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WRONG TURN

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BRUCE VANWYNGARDEN Editor SHARA CLARK Managing Editor JACKSON BAKER Senior Editor TOBY SELLS Associate Editor CHRIS MCCOY Film and TV Editor ALEX GREENE Music Editor MICHAEL DONAHUE JON W. SPARKS Staff Writers JESSE DAVIS Copy Editor, Staff Writer JULIE RAY Calendar Editor MATTHEW J. HARRIS Editorial Assistant LORNA FIELD, RANDY HASPEL, RICHARD MURFF, FRANK MURTAUGH, MEGHAN STUTHARD Contributing Columnists AIMEE STIEGEMEYER, SHARON BROWN Grizzlies Reporters ANDREA FENISE Fashion Editor KENNETH NEILL Founding Publisher

OUR 1656TH ISSUE 11.19.20 As I predicted would be the case last week, we still don’t have a concession from President Donald Trump, who by the Associated Press’ most recent accounting, lost the popular vote by more than 5 million and will lose the Electoral College vote 306 to 232. That Trump hasn’t conceded yet isn’t a great surprise, by now. He’s made his bones by breaking all the conventional traditions of the presidency — common sense and common decency being two of them. But the fact that the president of the United States can petulantly declare that math is unfair and do his best to screw up a peaceful transition of power is a clear indication that the way we’re electing our president is broken. For starters, any “democratic” system in which a candidate who gets 5 million more votes than the opposing candidate could still lose an election, is absurd. Additionally, any representative system in which the state of Wyoming, which has about half the population of Shelby County, has as many U.S. senators as the state of California with nearly 40 million people, is royally screwed up. Much of this stems from the decision made at the original Constitutional Convention in 1787 to give each state two senators regardless of population. It was probably a good idea at the time, with 13 relatively similarly sized states. But not so much in 2020, with 50 far-flung states, some with huge populations, some with more cattle than people. Indeed, as things stand today, a cow in South Dakota is much better represented in the U.S. Senate than a human being in New York or Florida. This makes the Senate deeply unrepresentative of the American people and puts Democrats and urban Americans at a major disadvantage, since Democrats tend to represent more highly populated states while Republicans more often represent rural states. The Republican “majority” in the U.S. Senate currently represents about 47 percent of the American people, which means a mostly white, conservative, rural-based minority party is in control of the levers of power in our most powerful political body. And remember, Donald Trump came close to winning the presidency again with 47 percent of the vote! Sense a pattern here? We have to fix this. Every four years, the cry goes up to abolish the Electoral College, which most recently has made possible the minority elections of George W. Bush in 2000 and Donald Trump in 2016. But it seems to me the problem isn’t so much the Electoral College itself, but the rule that “winner takes all” of each state’s electors. An electoral college in which state votes were divvied proportionately to vote total percentages would make much more sense. Tennessee’s 11 electoral votes, for example, would have roughly split in 2020 to seven Trump electors and four Biden electors, a much more representative outcome of the state’s views. Similarly, the 5.7 million Trump voters in California would have gotten about a third of that state’s 55 electors. The same situation exists on a smaller scale in Tennessee state government. About four in 10 Tennesseans vote Democrat. The Tennessee state Senate has 27 Republicans and six Democrats. The Tennessee House of Representatives has 74 Republicans and 25 Democrats. That’s wrong. And it’s that way because the majority party gets to design the state’s district maps, and by slicing up urban district populations like a pizza and combining them with far-flung rural areas, those blue/city voters are diluted with rural voters, ensuring that the GOP can keep their lopsided, non-representative majority. It’s called gerrymandering and it’s endemic around the country. New district maps will be created next year and you can bet the GOP will set themselves up nicely for the next 10 years in the state House and Senate. It’s how Tennessee, a state with millions of urban voters, has come to be ruled by white, backwards country rubes. How do we break the cycle? For starters, we need a national law mandating N E WS & O P I N I O N that congressional district maps be created THE FLY-BY - 4 by bipartisan committees. And we need a NY TIMES CROSSWORD - 6 national law eliminating the “winner-takePOLITICS - 8 all” system for Electoral College votes. COVER STORY Nebraska and Maine already break “WRONG TURN” up their state electors geographically. The BY ELLEN KLYCE & other 48 states could do the same, but it DEANGELO BROWN - 10 SPORTS - 14 would take an act of Congress to make that WE RECOMMEND - 16 happen, which includes the Senate. Which MUSIC - 18 means we’ve circled back around again to CALENDAR - 20 minority rules — a minority that doesn’t FOOD - 24 want to dismantle the very thing that keeps BREWS - 25 them in power. TV - 26 Oy. C L AS S I F I E D S - 28 Bruce VanWyngarden LAST WORD - 31 brucev@memphisflyer.com

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THE

fly-by

MEMernet

W E E K T H AT W A S By Flyer staff

Trump, a Vaccine Trial, & the FTC

M E M P H I S R I D ES

Tennessee lawmakers join election deniers, a COVID-19 drug tested, and a blocked hospital deal.

CATALYTI C At least five Nextdoor users have had the catalytic converters stolen from their parked cars in recent weeks. The thieves strike at night and surprise the car’s owner with a mess in the morning. “According to the repair shop, I’m the 9th person they’ve seen in two weeks,” Zach Carr wrote in a post last week.

November 19-25, 2020

Edited by Toby Sells

A roundup of Memphis on the World Wide Web.

POSTED TO REDDIT U/BETWEENTHEWINDS

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Questions, Answers + Attitude

J UST D U C KY It’s the magic of the internet, really. Last week, Nextdoor user Ashley Bruneau found a duck and posted its photo with a simple plea: “Is this your duck?” Yep. Within a day, the duck was digitally reunited with its owners. Stephanie and Ti-Pei Feng claimed it. But as of press time the two had not been able to contact the original poster. Now we wait. TWE ET O F TH E WE E K @Midtownbuck put Trump’s motorcade crowd into perspective in a weekend tweet.

