Memphis Flyer 11/24/2022

Page 1

MPD WANTS YOUR SECURITY CAMERAS P4 NEWS OF THE WEIRD P26 ANDOR P28 OUR 1761ST ISSUE • 11.24.22

a s ' t a h T ! p a r W Free

ARROW CREATIVE

’TIS THE SEASON TO SHOP LOCAL WITH OUR ALTERNATIVE BLACK FRIDAY GUIDE.


2

November 24-30, 2022


JERRY D. SWIFT Advertising Director Emeritus KELLI DEWITT, CHIP GOOGE, HAILEY THOMAS Senior Account Executives MICHELLE MUSOLF Account Executive CHET HASTINGS Warehouse Facilitator JANICE GRISSOM ELLISON, KAREN MILAM, DON MYNATT, TAMMY NASH, RANDY ROTZ, LEWIS TAYLOR, WILLIAM WIDEMAN Distribution THE MEMPHIS FLYER is published weekly by Contemporary Media, Inc., P.O. Box 1738, Memphis, TN 38101 Phone: (901) 521-9000 Fax: (901) 521-0129 memphisflyer.com CONTEMPORARY MEDIA, INC. ANNA TRAVERSE FOGLE Chief Executive Officer LYNN SPARAGOWSKI Controller/Circulation Manager JEFFREY GOLDBERG Chief Revenue Officer MARGIE NEAL Chief Operating Officer KRISTIN PAWLOWSKI Digital Services Director MARIAH MCCABE Circulation and Accounting Assistant

National Newspaper Association

Association of Alternative Newsmedia

a spanish small plates and cocktail bar in the heart of midtown memphis KITCHEN OPEN LATE THURS-MONDAY

WWW.PANTAMEMPHIS.COM 2146 MONROE AVE

m e m p h i s f l y e r. c o m

CARRIE BEASLEY Senior Art Director CHRISTOPHER MYERS Advertising Art Director NEIL WILLIAMS Graphic Designer

CONTENTS

SHARA CLARK Editor SAMUEL X. CICCI Managing Editor JACKSON BAKER, BRUCE VANWYNGARDEN Senior Editors TOBY SELLS Associate Editor KAILYNN JOHNSON News Reporter CHRIS MCCOY Film and TV Editor ALEX GREENE Music Editor ABIGAIL MORICI Arts and Culture Editor MICHAEL DONAHUE, JON W. SPARKS Staff Writers BRYCE W. ASHBY, GENE GARD, COCO JUNE, GEORGE LARRIMORE, MICHAEL J. LAROSA, RICHARD MURFF, FRANK MURTAUGH, IZZY WOLLFARTH Contributing Columnists AIMEE STIEGEMEYER, SHARON BROWN Grizzlies Reporters ANDREA FENISE Fashion Editor KENNETH NEILL Founding Publisher

OUR 1761ST ISSUE 11.24.22 I am so excited! I wish you could have seen me last week when I realized I was going to be able to bring some old favorites back into the pages of the Memphis Flyer. Just giddy as all get-out! Grinnin’ and whistlin’ and dancin’ a jig … well, I wasn’t really whistling. I’ve never been able to get much out aside from a tea-kettle-like whisper. Anyway, after our tasting for the fall beer guide we published a couple weeks back, we (may have been buzzed and) got to talking about changes we might want to implement, what new and exciting — or simply reader-friendly and engaging — things we could do to make the paper bigger, better, and weirder. We’ve still got some ideas stewing, but we really went for it this week. And I am excited for y’all, too! I’m also excited for the handful of coworkers who are going to be just as surprised as you are when they crack open this week’s issue. I did my best to keep this a secret outside of the folks who work in the design and copyediting trenches of producing this paper. Longtime readers will surely recognize some changes on the following pages — and the return of some fun and super-useful content — all in a slightly larger, 32-page package that allowed us the breathing room to TCB on these goals. Some of you may remember the weekly insights offered by Rob Brezsny with his Free Will Astrology horoscopes. His work has been syndicated for years by alt-weeklies across the U.S. and was in our very own paper for a long time. It was cut some years back when so many publications like ours downsized and focused more closely on original content in limited print space. Another item that was cut — that I continue to be asked about when the Flyer comes up in conversation — is News of the Weird, a compilation of strange and surreal news stories from headlines across the globe. Well, guess what, lovelies? They’re baaaaack! Also gracing these pages once PHOTO: DAN PARLANTE | UNSPLASH again is our After Dark live music Get weirder. calendar. This is a bit of a trial run on those listings, as we’ve not printed them since the Before Times. But live music is kicking and thriving in the city now, and we believe this to be a valuable resource. If you’re in a band or do promotions for local venues, please send your music events to calendar@memphisflyer.com with the subject line AFTER DARK. Were you tired of having to dig out a magnifying glass to read the clues on The New York Times crossword puzzle? Did you have to use the smallest pen in the world to fill in the answers in those teeny-tiny boxes? We’ve got great news for you (and for the many folks who’ve complained about it over the years) — we upsized the puzzle! Lastly on the new-and-different front this week is a “now playing” conclusion to the film/TV section, where we’re testing finishing up there with a rundown of mustsee films currently in theaters. I’m new to this position and title, but I’m not new here, as you may have read in my introductory official editor’s note a few weeks back. I started out as a reader more than two decades ago — literally just a kid. I looked to the Flyer for the fun stuff — like astrology and weird news from around the world, long before we all scrolled viral videos on our phones. The extensive live music, arts, food, theater, film (etc.!) event listings helped me plan my weekends, and showed me just how much Memphis had to offer in terms of entertainment. And of course these were icing on the cake for the unmatched news reporting, politics analysis, event highlights, music and NEWS & OPINION film reviews, food coverage, poignant THE FLY-BY - 4 opinion pieces (etc.!) that could be POLITICS - 8 found in every issue, every single week. FINANCE - 9 We’re hoping you all will find these AT LARGE - 10 additions, along with our outstanding COVER STORY standard content, informative, fun, and “THAT’S A WRAP!” BY FLYER STAFF - 12 useful — and we’re hoping some new SPORTS - 16 readers will join us on this journey as WE RECOMMEND - 17 we make the Flyer bigger, better, and MUSIC - 18 weirder! (And boy, there are a lot of AFTER DARK - 19 exclamation marks in this column! Did CALENDAR - 20 NY TIMES CROSSWORD - 21 I mention I was excited?) With that said, BOOKS - 24 after you’ve read through this issue, pass FOOD - 25 your copy along to a friend or colleague. NEWS OF THE WEIRD - 26 Share the love and legacy of Memphis’ ASTROLOGY - 27 alternative weekly newspaper — and TV - 28 stay tuned for what comes next! CLASSIFIEDS - 30 Shara Clark LAST WORD - 31 shara@memphisflyer.com

3


THE

fly-by

MEMernet

CITY REPORTER B y To b y S e l l s

Surveillance Friends

TACO BURN

MPD wants your security camera to join its new network for quicker crime fighting.

The word is out that TacoNGanas owner Greg Diaz is under federal investigation for alleged sketchy labor practices (h/t to The Commercial Appeal’s Daniel Connolly). Some here are barely hiding suspicions and, perhaps, contempt. “Say it ain’t so, Greg!” wrote Larry Livingston on Nextdoor last week. “My go-to food truck is being investigated by the U.S. government. However, last Thursday’s usual order actually sucked? Coincidence or just your underpaid workers don’t care anymore?” BEGINNING TO LOOK …

POSTED TO NEXTDOOR BY JACK YATES

November 24-30, 2022

Edited by Toby Sells

Memphis on the internet.

POSTED TO FACEBOOK BY TACONGANAS

… a lot like Christmas! An East Buntyn neighbor knew last week his holiday decorations may be “too early for some” but invited those in the spirit to drive by his house on Ellsworth for “some holiday cheer.” IT’S A SIGN

POSTED TO INSTAGRAM BY UNAPOLOGETICALLYMEMPHIS

4

{

Questions, Answers + Attitude

The Union Krystal misspelled the restaurant chain’s misspelling of “chick” as “chic” instead of “chik,” and Unapologetically Memphis unapologetically busted them out for it on Instagram.

The Memphis Police Department (MDP) asked residents last week to voluntarily register their security cameras on a new network for quicker access to footage and, perhaps, live video in a move one activist called a “sham-ass publicity stunt.” City officials announced the Connect Memphis network last Wednesday. They said the network is “designed to provide critical and actionable information that speeds up investigations and emergency response PHOTO: SCOTT WEBB | UNSPLASH and keeps residents and Connect Memphis has two tiers. One only asks the location of your security camera. businesses safer.” The next tier asks you to buy special equipment and share your live feed with permission. With Connect Memphis, MPD will have a list of cameras in areas around the city. Should a yearly subscription of $2,300 is required for this bundle. crime occur, the list would help eliminate the need for doorThe live video systems can be shared only on alert, using to-door canvassing — police asking neighbors if they have a a smartphone app or a manual trigger button, at the camera camera and footage that may help solve the crime. owner’s discretion, said MPD. “Having the ability to quickly review video footage in a MPD Chief C.J. Davis said Connect Memphis “will serve criminal investigation is critically important,” said Memphis as a deterrent and aid with the collection of video evidence Mayor Jim Strickland. “With Connect Memphis, our officers in a timely and convenient manner.” will know where active cameras are in relation to a crime A registry portal on Connect Memphis is now open scene and be able to obtain the footage more quickly or for citizens and businesses to list their security cameras request it to help with their investigation. We hope you will with police. Visit connect2memphis.org and follow the sign up and join us in the fight against crime.” instructions. As of last Friday morning, 478 cameras had been registered and 26 had given MPD access to live video. “Now, the city is asking you to In response, Decarcerate Memphis wrote, “Let us be clear give up your personal privacy ... to and speak loudly against this. help the police do their jobs. “The city of Memphis spent $10 million on cameras to prevent crime and solve crime. Memphis is no safer This does not make use safer.” after spending all of that money that could have gone into Camera registration does not give MPD access to live supporting the needs of the city’s people. Now, the city is video. Investigators will contact camera owners only if they asking you to give up your personal privacy or the privacy need help collecting camera footage. of the employees and customers of your business to help the However, residents and businesses can upgrade their police do their jobs. This does not make use safer.” video security systems to include live video feeds to MPD. Local activist Hunter Demster called Connect Memphis With the installation of a “small CORE device,” they can “a sham-ass publicity stunt to give folks publicity and share video “in emergencies to improve employee safety and the perception of action” and warned of maybe darker police response.” intentions. The devices range in price from $350 for one device that “We just had a federal trial because [MPD was] violating can support up to four cameras. A yearly subscription of $150 a federal consent decree for spying on citizens,” Demster is required for this bundle. The most expensive live-videowrote. “One of those ways was taking pictures of us with the feed bundle is $7,300 and can support up to 50 cameras. A SkyCop cameras. They aren’t to be trusted.”


Starting pay up to $22/hour.

fedexishiring.com

m e m p h i s f l y e r. c o m

If you’re seeking a career with a company that will offer you both – come join us!

NEWS & OPINION

Discover where a career at FedEx can take you.

5


LASER LIGHT SHOW MEMPHIS MUSEUM

OF SCIENCE & HISTORY

Friday Nights Nov. 25 thru Dec. 23

{

LGBTQ+ By Kailynn Johnson

‘Open Dialogue’

Law enforcement and the LGBTQ+ community have to work together for public events in uneasy times.

E MEMPHIS MUSEUM

OF SCIENCE & HISTORY

moshmemphis.com

PREVENT OPIOID OVERDOSE

CARRY NARCAN (Narcan provided at no cost)

November 24-30, 2022

Free Individual and Agency trainings are available Qualifying Agencies are: • Health Organizations • Treatment Centers • Churches • Schools • Local Businesses • Non Profits • Restaurants/Bars/Clubs • Hotels etc... To schedule training, please call: David Fuller (901) 484-2852

memphisprevention.org

If you need help, support, or referral to treatment, please call Lincoln Coffman (901) 495-5103

6

This project is funded under a Grant Contract with the State of Tennessee Department of Mental Health and Substance Abuse Services.

fforts are currently being made between members and representatives of the LGBTQ+ community and local law enforcement to create “open dialogue” in light of recent events and proposed legislation. “With terrible legislation going around, also known as hate, we need to know what support is being offered,” said representatives from The Haven Memphis on a post via Instagram. Vanessa Rodley serves as president of Mid-South Pride, the organization responsible for the annual Memphis Pride Fest. Rodley said there has always been a need for open dialogue and communication, and with new bills coming out and the events at the Museum of Science & History (MoSH), it seems that now is an important time to talk about issues together. Recently, a group of Proud Boys showed up to MoSH before a “family-friendly drag show,” causing law enforcement to intervene and the show to be canceled. In more recent news, Tennessee Senate Majority Leader Jack Johnson has proposed legislation that could make public drag shows a criminal offense in Tennessee. “The trust is not all the way there with the LGBTQ+ community and local law enforcement,” said Krista Wright Thayer, director of outreach and prevention at The Haven. “The MoSH event didn’t show us we were supported as much as we could be. Was the protection there? Almost after the fact. Police were there before the Proud Boys showed up, but that event still got shut down and that was the Proud Boys’ intent, and they succeeded and that’s not okay.” Natalie Hillman, the LGBTQ+ liaison for the Shelby County Sheriff ’s Office, said that in regard to the events at MoSH, she felt that there was a misunderstanding regarding constitutional rights. “From everyone I talked to, they didn’t understand why [the Proud Boys] weren’t asked to leave,” said

Hillman. “They have a right to protest, and they have a right to bear arms, so it kind of ties the police officers’ hands at this point because they’re protected.” According to Thayer, conversations were had to see how they can collaborate with law enforcement on how they can keep their public events not only safe, but seen as “family-friendly and needed in our community.” Rodley said Mid-South Pride has to work with the police and sheriff ’s office for their events, so they have to have an open dialogue. However, Rodley also said that all groups do not feel comfortable in doing this. Rodley said law enforcement would like to help them in creating safe spaces, but the community needs to communicate when things are happening so that law enforcement can support them.

PHOTO: SOPHIE EMENY | UNSPLASH

Recent events and legislation have the community on guard. According to Hillman, this is her sole job, and she spends her days meeting with members of the LGBTQ+ community and different organizations. “We try to get in that door and talk to them,” said Hillman. “We just have so many ideas, and we’re trying to get them into place. “The community has asked for us to be there even more, you know [we] asked for some help so we can be there more, and it’s our hope that we can be in one of the centers daily just so that the community, if they have a need for law enforcement, are not afraid to come and report to us, or if they have an issue with law enforcement and a mistreatment issue, they can report to us, and then we can handle it accordingly.”


7

NEWS & OPINION

m e m p h i s f l y e r. c o m


POLITICS By Jackson Baker

$500,000

Karen Camper’s Race Translating the legislative experience into the grassroots.

myDream Car

Experience Fridays & Saturdays* 6PM–10PM October 30 - December 31 Win up to $1,000 Free SlotPlay®! 10 points equal one (1) entry. Start earning entries weekly from October 30 - December 31. Hollywood 20X entries on Sunday and 25X entries on Mondays at 1st Jackpot and Wednesdays at Hollywood. Earn 10X entries on Saturdays. Swipe at any promotional kiosk on Saturdays from 10am – 4pm to activate your multiplier.

Show N' Win

Show the mychoice App when your name is called as a winner and receive a prize based on tier.

