumstances, my notions of people in other climes and cultures were second- or thirdhand, based on other people’s accounts. But even the most scrupulous and elaborate depictions of life elsewhere — in news articles, scholarly accounts, travelers’ reports, or even the living color of artful video — amounted, finally, to a kind of hearsay. In the words of the well-worn catchphrase, you had to be there. So I have, in recent years, made it a point — and a financial priority, at the expense of other undertakings — to be there, to see for myself. Since my first trip to Europe in 2015, when I ponied up enough poor man’s funding to attach myself to  a tour of Western European sites organized mainly for his clients by local wealth adviser David Pickler, I have at least scratched the surface of an understanding that I would not have had otherwise. Since that trip, I have made solitary jaunts of my own abroad — a week in Berlin in 2016, a week in Moscow earlier this year — and then the journey en famille to Paris. Each occasion was, as they say, a learning experience.   To start with the most recent trip, both my daughters and I were able to debunk to our satisfaction the strangely persistent myth of The Rude Frenchman. Despite our sputtering attempts to communicate in pidgin French — largely forgone as the week went on — we encountered helpfulness everywhere. Oh, there was the cab-driver who (as we later realized) padded the fare for the ride in from the airport, but even he

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The Big Jump

BRANDON DILL

Innovative projects are underway to make bicycling a way to “do daily life” for thousands of Memphians. C OVE R STO RY BY M AYA S M ITH

December 7-13, 2017

The Big Jump “That’s not right.” That’s what 11-year-old Joshua told me as he reached over from his bike and adjusted my helmet straps for me. “You have to make sure the buckles are right under your ears, like this,” he 12 said, pointing to his own helmet. He learned that — among other

SYLVIA CRUM

I

n 2010, Memphis was the 18thlargest city in the country but had only 1.5 miles of bike lanes. Now, just seven years later, the city is on track to have 400 miles of bikefriendly thoroughfares. Memphis has the chance to be a great biking city. That’s what the city’s Bikeway and Pedestrian Manager, Nicholas Oyler will tell you. That’s in part, he says, because of the city’s flat topography, its fairly mild climate — aside from July and August — and traditional street grids throughout the city that work well for biking. Apart from recreation and exercise, Oyler says, biking can play an important role in the city’s transportation network. “In a city where a quarter of the people are living below the poverty line and might not have access to a car, biking isn’t just a fad or exercise, it’s how they get around, how they do their daily life.” There are lots of big plans and innovative projects underway to help bicycling to become a part of “doing daily life” for many more Memphians — and in areas where safe bike facilities could really make a difference.

biking tips — as one of the 11 young “ambassadors” of the Big Jump program, a three-year initiative aiming to make biking in South Memphis safer and more convenient. Memphis is one of 10 cities chosen from nearly 100 applicants nationwide for the Big Jump program, sponsored by People For Bikes (PFB), a bicycling advocacy nonprofit out of Colorado. New York, Los Angeles, Austin, and Portland are among some of the other cities selected. The Big Jump aims to “achieve a dramatic boost in bike riding in specific focus neighborhoods within each of the 10 cities.” One of the key components of the program is community engagement, and educating the teen ambassadors on all things biking is a large piece of that, Oyler says. “We can’t just put bike lanes on the street and expect that to be it. We really have to work with the people living in the neighborhoods.” The city, in partnership with The

Works CDC of South Memphis and Revolutions Bicycle Co-Op, recruited the teens for monthly training sessions, in which they learn safe bike riding, maintenance, and community organizing skills. In March, once the training is complete, each teen will receive a bike with a lock, lights, and a helmet. More importantly, Oyler says, the teens will become advocates for the Big Jump program and leaders of regular community bike rides. The goal, Oyler says, is not only to empower the teens as they lead the rides, but also to acclimate people to seeing bikes on the street. Aside from community outreach, the Big Jump is unique in that it’s datadriven. “The city has done a great job in the past with building infrastructure and fairly quickly, but improvement is needed and what will be different about the Big Jump is data collection,” Oyler says. As an early part of the initiative, the

Teen ambassadors in the Big Jump Program help lead the charge to make biking in Memphis safer and more convenient (above); Roshun Austin (opposite) displays serious skill — and enthusiasm — for safe cycling. city’s first permanent bike counter was installed last month near Florida and Virginia streets, south of downtown. The counter sits under the street and counts each bike that passes over it, and eventually it will assess how that number changes over time as the street becomes more conducive to biking. Florida was chosen, Oyler says, because it’s one of the city’s few streets that serves as a good north-south connector between downtown and South Memphis. The data collected from the counter will not only help in decision making, but it will also validate and prove that people are riding bikes in the neighborhood, Oyler says.


“Obviously, bikes aren’t going to be the answer to everything, but if you can make it easier to get to these places by bike, then why not?” Each of the neighborhoods will be used as a “proving ground” over the next three years, in which the city will try different approaches to make biking easier. The lessons that are learned in South Memphis will be carried to other neighborhoods around the city, Oyler says. One of the next steps of the Big Jump will be to figure out how infrastructure improvements in the neighborhood should look, based on residents’ needs and preferences. Mississippi Boulevard is slated to be repaved with bike lanes in summer 2018, as the city works with the community to create a route connecting the south end of downtown to MLK Riverside Park, Soulsville, and other South Memphis locales. Forming the connection will begin next spring, when signage will be installed that directs riders from one neighborhood to the other. Over the next 12 to 18 months, Oyler says, the route will be upgraded and repaved with protected bike lanes. “I don’t want people to talk about this as a bike project or program. I really see it as a community development program. While maybe the focus is on bikes, it’s really much more than that.” One and Only After Joshua was certain my helmet was on correctly, I joined him, his brother (also a teen ambassador), executive director of Revolutions Sylvia Crum, members of The Works staff, and Oyler for a Friday-afternoon bike ride through parts of the Big Jump focus area. We took off from the back of the South Memphis Farmers Market, a storage space The Works

reclaimed for a fleet of refurbished bikes and helmets from Revolutions. As we headed down Mississippi Boulevard, I rode on the back of a tandem bike with Gregory Love of The Works. Riding through the neighborhood, we passed churches, beauty salons, and a boarded window that read “believe in yourself ” before reaching a small building marked by a bike hanging from the lamp post out front. Located across from the Stax Museum, the salmon-pink building — with old bikes and their parts scattered about inside — is being converted into South Memphis’ only bike shop. It is expected to be open for business sometime in 2018. The next stop on our ride was at a two-thirds-acre farm near Lauderdale and Walker. It’s the Green Leaf learning farm, a signature program of Knowledge Quest, a nonprofit serving as a “community social change agent in South Memphis.” In step with the Big Jump goals, Knowledge Quest will incorporate biking into its community agriculture outreach. A community-support agriculture program will be launched in the spring; it will hire teens in the community to regularly distribute fresh produce to residents via cargo bikes. A grant for the bikes was submitted to the state’s health department in late November, but Oyler says “because it’s such a cool idea,” even without a grant, it will happen. As the sun lowered in the west, we made our final stop at Ida B. Wells — one of 15 schools across the city expected to participate in Revolutions Bicycle Co-Op’s Fourth Grade Bicycle Safety program, launching next fall. In partnership with the Shelby County School System’s (SCS) office of physical continued on page 14

Potential Trails

Bike Lanes Planned for 2018 Manassas, MLK to North Parkway: Establish northsouth spine through the Medical District, narrowing the street and making more space for pedestrians and bikers. Memphis Medical District Collaborative will add decorative installations, planters, land landscaping. MLK Avenue, Peabody to Fourth: Protected bike lanes. Cooper, Central to Poplar: Continuous bike lane from Cooper-Young to Overton Square to Overton Park. South Parkway, Lamar to Southern: Continuous path from Overton Park to South Memphis. Existing Off-Road Trails: Mississippi River Trail, 32 miles Shelby Farms Greenline, 10.65 miles Wolf River Greenway, 2.6 miles V&E Greenline, 1.7 miles Hamp Line, 1.7 miles Big River Crossing, 1 mile

MAYA SMITH

Local Bike Shops : Bikesmith 901Bikes Outdoors, Inc. Pedaltown Peddler All About Bikes Midtown Bike Company Revolutions Bike Co-Op Victory Bicycle Studio See clips of our bike ride through the portions of the Big Jump area on Memphisflyer.com

COVER STORY m e m p h i s f l y e r. c o m

JUSTIN FOX BURKS

“People have asked me, ‘Why South Memphis? People don’t ride bikes there. Why not Cooper-Young or Midtown?’” Oyler says. “But that’s wrong, and we now have data to show that.” Since 2014, the city has been counting the number of cyclists riding through the intersection of South Parkway and Mississippi Boulevard. The first count, done prior to bike lane installations on South Parkway, showed an average of two riders a day. But, in the spring, the latest count showed around 122 cyclists each day. That’s about a 6,000 percent increase. “To me, that says two things,” Oyler says. “One, when you put in the infrastructure to make it safer for riding, people will ride. And two, despite what some may think, people are already riding bikes in South Memphis.” Big Jump sponsors, PFB, worked with Memphis in 2012 on the Green Lane project, which aimed to build protected bike facilities like those in Europe in U.S. cities. Oyler calls these facilities “all-ages infrastructure,” usable for all riding abilities. But over time, the project showed PFB that a set of landmark bike lanes in a city is useless if they don’t make up a larger network in the community. “If you build one really nice bike lane that doesn’t go where people are trying to go,” Oyler says, “they aren’t going to use it.” While the Green Lane project’s focus was city wide, the Big Jump concentrates on 20 square miles bordered by Mallory in South Memphis, Linden on the north, Riverside on the west, and Hernando on the east. In those designated neighborhoods, Oyler says, the aim is to improve connections and access to recreation, jobs, and education.

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continued from page 13

December 7-13, 2017

education, the program will teach the students how to safely ride a bike on on the street, giving them a reliable transportation option to get to school. “They can try it when they’re in elementary school, then when they go to middle and then high school — which might be farther — they’ll have a good, safe way of getting there,” Crum says. “I thought when we talked with them [SCS], we would have to convince them to do bikes with kids, but they were like ‘Of course we should.’ They immediately bought in.” Downtown Elementary and LaRose Elementary, also in the Big Jump area, are two more of the 15 schools set to participate in the program. Revolutions, located in CooperYoung, is a nonprofit started in 2002 whose mission is to provide all Memphians, particularly the working poor, with well-functioning bikes. The co-op offers bicycle education and repair classes, bike services, and leads community rides. Revolutions has a retail store that sells refurbished bikes for reduced prices, as well as other accessories and equipment. They also have bikes available for rent.

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Bike Share As the Big Jump ramps up, one of its partner organizations, the nonprofit Explore Bike Share, is set to launch a bike-share system by spring 2018, in partnership with the B-Cycle Dash System, which operates 1,250 bike share stations with more than 10,000 bikes in 50 communities in the U.S. B-Cycle will bring 600 bikes to Memphis. They'll be equipped with high-tech amenities, such as GPS systems with route recommendations and turn-by-turn directions. Explore Bike Share, whose mission is to provide an inclusive and accessible bike-sharing system, plans for its 60 bike share stations to service highdemand areas such as Midtown and downtown, as well as developing biking communities like Binghampton, Uptown, Orange Mound, and parts of the Big Jump focal areas in South Memphis. “From its inception, Explore Bike Share has vowed to prioritize neighborhood needs, utilizing the system to serve all of Memphis — not just where the city sees density on a map,” says Roshun Austin, executive director of the Works and an Explore Bike Share board member. “We are proud to execute equity-oriented strategies such as bike safety education, ambassador programs, and workforce development partnerships.” By 2019, Explore Bike Share plans to add 300 bikes to Memphis’ fleet at 30 additional stations, thanks to a $2.2 million Congestion Mitigation Air Quality expansion grant.

The Path Forward Oyler said he hopes as more Memphians are riding bikes throughout the city, the riders will be more “representative of Memphis’ population.” For many Memphians living below the poverty line, bicycles can provide transportation equity, Austin says. “You may be initially getting on a bike for varying reasons, but when we did our community ride, people were coming from different backgrounds. Some were walk-ups from the neighborhood. They saw us and got excited and wanted to participate.” Crum agrees, adding that cycling has to become more visible, with slow rides, group rides, and rides that connect from one neighborhood to another. “It helps all of us see people out on bicycles. And when residents see people who look like them out on bike rides, then the mindset starts to change to ‘Hey, maybe I could try that out.’” If the goal is to get more people biking in Memphis, Austin says the city has to create a larger system of safe bike facilities. “You don’t build a house without a foundation. And infrastructure is that foundation for cycle transportation.” Bike lanes smooth new riders’ transition to the road, says Lyndsey Pender, The Works’ research and evaluation specialist. “One of the barriers we encounter is fear of the road and sharing it with cars. I think bike lanes provide that confidence that some people might need initially, when starting to bike.” Oyler says the city’s vision for the near future is to have a better network of safe bike facilities throughout the entire city. “For so long we have built our streets and neighborhoods around cars in Memphis,” Oyler says. “The only way that’s reliable, safe, and realistic to get around Memphis, for the most part, is by car — by design. “If you look at a map of our bike lanes today, it’s disconnected, with a little piece there and a little piece here,” Oyler says. “If you imagine that those lines on the map were streets, you wouldn’t see that many cars, because what’s the point? You can’t connect. You can’t get to point A and B.” But, two to three years from now, he says there will be a “much better connected network of safe streets for bike riding, and as a result of that, more people will ride bikes for transportation, because it will become easier. “There’s a saying among bike advocates that you don’t justify building a bridge by the number of people swimming across the river,” Oyler says. “You build the bridge, and then people start going across it, and that creates the demand. It’s the same with safe bike facilities and bike lanes. Until we have the safe infrastructure it will be a barrier to people.”