WE E K LY VI R US C O U NTS The fall surge of new virus cases continued last week as the seven-day rolling average peaked north of 300. Shelby County also passed two grim milestones last week as total cases surpassed 40,000 and total deaths rose above 600. Monday: new cases - 566, total - 39,990, deaths - 589 Tuesday: new cases - 691, total - 40,681, deaths - 589 Wednesday: new cases - 187, total - 40,868, deaths - 594 Thursday: new cases - 257, total - 41,125, deaths - 604 Friday: new cases - 268, total - 41,393, deaths - 606 Saturday: new cases - 354, total - 41,747, deaths - 610 Sunday: new cases - 373, total - 42,120, deaths - 612 As of Monday morning, 3,249 people were known to have the virus in Shelby County.

Clockwise from top left: The FTC blocked a deal for Methodist to buy two Saint Francis hospitals, single-use plastic may be banned, and Rust Hall

F TC B LO C KS H OS P ITAL D EAL The Federal Trade Commission (FTC) acted last week to block the proposed $350 million acquisition by Memphisbased Methodist Le Bonheur Healthcare of the two Memphis-area Saint Francis hospitals owned by Dallas-based healthcare system Tenet Healthcare Corp. The complaint alleges that the proposed acquisition would substantially lessen competition in the Memphis area and would cause healthcare costs to rise. C OVI D -19 TR IAL A Memphis vaccine trial will enlist 500 for a possible COVID-19 drug. St. Jude Children’s Research Hospital and the University of Tennessee Health Science Center will offer a testing site for the Janssen Pharmaceutical Companies of Johnson & Johnson’s Phase 3 clinical research study. MAS KS S LOW VI R US D EATH R ATE Mask mandates have worked to slow COVID-19 deaths in Tennessee, according to new research from Nashville’s Vanderbilt University. Death rates in counties that adopted mask mandates early on (like Shelby County) fell a couple of weeks after the mandates were ordered and have trended downward ever since. Death rates fell in late-adopting counties, but they have continued to rise in those counties that never mandated masks.

TN LAWMAK E R S S I D E WITH TR U M P No winner of 2020’s presidential election should be declared until voting “irregularities” have been investigated and court appeals have been exhausted, according to some of Tennessee’s top lawmakers. Twenty-four members of the Tennessee Senate Republican Caucus signed a letter issued last week stating they stand “absolutely and unequivocally with President Donald J. Trump as he contests the unofficial results of the presidential election of 2020.” The letter was sent at least to members of the press but was not addressed to any entity or organization. C O U N C I L R EVI EWS S P E E D, R UST HALL Memphis City Council members were slated to review proposals for Rust Hall, the city’s speed limit, and plastic water bottles this week. They were set to review a 100-year lease to the Metal Museum for Rust Hall in Overton Park. Museum leaders have raised $12 million to renovate the building so far. City leaders hope to reduce the city’s default speed limit from 30 miles an hour to 25 miles per hour. The move is hoped to protect pedestrians, cyclists, and more. A proposal would prohibit the city from buying or selling single-use bottled water in an effort to fight climate change, litter, and reliance on fossil fuels. Visit the News Blog at memphisflyer.com for fuller versions of these stories and more local news.


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For Release Monday, August 20, 2018

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43 Classic toy store founder

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46 Symbol of power

21 “___ magnifique!” 47 Olympian Apolo Anton ___ 23 Zilch 48 Shoe material 24 French wine 50 Brian who valley coined the term 25 “Nonsense!” “ambient music” 26 Achy 51 Dog unlikely to have a solid coat 27 Indy-to-Cleveland 52 Braid, e.g. direction

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36 “Special” things in sci-fi films 37 Reason for a doubleheader 38 “My sincere apologies” 39 Company with an annual “Color of the Year” award 40 Kindle, for one 41 Revolutionary War foe 42 Dolce

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57 Georgia’s 2 It’s tough for Tennessee 1 kids to earn capital:more Abbr. money than their parents. In Memphis, upward mobility 14and the 58 Approach depends a lot on your race neighborhood respectfully, in in which you grow up. Those are some key findings modernfrom parlance a new report called17 Economic Opportunity and Upward Mobility 64 Indian yogurt dish in Tennessee issued Friday from the 20 Sycamore Institute, a Nashville-based 66 Boys’ school public policy research center. Much near Windsor of the research was done by Dr. Raj Chetty and others from Opportunity 67 Of all time Insights, a Harvard University-based think tank focused on the 27economy. 28 68 Ringo of The the top line from the Tennessee Beatlesstudy: “Children from 33 69 PoliticalTennessee are less likely competition than kids from 36 similar families 70 Farm structure nationwide move up 71 Weirdlytothespooky economic ladderafrom 72 Space on their parents in 49 50 schedule adulthood.” The shot 73 Friend atinupward war 54 40

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Online subscriptions: Today’s puzzle and more than 7,000 past puzzles, nytimes.com/crosswords ($39.95 a year). Read about and comment on each puzzle: nytimes.com/wordplay.

mobility across the country 57 has dropped a lot since 1940. Then, the share of children earning more than their64 parents was 90 percent. Today, it’s less than 50 percent. In Tennessee, the shot68 at economic mobility varies across the state. But not that much, research said. Counties in Middle Tennessee had71 the highest rates of upward economic mobility. But its average advantage over the rest of the state was just one percentage BY point. The study found PUZZLE there was also little difference in rural and urban counties when it came to upward mobility trends here. But there were differences. Some neighborhoods offer much better prospects than others, reads the study. The best places for upward mobility tend to have higher socioeconomic status, more married parents, and high employment rates — regardless of circumstances in a child’s own home. Also, Black and white children from the same neighborhoods and income levels often have very different rates of upward mobility. This is plain when you look at