ADVANTAGE

= $25 Free SlotPlay

PREFERRED

= $75 Free SlotPlay

ELITE

= $150 Free SlotPlay

November 24-30, 2022

= $250 Free SlotPlay

GRAND PRIZE DRAWING – BUILD YOUR DREAM CAR ON US! Package includes a $50,000 Car Voucher, 2 Nights at a Hollywood Casino Hotel Suite, 5-Course meal in Fairbanks & VIP Transportation

Friday, Dec 30 @ 10PM Saturday, Dec 31 @ Midnight 8

Depending on how controlled the House. one interprets the Chumney had credentials, but recent announcethey were, like those of Camper today, ment by Michelle amassed primarily in an environment, McKissack as to her Capitol Hill in Nashville, that was political intentions, physically distant from the constituency there are either one of greater Memphis and not nearly as or two women in familiar to its voters as the governmental the running for Memphis mayor. There arenas for those public officials who had are still those who regard McKissack, the served closer to home. school board chair and former TV anchor, Had Chumney chanced a mayoral as having been equivocal or hypothetical race on the basis of her legislative qualiin her formal announcement. Did she say fications, she would likely have had far she was running or merely indicate she greater difficulty than she did in the 2007 was thinking about it? race, where she was a major contender There was no such ambiguity about from beginning to end. Indeed, she had Karen Camper’s intenmade a Democratic tions. The minority primary race for Shelby leader, declaring her County mayor in 2002, candidacy from a while still a legislator, position next to her and had run respectgrandmother’s front ably, but well behind, porch in South Memagainst eventual winner phis, proclaimed herself AC Wharton, then the “ready” and reinforced county’s public defender. the immediacy of her In 2003, though, candidacy with some Chumney had said striking words: “From goodbye to the General the front porch, we can Assembly and run for see the conditions of a seat on the Memphis our streets. We can see City Council against whether it is littered PHOTO: JACKSON BAKER fellow hopefuls George with potholes. We can Karen Camper as a Flinn and Jim Strickfreshman legislator in 2008 land. She won that race hear the engines of cars roaring out of control. and wasted no time in We can hear street racing. We can hear broadening her acquaintance with the gunshots.” city’s voters and theirs with her. She declared, “Memphis needs a In the four years leading up to the mayor that’s willing to meet with you on 2007 mayor’s race, Chumney was the your front porch.” most visible member of the council, posIn so dramatizing her effort, positioning challenge after challenge not only to ing herself as having sprung right from the the more questionable actions of Mayor grassroots of inner city Memphis, Camper Willie Herenton but to the good-ol’-boy was ingeniously minimizing one of the presumptions of a council where pork potential shortcomings of her position — was ladled about by members like so that her basic governmental experience, many reciprocated scratchings of each however renowned, has taken place at other’s back. something of a remove from home. In so doing, Chumney ruffled some Camper’s race can usefully be feathers in city hall, but she got the atcompared to that of a previous mayoral tention of the voters, enough so that she aspirant, Carol Chumney, who sought finished a close second to Herenton in the office in 2007, against then incumthe three-cornered mayor’s race, leading bent Mayor Willie Herenton and MLGW to speculation that she might have won CEO Herman Morris. in a one-on-one. Like Camper, Chumney, now a Civil Karen Camper doesn’t have the adCourt judge, had served for many years vantage that Chumney had of recent and in the Tennessee state House. She did not close-up tangles with the powers-that-be, become her party’s leader, as has Camper, but, to judge by her unusual mode of but Chumney was an influential legislaannouncement, she has good grassroots tor, particularly in the field of children’s instincts. And, of all the contestants, she services, which she turned into a major may be most familiar with the ongoing public concern, and she held several threats to home rule posed by today’s leadership positions in the Democratic state government. Which may be more of hierarchy, which in those days actually an issue than it may seem.


FINANCE By Gene Gard

Three Tax Concepts Working through the complexity of personal tax planning.

Tax advantaged saving Depending on income, employment status, and employee benefits, there are various tax-advantaged ways to save. Things like 401(k) plans, 403(b) plans, traditional and Roth IRAs, and HSAs are all potentially advantageous from a tax perspective. Generally, they either allow you to exclude money from your taxable income (to save taxes today) or allow you to pay taxes now but let the money grow tax free (so you can save on taxes in the future). Every situation is different, but it is likely in your best interest to max out these types of programs, even if you feel like you have “too much” money locked away in IRAs, or even if you want to retire early. There are many ways to access retirement accounts early, such as the rule of 55, Substantially Equal Periodic Payments, or Roth Conversion Ladders. Roth Conversions In traditional IRAs or 401(k)s, the money going in is not taxed but any eventual withdrawals are taxed like ordi-

Charitable giving strategies Most people become more charitably inclined as they age, and understand the tax benefits that giving can bring. There are a number of strategies that can make doing good do even better when it comes to your tax liability. Donor Advised Funds are a way to move money to an account and take the full deduction at the time of the gift. You can never take back the gift, but you can continue to control it in the sense that the money can stay invested and can be donated over time to the charities of your choice. This lets donors take a larger deduction in certain high-tax times, so gifting can be bunched up and then used over multiple years in the future. Later in life, Qualified Charitable Distributions (QCDs) can be made directly from IRAs to charity to meet RMD requirements. Conclusion These concepts are only the beginning of a comprehensive tax plan, especially if your income and assets are large. While these ideas are a good start, there’s no substitute for real advice from tax professionals and financial advisors. We all have a responsibility to pay our taxes, but there’s no reason to ignore the opportunities afforded by the tax code when planning for your future — and it’s never too early to begin! Gene Gard is Chief Investment Officer at Telarray, a Memphis-based wealth management firm that helps families navigate investment, tax, estate, and retirement decisions. Ask him your questions or schedule an objective, no-pressure portfolio review at letstalk@telarrayadvisors.com. Sign up for the next free online seminar on the Events tab at telarrayadvisors.com.

c

Low 5% APR 12 months to repay Personal loan up to $5,000 901-751-9351 southeastfinancial.org

Maximum loan amount $5,000. Subject to credit approval. Payment Example: At 5% APR, 12 monthly payments of $428.04 on $5,000 loan. Apply in person at any branch between 8:00 am and 4:30 pm on 11/25/22 or 11/28/22, by calling 800-521-9653 between the hours of 7:00 am and 6:00 pm (CST) on 11/25/22 or 11/28/22, and online starting at 12:00 am on 11/25/22 through 11:59 pm 11/28/22. Loans must close on or before 12/5/22 to qualify for this special rate. Limit one loan per borrower. Other restrictions may apply.

southeastfinancial.org | 901-751-9351

m e m p h i s f l y e r. c o m

PHOTO: JON TYSON | UNSPLASH

nary income. With “Roth” accounts, the money going in is fully taxed but then any eventual distributions are generally tax free. There is a way to convert traditional money to Roth at any time — you just have to treat the money converted as though it’s income which is taxed. Usually, it’s best to defer taxes as long as possible, but in some cases it makes sense to take the hit and pay taxes early. If you plot a typical person’s lifetime tax paid, it is U-shaped — income and therefore taxes paid are higher while working, get lower after retirement, and then rise later in life when required minimum distributions create taxable income. It can make sense to do Roth conversions during those low tax years just after retirement when you’re likely in a low tax bracket.

NEWS & OPINION

T

he modern U.S. income tax began in 1913, and at first it was very simple. Since then, virtually every congress and administration has layered on additional complexity to the point that the tax code is thousands of pages long and no one person can be expected to be competent in every nuance of tax. As your income and assets grow, tax planning is more and more important. Consulting an expert is almost always a good idea, but here are three general concepts that cover a lot of ground when it comes to working through this complexity via personal tax planning.

9


A T L A R G E B y B r u c e Va n W y n g a r d e n

Hail Mary #8 Memphis will take another shot at pro football. Lord help us.

D MIDTOWN LINGERIE

————————— 710 S.COX ST. 38104 ————————— OPEN MON-SAT 11:30-7PM COCOANDLOLAS.COM

@COCOANDLOLAS

WINNER!

MAKE YOUR CLOSET HAPPY, MANE. VISIT US AT

GRINDCIT YDESIGNS.COM/ MEMPHISFLYER

November 24-30, 2022

TO PLACE AN ORDER.

10

id you hear the big news? Memphis is going to get a USFL team! The USFL, in case you’re not familiar with the latest iteration (I wasn’t), is a professional football league that had its debut season last spring with eight teams, all of which played their games in Birmingham, Alabama — which is weird, since the teams were supposedly affiliated with other cities. The Philadelphia Stars take on the Pittsburgh Maulers in Alabama in April? How does that setup not draw huge crowds? Anyway, next spring, according to a newly signed agreement (obtained by the Daily Memphian via an FOIA request) between the city of Memphis, Liberty Stadium managers Global Spectrum, and the USFL, Memphis gets a piece of this sweet gridiron action. The new Memphis Showboats will play in the Simmons Bank Liberty Stadium, along with the possibly mighty Houston Gamblers, who will also call Memphis their home field. (When the Gamblers and the Showboats hook up, will both teams wear home uniforms? Tune in next spring and find out!) The Showboats will mostly be made up of players from the now-defunct Tampa Bay Bandits USFL team, which folded after one season. Dear reader, you may be forgiven if you are less than enthralled. I am myself extraordinarily underwhelmed. They should have called this team the Memphis Deja Vu because we’ve all been here before. Memphis is no stranger to startup, wonky-league football teams, having been home to no less than seven through the years. Let me refresh your memory, in case you don’t still have the souvenir jerseys: Memphis Southmen, WFL (1974-75); Memphis Showboats, USFL (1984-85); Memphis Mad Dogs, CFL (1995); Tennessee Oilers, NFL (1997); Memphis Maniax, XFL (2001); Memphis Express, AAF (2019). This list doesn’t include the Memphis Dragons, an Arena League team that played in the Pyramid for a season in the 1990s. Suffice it to say that all Memphis professional football teams should be required to have the words “The Short-Lived” above the team name on the jerseys. Two years for a Memphis pro football team is an “era.” Reportedly, the prime mover for this latest Excellent Adventure in Football Fantasy is FedEx founder and chairman Fred Smith, who, bless his heart, has wanted a professional football franchise for his home city for decades. Remember the Memphis Hound Dogs, the city’s

well-funded 1990s Hail Mary pass at the NFL? Smith was part of that ownership group, along with cotton magnate Billy Dunavant, billionaire Paul Tudor Jones, and Elvis Presley Enterprises. Despite the undeniably rockin’ name and lots of money, Memphis lost out to the Jacksonville Jaguars and Carolina Panthers, who had the good sense to choose cat names. Smith then became part of the ownership group of the (obligatory “short-lived” descriptor goes here) CFL Memphis Mad Dogs, who entertained the city, sort of, for one season. Oh, Canada. Anyway, at last week’s announcement, when Smith and Memphis Mayor Jim Strickland posed awkwardly, jointly holding an orange-ish football and wearing too-small Memphis Showboat hats, it had a kabuki theater, been-here-donethis feel. Lord help us. Who’s fired up for April minor-league football, y’all? Show of hands.

They should’ve called this team the Memphis Deja Vu because we’ve all been here before. By all accounts, the city’s financial commitment to this silliness is fairly minimal: some minor upgrades to the stadium and providing office and practice space to the team — which is apparently going to be the Pipkin building. The last time most Memphians were there was when we were driving through to get Covid shots in 2020. Good times! It should be noted for historical purposes that the original USFL lasted three (whoo!) entire seasons (1983-85). Three consecutive Heisman Trophy winners signed with the league, including Georgia senatorial candidate Herschel Walker (who said last week he would rather be a werewolf than a vampire). The league played its games in the spring for two seasons, but one influential team owner pushed relentlessly for the league to shift its games to the fall. “If God wanted football in the spring,” the owner said, closing his case, “he wouldn’t have created baseball.” The ensuing move to a fall schedule doomed the league, which could not compete for fans or TV eyeballs with the NFL and college football. The owner whose business acumen destroyed the league? It was New Jersey Generals owner Donald J. Trump. A stable genius, even back then. Go Showboats.


ACOUSTIC SUNDAY LIVE! PRESENTS THE CONCERT TO

PROTECT

OUR

AQUIFER

TICKETS ACOUSTICSUNDAYLIVE.COM INFO 901.237.2972

PRODUCED BY BRUCE & BARBARA NEWMAN FOR PROTECT OUR AQUIFER

with SPECIAL GUEST

TERRY “HARMONICA” BEAN

7PM SUNDAY DEC4TH 2022

FIRST CONGO CHURCH • 1000 COOPER, MEMPHIS, TN 38104

NEWS & OPINION

TOM PAXTON PLUS CRYS MATTHEWS SUSAN WERNER THE ACCIDENTALS

m e m p h i s f l y e r. c o m

FEATURING GRAMMY LIFETIME ACHIEVEMENT AWARD RECIPIENT

11


a s ’ t a h T ! p a r W

PHOTO: RUTH BLACK | DREAMSTIME.COM

COVER STORY By Flyer Staff

’TIS THE SEASON TO SHOP LOCAL WITH OUR ALTERNATIVE BLACK FRIDAY GUIDE.

A

s we shop around to find the perfect gift for family, friends, and loved ones, resist the impulse to scroll over to Amazon and let Jeff Bezos fix all your problems. Local businesses are the bedrock of any city, and there are plenty of well-known shops and hidden gems that can provide the perfect present, no matter the festivity. From art to socks to whiskey, our alternative Black Friday guide has Memphis shoppers covered, helping create a cheery holiday spirit for both Bluff City customers and entrepreneurs.

November 24-30, 2022

Arrow Creative Holiday Bazaar The much-beloved Holiday Bazaar continued the Memphis College of Art’s (MCA) 69-year tradition when it opened last week at Arrow Creative. For all of those years, Memphians were well used to finding MCA’s Rust Hall in Overton Park, where the public was welcomed into creative spaces to find the work of the school’s students, faculty, staff, and alumni. The school closed in 2020. That’s when Arrow picked up the mantle to continue the Holiday Bazaar tradition. But Arrow leaders changed the weekend event into a month-long affair with a ticketed First Dibs Party (last week), private shopping experiences, and creative classes throughout the month. Local artists and creatives remain the 12 focus of the bazaar — a free shopping event — now in its third year at the Coo-

upon colorful paintings and sculptures inspired by sea life. “Everyone is lively, carrying their treasures to check-out, and feeling a little drunk on wine and holiday cheer.” — Toby Sells Bazaar runs through December 23rd, 653 Philadelphia St., 213-6320, arrowcreative.org

per-Young-area Arrow. The bazaar will feature one-of-a-kind gifts including art, jewelry, home goods, accessories, apparel, and more from more than 80 local artists. Shoppers will find sculpture, ceramics, painting, fine art, fashion design, fiber arts, photography, woodworking, the Memphis Flyer coloring book (just sayin’), and more. “The excitement is contagious,” said Arrow artist Terri Scott, describing the event. “With a cup of wine, you weave through the crowd. You have a mental note of the tables you want to visit first. A table of carefully crafted jewelry beckons you forward and you can’t resist gazing

PHOTO (ABOVE): ARROW CREATIVE

Arrow Creative Holiday Bazaar PHOTO (BELOW): D’ANGELO CONNELL

Launch a budding artist’s career at Art Center on Union.

