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FRESH STORIES DAILY AT MEMPHISFLYER.COM BLUFF CITY TOFFEE P26 • BETWEEN THE WORLD AND ME P27 • REMEMBERING TOMMY PACELLO P31

OUR 1657TH ISSUE • 11.26.20

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GREG CRAVENS

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CONTENTS

BRUCE VANWYNGARDEN Editor SHARA CLARK Managing Editor JACKSON BAKER Senior Editor TOBY SELLS Associate Editor CHRIS MCCOY Film and TV Editor ALEX GREENE Music Editor MICHAEL DONAHUE JON W. SPARKS Staff Writers JESSE DAVIS Copy Editor, Staff Writer JULIE RAY Calendar Editor MATTHEW J. HARRIS Editorial Assistant LORNA FIELD, RANDY HASPEL, RICHARD MURFF, FRANK MURTAUGH, MEGHAN STUTHARD Contributing Columnists AIMEE STIEGEMEYER, SHARON BROWN Grizzlies Reporters ANDREA FENISE Fashion Editor KENNETH NEILL Founding Publisher

OUR 1657TH ISSUE 11.26.20 The big, bald, white guy standing in line at Midtown Home Depot is laughing loudly, sharing a joke with a couple of co-workers, or maybe employees. They look Hispanic and they are wearing masks, so I can’t tell if they’re laughing. In fact, everyone within eyesight in Home Depot is wearing a mask except the big, loud guy. Maybe he’s one of the DeSoto County Sheriff ’s Department deputies who don’t wear masks because, as their boss says, “they’re risk-takers.” Yeah, that’s probably it. The guy in Home Depot is a risk-taker, a macho dude who needs to let everyone know that he don’t need no stinking mask, ’cause he ain’t skeered of the ’rona. What can you do when you encounter selfish idiots like that? Not much, except stay away, move to another line, let him check out before moving forward. You can’t expect Home Depot workers to put their own health and safety at risk confronting someone who is probably hoping someone confronts him, so he can proclaim masks don’t help and they infringe on his freedom and what are you gonna do about it, punk? There were some similar sentiments vociferously offered at Monday’s Shelby County Commission meeting, mostly coming from folks in the restaurant community, which has arguably suffered more damage from the pandemic than almost any other business sector. One Germantown restaurant owner proclaimed that in regards to actual deaths from COVID, “There are no hard numbers showing anything.” I know of 260,000 dead Americans who might differ with that assessment. And the numbers showing that masks, social distancing, and other health measures save lives are very hard, and undeniable. But I get it: COVID is not just killing individuals; it’s killing jobs and businesses; it’s getting people evicted; it’s putting millions of Americans in food lines and on unemployment rolls. The entire economy is devastated. Movie theaters, music venues, bars, brick-and-mortar retail stores, and yes, restaurants are dying every day. In Memphis this week we learned that two of our cultural icons are in trouble: The P&H Cafe (The Beer Joint of Your Dreams) and Earnestine & Hazel’s (Home of the Soul Burger) are both precariously near extinction. Here’s the deal, as President-elect Joe Biden might say: Health regulations aren’t what’s killing businesses. That’s like blaming seat belts for car accidents. COVID is killing businesses. And nothing gets better until we get this pandemic under control. And it doesn’t get under control until we have a coordinated national strategy to flatten the curve all over the country, one that gets masks on as many sentient beings as will wear them, that gets adequate amounts of PPE and other vital supplies to hospitals and healthcare workers, and that ramps up a strategy to deliver vaccines and cutting-edge remediation meds to those who need them most. And yes, one that will probably require continued social distancing in certain indoor spaces. The U.S. is like a tornado-ravaged village. The damage is everywhere. Except maybe on certain golf courses. It’s time to begin to start the recovery process. We need a domestic Marshall Plan, including a comprehensive COVID relief package that puts real money in the hands of struggling business owners and real Americans — and soon. And we need to accept reality. A few shell-shocked Republicans are climbing out of their bunkers and finally, sorta, kinda saying maybe we ought to possibly consider — I mean, just spitballing here — that Joe Biden may have, you know, theoretically speaking, won the presidency … Pleasedon’thurtmeMr.Trump! This is what passes for political courage in the GOP these days. Lord knows they don’t want to rush to judgment and contradict the very plausible theory that millions of votes in several states were changed by a sneaky voting-machine program created by Venezuelan President Hugo Chavez (who died in 2013!) and used by Democrats and certain RINOs to steal the election from Fearless Leader. This evil cabal was so fiendishly clever that its conspirators decided to allow Senator Mitch McConnell to be re-elected, as well as pushing several N E WS & O P I N I O N toss-up Senate and House races to the THE FLY-BY - 4 Republicans. NY TIMES CROSSWORD - 6 This is pretty much the actual theory POLITICS - 8 being pushed by the president’s crack FINANCIAL FEATURE - 9 legal team of Slapdash, Dipshit, and COVER STORY RunnyDye, because it makes perfect “GIVE MEMPHIS!” sense in the Bizarro World of QAnon, BY FLYER STAFF - 10 SPORTS - 15 OAN, Breitbart, Newsmax, and Parler. HOLIDAY GIFT GUIDE - 17 So yeah, it’s been a fun four years, WE RECOMMEND - 18 America. But damn, it’s time to move MUSIC - 20 on, time to take the bowl of nuts off CALENDAR - 22 the coffee table, time to say enough to FOOD - 26 the “risk-takers.” There’s a real mess to TV - 27 clean up. C L AS S I F I E D S - 28 Bruce VanWyngarden LAST WORD - 31 brucev@memphisflyer.com

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THE

fly-by

MEMernet A roundup of Memphis on the World Wide Web. HARVEY & MAH O GANY Comedian/game show host/radio show host Steve Harvey hyped a Memphis restaurant Monday on his radio show, The Steve Harvey Morning Show. According to those on the Where Black Memphis Eats Facebook group, Harvey and his wife were seen this weekend eating at Mahogany Memphis, the upscale Southern restaurant in Chickasaw Oaks Village. He bragged on the restaurant on the show and mentioned it was Black-owned. JA M E ETS JA A Grizzly met a giraffe last week when Ja Morant met Ja Raffe, the Memphis Zoo’s new baby giraffe named for Morant. The two met Friday and made some MEMernet gold.

November 26-December 2, 2020

POSTED TO TWITTER BY @MEMGRIZZ

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In his own Twitter video of the meet-up, Morant said, “If I ever did a dunk contest, I’m taking my son [Ja Raffe] with me. I’m going to jump over him.” Morant’s zoo visit also included visits to other animals. He fed Rhatu, the Sumatran tiger, by flinging a Flintstones-sized drumstick into the enclosure. He had to clear the moat, though. He did. He shot. He scored.

POSTED TO TWITTER BY THE MEMPHIS ZOO

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Questions, Answers + Attitude Edited by Toby Sells

W E E K T H AT W A S By Flyer staff

A Plea, Masks, & a Breakthrough ‘We know you’re tired,’ requirements at restaurants and gyms, and big virus news. WE E K LY VI R US C O U NTS The fall surge of new virus cases continued last week as the seven-day rolling average peaked higher at nearly 400. Total cases surpassed 45,000 and total deaths here rose to 630. Monday: new - 686, total 42,806, total deaths - 613 Tuesday: new - 835, total 43,641, total deaths - 613 Wednesday: new - 192, total 43,833, total deaths - 617 Thursday: new - 389, total 44,222, total deaths - 624 Friday: new - 252, total 44,474, total deaths - 626 Saturday: new - 185, total 44,659, total deaths - 630 Sunday: new - 509, total 45,168, total deaths - 630 As of Monday morning, 4,125 people were known to have the virus in Shelby County.

Clockwise from top left: Reseachers at St. Jude make COVID breakthrough, the Memphis Zoo welcomes Ja Raffe, wear a mask, and a Kresge grant

H OS P ITALS U R G E CAUTI O N Leaders of the area’s four largest hospital systems warned of future business closings and clogged healthcare facilities if COVID-19 cases “slip far out of our control.” They urged citizens to recommit to personal health precautions in a joint statement issued last week. “We know you’re tired,” reads the statement. “But we cannot give up.” JA AN D JA A reticulated giraffe was born at the Memphis Zoo last week. In a total Memphis move, he was named to celebrate a Memphis basketball player. Ja Raffe was born last week to parents Niklas and Angela Kate. Zoo officials named the giraffe calf to celebrate Ja Morant’s winning the NBA’s rookieof-the-year award. C OVI D -19 B R EAKTH R O U G H AT ST. J U D E Researchers at St. Jude Children’s Research Hospital may have figured out how the pandemic virus kills and how to stop it. Lab research at the hospital has given St. Jude immunologists a better understanding of the pathways and mechanisms that drive COVID-19 inflammation, lung damage, and organ failure. This research can lead to effective treatment strategies possibly using existing drugs, according to the hospital. The research team included scientists from Memphis-based University of Tennessee Health Science Center.

C OVI D -19 R ESTR I CTI O N S New restrictions on Shelby County businesses came last week as virus cases here continue to surge. The latest directive from the Shelby County Health Department limits capacity at bars and restaurants to 50 percent and closes them at 10 p.m. Patrons are required to wear a mask at all times “except when actually eating a bite of food or drinking a beverage.” Dining groups are limited to six people but no more than four adults. Gym-goers are now mandated to wear a mask at all times, except in pools or showers. Schools were encouraged to stop close-contact sports. K R ES G E G R ANT AI D S S O C IAL J USTI C E The Kresge Foundation announced a $30 million suite of grants for grassroots racial and economic justice organizations in Memphis, as well as in Detroit, New Orleans, and Fresno, California. The $1.9 million designated for local recipients will go to Latino Memphis, the Community Foundation of Greater Memphis (Power of Place Fund), FSG (supporting the formation of a community collaborative to accelerate economic inclusion and mobility in conjunction with the Power of Place Fund), Memphis Interfaith Coalition for Action and Hope (MICAH), My Sistah’s House, Refugee Empowerment Program, and River City Capital. Visit the News Blog at memphisflyer.com for fuller versions of these stories and more local news.


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ACROSS 1 Home to Queen Sonja 5 Feather’s partner 8 Short fly ball 13 “Well done!” 14 Part of a house that projects 15 “___ a Grand Old Flag” 16 Campus area for amorous students? 18 Common spreadsheet program 19 Barely got 20 Reporter’s non-W query 22 Plot turner 23 S.E.C. school near Atlanta, for short 24 Manages 26 Flutterer around Orange County and L.A.? 32 Holed, as a putt 33 Rent out

34 Where Seoul and Pyongyang are 35 Groan-worthy remark, say 36 Unable to see … or, when taken as a homophone, what today’s puzzle answers and clues all are 39 Rock concert need 40 Lagoon surrounder 42 Beverage that may be labeled “XXX” 43 Layers of dark green eggs 44 Put-down to someone from Manhattan or the Bronx? 48 Horse genus 49 Spun trap 50 Cause of Cleopatra’s death 53 Large coffee vessel 54 Judge’s voluntary removal from a case

ACROSS

Insultsby Will Shortz Crossword OfficialEdited

58 James who wrote “Ulysses” 60 Marathons, way back when? 62 Edge of a green 63 Dear, as a memory 64 German pop star who once had a #2 song 65 Butler who frequented Tara 66 Game that has Draw Two and Reverse cards 67 “On the double!”