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Shop Local

This holiday season, we’re encouraging our readers to support local businesses by shopping right here at home. Five in One Social Club This “Kindergarten for Grown Folks” hosts creative workshops — casting, woodburning, and more — for small groups. Its retail shop showcases work by local artists, with a focus on one-of-akind pieces. Also available are household goods, T-shirts, and jewelry. Miniature food jewelry, like these earrings, handcrafted with polymer clay by Funlola Coker ($24), can be found within. Visit Five in One Social Club at 2535 Broad Avenue or fiveinone.org. Outdoors, Inc. Since 1974, Outdoors, Inc. has outfitted outdoor enthusiasts with the best in activewear and sporting gear. Their knowledgeable team can help you find the perfect piece for the men, women, or children in your life — from camping gear and hammocks to shoes and accessories. This Arc’teryx Men’s Atom LT Hoody ($249) is a popular choice. Visit Outdoors, Inc. at 5245 Poplar, 1710 Union, 833 N. Germantown Parkway in Cordova, 3421 Summer Avenue (outlet) or outdoorsinc.com. Falling Into Place Home-and-lifestyle boutique owner Mary Claire White opened Falling Into Place in 2015, with a focus on featuring work by independent artists and designers. White handcrafts small-batch soy wax candles infused with natural essential oils. Your gift recipients can relax with soothing aromas like Candied Saffron Ginger or White Tea + Berries, available in 7.5-ounce jars ($24). Visit Falling Into Place at 2613 Broad Avenue or fallinginto place.net.

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steppin’ out

We Recommend: Culture, News + Reviews

Wait for It ...

Clowning around

By Chris Davis

The holidays are a time of reassurance when we celebrate familiarity and comfort in all things, from food and drinks we consume to the entertainment we gobble up like sugar cookies and milk. It’s the caroling time of year when area playhouses turn to beloved titles like A Christmas Carol, Peter Pan, or maybe even the Santaland Diaries for folks who prefer their cocoa on the bitter side. But the Tennessee Shakespeare Company isn’t like other area theaters. The Bard-minded professional troupe has always gone its own way and, true to form, TSC has another kind of classic in mind for this season of giving — a widely celebrated, often misunderstood clown show penned in the wake of WWII, at the dawn of a frightening atomic age. Samuel Beckett’s austere comedy Waiting For Godot is the 20thcentury “bounded in a nutshell,” as Shakespeare might say — a slapstick hymn to eternity in all its terrifying glory. TSC’s founding director Dan McCleary says he’s wanted to produce Godot for years, but he waited for the right moment and the right group of people. “To work as a clown means that you feel everything very deeply, whether it’s joy or loss,” he says, considering what it takes to fill the ragged pants and ill-fitting shoes of Beckett’s famous hobos Vladimir and Estragon, who, in the face of a random, sometimes malevolent-seeming world, turn to one another for affirmation and survival. “Clowns feel things very deeply, then in the next breath they let it go. So clowns have short-term memories. “Out of extremes comes a play of tremendous compassion and understanding and inquiry,” McCleary says, describing Godot as beautiful in timing and grace. “It’s always struck me as a fine seasonal, holiday play. It’s very funny.”

December 7-13, 2017

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In the spirit of the season — wine makes a great holiday gift. Spirits, p. 33

Health Nut Food Truck is here to help you eat healthy. Food, p. 32

THURSDAY December 7

FRIDAY December 8

“From Grandma’s Attic to Now” St. George’s Episcopal Church (2425 S. Germantown), 6-8 p.m. Opening reception for this exhibit of work from the members of the Memphis Chapter of the Embroiderer’s Guild of America. Living Nativity and Bethlehem Village Germantown Baptist Church, 6-9 p.m. The story of Christmas brought to life with live animals and biblical characters.

Community Conversation Crosstown Arts Galleries, noon-1 p.m. Talk held in conjunction with the exhibit “Art/Race/Violence” with the show’s artists Cat Pena, Jamond Bullock, Yancy Villa Calvo, and Lawrence Matthews, led by Tami Sawyer.

South Main Sounds Christmas Show South Main Sounds, 7-9 p.m. Christmas show featuring Brad Webb, Jimmy Stephens Jr., Jackie Flora, Jon Dillard, and others. “The Forget Me Nots” Marshall Arts Gallery, 6-8 p.m. Closing reception for this exhibition by Roger Allan Cleaves. The work is based on a short story by Cleaves about calamities and misadventures.

Toy Bash Propcellar Vintage Rental, 7-11 p.m., $100 and toy donation Party with cocktails, appetizers, the Grinch, and Santa. Benefiting the Boys & Girls Clubs of Greater Memphis. Fourth Bluff Listening Party Fourth Bluff (promenade behind Cossitt Library), 12:15 p.m. Today’s album will be super cool — Booker T & the MGs’ In the Christmas Spirit. It will be introduced by Jeff Kollath with Stax Museum.


HOLIDAYS AT THE

Who is Terry Prince?

Court of Owls It’s not a conspiracy. The Memphis Flyer has always employed an embarrassment of creative people. It’s hard to walk down our halls without bumping into a notable musician, artist, actor, podcaster, author, or chef who’s also an ad rep, designer, writer, or editor. When one of them does something special, we like to brag a little and let folks know. Flyer copy editor and music writer Jesse Davis is another proud conflict of interest. This week his band Terry Prince & the Principles release Dreamland, a four-song EP inspired by magic, mystery, the Memphis film community, and the band’s history. A packed lineup for the release party includes performances by Native Blood, Racquets, and Louise Page. Davis describes “Horns” — a tune inspired by the plastic owl depicted on the Dreamland cover — as a kind of incantation. The song’s opening guitar riff — an eerily familiar variation on Johnny Rivers’ classic “Secret Agent Man” — ramps up the whole David Lynch vibe. “The owl’s kind of become our mascot,” he says. “We carry it around to gigs.” The Principles’ horned mascot is a found object. “It was broken,” says Davis, who rescued it from the street. “And it was filled with all these Black Cat fireworks.” The partially-exploded owl’s origins were later revealed at a party when a distressed neighbor urged Davis to get rid of the cursed object before something awful happened. The plastic decoy, it was said, had been used in some kind of a failed self-exorcism. The demons were strong in this bird. Davis collects lost things and overheard dialogue. When stories like this get told he tucks them away: “Hey, thanks for the lyric.” There is no Terry Prince, by the way; he’s fiction. The Principles are Jesse Davis, Jeff Drzycimski, Kent Stratton, and Ian Younkin. Totally not a conspiracy.

Nov 18 - Dec 24, 2017

RELEASE PARTY FOR “DREAMLAND” BY TERRY PRINCE & THE PRINCIPLES WITH NATIVE BLOOD, RACQUETS, AND LOUISE PAGE. FRIDAY, DEC. 8TH, 8:30 P.M. SOUNDS GOOD MEMPHIS, 831 S. COOPER STREET $5

James Franco (above) directs and stars in The Disaster Artist, a film about the making of The Room. Film, p. 34

3050 Central Ave / Memphis 38111

SATURDAY Decemer 9 Cabaret Noel III: Sleighbells Ring, Are You Listening TheatreWorks, 8 p.m., $15 An evening of song with Christmas classics to original tunes to get you into the holiday spirit.

Ugly Sweater Day Memphis Zoo, 9 a.m.-5 p.m. Wear your ugliest holiday sweater (the one your grandma gave you) to the zoo today and receive a stocking full of candy. Guests will be entered into a virtual sweater contest. 6th Annual Holiday Classics on Ice Mid-South Ice House, noon-1 p.m., $10-$25 Annual figure-skating show from the Figure Skating Club of Memphis. Includes performances to tunes from The Grinch, The Nutcracker, Frozen, Charlie Brown, and Polar Express.

Pub’s 70th Anniversary Party High Point Pub, 4 p.m.-1 a.m. Party celebrating one of Memphis’ oldest pubs with beer, music, and more. Black Clover Malco Paradiso, 2 p.m. Manga series about a pair of orphans — one magical, the other not so much.

P!NK PALACE MUSEUM

901.636.2362

The Mid-South’s Finest Stereo & Turntable Selection

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m e m p h i s f l y e r. c o m

in 2D

ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT

BRYAN ROLLINS

By Chris Davis

PINK PALACE

19


MUSIC By Alex Greene

Europa My Mirror Goner publishes a book of compelling tales from the road by Quintron.

December 7-13, 2017

20

form perfect little air-puzzles.” Quintron is equally thoughtful about the cultures he samples. Considering the ubiquity of McDonald’s, he notes that “Even the smallest European village might have a butcher shop. Unpasteurized handmade cheese is literally everywhere, and if you want fresh fish, you go to the fishmonger and not to the gas station freezer.” He and his sound guy go to a Golden Arches near Lisbon to study the local particulars by way of the familiar. It’s part of the spirit of inquiry Quintron brings to being a stranger in a strange land. Even being refused entry into a “big gay disco” in Berlin can jump start his musings. Quintron

RUSH JAGOE

Q

uintron, arguably the best one-name performer since Prince or Cher, is no stranger to Memphis. Due to his indefatigable touring, he’s actually acquainted with much of the world, but he has a special affinity with Memphis’ indie spirit, typified by his organ work on albums by the Oblivions and his own releases on Goner Records. And by “indie spirit,” I don’t mean “indie” in the generic alt-rock sense, but an imagination that follows its own muse, conventions be damned. One could guess as much by his unpredictable songs, his one-man-band approach, his self-made Drum Buddy (an analog rhythm machine), and the puppet shows staged by his colleague and partner, Miss Pussycat, during his performances. Now, with Europa My Mirror, a book just released by Goner, he’s also an author. Ostensibly a chronicle of Quintron’s last European tour, it exudes the sweat and stink that all road-hog troubadours know well. Indeed, it should be required reading for any aspiring beat monkey bedazzled by the possibilities of a song, some gear, and a tank full of gas. But Quintron takes it far beyond any swaggering account of leather-clad riff mongering, peppering his tale with philosophical asides, wry humor, and a sharp eye for character. His wide-ranging approach avoids pretentiousness by keeping it conversational. And therein lies the charm of Europa My Mirror. The narrative is conversational but not rambling, clocking in at just over 100 pages, including amusing illustrations by Miss Pussycat. “I like the idea of writing a book in public, the way you do a show, in real time,” Quintron told me. Indeed, many fans first read these writings as posts on social media as the tour unfolded, and it’s not for nothing that the last words of the book are “Sent from my iPhone.” But Quintron does cop to a good bit of editing and rewriting. “It’s mostly been tightened and expanded on from the original journals. It’s just fleshed out, with the removal of some bad-habit Americanisms.” Unlike with many rock memoirs, there is plenty of bigger-picture stuff, as in his description of Terrier, a Madrid band he loved: “Like all great bands, the real power is in the musicians’ eyes and body language, and of course, the tone of each sound, fitting together with the others to

And this is where the “mirror” comes in. For though he revels in the alternative universe that Europe can offer, Quintron seizes the opportunity to reflect on our own cultural biases. “It really does serve as this sharp-focus mirror. You don’t realize what it means to be an American or what America means when you’re swimming in it, when you’re drowning in it. But when you’re removed and you’re surrounded by something else, it comes into focus.” Ultimately, though, Quintron doesn’t romanticize the Old World. “I don’t know if I could truly be an expatriot,” he says. “Maybe I’m wrong, but artistically I feel like I have to be close to the ground I came from to produce honestly. I don’t know if I could move someplace else and have anything to say. But plenty of people did. I should try it. Maybe if things keep going down the toilet, we’ll all try it.” Quintron and Miss Pussycat, Jack Oblivian, and Room Thirteen play the Hi-Tone, December 31st, 10 p.m. $15


by

SAMUEL BECKETT directed by

DAN McCLEARY at

On stage

DECEMBER 7-17

The most important play of the last 100 years is two clowns’ gift to the world this holiday season. 2017-18: THE TENTH ANNIVERSARY SEASON

Sundays

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Eric Hughes Band 8pm-12am

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Young Petty Thieves 8pm-12am

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Sensation Band-8th, 9th, 22nd, 23rd, 29th & 30th

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KAMASI WASHINGTON MONDAY, DECEMBER 11TH NEW DAISY THEATRE

LIZ BRASHER FRIDAY, DECEMBER 8TH BAR DKDC

THE SUBTEENS SATURDAY, DECEMBER 9TH HI-TONE

After Dark: Live Music Schedule December 7 - 13 Club 152 152 BEALE 544-7011

Alfred’s 197 BEALE 525-3711

Gary Hardy & Memphis 2 Thursdays-Saturdays, 6-9 p.m.; Karaoke Thursdays, TuesdaysWednesdays, 9 p.m.-1 a.m. and Sundays-Mondays, 10 p.m.-2 a.m.; Mandi Thomas Fridays, Saturdays, 6-9 p.m.; The 901 Heavy Hitters Fridays, Saturdays, 10 p.m.-2 a.m.; Flyin’ Ryan Fridays, Saturdays, 2:30 a.m.; Memphis Jazz Orchestra Sundays, 6-9 p.m.