Unlock Your Inner Artist at Art Center Inside Art Center, everyone has a chance to be an artist. Conveniently placed on Union Street, the Art Center offers a plentiful selection of well-known and quality products for any art project. Their shelves are always stocked with the best and most popular supplies — Golden Acrylic, Gamblin Oil, Princeton Brush, Fredrix Canvas, Copic Markers, Montana Spray Paint, a dozen sketchbook brands in multiple sizes, a fully stocked drawing supply section, a children’s art supply section, decorative papers, and much more. Aside from the quality and quantity of products offered, the staff is eager to help you plan your next project. Whether you’re an art teacher, an aspiring designer, or just looking for a new hobby, each staff member will welcome you with open arms. If this isn’t enough, the windowed storefront invites you to enter and explore. The Art Center, for nearly 50 years, has never ceased making connections with the Memphis community. While browsing inside, find their decorated


PHOTO: MEDNIKOW JEWELERS

Necklace by Penny Preville

PHOTO: JUSTIN FOX BURKS

Jared McStay at Shangri-La Records

bulletin board of local artists’ business cards and information. These artists range from photographers, graphic designers, calligraphy artists, to influencers all in the Memphis area. While inspiring local artists to accomplish their goals, the Art Center also celebrates everyone’s potential to create a more colorful world. With discounted products and new sales every day, find your new favorite art supplies on every visit. — Izzy Wollfarth Art Center, 1636 Union Ave., 276-6321, artcentermemphis.com

for about a hundred hours.” — Abigail Morici Cotton Row Uniques, 4615 Poplar Ave., 590-3647, shopcottonrow.com

Cotton Row Uniques Nestled among the storefronts at the Poplar Collection strip mall, Cotton Row Uniques offers a carefully curated shopping experience. “We try to have something for everyone,” owner Shane Waldroup says. “We have everything from furniture to Turkish rugs to a gourmet food section to perfumes and colognes. It’s kind of that one-stop shop for your unique gift.” Unique is a keyword in this store’s operation. Waldroup, along with co-owner Scott Barnes, sources items that extend outside the run-of-the-mill to appeal to the store’s eclectic customer base. “We love seeing mothers buying gifts for their kids, and then kids coming in and buying for their parents and grandparents,” Waldroup adds. For this holiday season, Waldroup points to a few popular sellers, first among which is the HeARTfully Yours Christmas Ornaments by Christopher Radko. The charming ornaments are hand-blown in Europe, with proceeds benefiting causes including heart disease, breast cancer, AIDS research, and food insecurity. Another popular item this season, Waldroup says, is the “Walking in Memphis” downfilled pillow, with a design of the Memphis skyline and other Memphis references. And, of course, there’s Cotton Row’s brand of candles, including the Memphis Creed, #901 Bond, Citrus Grove, Southern Garden, and Cotton Row. Of the candles, Waldroup says, “We’ve made sure that the fragrance would last until the candle is completely finished. They’ll burn

Pick Up Some Vinyl at Local Record Stores “Give the gift of music,” went the old promotional slogan, back when that could only mean purchasing an album or single on vinyl or CD. Streaming changed all that, of course … or did it? With vinyl’s share of the music market on the rise, record stores in Memphis are not only thriving, they’re multiplying. Shangri-La is the granddaddy of them all, and Goner has followed their example (and then some). But don’t sleep on the Memphis Music shop on Beale Street, stocked with an impressive array of albums by Memphis artists past and present. And just a stone’s throw away is the relatively new River City Records, also doing brisk business. Finally, there are pockets of vinyl in stores focused on other products, such as the second floor of A. Schwab and, believe it or not, Urban Outfitters. Note that the dedicated record stores above also feature oodles of other musicrelated delights, including CDs, cassettes, and books galore. It turns out you can give the gift of music. River City Records’ Chris Braswell notes, “The people that are really driving the increases [in record sales] are teenagers, 20-year-olds, and

30-year-olds. They’re becoming avid vinyl collectors. A lot of people think streaming services like Spotify hurt physical sales, but I think it’s the exact opposite. This most recent generation has started looking for a way to physically possess their music, and vinyl is just the coolest medium there is. You get liner notes and the cover art!” — Alex Greene The Broom Closet This metaphysical shop on South Main has everything for the witchy giftees on your list. And you certainly won’t find these items in big-box stores. Herbs, essential oils, an extensive selection of crystals, candles, books, boxes, incense, goblets and chalices, and so much more. You can also book a personalized tarot reading, an aura and chakra analysis, or purchase a gift card so your special someone can choose for themselves. Does your gift recipient wish to ward PHOTO: SHARA CLARK

Hand-dressed candles at Broom Closet

Mednikow Jewelers If you like your gifts to twinkle and sparkle, then you should go directly to Mednikow, the jewelry store that’s been bringing the best, the brightest, and the most shimmering stones to Memphis since 1891. With five generations of dedication to the art of jewelry, you’ll find gems in a wide range of styles and prices. The store carries pieces by top designers, including David Yurman, Mikimoto, Elizabeth Locke, Penny Preville, Roberto Coin, John Hardy, Gurhan, Monica Rich Kosann, Charles Krypell, and Michael Bondanza. Pictured is one of Penny Preville’s striking creations, a diamond charm necklace with a toggle clasp and several charms. Mednikow not only prides itself on providing gorgeous, top-quality jewelry, but it also loves to work with you to help you come to a decision — after all, it has to be perfect, right? The experts there have decades of knowledge of what’s exceptional and they want you to be exceptionally happy. In fact, you may not know precisely what you want until you go inside, look around, and then see the exact engagement ring that catches your eye. Or bracelet, or earrings, or locket, or necklace, or — well, you get the idea. Whatever you decide, you or someone you love will be wearing a work of art. — Jon W. Sparks Mednikow Jewelers, 474 Perkins Extd. #100, 767-2100, mednikow.com Straight Tennessee Whiskey from Old Dominick Distillery The holidays are a time for joy and cheer. But they’re also a time for family, which could go either way for many of you out there. If your “straight shooter” old uncle is going to be there at the end of the table, hogging all the Thanksgiving turkey and spouting alternative facts, then you’ll need some straight shootin’ of your own. To make sure the whole table is covered and continued on page 14

COVER STORY m e m p h i s f l y e r. c o m

PHOTO: COTTON ROW UNIQUES

Ornament at Cotton Row Uniques

off the evil eye? Perhaps they could use a little money luck? The shop’s knowledgeable staff has prepared a variety of intentional smudge kits ($18) — for protection, love drawing, money drawing, and home cleansing and blessing — that include tools like sage bundles, incense cones, selenite sticks, gemstones, and chime candles for ritual assistance. For manifestation work, they offer candles ($12), hand-dressed with oils, herbs, and gemstone sand, and blessed in-store for their purpose — cleansing, drawing money or love, protection, and more. These are just a few of the unique goods you’ll find at the Broom Closet. Stop in, stock up, and give the gift of magic this season! — Shara Clark The Broom Closet, 552 S. Main, 497-9486, thebroomclosetmemphis.com

13


PHOTO: OLD DOMINICK DISTILLERY

Straight Tennessee Whiskey continued from page 13

Custom Socks at Rock Ya Sox Jeff Farmer is quick to say he’s known for his socks. “At one point I had over 200 pairs of colorful designs,” he says. That was just his personal collection. So, it’s only natural Farmer is owner of Rock Ya Sox, which features more than 100 unisex sock designs, many of which Farmer created. A native Memphian, Farmer decided to start his own sock business after he visited a store in Portland, Oregon, that just sold socks. A friend then told him where he could get socks in bulk and another place that created sock designs. Farmer decided to design socks as well. Baptist Memorial Hospital reached out to

November 24-30, 2022

to be supportive of local businesses at the same time, pick up a strong bottle of liquor from Old Dominick Distillery. We’ve all had the staples: the Formula No. 10 Gin, the Huling Station Straight Bourbon, the Honeybell Citrus Vodka. But this holiday season, focus on the distillery’s major new milestone. Released November 1st, Old Dominick officially launched its Straight Tennessee Whiskey ($35.99 a bottle, $69.99 for the bottledin-bond variation), the first distilled, barreled, matured, and bottled whiskey in Memphis since Prohibition. “As a Kentucky native, I did not think I would ever make a Tennessee whiskey,” says Alex Castle, master distiller at Old Dominick, “and yet, here we are.” The whiskey is aged for a minimum of four years in West Tennessee White Oak barrels. “Straight Tennessee Whiskey opens with vanilla, tobacco, anise, and caramel on the nose. Sugar Maple Charcoal filtering delivers a mellow, medium-bodied whiskey, lightly sweet with caramel and crème brûlée with a hint of oak and vanilla for a silky finish.” Drink up, whiskey connoisseurs! — Samuel X. Cicci Old Dominick Distillery, 305 S. Front St., 260-1250, olddominick.com

Allpa Del Día Travel Surprise Pack at Outdoors Inc. Want a travel item that stands out? Each of these Allpa Del Día innovative travel bags are unique. Since they are made with repurposed remnant fabric of various colors, no two look exactly alike. But, looks aside, this well-constructed 35-liter travel essential is full of nifty features, including a low-profile harness suspension system, contoured shoulder straps, air-mesh back panel, adjustable sternum strap, and padded hip belt. The bag also features a suitcase-style, full-wrap zipper opening on the main compartment that opens into a large, zippered mesh compartment. It’s perfectly sized for carry-on, and its padded laptop and tablet sleeves are accessible via an exterior zipper. A subdivided compartment on the top is designed with passports and other small essentials in mind. As a security measure, all external zippers feature theft-proof webbing sewn across the openings. Additionally, four reinforced grab handles provide multiple carry points when the shoulder straps are tucked away. There’s even a high-visibility rain cover that stows into the pack. Solidly designed and uniquely colorful, for $200, what’s not to like? — Bruce VanWyngarden Outdoors Inc., multiple locations in Memphis, outdoorsinc.com

14

PHOTO: OUTDOORS INC.

PHOTO: MICHAEL DONAHUE

Allpa Del Día travel bag

Rock Ya Sox


QUANTUM him and asked him to “create something for a good cause.” So, he came up with a sock with “polka dots, contrasting colors.” People tell him what they want. “If they want to get them in bulk, it’s $100 minimum.” But, he says, “If they want me to make the socks, it can be as little as one pair. I make socks at home.” A single pair of socks sells for $13. “If someone calls and wants me to put a picture of their face or dog on the sock, I can create those socks.” Want something unusual? Farmer also carries “3D socks. They may have a nose on them or ears hanging on them. Or Superman socks with a cape on the back.” — Michael Donahue Available online at rockyasox.com Thistle and Bee Gift Boxes Sweet treats are always popular as stocking stuffers, but this year, why not do some good at the same time? “Thistle and Bee is a nonprofit organization that helps women survivors of sex trafficking and addiction get back into society again and thrive,” says Bridgette House, social justice enterprise manager at Thistle and Bee. Based out of Second Baptist Church on Walnut Grove, Thistle and Bee’s name refers to their means of production. “We have 40-plus hives that we use to harvest our own honey, and we make our products from the honey that we harvest. All of our products are made by survivors, and they’re packaged with a lot of love and a lot of care.” Currently, Thistle and Bee supports a residency facility for 11 survivors; next year, they hope to double that capacity. Their premium wildflower honey is also available in a hot, pepper-infused flavor and whipped cinnamon. They also make their own custom blend of tea and granola. “We have the premium brand and then we have a lovely chunky and we have a seasonal apricot and pumpkin spice,” says House. “For the holidays, we have all types of soaps and stocking stuffers, like lip balm.” Thistle and Bee gift box options include a sampler with all three honeys ($30) and the Gratitude Box ($38), which

ANTIQUE GALLERY

includes honey, granola, tea, and a beeswax candle. — Chris McCoy Available online at thistleandbee.org Tuft Crowd Custom Rugs Jackeli Bryant’s tufted rug company was born out of a new wave of artistry during the Covid-19 pandemic. Bryant would see the art form on TikTok, and this inspired him to purchase a tufted rug starter kit consisting of a yarn threader, a tufting frame, and other materials needed to get started. While Bryant only started selling rugs about four months ago and received his first commission from a sneaker cleaning company in Memphis, he’s been able to make a number of tufted masterpieces featuring Kobe Bryant, Nipsey Hussle, and even a recreation of Brent Faiyaz’s EP, A.M. Paradox. Bryant considers his rugs a unique gift for the holiday season as they are extremely customizable, and he says that he can work with different types of images and “give that gift that no one else is going to have.” Bryant said that everything that he does is “one of one,” as everything is personalized and handmade with high-quality materials. “Art never loses value. It’s something that you’ll be able to take to another house with you. It’ll be something that you didn’t go to the store and buy. You put in the order, found the image, and then I created it and brought it to life.” — Kailynn Johnson Contact Jackeli Bryant at tuftcrowdcustoms@gmail.com, or on Instagram: @_tuftcrowd PHOTO: JACKELI BRYANT

Tuft Crowd Custom Rugs

Antique Mall 30,000 SF 100+ VENDORS

aquaTreasures

ESTATE CENTER

& MARKET

DECEMBER

♦ Antiques ♦ Furniture ♦ Vintage Items ♦ Collectibles ♦ Decor + Much More!

SALE -70% OFF 30 OPEN WED. - SUN.

ALL YOUR HOLIDAY DECOR SUMMER/HIGHLAND/ SAM COOPER

TODD’S AUCTION 5:30 PM, SAT., DEC. 3RD & 17TH ANTIQUES/DECOR/COLLECTIBLES

**************

AquaTreasures.com

PARK IN REAR 3455 Summer Ave. 38122

901-486-3444

Todd’s Auction Services TN 5911 aquaTreasures Estate Sales, BBB Check Facebook, Instagram

5696 SUMMER AVE

(901) 385-2544 Come Shop Our Mall Wide

HOLIDAY SALE NOV 25 - DEC 11

COVER STORY m e m p h i s f l y e r. c o m

PHOTO: THISTLE AND BEE

Thistle and Bee Gratitude Box

15


S P O R T S B y Fr a n k M u r t a u g h

Black Friday Starts NOW!

Kid Chef PHOTO CONTEST

100

PRESENTED BY

November 24-30, 2022

Digital Sale List Available at OutdoorsInc.com

$ SUBMISSIONS

Nov. 17-24 16

WINNER RECEIVES A

VISA GIFT CARD

VOTE NOW

Nov. 25-30

TO VOTE NOW VISIT MEMPHISMAGAZINE.COM/KID-CHEF.

Bowls and ’Boats There’s plenty of optimism around Memphis sports as the Showboats make their return.