DOWN 1 Oil grp. 2 ___ Alto, Calif. 3 Org. defending the Bill of Rights 4 Move so as to hear better, say 5 The Empire State Building has 102 of them 6 Like candles 7 Smart ___ TO PREVIOUS PUZZLE MIDTOWN (wiseacre) LINGERIE 8 Human ___ T E D I S ————————— B A R Project S.COX ST. 38104 O D S O N 710 T ————————— I M E 9 Add even more N U T S T H E OPEN G 11:30-7PM A MON-SAT P criticism S R O M D @COCOANDLOLAS E L T A 10 Music genre G O F O R L E O I related to punk C A B A R E T C A R D 11 Place to see 30

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the chances for upward mobility of children living in Midtown and North 15 were stark. Memphis. The differences “A child who grew up in a lowincome home in Midtown [Memphis] had about a 16 percent18 chance of becoming a high-income adult,” reads the study. “One mile away in 21 North Memphis, a low-income child had less than a 1 percent chance. The odds of moving from middle- to 24 high-income were 19 percent for kids from Midtown and less than 1 percent for those from North30 29 31 Memphis.”

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O H B A B Y

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CITY REPORTER B y To b y S e l l s

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UNLINED OPEN CUP BRA WITH RING DETAILS AND MATCHING HIGH WAISTED PANT Y

Black children have a steeper climb 65their white40-11474 66 than counterparts. S, M, L, XL

“Whether or not a child’s own MSRP $48.00 69 parents are married, their prospects ESTATE BLUE for moving up the economic ladder improve when they live in neighborhoods with more 72 married-couple families and fewer single-parent families,” the study said. “Regardless of wage levels, ERIK AGARD neighborhoods where more people are employed tend to produce better economic outcomes for their children.” Black and white children have very different ratesMELODY of upward OPEN and CUP TEDDY WITH mobility in UNLINED Tennessee Memphis. RING AND ELASTIC DETAILS The probability of a white child 51-11474 in Midtown making51-11474X more money than their parentsS, is percent, M, 22 L, XL, 1X, 2X according to the study. A Black LIST $18.00 MSRPabout $50.00 an 8 child in Midtown has percent chance of upward mobility. ESTATE BLUE Researchers could not predict upward mobility chances for a white kid in North Memphis but said Black children there have a shot that’s only 31 greater than 1 percent. LIST $17.00

28 Musical Yoko 29 Alien 30 Fix, as an election 31 Picture holder 32 Dove’s sound 37 Item on a concert stage 38 Tending to one’s own well-being 40 Instagram

45 R&B singer the hits “So Sick” and “M Independen 47 Princess’ headwear

49 Sandpaperl

50 Bested in a dog contest

51 Stopwatche sand clocks


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It may be too late in the election year for an October surprise (i.e., some unexpected development that stands the pending political situation on its head), but the calendar clearly allows for a November surprise, and, courtesy of the Shelby County Election Commission, we have one. The SCEC, having been foiled last month in its efforts to get County Commission funding for new ballotmarking election devices from the ES&S Company, has done what one critic calls “an end-run” around the commission, buying three of the ES&S devices using its own funds. In declining to purchase the ES&S ballot-marking devices, the County Commission had made its preferences clear in that it favored devices equipped for handmarked paper ballots. In a matter-of-fact press release issued Monday, the Election Commission administrator’s office attempted to make the case that it had no choice but to purchase the new machines, inasmuch as the old machines used by Collierville in the city’s first round of elections earlier this month were tied up, pending certification on November 23rd of the November 3rd results. Collierville requires runoff elections in cases where candidates don’t receive majorities originally, and two seats on the city’s Board of Aldermen will have to be resolved that way, with early voting for the runoffs beginning on Wednesday of this week. “We simply had no choice but to purchase three of the machines to get us through Collierville’s early voting period,” Election Administrator Linda Phillips said in the news release, pointing out that the Election Commission had previously voted 4-1 in favor of the ES&S ballot-marking devices before encountering resistance from the County Commission. The SCEC press release goes on to say that “[b]y Election Day for the runoff, which will be held December 8th, the older machines voters have been using for years, will be available.” And further: “The ballot-marking devices selected by the commissioners are used in conjunction with scan-

ners that are also capable of scanning voter-marked paper ballots. There will be a ballot-on-demand printer capable of printing ballots on demand for those who want to use hand-marked paper ballots. “If a voter would prefer to vote on paper that ballot will be printed on the spot.” Steve Mulroy, a University of Memphis law professor and former county commissioner, is a prominent local advocate of the paper-marked-ballot system of voting, and he expressed skepticism about the election administrator’s decision to purchase the three new machines and her rationale for doing do, which he termed an “excuse.” Mulroy observed: “Note they also said that they would have a ballot-ondemand printer available during early voting, so that anyone who wanted to just vote by a hand-marked paper ballot could do so. “Given that, why could they not just go with the ballot-ondemand printer for early voting? They were already going to have one. That would’ve sufficed by itself. It would cost less money. It would not require using the SCEC slush fund to buy voting machines that the local funding body Linda has by resolution rejected Phillips three times — in January, April, and October. “The answer,” said Mulroy, “may be that they are determined to sneak in their ballot-marking devices by hook or by crook.” He said the purchase was “a clever attempt to do an end-run around the County Commission’s authority, starting a process of doing BMDs by dribs and drabs, to the point that they will be able to say to you later on, ‘Hey, we already have a number of these things anyway. You might as well just go ahead and approve what we originally suggested, because otherwise these machines won’t be compatible.’” Suggesting there were other alternatives available, Mulroy said, “I’m also wondering just how large a slush fund SCEC has that it can buy multiple pieces of expensive equipment without going through the normal funding process?” Members of the County Commission are sure to have similar questions in mind and will no doubt be ready to express them when the commission meets in committee sessions on Wednesday.