B.B. King’s Blues Club 143 BEALE 524-KING

The King Beez Thursdays, 5:30 p.m.; B.B. King’s All Stars Thursdays, Fridays, 8 p.m.; Will Tucker Band Fridays, Saturdays, 5 p.m.; Lisa G and Flic’s Pic’s Band Saturdays, Sundays, 12:30 p.m.; Blind Mississippi Morris Sundays, 5 p.m.; Memphis Jones Sundays, Wednesdays 5:30 p.m.; Doc Fangaz and the Remedy Tuesdays, 5:30 p.m.

Live Music WednesdaysSundays, 7-11 p.m.; Live DJ Wednesdays-Sundays, 11 p.m.; Third Floor: DJ Tubbz Fridays, Saturdays, 10 p.m.

Handy Bar 200 BEALE 527-2687

The Amazing Rhythmatics Tuesdays, Thursdays-Sundays, 7 p.m.-1 a.m.

Hard Rock Cafe 126 BEALE 529-0007

Adam McClelland Thursday, Dec. 7, 6:30-9:30 p.m.; Ryan Brewer Sunday, Dec. 10, 8-11 p.m.; Royal Radio Showcase Wednesday, Dec. 13, 6-10 p.m.

New Daisy Theatre

King Jerry Lawler’s Hall of Fame Bar & Grille

Rum Boogie Cafe

159 BEALE

King’s Palace Cafe 162 BEALE 521-1851

David Bowen Thursdays, 5:309:30 p.m., Fridays, Saturdays, 6:30-10:30 p.m., and Sundays, 5:30-9:30 p.m.

King’s Palace Cafe Patio 162 BEALE 521-1851

Sonny Mack Mondays-Fridays, 2-6 p.m.; Cowboy Neil Mondays,

182 BEALE 528-0150

Young Petty Thieves Thursdays, 8 p.m.-midnight; Sensation Band Friday, Dec. 8, 8 p.m.midnight, Saturday, Dec. 9, 8 p.m.-midnight and Sunday, Dec. 10, 7-11 p.m.; Eric Hughes Band Mondays, 8 p.m.-midnight; Gracie Curran Tuesdays, 8 p.m.midnight; Plantation Allstars Wednesdays, 8 p.m.-midnight.

Rum Boogie Cafe Blues Hall 182 BEALE 528-0150

Memphis Bluesmasters Thursdays, Sundays, 8 p.m.-midnight; Vince Johnson and the Plantation Allstars Fridays, Saturdays, 4-8 p.m. and Sundays, 3-7 p.m.; Delta Project Friday, Dec. 8, 8

p.m.-midnight; Juke Joint Allstars Saturday, Dec. 9, 8:30 p.m.12:30 a.m.; Brian Hawkins Blues Party Mondays, 8 p.m.-midnight; Chris McDaniel Tuesdays, Wednesdays, 8 p.m.-midnight.

5:30-9 p.m., Sundays, 11 a.m.-2 p.m., and Mondays-Wednesdays, 5:30-8 p.m.

Silky O’Sullivan’s

DJ Dance Music MondaysSundays, 10 p.m.

183 BEALE 522-9596

Dueling Pianos Thursdays, Wednesdays, 9 p.m.-1 a.m., Fridays, Saturdays, 9 p.m.-3 a.m., and Sundays, Tuesdays, 8 p.m.midnight.

Dirty Crow Inn 855 KENTUCKY

Nancy Apple Thursdays, 8 p.m.; Bobbie Stacks & Her Assets Wednesdays, 7-10 p.m.; Bobbie & Tasha Wednesdays, 8-11 p.m.

Earnestine & Hazel’s 531 S. MAIN 523-9754

Amber Rae Dunn Hosts: Earnestine & Hazel’s Open Mic Wednesdays, 8-11 p.m.

Flying Saucer Draught Emporium 130 PEABODY PLACE 523-8536

Songwriters with Roland and Friends Mondays, 7-10 p.m.

Huey’s Downtown 77 S. SECOND 527-2700

Purple Haze Nightclub 140 LT. GEORGE W. LEE 577-1139

Rumba Room 303 S. MAIN 523-0020

Salsa Night Saturdays, 8:30 p.m.-3 a.m.

Front Porch Music Series Tuesday, Dec. 12, 7-8 p.m.; Front Porch Music Series - Hope Clayburn and Soul Scrimmage Tuesday, Dec. 12, 7-8 p.m.

Boscos 2120 MADISON 432-2222

Sunday Brunch with Joyce Cobb Sundays, 11:30 a.m.2:30 p.m.

The Silly Goose

Canvas 1737 MADISON 443-5232

DJ Cody Fridays, Saturdays, 10 p.m.

South Main Ghost River Brewing 827 S. MAIN 278-0087

Sunday Evening with Van Duren Sunday, Dec. 10, 5-7:30 p.m.

Loflin Yard 7 W. CAROLINA

Electric Church Sundays, 2-4 p.m.

South Main Sounds 550 S. MAIN 494-6543

Christmas Show featuring Jimmy Stephens, Jr., Brad Webb, Rice Drewry, Melinda Milligan, Jon Dillard and Abby Frances Friday, Dec. 8, 7-9 p.m.

Karaoke Thursdays, 9:30 p.m.; U901 & Friends: The Art of Being [EP Release Concert] Saturday, Dec. 9, 9 p.m.-midnight; Kyle Pruzina Live Mondays, 10 p.m.-midnight.

Celtic Crossing 903 S. COOPER 274-5151

Jeremy Stanfill and Joshua Cosby Sundays, 6-9 p.m.; Candy Company Mondays.

The Cove 2559 BROAD 730-0719

Jazz with Ed Finney, Deb Swiney & David Collins Frog Squad Thursday, Dec. 7, 8-11 p.m.; Agori Tribe Friday, Dec. 8, 9 p.m.; J-Train Saturday, Dec. 9, 9 p.m.; David Collins & Frog Squad Sunday, Dec. 10, 6-9 p.m.; Ben Minden-Birkenmaier Wednesday, Dec. 13, 6-8 p.m.; Karaoke Wednesdays, 9 p.m.

Growlers

Paulette’s Live Pianist Thursdays, 5:30-8:30 p.m., Fridays and Saturdays,

3030 POPLAR 415-2700

100 PEABODY PLACE 435-6915

The Matt Spinks Trio Sunday, Dec. 10, 8:30 p.m.-midnight. RIVER INN, 50 HARBOR TOWN SQUARE 260-3300

Benjamin L. Hooks Central Library

1911 POPLAR 244-7904

Bar DKDC 964 S. COOPER 272-0830

Liz Brasher Friday, Dec. 8, 8 p.m.

Crockett Hall Tuesdays with the Midtown Rhythm Section Tuesdays, 9 p.m.

December 7-13, 2017

Blind Mississippi Morris Fridays, 5 p.m. and Saturdays, 5:30 p.m.; Brad Birkedahl Band Thursdays, Wednesdays, 8 p.m.; Earl “The Pearl” Banks Saturdays, 12:30 p.m. and Tuesdays, 7 p.m.; Brandon Cunning Band Sundays, 6 p.m., and Mondays, 7 p.m.; FreeWorld Sundays, 9:30 p.m.

Big Don Valentine’s Three Piece Chicken and a Biscuit Blues Band Thursdays, Tuesdays, 8 p.m.-midnight; Cowboy Neil Friday, Dec. 8, 8 p.m.-midnight; Juke Joint Allstars Saturday, Dec. 9, 8 p.m.-midnight.

Alex Bugnon and Julian Vaughn Friday, Dec. 8, 7 p.m.; Kamasi Washington Monday, Dec. 11, 7 p.m.

145 BEALE 578-3031

Blues City Cafe 138 BEALE 526-3637

168 BEALE 576-2220

Nat “King” Kerr Fridays, Saturdays, 9-10 p.m.

Queen Ann and the Memphis Blues Masters Fridays, Saturdays, 8 p.m.-midnight.

341-345 BEALE 577-1089

King’s Palace Cafe Tap Room

330 BEALE 525-8981

Itta Bena

Chris Gales Solo Acoustic Show Mondays-Saturdays, 12-4 p.m.; Eric Hughes solo/acoustic Thursdays, 5-8 p.m.; Karaoke Mondays-Thursdays, Sundays, 8 p.m.; Live Bands Fridays, Saturdays, 8 p.m.

Blue Note Bar & Grill

Thursdays, 7-11 p.m. and Saturdays, Sundays, 2-6 p.m.; Sensation Band Tuesdays, Fridays, 7-11 p.m.; Fuzzy and the Kings of Memphis Saturdays, 7-11 p.m.; Chic Jones and the Blues Express Sundays, 7-11 p.m.; North and South Band Wednesdays, 7-11 p.m.

GRIZZ VS THUNDER SATURDAY, DECEMBER 9 Social Media Night. Grizzlies Popsocket to the first 5,000 fans in attendance. Special tip-off 8pm! GRIZZLIES.COM | 901.888.HOOP

22

WWE RAW MONDAY, JANUARY 8 Superstars of WWE return to action at FedExForum with Roman Reigns, Seth Rollins, and many more. Tickets available!

HARLEM GLOBETROTTERS SATURDAY, JANUARY 20

WINTER JAM SATURDAY, MARCH 3

Known for their one-of-a-kind family entertainment, the Globetrotters are bringing their 2018 World Tour to FedExForum. Tickets available!

Christian music’s largest tour featuring Skillet, Kari Jobe & Cody Carnes, building 429, KB, Jordan Feliz and Newsong. Suggested donation of $15 at the door.

Get tickets at FedExForum Box Office | Ticketmaster locations | 1.800.745.3000 | ticketmaster.com | fedexforum.com


After Dark: Live Music Schedule December 7 - 13 831 S. COOPER 504-6705

Terry Prince & the Principles EP Release with Native Blood, Racquets, and Louise Page Friday, Dec. 8, 9 p.m.

Wild Bill’s 1580 VOLLINTINE 207-3975

The Wild Bill’s Band with Tony Chapman, Charles Cason, and Miss. Joyce Henderson Fridays, Saturdays, 11 p.m.-3 a.m.

Huey’s Poplar 4872 POPLAR 682-7729

Soul Shockers Sunday, Dec. 10, 8:30 p.m.-midnight.

Mortimer’s 590 N. PERKINS 761-9321

Van Duren Solo Thursdays, 6:30-8:30 p.m.

Wang’s East Tapas 6069 PARK 685-9264

Lee Gardner Fridays, 6:30-9 p.m.; Eddie Harrison Tuesdays, 6:30-9 p.m.

Summer/Berclair Cheffie’s Cafe 483 HIGH POINT TERRACE 202-4157

Songwriter Night hosted by Leigh Ann Wilmot and Dave “The Rave” Saturdays, 5-8 p.m.

Maria’s Restaurant 6439 SUMMER 356-2324

Karaoke Fridays, 5-8 p.m.

Hadley’s Pub 2779 WHITTEN 266-5006

8071 TRINITY 756-4480

The Brian Johnson Band Friday, Dec. 8, 9 p.m.; The Backstreet Crawlers Saturday, Dec. 9, 9 p.m.; Charlie & Juno’s All Star Experience Sunday, Dec. 10, 5:30 p.m.; Carlos Ecos Band Wednesday, Dec. 13, 8 p.m.

Frayser/Millington

RockHouse Live

The Rusty Pieces Sunday, Dec. 10, 4-7 p.m.

5709 RALEIGH-LAGRANGE 386-7222

Live Bands Fridays, Saturdays, 8 p.m.; Open Mic Mondays Mondays, 8 p.m.-midnight; Live

Huey’s Midtown

T.J. Mulligan’s Cordova

1927 MADISON 726-4372

The Southern Edition Band Tuesdays.

Huey’s Millington 8570 HWY 51 N.

Toni Green’s Palace 4212 HWY 51 N.

Toni Green’s Palace MondaysSundays, 7 p.m.; Live DJ Thursdays, Fridays, 7 p.m.

Germantown

The Chaulkies Sunday, Dec. 10, 4-7 p.m.; Ghost Town Blues Band Sunday, Dec. 10, 8:30 p.m.midnight.

Germantown Performing Arts Center 1801 EXETER 751-7500

Lafayette’s Music Room

Germantown Holiday Concert Saturday, Dec. 9, 7 p.m.