T

his being a week for giving thanks, we should count our blessings for the bounty of big-time sports raising the Memphis smile index to record levels. In the ever-fluctuating world of athletes and coaches — injuries (we’ll get to those) and firings around the next corner — it’s rare to find so much optimism, even confidence, throughout a single city. Count the win totals as they climb and consider: The Memphis Showboats are back. The University of Memphis football program secured a ninth consecutive bowl berth last Saturday with a win over North Alabama. Now 6-5 with a single regular-season game left to play (this Saturday at SMU), coach Ryan Silverfield’s squad endured an ugly four-game losing streak, the kind of skid that typically kills a season. Yet it appears Memphis will play a 13th game after all. On the hardwood, coach Penny Hardaway has somehow built a Tiger roster that could exceed its preseason hype. A trio of veteran transfers led by Kendric Davis lends a “grown-up” feel to a Memphis team already stocked with a pair of “seasoned” leaders in Alex Lomax and DeAndre Williams. Davis outscored the entire VCU team in the first half of Sunday’s win at FedExForum. He’s a legitimate All-America candidate. And, of course, we have the Grizzlies. After Sunday’s loss at Brooklyn, the Griz are 10-7, good for sixth in the Western Conference. This, despite playing 17 games (all of them) without once suiting up every member of their big-three: Ja Morant, Desmond Bane, and Jaren Jackson Jr. As Jackson plays his way toward full strength, and with Bane’s presumed return in a couple of weeks, it’s hard to find a team in the entire NBA, let alone the Western Conference, capable of slowing the Grizzlies’ rise. Until, that is, we watched Morant helped off the court with another lower-body (this time, his left ankle) injury. The NBA season is a slog, friends. Even if Morant misses a month, he’ll have more than three to play before the postseason begins. The defending champion Golden State Warriors are under

.500 (8-9). The longtime face of the league (LeBron James) takes the floor for a 5-10 LA Lakers outfit. Optimism? If the Grizzlies can reach the playoffs at full strength, another second-round exit in 2023 would be a disappointment. And then we have the Showboats! Those of us who remember the brief (1984-85) stint of the original ’Boats know USFL action at the Liberty Bowl was about as much fun as a fan could have with his clothes on. I attended a sold-out battle with the Birmingham Stallions in June 1984 during a visit to see my grandmother. It remains one of the most exciting sporting events of my life. The new operation is going with new colors and a new logo, but I’ll be the first in line if the Showboats sell

PHOTO: LARRY KUZNIEWSKI

Seth Henigan: Bowl-bound retro gear on game days. Will Memphis have an appetite for spring football? During a Grizzlies playoff run and the start of baseball season? It’s hard to tell. But there’s something to be said for a positive vibe in sports. And the Memphis Showboats’ vibe has long outlived their presence in this town. Again with the optimism. In addition to the Tigers and Mustangs on the gridiron, the holiday weekend will feature three Tiger basketball games (Penny’s squad will play at the ESPN Events Invitational in Orlando), and a pair of Grizzlies contests (New Orleans at home Friday, then at New York Sunday). Thanksgiving sports is more, in fact, than the Detroit Lions and Dallas Cowboys. Relish every moment, and pass the gravy.


steppin’ out Live music We Recommend: Culture, News + Reviews

Who’s There

By Abigail Morici

at

PHOTO: PLAYHOUSE ON THE SQUARE

Courtney Oliver as Cindy-Lou Who

Every Who down in Who-ville loved Christmas a lot. But Cindy-Lou, who lives on the south side, has been through a LOT. Now living in a trailer park, she is ready to share her turbulent story, so stop by Playhouse on the Square and see Cindy, as played by Courtney Oliver, in her full glory. “I cannot stress enough that this is not a kids show,” says director Marcus Cox. Put simply, Cindy-Lou with her unexpected past is quite unorthodox. “She asks audience members questions. There’s some food handed out. But it’s not like Rocky Horror where you can scream and shout.” For Cox, this show marks his Playhouse directorial debut, and he’s the one who introduced the play to the crew. Before this, he’s mostly dabbled in children’s theater, but as said before, this is strictly an adults-only feature. But, fear not, Playhouse has kid-friendly productions going on this month, too: The Wizard of Oz and Junie B’s Essential Survival Guide to School are sure to woo. “We tell the stories of our full community, young and old,” says Cox. “We tell the stories of our community’s minds, hearts, and souls.” As the regional theater for the entire Mid-South, Playhouse has to cover a large swath of land. “That requires us to do more shows, but we are proud that we have a team that can. “People know Playhouse for edgy shows that make people cry and make people think, and all of that is vital and extremely distinct,” says Cox. “But it’s also good just to be able to relax and enjoy live theater with your family and with your friends. For Who’s Holiday, in particular, the fun never ends.” But will your heart grow three sizes after the play? Well, only you can say, but on Thursdays through Saturdays at 8 p.m. and Sundays at 7 p.m., you can catch Who’s Holiday, opening this Friday. To purchase tickets to this production, The Wizard of Oz, and Junie B, visit playhouseonthesquare.com or call 937-6496.

with

Sons of Mudboy

WHO’S HOLIDAY , THE MEMPHIAN ROOM AT THE CIRCUIT PLAYHOUSE, FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 25-DECEMBER 22, $20-$45. JUNIE B’S ESSENTIAL SURVIVAL GUIDE TO SCHOOL , THE CIRCUIT PLAYHOUSE, PERFORMANCES THROUGH DECEMBER 22, $10-$35. THE WIZARD OF OZ , PLAYHOUSE ON THE SQUARE, PERFORMANCES THROUGH DECEMBER 22, $15-$45.

New Ballet Ensemble’s NutRemix Cannon Center for the Performing Arts, Saturday, November 26, 5:30 p.m. | Sunday, November 27, 2:30 p.m., $25-$40 This modern retelling of Tchaikovsky’s The Nutcracker by New Ballet Ensemble, NutRemix, set on Beale Street, transports audiences to a magical world. Experience a fusion of dance, featuring ballet, hip-hop, West African and Congolese dance and drumming, Memphis Jookin, and American tap. Memphis dancers of all ages bring the story to life with the accompaniment of the Memphis Symphony Orchestra & Big Band. Lil Buck returns to dance his original role of the Memphis Angel!

Visuals & Vibes VII: The Pull Up Exit 221, Sunday, November 27, 7-10 p.m., 18+, $35-$50 Curated by Chassidy Jade and presented by Crown Me Royal Labs, this very Black pop-up, drive-in experience showcases Black filmmakers and artists. Check out some dope indie Black films, recorded music performances, plush cars, and dope art. Food trucks and concessions will be on site. Guests can take pictures with some of the flyest decked-out vehicles. Chairs and blankets are welcome. Tickets are sold per car. Virtual tickets are available for $15. Visit crownmeroyallabs.com/vibe for more information.

UNSTRUCTURED

DELUXE railgarten.com

ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT

Holiday Wonders Memphis Botanic Garden, Friday, November 24-December 23, $10-$14 The annual Holiday Wonders is back, offering eight acres of lights and cheer, a footprint larger than ever before. Plus, larger-than-life “Alice’s Adventures at the Garden” sculptures will be aglow along with other new features, old favorites, brighter lights, and an updated layout. The 23-night run includes everyone’s favorite nights, including the dog-friendly Paw-liday Wonders evenings and Santa Sundays with the big guy himself, among other special nights. For the season’s kick-off on Friday, November 25th, Santa will make an appearance. Saturday, guests can meet with live Alice in Wonderland characters and take home a special Alice-themed souvenir.

m e m p h i s f l y e r. c o m

VARIOUS DAYS & TIMES November 24th - 30th

2 1 6 6 C e n t r a l Av e . Memphis TN 38104

17


MUSIC By Alex Greene

A Legend Among Legends Folk musician Tom Paxton will join other songsters in the round at Acoustic Sunday Live.

N KIER AS SEEN ON TNN AND HBO

THURSDAY, DECEMBER 1

KEN MILLER WINNER OF STEVE HARVEY’S STANDUP SPOTLIGHT COMEDY COMPETITION

THURSDAY, DECEMBER 8

November 24-30, 2022

FOR TICKETS, VISIT GOLDSTRIKE.COM OR CALL 1.888.747.7711

18

LIVE MUSIC NIGHTLY!

WINNER!

Must be 21. Schedule subject to change. All rights reserved. Gambling problem? Call 1.888.777.9696.

ow 85, Tom Paxton is what you might call an OG folk musician, having made his name as a songwriter in Greenwich Village before Bob Dylan even arrived from Minnesota. And so there’s a certain historical spark in speaking with him about our common love for Woody Guthrie. He surely had that same conversation with countless compatriots at the Gaslight Cafe, back in the day, especially since he’d landed there by way of his native Oklahoma. “I played football against a team from [Guthrie’s hometown of] Okemah, about 26 miles from my hometown,” Paxton remembers today. “But I actually never heard of Woody Guthrie until I went to the University of Oklahoma and started hearing his records, and he quickly became one of my heroes. I think he’s one of my biggest influences.” Of course, part of Guthrie’s legacy is the tradition of the political or protest song, something that Paxton’s always had at the core of his craft. It’s also at the core of the annual series known as Acoustic Sunday Live, the latest version of which will feature Paxton, Crys Matthews, Susan Werner, The Accidentals, and Terry “Harmonica” Bean on Sunday, December 4th, at the First Congregational Church. Woody Guthrie’s spirit has been with the concert series from the very beginning, when Bruce and Barbara Newman organized a tribute to Guthrie 28 years ago, featuring Paxton, Richie Havens, Odetta, and Ramblin’ Jack Elliott. Since then, each show has been a fundraiser for a local cause, and in recent years that’s been Protect Our Aquifer. Paxton, reflecting on the cause of ensuring the purity of the Sparta or Memphis Sand Aquifer, quips, “Talk about a no-brainer! It makes you want to get a bumper sticker: ‘Like Drinking Water? Duh?!’” He’s seen innumerable citizen movements to protect sources of fresh water and feels one of his songs still rings true in that context. “The one I mainly still sing after 50 years is ‘Whose Garden Was This?’” he says. “Everything about ecology is in that song. If you want to enjoy it, you’ve got to preserve it.” It’s yet another echo of Guthrie’s approach to folk music. “You had no trouble understanding the lyrics when he sang,” Paxton says. “And that’s always been a really important part to me. The way I feel is, I busted my butt writing these lyrics, I want to make sure people understand them.” That’s especially crucial to topical songs, he says. “You know, political and protest songs are as old as America. Now and then you’ll turn up songs that were

current before or during our revolution, that were just flat-out protest songs against England and King George. Lots of them! Back during the Vietnam days, we took a lot of heat for writing songs opposing the war, but it’s a very old tradition.” Old traditions appeal to Paxton, and his appreciation of the late Jean Ritchie spoke to that. “I visited with her in Kentucky two weeks before she passed [in 2015],” he says. “There was a song that was current back in the ’60s called ‘Passing Through’. So I wrote a verse for her: ‘Jean Ritchie of the Cumberlands, her dulcimer in hand/Came singing songs both old and new. … And she sang ’em all while she was passing through.’ She was a good, good person.” Always generous in his praise of fellow artists, Paxton has leaned into the joys

PHOTO: COURTESY OF FLEMING & ASSOCIATES

Tom Paxton of collaboration of late. “I went for years basically just writing for myself, but the pandemic shut everything down, and if I was going to stay in touch with people, [co-writing on] Zoom was a way to do it. So I really went for it. I’ve been writing with The Accidentals, with Jackson Emmer, with my friend Cathy Fink. And it’s so satisfying that I want to keep doing it. Since the pandemic, so far I’ve co-written over 200 songs.” He’s looking forward to the songwriters-in-the-round style of Acoustic Sunday Live, he says. “It’s great to be coming back to Memphis, and it stacks up to be a hell of a concert. You’ve got some really good people on there, like Crys Matthews and The Accidentals, and Susan Werner is absolutely dynamite on stage. And I’m bringing a colleague of mine from Colorado to be part of this, named Jackson Emmer. We’ve co-written several songs now. It’s a real kick for me, to hear young people singing a song I’ve helped to write.”


AFTER DARK: Live Music Schedule November 24 - 30 Daykisser, Melinda, Joelton Mayfield, Treespots Chris Gales Live

An acoustic performance in the lobby of this elegant hotel. Friday, Nov. 25, 6-9 p.m. THE WESTIN MEMPHIS BEALE STREET

K-LOVE Christmas Tour: Crowder, Matt Maher, Jordan St. Cyr, & Katy Nichole

Celebrate an evening to remember at the K-LOVE Christmas Tour! Wednesday, Nov. 30, 7 p.m.

79th Thanksgiving Throwdown ft. Super T with special guests Thursday, Nov. 24, 9 p.m.

Monday, Nov. 28, 8 p.m. HI TONE

Dead Soldiers

Saturday, Nov. 26, 10 p.m.

HI TONE

HI TONE

Alexandra Kay with Lauren Weintraub

Drugdealer with Reverend Baron

GROWLERS

HI TONE

Al Kapone

Frog Squad

MINGLEWOOD HALL

LAMPLIGHTER LOUNGE

Amber McCain Band

Wednesday, Nov. 30, 7 p.m.

Monday, Nov. 28, 9 p.m.

Performances by whit3corset (industrial/digital hardcore), Birmingham Sits Throned (dream guitar), Pop Saw (jazz/ free improv), and Stupid Lepton (electronic/granular). $10. Friday, Nov. 25, 8 p.m.

RAILGARTEN

Songwriter Night

Performances by Lady Owl, Sarah Spain, and Crockett Hall. Sunday, Nov. 27, 7:3011:30 p.m.

LAFAYETTE’S MUSIC ROOM

Richard Wilson

Area 51

Tuesday, Nov. 29, 7 p.m.

LAMPLIGHTER LOUNGE

GROWLERS

Roxi Love

Thriller 40th Anniversary: A Tribute By Saturday Sunset

Saturday Sunset will be performing all of the songs from the legendary and recordbreaking Thriller album the same way it was released in 1982. $15. Wednesday, Nov. 30, 6:30 p.m. CAROLINA WATERSHED

Tuesday, Nov. 29, 6 p.m.

LAFAYETTE’S MUSIC ROOM

Joe Restivo 4

Breeze Cayolle & New Orleans

Saturday, Nov. 26, 11 a.m.; Sunday, Nov. 27, 11 a.m.

LAFAYETTE’S MUSIC ROOM

LAFAYETTE’S MUSIC ROOM

Friday, Nov. 25, 10 p.m.

Wednesday, Nov. 30, 6 p.m. LAFAYETTE’S MUSIC ROOM

Brenna with Lady Owl and Madaline Collins Friday, Nov. 25, 7 p.m. GROWLERS

Cjizzle! with Blueberry Pool Saturday, Nov. 26, 2 p.m.

Day After Thanksgiving Party with The MD’s B-SIDE

LAFAYETTE’S MUSIC ROOM

HI TONE

Saturday, Nov. 26, 7 p.m.

Skinny Powers with the Mourning and Woodsage

Lance & Madison

GROWLERS

LAFAYETTE’S MUSIC ROOM

Sunday Jazz with David Collins & Friends

Saturday, Nov. 26, 2 p.m.

Sunday, Nov. 27, 6-9 p.m. THE COVE

OVERTON SQUARE

Friday, Nov. 25, 9 p.m.

Six Feet Thunder

Kontravoid, Lunacy, The Pop Ritual, Dog Chakra Friday, Nov. 25, 9 p.m.

T.J. MULLIGAN’S KIRBY

Turnt

Tribute to The Allman Brothers

Swingtime Explosion Big Band Monday, Nov. 28, 6 p.m. LAFAYETTE’S MUSIC ROOM

Friday, Nov. 25, 9 p.m.

Sunday, Nov. 27, 2-5 p.m. LAMPLIGHTER LOUNGE

Friday, Nov. 25, 8 p.m.

Twin Soul

NEIL’S MUSIC ROOM

LAFAYETTE’S MUSIC ROOM

Friday, Nov. 25, 3 p.m.

RUM BOOGIE CAFE BLUES HALL

LAFAYETTE’S MUSIC ROOM

North Mississippi Allstars with Sons of Mudboy

CANNON CENTER FOR THE PERFORMING ARTS

Sunday, Nov. 27, 8 p.m.

The Brian Johnson Band

Thursday, Nov. 24, 7 p.m.

Saturday, Nov. 26, 10 p.m.

Hazing Over with Rosary, Ten Crowns, Aversive Control

Friday, Nov. 25, 12:30-3:30 p.m.; Sunday, Nov. 27, 3:306:30 p.m.

The Breakfast Club

HI TONE

Friday, Nov. 25, 8 p.m.

$5. Friday, Nov. 25, 9-11 p.m.

Saturday, Nov. 26, 8 p.m.

Memphis Concrete

Will Tucker Band

Sunday, Nov. 27, 3:30 p.m. LAFAYETTE’S MUSIC ROOM

WiMM presents: Louise Page, Mothcat, Journeys Adventure

Wednesday, Nov. 30, 7-10 p.m. B-SIDE

Amy Grant & Michael W Smith Christmas Tour Amy Grant and Michael W. Smith take their popular Christmas tour on the road. $59.50. Saturday, Nov. 26, 8 p.m. GRACELAND SOUNDSTAGE

Just Groovin’ Experience

$10. Friday, Nov. 25, 7 p.m.

Rudi E. Scheidt School of Music Holiday Concert

This concert will bring multiple ensembles and choirs performing seasonal classics and sing-a-long opportunities for the audience. $20. Tuesday, Nov. 29, 7:30 p.m. HARRIS CONCERT HALL, UNIVERSITY OF MEMPHIS

BigMixx

Wednesday, Nov. 30, 7 p.m. HADLEY’S PUB

Martin & Taylor Band Friday, Nov. 25, 6-11 p.m. SIDECAR CAFE MEMPHIS

Southern Comfort Jazz Orchestra featuring Bernie Dresel Monday, Nov. 28, 7:30 p.m. HARRIS CONCERT HALL, UNIVERSITY OF MEMPHIS

HERNANDO’S HIDEAWAY

Send your live music events — two weeks in advance — with subject AFTER DARK to calendar@memphisflyer.com. To submit events to our online calendar, find “+Add event” on events.memphisflyer.com.