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26 Classic game now sometimes 1 Australia’s national played with gemstone “lasers” 5 “___ Surfin’” 27 Faux money (2008 rap song) 33 Wolf Blitzer’s 9 Lead-in to frost channel 34 Madam’s 4 Walk back and counterpart forth nervously 35 Latest dope 5 What a fisherman might bring home 36 Couches even if he doesn’t 39 Dental problem fixed by braces catch any fish 41 Annual award 6 “Later!” from Stockholm 7 Singer Fitzgerald 44 “You said it, brother!” 8 Yoked animals 46 Open ___ night (comedy club 9 Weavers’ devices offering) 0 Start of an 48 “Many years ___ overseas …” telephone 49 What a number micromanager would like to 3 Former org. Helpfor Support Lifesaving Cures have James Comey 54 “Yes, ma chérie” 4 Three onWe a are seeking blood and cell donors to support 55 important “This might be sundial medical research focused ofoninterest,” on a fighting life-threatening diseases. memo 5 Test in a You hospital can make a big difference patients seeking newFish hope. eggs tube, for for short 56 ANSWER TO PREVIOUS PUZZLE J E W E L E R

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Online subscriptions: Today’s puzzle and more than 7,000 past puzzles, nytimes.com/crosswords ($39.95 a year). Read about and comment on each puzzle: nytimes.com/wordplay.

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Cash’s expression was one of disbelief. Robinson then asked staff members to mute all mics except45 for those 44 46 acknowledged by her. Ford continued to mouth angrily and somehow managed to un-mute his mic. 51 “My mic is off but he’s a little short-ass man,” Ford said, before being 55 time. muted for the last election of Frank Colvett Jr. as new The exchange was less than a council chairman, whom Ford had minute long, but it drew a formal 57 58 council member 59 nominated. Jones was nominated, too. ethics probe from During remarks before the vote, Jones J.B. Smiley, who has also requested referenced a similar situation in a a rule change to not allow council 65to insult one another.66 previous council election64 that involved members Edmund Ford Jr., the son of Edmund Smiley’s complaint also includes Ford’s Ford Sr. behavior in a committee meeting 68 Colvett, 69a After a brief speech from earlier that day when he berated Ford requested permission to speak member of Mayor Jim Strickland’s from Robinson. She granted it and administration over contracts to cut 71 72 Ford laid into Jones. grass in cemeteries. “Councilman Jones, you shouldn’t For all of it, Smiley asked current have went there,” he began. “Don’t council chairwoman Robinson ever go there again with me and my to convene a three-person ethics PUZZLE AGARD family, my son, or anybody else. YouBY ERIK committee to review the matter. did it once. You did it once before. Do Smiley also wants an amendment not go there anymore. You keep your to ban council members from making comments to yourself. Because you “personal, impertinent, slanderous, or don’t want me to come out there and profane remarks to any member of the talk about … ” council, administration, staff, or public The rest of the words became during a council meeting.” indecipherable as Jones began to retort “… [T]here are certain behaviors and the audio became garbled. To that we cannot and should not allow be heard over the noise, Ford leaned to continue,” Smiley wrote in his letter directly into his computer’s camera last week. “I have witnessed a pattern and yelled, “because you got butthole of verbally abusive behavior toward problems, don’t you?” Though Ford’s the administration and our very own mic was muted, he could be seen colleagues. Enough is enough. I am mouthing angrily on camera. asking you and the rest of this body to Many other council members were put an end to this blatant disrespect clearly uncomfortable at the words. and dishonor for individuals and the Sign language interpreter Brenda offices we hold.”

DOWN 1 Oil grp. 2 ___ Alto, Calif. 3 Org. defending the Bill of Rights 4 Move so as to hear better, say 5 The Empire State Building has 102 of them 6 Like candles 7 Smart ___ (wiseacre) 8 Human ___ Project 9 Add even more criticism 10 Music genre related to punk 11 Place to see

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57 Georgia’s 1 2 capital: Abbr. 14 58 Approach respectfully, in modern parlance 17 64 Indian yogurt dish 20 66 Boys’ school near Windsor 67 Of all time 27 28 68 Ringo of the BeatlesLast week’s Memphis City Council meeting ended in a vulgar 33display of 69 Politicalanger as one council member called another nasty names. His words are competition now part of an official city 36ethics probe. 70 Farm structure Council member Edmund Ford said council member Martavius 71 WeirdlySr.spooky Jones had “butthole problems” and was a a “short-ass man” in a tirade that 72 Space on ended only when council49 chairwoman 50 schedule Patrice Robinson muted the mics of nearly all council members. 73 Friend in war 54 after the The insults came directly 29

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28 Musical Yoko 29 Alien 30 Fix, as an election 31 Picture holder 32 Dove’s sound 37 Item on a concert stage 38 Tending to one’s own well-being 40 Instagram

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Session 1: 10:00 a.m. – 11:30 a.m. | Session 2: 1:00 a.m. – 2:30 p.m. The Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA) is planning an Interim Response Action (IRA) Project at the Allen Fossil Plant (ALF) located in southwest Memphis, TN. The project will be constructed to extract and treat groundwater for arsenic and discharge the resulting effluent to the City of Memphis wastewater treatment plant. If you are interested in learning more about the upcoming project, please RSVP by noon on November 30, 2020 to TVAAllen.IRA@kiewit.com indicating which session you would like to attend. A link for the event will be sent to you upon receipt of your confirmation.

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Kudos to Lamar It took a while, but Tennessee’s outgoing senator finally tells it like it is. In March 1995, I had multiple media obligations, one of which was that of regional correspondent for Time magazine. The magazine was generous to its scrubs, never more so than when it asked me to accompany Tennessee’s own Lamar Alexander on his announcement tour for a run for the presidency in 1996. The tour began in Alexander’s hometown of Maryville, and it ended in Florida after a week’s travel to stops in Iowa, New Hampshire, Texas, and several other states where the then-ex-governor would be on the GOP primary ballot the next year. The nature of such tours is that the candidate, accompanied by his campaign entourage and a press pack, flies to pre-planned venues and makes the same speech over and over. Alexander’s themes were typically Republican ones of the time (holding down taxes and deficits) and were couched in generalities. At one point along the route, as I reported to Time, he got a phone call of encouragement from Ross Perot, the third option from the presidential race of 1992. (Asked about that on C-Span later that week, Perot clammed up, other than to grouse about “some reporter evidently sitting too close on the plane.” Actually, it had been an ad hoc chartered bus. In any case, I basked.) Two points continually repeated by the candidate stood out — his lamentation that school kids no longer felt free to take a pocketknife to school (an obvious metaphor whose import escaped me) and his insistence on abolishing the Department of Education (an odd position, I thought, for a recent former U.S. Education Secretary and UT president). I was most impressed (and grateful) at a meet-and-greet at the Sioux City airport when, in sub-freezing temperature, Alexander’s speech, in its entirety, went: “I know you all want your next president to be a man of good judgment. My judgment tells me we’ve got to get in out of this weather.” Much more than the pocketknife thing, that made for a human connection. It seemed natural then — as it has ever since — to think of this personable man as Lamar, especially since his given name, plus an exclamation mark, was in fact his campaign slogan, festooned on bumper stickers, wall signs, and everything else. He came close to making it all the way in the Republican primary, being edged

out in the last week of the New Hampshire primary by Bob Dole, who paid for a blizzard of last-minute TV commercials attacking Alexander, improbably, as a mad taxer. I always thought of Alexander as an executive personality and later, when he mounted a political comeback as a senatorial candidate, wondered how good a fit the legislative role would be for him. Even now, with the three-term senator retiring, I still wonder, since so much of that job consists of toeing, or having to confront, a party line laid down by somebody else. The senator’s problems of that sort became acute under the yoke of Donald Trump, and never more so than when Trump was defeated for re-election and seemed determined to ignore that reality and to fight to remain in office.

Alexander’s themes were typically Republican ones of the time (holding down taxes and deficits) and were couched in generalities. Lamar’s first few responses to that were hamstrung to the point of setting the bar for forthrightness at ground level. Example: “If there is any chance whatsoever that Joe Biden will be the next president, and it looks like he has a very good chance, the Trump Administration should provide the Biden team with all transition materials, resources, and meetings necessary to ensure a smooth transition so that both sides are ready on day one.” If? Both sides? This was two weeks after the election, when there was no mystery whatsoever as to who had won. More Lamar: “Al Gore finally conceded 37 days after the 2000 election, and then made the best speech of his life accepting the result.” That’s a false equivalence if there ever was one. There were some 537 votes at issue between Gore and George W. Bush, in one state, Florida — unlike the many tens of thousands of votes dividing Biden from Trump in multiple swing states! This week, Lamar got closer: “Since it seems apparent that Joe Biden will be the president-elect, my hope is that President Trump will take pride in his considerable accomplishments, put the country first, and have a prompt and orderly transition to help the new administration succeed.” Leaving aside those “considerable accomplishments,” that was pretty much on target. Congratulations, Senator Alexander, and thanks.


F I N A N C I A L F E AT U R E B y S e a n G o u l d

Buy or Pass? Pros and cons on trending stocks.

thriving black market also puts significant pricing pressure on legal operators. Bitcoin is the world’s most popular cryptocurrency. Its stock price surged in 2020, rising over 130 percent as many viewed the crypto as a safehaven investment in the wake of the coronavirus recession. Why you would buy: As the U.S. continues to increase the national debt in response to the virus, Bitcoin could be a good inflation hedge. Also, PayPal recently announced it will allow users to buy, sell, and hold cryptocurrencies, which makes buying the crypto very easy and introduces possible future merchant adoption. Why you would pass: Even with PayPal’s announcement, there is still not a lot of tangible use for the currency. It also lacks standardization and regulation around trading. Furthermore, the currency is now only 12 percent below its highest value and therefore might not be a good entry point at this time.

The pandemic also produced many high-flyer stocks that have capitalized on mandated shutdowns. But it is unlikely the momentum will last as vaccines become readily available. Zoom Video Communications has been one of the best performing stocks in the Russell 3000, up over 487 percent on the year. Peloton Interactive, a producer of at-home workout equipment, is up over 258 percent on the year. The pandemic has provided numerous investing opportunities across different sectors. Having a few talking points on several stock ideas will impress your guests. But the most important thing to remember is that when investing in specific companies, it is critical to always do so in a diversified manner, and not based solely on dinner table turkey talk. Source: Morningstar. Waddell & Associates is not making a recommendation to buy or sell any of the equities mentioned in this article. Sean Gould, CPA/PFS, CFP, is a Senior Wealth Strategist with Waddell & Associates.

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The pandemic has provided numerous investing opportunities across different sectors.