2119 MADISON 207-5097

Blackwater Trio Thursday, Dec. 7, 6 p.m.; Derryl Perry Thursday, Dec. 7, 9 p.m.; Greasy Tree Friday, Dec. 8, 6:30 p.m.; Almost Elton John Friday, Dec. 8, 10 p.m.; Daniel Mason Band Saturday, Dec. 9, 6:30 p.m.; Devil Train Saturday, Dec. 9, 10 p.m.; Joe Restivo 4 Sunday, Dec. 10, 11 a.m.; Heather Gillis Band Sunday, Dec. 10, 4 p.m.; Ladies of Seeing Red Sunday, Dec. 10, 8 p.m.; Susan Marshall Monday, Dec. 11, 6 p.m.; Patty Harper & Faultline Tuesday, Dec. 12, 5:30 p.m.; The Michael Brothers Tuesday, Dec. 12, 8 p.m.; Breeze Cayolle & New Orleans Wednesday, Dec. 13, 5:30 p.m.; Memphis All-Stars Wednesday, Dec. 13, 8 p.m.

Huey’s Southwind 7825 WINCHESTER 624-8911

Bluff City Soul Collective Sunday, Dec. 10, 8:30 p.m.-midnight.

Huey’s Germantown 7677 FARMINGTON 318-3034

Five O’Clock Shadow Sunday, Dec. 10, 8-11:30 p.m.

Russo’s New York Pizzeria & Wine Bar 9087 POPLAR 755-0092

Live Music on the patio Thursdays-Saturdays, 7-10 p.m.

North Mississippi/ Tunica

Midtown Crossing Grill

Gold Strike Casino

394 N. WATKINS 443-0502

Natalie James and the Professor Saturdays, Sundays, 11 a.m.-3 p.m.; “The Happening” Open Songwriter Showcase Tuesdays, 6:30-9:30 p.m.

1010 CASINO CENTER IN TUNICA, MS 1-888-245-7829

Minglewood Hall

1150 CASINO STRIP RESORT, TUNICA, MS 662-357-7700

The Oak Ridge Boys Saturday, Dec. 9, 8-9:30 p.m.

Hollywood Casino

1555 MADISON 866-609-1744

Live Entertainment Fridays, Saturdays, 9 p.m.-1 a.m.

Pokey Lafarge, the Easy Leaves Friday, Dec. 8, 7 p.m.

Huey’s Southaven

Murphy’s

7090 MALCO, SOUTHAVEN, MS 662-349-7097

1589 MADISON 726-4193

Whatever Dude! Saturday, Dec. 9.

Jamie Baker and the VIP’s Sunday, Dec. 10, 8:30 p.m.-midnight.

P&H Cafe

Poplar/I-240

1532 MADISON 726-0906

Rock Starkaraoke Fridays; Open Mic Music with Tiffany Harmon Mondays, 9 p.m.-midnight; Olivia Mainville & the Aquatic Troupe, Jack & the Bear Tuesday, Dec. 12.

The Phoenix

East Tapas and Drinks

University of Memphis The Bluff 535 S. HIGHLAND

The Phoenix Blues Jam Tuesdays, 8-11 p.m.

DJ Ben Murray Thursdays, 10 p.m.; Bluegrass Brunch with the River Bluff Clan Sundays, 11 a.m.

Railgarten

East Memphis

1015 S. COOPER 338-5223

2160 CENTRAL

Blackwater Friday, Dec. 8, 8 p.m.; Alvin Youngblood Hart Saturday, Dec. 9, 8 p.m.; Live Band Karaoke with Public Record Wednesdays, 7 p.m.

Music Tuesdays, Wednesdays, 8 p.m.-midnight.

Folk’s Folly Prime Steak House 551 S. MENDENHALL 762-8200

Intimate Piano Lounge featuring Charlotte Hurt MondaysThursdays, 5-9:30 p.m.; Larry Cunningham Fridays, Saturdays, 6-10 p.m.

6069 PARK 767-6002

Eddie Harris Thursdays, Fridays, 6:30-9:30 p.m.; Van Duren Solo Tuesdays, 6-8 p.m.

Neil’s Music Room 5727 QUINCE 682-2300

Jack Rowell’s Celebrity Jam Thursdays, 8 p.m.; Eddie Smith Fridays, 8 p.m.; Midnight Train Saturday, Dec. 9, 8 p.m.; Flashback Sunday, Dec. 10, 4-7 p.m.; Debbie Jamison & Friends Tuesdays, 6-10 p.m.; Elmo and the Shades Wednesdays, 8 p.m.midnight.

Owen Brennan’s THE REGALIA, 6150 POPLAR 761-0990

Lannie McMillan Jazz Trio Sundays, 10 a.m.-2 p.m.

South Memphis Stax Museum of American Soul Music 926 E. MCLEMORE 946-2535

The MDs in the Christmas Spirit Wednesday, Dec. 13, 7 p.m.

Bartlett Bartlett Performing Arts and Conference Center 3663 APPLING 385-6440

Elisabeth Von Trapp Saturday, Dec. 9, 7:30 p.m.

Shelby Forest General Store 7729 BENJESTOWN 876-5770

Shacksdale Motel 8144 OLD HIGHWAY 49 S 662624-8329

Burdine Blues and Greens Festival Dec. 8-10.

Tunica Roadhouse

Steak Night with Tony Butler and the Shelby Forest Pioneers Fridays, 6-8 p.m.; Robert Hull Sundays, 12:30-3:30 p.m.

Live Music Fridays, Saturdays.

Collierville

Raleigh

1107 CASINO CENTER, TUNICA, MS 662-363-4900

Huey’s Collierville

Stage Stop

2130 W. POPLAR 854-4455

2951 CELA 382-1576

Charvey Mac’s Six String Lovers Sunday, Dec. 10, 8-11:30 p.m.

Cordova Huey’s Cordova 1771 N. GERMANTOWN PKWY. 754-3885

John Paul Keith Trio Sunday, Dec. 10, 8:30 p.m.-midnight.

Blues Jam hosted by Brad Webb Thursdays, 7-11 p.m.; Open Mic Night and Steak Night Tuesdays, 6 p.m.-midnight.

m e m p h i s f l y e r. c o m

Hales Corner, Harlan Thursday, Dec. 7, 9 p.m.; The Kickback: ’80s & ’90s hip-hop Friday, Dec. 8, 9 p.m.; Rock Against Racism featuring the Subteens, the Gloryholes, Negro Terror, Arizona Akin, the Hoodrat Hyenas Saturday, Dec. 9, 9 p.m.; The Bar Olympics Sunday, Dec. 10, 3 p.m.; One Step From Falling, One Million Horsepower Tuesday, Dec. 12, 9 p.m.

Sounds Good Memphis

ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT

Hi-Tone 412-414 N. CLEVELAND 278-TONE

23


CALENDAR of EVENTS:

December 7 - 13

Send the date, time, place, cost, info, phone number, a brief description, and photos — two weeks in advance — to calendar@memphisflyer. com or P.O. Box 1738, Memphis, TN 38101. DUE TO SPACE LIMITATIONS, ONGOING WEEKLY EVENTS WILL APPEAR IN THE FLYER’S ONLINE CALENDAR ONLY.

TH EAT E R

Circuit Playhouse

The Santaland Diaries, with a healthy dose of sarcasm and snark, Crumpet manages to reveal the shortcomings of the hustle and bustle surrounding the holidays while reminding us of the true meaning of the season. www.playhouseonthesquare.org. $25-$40. Thursdays-Saturdays, 8 p.m., and Sundays, 7 p.m. Through Dec. 23. Junie B. Jones, The Musical, adaptation of four of Barbara Park’s best-selling books brought to life in a genuinely comical musical. www.playhouseonthesquare.org. $25-$40. Saturdays, Sundays, 2 p.m., and Thursdays, Fridays, 7 p.m. Through Dec. 23. 51 S. COOPER (725-0776).

Landers Center (DeSoto Civic Center)

A Christmas Carol, www.dftonline. org. $22-$30. Sun., 2 p.m., Sat., 2 & 7 p.m., and Fri., 7 p.m. Through Dec. 10. 4560 VENTURE, SOUTHAVEN, MS (662-280-9120).

The Dixon Gallery & Gardens

Waiting for Godot, by Samuel Beckett as an absurdly comedic response to William Shakespeare’s King Lear. Prompts us all to ask ourselves, who or what are we waiting on this holiday season? Celebrate the now. www.tnshakespeare.org. $16-$34. ThursdaysSaturdays, 7 p.m., and Sundays, 3 p.m. Through Dec. 17. 4339 PARK (761-5250).

The Evergreen Theatre

Tia Pancha: A Christmas Story, the Classic Christmas Story of Scrooge with a Latin twist as Tia Pancha learns about the true meaning of the Christmas Spirit, as well as its traditions, music and food. www. cazateatro.org. $15. Fri., Sat., 8 p.m. Through Dec. 10. 1705 POPLAR (274-7139).

Germantown Community Theatre

Who Is Irving Berlin? A Musical Revue, www.gctcomeplay.org. Through Dec. 10.

December 7-13, 2017

3037 FOREST HILL-IRENE (453-7447).

Hattiloo Theatre

Take the Soul Train to Christmas, musical journey follows Granddad as he ushers his granddaughter and two of her friends back through time on the magical Soul Train. www.hattiloo.org. $30-$35. Sundays, 3 p.m., Saturdays, 2 & 7:30 p.m., and Thursdays, Fridays, 7:30 p.m. Through Dec. 17. 37 S. COOPER (502-3486).

The Orpheum

The Phantom of the Opera, www. orpheum-memphis.com. $24 -$129. Sun., 1 & 6:30 p.m., Sat., 2 & 8 p.m., Fri., 8 p.m., and Tues.Thurs., 7:30 p.m. Through Dec. 10. 203 S. MAIN (525-3000).

Playhouse on the Square

24

Peter Pan, life will never be the same for Michael, John, and Wendy Darling after Peter Pan visits their nursery window offering to take them to the magical world

of Neverland. www.playhouseonthesquare.org. $25-$40. Saturdays, Sundays, 2 p.m., and Fridays, 7 p.m. Through Dec. 31. 66 S. COOPER (726-4656).

TheatreSouth

The J & K Cabaret, fantastic funny ladies of Memphis, Jenny Odle Madden and Kim Justis, are hitting the stage with an age-infused cabaret that is destined to twirl your socks. www.voicesofthesouth. org. $25. Fridays, Saturdays, 8 p.m. Through Dec. 16. INSIDE FIRST CONGREGATIONAL CHURCH, 1000 S. COOPER (726-0800).

TheatreWorks

Cabaret Noel III: Sleigh bells Ring, Are Ya Listening!, evening of song and laughter to welcome the holiday season featuring favorite holiday classics, new classics, and soon-to-be classics performed by some of the city’s best. www. etcmemphistheater.com. $15. Fri., Dec. 8, 8 p.m., Sat., Dec. 9, 8 p.m., and Sun., Dec. 10, 2 p.m. 2085 MONROE (274-7139).

A R T I ST R E C E PT I O N S

ANF Architects

Opening reception for “Flying Colors,” exhibition of works by Sally Hughes Smith. www.anfa. com. Fri., Dec. 8, 5:30-7:30 p.m. 1500 UNION (278-6868).

Flicker Street Studio

Opening reception for “Small Worlds,” exhibition of small format work by Jim Buchman, Nancy Cheairs, Erin Wright, Melissa Dunn, Elizabeth Alley, Susan Maakestad, Sunny Montgomery, Emma Kate Rose, Pam McDonnell, and Marja Vallila. www. flickerstreetstudio.com. Fri., Dec. 8, 6-8 p.m. 74 FLICKER (767-2999).

Marshall Arts Gallery

Closing reception for “The Forget Me Nots,” exhibition of works ranging from large paintings to pedestal sculptures by Roger Allan Cleaves. www.marshallartsmemphis.org. Fri., Dec. 8, 6-8 p.m. 639 MARSHALL (679-6837).

Peanut Butter & Jammies at Germantown Performing Arts Center, Friday, Dec. 8th North Light Gallery

Artist reception for “Mississippi Mud: A Pottery Marketplace,” exhibition and sale of Satterfield and Singletary pottery with prices starting at $8. www.facebook.com/ gallerynorthlight. Thurs., Dec. 7, 6-7 p.m. 295 HIGHWAY 7 N (662-259-0094).

Southside Gallery

Opening reception for “Passages,” exhibition of landscapes by Robert Malone www.southsidegallery. com. Sat., Dec. 9, 5-8 p.m. 150 COURTHOUSE SQUARE, OXFORD, MS (662-234-9090).

St. George’s Episcopal Church

Artists Reception for “From Grandma’s Attic to Now,” exhibition of needlework by the Memphis Chapter of the Embroiderer’s Guild of America. www.stgchurch. org. Thurs., Dec. 7, 6-8 p.m.

to creative writing students read from their final projects. Thurs., Dec. 7, 7 p.m. JAVA CABANA, 2170 YOUNG (272-7210).