We help Mid-South nonprofits succeed.

TN ROOTS IS THE MID-SOUTH’S #1 PRODUCER OF LEGAL (HEMP-DERIVED) CANNABIS EDIBLES, SALVES AND TINCTURES.

STOCK UP HOLIDAYS FOR THE

♦ 50% OFF All Tinctures ♦

♦ Take & Bake Brownie Kits ♦

♦ Shop Online or In-Store at Bluff City Botanicals ♦

Bluff City Botanicals 348 New Byhalia Rd

www.tnrootscbd.com

ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT

901.726.5725 momentumnonprofit.org

m e m p h i s f l y e r. c o m

DO GOOD. BETTER.

19


CALENDAR of EVENTS:

November 24 - 30

Send the date, time, place, cost, info, phone number, a brief description, and photos — two weeks in advance — to calendar@memphisflyer.com. DUE TO SPACE LIMITATIONS, ONGOING WEEKLY EVENTS WILL APPEAR IN THE FLYER’S ONLINE CALENDAR ONLY. FOR COMPREHENSIVE EVENT LISTINGS, VISIT EVENTS.MEMPHISFLYER.COM/CAL

“once a river, once a sea”

ART AN D S P EC I A L E X H I B ITS

Recognized widely for her gouache paintings on stitched paper of ephemeral landscapes, Maysey Craddock examines growth and decay along the Gulf Coast in relation to space and time. Through Dec. 23.

2022 CBU Visual Arts Faculty Exhibition

This exhibition features work by full-time and adjunct faculty in the department of visual and performing arts at Christian Brothers University: Janie Carp, Scott Carter, Nick Peña, Melinda Posey, Jana Travis, and Matthew Thomas. Through Dec. 3.

DAVID LUSK GALLERY

“Rapid Response Exhibition: POVERTY TODAY!”

BEVERLY + SAM ROSS GALLERY

Exhibition that highlights the current Poor People’s Campaign Movement and dire issues impacted by the pandemic. Through Dec. 31.

2022 MGAL Winter Juried Exhibition

The MGAL exhibit, juried by local and internationally acclaimed portrait artist, Jamie L. McMahan, will include nearly 50 artistic works in a variety of styles and mediums from almost 40 local artists. Through Nov. 29.

NATIONAL CIVIL RIGHTS MUSEUM

“Rotunda Projects: Monika Grzymala”

This dynamic installation plays with our sense of scale by presenting an immense and immersive line drawing, offering us a drawing we can walk into. Miles and miles of black tape cascade, pool, revolve, and scribble to activate walls, columns, and most dramatically, voids in the space. Through Jan. 9.

ST. GEORGE’S EPISCOPAL CHURCH ART GALLERY

“A Better Life for Their Children”

An exhibition of photographs and stories that brings readers into the impactful yet largely unknown story of Rosenwald schools. Through Jan. 2.

MEMPHIS BROOKS MUSEUM OF ART

NATIONAL CIVIL RIGHTS MUSEUM

“A Lasting Memento Art Exhibit” Exhibition of photography by Bob Pierce. Through Nov. 30. MEMPHIS BOTANIC GARDEN

“Bearing Witness: The Arkansas Delta in Blue” Exhibition of work by Beverly Buys. Through Dec. 2. EAST ARKANSAS COMMUNITY COLLEGE

“Beyond, Part IV”

Featuring Pam Cobb, Pamela Hassler, Sam Red, and Julie Schumer. Through Dec. 31. JAY ETKIN GALLERY

“Beyond the Emerald City”

An exhibition of Oz-themed comics and artwork by Dale Martin. Through Dec. 28.

November 24-30, 2022

PLAYHOUSE ON THE SQUARE

20

“Cry Now”

Exhibition of work by Jesse Butcher. Saturday, Nov. 26Jan. 21. TOPS GALLERY

“Drawing the Curtain: Maurice Sendak’s Designs for Opera and Ballet”

The Hungry Turkey 5K, happening Thanksgiving morning, will benefit the Memphis Food Bank. ingenuity found within each of us. Through Jan. 8.

Exhibition dedicated to children’s book author and illustrator Maurice Sendak’s set designs and clever costumes. Through Jan. 8.

THE DIXON GALLERY & GARDENS

MEMPHIS BROOKS MUSEUM OF ART

TOPS GALLERY

“Emily Ozier: Marisol’s Dress”

Through a series of paintings based on her mother’s experience as a refugee fleeing Cuba in the 1950s, Emily Ozier’s triumphant Marisol’s Dress explores the resilience and

“Fun and Games”

Exhibition of work by John McIntire. Saturday, Nov. 26Jan. 21.

“Josef Albers: Opening Eyes”

A collection of paintings and prints by Bauhaus master Josef Albers and his colleagues. Through Dec. 17. ART MUSEUM AT THE UNIVERSITY OF MEMPHIS (AMUM)

“Les Paul Thru the Lens” A collection of rare photographs that revel the behindthe-scenes life of the father of modern music, Les Paul. Through Dec. 30.

STAX MUSEUM OF AMERICAN SOUL MUSIC

“Light and Color Inspired”

Collection of original art by Phyllis Boger, Carol Caughey, Barbara Hicks, and Ann Brown Thomason. Through Nov. 29. GALLERY 1091

“Looking Back”

Exhibition of Lynda Watson’s work that incorporates materials such as metal, felt, and charcoal, in addition to found objects, creating a detailed 3D scrapbook of her memories. Through Jan. 29. METAL MUSEUM

“Lost and Found”

Exhibition of work by Randy Akers. Through Nov. 30. L ROSS GALLERY

“Mending in a State of Abundance”

Exhibition of work by Katrina Perdue exploring the emotional and physical labor of repair, offering an alternative response to the modern realities of material excess. Through March 5. CROSSTOWN ARTS AT THE CONCOURSE

“Nature’s Rhythms: Watercolor, Ceramics, and Mixed Media” Featuring work by by Sally Markell and Anne Froning. Through Dec. 12. BUCKMAN ARTS CENTER AT ST. MARY’S SCHOOL

“Simple Pleasures: The Art of Doris Lee”

Rediscover one of the most popular figurative artists in American art history: Doris Lee. In exploring her life and work, the exhibition pays respect to her ability to conjure joy in life’s simple pleasures and erases the idea that her art was too unserious to take seriously. Through Jan. 15. THE DIXON GALLERY & GARDENS

“Summer in Shanghai”

A three-part video series of reflections and meditations during the hottest time of the year in China’s biggest city. Through March 5. CROSSTOWN ARTS AT THE CONCOURSE

“Those Who Hold Dominion Here”

Exhibition of work by Sarah Elizabeth Cornejo takes inspi-


CALENDAR: NOVEMBER 24 - 30 ration from serpents in Incan mythology and Southern snakes. Through March 5. CROSSTOWN ARTS AT THE CONCOURSE

“Tripping Through Your Orbit”

Exhibition of large abstract paintings by Amy Hutcheson. Through Jan. 9. GERMANTOWN PERFORMING ARTS CENTER

“What Are the Chances?”

This exhibit showcases the artwork of three prolific artists who came together by chance: Dominique Bellott, Barrie Foster, and Terry Kenney. Through Nov. 30. MEMPHIS BOTANIC GARDEN

AR T HAP P E N I N G S

“Cry Now” Opening

Exhibition of work by Jesse Butcher. Saturday, Nov. 26, 5-7 p.m. TOPS GALLERY

“Fun and Games” Opening

Exhibition of work by John McIntire. Saturday, Nov. 26, 5-7 p.m. TOPS GALLERY

Memphis Arts Collective Holiday Artists Market 2022

The Memphis Arts Collective Holiday Artist Market is back for its annual holiday show. This year MAC is proud to partner with Arkwings Foundation, a Frayser community organization dedicated to promoting mind, body, and spirit wellness through the healing power of arts and nature. Stop by the Arkwings booth to learn more! Friday, Nov. 25-Dec. 24.

DIY Bath Bomb Workshop

Learn how to make DIY Flower Bath Bombs from a flower farmer! $40. Saturday, Nov. 26, 3-5 p.m. BLACKSPRING FARMS BRICK AND MORTAR

Embroidery 101: Snowflake Stitch Sampler with Marley Wisby

Embroidery 101 with Marley Wisby will teach you basic embroidery stitches and you will create your own snowflake pattern embroidery! $30. Wednesday, Nov. 30, 5:30-7:30 p.m. ARROW CREATIVE

Memphis Roller Derby Skate School

Join Memphis Roller Derby for “skate school,” where interested skaters can drop in on Tuesday nights. Through Dec. 27. PIPKIN BUILDING

Nutcracker Paint Party with Dorothy Collier

Paint your own nutcracker to celebrate the holiday season! Dorothy Collier will guide you with the best practices and pattern techniques. $90. Monday, Nov. 28, 6-9 p.m. ARROW CREATIVE

The Tingey Painting with Parkinson’s Program (TINCAN™)

Secret Show Comedy at Local on Main presented by Comma Comedians

THE DIXON GALLERY & GARDENS

LOCAL (DOWNTOWN)

An art therapy program that supports people living with Parkinson’s. Wednesday, Nov. 30, 10 a.m.-noon.

Thees W@#$ Folks Crazy

C O M E DY

Kerwin Claiborne headlines. $25-$50. Friday, Nov. 25-Nov. 27.

FAF Open Mic

Hosted by Josh “Hollywood” Walker. Wednesday, Nov. 30, 7:30 p.m.

CHUCKLES COMEDY HOUSE

CHUCKLES COMEDY HOUSE

C O M M U N I TY

Katt Williams: 2023 And Me Tour

Our Stories Matter: Laps-for-Literacy Walkathon

With a career spanning over 20 years, Williams has earned a worldwide reputation as one of today’s top entertainers, having developed a career seeded with thousands of sold-out arenas, an expansive list of starring roles on the small screen, and memorable performances in major box office hits. $65-$255. Friday, Nov. 25, 8 p.m. LANDERS CENTER

Open Mic Comedy

The Our Stories Matter: Laps-for-Literacy Walkathon is back. Your support will help raise awareness of Black children’s authors and the stories they write. $20-$35. Friday, Nov. 25, 10 a.m.-noon. RALEIGH SPRINGS CIVIC CENTER

Porter-Leath Toy Truck at Poplar Collection

Drop off new, unwrapped toys as well as cash or check donations. Please bring puzzles, dolls, balls, blocks, and other toys that promote early childhood learning. Wednesday, Nov. 30-Dec. 3.

Hosted by John Miller. Sign up at 7:30 p.m. Tuesday, Nov. 29, 8 p.m.

Small Group Wreath Making Workshops

Get your laughs on with the Comma Comedians, a fantastic lineup of local and touring comedians. Thursday, Nov. 24, 8-9:30 p.m.

HI TONE

POPLAR COLLECTION SHOPPING CENTER Make your own wreath with family and friends. Recovering Hoe Comedy Tour All materials provided. Price will vary dependHeadlined by Bennie Mac. Starring Ms. ing on the size of the wreath you choose. The New York Times Syndication Sales Corporation Arkansas, Felicia, and Big E Johnson. $22-$45. Monday, Nov. 28, 5-6 p.m. 620Thursday, EighthNov. Avenue, New York, N.Y. 10018 continued on page 22 24, 8 p.m. URBAN EARTH GARDENS, NURSERY & MARKET

For Information Call: 1-800-972-3550 For Release Friday, January 4, 2019

CHUCKLES COMEDY HOUSE

CORNER OF POPLAR & HIGHLAND

Crossword

THE DIXON GALLERY & GARDENS

“This Is a Photograph” Exhibit Opening

Kevin Morby returns to Memphis after photographing and writing songs inspired by the city. The exhibit will be on display during the Raised by Sound Fest. Wednesday, Nov. 30-Dec. 3. MEMPHIS LISTENING LAB

Visuals & Vibes VII: The Pull Up

A very Black pop-up, drive-in experience showcasing Black filmmakers and artists. Check out some dope indie Black films, recorded music performances, plush cars, and dope art. Sunday, Nov. 27, 7-10 p.m. EXIT 221

WinterArts

The South’s premier holiday artists’ market presents its 14th annual showcase of exceptional and unique hand-crafted works by the region’s finest artists. Check out this year’s stellar collection of holiday gift ideas crafted in glass, metal, wood, fiber, and clay, plus, jewelry, and more. For more information see winterartsmemphis.com. Saturday, Nov. 26-Dec. 24. PARK PLACE CENTRE

Yule Holiday Market

A market that caters to handmade goods, Yule magic and gifts from local artists. Spin-theWheel for a chance to win a Christmas Tree. Live performance from Pink WIlliams. Free. Saturday, Nov. 26, 11 a.m.-5 p.m. BLACK LODGE

C LAS S / WO R KS H O P

Beginner Adult African Dance Class

Come together in the spirt of peace and love to learn West African culture and dance in a nonintimidating atmosphere. Classes feature live drumming. $10. Tuesday, Nov. 29, 6:45 p.m. COLLAGE DANCE COLLECTIVE

Daffodil Forcing Workshop

Learn how about how to force daffodil bulbs in the winter to have fragrant blooms early in the spring. $75. Sunday, Nov. 27, 3-5 p.m. BLACKSPRING FARMS BRICK AND MORTAR

ACROSS “You Don’t Mess Around With Jim” singer, 1972 6 Resort in Salt Lake County 10 Hill worker 13 Modern phrase said before doing something foolish 15 Coping mechanisms? 17 Homer’s specialty 18 Website for tech whizzes 19 Eastern state 20 One might tell you to do the math 21 Kind of dog found in New York City 22 Warm and toasty, e.g.: Abbr. 23 Follower

25

1

28 29 30 33 34 35

36 38 39

40 41 43 44 45

Render harmless, in a way Little suckers In play Put off Lets go “___ anniversaire!” County in a Pulitzer-winning play title Holders of solutions Mountaineer’s tool Oftenmisspelled contraction Court suspension Neat Ran fast Runs ___ Smetanina, first woman to win 10 Winter Olympic medals

ANSWER TO PREVIOUS PUZZLE A R M A N I

S A L A D S

T E A L A D Y

M A N L I E R

P I N E N U T

O M I T T E R

O S T C T O R D E L A W E L L S L A I Y C G N K E A W E R I O U T A T B R A I F O G D A T E O B E

S G L N E I A W

A C R O

S H A W L

T U O O R B R N D A Y E B C E R O N A T I N C T H

T R O S N O O K N O L A F I T A T T E B O E R R P S E E A K Z U N I E G I N U S C A S H A I T E S R A S H

47 50 51 53 54

55 56 57

’Vette alternative Flier from Asia “Take a chill pill!” Shakers, e.g. Employer of some shepherds Call, in poker Japanese bowlful Title character of a “Dora the Explorer” spinoff

DOWN

Edited by Will Shortz 1

2

3

4

5

13

6

7

8

No. 1130 9

10

14

16

18

19

20

21

22 26

23

27 30

33

34

36

24

28

29

31

37

42

32

35 38

39 41

12

15

17

25

11

40 43

Fancy 44 45 46 47 48 49 restaurant name starter 50 51 52 2 Skip it! 53 54 3 “This Is Us” producer Ken 55 56 57 4 Org. behind the surveillance report FluView PUZZLE BY ROBYN WEINTRAUB 5 They may have 21 Like many 42 California’s 28 Some rooms to spare laundromat Point ___ succulents appliances Peninsula 6 Acts as a decoy 30 “Something” for, possibly 22 Advance notice 43 Synergistic can be heard for an event 7 Mother of promo on it Artemis 24 Jost’s “Weekend 31 Bigwigs may 46 “Felice ___ 8 University Update” nuovo!” have big ones of Maryland co-anchor 47 Plastered 32 Cubs’ places athletes 25 Bonkers 48 Bit of kindling 37 Address that’s 9 Secret ending? 26 Fashion not often 49 Not falling for 10 Not just chilly designer ___ written down 51 Big 12 sch. Saab 11 Overprotective 40 Fiddler’s aid government, so 27 Activity for 52 Determination to speak newlyweds from a 41 Units equivalent at a wedding Breathalyzer to volts per 12 Message that reception test, for short ampere might be sent in a storm? Online subscriptions: Today’s puzzle and more than 7,000 past 14 Fawns, e.g. puzzles, nytimes.com/crosswords ($39.95 a year). 16 Possible reason to forgo Read about and comment on each puzzle: nytimes.com/wordplay. mascara 1

m e m p h i s f l y e r. c o m

The lecture series features presentations by local artists, scholars, and Dixon staff sharing their knowledge on a variety of topics. Wednesday, Nov. 30, noon-1 p.m.

ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT

Munch and Learn

21


CALENDAR: NOVEMBER 24 - 30

The Best Gift Shop in Memphis! Memphis’ Leading Metaphysical Shop continued from page 21

WINNER!

901.497.9486 552 S Main St.

Gemstones ♦ Singing Bowls Jewelry ♦ Incense ♦ Books Tarot, Aura & Chakra Readings Sound Therapy Sessions Workshops ♦ Gifts and More!

FA M I LY

901 Student Passport

The “901 Student Passport” program allows Shelby County’s school-aged children and their families free admission to nine historic sites and cultural institutions. Through Nov. 30. MEMPHIS

Sprouts (12-24 months) This interactive program for toddlers and their caregivers explores all the senses. $8. Thursday, Nov. 24, 10:3011:30 a.m. THE DIXON GALLERY & GARDENS

FI LM

As You Wish: The Princess Bride

Celebrate the 35th anniversary of a seminal ’80s fairy-tale fantasy, followed by a screening of George Lucas’ epic fantasy adventure Willow. Sunday, Nov. 27, 6 p.m. BLACK LODGE

Fab Friday: National Lampoon’s Christmas Vacation 2D

It’s Christmas time and the Griswolds are preparing for a family seasonal celebration, but things never run smoothly for Clark, his wife Ellen, and their two kids. Friday, Nov. 25, 8-10 p.m.

November 24-30, 2022

MUSEUM OF SCIENCE & HISTORY

22

Lizzo Laser Light Show

Experience hip-hop’s latest superstar in a remarkable way. Laser Lizzo will leave you feeling “good as hell.” The set list includes “Cuz I Love You,” “Scuse Me,” “Better in Color,” and “Heaven Help Me” among other hits. $13. Friday, Nov. 25, 6:30-8 p.m. MUSEUM OF SCIENCE & HISTORY

NCT Dream the Movie: In A Dream

The brand-new film features high-energy performances with the seven members captured during their second solo concert at the iconic Olympic Stadium, the largest stadium in South Korea and the dream venue for music artists. Tuesday, Nov. 29, 5:30 p.m. MALCO CORDOVA

WKNO’s November 1091 Gallery showcases work highlighting the drama of light and the excitement of color. Portrait of the Queen

Portrait of the Queen offers an original portrayal of the story of Queen Elizabeth II from a totally new perspective — through the most intense, amazing, revealing photographic portraits of her, as shared by the extraordinary photographers who accompanied and often created the image of the British monarchy itself. Wednesday, Nov. 30, 7 p.m. PARADISO CINEMA GRILL & IMAX

Sunset Blvd.

A screening of the beloved creepy tale of Hollywood’s dark side from Academy Award-winning director Billy Wilder and starring a stunning, unforgettable Gloria Swanson in not only her finest performance, but one of the greatest performances in all of cinema history. Tuesday, Nov. 29, 5:30 p.m. BLACK LODGE

FO O D A N D D R I N K

Cooper-Young Community Farmers Market

A variety of fresh seasonal produce and special artisan fares, featuring work by local artists. Saturday, Nov. 26, 8 a.m.-6 p.m. FIRST CONGREGATIONAL CHURCH

Food Truck Thursday

Walk, run, or drive over to Court Square Park every Thursday for an assortment of delicious food with food trucks. Thursday, Nov. 24, 11 a.m.-2 p.m. COURT SQUARE

Lightfoot Farm Market

Local farmers market full of fresh farm raised meat, produce, fresh eggs, baked goods, artisan cheeses, jams and jellies, canned goods, spices and rubs, honey, bottled barbeque sauces, and more. Saturday, Nov. 26, 9 a.m.-2 p.m. LIGHTFOOT FARM

H EA LT H A N D F IT N ES S

After Thanksgiving Day Hike 2022

Take a hike along the Discovery Trail with park staff and learn about the park history and nearby wildlife. Free. Friday, Nov. 25, 9 a.m.-3 p.m. T.O. FULLER STATE PARK

Hungry Turkey 5K

Benefiting the Memphis Food Bank. (Kids Dash begins at 8:15 a.m.) Finisher’s medals and locally made Gibson’s donuts will be awarded at the finish line. $12.99/children 11 and under, $60/adults. Thursday, Nov. 24, 8:30 a.m. MEMPHIS BASS PRO SHOPS AT THE PYRAMID

Lunchtime Meditations with Memphis Center for Mindful Living

Make time for yourself each week and explore a variety of meditation practices designed to help you find balance and reduce stress. Free. Thursday, Nov. 24, noon-12:30 p.m. THE DIXON GALLERY & GARDENS

Memphis Turkey Trot

Long sleeve shirt to all registrants. Great four-mile course through Shelby Farms and the return of the two-mile relay. Thursday, Nov. 24, 9 a.m. SHELBY FARMS PARK

Taijiquan

Led by Milan Vigil, this Chinese martial art promotes relaxation, improves balance, and provides no-impact aerobic benefits. Ages 16 and older. Free. Saturday, Nov. 26, 10:30-11:30 a.m. THE DIXON GALLERY & GARDENS

Yoga with Laura Gray McCann

Strengthen your yoga practice and enjoy the health benefits of light exercise with a certified yoga instructor. If weather permits, yoga will take place in the gardens. Thursday, Nov. 24, 6-6:45 p.m. THE DIXON GALLERY & GARDENS

H O LI DAY EVE NTS

Holiday Wonders

This season offers approximately eight acres of lights and cheer and features the larger-than-life Alice’s Adventures at the Garden sculptures


CALENDAR: NOVEMBER 24 - 30

Reindeer Run Scavenger Hunt

Bring your treasure hunting skills to this event and find Santa’s reindeer and the gifts before Christmas Eve. The race begins at Jones Pond Pavilion. The course runs along Chickasaw Trails. Saturday, Nov. 26, 9 a.m.-1 p.m. SHELBY FARMS PARK

Starry Nights

Experience the magic of the holidays at Shelby Farms Park’s largest event, complete with dazzling displays featuring millions of lights. Festive fun is in store for kids and kids at heart at this drive-through holiday event. Continue the tradition and make new memories! Friday, Nov. 25-Dec. 30. SHELBY FARMS PARK

String Light Untangling Contest and Light Workshop Test your holiday mishap skills in a string light untangling competition. See how fast you can get your lights ready to decorate, and check out the workshop to learn why your old lights don’t work. Friday, Nov. 25, 7 p.m. MUSEUM OF SCIENCE & HISTORY

The Enchanted Forest Festival

Visitors are invited to explore a forest of festive and aweinspiring trees decorated by professional designers, individuals, and local organizations. Through Dec. 24. MUSEUM OF SCIENCE & HISTORY

Winter Wonderland at CMOM

From the moment you walk into the doors, you will feel transported to a Winter Wonderland as you stroll through trees, twinkling lights, dancing snowflakes, and all the seasonal trappings at CMOM. Saturday, Nov. 26-Dec. 31. THE CHILDREN’S MUSEUM OF MEMPHIS

Zoo Lights

The zoo is decking the halls with gorgeous displays and some of your favorite Zoo Light features, plus some brand-new decorations. It’s the perfect event for a date night, family night, or an evening out with friends. $14-$19. Through Dec. 1. MEMPHIS ZOO

P E R FO R M I N G AR TS

901 Poetry Open Mic An organic, safe, and all-round cool open mic. Monday, Nov. 28, 8 p.m. HI TONE

JustLarry’s MiniMayhem!

The craziest variety show in the Mid-South comes to Downtown! Join JustLarry and his cast of unusual friends in an intimate evening of epic entertainment! $10. Friday, Nov. 25-Nov. 26, 8 p.m. MEMPHIS CLOVER CLUB

This modern retelling of Tchaikovsky’s The Nutcracker, set on Beale Street, transports audiences to a magical world! Experience a fusion of dance, featuring ballet, hip-hop, West African and Congolese dance and drumming, Memphis Jookin, and American tap. $25-$40. Saturday, Nov. 26, 5:30 p.m.; Sunday, Nov. 27, 2:30 p.m. CANNON CENTER FOR THE PERFORMING ARTS

Newbies in November

Burlesque and drag revue. $15. Saturday, Nov. 26, 9 p.m. LAMPLIGHTER LOUNGE

Poetic Blues Flow

The artist Yella P provides live entertainment with a laid back bluesy sound while local poets share their creative word flow! It’s a cool vibe for artists to network and enjoy positive energy! $10-$15. Sunday, Nov. 27, 7-10 p.m. VENTURE SOUTH STUDIOS

Random Thursdays

Rebekah Random heads up “Random Thursdays” with a cast of new, upcoming faces for your entertainment! Thursday, Nov. 24, 12:30 a.m. DRU’S PLACE

The Boom Boom Effect

Putting the boom back into your Saturday nights. Saturday, Nov. 26, 10:30-11:45 p.m. DRU’S PLACE

Cars & Coffee

An event where people come together to display their cars or just to look at cars. Free coffee and donuts courtesy of the Germantown Kiwanis Club! Saturday, Nov. 26, 8-10 a.m. GERMANTOWN PERFORMING ARTS CENTER

S P O R TS

NBA Memphis Grizzlies vs. New Orleans Pelicans Cheer on the Grizzlies! Friday, Nov. 25, 7 p.m. FEDEXFORUM

TH EATE R

Creative Aging Senior Arts Series: Theatre Memphis’ A Christmas Carol

Enjoy Theatre Memphis’ presentation of this holiday classic. $5. Wednesday, Nov. 30, 10:30 a.m. THEATRE MEMPHIS

Dear Evan Hansen

A letter that was never meant to be seen, a lie that was never meant to be told, a life he never dreamed he could have. Evan Hansen is about to get one thing he’s always wanted: a chance to fit in. Tuesday, Nov. 29-Dec. 4. ORPHEUM THEATRE

SEASON

Discover the magic of Dr. Seuss’ classic holiday tale as it comes to life on stage. Featuring the hit songs “You’re A Mean One, Mr. Grinch” and “Welcome Christmas,” the Grinch discovers there’s more to Christmas than he bargained for in this heartwarming holiday classic. $25$90. Through Nov. 27.

IT’S A WONDERFUL LIFE The Live Radio Play

ORPHEUM THEATRE

Junie B’s Essential Survival Guide to School

The Circuit Playhouse’s favorite first-grader is at it again in this hilarious, wholehearted show about owning up to your mistakes and how no one is ever done learning. Through Dec. 22.

DEC 9-10 / 7:30PM & DEC 10-11 / 2PM

LIVE THEATRE — Watch an angel get his wings as he reminds a down-on-his-luck George Bailey of all the things that make his a truly wonderful life. Don’t miss this heart-felt holiday classic.

CIRCUIT PLAYHOUSE

The Wizard of Oz

Based on the classic motion picture, young Dorothy Gale and her dog Toto are swept away in a tornado to the magical land of Oz. Through Dec. 22. PLAYHOUSE ON THE SQUARE

Velveteen Rabbit the Musical

The Velveteen Rabbit was the boy’s favorite birthday present. But when the party started the Velveteen Rabbit was forgotten. $30-$35. Saturday, Nov. 26-Dec. 18. HATTILOO THEATRE

Who’s Holiday! S P EC I A L EVE N TS

2022-2023

How the Grinch Stole Christmas: The Musical

In this adults-only rollick through the land of Dr. Seuss’s classic tale, return to Mount Crumpit to find Cindy Lou Who … living in a trailer? A lot has happened to the little girl from Whoville. Grab a drink or two as grown-up Cindy spills the tea for you. Friday, Nov. 25-Dec. 22

TICKETS & INFO 24/7 @ BPACC.org

901.385.5588 — Box Office Hours — 10a.m. to 2p.m. Michael Bollinger — Artistic Director

MEMPHIS MUSEUM

OF SCIENCE & HISTORY

PLAYHOUSE ON THE SQUARE

Nov.19 Dec. 24

TO U R S

Backstage Experience Tour

Each week, the Shell is opening up the Green Rooms for an incredible and immersive guided tour that will take you from its 1936 beginnings all the way to the present and everything in between. $15. Monday, Nov. 28, 2-3 p.m. OVERTON PARK SHELL

Tours at Two

Meet in the Catmur Foyer for a tour of a current exhibition with a Dixon docent or staff member. Sunday, Nov. 27, 2-3 p.m.

m e m p h i s f l y e r. c o m

MEMPHIS BOTANIC GARDEN

New Ballet Ensemble’s NutRemix

Benefiting

Le Bonheur Children’s Hospital

THE DIXON GALLERY & GARDENS

Where Have I Seen that Name Before?

Park. Toof. Leath. Crump. Hooks. If you’re a Memphian, these are just some of the names you see every day as you travel through the city. Schools, streets, municipal buildings, libraries, parks, and more reflect the names of these Elmwood Cemetery residents. Learn more about them during a brand-new walking tour $20. Saturday, Nov. 26, 10:30 a.m.-noon. ELMWOOD CEMETERY

SPONSORED BY

moshmemphis.com

ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT

aglow. $10-$14. Friday, Nov. 25-Dec. 23.

23


BOOKS By George Larrimore

Censoring History Local author’s award-winning children’s book added to ban list.

T

DEC 9 6-9PM DEC 9 6-9PM THE KENT DOWNTOWN THE KENT DOWNTOWN

November 24-30, 2022

Ring in the holiday season with Holiday Spirits Cocktail Festival. We've stuffed your stocking with early access to discounted Ring in the holiday season with Holiday Spirits Cocktail Festival. tickets. Ho Ho Hooray! We've stuffed your stocking with early access to discounted tickets. Ho Ho Hooray! At this fest, we'll get merry sipping cocktails, enjoying holiday tunes and treats, and posing with Santa. Each ticket includes 12 At this fest, we'll get merry sipping cocktails, enjoying holiday sample-sized yule themed cocktails. This event supports tunes and treats, and posing with Santa. Each ticket includes 12 Volunteer Memphis, so every sip gets you closer to the nice list! sample-sized yule themed cocktails. This event supports Volunteer Memphis, so every sip gets you closer to the nice list!