NEWS & OPINION

T

he holiday season is upon us. Although gatherings may be untraditional this year, some usual dinner topics may still arise. To help avoid politically charged conversations or the infamous “when are you getting married?” question, wow your guests with tips regarding these three stocks. Tesla — led by CEO Elon Musk, cofounder of PayPal and founder of SpaceX — is the world’s leading maker of electric vehicles. The company share price has surged over 500 percent during the past year and the stock was recently added to the S&P 500 index. Why you would buy: Tesla’s longrange electronic vehicle and battery technology can store solar energy that is generated from its own products. The cost advantage of recharging over gasoline will eventually pay for itself, and it is believed that gas will not be able to keep up. Importantly, the company has experienced four consecutive quarters of profitability. Why you would pass: Mass electronic adoption in vehicles could take longer than Tesla expects. If the projected demand does not pan out, the company may struggle to maintain profitability. Other car manufacturers have jumped on the electronic vehicle bandwagon, so competition is coming to the table. Finally, Elon Musk’s behavior can be erratic at times. Cannabis stocks experienced recent momentum with increased U.S. legalization during the November elections. Marijuana is legal in 33 states plus D.C., and it is recreationally legal in 11 of these states. Our northof-the-border neighbor, Canada, also fully legalized cannabis in 2018. There are several ways to invest in cannabis companies, including but not limited to Aphria, Canopy Growth, Tilray, or the ETF (exchange-traded fund) ETFMG Alternative Harvest (ticker MJ). Why you would buy: Cannabis is one of the fastest-growing industries across the world, and some experts predict the marijuana industry to triple in the next five years. Although there has been recent momentum, the industry is still in a correction, which could make for a good buying opportunity. Why you would pass: Despite recent legalization, the possibility of national legalization remains tenuous and federal legalization is not guaranteed. The

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GIVE MEMPHIS! COVER STORY BY FLYER STAFF

Great local gift ideas for the holidays.

November 26-December 2, 2020

A Box of Magic Have a giftee in your life who seeks to better understand their own power, to look within and outside for growth and restoration? Give them a box of magic, or as Sami Harvey, owner of Foxglove Pharm, calls it: a Coven Box. “I’ve always been amazed by Mother Nature’s ability to heal, and I love finding new ways to use her ingredients to solve my problems,” Harvey says. “I started Foxglove Pharm in 2017 because I wanted to share some of those solutions with my community.” Each subscription box ($40/month) includes a rotating variety of handcrafted herbal “remeteas” (About Last Night: Hangover Tea, Out of the Blue: Third Eye Tea, and others), scented oils, Resting Witch Face skincare products, rituals, and more special items that “honor the moon, the current astrological phase, and a featured plant.” Each month, she partners with another local maker or small business to spotlight their wares. For her Foxglove offerings, Harvey is “the only witch in the kitchen,” so the products are small-batch and made with “ethically sourced, organic, sustainable ingredients.” Regarding the rituals included in a box (or separately on the website), Harvey says, “These aren’t like supernatural spells that will destroy all your enemies and turn Michelle Obama into your BFF. But they’re ways to meditate and channel your energy into manifesting a better reality for yourself. The real magic ingredient is you 10 and your intention.” Visit foxglovepharm.com to order a

Coven Box and shop products. — Shara Clark Feed an Artist The old cliché about “starving artists” has seldom been more true. Buying art is often the last thing folks are thinking about during tough times like these, but our Memphis painters and sculptors and photographers — and their galleries — have bills to pay, just like the rest of us. That’s why this might be a great year to put a new painting on your wall, or gift someone a work of art so they’ll be reminded of you every day. There are many fine galleries in Memphis. Here are just a few: L Ross, David Lusk, Jay Etkin, Crosstown Arts, Orange

me crave a slice or three: “The cake is four layers. Each layer is literally soaked in a bourbon caramel sauce. And then our caramel icing, which we make from scratch.” Sugar Avenue worked with Old Dominick’s master distiller/senior vice president Alex Castle to come up with the perfect blend of cake and bourbon. Old Dominick’s Huling Station Straight Bourbon Whiskey was chosen for the cake, which has “a great hint of bourbon flavor,” Crenshaw says. “We add bourbon to the icing and ice the cake with it.” To help you get even more into the holiday spirit, Sugar Avenue Bakery recently began adding two-ounce jars of extra caramel sauce with every bourbon-flavored cake.

Memphis Bourbon Caramel Cakes are $55 each, and they’re available at sugaravenue.com. — Michael Donahue Accessorize in Style When Memphians need to give the gift of stylish living, they turn to Cheryl Pesce, the jewelry and lifestyle store in Crosstown Concourse. The store takes its name from its owner, Cheryl Pesce, a jewelry maker, entrepreneur, and allaround style guru. This month, Pesce opened a second store in the Laurelwood Shopping Center, giving Bluff City-area shoppers double the chances to find — and give — stylish accoutrements. “I’m banking on Memphis,” Pesce explains. And Memphis seems ready to support Pesce. “We had a grand open house, social

Mound Gallery, Art Village, Cooper-Young Gallery, and B. Collective. Artists featured include Matthew Hasty, Jeanne Seagle, John Ryan, Mary Long, Roy Tamboli, Eunika Rogers, Cat Pena, Yancy Villa-Calvo, Hamlett Dobbins, Anne Siems, Tim Craddock, and many, many more. In addition, many galleries are featuring special holiday shows. End what has been a nightmarish year on an upbeat note: Buy a piece of art. It’s good for your heart. — Bruce VanWyngarden Let Them Eat Cake I’d be happy to receive a Memphis Bourbon Caramel Cake from Sugar Avenue Bakery, either in or out of my stocking. This is the Sugar Avenue collaboration with Old Dominick Distillery. Just listening to Sugar Avenue owner Ed Crenshaw describe the six-inch cake makes

GREG CRAVENS; SAMI HARVEY

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f 2020 has proven anything, it’s that we need to come together to support our community — the health, happiness, and longevity of our fellow Memphians count on it now more than ever. While we may not be able to gather with friends and family for gift exchanges like we have in the past, we can still lift their spirits with thoughtful presents that help our local restaurants, retail outlets, and entrepreneurs keep doing what they do. Think local this season!


COURTESY JAY ETKIN GALLERY; MATTHEW J. HARRIS COURTESY BEN FANT; COURTESY CHERYL PESCE

(clockwise from top left) Untitled by John Ryan; books from Novel; handmade jewelry from Cheryl Pesce; and Sugar Avenue cake

masks, Christmas ornaments, and anything with the Crosstown logo — she’s the official source for Crosstownbrand goods. Laurelwood is larger and a little more deluxe. “One of the focuses for that store is local and regional artisans,” Pesce says. She carries Mo’s Bows, Paul Edelstein paintings, and, of course, hand-crafted jewelry. “That’s really my wheelhouse. “My studio is at Laurelwood,” Pesce says, “so not only is it made in Memphis, made by me, but it’s all under one roof now. The store, the studio. You can literally come pick out your own pearls — ‘I want this pearl on that earring’ — and then I craft it for you right there.”

You don’t need Hercule Poirot to solve the mystery of what gift to give this season. Cheryl Pesce is located at 1350 Concourse Avenue, Suite 125, and at 374 Grove Park Road South, Suite 104. Find out more at (901) 308-6017 or at cherylpesce.com. — Jesse Davis Good Reads There’s something that comes from

holding the edges of a book and being taken to a distant land or wondrous world. Whether it’s due to happenstance or the crazy and confusing world in which we find ourselves now, I have been reading more and more as the months drag on. To fuel my ever-growing hunger for words and phrases completed on the page, Novel has been my go-to place. Novel is proof that when you are doing something you love, the results will follow. The bookstore, founded in 2017, is the go-to for other local book enthusiasts, too — and with good reason. Their staff will go to the moon and back to help you find the book that fits you just right, and if you’re looking for something specific, chances are they will be just as excited about it as you are. Many of their aisles have felt like a second home to me the past few months. And with books in every genre, it is often easier to ask them what they don’t have, rather than what they do. Personally, I love their new-thisyear home delivery option, which offers a safe way to give the gift of literature this holiday season. — Matthew J. Harris

continued on page 12

COVER STORY m e m p h i s f l y e r. c o m

distancing into the parking lot, and it went well.” The store opening story is just the tip of the breaking-news iceberg, though. Pesce tells me excitedly that she’s been in touch with fashion designer Patrick Henry, aka Richfresh, about his newly designed Henry Mask. “I spoke with him today and — drumroll — we will now be carrying his masks in my Laurelwood store.” But wait! That’s still not all. The ink is still fresh on a deal for Pesce to carry Germantown-produced Leovard skincare products. “I will be his only brick-and-mortar store in the country,” Pesce says. “So there are a lot of cool things happening, most of them local.” In the smaller store in Crosstown, Pesce sells hand-sewn baby items,

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A Memphis Chess Club membership isn’t as risky a move as the Queen’s Gambit. continued from page 11 Hit the Boards This year has given us plenty of time to learn new skills. And what better way to get your mind pumping in both a constructive and competitive fashion than with a game of chess? The Memphis Chess Club recently opened its new café/headquarters Downtown at 195 Madison Avenue, and the three levels of annual memberships make for a great gift, whether someone is looking to seriously pursue an interest in the game or just learn a few tips and tricks. The social membership ($50) allows members to play chess in the café area at any time, with tables, pieces, and clocks all provided. The full membership ($100), meanwhile, affords all of the social perks but provides unlimited and free access to all classes and tournaments, which are held at the club weekly. It also offers discounts on merchandise, and members are able to check out materials from the club’s chess library, which contains old magazines and strategy books. For whole families looking to kickstart an interest in the game? The family membership ($150) contains all full membership benefits and includes two adults and all the children in a household. And, hey, if chess isn’t your thing, the spacious café is a great space to just hang out or study while sipping on some brewed-in-house coffee or munching on one of chef Grier Cosby’s specialty pizzas. Visit memphischessclub.com/join for more information. — Samuel X. Cicci

this pandemic. Restrictions on them have come and gone and may come again soon. Memphis restaurateurs have shown amazing resilience in these ups and downs. They’ve shifted business models, adapted to the latest health directives, and adjusted staff levels (laying off workers and hiring them back) to match it all. However, we forever lost some Memphis favorites, like Lucky Cat and Grove Grill. The National Restaurant Association said nearly 100,000 restaurants across the country closed either permanently or for the longterm six months into the pandemic. Nearly 3 million employees have lost their jobs. Help restaurants out and have food fun, too. This holiday season, buy gift cards from our local restaurants. At the pandemic’s beginning in March, we told you about a national push to buy “dining bonds” or “restaurant bonds.” Many Memphis restaurants jumped in — many selling gift cards at deep discounts. For restaurants, gift cards are quick infusions of cash, helpful in tough times. So instead of that scarf you’re kind of on the fence about, spend the same amount on a restaurant they love. It’ll be unexpected and, yes, come with some delayed gratification — delicious delayed gratification. Present it not as a gift card but as that dish they love from that place they love. Sing it with me: “Everybody knows, a burger and some mistletoe help to make the season bright. Memphis foodies, with their eyes all aglow, will find it hard to sleep tonight.” Gift cards are available at almost every restaurant and for almost any amount. Check websites and socials for details. — Toby Sells

The Gift of Grub Food is fun and helps define Memphis culture. Those who make that food and fun are in trouble. Restaurants have maybe suffered more than any small business during

Music to Their Ears Remember when giving music was a thing? Physical things like LPs, CDs, and cassettes could be wrapped. But now that everything’s ethereal, there’s still a way to give the gift that