Sonnet Contest

Shelby County students are invited to submit their original composition for Rhodes College’s inaugural Sonnet Contest. Submit by email, yearwoodl@rhodes.edu. Through March 2, 2018. WWW.RHODES.EDU.

Soulsville Metals Collaborative Student Art Showcase + Sale

Exhibition and sale showcasing handmade jewelry, holiday ornaments, and art pieces made through the fall semester. Support original work and buy handmade art. Thurs., Dec. 7, 5-6:30 p.m. JACK ROBINSON PHOTOGRAPHY GALLERY, 44 HULING (576-0708), WWW. METALMUSEUM.ORG.

“Stargazer Garden” Flower-Folding

2425 SOUTH GERMANTOWN (754-7282).

Stop by and fold a paper flower for collaborative art installation. Mondays-Fridays, 9:30 a.m.-5:30 p.m.

OT H E R A R T HAPPE N I NGS

CROSSTOWN CONCOURSE (FORMERLY SEARS CROSSTOWN), N. CLEVELAND AT NORTH PARKWAY, WWW.CROSSTOWNARTS.ORG.

“Going Moderne: The Impact of Art on American Interiors 1918-35”

In conjunction with current exhibition, Sarah Coffin, curator at the Cooper Hewitt Museum, will discuss the impact of European art and design upon the United States during the ’20s and ’30s. Sat., Dec. 9, 10:30 a.m. MEMPHIS BROOKS MUSEUM OF ART, 1934 POPLAR (544-6209), WWW.BROOKSMUSEUM.ORG.

Next2Rock2017

Register as a solo artist, band, or fan for competition that ends with a national live finale in Los Angeles. For competition registration and fan voting details, visit website. Through Dec. 12. WWW.981THEMAX.COM.

Open Mic/CBU Senior Projects

CBU seniors and introduction

WinterArts

Unique handcrafted work by regional artists including a stellar collection of holiday gift ideas crafted in glass, metal, wood, fiber, and clay, plus jewelry and more. Sundays, 12-5 p.m., Fridays, 10 a.m.-9 p.m., Thursdays, 10 a.m.-7 p.m., and Mondays-Wednesdays, Saturdays, 10 a.m.-6 p.m. Through Dec. 24. PARK PLACE CENTER, 1215 RIDGEWAY (260-7486), WWW.WINTERARTSMEMPHIS. ORG.

O N G O I N G ART

Art Museum at the University of Memphis (AMUM)

“Desert to Delta: Saudi Contemporary Art in Memphis,” exhibition by 20 artists and a video artist

continued on page 26


MOONSHINE

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ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT

THE YING YANG TWINS DECEMBER 31

m e m p h i s f l y e r. c o m

BALL

25

12/1/17 3:41 PM


CALENDAR: DECEMBER 7 - 13 continued from page 24 collective from the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia. www.memphis. edu/amum. Through Jan. 6, 2018. “Africa: Art of a Continent,” permanent exhibition of African art from the Martha and Robert Fogelman collection. Ongoing. 142 COMMUNICATION & FINE ARTS BUILDING (678-2224).

ANF Architects

“Flying Colors,” exhibition of works by Sally Hughes Smith. www.anafa.com. Dec. 8-Jan. 12. 1500 UNION (278-6868).

Belz Museum of Asian and Judaic Art

“Chinese Symbols in Art,” ancient Chinese pottery and bronze. www.belzmuseum.org. Ongoing. 119 S. MAIN, IN THE PEMBROKE SQUARE BUILDING (523-ARTS).

Bingham and Broad

“My Kin Is Not Like Yours,” exhibition of works by Debra Edge. Ongoing. 2563 BROAD (323-3008).

Brickwood Hall

“Triptych Memphis,” exhibition of work by London Thomas, Nicole Maron, Samilia Colar, Alesandra Bellos, Colleen Couch-Smith, Bree Mayes, and others benefiting Alzheimer’s & Dementia Services of Memphis. Through Dec. 17. 391 S. FRONT.

memphisbotanicgarden.com. Through Jan. 3, 2018.

Buckman Arts Center at St. Mary’s School

750 CHERRY (766-9900).

“From Trash to Treasure,” exhibition of new works by Frank Lilly. www.buckmanartscenter. com. Through Dec. 16.

Java Cabana

“Putting the Pieces Together,” exhibition of new paintings by Erica McCarrens. Through Jan. 24, 2018.

60 N. PERKINS EXT. (537-1483).

Circuitous Succession Gallery

2170 YOUNG (272-7210).

“Uninhabitable,” exhibition of paintings and drawings on paper by Christopher St. John. www.circuitoussuccession.com. Through Dec. 20.

Jay Etkin Gallery

1789 KIRBY PARKWAY.

942 COOPER (550-0064).

“Divisions,” exhibition of recent works by Pam Cobb. www. jayetkingallery.com. Through Dec. 11.

Crosstown Concourse

“Art/Race/Violence: A Collaborative Response,” exhibition of multidisciplinary art in collaboration with visual culture historian Dr. Earnestine Jenkins and artist Richard Lou. www. crosstownarts.org. Through Jan. 14, 2018. N. CLEVELAND AT NORTH PARKWAY.

David Lusk Gallery

“Angst,” exhibition of painted photographs by Catherine Erb. www.davidluskgallery.com. Through Dec. 23. 97 TILLMAN (767-3800).

The Dixon Gallery & Gardens

“Isabelle de Borchgrave: Fashioning Art from Paper,” exhibition of recreated historic fashions. Through Jan. 7, 2018. “Boukay,” exhibition of mixedmedia works by Justin Bowles. Through Jan. 7, 2018. “Made in Dixon,” exhibition

L Ross Gallery

Gallery Artists Holiday Group Exhibition, www.lrossgallery. com. Through Dec. 31. showcasing the colorful and joy-filled artwork created by artists of all ages in the Dixon’s educational programs. www. dixon.org. Ongoing. 4339 PARK (761-5250).

EACC Fine Arts Center Gallery

“Atmospheric Abstracts,” exhibition of abstract paintings by Jaquita Phillips Ball. www.eacc. edu. Through Dec. 15. EAST ARKANSAS COMMUNITY COLLEGE, 1700 NEWCASTLE, FORREST CITY, AR.

Eclectic Eye

December 7-13, 2017

Monday - Friday 4PM-7PM PM $2 dollar domestic bottled beer and $3 well liquor

Fratelli’s

“From My Garden and Other Places by Zoe Nadal,” www.

LIVE MUSIC DECEMBER 22

PINT NIGHT Wednesdays 7PM-Close -Close

New Year’s Eve

Marshall Arts Gallery

“The Forget Me Nots,” exhibition of works ranging from large paintings to pedestal sculptures by Roger Allan Cleaves. (491-3647), www.marshallartsmemphis.org. Through Dec. 8. “Love of Art” and “Memphis,” exhibition of work by Nikki Gardner and Debra Edge by appointment only. (647-9242), Ongoing. 639 MARSHALL (679-6837).

Memphis Botanic Garden “Winter Wonders,” exhibition of work by the Memphis Artists Group. www.memphisbotanicgarden.com. Through Jan. 3, 2018. 750 CHERRY (636-4100).

Arkansas State University Mid-South is hiring adjunct faculty for the following areas:

• Criminal Justice

• Information Technology

AVAILABLE FOR

5040 SANDERLIN (767-2200).

Always wanted to teach?

Thursday Nights 8pm-10pm with Memphis Trivia League

TRIVIA

Sundays 11AM-3PM

AND MIMOSA’S

3715 CENTRAL.

• Hospitality Management

Ghost Town Blues Band

$3 BLOODY MARY’S

Fogelman Galleries of Contemporary Art, University of Memphis

photographs, found objects, and written materials produced using a variety of processes for MFA thesis by Jesse DeLira. (678-2216) Through Dec. 7. “Still Strippin’,” exhibition of Fall 2017 BFA thesis work in a variety of media including painting and photography by Devin Picchi, Amira Randolph, Kristin Smith, and Sadie Tomes. (678-2216), www.memphis.edu. Through Dec. 7.

DAILY LUNCH SPECIALS Monday - Friday

DRAFTS HOLIDAY PARTY RENTAL

HAPPY HOUR

“Small Worlds,” exhibition by Jim Buchman, Nancy Cheairs, Erin Wright, Melissa Dunn, Elizabeth Alley, Susan Maakestad, Sunny Montgomery, and others. (767-2999), flickerstreetstudio.com/. Dec. 8-16, 6-8 p.m.

“Lurkmoar,” exhibition of

LATE NIGHT FOOD: Kitchen open til 2AM DELIVERY until midnight 7 nights a week

ROTATING

Flicker Street Studio

242 S. COOPER (276-3937).

Monday thru Sunday 11AM - 3AM

36

985 S. BELLEVUE (948-9522).

74 FLICKER (767-2999).

901-278-0034 • 901-274-7080 youngavenuedeli.com

125+ BEER OPTIONS w/ New beers every week

Mosal Morszart, exhibition of works by Black Arts Alliance artist. www.memphisblackartsalliance.org. Ongoing.

“Skyward,” exhibition of ceramics and oil by Melissa Bridgman and Martha Kelly. www.eclectic-eye. com. Through Dec. 29.

2119 YOUNG AVENUE

“Mississippi Mud” at North Light Gallery, Thursday, Dec. 7th

FireHouse Community Arts Center

• Mathematics • Aviation Maintenance For more info, visit

asumidsouth.edu/career-opportunities

DECEMBER 31

with Spaceface

tickets now available at ticketweb.com

26

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CALENDAR: DECEMBER 7 - 13 Memphis Brooks Museum of Art

“Coming to America: Lachaise, Laurent, Nadelman, and Zorach, 1914-1945,” exhibition of sculptures. Through Jan. 7, 2018. “About Face,” exhibition located in the Education Gallery highlighting the different ways artists interpret the connection between emotion and expression. Ongoing. “Drawing Memory: Essence of Memphis,” exhibition of works inspired by nsibidi, a sacred means of communication among male secret societies in southeastern Nigeria by Victor Ekpuk. www. brooksmuseum.org. Ongoing.

Village Frame & Art

“20th Century Memphis Photographs,” exhibition of work by Charlie Ivey and Virginia Schoenster, (767-8882), Wednesdays, 10 a.m.-6 p.m. Gallery Artists, exhibition of work by Charlie Ivey, Virginia Schoenster, Lou Ann Dattilo, and Matthew Hasty. Ongoing.

2017 Fall BFA Thesis, exhibition of work from graduating seniors in the BFA program in conjunction with the Jan Hankins exhibit in the Alumni Gallery and the Creativity and Inclusivity exhibit in the Lower Gallery. Through Dec. 14. “Creativity and Inclusivity,” exhibition of work created by artists from Memphis Center for Independent Living (MCIL), Shelby Residential and Vocational Services (SRVS), and Memphis College of Art. www.mca.edu. Through Dec. 14. Jan Hankins, www.mca.edu. Through Dec. 14.

$30 nonmembers. Thurs., Dec. 7, 11:30 a.m.

394 N. WATKINS (443-0502).

NAPA CAFE, 5101 SANDERLIN, SUITE 122 (683-0441), WWW.MMGMEMPHIS.COM.

B O O KS I G N I N G S

Booksigning by Russell Johnson

540 S. MENDENHALL (767-8882).

Author discusses and signs Memphis Then and Now. Thurs., Dec. 7, 6 p.m.

WKNO Studio

NOVEL, 387 PERKINS EXT. (922-5526), WWW.NOVELMEMPHIS.COM.

7151 CHERRY FARMS (458-2521).

L E CT U R E / S P E A K E R

C O M E DY

American Marketing Association Memphis December Luncheon

Bartlett Art Association, exhibition by association members. www.wkno.org. Through Dec. 29.

1934 POPLAR (544-6209).

Memphis College of Art

funny standup. PWYC. Sun., Dec. 10, 7-9 p.m.

Midtown Crossing Grill

Weekend Basketball Comedy Tour, tour includes Steamboat Silly to bring an evening of great food and

Nikki Arnell, Associate Professor of Graphic Design at Arkansas State University will present “Global Design Thinking and How the Millennial Mindset is Changing the World.” $25 members,

TO U R S

Christmas in Collierville Home Tour

Four homes, both historic and new along with a circa-1910 cottage, now a U.S. History Library will be featured. Morton Museum will serve as Gift Gazebo and free shuttle to tour homes. $25. Sat., Dec. 9, 10 a.m.-4 p.m. MORTON MUSEUM OF COLLIERVILLE HISTORY, 196 MAIN, COLLIERVILLE (457-2650), WWW.COLLIERVILLECONTEMPORARYCLUB.ORG.

continued on page 29

1930 POPLAR (272-5100).

Metal Museum

“Everyday Objects: The evolution and innovations of Joseph Anderson,” exhibition of works by artist-blacksmith and sculptor highlighting utensils and functional objects. Through April 22, 2018. Master Metalsmith: David Secrest, exhibition by sculptor and blacksmith well known for his incorporation of textures and patterns in forged iron, fabricated steel and bronze sculptures, and furniture. Through Dec. 31. “The Tributaries: Zachery Lechtenberg,” exhibition of enameling techniques applied to jewelry and illustration combined creating brightly colored cartoon style imagery. www.metalmuseum. org. Through Jan. 14, 2018. 374 METAL MUSEUM DR. (774-6380).