TICKETS AT TICKETS AT

HOLIDAYSPIRITSTN.COM HOLIDAYSPIRITSTN.COM BENEFITING BENEFITING

24

hat was first time list. Calls and emails to the Board of in my life that I Education have not been answered. saw a living writer. According to PEN America’s Index of I assumed most of School Book Bans, more than 1,600 them were dead.” Alice Faye Duncan titles have been banned or restricted in recalls the day in the sixth grade libraries across America. at Snowden Elementary School in Tennessee, through what’s called Memphis that the poet Etheridge the Age-Appropriate Materials Act, is Knight spoke to her class. Duncan, one of the states leading the movement the child of two educators, was the to restrict student access to certain one walking around with “oodles” of books. The act, signed into law in April journals, filled with poems and short by Governor Bill Lee, requires “each stories. It was that day her life changed. public school to maintain and post on After that, “I told anyone who would the school’s website, a list of materials listen, ‘I’m going to be a writer.’” in the school’s library collection.” Today, Duncan is an award winner, While the new Tennessee law is aimed the author of 12 at screening “obscene books, including her materials or materials latest, Yellow Dog harmful to minors,” Blues, the story of a the study by PEN boy and his runaway America estimates that dog, the Blues Trail, at least 40 percent of and Beale Street. bans nationwide “are The New York Times connected to either and the New York proposed or enacted Public Library have legislation” or from honored the book “political pressure to (with illustrations restrict the teaching by Caldecott Medalor presence of certain winner Chris books or concepts.” Raschka) as Among those one of the Best concepts Illustrated is racism. among Memphis, children’s books Martin, and the published in Mountaintop 2022. Duncan’s looks at the illwriting is fated 1968 strike considered to by sanitation be in line for workers from awards as well. the point of view Now, of a 9-year-old Duncan’s 2018 girl, whose father book, Memphis, is one of the Martin, and the strikers. PHOTO: ALICE FAYE DUNCAN Mountaintop, Another of Author Alice Faye Duncan has been pulled Duncan’s books, into a growing Evicted!: The controversy — the banning of books Struggle For The Right To Vote, also aimed at young readers in conservativepublished in 2022, chronicles the story leaning states. Memphis, Martin, and the of voter registration drives led by Black Mountaintop received a Coretta Scott people in Fayette County, Tennessee, King Books For Children Honor Medal starting in the 1950s. in 2019, but since January it has been “My mission is to write books to banned “pending investigation” by the leave a record for the children who Duval County (Jacksonville, Florida) weren’t there,” she says. “Because if we Board of Education. Speaking on the don’t share the history as we are seeing WKNO-TV series A Conversation With it, people will say it never happened.” (available at wkno.org), Duncan calls Duncan has three other books book-banning “anti-intellectual” and currently in the works and says she “unhealthy” and says it “contributes to won’t allow censorship to affect what the dumbing down of America.” she writes, or how. You can learn more Duncan’s book is one of almost 200 about Alice Faye Duncan and her on the Duval County banned book books at alicefayeduncan.com.


FOOD By Michael Donahue

The Peabody’s New Chef Tyler Plagmann curates a tasting menu experience at the reopened Chez Phillipe.

“Because I didn’t know what I wanted to do and I was just stumbling through life as most people were at that age. I was gaining new and exciting experiences. And it was a dangerous thing to learn.” A sous chef friend at a resort asked him if he wanted a job, and Plagmann went to work as a dishwasher and pantry/garde manger cook at the resort. “It was the first time in my life I was never bored. “I’ve never seen a job where people can just create something. Just whatever they want to do. And you’re constantly tasting. And there’s fire, knives, and yelling.” Plagmann, who eventually rose to executive sous chef, worked at restaurants in Vermont, Boston, Portland, and Nashville before moving to Memphis. Memphis “felt more like home than Nashville ever could. Maybe it’s just due to my upbringing and surroundings growing up, but you could see there was a lot of life in the structures, the buildings. There’s

A HOLIDAY COLLAGE CONCERT Saturday, December 10 at 2:30pm & 7:30pm . Cannon Center Robert Moody, conductor Kalena Bovell, conductor Memphis Symphony Chorus Dr. Lawrence Edwards, conductor

Presented by

Tickets Now On Sale - Order Yours Today! 901.537.2500 . MemphisSymphony.org

FUTSAL • BASKETBALL • VOLLEYBALL

REC BASKETBALL • CLUB BASKETBALL DEVELOPMENTAL SOCCER

m e m p h i s f l y e r. c o m

PHOTO: MICHAEL DONAHUE

TJ Sheridan, Tyler Plagmann, Tyler Reed, and Joshua Bogador

beautiful murals. Sun Studio. It’s all there. My driver picked me up at the airport and he was playing blues.” In his Chez Philippe position, Plagmann says, “I create the menu through the collaboration between myself and my sous chef. This is the first time that The Peabody has officially ever had a tasting menu inside Chez Philippe.” The restaurant now has a “more globalstyle tasting menu,” Plagmann says. “We have a 10-course tasting menu. So, you’re getting the smaller, more flavorful, more intricate types of food, as opposed to the fine dining we did in the past.” The menu includes an amuse-bouche snack, a bread course, a vegetable course, a fish/seafood course, an intermezzo, two meat courses, and petit fours. “You also get a take-home of bananas Foster banana bread.” The Peabody wanted Chez Philippe’s menu “to be more modern.” That means, “French techniques, but with Asian and Nordic influences.” The next menu, which will begin November 24th, includes “more fermentations. More Nordic-style plating with French and Asian ingredients.” Plagmann puts a lot of emphasis on vegetables and their different preparations. The coho salmon is grilled on a yakitori grill and basted with a fermented satsuma glaze. He plans to change the menu “every two to three weeks. We already started working on the menu after this menu.” Plagmann worked fast after he got to Memphis. “Basically, in the span of a few weeks, I had to build my team, create a new menu, get plates, bowls, equipment, learn about the city. It’s a completely new, foreign city to me.” The back, as well as the front of the house, had to work fast. Plagmann had to get acquainted with “local products, vendors, farms in a limited amount of time to open up Chez Philippe and present a tasting menu. It really was about two to three weeks.” Food and beverage management had to build a team of servers and get everything going in a very short amount of time. Chez Philippe reopened October 20th. “Every review we get, it’s a little overwhelming. It’s a very humbling experience to see just how much people have really taken to the food that we are creating and the service we are offering.”

AFTER-SCHOOL ENRICHMENT PROGRAMS CAMPS • CLINICS • AND MORE!

CHECK US OUT AT THEMSEC.COM

Join the MSEC newsletter, and be the first to hear about our youth and adult leagues, tournaments and events, camps, clinics, and more! SIGN UP BEFORE DECEMBER 1 AND BE ENTERED TO WIN AN MSEC GRAND OPENING SWAG PACK!

SCAN TO JOIN!

ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT

T

yler Plagmann originally wanted to be a comic book artist. “I had several characters,” he says. “I even pursued it a little bit more when I was cooking. I created a series with a chef who fought demons from hell.” The chef’s name was Jim, says Plagmann. “It was just an amalgamation of many different people I thought an amazing chef could have been.” Plagmann has become Jim in real life (minus the demons). A veteran chef of fine dining restaurants, he is now executive sous chef at The Peabody, as well as executive chef of the hotel’s Chez Philippe restaurant, which recently reopened after being closed since the pandemic. Cooking wasn’t the first career for Plagmann, who is from Evansville, Indiana. “Fourteen years ago, I was a welder. I used to weld when I was younger — weld on barges.

25


NEWS OF THE WEIRD By the editors at Andrews McMeel Syndication

STAY IN THE LOOP November 24-30, 2022

SUBSCRIBE TO THE MEMPHIS FLYER NEWSLETTER TODAY.

26

Inexplicable A female lion at the Topeka Zoo in Kansas has grown a mane, The Topeka Capital-Journal reported on Oct. 23. Zuri, 18, who lost her mate, Avus, in 2020, started producing more testosterone after his death, which has resulted in the butch look. “It’s nothing like the mane you would see on a fully sexually mature male lion,” said Zuri’s curator, Shanna Simpson. “She looks like a teenaged male lion.” Zookeepers said along with the mane, Zuri has become more feisty — growling, snarling, and roaring more than before. “She feels like she needs to protect her pride, so her testosterone increases,” Simpson said. [Topeka C-J, 10/23/2022] Great Art A 1941 artwork by Dutch abstract artist Piet Mondrian has been found to have been hanging upside down in various museums for 75 years, The Guardian reported. One could be forgiven for the mistake; the piece features interlaced red, yellow, black, and blue adhesive tape strips that subtly thicken at the bottom. But a photograph of Mondrian’s studio shows the same piece on an easel — with the “bottom” at the top. However, Susanne Meyer-Buser, curator of the North Rhine-Westphalia’s art collection, said it will continue to be displayed upside down. “The adhesive tapes are already extremely loose and hanging by a thread,” she said. “And it’s now part of the work’s story.” [Guardian, 10/28/2022] Armed and Clumsy A man who stopped in a corn maze in Brooklyn Park, Minnesota, on Oct. 22 to get a corn kernel out of his shoe accidentally shot himself in the leg, KMSP-TV reported. The 38-year-old from Circle Pines was carrying the gun legally, and it discharged when he bent over to retrieve the kernel. Police said the gun did not have a safety; the owner wasn’t charged. [KMSP, 10/24/2022] Wait, What? Designer Amanda Booth, 33, of Toronto, Canada, has a business making jewelry, aptly named Trinkets by Amanda, Oddee reported on Oct.

31. Her first pieces were of clay, but then a friend contacted her and asked if she could make a jewelry set from her son’s ashes. Booth has “never said no” to a friend, and the set inspired other customers — one who asked if she could use breast milk to make jewelry. She posted about the jewelry on TikTok and business took off, including orders for items made with umbilical cords, placenta, and hair. But the real crème de la crème came when people started requesting jewelry made from semen. Booth transforms the liquids to powder and mixes them with clay, then sculpts the jewelry piece. “I am an open-minded artist,” Booth said. [Oddee, 10/31/2022] Spooky Linda Hill, owner of a rental home in Gainesville, Texas, has ghosts, Fox News reported. Many ghosts. “We’ve got kids, and we’ve got old people, old guys, and we’ve got hookers,” she said. The hookers are the most common visitors, known to stroke a male renter’s face or their arm. “They try to stir up business, but they can’t figure out a way to conclude the transaction, so nothing ever happens,” she said. [Fox News, 11/1/2022] Bright Idea Self-proclaimed “Britain’s dullest man” Kevin Beresford has your holiday shopping list solution: a 2023 calendar of Britain’s best parking lots, the Daily Record reported. Beresford traveled the country from one end to the other, photographing parking lots and later compiling his favorites into a 12-month calendar. His personal favorite was Trinity Street car park in Birmingham, featuring walls made of crushed cars and adorned with street art. Beresford, of Worcestershire, said he focuses on “slices of English life that nobody else does. I don’t create your normal conventional calendars. It’s sexy being dull.” Beresford is single, ladies. [Daily Record, 10/22/2022] Send your weird news items with subject line WEIRD NEWS to WeirdNewsTips@ amuniversal.com. News of the Weird is now a podcast on all major platforms! Visit newsoftheweirdpodcast.com to find out more. © 2022 ANDREWS MCMEEL SYNDICATION 1130 Walnut, Kansas City, MO 64106; 800-255-6734


TAURUS (April 20-May 20): Your keynote comes from teacher Caroline Myss. She writes, “Becoming adept at the process of self-inquiry and symbolic insight is a vital spiritual task that leads to the growth of faith in oneself.” Encouraging you to grow your faith in yourself will be one of my prime intentions in the next 12 months. Let’s get started! How can you become more adept at self-inquiry and symbolic insight? One idea is to ask yourself a probing new question every Sunday morning, like “What teachings and healings do I most want to attract into my life during the next seven days?” Spend the subsequent week gathering experiences and revelations that will address that query. Another idea is to remember and study your dreams, since doing so is the number one way to develop symbolic insight. For help, I recommend the work of Gayle Delaney: tinyurl.com/InterviewYourDreams. GEMINI (May 21-June 20): The TV science fiction show Legends of Tomorrow features a ragtag team of imperfect but effective superheroes. They travel through time trying to fix aberrations in the timelines caused by various villains. As they experiment and improvise, sometimes resorting to wildly daring gambits, their successes outnumber their stumbles and bumbles. And on occasion, even their apparent mistakes lead to good fortune that unfolds in unexpected ways. One member of the team, Nate, observes, “Sometimes we screw up — for the better.” I foresee you Geminis as having a similar modus operandi in the coming weeks. CANCER (June 21-July 22): I like how Cancerian poet Stephen Dunn begins his poem, “Before We Leave.” He writes, “Just so it’s clear — no whining on the journey.” I am offering this greeting to you and me, my fellow Cancerians, as we launch the next chapter of our story. In the early stages, our efforts may feel like drudgery, and our progress could seem slow. But as long as we don’t complain excessively and don’t blame others for our own limitations, our labors will become easier and quite productive.

LEO (July 23-Aug. 22): Leo poet Kim Addonizio writes a lot about love and sex. In her book Wild Nights, she says, “I’m thinking of dating trees next. We could just stand around all night together. I’d murmur, they’d rustle, the wind would, like, do its wind thing.” Now might be a favorable time for you, too, to experiment with evergreen romance and arborsexuality and trysts with your favorite plants. When was the last time you hugged an oak or kissed an elm? JUST KIDDING! The coming weeks will indeed be an excellent time to try creative innovations in your approach to intimacy and adoration. But I’d rather see your experiments in togetherness unfold with humans. VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22): In her book Daughters of the Stone, Virgo novelist Dahlma Llanos-Figueroa tells the tale of five generations of Afro-Cuban women, her ancestors. “These are the stories of a time lost to flesh and bone,” she writes, “a time that lives only in dreams and memories. Like a primeval wave, these stories have carried me, and deposited me on the morning of today. They are the stories of how I came to be who I am, where I am.” I’d love to see you explore your own history with as much passion and focus, Virgo. In my astrological opinion, it’s a favorable time for you to commune with the influences that have made you who you are. LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22): In accordance with astrological omens, here’s my advice for you in the coming weeks: 1. Know what it takes to please everyone, even if you don’t always choose to please everyone. 2. Know how to be what everyone wants you to be and when they need you to be it, even if you only fulfill that wish when it has selfish value for you. 3. DO NOT give others all you have and thereby neglect to keep enough to give yourself. 4. When others are being closed-minded, help them develop more expansive finesse by sharing your own reasonable views. 5. Start thinking about how, in 2023, you will grow your roots as big and strong as your branches. SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21): Even if some people are nervous or intimidated around you, they may be drawn to you nonetheless. When that happens, you probably enjoy the power you feel. But I wonder what would happen if you made a conscious effort to cut back just a bit on the daunting vibes you emanate. I’m not saying they’re bad. I understand they serve as a protective measure, and I appreciate the fact that they may help you get the cooperation you want. As an experiment, though, I invite you to be more reassuring and welcoming to those who might be inclined to fear you. See if it alters their behavior in ways you enjoy and benefit from.

CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19): You now have extra power to exorcise ghosts and demons that are still lingering from the old days and old ways. You are able to transform the way your history affects you. You have a sixth sense about how to graduate from lessons you have been studying for a long time. In honor of this joyfully tumultuous opportunity, draw inspiration from poet Charles Wright: “Knot by knot I untie myself from the past / And let it rise away from me like a balloon. / What a small thing it becomes. / What a bright tweak at the vanishing point, blue on blue.” AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18): In accordance with current astrological rhythms, I am handing over your horoscope to essayist Anne Fadiman. She writes, “I have always felt that the action most worth watching is not at the center of things, but where edges meet. I like shorelines, weather fronts, international borders. There are interesting frictions and incongruities in these places, and often, if you stand at the point of tangency, you can see both sides better than if you were in the middle of either one.” PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20): Over the course of my life, I have been fortunate to work with 13 psychotherapists. They have helped keep my mental health flourishing. One of them regularly reminded me that if I hoped to get what I wanted, I had to know precisely what I wanted. Once a year, she would give me a giant piece of thick paper and felt-tip markers. “Draw your personal vision of paradise,” she instructed me. “Outline the contours of the welcoming paradise that would make your life eminently delightful and worthwhile.” She would also ask me to finish the sentence that begins with these words: “I am mobilizing all the energy and ingenuity and connections I have at my disposal so as to accomplish the following goal.” In my astrological opinion, Pisces, now is a perfect time to do these two exercises yourself.

November 25 – December 24

Nov. 25 Opening day hours:10:30 - 6:30pm Reception with live music: 6:30 - 8:00pm

A Very Tasteful Food Blog Dishing it out at .com.