SAMUEL X. CICCI

421 N. Watkins, Memphis, TN 38104 901-278-8965


keeps on giving: Patreon. Musicians are embracing this platform more and more, and it’s working for them. A subscription to their accounts may just be the perfect gift for the superfan in your life who already has everything. Mike Doughty (Soul Coughing, Ghost of Vroom) relies on his Patreon subscribers for both income and inspiration. As he told the Detroit Metro Times, “Doing a song a week is amazing, and that is really what, if I had my druthers, I’d do for the rest of my life.” Patrons can subscribe at different levels, each with premiums like CDs and T-shirts, but everyone paying at least $5 a month can access Doughty’s

song-a-week and more. Other Memphis-affiliated singer/ songwriters like Eric Lewis, J.D. Reager, and (coming in December) Marcella and Her Lovers also have accounts. And last month, label and music retailer Goner Records began offering Patreon subscriptions that include access to the Goner archives and exclusive music and videos. Patreon’s site notes that “there isn’t currently a way to gift patronage,” but if you get creative, you can search for an artist on patreon.com and buy a subscription in a friend’s or family member’s name — and they can thank you all through the year. — Alex Greene

e l a S

BLACK

FRIDAY

Feast & Graze

Support Arts and Culture “A plague on both your houses!” cried the dying Mercutio in Romeo and Juliet, and it seems the COVID-19 pandemic took that sentiment to heart, emptying out our theaters and concert halls and thinning out attendance at museums. But still they persisted. The organizations behind the arts we love are still at work online, virtually, distancing, and striving to keep the arts alive — especially in programs aimed at young people. You can help the old-fashioned way by getting season subscriptions and

Performing arts organizations: • Playhouse on the Square (playhouseonthesquare.org) • Theatre Memphis (theatrememphis.org) • Opera Memphis (operamemphis.org) • Ballet Memphis (balletmemphis.org) • New Ballet Ensemble (newballet.org) • Cazateatro (cazateatro.org) • New Moon Theatre (newmoontheatre.org) • Hattiloo Theatre (hattiloo.org) • Tennessee Shakespeare Company (tnshakespeare.org) • Memphis Black Arts Alliance (memphisblackarts.org) • Emerald Theatre Company (etcmemphistheater.com) Museums and galleries: • Memphis Brooks Museum of Art (brooksmuseum.org) • Dixon Gallery and Gardens (dixon.org) continued on page 14

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COVER STORY m e m p h i s f l y e r. c o m

MEMPHIS RESTAURANT ASSOCIATION/FACEBOOK; FEAST & GRAZE/FACEBOOK

Support local restaurants — so they can stick around.

memberships for whenever the lights come back on — and they could use that support right now. Or make a simple donation. Help keep Memphis culture alive by giving gifts on behalf of the following, but don’t be limited by this partial list — if you have other favorites, give them a cup o’ kindness as well.

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continued from page 13

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• National Civil Rights Museum (civilrightsmuseum.org) • Metal Museum (metalmuseum.org) • Stax Museum of American Soul Music (staxmuseum.com) • Pink Palace Museum (memphismuseums.org) • Children’s Museum of Memphis (cmom.com) • Fire Museum of Memphis (firemuseum.org) — Jon W. Sparks Basket or Box It for a Gift That Rocks It Need something sweet for your honey this holiday season? Thistle & Bee has the gift that gives twice. A relaxing gift box contains raw Memphis honey, a milk and honey soap bar, and a pure beeswax candle ($20). Every item is handcrafted and directly supports women survivors to thrive through a journey of healing and hope. Social enterprise director at Thistle & Bee, Ali Pap Chesney, drops a stinger: “We partner with other businesses, too. Feast & Graze uses our honey.” The cheese and charcuterie company Feast & Grace is co-owned by Cristina McCarter, who happens to co-own City Tasting Box. Boxes are filled with goodies promoting local Black-owned businesses like Pop’s Kernel and The Waffle Iron. An exclusive limitedquantity holiday gift box, Sugar and Spice, just rolled out for the season in two sizes — regular ($74.99) and ultimate ($124.99). Memphis Gift Basket is owned by Jesse James, who says he is rolling out a new logo this week. Along with the new logo are new products for baskets ($55$100) that focus on diversity by including more women- and minority-owned businesses, in addition to local items with iconic names like The Rendezvous and Memphis magazine. Guess what else you might find in a Memphis Gift Basket? Thistle & Bee honey. Now that we’ve come full circle, check out these gift box and basket businesses, as well as partnering companies, for errbody on your holiday

list — including that corporate gift list. Visit thistleandbee.org, citytastingbox.com (use code SHIP100 for free shipping on orders over $100), and memphisgiftbasket.com for more. — Julie Ray Lights, Camera, Action A lot of businesses have been hardhit during the pandemic, and movie theaters have been near the top of the list. With social distancing-limited theater capacity and Hollywood studios delaying major releases into next year in the hopes a vaccine will rekindle attendance, theater chains like Memphis-based Malco have been in dire straits. The exception has been drive-in theaters, like the Malco Summer Drive-In, which have seen a renaissance in 2020. If you want to support this local institution and give a treat to the movie-lover in your life, you can buy them a Malco gift card. Available in any denomination from $10 to $500, the gift cards can be used for movie tickets and concessions for any film now or in the future. You can also enroll in the Malco Marquee Rewards program, which allows frequent moviegoers to earn points toward free tickets and concessions. Malco has taken extraordinary steps to ensure the safety of its patrons, including mandatory masks, improved air filters, and non-contact payment options. And if you’re not comfortable sharing a theater with strangers right now, there’s a great option: The Malco Select program allows you to rent an entire theater for a screening of any film on the marquee — and that includes screenings in the massive IMAX theaters at the Paradiso. Prices start at $100, which works out pretty well if you want to watch Wonder Woman 1984 with your pod this holiday season. And if the person you’re buying for is a gamer, Malco has a brand-new option. With Malco Select Gaming, you can bring your system to the theater and play Call of Duty or The Last of Us on the biggest possible screen. — Chris McCoy

JON W. SPARKS

Spring, Summer, Fall at the Brooks Museum by Wheeler Williams


S P O R TS B y Fr a n k M u r t a u g h

Tiger Tip-Off

Hardaway hopes for big things in his third season.

Penny Hardaway’s second winter as head coach was to be the revival of a onceproud program. “The two years I’ve coached have taught me a lot,” says Hardaway. “I don’t think anything will surprise me. In the beginning, I was fast-tracking everything. But I’m caught up, and looking at things better on and off the court.” After three games in Sioux Falls, the Tigers open their home schedule December 2nd when Arkansas State visits FedExForum. (Attendance will be limited to between 3,000 and 3,500 fans, at least at the season’s outset.) There will be only two other nonconference foes (Mississippi Valley State, and Auburn) before the Tigers embark on a 20-game league gauntlet. The University of Memphis has somehow played six seasons without reaching the Big Dance, and the program hasn’t gone seven years without proper Madness since the days when the tournament invited fewer than 30 teams (1963-72). Will there be a 2021 NCAA tournament? Will it be played in a singlecity “bubble” for pandemic protection? A bigger question for a long-frustrated Tiger fan base: Would a return to the tournament bring jubilation, or merely a sigh of relief? Take a few deep breaths and grab your face coverings, because we’re about to find out.

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and forward Lance Thomas — bring more experience to the floor, though neither has found the consistency Hardaway would like to see. The star of Hardaway’s third recruiting class is center Moussa Cisse. A native of Guinea, the 6’10” Cisse averaged 18.4 points, 15.3 rebounds, and 9.2 blocks in leading Lausanne Collegiate School to a 2020 state championship. He’s the kind of interior defensive presence the Tiger program has lacked over the last decade. The Tigers are projected to finish second (behind Houston) in the preseason AAC coaches poll and they are outside the national Top 25 looking in, but Hardaway is aiming for loftier achievements. “It’s refreshing to have [last year’s] freshmen understand their roles now,” says Hardaway. “They put a lot of pressure on themselves last season. And Landers and DeAndre are great additions. We feel like we have the talent, but we haven’t proven anything yet.”

ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT

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f you want to make God laugh, tell Him your plans. If the Almighty pays any attention to college basketball, He must have lost His breath by the end of the Memphis Tigers’ 2019-20 season. Penny Hardaway’s second winter as head coach was to be the revival of a once-proud program, and then some. The country’s most heralded recruiting class arrived. Surely a deep NCAAtournament run awaited come March. HA! The country’s top freshman — James Wiseman — departed the program after three games, neck-deep in NCAA investigative eyes. The team’s second-leading scorer, D.J. Jeffries, went down with a knee injury the first week in February. Then, just as the Tigers completed a second straight season in fifth place among American Athletic Conference teams … a pandemic eliminated March Madness. But Tiger basketball is back, pandemic be damned. Gone, of course, is Wiseman, along with Precious Achiuwa, the electric forward who became the first Tiger freshman to earn conference Player of the Year honors. (Wiseman and Achiuwa were the 2nd and 20th selections, respectively, in last week’s NBA draft, the first former Tigers chosen since 2012.) The U of M’s top three-point shooter over the last two seasons — Tyler Harris — transferred to Iowa State. When the Tigers open play Wednesday in the Crossover Classic in Sioux Falls, South Dakota, they’ll do so against the Saint Mary’s Gaels and not the Ohio State Buckeyes, the latter having pulled out of the event over, you guessed it, coronavirus concerns. Last year’s acclaimed freshmen — at least the five who remain — are now sophomores: guards Boogie Ellis, Lester Quinones, and Damion Baugh, and forwards Jeffries and Malcolm Dandridge. Hardaway expects, with a season behind them, these young veterans will make a larger impact than they did as college rookies. Add to this group a pair of significant transfers: sophomore Landers Nolley II (from Virginia Tech) and DeAndre Williams (from Evansville, pending NCAA approval to play this season). Nolley averaged 15.5 points per game for the Hokies last season and will be asked to fill the sharp-shooting role vacated by Harris. He hit 68 three-pointers as a freshman. Williams started 15 games for the Purple Aces and averaged 15.2 points. A pair of juniors — guard Alex Lomax

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The Broom Closet Memphis’ leading metaphysical store carries a huge selection of conscious living and self-care products such as sage, incense, gemstones, tarot and oracle cards, along with a variety of gifts and décor for the spiritually minded. We have hundreds of unique stones, minerals, points, pyramids, spheres, and display specimens to choose from. Holiday specials include love, healing, and Chakra stone kits from just $5 through December 6th, while supply lasts. 546 S. Main Street and online at thebroomclosetmemphis.com. Todd’s Auctions Black Friday, Black Saturday shopping! Antiques, collectibles, and home furnishings at Todd’s Auctions. Holiday gifts to choose from many estates. We have three buildings full of great gift ideas. Call us for appt., estate sales, and unique home décor — loaded with home fashion, art, jewels for everyone on your list. 3449 Summer Avenue. Hours 11 a.m.-5 p.m. with extended holiday hours.