JACKSON BAKER

Phillips announces partial purchase of ES&S machines for Collierville runoff elections.


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November 19-25, 2020

WRONG TURN

Ellen Klyce and Deangelo Brown

10


How a misdemeanor traffic violation became one man’s nightmare.

H

ave you ever been stopped for speeding? If so, think about what happened next, and the life-altering and traumatizing consequences of your lead foot. Oh, there weren’t any? I’ve never experienced any, either. I have been stopped for speeding more than once in Memphis and have received either a warning or a ticket. I paid the fine if there was one and that was that. No further trouble, Ms. Klyce, just watch it from now on. I am a white Memphian of a certain age who drives a 2007 Prius. When Deangelo Brown, a Black Memphian age 24, was stopped for speeding, that’s not what happened. A Melrose graduate, Brown was driving too fast one day while making deliveries and was pulled over. He was working to pay for tuition at Remington College, where he’s studying to become an HVAC technician. He’ll graduate next year. I’ve known Deangelo almost his whole life. He was raised by his grandmother, Louise Brown. She was employed by my mother, Polly Cooper. Even though my mother died in 2009, I have remained close with Deangelo and his family. He called me recently, and I asked how he was doing. He said “Not too good. I just got out of jail.” I wanted to help tell Deangelo’s story to increase our awareness about how the justice system can sometimes be cruelly unjust — and can turn a routine pizza delivery into a nightmare. — EK

O

n September 14th, around 2:30 in the afternoon, I’m driving west on Union and the cars in front of me in both lanes are going about 20 mph. I merge left into the turning lane, pass them, and then merge back. I stop at the light at Danny Thomas, and then at the one at B.B. King. I notice a white SUV with tinted windows come up behind me at the light. The light turns green and I proceed to Second Street. The light is turning from green to yellow as I go through the intersection. At Front Street I realize I have missed my turn, so I turn around in a parking lot at Wagner Place. I head back east on Union to make the delivery. When I stop at the light at Front Street, I notice the white SUV making a U-turn on Union back toward me. It comes up close on my bumper while I am stopped, so when the light turns green I pull over so the SUV can pass me. Instead, it pulls up on my bumper again and just sits there — no siren, no blue lights, no intercom, no attempt to get my attention. So I pull out

and head toward Main. Then I notice the white SUV has sped up and is on my bumper again. I pull over. At that point, I’m fearing for my life and wondering what’s going on. The driver of the SUV gets out of his car and he’s wearing a police uniform. He instructs me to cut my car off and step out of the vehicle. I do as instructed. He tells me, “You’re going to jail,” and grabs me by my clothes and puts me over the hood of the SUV. He tells me to put my hands behind my back, and he handcuffs me. I tell him that I’m sorry; I’m at work on a delivery. I tell him he was riding my bumper and I didn’t know who he was. I tell him again that I’m the only driver at my job and I’m the only one delivering all these orders. He asks me if I have anything on me. I say, “No, sir, just my wallet and my phone.” It’s my music phone. My work phone — my regular cell phone — is still in the car. Then he says “What were you thinking going that fast?” I tell him that I’m sorry; I’m at work on a delivery. I tell him he was riding my bumper and I didn’t know who he was. I tell him again that I’m the only driver at my job and I’m the only one delivering all these orders.

F

our more police squad cars show up. Another officer gets out, searches me, then he puts me in the back of his squad car, saying, “I’m not mad at you. We all speed sometimes.” He closes the door and talks to the officer who stopped me. I’m now alone in the back of a closed police car and it’s very hot. The officer who put me in the car comes back and asks me if I have a license or insurance. This is the first time anybody has asked me that. I say, “Yes, sir.” He asks me for my address, ZIP code, and phone number and closes the door again. By then I have been in the car for at least 10 minutes. I am still handcuffed. Then a third officer comes and asks if I know my boss’ number so they can come get the pizzas I was trying to deliver. I tell him, “Yes, but you are going to have to get my phone out of my car.” A fourth officer appears and begins to search my car. He looks in the back seat, under the back seat, in the pockets of the seats, inside the trunk, inside the

glove compartment, inside the armrest, inside the middle console, and inside all four doors. After he finishes, the third officer gets my phone from the floor on the driver’s side. I give him the code to unlock my phone and the number to call my general manager. When she answers, he puts the phone on speaker and I tell her that I am going to jail. She asks “Why?” and the officer says “for reckless driving.” She says, “I’ve never heard of anyone going to jail for reckless driving. Do you have to take him to jail?” He doesn’t say anything and does not return my cell phone. My general manager calls the day manager and tells her to come get the pizzas, the money, and receipts that were in my car, and to see if the police will let her drive my car home for me. The day manager says she is on her way, and my general manager tells me that if I need anything to call her. This is all on speaker, and the officer is standing right there. She hangs up and he closes the door. They switch handcuffs on me because the first ones were super tight. The second ones are still very tight. Then the first officer, the one who arrested me, comes and asks me again, “What were you thinking going so fast?” I say, “Yes, sir, I did do all those things you said I did. I understand you have a job to do and I was doing my job as well.” That’s when a fifth officer shows up and puts me in the back of his squad car. Then they search my car again.