GET ONE 2 PC DARK DINNER

FREE W/ PURCHASE OF ONE 2PC DARK DINNER & 2 MED DRINKS. WITH THIS COUPON. EXPIRES 12/31/22.

Drive Thru 2520 Mt. Moriah 4349 Elvis Presley 2484 Jackson Ave. 1370 Poplar Ave. 890 Thomas

NO PHOTOCOPIES ACCEPTED!

m e m p h i s f l y e r. c o m

ARIES (March 21-April 19): One of your callings as an Aries is to take risks. You’re inclined to take more leaps of faith than other people, and you’re also more likely to navigate them to your advantage — or at least not get burned. A key reason for your success is your keen intuition about which gambles are relatively smart and which are ill-advised. But even when your chancy ventures bring you exciting new experiences, they may still run you afoul of conventional wisdom, peer pressure, and the way things have always been done. Everything I have described here will be in maximum play for you in the coming weeks.

SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21): Sagittarian rapper and entrepreneur Jay-Z has stellar advice for his fellow Sagittarians to contemplate regularly: “Ain’t nothin’ wrong with the aim; just gotta change the target.” In offering Jay-Z’s advice, I don’t mean to suggest that you always need to change the target you’re aiming at. On many occasions, it’s exactly right. But the act of checking in to evaluate whether it is or isn’t the right target will usually be valuable. And on occasion, you may realize that you should indeed aim at a different target.

ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT

FREE WILL ASTROLOGY By Rob Brezsny

27


TV By Chris McCoy

Rebel Scum Andor has quietly become one of the best shows on TV.

November 24-30, 2022

I

28

n 2016, Star Wars violated its own formula with Rogue One. Directed by Gareth Edwards and written by Tony Gilroy and Chris Weitz, it jettisoned the space wizards and coming-of-age stories in favor of more straightforward space thriller action, all spun off of two sentences in A New Hope’s famous opening crawl text from 1977. Rogue One was to be the first of many anthology films, telling stories in the Star Wars universe outside of the increasingly playedout Skywalker family saga. But after Solo’s mediocre box office performance and the pandemic set Disney down a course toward streaming, those energies were directed toward creating live-action series. Coming three years after the debut of The Mandalorian, Andor is the best of the bunch. Diego Luna stars as the rebel super spy Cassian Andor. When we first meet him, he’s far from the ideologically motivated utilitarian who sacrifices himself to give the Rebellion a fighting chance in Rogue One. His first brush with the Empire is with one of Palpatine’s subcontractors. He’s in a brothel searching for his missing sister. He hasn’t seen her since he was rescued from the dying planet Kenari by Maarva (Fiona Shaw), a kindly scavenger making a living from collecting discarded Imperial technology. Andor attracts unwelcome attention from a couple

of security contractors looking for a quick shakedown, and when things get out of hand, he kills them and flees back to Maarva’s home on Ferrix. On the run, he decides to sell the most valuable piece of contraband he owns to buy passage offworld. His buyer turns out to be Luthen Rael (Stellan Skarsgård), one of the founders of the Rebellion against the Empire, who recruits him for an impossibly dangerous mission: stealing the Imperial payroll for an entire planet. Meanwhile, a corporate security officer named Syril Karn (Kyle Soller) is trying to track down and arrest Andor for the murder of his two

Diego Luna as Cassian Andor and Genevieve O’Reilly as Mon Mothma employees. His bungling attracts the attention of Dedra Meero (Denise Gough), an Imperial Security Bureau officer who believes Andor is the key to unraveling the galaxy-wide conspiracy that will become the Alliance to Restore the Republic. Rogue One screenwriter Tony Gilroy has developed Andor into one of the most compelling characters on television. The 12-episode series starts slow, but the first episode is also the worst. It gains momentum as

Andor’s perspective changes. At first, his only goal is survival. But when he tries to flee the politics of the fragmenting Empire, he finds that wherever you go, politics always finds you. Before he even understands what he’s fighting for, Andor is already making sacrifices and hard choices for the sake of the Rebellion. Just as interesting as Andor’s commando missions and prison breakouts is the intrigue on Coruscant, where wealthy Senator Mon Mothma (Genevieve O’Reilly) plays cat and mouse with Imperial investigators as she tries to coordinate and arm the rebellion’s restless factions. While there is the requisite cute robot (B2EMO, voiced by Dave Chapman), Andor’s tone is different than the space opera we’re used to from Star Wars. The action on the Imperial capital planet Coruscant resembles the Cold War tension of The Americans; I would watch an entire series that’s just scenes from Mon Mothma’s marriage to the clueless playboy Perrin (Alastair Mackenzie). I still don’t side with the people who say all of Star Wars should be gritty and “realistic” (whatever that means in a universe with space wizards), but it certainly works for Andor. On Wednesday, November 23rd, the first two episodes of Andor will air on ABC, while the series finale will join the other 11 episodes streaming on Disney+.


N O W P L AY I N G B y C h r i s M c C o y

This Week in Theaters Master detective Benoit Blanc (Daniel Craig) is back, and his accent is more outrageous than ever in Rian Johnson’s sequel to the sleeper hit Knives Out. This time, he’s on an island with a billionaire (Edward Norton) who has invited him to play the ultimate murder mystery dinner party game. But the stakes are raised when someone in the all-star cast dies for real.

Steven Spielberg’s autobiographical film about growing up as a movie-obsessed kid in a home that’s slowly breaking apart. Written by Angels in America playwright Tony Kushner, it features acclaimed performances by Michelle Williams as Mitzi, a character based on Spielberg’s mother, and Paul Dano as Burt, his father.

Black Panther: Wakanda Forever

Angela Bassett, Lupita Nyong’o, and Letitia Wright mourn the original Black Panther (Chadwick Boseman) as they try to defend Wakanda from an invasion by hunky new anti-hero Namor the SubMariner (Tenoch Huerta). If you haven’t seen this yet, what are you waiting for?

$0 MONTHLY PREMIUM

HOME OF THE TIME WARP DRIVE-IN SERIES

Most people that respond to this qualify for ACA insurance plans with NO MONTHLY PREMIUM!

901-270-4974

If you have been declined before or were told you didn’t qualify, REAPPLY! If you don’t qualify for a FREE PLAN, will help yourespond enroll in one that is Mostwe people that to this qualify for ACA insurance plans with affordable.

NO MONTHLY PREMIUM!

If you have been declined before or were told you didn’t qualify, REAPPLY! If you don’t qualify for a FREE PLAN, we will help you enroll in one that is affordable.

m e m p h i s f l y e r. c o m

HEALTH INSURANCE PLANS

ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT

Glass Onion: A Knives Out Mystery

The Fabelmans

29


901-575-9400 classifieds@memphisflyer.com LEGAL NOTICES FRESH START ACT OF 2022 H.R. 6667 I’ve been waitin’ for a day like this to come. There you go making my heart beat again. We are on the edge of somethin’ wonderful. Face to face with changes, we are going to light up Memphis, TN. We got some pages to turn. Federal expungement. GRAY 2006 PONTIAC G6 GT This is an attempt to apply for a car title VIN# 1G2zh558864228426 Anyone showing interest please contact Sheyaudriana Ware by certified mail to 5327 Banbury Ave Memphis TN 38135. Return receipt requested within 10 business days of the date of this publication. VEHICLES 2004 Ford F150 1FTPW14534KD13465 (Ellis) 2014 Dodge Charger 2C3CDXBGXEH234559 (Balfour) 2004 Toyota Sequoia 5TDZT34A84S222145 (Boyd) 2003 Cadillac Escalade 3GYEK63N03G154163 (Holliday) 2016 Nissan Altima 1N4AL3AP6GN306485 (Warmsley) 2011 Toyota Corolla 2T1BU4EE9BC542022 (Newsome) 2008 Chevy Impala 2G1WB58K381232494 (Nelson) 2018 Mits Outlander JA4AP3AU9JU024854 (Chaney) 2008 Chevy Corvette 1G1YY26WX85101413 (Hampton)

LEGAL NOTICE • EMPLOYMENT • REAL ESTATE • SERVICES

2018 Honda Accord 1HGCV1F36JA150844 (Booker) All parties holding claim on the following vehicles should contact Bobo’s Tires & Towing, LLC at 901-379-8379 within 10 days of this notice.

EMPLOYMENT SALES POSITION AT SIGNWORKS Signage and large format digital printing company in Midtown has a career opportunity for an Account Development/Sales Representative, who is dependable and enthusiastic to join our team. General computer knowledge and skills including Microsoft Office excel, etc., as well as fluent skills in Adobe Illustrator and design layout are required. Our office is fast paced, fun and is suited for someone that is quick thinking, and can multitask in a changing environment.We offer competitive compensation, good benefits package plus working with people that appreciate and support your efforts. Please call Dale at 2723889 and/or Email your resume to dale@signworksmemphis.com and lsouthern@commtrans.com SIGNWORKS PRODUCTION TEAM Signworks in Midtown is looking for a new member to join their production team! We are looking for the following skill sets:

- Valid driver’s license - Comfortable on ladders - Committed to finishing work started - Exhibit problem solving skills - Fabrication experience preferred, but not required - Sign experience preferred, but not required - Able to communicate with customers on site during sign installation - Ability to lift 50 lbs Please call Signworks at 272-3889 and ask for James.

SHARED HOUSING FURNISHED ROOMS Bellevue/McLemore, Jackson/ Watkins, Airways/Lamar. Call 901-485-0897.

BUY, SELL, TRADE WANTED: OLD WINDUP Victrolas & old 45 & 78 records. Call Paul 901-734-6111.

ENTERTAINMENT FOR CHRISTMAS AND NEW YEAR’S PARTIES. Call 901-520-1917

Discover where a career at FedEx can take you. We’re hiring at the FedEx Express World Hub in Memphis.

AUDI-VW-PORSCHE

Starting pay up to $22/hour.

fedexishiring.com

ANNOUNCING THE

Specializing in

5331 Summer Ave.

www.WolfsburgAuto.com

Factory Trained Experience Independent Prices

(901) 761-3443

Call today for an appointment!

November 24-30, 2022

AUDI-VW-PORSCHE

Memphis, TN 38122

FEATURING Acclaimed Actor & Comedian

GEORGE

LOPEZ Friday, December 16, 2022 11:30 a.m. Peabody Hotel

I

Memphis TN

BENEFITTING

30

Sponsorships, tables and tickets available now! www.methodisthealth.org/luncheon I 901.478.0704


T H E L A S T W O R D B y B r y c e W. A s h b y a n d M i c h a e l J . L a R o s a

Tacos and Labor Abuse

THE LAST WORD

Everyone loves tacos, but most of us don’t think too much about how they’re made, or who, in fact, makes them. That all changed here in Memphis, thanks to a recent story in the Commercial Appeal by veteran reporter Daniel Connolly, an expert on the local and national Hispanic community. The Covid-19 pandemic dramatically shifted the labor market locally and nationally; employees asked for protection during the deadly phase of the infection, and many have since declined to return to unfulfilling — sometimes dangerous — minimum-wage jobs. As a result, ubiquitous “We’re Hiring” signs hang in windows across Memphis and the country. Currently, with about 11 million unfilled jobs in the United States and an estimated 4 million workers “displaced” from the labor market due to Covid and the continued effects of “long-Covid,” employers are scrambling for employees who now don’t want to work under pre-Covid terms. Laborers are not returning to degrading low pay that doesn’t translate to a “living wage” — or at least compensation and benefits that fully acknowledge their contributions to the business. Americans aren’t lazy — they’re just fed up. As American corporate profits soar, a South African megalomaniac (“the richest man in the world”) buys Twitter for $44 billion, and a Portuguese soccer player grabs PHOTO: NATHAN DUMLAO | UNSPLASH $167 million per year in pay and endorsements, it’s understandable why Taco truck immigration diplomacy is not going to cut it. there’s little motivation to return to a $7.25 an hour job here in the U.S. Congress refuses to move on a federal minimum wage, and the Tennessee General Assembly is content with its citizens earning a pittance. Each relies on the same old tired arguments: Raising the minimum wage, they tell us with neither conviction nor data, will lead to unemployment. Reminding our friends in Congress of the 11 million jobs that are unfilled, presently, doesn’t seem to register. Hence, the long gaze south. Connolly’s report focuses on a local restaurateur/taco operation who, like most restaurant owners in our city, has struggled in the nearly impossible labor market outlined above. Why not open our southern border to allow for labor flow from Mexico? The minimum wage there is currently the equivalent of $8 per day — or $160 per month. Given that grim reality, $7.25 per hour sounds pretty damn good. No workable legal pathway exists to bring “low-skilled” people from Mexico here. So people cross the border illegally. Many of these people are “pulled” here by unscrupulous business owners in the United States who need a stable labor force to stay in business and by offering, via Facebook, Twitter, or some other electronic medium that penetrates borders, “a 100-percent safe trip, but without a visa.” Working without proper documentation (a visa) in the United States is not legal, and soliciting workers with offers of a visa-less “safe trip” sounds remarkably close to trafficking. It will certainly attract the attention of the United States Department of Labor in Washington, especially when the pay advertised clearly violates federal overtime laws. In the end, taco truck immigration diplomacy is not going to cut it. We need leadership from Washington right now because only the federal government can set, change, and update immigration policy. If we want to avoid more potential employer trafficking, reduce the flow of unauthorized border crossings, and make a dent in the 11 million unfilled jobs in the U.S., Biden will need to lead on immigration reform. The “other side” in Congress has focused on pure nonsense for the past two years: defending a lunatic who once was president of the U.S., spewing conspiracy theories about a stolen election, and working to take rights away from women. There’s no hope they will join in for a real solution, so before losing control of the House, Biden should push for passage of the Dream Act (filibuster be damned!), which would regularize the status of millions while permanently welcoming them into the labor force. Biden should also work to modernize our 1960s-style (i.e. outdated) visa system to attack the long backlogs of pending applications. Both moves would require federal action. The benefits: Our contemporary labor/immigration crisis could be managed out of Washington via responsible legislation rather than from the back of a taco truck parked on Summer Avenue. Bryce W. Ashby is an attorney at Donati Law, PLLC. Michael J. LaRosa is an associate professor of history at Rhodes College.

m e m p h i s f l y e r. c o m

This crisis could be managed out of Washington rather than from the back of a food truck.

31


New/Used LPs, 45s & CDs.

2152 Young Ave - 901-722-0095 goner-records.com Voted Flyer’s Best of Memphis Since 2004

OPEN 8AM BLACK FRIDAY

RECORD STORE DAY

We Buy Records!

We're sweetening the deal. Each holiday gift subscription includes 12 issues of MEMPHIS MAGAZINE. Plus a milk chocolate bar from Dinstuhl’s.

ANTIQUES & COLLECTIBLES 21,000 sq ft. 100 + booths • 5855 Summer Ave. (corner of Summer and Sycamore View ) exit 12 off I-40 | 901.213.9343 Mon-Sat 10a-6p | Sun 1p-6p

ORDER TODAY

Coco & Lola’s Midtown Lingerie Spice Up Date Night!

ALL SIZES SMALL – 3X!! New Styles at

CocoandLolas.com IG/FB/TW @CocoandLolas Memphis’ Top Lingerie Shop

710 S. Cox | Mon-Sat 11:30-7:00

MEET

BEAR!

MEMPHISMAGAZINE.COM.

Use code HOL22 or call 901.575.9470

JUST $18! more than 70% off the newsstand cover price!

Tune into the Memphis Flyer Radio podcast! A weekly podcast from the pages and people of the Memphis Flyer. Available wherever you stream your podcasts!

anchor.fm/memphis-flyer

Bear is a handsome young Shepherd/Hound mix who needs a home. He is sweet-natured and well-mannered and gets along with everyone. TO ADOPT BEAR, VISIT: https://dogs2ndchance.org

GO GLOBAL!

xm7digitalsales.com Advertise

Online* Mobile Phone * Distribution

call us @ (877)-879-9XM7