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steppin’ out (& stayin’ in)

We Recommend: Culture, News + Reviews By Julie Ray

If you think winter is coming, Jon Snow, you’re wrong. It’s here. You are going to need a dragon, or whatever crazy creature that artist Becky Zee has imagined into existence from her Pots with Personality studio. I hear she’s got a new one named Gordo that might be ready for the 2020 WinterArts holiday artists market. This curated show and sale highlights some of the finest artists, makers, and craftspeople in our region. Artists like Michael Talbot, who will be showcasing his Shaker Boxes, work tirelessly at their craft in preparation for the show. The boxes are made of thin, curved wood sheets and fitted with tops. The antique painted poplar wood boxes will be sold individually and in stacks. “After being cut in a strip, the wood goes in for a 14-minute steam bath. Then it is wrapped to the drying form. Santa’s shop is really a mess during this busy time,” says Talbot. Look for fiber wearable art, too. Vickie Vipperman is part of a movement called “slow cloth” that promotes sustainable practices and values high quality over large quantity. She weaves and dyes from her home studio using mostly silk, cotton, bamboo, and hemp yarns. Like many of the artists at the market, due to the custom aspects of her work, she only sells at shows like WinterArts. Find these and many other exceptional and unique handcrafted works in glass, metal, wood, fiber, and clay, plus jewelry and more.

November 26-December 2, 2020

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Sharing sweetness — Stephanie Upshaw’s Bluff City Toffee Food, p. 26

FACEBOOK/WINTERARTS

Winter is Here

All I want for Christmas is Gordo the dragon.

Remembering Tommy Pacello (above) The Last Word, p. 31

VARIOUS DAYS & TIMES November 26th - December 2nd Memphis Turkey Trot Shelby Farms Park, 500 N. Pine Lake, shelbyfarmspark.org, Thursday, Nov. 26, 8 a.m., $30-$35 Run in person or online during this Thanksgiving day tradition. Limited number of spots. Register now or take advantage of the 5K online option.

Orion Starry Nights Shelby Farms Park, 500 N. Pine Lake, shelbyfarmspark.org, starts Friday, Nov. 27, and continues through Sunday, Jan. 3, $16-$35 Enjoy more than 3.5 million lights with dazzling displays that will bring the spirit of the season to life. Select nights. See website for more.

Holiday Artist Market 3484 Poplar (formerly Spin Street), starts Friday, Nov. 27, and continues through Wednesday, Dec. 24 Shop local at the Memphis Arts Collective annual holiday artist market. The market is also a dropoff location for the Mid-South Food Bank.

Front Street Automotive Festival Malco Powerhouse Cinema Grill & Bar, 540 S. Front, Saturday, Nov. 28, 9 a.m.-noon, $5 Awards for best in show, best classic, best modern classic, and more, benefiting Palmer Home for Children. Admission includes a vote for best in show.

Light Up The Holidays: Annual Peabody Tree Lighting Ceremony The Peabody Hotel, 149 Union, Friday, Nov. 27, 4-6 p.m., packages start at $199 Open only to hotel guests via a special holiday package featuring drinks, snacks, music, Santa and Mrs. Claus, keepsake Christmas ornament, and Peabody face masks.

Holiday Wonders at the Garden Memphis Botanic Garden, 750 Cherry, starts Friday, Nov. 27, and continues through Sunday, Dec. 27, $10 Enjoy 23 nights of activities at three venues: Snowy Nights in My Big Backyard, Under the Stars Outdoor Lounge, and City of Memphis Christmas Tree.

Whiskey Tasting with Celtic Crossing Celtic Crossing, 903 S. Cooper, celticcrossingmemphis.com, Friday, Nov. 27, 7-9 p.m., $40 Wrap up your Thanksgiving festivities by participating in a virtual or in-person whiskey tasting presented by owner DJ Naylor.

Santa’s Forest South Santa’s Forest South, 3268 Commercial, starts Saturday, Nov. 28, 11 a.m.-7 p.m., and continues through Friday, Dec. 25, free All Occasion Florist has created a festive winter wonderland in South Memphis, featuring daily visits from Santa, local entertainment, and local vendors.


MEMPHIS ARTS COLLECTIVE ANNUAL

Holiday Artist Market

Have a “Hard (Cider) Candy Christmas” with the Miracle pop-up at The Liquor Store.

Loaded Santas The Liquor Store on Broad will host the very first Miracle pop-up bar in Memphis. So what the heck is a Miracle pop-up bar anyway? Miracle is a global pop-up concept that partners with bars and restaurants around the world to offer masterfully crafted Christmas cocktails in cheery holiday-themed settings. You can expect groovy concoctions like the Fruitcake Flip, Bad Santa, and Christmas Carol Barrel served in kitschy glassware. Guests can also expect the space to be transformed with over-the-top décor so you feel like you’ve walked into a nostalgic holiday wonderland. In order to prepare the bar and staff, The Liquor Store gave notice via Facebook last Friday: “We will be closed through Thanksgiving Thursday. Our team has earned some much-deserved time off, and we need to transform the space into @miraclepopup. We’ll see you on the other side.” Due to COVID, drinks will also be offered to-go. Still as cheesy. Still as festive. Still a Miracle. You can reserve a 15-minute time block to come in, take photos, and pick up food and drinks to-go. Guests can also purchase the holidaythemed custom glassware, with a portion of the proceeds being donated to the James Beard Foundation’s Open for Good campaign to aid the relief efforts of independent restaurants and bars due to the negative impacts of COVID-19. Cheers! Salute! Prost! Bottoms up!

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hours: Mon-Sat: 10:30a - 6:30p Thurs: til 8:00p · Sun: noon- 5:00p Drop off location for The Mid-South Food Bank

Tiger Blue The Flyer’s MeMphis Tiger Blog

www.memphisflyer.com/blogs/TigerBlue/

Christmas Movie Trivia at the Summer Drive-In Malco Summer Drive-In, 5310 Summer, Saturday, Nov. 28, 6-8 p.m., free with movie entry of $25/car Celebrate the season by playing Christmas movie trivia. Listen and win from any screen on 105.1 FM. Prizes from Malco for first, second, third, and best team name. Stay for the double-feature movie. 40th Anniversary: The Blues Brothers Malco Paradiso Cinema, 584 S. Mendenhall, Sunday, Nov. 29, 3 p.m., and Wednesday, Dec. 2, 7 p.m., $15 Comedy icons John Belushi and Dan Aykroyd star in the musical comedy The Blues Brothers.

MBAA Virtual Telethon facebook.com/memphis.black.arts. alliance.firehouse, Sunday, Nov. 29, 4 p.m., donation-based From bright new talent to Memphis legends, kick off the season in style as talented artists show off their craft and raise funds to keep art in Memphis top-notch.

Bartlett Art Association Exhibition wkno.org., starts Monday, Nov. 30, and continues through Monday, Dec. 30 View work by select members of the Bartlett Art Association online from Gallery 1091, WKNO’s art gallery.

Fat Charlie’s Bourbon Tasting Fat Charlie’s Speakeasy, 107 Harbor Town Square, Sun., Nov. 29, 6-8 p.m., free-$50 Join The Underdog as he shares four of his favorite bourbons and a cigar. Featuring barbecue, dessert, and a longest ash contest.

Stand! Malco Paradiso, 584 S. Mendenhall, and Collierville Grill, 380 Market, Tuesday, Dec. 1, 7 p.m., $17.50 This movie musical is an immigrant Romeo and Juliet. Stefan, who fled Ukraine, is smitten with Jewish suffragette neighbor Rebecca. Their families oppose the relationship during a time of upheaval.

Tiger Blue THE FLYER’S MEMPHIS BLOG

www.memphisflyer.com/blogs/TigerBlue/

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m e m p h i s f l y e r. c o m

Ta-Nehisi Coates’ Between the World and Me is reimagined as a narrative visual essay by director Kamilah Forbes. Film, p. 27

ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT

MAGRINO PR

By Julie Ray

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MUSIC By Alex Greene

The Scruffs! Album of rare ’70s cuts is released on French label.

S

November 26-December 2, 2020

o many Memphis musicians have experienced the “Big in Japan” syndrome, though many would need to insert “Europe,” instead. It’s the phenomenon where relative unknowns here are embraced overseas for their groundbreaking vision, their refusal to bow to trends, their determination to follow their own muse. One expression of this is the perennial European (or Japanese or Australian) tour. Suddenly, local nobodies are treated to applause and paying audiences for a few weeks or months, only to return to sleepy, indifferent crowds on the home front. The same dynamic is at play with overseas record labels. One case in point: Mono-Tone Records, based in Nice, France, who may be doing more to preserve the history of the Memphis underground than any label around today. Their 2018 release of archival tracks by the Klitz, Rocking the Memphis Underground 1978-1980, is the definitive chronicle of the city’s first punk group in their heyday. This year, the label’s done it again with Teenage Tragedies 1974-1979, a collection of previously unreleased gems by the Scruffs. Alas, the Scruffs are known and loved by only a few local scenesters these days, despite having forged a

20

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sound and attitude that has aged very well. Rick Branyan, the group’s original bassist, thinks it may go back to a problem the band had even then: They’ve always been hard to pigeonhole. “We cut our first album at Ardent with John Fry in ’77, and released it early ’78, I think,” he recalls. “It had a few songs with a very slight punk edge to them, and because of that we were misclassified as punks here. We were slated to warm up for the Sex Pistols. It didn’t happen, but people thought we were a good match. Really, we weren’t punk at all; we were poppy as hell. But because our songs were short, and we didn’t have a hundred guitar solos and long jams, we were ‘punk.’ Our album was well reviewed in New York, so we went up there, played CBGB’s and Max’s Kansas City, and all the places, but in New York we had the opposite problem: We weren’t punk enough. So we were too pop for New York and too punk for Memphis.” That’s not a bad characterization of their sound. Choppy, jangly guitars cascade over pounding rhythms and Steve Burns’ attitude-laden vocals, complete with irresistible hooks and background harmonies. Though Memphis had already bred its own style of power pop, with Big Star and others, this was a new sound that would also be tagged with that label. The mid- to late-

VE, & SMO PEACE, LO

KIN’

’70s brought a new power pop, epitomized by the Knack and similar hitmakers. But this didn’t sit well with most Memphis crowds at the time. “It was real hard to get gigs,” recalls Branyan. “The Scruffs had to leave town because we literally couldn’t get gigs. And when we did get them, we would have the same 20 people show up and the rest would just hate us. Everybody wanted to hear cock rock or ZZ Top-type stuff or mellow-out type stuff. Club owners hated it. They’d just pull the plug on you.” Still, the Scruffs found a niche, and Burns still fronts revamped versions of the band to this day. Their debut, Wanna Meet the Scruffs?, was praised by uber-critic Robert Christgau at the time: “A middle-period Beatles extrapolation in the manner of Big Star (another out-ofstep Memphis power-pop group on a small, out-of-step Memphis label), it bursts with off harmonies, left hooks, and jolts of random energy. The trouble is, these serve a shamelessly and perhaps permanently post-adolescent vision of life’s pain, most of which would appear to involve gurls [sic].” The new Mono-Tone collection digs even deeper, with side A devoted to more Ardent tracks cut before the debut, and side B comprising post-debut tracks cut at Shoe Studios. They’re all of a piece, revealing a band that hit the ground running with a fully realized sound as early as 1974. Still, there’s a downside to all this recognition coming from elsewhere. Teenage Tragedies 1974-1979, released in France this June, sold out quickly. The label assures fans that a new pressing will be available in December, but you’ll need to visit your favorite record store and request an order from the distributor, Forced Exposure. Still, for those in search of the city’s true innovators, it’s well worth the legwork.

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THEY’VE SERVED US, NOW LET’S SERVE THEM.