The day manager arrives and takes the two pizzas and the money and the receipts from the officers. As she walks away, she looks at me and shakes her head, meaning the police wouldn’t allow her to take my car home for me. So far, no one has even looked at my driver’s license or asked for my vehicle’s registration or looked at my proof of insurance.

to drive me to 201 Poplar Avenue. I ask him, “What do I do about my car?” He says “Do you have insurance?” I say, “Yes, sir.” He says, “They should just give you your car back if you show proof of ownership and insurance.” As soon as we get to 201, he helps me out of the squad car. I’m still in handcuffs. The woman doing the processing asks me if I have any symptoms of COVID-19 and I say no. Then she gives the officer a mask for me and takes my temperature. The officer takes the handcuffs off. My left thumb is numb. The officer gives me the mask and I put it on. It’s around 3:40 p.m. It was my first time inside 201 Poplar. Once I enter the building, the officer tells me to empty my pockets and put everything on the counter, so I pull out my wallet and music phone and leave them. My name is called and my fingerprints are taken and I’m told to sit back down. Then I get a full body search and I’m taken to a little holding block to wait for intake, where they take more fingerprints. I sign my name and give them my money — $22. Then they do another full body search and tell me to write down on a card any phone numbers I need to remember, and then take my phone. I sit in intake for three hours. Finally, they call my name and take my picture and process me into the system, giving me a wristband with my name, gender, birthdate, and inmate number. It’s about 8 o’clock. I sit for about another hour, and then they bring us small sack lunches: bologna sandwich, chips, and a juice carton. At 9:30, they call me to the medical staff, who check my blood pressure and oxygenation and ask me if I have any symptoms of COVID-19. Then I’m moved to pre-trial. They verify my address and ask for two emergency phone numbers. They ask me if I have ever been locked up before. I say, “No, ma’am.” Another hour goes by, then they call my name to get dressed in the jail uniform. I’m frightened because I thought I would be getting released or given an amount of money for a bond. I had no idea I would have to spend the night in jail. After putting on the jail uniform, they send me back to intake, where I sit for another three hours. Around 1 a.m., I call my sister and let her know I’m in jail. I also call my brother, who calls my cousin, who is a bail bondsman, to see

T

continued on page 13

Around 1 a.m., I call my sister and let her know I’m in jail. I also call my brother, who calls my cousin, who is a bail bondsman, to see if they have set a bond. My cousin says I haven’t even been processed into the system yet.

en minutes later, an officer comes back to the squad car and starts

COVER STORY m e m p h i s f l y e r. c o m

{ COVER STORY BY ELLEN KLYCE & DEANGELO BROWN / PHOTOGRAPH BY MURRAY RISS }

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if they have set a bond. My cousin says I haven’t even been processed into the system yet.

I

t’s 2:30 a.m. I have been sitting in an uncomfortable chair for several hours. They call my name, search me again, and give me a bag with a toothbrush, toothpaste, shampoo, deodorant, a blanket, a sheet, a big towel, and two discolored and stained face towels. As they’re taking me to the lower level, I ask the correctional officer why I’m going to the lower level. I thought I was supposed to be getting out. She says she will check on it. Then I’m put into a cell. It is very small, almost like being in a cardboard box. There are two of us. If my roommate and I were to both stand up, there would be three feet of space between us. There is a bunk bed to the right and an open toilet to the left. I just sit on the floor all night. I don’t feel safe getting into the top bunk. They give us breakfast around 6 a.m. — grits, a piece of cake, cereal and milk, and black coffee. Around 8 a.m., they start coming to get people for court. I ask the morning CO if I have court or if she’d heard anything. She says she’ll check. Around 8:30, we get an hour of “rec” where we can use the phones and walk up and down the halls. I wait behind two inmates to use the phone. It turns out the phone requires a code. When I finally get a call to go out, a recording tells my sister she has to put money on a card to talk to me. So we don’t talk. I sit in my cell for the rest of the day. We get our next meal around 6 p.m. — a Polish sausage, two slices of bread, a piece of cake, and Kool-Aid. No one has said anything to me about my case. Around 7 p.m., I see the second-shift CO and ask if he could check to see if I got a bond or an ROR. He comes back 30 minutes later and says I will be going to court Wednesday morning at 9 a.m. Around about 1 a.m., I finally climb up on the top bed and try to go to sleep, but I just toss and turn all night long. I just want to go home.

A

t 5 a.m. Wednesday, the thirdshift CO flashes her light in my room and tells me to wake up. The nurse comes and takes my vitals. She says usually when you are seen by the nurse you are about to go home. She also says we are on quarantine lockdown because an inmate is experiencing COVID-19 symptoms. They give us breakfast around 6:30 a.m. — soupy eggs. At 10:30 a.m., the CO calls my name and says that pre-trial is getting me released. I change out of the jail uniform into my clothes and get my valuables back: sunglasses, headphones, regular phone, music phone, wallet, and a check for $22. Everything is there. They take

my picture again and cut off my armband and release me. I leave the building and call my sister, who comes to pick me up. When I get home, I open a letter from the city of Memphis that arrived while I was in jail. It says that my vehicle was impounded and the reason was possible theft. It says I can retrieve it at the impound lot. I call them and give the last six digits of the car’s VIN off the car’s title, which I keep at the house. The person at the impound lot tells me it will be $195 to get my car back. I tell her that the police said that if I showed proof of ownership and insurance I could get my car back without paying anything. She says they

don’t do that at the police impound lot and I had to pay $195 and that the fee was going up the next day and I’d have to pay more. I call my brother to take me to get my car, and I pay the $195 cash and get my car back. At 9 a.m. on Thursday, September 17th, I appear at General Sessions Court for my charge of reckless driving. Thanks to family and friends, I am able to get a lawyer. I sit there for about 30 minutes until they call my name. My lawyer talks to the judge, and then the prosecuting attorney. Then the judge calls me up to let me know that my charges are being dismissed.