Overton Park Gallery

“Visual Poetry: Mundane Made Magical,” exhibition of photography by Jenn Billy Brandt. www. overtonparkgallery.com. Through Dec. 29. 1581 OVERTON PARK (229-2967).

Playhouse on the Square

“Wild in the City: Animals Real and Imagined,” exhibition of assemblages and paintings by Angi Cooper. www.playhouseonthesquare.org. Through Dec. 31. 66 S. COOPER (726-4656).

Ross Gallery

Slavehaven Underground Railroad Museum

“Images of Africa Before & After the Middle Passage,” exhibition of photography by Jeff and Shaakira Edison. Ongoing. 826 N. SECOND (527-3427).

Southside Gallery

“Passages,” exhibition of landscapes by Robert Malone. (662-234-9090), Through Jan. 6, 2018. 150 COURTHOUSE SQUARE, OXFORD, MS (662-234-9090).

St. George’s Episcopal Church

“From Grandma’s Attic to Now,” exhibition of needlework by the Memphis Chapter of the Embroiderer’s Guild of America. www.stgchurch. org. Through Dec. 31. 2425 SOUTH GERMANTOWN (754-7282).

Tops Gallery: Madison Avenue Park

“Man Finds Meteorites in His Yard (This Is Planet Earth),” exhibition of new works by Josef Bull. Through Jan. 12, 2018. 151 MADISON (340-0134).

Trezevant Manor Art Gallery

Artists’ Link Group Exhibition. Through Jan. 4, 2018. 177 N. HIGHLAND (325-4000).

ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT

CHRISTIAN BROTHERS UNIVERSITY, PLOUGH LIBRARY, 650 E. PARKWAY S. (321-3000).

m e m p h i s f l y e r. c o m

“No Way Back,” exhibition of work by senior BFA students at CBU featuring work by Taylor Bing, Christina Chaffin, Luis Martinez, and Samantha Reeves. www.cbu.edu/gallery. Through Dec. 8.

27


December 7-13, 2017

six impressive homes showcasing the best in home building, design and technology.

NOV. 18 Through DEC. 10

six impressive homes showcasing the best in home building, design and technology.

parking available at germantown baptist church 9450 poplar ave, germantown, tn 38139 PRESENTED BY

28

for more information and to purchase tickets visit

vestahomeshow.com


CALENDAR: DECEMBER 7 - 13 continued from page 27 Old Forest Hike

Walking tour of the region’s only urban old-growth forest. Second Saturday of every month, 10 a.m. OVERTON PARK, OFF POPLAR (276-1387).

F E S T IVALS

Burdine Blues and Greens Festival

Featuring live music, bike ride to Dublin, turnip greens cook-off, and more. For more information and schedule of events, visit website. Free-$75. Dec. 8-10. SHACKSDALE MOTEL, 8144 OLD HIGHWAY 49 S (662-6248329), WWW.BBGFESTIVAL.COM/.

Advent Dinner Church

Holiday Heroes Party

Toy Bash

EPIPHANY LUTHERAN CHURCH, 7887 POPLAR (861-6227), WWW.EPIPHANYLU.ORG.

Individuals or businesses can sponsor one or several youth at Youth Villages, Bartlett Campus. Wed., Dec. 13, 1-4 p.m.

Christmas Onesie Party

BARTLETT AREA CHAMBER OF COMMERCE, 2969 ELMORE PARK (372-9457), WWW.BARTLETTCHAMBER.ORG.

PROPCELLAR VINTAGE RENTAL, 2585 SUMMER (278-2947), WWW.BGCM.ORG.

Wednesdays, 5:30 p.m. Through Dec. 20.

Wear your best Christmas onesie and strut your stuff featuring live DJ, $5 Jameson shots, and $3 domestic beers till 11p.m. Glow Co. will be performing during the party. Fri., Dec. 8, 8 p.m. TIN ROOF, 315 BEALE, WWW.TINROOFMEMPHIS.COM.

The Enchanted Forest Festival of Trees

Featuring Festival of Trees, Gingerbread Village, Model Train and Christmas Village, pictures with Santa, and Enchanted Forest Fridays. $6. Through Dec. 31.

Shake-A-Fairytale-Feather

Visit Santa and enjoy of show of Cinderella, The Boy Who Cried Wolf, and other classic stories. Sat., Dec. 9, 11 a.m. CORNELIA CRENSHAW BRANCH LIBRARY, 531 VANCE (5251643), WWW.MBAAFIREHOUSE.ORG.

Starry Nights

$20 per car. Through Dec. 29, 6 p.m. SHELBY FARMS, 500 N. PINE LAKE (767-PARK), WWW. SHELBYFARMSPARK.ORG.

MEMPHIS PINK PALACE MUSEUM, 3050 CENTRAL (6362362), WWW.MEMPHISMUSEUMS.ORG.

Benefiting the Boys & Girls Clubs of Greater Memphis. $100 and toy donation. Fri., Dec. 8, 7-11 p.m.

F I LM

A Wider Angle Movie Series: Glory

A state railroad worker is rewarded for turning in millions in cash he finds on the train tracks over to the police, but his life spirals into a bureaucratic nightmare. In Bulgarian with subtitles. Free. Wed., Dec. 13, 6 p.m. BENJAMIN L. HOOKS CENTRAL LIBRARY, 3030 POPLAR (415-2700), WWW.MEMPHISLIBRARY.ORG.

KIDS

Kimmi and Gabbie Spa Lock-in (Toy Drive)

Children’s spa with a mission to make a difference by encouraging, uplifting, and giving back to children who have been placed in foster care. Free. Sat., Dec. 9, 10 a.m.-1:30 p.m. BENJAMIN L. HOOKS CENTRAL LIBRARY, 3030 POPLAR (901.264.5661).

Peanut Butter & Jammies $8. Fri., Dec. 8, 6:30 p.m.

GERMANTOWN PERFORMING ARTS CENTER, 1801 EXETER (751-7500), WWW.GPACWEB.COM.

“Pictures Tell the Story”

Students can reenact the historic “I Am A Man” photograph as part of MLK50 Campaign. School representatives must call the museum to schedule sessions. Through Dec. 31. ERNEST WITHERS COLLECTION GALLERY & MUSEUM, 333 BEALE (523-2344), WWW.THEWITHERSCOLLECTION.COM.

S P EC IAL EVE N TS

Books for Le Bonheur

For each donor that gives blood or platelets during the designated dates, Lifeblood will donate a book to a Le Bonheur patient. Through Dec. 18.

Served 7-Days a Week • $9.99

Mondays & Tuesdays Get $10 in Promo Cash for each paid breakfast

WWW.LIFEBLOOD.ORG.

David Rogers’ Big Bugs

Representing eight different species, this nationally recognized traveling art exhibit features 10 giant wooden bug sculptures towering up to 18 feet tall. Through Dec. 31.

CASINO PROMOTIONS

MEMPHIS BOTANIC GARDEN, 750 CHERRY (636-4100), WWW.MEMPHISBOTANICGARDEN.COM.

Friday Night Dance Party

Themed outdoor dance parties featuring illuminated dance floor, food vendors on site, and beer and wine available with a valid ID. Free. Fridays, 6-9 p.m.

H O L I DAY EVE N TS

16th Annual Toy Truck Benefiting Porter-Leath

Collects toys for over 5,900 children, 6 weeks-5 years old, served by Porter-Leath’s Preschool program. Bring dolls, puzzles, balls, blocks, and early childhood learning toys. Monetary donations accepted. Wed.-Fri., Dec. 6-8. 8 a.m.-6 p.m. BUD DAVIS CADILLAC, 5433 POPLAR (577-2500), WWW. PORTERLEATH.ORG/TOY-TRUCK-HOME.

16th Annual Toy Truck Benefiting Porter-Leath, WMC-TV

Monetary donations accepted. Sat., Dec. 9, 8 a.m.-4 p.m. WMC-TV, 1960 UNION (577-2500), WWW.PORTERLEATH. ORG/TOY-TRUCK-HOME.

’68 Comeback: Christmas in Memphis

The next chapter in Elvis’ life by taking the viewer on a journey from the King’s enlistment to his return to musical dominance in 1968. Stars two Images of the King World Champion Elvis entertainers, Dwight Icenhower and Ryan Pelton. $49-$89. Sat., Dec. 9, 3-10 p.m. NEW DAISY THEATRE, 330 BEALE (525-8981).

FitzgeraldsTunica.com • 1-662-363-LUCK (5825) • Must be 21 and a Key Rewards member. See Cashier•Players Club for rules. While supplies last. Tax and resort fee not included in listed price. Advance hotel reservations required and subject to availability. $50 credit or debit card is required upon hotel check-in. Arrivals after 6pm must be guaranteed with a credit card. Management reserves the right to cancel, change and modify the event or promotion. Gaming restricted patrons prohibited. Gambling Problem? Call 1-800-522-4700.

ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT

m e m p h i s f l y e r. c o m

MEMPHIS PARK (FOURTH BLUFF), FRONT AND MADISON, WWW.THEFOURTHBLUFF.COM.

29


BOOKS By Corey Mesler

Totally

Matthew Weiner’s cinematic novella, Heather, the Totality.

M Sundays with the Arts at the Schoettle DeltaARTS Presents

Christmas in the Delta

with Wesley Emerson and Friends December 10, 3:00 p.m.

December 7-13, 2017

Glenn P. Schoettle Arts Education Center 301 S. Rhodes, West Memphis Wrap up some Christmas Cheer with an afternoon of musical merriment! Musicians Wesley Emerson (piano), Jeanne Simmons (penny whistle and flute), and Michelle Vigneau (oboe) will be joined by singers Catherine Grace Durbin (soprano) and Daniel Massey (tenor) in a program featuring holiday favorites. Information about and demonstration of instruments (including voices) and a sing-a-long will be featured in the performance. Refreshments will be served. This free series is made possible by a grant from

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atthew Weiner had a hand in creating, as producer and writer, two of modern television’s best series, The Sopranos (1999-2007)and Mad Men (20072015). Both were critical successes and overwhelmingly popular. Both have, since, been recognized as watershed moments in the history of the idiot box. The Sopranos (1999-2007)and Mad Men (2007-2015). Now, after mastering what might be called the long game, Weiner has turned his hand to fiction, with this novella. Checking in at a sparse 138 pages, it portrays a family’s evolution over a period of about fifteen years. That he is successful on the page is testament to his rich imagination and to his ability to do much with few words. The tale is as elliptical — and as unpredictable — as Don Draper’s peripatetic manner. Heather, the Totality, is quiet in its sustained tension and drama, compared to the occasionally outrageous plotlines of both TV series. This move to fiction is similar to the smash success of Noah Hawley’s turn at novel-writing with the thriller, Before the Fall, after he penned the exceptional TV series, Fargo. But Weiner is after something a bit more literary and a bit more daring. He’s moved to Raymond Carver territory, after impersonating Mario Puzo for the small screen. The story begins with the courtship and subsequent marriage of Mark and Karen Breakstone; privileged and attractive, they glisten. Weiner’s ability to sketch an individual with quick, visual strokes is impressive. Soon, a third party is added, the couple’s daughter, the titular Heather. She is born beautiful and magnetic. As a child she brightens the lives of strangers. There is something mystical in the way she draws people to her, as if she were not just lovely but numinous. As she grows up, her intelligence comes to the fore; she is recognized by her teachers for her precocity and ability to debate anyone, peer or adult. Heather is almost preternatural, a real teen angel. Yet, she is still predisposed to teen behavior and attitude. As her hormones come into play, she and her mother

are at loggerheads, while she and her father have ‘dates’ involving coffee and discussions of politics and film. Vis-à-vis her parents, Heather is painfully aware and observant. “She was never disloyal by sharing their behavior, knowing it would be a catastrophic betrayal if the world discovered the Breakstone family wasn’t perfect. … She also knew they were poisoned with some disease of wealth that had turned them into half-people with coffee machines and cash registers where their hearts should be.” Then a second storyline enters. It concerns Bobby, who is everything the Breakstones are not. Born poor, with a junky mother, he is cruel though brilliant, deprived, unloved and incapable of love, and, soon, quite dangerous. His appearance in the narrative is initially baffling — what could he possibly have to do with the Breakstones? — but soon engenders dread, because the reader knows that the two story strands will eventually dovetail and the results will probably not be pretty. Weiner strings this tension out beautifully, giving the reader just enough and then pulling back, letting the story develop like the slow unfolding of a life cycle. Regarding the Nietzschean Bobby, Weiner says, “He was so damn smart that people bored him and he was a bright light among them with all the power in heaven, and he could rape them and kill them anytime he wanted because that’s why they were on earth.” Told in short, visual vignettes, there’s no way to get around calling this book cinematic. Essentially, Heather, the Totality becomes a four-person play. But Weiner’s razorsharp observations and his instinct for how to build suspense make this an enjoyable, fast-paced and edgy novella. It works because the author understands that patience and brevity can succeed like pointillism. He builds his story, dot by dot, shard by shard. In the spaces between vignettes, there is a shadow, something subterranean and malevolent. It keeps the pages turning. And the denouement to this compact, tightly controlled, dark excursion is both surprising and satisfying, maybe even transcendent.