We know these are difficult times. Here’s one way to make them easier: Eat local. You get a tasty break from cooking; Memphis’ restaurant community gets some local love. They’ve served us, now let’s serve them. SO JOIN US IN SUPPORT BY EATING LOCAL. Our restaurants are safe, open and Ready To Serve You.

ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT

m e m p h i s f l y e r. c o m

Learn more at: ilovememphisblog.com/eatlocal

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CALENDAR of EVENTS:

Nov. 26 - Dec. 2

watercolor florals. $10-$50. Ongoing.

T H EAT E R

Hattiloo Theatre

ARROW CREATIVE, 2535 BROAD.

Sarafina!, past production about human rights in the 21st century, written by Mbongeni Ngema. Ongoing. God’s Trombone, enjoy the original production of inspirational sermons by African-American preachers reimagined as poetry, reverberating with the musicality and splendid eloquence of spirituals. Free. Ongoing. Iola’s Southern Fields, enjoy an online past performance drawn from the writings of Ida B. Wells. Free. Ongoing.

O N G O I N G ART

Arrow Creative

“On Your Mark,” exhibition of works by Shelby Brown in the virtual Mary and Mike Conley Gallery. arrowcreative.org. Through Dec. 31. 2535 BROAD.

ArtsMemphis

“Unfolding: The Next Chapter in Memphis,” exhibition of visual art by local Memphis artists, curated by Kenneth Wayne Alexander. Ongoing. artsmemphis.org.

37 S. COOPER (502-3486).

The Orpheum

Orpheum Virtual Engagement, join Orpheum staff, artists, and students for activities, interviews, and more on Facebook, Instagram, Twitter, and YouTube. Visit website for more information. Ongoing. 203 S. MAIN (525-3000).

Playhouse on the Square

Playhouse on the Square at Home, a series of digital content through POTS website and social media platforms. View past performances, engage in quizzes, enjoy digital playwriting, and more. Free. Ongoing. 66 S. COOPER (726-4656).

Theatre Memphis

Online on Stage, a Theatre Memphis Facebook group that serves as a clearinghouse for performers wanting to share their talents. Featuring storytime, readings, or performance art. Ongoing.

November 26-December 2, 2020

575 S. MENDENHALL (578-2787).

Binder Projects

Holiday Wonders at the Garden at Memphis Botanic Garden, November 27th through December 27th MID-SOUTH ARTIST GALLERY, 2945 SHELBY (409-8705), MID-SOUTHARTIST-GALLERY.PIXELS.COM.

3rd Space Online

MEMPHIS PINK PALACE MUSEUM, 3050 CENTRAL (636-2362).

Visit Facebook, Instagram, LinkedIn for exciting activities and relief efforts from the local creative community. Ongoing. 3RDSPACEARTS.ORG.

Holiday Artist Market Nov. 27-Dec. 24.

3484 POPLAR (FORMERLY SPIN STREET MUSIC) (327-8730).

630 PERKINS EXT. (682-8323).

OT H E R ART HAP P E N I N G S

MEMPHISMAGAZINESTORE.COM.

Email or mail nominations. Include name and email address of the artist plus processing fee of $10 per nominee. Artist cash prize $500. $10. Through Dec. 31.

Order your book today benefiting local artists and journalism. $35. Ongoing.

Memphis Maker Mondays

Live show featuring Crafts & Drafts makers and artists in their own studios via Memphis Flyer’s Facebook Live. Mondays.

Metal Museum Online

Featuring past gallery talks from previous exhibitions, interviews with artists, and demonstrations including “Beauty in the Boundary,” the museum’s exhibition of gates and railings. Free. Ongoing. METAL MUSEUM, 374 METAL MUSEUM DR. (774-6380).

Novel at Home: Elizabeth L. Jemison and Reverend Laura F Gettys

Authors discuss Christian Citizens: Reading the Bible in Black and White in the Postemancipation South. Free with registration. Tues., Dec. 1, 6 p.m. NOVEL, 387 PERKINS EXT. (922-5526).

FACEBOOK.COM/MEMPHISFLYER.

Bene�iting Le Bonheur Children’s Hospital

PINK PALACE WWW.MEMPHISMUSEUMS.ORG

22

Memphis Modern Market Crafts Fair PopUp Shop Featuring MAC Artists Angi Cooper, Jan Shivley, and Jana Wilson. Fridays, Saturdays, 10:30 a.m.-5 p.m., and Sundays, noon-5 p.m. Through Dec. 27.

Memphis Flyer Coloring Book

2020 Artist of the Year Award Nominations

Send the date, time, place, cost, info, phone number, a brief description, and photos — two weeks in advance — to calendar@memphisflyer.com or P.O. Box 1738, Memphis, TN 38101. DUE TO SPACE LIMITATIONS, ONGOING WEEKLY EVENTS WILL APPEAR IN THE FLYER’S ONLINE CALENDAR ONLY.

Orpheum Mini Golf

Putt on nine socially distanced Broadway-themed holes, including Hamilton, The Phantom of the Opera, The Color Purple, Memphis, and more. $10. Saturdays, Sundays, 10:30 a.m.-10:30 p.m. Through Dec. 6. THE ORPHEUM, 203 S. MAIN (5253000), ORPHEUM-MEMPHIS.COM.

The Peace Project

Hear the peace offerings made up of artists’ voices, instruments, ambient noises, and reverberations in a healing space featuring work by Hank Willis Thomas. Ongoing, 6 a.m.-6 p.m. MEMPHIS PARK, FRONT AND MADISON, MEMPHISRIVERPARKS.ORG.

Pinot’s Palette Virtual Paint

Register online for Zoom invite and an emailed supply list. Don’t forget the wine. Visit website for dates and times, $15. Ongoing. PINOTSPALETTE.COM.

Watercolor Florals 101 Shelby Brown, studio artist at Arrow, has made a PDF of steps, techniques, and a 25-minute video tutorial to teach you how to make

“The Circular Quiet,” exhibition of new paintings created during the pandemic by Nancy Cheairs. Through Nov. 30. 74 FLICKER (9016341698).

Buckman Arts Center at St. Mary’s School

“Magellan’s Medicine,” exhibition of hand-painted ceramics by Dr. Malini Gupta. Through Dec. 14. 60 N. PERKINS EXT. (537-1483).

David Lusk Gallery

“Woebetide,” exhibition of visceral gouache paintings of ephemeral landscapes that examine dualities and mysteries of nature by Maysey Craddock. Through Dec. 23. 97 TILLMAN (767-3800).

The Dixon Gallery & Gardens

“The Beauty of Calligraphy,” exhibition by the Memphis Calligraphy Guild celebrating calligraphy and the resulting gestural art. Through Jan. 3, 2021. “Made in Dixon / Hecho en Dixon,” exhibition of artwork by Dixon program participants of all ages, diverse cultural backgrounds, and interests. Through Dec. 20. “Illuminating the Word: The Saint John’s Bible,” exhibition

of the first handwritten Bible that interprets and illustrates scripture from a contemporary perspective. A reflection of a multicultural world and strides in science, technology, and space travel. Through Jan. 10, 2021. 4339 PARK (761-5250).

EACC Fine Arts Center Gallery

“The Long Way Home,” exhibition of photography by Margo Duvall investigating photography’s role in the development of memory and identity. Through Nov. 30. EAST ARKANSAS COMMUNITY COLLEGE, 1700 NEWCASTLE, FORREST CITY, AR.

Gallery 1091

“Wading Birds of the Southern United States,” exhibition of a collection of photographs by Joseph A. Sullivan, M.D. featured in his book Talkin’ ‘Bout Birds. View online. (458-2521), wkno.org. Free. Through Nov. 30. Bartlett Art Association, exhibition of works online by BAA members. (729-8722), wkno. org. Nov. 30-Dec. 30. WKNO STUDIO, 7151 CHERRY FARMS (458-2521).

Jay Etkin Gallery

Permanent Collection: “The Flow Museum of Art & Culture,” Ongoing. 942 COOPER (550-0064).

Memphis Brooks Museum of Art

“Arts of Global Africa,” exhibition of historic and contemporary works in a range of different media presenting an expansive vision of Africa’s artistry. Through June 21, 2021. “Drawing Memory: Essence of Memphis,” exhibition of works inspired by nsibidi, a sacred means of communication among male secret societies in southeastern Nigeria by Victor Ekpuk. Ongoing. 1934 POPLAR (544-6209).

continued on page 24

HOLIDAY EXHIBIT November 21 - December 31. Photos with Santa, Holiday Movies & Planetarium Shows.


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CALENDAR: NOVEMBER 26 - DECEMBER 2

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continued from page 22 Memphis College of Art

“Intrepidly Yours,” exhibition of Spring 2020 BFA work by last graduating class. mca2020bfa.com. Through Feb. 28, 2021. 1930 POPLAR (272-5100).

Mid-South Artist Gallery

Sandra Horton, exhibition of works by featured artist. Free. Ongoing. Becky McRae, exhibition of works by featured artist. (409-8705), mid-southartistgallery.pixels.com. Ongoing. Michelle Lemaster, exhibition of works by local featured artist. , mid-southartist-gallery. pixels.com. Ongoing. Jon Woodhams, (409-8705), mid-southartist-gallery.pixels.com. Through Dec. 5. 2945 SHELBY (409-8705).

Tops Gallery

Luther Hampton, exhibition of seventeen sculptures made between 1968 and 2000. By appointment. Through Dec. 31. 400 S. FRONT.

Various locations

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“We Deliver for Memphis,” exhibition of work honoring essential workers on digital billboards along I-55 near Downtown Memphis West I-55, I-55 at Hwy 61 (Third Street), and 240 at Airways. uacmem.org. Ongoing. SEE WEBSITE FOR MORE INFORMATION.

OPERA

“Opera Speed-Runs” Series by Jake Stamatis

Tales of Hoffman on YouTube by Handorf Company artist. Free. Ongoing. OPERA MEMPHIS, 6745 WOLF RIVER (257-3100).

DA N C E

November 26-December 2, 2020

Get Back to the Barre

From creative movement for 3-year-olds to advanced, preprofessional training under the guidance and direction of Mandy Possel. All levels invited to join fall classes. Saturdays, 9:30 a.m.-2:30 p.m., and Mondays-Fridays, 4-7 p.m. Through Dec. 12. BUCKMAN ARTS CENTER AT ST. MARY’S SCHOOL, 60 N. PERKINS EXT. (537-1483).

Enroll Your Child in Pre-K Pre-K will help give your child the basic skills they will need later in school. Plus some programs provide extra support, like devices, for home learning. And, depending on your income, it’s all free.

To enroll your child in Pre-K, visit:

24

PrekMemphis.com

High-quality early childhood programs benefit the whole community. First 8 Memphis coordinates services for kids birth through third grade.

C O M E DY

Hi Tone

Live Weekly Comedy with John Miller, open micstyle. Free. Tuesdays, 8-10 p.m. 282 N. CLEVELAND (278-TONE).

TO U R S

Metal Museum Audio Tour

Explore the newly updated Sculpture Garden and accompanying audio tour while adhering to safe social distancing. PWYC. Ongoing, 11 a.m.-5 p.m. METAL MUSEUM, 374 METAL MUSEUM DR. (774-6380).

Old Forest Hike

Walking tour of the region’s only urban oldgrowth forest. Last Sunday of every month, 10 a.m. OVERTON PARK, OFF POPLAR (276-1387).