I

’m sharing my story because it was unbelievable, shocking, terrifying, and life-threatening. No human being should be treated the way I was for a traffic misdemeanor. It makes me look at life differently. I got treated like a criminal, and I’m not a criminal. I do nothing but good things for people. I go to work. I go to school. I try not to ask people for help, try to do it on my own. I want to make a difference in this world. I wouldn’t want this to happen to anyone else, but it does happen — and could happen to anybody. And that’s just wrong. I want a justice system that works for everyone. — DB

OUR FIGHT AGAINST OUR FIGHT AGAINST #MASKON901

#CONTINUETHECOURSE

COVID-19 COVID-19 “I’m encouraged everyday by thebypower and and resilience “Sinceofthe of the pandemic, leaders “I’m encouraged everyday the power ourstart beloved community. People have been willing to resilience of our beloved community. People around this community have been singularly return to work and help ourhelp economy, no focused matter how thingsthe seem. and school leaders are have been willing to return to restore work and on hard reducing risk Teachers of spread, restoreworking our economy, no matter how hard because that’s how we can save lives. We are after sacrifice to to safely open up schools, in a school year like none before. Families have made sacrifice things seem. Teachers and school leaders are calling on everyone to dig a little deeper and slow the spread COVID-19. let up now. Let’s dig continue course.” working to safely openofup schools, We in acan’t school prepare todeep. fight Let’s a little longer.the Each of us has year like none before. Families have made a role in helping to slow the spread. Working -Shelby County Mayor Lee Harris sacrifice after sacrifice to slow the spread of together, we will get to the other side.” COVID-19. We can’t let up now. Let’s dig deep. —Shelby County Commission Let’s continue the course.” “Since the start of the pandemic, leaders around thisChairman communityEddie have been Jonessingularly focused on reducing the risk of —Shelby County Mayor Lee how Harris spread, because that’s we can save lives. We are calling on everyone to dig a little deeper and prepare to fight a

little longer. Each of us has a role in helping to slow the spread. Working together, we will get to the other side.”

• • • • • •

-Shelby County Commission Chairman Eddie Jones

• $1 Million to YMCA for Community Food and Virtual • Protective Measures in Creation of COVID-19 Joint • Expanded Access toDistribution Veterans Benefits • Coordinated Declarations of Emergency Learning Centers Public Buildings Task Force • Surge Testing of •Nearly 2,000 Inmates and Health Corrections Staff $265,000 to Church • Creation of COVID-19 Joint Task Force • Eviction Fund Support for Consolidated Press Briefings for Acute Care for Uninsured Those in Need New Online Portal Share • Hundred and Hundreds of MaskPatients Stitched by Inmates in Local Prison • Consolidated PresstoBriefings COVID-19 • Expanded Access to Critical Data $1 MillionFacilities Health & • New Online Portal to Share Critical DataVeterans Benefits • Free Calls at Local• Detention Video Conference Solutions Safety Grant for Close• Surge Testing of Nearly for Public Meetings Contact Businesses • Free Childcare Services for Essential Employees • Video Conference Solutions for Public Meetings 2,000 Inmates and Designated Senior Hours at • $450,000 in Grants to Corrections Staff • $1 Million to Collins Chapel to Help Shelter Homeless Individuals • Designated Area Grocery Senior StoresHours at Area Grocery Stores Limited Service Restaurants • Hundred and Hundreds of Under Quarantine to Help with Reopening New Health Department • New Health Department COVID Response Mask Stitched by Inmates in COVID Response Team • New Tech and Free Local Prison • $1 Million to YMCA for CommunitySupport Food Distribution and Virtual Team Headquarters Headquarters Technology for • Free Calls at Local Learning Centers Senior Citizen Homes $11.4 Million • $11.4 MillionInvestment Investment in in Massive 140+ EmployeeFacilities Detention Massive 140+ Employee • Live-Streaming • $265,000 Health for Acute Care forFaith Uninsured COVID-19 Patients ExpansionofofHealth Health Department • Free Childcare Services for to ChurchEquipment Expansion for Small Essential Employees Department Based Organizations

• Coordinated Declarations of Emergency

• New Normal Virtual Summit for Business Community

COVER STORY m e m p h i s f l y e r. c o m

continued from page 11

• Hazard Pay for Frontline Workers in•

• $1 Million Health & Safety Grant for Close-Contact Businesses

• Protective Measures in Public Buildings

• Live-Streaming Equipment for Small Faith Based Organizations

• Eviction Fund Support for Those in Need

• Free Museum Admission to Support Virtual Learning Students

$1 Million to Collins • Free Museum Admission Chapel to Help Shelter Virtual • $450,000 in Grantstoto Support Limited Service Restaurants to Help with Reopening Homeless Individuals Learning Students • New Normal Virtual Summit for Business Community Under Quarantine • New Tech and Free Technology Support for Senior Citizen Homes

• Hazard Pay for Frontline ShelbyinCounty Government Workers Shelby County Government

ContInue the cOurse Assistance Programs & Resources Online at WWW.SHELBY.COMMUNITY

#MaskUpMemphis

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#MaskUpShelbyCount


S P O R TS B y Fr a n k M u r t a u g h

White Moves Up Three thoughts on Tiger Football — and a strange season.

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the Liberty Bowl — swung the other way for the Memphis Tigers this season, they’d be staring at a 2-4 record instead of their current mark of 4-2. And worse, they’d be 1-4 in league play (the Electoral College of college football) instead of 3-2. But such is the weight of every game in a season abbreviated by a pandemic. The remaining four games on the Tiger schedule appear winnable, particularly factoring in Houston’s visit here on December 5th. (This Saturday’s opponent, Navy, had its game last weekend postponed because of positive COVID tests.) But the Memphis defense and rushing offense will need to improve for less nail-biting over the season’s final month. To make those “swing games” against Florida teams truly meaningful, the Tigers must capture more victories, including their first on the road.