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FOOD By Susan Ellis

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Michelle McLaurin knows she can be a bummer. She has a habit of judging coworkers’ and friends’ eating habits. But, she has their best interests at heart. She wants them to be healthy. McLaurin is a personal trainer. She recently launched her food truck Health Nut Food Truck. “The biggest part of it,” says McLaurin of being healthy, “is the food.” She says she is using her truck to raise awareness. “People can eat off a food truck, and it could be healthy. It doesn’t have to be bland.” McLaurin says a friend turned her on to a food truck for sale. “It was a big investment. I couldn’t pass it up.” She offers what she calls “nutritional and traditional.” So she may have both a beef and turkey burger on the menu and regular fries and sweet potato fries. The turkey burger and sweet potato fries work as sort of a lure to the healthier side. She also notes that 100 percent adherence to a healthy diet is a non-starter. Folks just won’t stick to it if they’re feeling deprived. She aligns with the 80/20 idea — 80 percent healthy, 20 percent whatever you want. Other offerings include omelets, wraps,

and salads. As the season changes, she’s offering more soups and chilis. McLaurin says, she’s still figuring out this food truck business. She’s been pulling up at Terminix, where she works, and at L.A. Fitness, where she also works. She’s looking for other opportunities and says she’s done pretty well so far. Ultimately, she would like to take the truck full time. “It’s more than a truck to me,” she says. McLaurin says she’s battling two mindsets: Eating healthy is expensive, and it tastes nasty. She wants the chance to change your mind. “The food speaks for itself,” she says. Adam Weeks is a judge in Arkansas. His side hustle is his gig as a farmer with Powhatan Farms. His side side hustle is the new SingBean.com, a farmers market delivery service. Weeks says he knows of no other service like SingBean. Unlike a CSA, you can pick and choose what you want and how much you want from a variety of farmers. That means if you want a small thing of tomatoes, so be it. Customers can pick up their orders at Trolley Stop from 3 to 8 p.m. Tuesdays, or have their order delivered by Meals in Motion for a $6.99 fee. Weeks says he sought out local farmers market superstars. Among SingBean’s vendors are Bonnie Blue Farms, which sells goat cheese, Dave’s Bagels, and Whitton Farms. Sing Bean recently launched its mealkit service. Among the offerings are herbs ($2.39); sweet potatoes ($3.99); mushrooms ($5.38); cheeses from Bonnie Blue Farm ($6.75-$8.75); Braggadocio’s rices, grits, and popcorn ($3.75-$5.99); eggs ($5.99); bratwurst ($7.53); bacon ($10.73); and pork chops ($12.29). As for the name SingBean, Weeks says that he liked how it sounded like “string bean” and “singing” and, at the same time, sounds like a doorbell ringing. “That’s all,” he says.

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hristina Bognet was an MIT grad working long hours in a consulting job. She found she was too busy to cook or do meal planning. In two years, she had gained 50 pounds. The experience led her to start, in 2013, PlateJoy, an online meal-planning service aimed at the time-pressed consumer with jobs and families looking to improve their diets. Customers go to the platejoy.com website and fill out info on 50 data points — tastes, lifestyle, preferences, time constraints, active time, etc. And then PlateJoy crafts a super-specific meal plan, so they can figure out something for a vegan who doesn’t like tofu and wants a cleanse option. The idea, says Nicole Villeneuve, PlateJoy’s director of partnerships, is to create a solution to those puzzling over how to eat healthy. For the Memphis launch in November they added a grocery-shopping option, so it really couldn’t be easier, says Villeneuve. Membership is $69 per month, $79 per year. With grocery delivery, it’s the same plus cost of groceries and a $7 delivery fee. Villeneuve calls PlateJoy “everyday cooking,” something to use on a weeknight.


S P I R ITS By Andria Lisle

I

haven’t had a drop of alcohol in a week. I have pneumonia, and my nightly toddy has been replaced with steroids, antibiotics, and endless rounds of cough syrup. I’m still thinking about booze, though — when I can keep my eyes open, I’ve been using my strictly enforced downtime to complete my holiday shopping. In some cases, that means making shopping lists of items like a traditional bottle of Kahlua for a friend, or the de rigueur locally-brewed growlers that I export personally from Memphis to my brother in rural Georgia. In other cases, that means searching virtual store shelves for something that looks truly unique. If you’re a film buff like me, you’ll love the labels used by the vineyard Killibinbin, located halfway around the world in Langhorne Creek, South Australia. A few of the bigger liquor stores in town stock Killibinbin Sneaky Shiraz, which was bottled in 2013. The wine inside the bottle tastes fruity and crisp, while the bottle label features a very noir drawing of a dame in a trench coat on the label. Priced at under $15 a bottle, I’d pair it with a Blu-ray of a Hitchcock flick, or a copy of John Huston’s 1941 masterpiece The Maltese Falcon. Granted, Sam Spade is more of a whiskey drinker, but the Sneaky Shiraz is still a classy gift. Along the same lines, a case of Francis Ford Coppola’s Director’s Cut — either a Chardonnay or a Zinfandel — would make a great gift alongside a box set of The Godfather. “I like to drink wine more than I used to,” Vito Corleone sagely noted to his son, Michael, in Coppola’s sprawling Mafioso epic. Your lucky recipient can make it through all 539 minutes of the organized crime saga and have a few bottles left over. Shopping for a world traveler? The black-and-white vineyard maps that grace the bottles of Portuguese imports from Churchill’s Estates are so elegant

that these bottles don’t need wrapping. Churchill’s Estates Douro 2012, a peppery red wine, can be procured locally for under $20 per bottle. Globe trotters might also appreciate a bottle of Boarding Pass, a Spanish Shiraz by R Wines that comes emblazoned with a fun, but no-nonsense blue-and-white label. I’ve found it on local shelves for just under $20. Graphic design lovers should seek out the popular Willamette Valley, Oregon, vineyard Mouton Noir. The winery has a great-looking — and tasting — line of reds and whites from the mid-2010s that run between $16 and $42 per bottle. Look for their O.P.P. — Other People’s Pinot, an earthy and spicy Pinot Noir with a simple white label slapped on the bottle. It retails for $21, while the winery’s Mouton Noir Lieu-dit 2013, which bears a charming, if crudely-rendered, black sheep on the label, sells for $25. Stroll down any good shop’s aisles, and you’ll see it all, including bottles bearing blooms, bicycles, birds, and time bombs. Be aware that purchasing a wine by label alone can backfire on you — sometimes the product inside tastes underwhelming in comparison to the kitschy artwork on the outside of the bottle. For under $15, it’s worth the experiment. For much more, I recommend deferring to store personnel, who generally excel on solid recommendations at all price points. In some cases, I’m eschewing labels altogether: For a group of girlfriends, I’ve purchased Memphis-centric “We Grind Here” foam sleeves from a local purveyor. As soon as I’m well enough to resume my shopping in person, I’ll purchase cans of wine (Underwood, at $7/can) to slip inside each koozie. The Grizzlies might not be doing well, but these will make great stocking stuffers, and they’re perfect for popping into your purse for an outdoor hang-out. Don’t tell Santa, or my doctor, but I went ahead and bought a koozie for myself, too.

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FILM REVIEW By Chris McCoy

Impostor Syndrome James Franco enters The Room in The Disaster Artist.

H

December 7-13, 2017

ave you ever been at your job, or at school, or on the playing field, and felt like you’re faking it? It doesn’t matter if you’re actually good at something. All of your successes have been sheer dumb luck. One day, you’re going to be exposed as a fraud in front of all these people. If these thoughts have ever crossed your mind, you’re not alone. It’s a full-blown psychological phenomenon called impostor syndrome. In the words of Wikipedia, “Despite external evidence of their competence, those exhibiting the syndrome remain convinced that they are frauds and do not deserve the success they have achieved.” The doctors who discovered impostor syndrome in the 1970s first identified it in highly successful women, but later studies found that 70 percent of the population had felt like that at one time or another. But the case of Tommy Wiseau raises the question: Is it still impostor syndrome if you actually are an impostor who is bad at their job? Wiseau is the writer, director, and producer of The Room, the 21st century’s leading contender in the race for the Worst Film Ever. Even in Hollywood, a place

34

where strange things roam, Wiseau is a weirdo. First of all, he wears a lot of belts. Not different belts at different times, but rather, many belts, all at once. He claims to be from New Orleans, but his accent is clearly Eastern European. No one knows how old he is — which, come to think of it, is really not that uncommon in Hollywood. And nobody knows where he got the enormous pile of money he used to make The Room. But one thing is certain — he didn’t have the faintest idea how to make a movie. If you’ve never seen it before, The Room is kind of indescribable. Imagine a movie about love and betrayal made by an alien who has only the roughest idea of what humans look like and how they behave. In a recurring scene that epitomizes the whole thing, Wiseau and his friends Mark and Denny throw around a football while having vague conversations. At no point do you get the impression that any of them know what a football is for, or have ever seen a football game before, or even understand what kind of emotions a person throwing a football in the park with his friends would likely experience. And yet, in the decade since it was released, The

Dave (left) and James Franco make movie magic with their film about the making of The Room. Room has found a large and enthusiastic audience among people who love bad film. There’s something endearing about the film’s hardscrabble ineptitude that you don’t get from $100 million debacles like Dracula Untold. Among the cult of The Room was James Franco, who was compelled to adapt The Disaster Artist, a memoir by Greg Sestero, who played Mark in the original production. In a deeply nested irony, the movie about the making of the worst movie ever made is actually really good. Screenwriters Scott Neustadter and Michael Weber take inspiration from Ed Wood for the well-paced script, which wrings laughs from the increasingly ridiculous situations that arise during production without stooping to open mockery. Dave Franco, the director’s brother, stars as Greg Sestero, a blandly handsome, marginally talented guy who meets Wiseau in a San Francisco acting class and soon finds himself moving to L.A. to pur-


FILM REVIEW By Chris McCoy sue stardom with the long-haired mystery man. Then, after years of frustration and an impeccably staged run-in with actual producer Judd Apatow, Wiseau has had it with the audition treadmill and proclaims, “Hollywood reject us! We do eet on our own!” It’s the familiar rallying cry of the indie filmmaker, even if delivered in a funny accent. James Franco, the comedic leading man who directs William Faulkner adaptations in his spare time, surely knows that feeling. He and his co-conspirator Seth Rogen, who plays The Room’s beleaguered script supervisor, have been an insurgent force in mainstream filmmaking for a decade now. You don’t make The Interview without getting a few doors slammed in your face. Some actors would just get the weird tics down and ham it up, but Franco’s portrayal of Tommy Wiseau is a

living portrait of impostor syndrome. You cringe with every inappropriate gesture, idiotic utterance, and awful decision, while also feeling a flash of recognition of all the times you’ve faked it and gotten away with it. The Disaster Artist seems like it started as an excuse for Franco and Rogen’s crew of Hollywood stoner buddies to recreate their favorite hilariously bad scenes from The Room, but when Wiseau cries in the lobby at his labor of love’s disastrous premiere, the audience sniffles along. By directing and acting in a movie about a bad actor/director, Franco the movie star made himself vulnerable — and created the best film of his career.

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EMPLOYMENT • REAL ESTATE Legal notices

Employment

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983 JUNE ROAD #6 Great E. Memphis 2 BR, 1.5 BTH, 2nd flr. rental in gated Poplar East Apartments 1Min from Starbucks & I-240. Pool & Clubroom incld. $1013/mo. Utils incld. Call 508-0639

LUXURY MIDTOWN APT 1703 Locket Place: 3BR/2BA, full kitchen, all hardwood floors, secured parking, 2 fireplaces, 2 large balconies. Over 2000 sq ft. Centrally located. $1250/mo. 901.859.1725

MIDTOWN HOMEs for Rent

Midtown APTS

BEST APARTMENT DEAL on the Square! Newly Renovated Village Square Apartments. $650 2024 Jefferson Ave. Ask Sarah about our Fall Move-In Special! 808-0144 Ext 102 or email ssolarez@meridianpac.com EVERGREEN DISTRICT/ SQUARE 1BR $495 or XLG 1BR $650, W/D, remodeled, porch, pet friendly. $25 credit ck fee. 452-3945 OVERTON SQUARE Walk to all events, Great 2BR/1BA on Diana St. New full size W/D, CH/A, walk in closet. Beautiful! $975/mo. +dep. Also Midtown 1BR staring at $625. Kevin @ 901-482-4262

FOR RENT •1655 Parktown Place; 2BR/1.5BA $1,095 •1291 Goodbar #3; 2BR/1BA, NEWLY Reno. $850 •1301 Goodbar #7 2BR/1BA $795 •1177 Linden #1 1BR/1BA $450 •302 Waldren #1 2BR/2BA $649 •302 Waldren #4 2BR/1BA $649 Call today 901-842-0805

Shared Housing MIDTOWN ROOMS FOR RENT Central Heat/Air, utls included, furnished. 901.650.4400 _____________________ RARE VACANCY! Midtown room for rent near medical district. Very safe, private entrance. Very large. Fully furnished. Wifi. $120/wk + dep. Utilities included. 901-725-3892. _____________________ NICE ROOMS FOR RENT S. Pkwy & Wilson. Utilities and Cable included. Fridge in your room. Cooking and free laundry privileges. Some locations w/sec. sys. Starting at $435/mo. + dep. 901.922.9089

Services PERSONAL ASSISTANT w/15yrs. exp. looks to help you with shopping, Dr.’s visits, errands, etc. 7a.m.-1p.m. 901-494-0340 Reliable, honest. $25/hr. One hour minimum.