Tour de Midtown

Join Breakaway Running for a group run starting from 2109 Madison. Free beer after the run. All paces are welcomed and the distance of runs vary from 3-5 miles. Free. Thursdays, 6 p.m. OVERTON SQUARE, 2101 MADISON, OVERTONSQUARE.COM.

Tours for Very Small Groups

Elmwood Cemetery’s staff is ready to take you and your very small group on a tour around the grounds in groups of 9. Masks required. $5. Ongoing, 10 a.m. ELMWOOD CEMETERY, 824 S. DUDLEY (774-3212).

E X POS/SA LES

Gifts of Green at the Garden

Seasonal pop-up shop inside the garden’s newly renovated visitors center. Through Dec. 30, 9 a.m.-4 p.m. MEMPHIS BOTANIC GARDEN, 750 CHERRY (636-4100).

Holiday Artisan Market Shop Levitt Shell-inspired works from local makers. Through Dec. 31.

LEVITT SHELL, 1928 POPLAR AVENUE (9012722722), LEVITTSHELL.ORG.

Southern Flea Market

$2. Sat., Nov. 28, 8 a.m., and Sun., Nov. 29, 9 a.m. LANDERS CENTER, 4560 VENTURE, SOUTHAVEN, MS (662-280-9120).

Virtual Crafts Fair

Featuring artists and brands from Memphis and the surrounding areas. From paintings and home decor to jewelry and candles. Through Dec. 12. MEMPHIS PINK PALACE MUSEUM, 3050 CENTRAL (636-2362).

WinterArts

Showcase of exceptional and unique hand-crafted works by regional artists. Holiday gift ideas crafted in glass, metal, wood, fiber, and clay plus jewelry and more. Sundays, 12-5 p.m., and Mondays-Thursdays, Saturdays, 10 a.m.-6 p.m. Through Dec. 25. SHOPS OF SADDLE CREEK, 7509 POPLAR, SUITE 1 (753-4264), WINTERARTSMEMPHIS.COM.

F EST IVA LS

Front Street Automotive Festival Awards for best in show, best classic, best modern classic, and more benefiting Palmer Home for Children. Admission includes a vote for best in show. $5. Sat., Nov. 28, 9 a.m.-noon. MALCO POWERHOUSE CINEMA GRILL & BAR, 540 S. FRONT (870-1341), MALCO.COM.

S PO R TS / F IT N ES S

Ballet Memphis Online Pilates and Ballet Classes

Visit website for more information. Classes offered include Espresso Flow, Stretch & Burn, Fascial Fun, Intermediate/Advanced Ballet, Intermediate Mat Flow, and Get Moving. $10. Ongoing, 7:30 a.m.-5:30 p.m. BALLET MEMPHIS, 2144 MADISON (737-7322).

Chilly Chili Virtual 5K

Benefitting Concord Academy. Through Nov. 30. CONCORD-ACADEMY.ORG.

Memphis Hungry Turkey 5K

Run anywhere, anytime during this Thanksgiving tradition. Free-$40. Nov. 2629, 9 a.m. TENNESSEERUNS.COM.

Memphis Turkey Trot

Run in person or online. Limited number of in-person spots with an online option. Thurs., Nov. 26, 8 a.m. SHELBY FARMS PARK, 500 N. PINE LAKE (767-PARK).

Mid-South Quarter Horse Show Fri.-Sun., Nov. 27-29.

AGRICENTER INTERNATIONAL, 7777 WALNUT GROVE (757-7777), MIDSOUTHQUARTERHORSE.COM.

M E ETI N G S

Churches from the Presbytery of the MidSouth: Sunday Worship Livestream Combined livestream worship. Visit website for more information and livestream link. Sun., 11 a.m. IDLEWILDCHURCH.ORG.

Virtual-T

Weekly Zoom gathering for anyone 18+ who identifies as a member of the trans or GNC community. For login information, email ahauptman@outmemphis.org. Tuesdays, 6 p.m. OUTMEMPHIS.ORG.

S P EC IA L EVE NTS

Lament to Hope: Prayer and Reflection

Participate in a communitywide call to prayer and reflection during the months of November and December online or in person at the historic Evans Chapel. Sundays, 9 a.m.-3 p.m., and Mondays-Fridays, 10 a.m.-3 p.m. Through Dec. 31. GERMANTOWN PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH, 2363 GERMANTOWN, GERMANTOWNPRES.ORG.

“The Negro Motorist Green Book”

Exhibition highlighting an annual guide started in 1936 that helped African Americans travel the country and was a resource for the era’s Black-owned businesses. $10. Through Jan. 3, 2021. NATIONAL CIVIL RIGHTS MUSEUM, 450 MULBERRY (521-9699).


CALENDAR: NOVEMBER 26 - DECEMBER 2 Prison Fellowship’s Angel Tree

Sponsor area children of incarcerated parents in the Greater Memphis area. Through Dec. 23. (800-55-ANGEL), PRISONFELLOWSHIP.ORG.

Season of Light

$8. Sundays, 2:30 p.m., Wednesdays-Fridays, 11 a.m. & 2:30 p.m., and Saturdays, 11 a.m. & 2:30 p.m. Through Dec. 26. AUTOZONE DOME PLANETARIUM, MEMPHIS PINK PALACE MUSEUM, 3050 CENTRAL (636-2362).

United Way of the MidSouth: Driving The Dream

For those impacted by COVID-19. Puts callers in contact with essential services, without individuals having to repeat the circumstances for the call. Follow-up ensures those connections were made. MondaysFridays, 8:30 a.m.-5 p.m. (888-709-0630), CALL.DRIVINGTHEDREAM.ORG.

H O LI DAY EVE N TS

Arrow Creative Holiday Bazaar

Shop local artists and makers for the holidays. Through Dec. 23. ARROW CREATIVE, 2535 BROAD.

Be a Santa to a Senior

CARRIAGE CROSSING, HOUSTON LEVEE & BILL MORRIS PKWY. (854-8240), SHOPCARRIAGECROSSING.COM.

CARRIAGE CROSSING, HOUSTON LEVEE & BILL MORRIS PKWY. (854-8240), SHOPCARRIAGECROSSING.COM.

Christmas Movie Trivia at the Summer Drive-In

Thanksgiving at the Peabody

Free with the purchase of a carload ticket to any of the evening’s double features. Sat., Nov. 28, 6-8 p.m.

Lunch served in the Continental Ballroom. This lavish meal features appetizers, salads, Thanksgiving-style entrées, side dishes, and desserts. $80, $28 kids. Thurs., Nov. 26, 12-4 p.m.

MALCO SUMMER 4 DRIVE-IN, 5310 SUMMER (681-2020).

Enchanted Forest Festival of Trees

Exhibit benefitting Le Bonheur Children’s Hospital. Photos with Santa, pandemicstyle, with Santa behind a Plexiglass shield that looks like a holiday snow globe. Wednesdays-Saturdays, 10:30 a.m.-5 p.m. Through Dec. 31. MEMPHIS PINK PALACE MUSEUM, 3050 CENTRAL (636-2362).

Holiday Wonders at the Garden

Enjoy 23 nights of activities at three venues: Snowy Nights in My Big Backyard, Under the Stars Outdoor Lounge, and City of Memphis Christmas Tree. Nov. 27-Dec. 27. MEMPHIS BOTANIC GARDEN, 750 CHERRY (636-4100).

Light Up The Holidays: Annual Peabody Tree Lighting Ceremony

Open only to hotel guests via a

THE PEABODY HOTEL, 149 UNION (529-4000).

Wonderland: An Interactive Holiday Photo Experience

Christmas Movie Trivia at the Malco Summer Drive-In, Saturday, November 28th, 6-8 p.m. special holiday package featuring drinks, snacks, music, Santa, and Mrs. Claus. $199 for holiday package. Fri., Nov. 27, 4-6 p.m. THE PEABODY HOTEL, 149 UNION (529-4000), PEABODYMEMPHIS.COM.

MBAA Virtual Telethon

Talented artists show off their craft and raise funds to keep

art in Memphis top-notch. Sun., Nov. 29, 4 p.m. MEMPHIS BLACK ARTS ALLIANCE, 985 S BELLEVUE BLVD, MEMPHISBLACKARTS.ORG.

Orion Starry Nights

Visit website for more information. $16-$35. Nov. 27-Jan. 3. SHELBY FARMS PARK, 500 N. PINE LAKE (767-PARK).

Santa’s Forest South

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p.m. Through Dec. 25. SANTA’S FOREST SOUTH, 3268 COMMERCIAL.

Senior’s Greetings

Letters to seniors initiative encourages customers to set aside one or more of the greeting cards they plan to send this holiday season and drop it off in the mailbox by Barnes & Noble. Through Dec. 13. CARRIAGE CROSSING, HOUSTON LEVEE & BILL MORRIS PKWY. (854-8240), SHOPCARRIAGECROSSING.COM.

Socially Distant Santa

Santa will return in person the weekend before Black Friday.

Immersive holiday photo experience from the minds of Memphis Escape Rooms. Located on the corner across from Forever 21 and H&M. Book your experience today. Through Jan. 10, 2021, 10 a.m. CARRIAGE CROSSING, HOUSTON LEVEE & BILL MORRIS PKWY. (854-8240), WONDERLANDMEMPHIS.COM.

Zoo Lights

Visit on select nights. Zoo Lights closed Dec. 2, 3, 9, 10, 24, and 31. $10. Fridays-Sundays, 6-9:30 p.m., and Wednesdays, Thursdays, 6-9:30 p.m. Through Nov. 30. MEMPHIS ZOO, 2000 PRENTISS PLACE IN OVERTON PARK (333-6500).

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Carriage Crossing will be collecting gifts for senior citizens. The tree with ornament wish

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25


FOOD By Michael Donahue

Sweet Dreams Bluff City Toffee continues to grow.

S

November 26-December 2, 2020

BOB BAYNE PHOTOGRAPHY

tephanie Upshaw’s sweet tooth led to a business she could sink her teeth into. Founder of Bluff City Toffee, Upshaw says, “I’ve been making toffee for 30 years for friends and family. Just my go-to holiday recipe that I make. Four years ago, I decided to turn it into a business.” Upshaw, who sells her toffee online, opened her first brick-and-mortar retail store November 17th at 5160 Sanderlin in Racquet Club Plaza. “I’ve always had a terrible sweet tooth,” says Upshaw, who moved to Memphis from Louisville when she was in the sixth grade.