JOE MURPHY

D

anny Wimprine threw his last touchdown pass as a Memphis Tiger quarterback on December 22, 2004. He found John Doucette late in the fourth quarter of the GMAC Bowl in Mobile, Alabama, a strike that merely reduced the margin of victory that night for Bowling Green (52-35). No other Tiger, before or since, threw as many touchdown passes until Brady White connected with Calvin Austin for the game-winner against USF at the Liberty Bowl, two Saturdays ago. With four games left on the Tigers’ regular-season schedule, a possible bowl game, and even one more season potentially ahead for White, Wimprine’s record will be a distant second on the chart before the current Memphis quarterback (and Ph.D. candidate) is finished. • How significant is White’s touchdown record? It’s fitting that he tied Wimprine’s mark in his 24th win as Memphis quarterback, another new record. Wimprine advocates — I’m one of them — will point out that he shared a backfield with a man (DeAngelo Williams) who ran for 37 touchdowns over his three seasons taking handoffs from Wimprine. So those 81 scoring strikes could have been much closer to 100 in a pass-first offense. But then consider the running backs White has called friends. Over the 2018 and ’19 seasons, Darrell Henderson, Patrick Taylor, and Kenny Gainwell combined to rush for 57 touchdowns. White has presided over a Memphis offense playing in a different gear than Wimprine knew. While Wimprine needed 46 games to toss 81 touchdown passes, Brady White has done so in just 34. They are two of the greatest football players ever to wear blue and gray, but White’s numbers will soon be in the blurry distance from Wimprine’s. • Florida is the swing state in this bizarre season for Memphis. Most Americans spent the week before last counting small margins, state by state, in a presidential election. Well, had onepoint victories over UCF (50-49) and USF (34-33) — both improbable comebacks at

Calvin Austin gets a lift.

• In completing their comeback against USF, the Tigers established a new Liberty Bowl record with their 13th straight home win. Remarkably, the previous record of 12 consecutive home wins ended with the same defeat — a one-point loss to UCF on October 13, 2018 — that preceded the current streak. Had that squeaker against the Knights gone the other way, Memphis would be riding a 26-game winning streak at the Liberty Bowl. The only four current programs with longer home winning streaks all reside in the Top 10: Clemson (27), Notre Dame (23), Ohio State (22), and Cincinnati (18). Since the start of the 2014 season, Memphis has gone an astounding 39-5 at the stadium they’ve called home since 1965. The crowds these days may be significantly reduced by a pandemic, but those showing up are packing a punch. The Tigers have two home games left on the 2020 schedule: November 21st (Stephen F. Austin) and December 5th (Houston).


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steppin’ out (& stayin’ in)

We Recommend: Culture, News + Reviews By Julie Ray

Vincent Astor and Tony Thomas will soon be reunited with an old friend, the Orpheum’s Mighty Wurlitzer pipe organ. The instrument has returned from Chicago for the Orpheum’s 92nd birthday, and you can be one of the first to hear this powerful pipe organ at a free homecoming celebration. “I’ve been playing this Wurlitzer off and on since 1970,” says Astor, who will open the show. “I plan to demonstrate mechanical parts of the instrument that may not be familiar to listeners, like the marimba, xylophone, and glockenspiel.” In fact, nearly 10,000 theater organs were built by about three dozen companies between 1910 and 1940. Only a few hundred still exist today and only 38 remain in any semblance of original condition. The Orpheum in Memphis has one of them. In addition to Astor’s masterful talent that will show off the organ’s unique sounds, Thomas will play silent film scores that should delight fans of nostalgia. Only fitting as the organs were very popular in theaters during the days of silent movies. Rumor has it that the Orpheum plans to return the Wurlitzer to this original purpose during upcoming film offerings. While you enjoy the plethora of almighty orchestral sounds from the singular instrument, Astor asks you to remember one thing: “There. Period. Are. Period. No. Period. Speakers. Period. It’s a pipe organ.”

COURTESY OF JUSTIN DORROH

MARCEL DE GRIJS | DREAMSTIME.COM

MIGHTY WURLITZER HOMECOMING, THE ORPHEUM, 203 S. MAIN, THURSDAY, NOV. 19, 7-9 P.M., FREE.

Lottie Dorroh (above) is the adorable star of highchair_gourmet. Food, p. 24

Drinking all night. Got into a fight. I feel so broke up, I want a Heineken. Brews, p. 25

November 19-25, 2020

VARIOUS DAYS & TIMES November 19th - November 25th

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ORPHEUM THEATRE

Give It a Wurl

What’d I say? The Wurlitzer returns!

Campsite Grilling Class: Glamping Feast Crosstown Concourse, 1350 Concourse, Thursday, Nov. 19, 5:30 & 6:30 p.m., $40 Taught by Melissa Petersen, benefiting Church Health Center and Curb Market. Recipes include Cajun catfish en papillote and grilled fall vegetables.

Memphis Arts Collective Pop-Up Holiday Show Woman’s Exchange Art Gallery, 88 Racine, Thursday, Nov. 19-Saturday, Nov. 21, 10 a.m. Featuring handcrafted holiday items, home décor, and artwork created by MAC artists Tatia Johnson, Mary Adcox, Brian Maness, Rick Cannon, and others.

Arrow Creative Holiday Bazaar Online from arrowcreative.org, starts Thursday, Nov. 19, and continues through Dec. 23 Featuring items by local artists and makers including Oil Wand Kaleidoscopes by Lingo Alchemy, Mandala Flasks from Lakeland Leatherworks, a Memphis Flyer coloring book, and more.

HappiDog Holiday Pop-Up Shoppe Coletta’s, 2850 Appling, Thursday, Nov. 19, 5-8 p.m., and Sun., Dec. 6, 5-8 p.m., free Featuring wine and appetizers, a huge selection of items at bargain prices, and swag bags, with every purchase benefiting HappiDog Animal Rescue.

Virtual Holiday Lighting Ceremony Online from graceland.com, Thursday, Nov. 19, 6 p.m., free Go online to help flip the switch on Graceland’s traditional Christmas lights and decorations.

Chilly Chili Virtual 5K Online from pr-eventmanagement. net, starts Friday, Nov. 20, and continues through Dec. 31, $30 Join the 7th Annual Ken Novotny Memorial Concord Academy 5K and Family Fun Run benefiting students of Concord Academy.