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Musician’s Exchange BAND PRACTICE SPACE Recording studio space available: 480 square feet with separate production room. 1st floor. Easy in/out. Sound proof. Heat/Air/Utilities/Wifi included. $480/mo. Marshall Arts, 639 Marshall Ave., 901-679-6837.

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THE LAST WORD by Randy Haspel

Show and Tell

m e m p h i s f l y e r. c o m

It’s a given that men are dogs and pigs, but, my God, the description of Harvey Weinstein’s conduct was shocking to me — then I talked to my wife. In my naivete, I never realized this ugly conduct happens all the time. Melody was and is an attractive woman, which means that since she was 16, practically every man she’s ever known has hit on her, including a cop and a former teacher. She’s seen it all — flashers, gropers, masturbaters, heavy breathers, and aggressive advances from acquaintances and co-workers both young and old. And her female friends said these encounters are common with them, as well. Everyone had a tale to tell. Some of Melody’s stories were too harrowing to repeat. Fortunately, she escaped these incidences unharmed. The 30 women who accused Weinstein of sexual abuse over 20 years weren’t so lucky. Weinstein’s victims include a Who’s Who of Hollywood actresses — Gwyneth Paltrow, Ashley Judd, Angelina Jolie — and Rose McGowan, who refused a $1 million hush-money offer and called out Hollywood talent agencies as being “guilty of human trafficking.” It only took one brave woman telling her story to The New York Times to open Pandora’s Box, so to speak. Harvey Weinstein initially denied engaging in nonconsensual sex, but his unspeakable behavior was common knowlWeinstein edge at Miramax, the company he founded. Weinstein has reached seven settlements with other victims. Weinstein’s predatory conduct was appalling because it was so disgusting. He invited women to his quarters and reappeared in a bathrobe, exposing himself. Ashley Judd was asked to watch him shower. Other unassuming targets were told that watching him masturbate would help their careers. Weinstein has been accused of giving alcohol to a minor, rape, and assault. The bloated, bearded swine blamed his behavior on coming of age in the 1960s, when the rules were different. No they weren’t. Only in Hollywood could a dirtbag feel so entitled and powerful that women would surrender to his nascent charm. He had the power to make or break an actress’ career, and if rebuffed, he would go out of his way to punish them. After the Weinstein allegations, 59 more men in politics and entertainment have been accused of abhorrent sexual behavior, and the list is growing every day. For 20 years, viewers spent their mornings with Matt Lauer. After learning that he had a button under his desk to lock women in his office and pull the old Harvey Weinstein bathrobe routine, I feel duped. It’s like if Dick Van Dyke were arrested in a child pornography sting. Same goes for Charlie Rose, fired by CBS, PBS, and Bloomberg for making lewd phone calls and incidences of groping. Thoughtful and soft-spoken political analyst Mark Halperin, co-author of Game Change, masturbated behind his desk while meeting with a female colleague. The hot comic Louis C.K., writer and director of the classic movie Pootie Tang, did bits about masturbation in his stand-up act. Now we know he wasn’t kidding. Accused of exposing himself and asking women to watch him masturbate, his upcoming comedy special and a new movie release have been cancelled. The list goes on: Kevin Spacey, Jeffrey Tambor, Dustin Hoffman, Garrison Keillor (!) for God’s sake. Bill O’Reilly paid out $13 million to five women. Former Fox News host Gretchen Carlson successfully sued Fox Chairman and CEO Roger Ailes for $20 million for “unwanted sexual advances.” Ailes took the easy way out and died earlier this year. Of course, there’s accused child predator and our probable new Senator from Alabama, Roy Moore, cruising teen hangouts to make new friends. He claims all of his accusers are lying. We have obviously reached a tipping point in male-female relationships. The old dinosaurs are going down, and the push is finally on for women to be believed. But must we blindly believe all women? Case in point is Senator Al Franken and his accuser, radio personality Leeann Tweeden. On a 2006 USO tour in Afghanistan, when Franken was still a comedian, Tweeden said Franken forcibly kissed and groped her. She later wrote Franken, “grabbed my breasts while I was sleeping and had someone take a photo of you doing it, knowing I would see it later and be ashamed.” Franken immediately apologized and called for an ethics investigation on himself, which was smart, because it could force Tweeden to testify under oath. The photo mentioned was childish and sophomoric but contradicts Tweeden’s account. She is asleep in a cargo plane wearing a flack jacket while Franken’s hands are hovering over her chest while he smiles for the camera — obviously a joke — a stupid one, but a joke just the same. Tweeden was a regular on Sean Hannity’s nightly propaganda broadcast, and a Trump supporter. Sounds like a hit job to me, yet some are demanding his resignation. Which brings us to the most blatantly hypocritical pot-and-kettle dilemma. Over the past two decades, taxpayers have paid $17 million for hush money and to settle Congressional sexual harassment charges for 264 Congressional staffers and other legislative employees. One other question remains: When is Donald Trump going to sue those 20 women who accused him of predatory sexual behavior, like he promised? Randy Haspel writes the “Recycled Hippies” blog.

THE LAST WORD

DENIS MAKARENKO | DREAMSTIME

Fifty-nine men — and counting — have been accused of predatory sexual behavior in recent weeks.

39


MINGLEWOOD HALL CELEBRATING 75 YEARS ON SALE THIS FRIDAY:

Thu March 29 - Ty Dolla $ign Sun May 13 - Jimmy Eat World UPCOMING:

Tue Dec 5 - Daisyland w/ Snails Fri Dec 8 - Downtown LIVE! w/ Alex Bugnon and Julian Vaughn Mon Dec 11 - Kamasi Washington w/ Moonchild Sat Dec 16 - Daisyland w/ Figure and Midnight Tyrannosaurus Fri Dec 22 - The Prince Experience Sun Dec 31 - Daisyland NYE Blackout w/ BT Sun Jan 14 - The Wailers Fri Jan 19 - Greensky Bluegrass Sat Jan 20 - The Eric Gales Band: The Resurrection Reunion Tue Jan 23 - Daisyland XL w/ Datsik, Space Jesus, Riot Ten, Wooli Thu Feb 1 - August Burns Red w/ Born of Osiris, Erra, Ocean Grove Tue Feb 6 - Y&T Tue Feb 13 - Daisyland w/ Excision: The Paradox 2018 Tue Feb 20 - AJR Thu Mar 1 - George Clinton & Parliament Funkadelic Fri Mar 2 - The SteelDrivers Sat Mar 3 - Beth Hart Wed April 4 - Big Krit Thu April 5 - Dweezil Zappa NEW DAISY THEATRE | 330 Beale St Memphis 901.525.8981 • Advance Tickets available at NewDaisy.com and Box Office

MURPHY’S Pool Table • Darts • WI-FI • Digital Jukebox Visit our website for live music listings or check the AfterDark section of this Memphis Flyer KITCHEN OPEN LATE, OPEN FOR LUNCH! 1589 Madison • 726-4193 www.murphysmemphis.com

YOUNGAVENUEDELI.COM 2119 Young Ave • 278-0034

12/6: $3 Pint Night! 12/7: Memphis Trivia League! 12/7: Blackstone Brewery Debut 12/19: Ballast Point Victory at Sea Celebration 12/22: Ghost Town Blues Band 12/30: UFC 219 Chris Cyborg vs. Holly Holm 12/31: NEW YEAR”S EVE w/ Spaceface Kitchen Open Late! Now Delivering All Day! 278-0034 (limited delivery area)

MEMPHIS MADE BREWING Taproom hours:

Mon 4 - 7 p.m., Thurs & Fri 4 - 10 p.m., Sat 1 - 10 p.m., Sun 1 - 7 p.m.

768 S. Cooper • 901.207.5343 FREE BREWERY TOURS 4 P.M. SATURDAY & SUNDAY

GONER RECORDS New/ Used LPs, 45s & CDs. We Buy Records! 2152 Young Ave 901-722-0095

I Buy Old Windup Phonographs & Records

Esp. on labels: Gennett, Paramount, Vocalion, QRS, Superior, Supertone, Champion, OKeh, Perfect, Romeo, Sun, Meteor, Flip; many others. Also large quantities of older 45’s. Paul. 901-435-6668

HIGHLAND STRIP 555 S HIGHLAND 901 452 4731

CORDOVA

MIDTOWN

981 N GERMANTOWN PKWY 2027 MADISON AVE 901 590 0048 901 654 3678

12/15: NXT Live! 12/16: Lucero Family Christmas w/ Cedric Burnside 12/22: 21 Savage W/ NBAYoungBoy 1/20: V3Fights 3/3: Wild N’ Memphis 3/15: SuicideGirls Blackheart Burlesque 4/18: Nightwish

1884 LOUNGE

12/1: Julien Baker – SOLD OUT 12/8: Pokey LaFarge w/ The Easy Leaves 12/26: Christmas w/ the Grateful Dead – Memphis Tributes 12/30: Roots Of A Rebellion w/ CCDE

MORE EVENTS AT MINGLEWOODHALL.COM

GROWLERS 1911 Poplar | 901growlers.com 12/15- 68’ & Whores. 12/27- Eyehategod 12/31- The Schwag

Coco & Lola’s MidTown Lingerie

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2027 Madison Ave 901 590 0048 whatevershops.com

Join our texting club and get 15% off your next purchase! Text WHATEVER to 51660 . Message & data rates may apply* whatevershops.com

JESSE & THE TWO SHOTS OF TEQUILA BAND Five Piece Band available for weddings, corporate events, parties etc... in Memphis and Nashville. Song list on website. More information including song lists and booking information at www.rick.business or call 407.608.8015. Calendar will fill up fast so act now. Special discounts for veterans.

TUT-UNCOMMON ANTIQUES 421 N. Watkins St. 278-8965 1500 sq. ft. of Vintage & Antique Jewelry. Retro Furniture and Accessories. Original Paintings, Sculpture, Pottery, Art & Antiques. We are the only store in the Mid-South that replaces stones in costume jewelry.

BOOK REPAIR

Have an old book or bible that needs repair? Call Art, Friends of the Library at 901.483.0478.

12/8 - Blackwater, 8p 12/9 - Alvin Youngblood Hart, 8p 12/15 - Mark Edgar Stuart, 8p 12/20 - Live Band Karaoke w/Public Record, 7p 12/23 - Snowglobe, 8p 12/29 - Graham Winchester & The Ammunition, 8p 12/30 - Juke Joint Duo w/Cedric Burnside & Lightenin’ Malcolm, 8p 12/31 - Mark Edgar Stuart Quartet + Star & Micey, 8p 12/15 - Mark Edgar Stuart, 8p Saturday 12/23 - Snowglobe, 8p

CHIP N’ DALE’S ANTIQUES 3457 Summer Avenue • Memphis, TN 38122 EVERYTHING ON SALE! Open Tues-Sat | 901-452-5620 “Celebrating 30 years in Business”

PRESSURE WASHING Patios, Siding, Decks, Sidewalks, Driveways, Fences ans More!

Call or text Steve 901-277-2442

ACOUSTIC SUNDAY LIVE! THREE WOMEN AND THE TRUTH

MEMPHIS ARTS COLLECTIVE HOLIDAY ARTIST MARKET

featuring: Gretchen Peters, Kathy Mattea and Mary Gauthier with very special guest Grammy® Lifetime Achievement Recipient TOM PAXTON, with the Don Juans. Sun, Dec. 17, 2017 - 7pm (doors open at 6:15). Halloran Centre for Performing Arts 225 S. Main St. Memphis, TN 38103

Nov. 24-Dec. 24 • 1501 Union Ave. (near Kimbrough Towers).

Tickets visit orpheum-memphis.com or call 901.525.3000.

Annual Solstice Party, Sat. Dec. 16 from 6-9 pm, music by the Sidestreet Steppers. Store Hours: Mon-Sat 10:30-6:30; Fri til 7:00, Sun 12-5. 901-833-9533 www.memphisartscollective.com

Memphis Flyer 12.7.17  

This week: The Big Jump! Memphis has several initiatives underway designed to make cycling a way of life here. Also: our review of The Disas...

Memphis Flyer 12.7.17  

This week: The Big Jump! Memphis has several initiatives underway designed to make cycling a way of life here. Also: our review of The Disas...