26

Stephanie Upshaw, founder of Bluff City Toffee

Apparently, the rest of her family also had an affinity for sugar. “When we were growing up, my mother would have alldessert dinners,” she says. “It would be no-bake cookies, pecan pie, and peanut butter fudge. I loved those special nights. It didn’t happen very often.” Upshaw, who worked in corporate jobs most of her professional life, began cooking when she was at Deluxe Check Printers in Nashville. “When I graduated from the University of Memphis, my first job was in Nashville. And I started cooking with a friend of mine.” That’s when she began making toffee. “We would have cooking days, and that’s what I would do.” Eight years later, Upshaw moved to Grainger, where she worked for 20 years. One day while she was cooking toffee, a friend called and asked if she’d be interested in making batches of toffee for

client gifts. “I think it was maybe 50 or 60 orders. I was like, ‘Oh, my gosh. I can’t cook that much.’ But I did. One thing led to another. I looked into packaging, branding. I said, ‘I’m going to try this.’ “My daughter had gone to college, and I wanted to do something different. I’d been making this [toffee] and decided to make a run for it. I started Bluff City Toffee. That was in 2016. I loved the idea of starting a business.” Upshaw, who began working out of a commercial kitchen, made batches of her toffee for bazaars and other functions. “That year, I started making my nutrition panels, started working with food scientists to understand shelf life.” She began getting Bluff City Toffee in retail stores. Buster’s Liquors & Wines was first. Now, she says, “I’m in about 15 retail stores.” Upshaw, who wants to ultimately build a kitchen at her store, wanted a “fulfillment center” where she could fill her online orders as well as provide a retail space for walk-ins and pick-up orders. The store is open from 1 to 4 p.m. on Tuesdays and Thursdays. “That will run through the holiday season. And then by appointment.” She makes English toffee. “I feel like I just associate the holidays with English toffee.” It’s “a softer toffee, and it doesn’t stick to your teeth. It’s handcrafted, small-batch. It’s not mass-produced. The texture of the toffee is what I find people love the most.” Her toffee is “so simple” to make, Upshaw says. It only takes four ingredients: butter, sugar, pecans, and chocolate. “It’s tricky to cook because of the heat.” But, she says, “Less is more.” Upshaw, who tweaked the recipe over the years, originally made milk chocolate pecan toffee. She now includes a dark chocolate toffee with sea salt. “So many people requested it. I use Ghirardelli’s chocolate. It’s my favorite. It’s not bitter.” And people love it, she says. “Milk chocolate is what put me on the map, but during the holiday season, the dark chocolate flies off the shelf.” Upshaw branched out this year and began making toffee popcorn. She coats the popcorn with the base that she uses for her toffee and adds peanuts. So, how much toffee does Upshaw, with her sweet tooth, consume? “I’m trying to get out of quality control. To watch the waistline, I had to back off a bit.” To order Bluff City Toffee, call (901) 4868500, go to bluffcitytoffee.com, or email hello@bluffcitytoffee.com.


TV By Chris McCoy

Between the World and Me

The words of Ta-Nehisi Coates come alive.

In Kamilah Forbes’ adaptation of Ta-Nehisi Coates’ Between the World and Me, a host of actors, like Oprah Winfrey (above), bring the script to life.

“talk” Black parents give their teenage sons to tell them that they must keep their noses clean and their conduct above reproach to try and avoid the worst abuses of racism — not that that is enough to guarantee their safety. “I did not tell you it would be okay, because I did not believe it would be okay,” writes Coates. The 2015 National Book Award winner was first adapted for the stage at Harlem’s fabled Apollo Theater by Kamilah Forbes in 2018. Then, in August 2020, in the heat of BLM summer, she directed a film adaptation for HBO. Between the World and Me is in no way a conventional movie. It is a spoken-word piece with visual accompaniment; its closest antecedent is probably one of Agnès Varda’s essay films, like Faces Places. There are montages, archival footage, and animation, but the point of the thing is Coates’ prose, which carries the same KJV rhythms as the language of the Black church. Instead of just having Coates read to us, the words are brought to life by a host of actors, including Oprah Winfrey, Phylicia Rashad, Mahershala Ali, and Angela Bassett. The late Chadwick Boseman, who attended Howard University with the author and collaborated on a play with the director, is seen giving a commencement address to his alma mater in 2018. Howard, which Coates calls “The Mecca,” plays a big part in the psychic universe of the film. Not only continued on page 28

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nology has exploded across the globe. More than 2.2 billion iPhones of increasing sophistication have been sold, joined by at least that many Android devices. The latest iPhone has a minimum of three cameras onboard, which means now practically everyone does have a camera in their pocket, capable of recording 4K video and streaming it to the internet in real time. And what has this technological revolution revealed? Clear images of UFOs are still rare as hens’ teeth, but a new video of police killing and brutalizing Black people rockets across the internet every few weeks. If the annus horribilis of 2020 has any value going forward, I hope it will be remembered as the year we shed our rose-colored glasses of American exceptionalism. The summer of Black Lives Matter was enabled by the imagination of the son of a Syrian immigrant, but it was the writings of Ta-Nehisi Coates that gave the protest movement its intellectual underpinnings. Between the World and Me was written in 2015 as a letter to Coates’ son, Samori, who was named for an Algerian freedom fighter who dedicated his life to trying to throw off French colonial rule. “I’m telling you this in your 15th year,” it begins. The book is a memoir in the form of the

ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT

S

ince Kenneth Arnold saw mysterious objects in the skies over Mt. Rainier Washington in 1947, people have been scanning the horizon for UFOs. The alien spaceships were there in the skies over America, we thought, for the better part of 60 years, but actual photographs of flying saucers were rare because not everybody was carrying a camera all the time. Since the Civil Rights movement of the 1960s, and the election of Barack Obama in 2008, racism has diminished in America, we thought. Arbitrary police violence directed toward Black people was a thing of the past, we thought. It was something Bull Conner did in Jim Crow Alabama, not something that happened in 21st-century America. Sure, every now and then we’d hear about a Black guy getting shot by police, but they probably did something to deserve it. Besides, it’s not like we had videos of police brutality. The year before Barack Obama was elected, Apple introduced the iPhone. Since then, smartphone tech-

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TV By Chris McCoy continued from page 27 did Coates meet his son’s mother there when he passed her a blunt at a college party, but he attributes his spiritual and intellectual awakening to his time at the HBC. After growing up in the poor neighborhoods of West Baltimore, Coates says his experiences at the school proved to him that “the African diaspora is cosmopolitan.” Howard also becomes the locus of Coates’ radicalization when one of his friends, Prince Carmen Jones, is shot and killed by police while driving to his fiancé’s house. Coates uses the incident to drive home the message to his son that “… there are awful men who have laid plans for you.” The writer has James Baldwin’s

gift for summing up complex social concepts with a memorable phrase. He explains the appeal of racism to white people with “A mountain is not a mountain without something below.” He implores his son to not measure himself by the standards of racist society, but to forge his own path and identity. But he also leans strongly on what he calls “the American expectation of fairness.” Far from what Coates’ critics would like you to believe, this is not a call for tribalism and cultural isolation, but instead a plea to rework the very foundations of the American identity. As you watch Oprah weep while she listens to an interview with Breonna Taylor’s mother, you’ll think, it’s about damn time. Between the World and Me is showing on HBO.

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THE LAST WORD By Julie Ray

Remembering Tommy

It was a beautiful fall day. I walked Cleo the five or six blocks to a neighbor’s house. Something in Cleo’s past had emotionally damaged her. She didn’t like most people. I had high hopes. She was a rescued wolf and husky hybrid, and my neighbor had owned this breed before. My neighbor lived in an old renovated firehouse building that had served the Uptown community in the early 1900s, now a residence. The door didn’t have a bell and the living quarters were upstairs. No one would hear a knock. I started to call, when a car drove up and simultaneously the firehouse door opened. Suddenly, where there was none, a flurry of excitement magically manifested. A slight, animated woman hopped out of the car. My neighbor, followed by his girlfriend who had set up the meet-and-greet overnight stay with Cleo, introduced me to his mom. She pulled dog treats out of her pocket. These were dog people. I felt good about this. We encountered a problem. The living quarters upstairs in the firehouse were narrow with sharp turns. Cleo balked ferociously. My neighbor’s mom pulled more treats from her pocket. We pushed, pulled, and enticed Cleo with treats. Somehow we managed to get her all the way up into an open space. Cleo, with great relief, stepped into the expanse. The back door led to an upper deck and another set of endless stairs down into the backyard, more like a park really. Lots of trees, a picnic table, and lots of room — a dog’s paradise. Between the back door and the stairs to the yard park was a fat orange cat that was crucial to Cleo’s future. A new dog would have to get along with this cat. Cleo liked cats. But it’s not the dog that makes the decision to be friends, it’s the cat. Both beasts seemed cautious but curious. Cleo had her eye on the park-like backyard. The cat was merely a distraction to her destination. Without goading or promise, she navigated the stairs down to the yard like a pro. As Cleo ran around, I felt really good about these people. They were dog people. Now that Cleo was not the focus any longer, my neighbor talked about the property and his progress. He showed me an uncovered cistern. When he initially uncovered it, he said, there was a goldfish living down there in the murky water at the bottom. He said it was huge and hadn’t seen the light of day for many years, if ever. He surmised it had belonged to a child who emptied a fishbowl into the cistern. There had been only about a foot of water at the bottom, but the conditions were perfect for a goldfish. The oldest recorded living goldfish was 43 years old. I wondered if this goldfish had broken that record. We’ll never know; the neighbor relocated the fish to live out its natural life in better conditions. Cleo didn’t work out. She bit a visitor to the firehouse. My neighbor, Tommy Pacello, was active in the community, and had many visitors. Cleo not liking people was a problem. Tommy did tell me how he sat with Cleo and they bonded. Cleo liked Tommy. It was hard not to like Tommy, with his infectious smile and genuine, easy demeanor. Time moved on. Tommy married his girlfriend, Olivia Wilmot. Later came a daughter, Colette. Olivia would stroll Colette past my house and take pictures of Cleo in the backyard then text them to me. They had another beautiful daughter, Cecile. Tommy was invested in life, his family, and his community. If you want a list of accomplishments, degrees, and community projects attributed to Tommy Pacello, there are some great articles published of late that you’ll find in other publications. This one isn’t it. Look up another article. This article is about his love for life. Even a life as small and insignificant as an emotionally damaged dog or an isolated elderly goldfish. At the young age of 43, on November 16th, Pacello passed away from complications due to pancreatic cancer during Pancreatic Cancer Awareness Month. There’s a famous quote by businessman and community builder Carl W. Buehner from 1971: “They may forget what you said, but they will never forget how you made them feel.” A similar quote attributed to poet and civil rights activist Maya Angelou adds a few more words, “People will forget what you said, people will forget what you did, but people will never forget how you made them feel.” What Tommy said and did was laudable. His greatest accomplishment? How he made us feel — wonderful. Julie Ray is the Flyer calendar editor.

m e m p h i s f l y e r. c o m

Tommy Pacello

THE LAST WORD

TOMMY PACELLO/FACEBOOK

“People will never forget how you made them feel.”

31


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All natural cleaning for your home • office • studio environment Contact Candace @ 901-262-6610 or teamcleanmemphis@gmail.com

TUT-UNCOMMON ANTIQUES

421 N. Watkins St. 278-8965 GOING OUT OF BUSINESS SALE Everything Goes at 70% OFF! Last Day 12/24. 1500 sq. ft. of Vintage & Antique Jewelry. Retro Furniture and Accessories. Original Paintings, Sculpture, Pottery, Art & Antiques. We are the only store in the Mid-South that replaces stones in costume jewelry.

Open Tues - Sat 10a-5p

SIMPLY HEMP SHOP

We carry a variety of CBD products. Full Spectrum oil, sprays, skin care, and even CBD for Pets. Find us at Oothones at 410 N Cleveland St or online at simplyhemp.shop 901-443-7157

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Memphis Flyer 11/26/2020  

Our annual shop local guide! Plus much more. Stay healthy, Memphis!

Memphis Flyer 11/26/2020  

Our annual shop local guide! Plus much more. Stay healthy, Memphis!