Coen Brothers Film Fest Malco Paradiso Cinema, 584 S. Mendenhall, Friday-Tuesday, Nov. 20-24, $2 per film The film fest features Coen Brothers favorites: Burn After Reading, The Big Lebowski, A Serious Man, No Country for Old Men, and Fargo. Big River Crossing Half Marathon + 5K Tom Lee Park off Riverside, Saturday, Nov. 21, 8 a.m.-noon, $25-$45 Starting at the foot of Beale Street on Riverside, the half-marathon course takes runners over Big River Crossing and through Big River Trail. 5K route showcases Downtown Memphis.


Kelly Lindsey of Switch901

Make It Monday You know that shopping and drinking event of the season, Memphis Crafts & Drafts? This year, after much review, the organizers decided to cancel the event due to the public health situation in Memphis and Shelby County. I know; it’s disheartening, not only for the vendors but the shoppers and beer drinkers as well. Event coordinator Molly Willmott says, “This would have been our sixth annual Memphis Crafts & Drafts Festival. We canceled to help keep everyone in our community safe.” Take heart, it’s not all bad. Memphis Crafts & Drafts will be a virtual Facebook Live show for 2020 called Memphis Maker Mondays. This means you can pop a top on your own beer stash, then sit back and watch the show every Monday from your living room. It’s sounding better all the time. “We want to showcase all of the great makers, crafters, and artists that we work with at Crafts & Drafts to all of our readers,” says Willmott of the new show. “Interesting makers like Rose Pettijohn of Pettijohn Textiles and Kelly Lindsey of Switch901 will be interviewed each week on the Flyer’s Facebook Live channel every Monday through December.” Fan, follow, and shop the very best local crafters, artists, and makers in Memphis. Who knows, you might even be able to buy something pretty for yourself.

Checkmate — Anya Taylor-Joy (above) stars in The Queen’s Gambit on Netflix. Film, p. 26

St. Louis Holiday Arts & Crafts Fair St. Louis Catholic Church, 203 White Station, Saturday, Nov. 21, 9 a.m.-4 p.m. ’Tis the season for shopping more than 100 vendors in two gyms, featuring MAC artists, RhoMax Designs, baked goods, fashion, and more.

Meritan’s MASKquerade Ball Online from meritan.org, Saturday, Nov. 21, 6 p.m. Enjoy a night of laughter, music, a silent auction, and more via Zoom with a take-home event package that will include a cocktail and food kit.

Enchanted Forest Festival of Trees Pink Palace Museum, 3050 Central, opens Saturday, Nov. 21, and continues Wednesdays-Saturdays, 10:30 a.m.-5 p.m., and Sundays, noon-5 p.m., through Dec. 31, $6 Holiday exhibit benefiting Le Bonheur. Featuring photos with Santa, pandemic-style, with Santa behind a Plexiglass shield that looks like a holiday snow globe.

Friends Thanksgiving Trivia Malco Summer 4 Drive-In, 5310 Summer, Saturday, Nov. 21, 6 p.m., $25 per car Invite your friends to play Friends Trivia (The one with all the questions about the Thanksgiving episodes).

A Little, Old-Fashioned Thanksgiving: Louisa May Alcott Tennessee Shakespeare Company, 7950 Trinity, Sunday, Nov. 22, 3 p.m., $15-$25 Salon curated by Stephanie Shine featuring excerpts from Alcott’s novel Little Men (1871) and short story “An Old-Fashioned Thanksgiving” (1882), as well as music of the season. Holiday Drive-In Series: A Charlie Brown Thanksgiving Box Lot, 607 Monroe, Wednesday, Nov. 25, 6:30 p.m., $40 per car Each vehicle will receive a goodie basket, bottled drinks, a toy, and a craft, plus coupons supporting the local Edge District businesses.

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MUSIC By Alex Greene

Bailey Bigger Confronting life’s traumas through music.

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November 19-25, 2020

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Memphis Flyer: Was it emotionally difficult to delve into your personal backstory to create the songs on the new EP? Bailey Bigger: Well, in my poetry-writing class, we were talking about trauma in poetry and how it’s really hard to write about traumatic experiences. You have to put yourself in that headspace again and relive it, in a way, to get those truths out on paper or in songs. And a lot of times that’s easier to just avoid. But I live for that stuff, in a way, because I think it’s one of the most important parts of

Bailey Bigger — she’s a keeper of the fire.

COURTESY BAILEY BIGGER

hat a difference a year makes. Last October, Bailey Bigger released her debut EP, Between the Pages, on Blue Tom Records (the label run by the University of Memphis), and certainly her skills as a songwriter and vocalist were obvious. Her unaffected alto, reminiscent of Buffy SainteMarie, was the perfect vehicle for her simple, deft turns of phrase. But now, as she is poised to release Let’s Call It Love, her first EP for Big Legal Mess Records, those songs seem a world away. It’s hard to believe she’s made such a journey with only 20 years under her belt. Her trademark qualities are still on full display, but are now complemented with an even more refined band, assembled at Delta-Sonic Sound by producer Bruce Watson. “Bruce brought a little bit of soul into my music,” she says. “He brought in the organ and the electric guitars and things like that that I never would’ve thought to do on my own. It’s Americana but Memphis.” She speaks the truth: With players like Mark Edgar Stuart (her mentor of sorts), Joe Restivo, Will Sexton, Al Gamble, George Sluppick, and Jana Meisner, the record represents the state-of-theart Bluff City sound. And yet Watson’s first pivotal move in making this record was simply rejecting her first batch of songs, forcing Bigger to come up with her best material yet. To compose the new songs, she dug deep into the turmoil she’d recently faced due to an unpleasant breakup, her grandmother’s death, and her feelings of alienation in moving from Marion, Arkansas, to the big city across the river. Now that she’s happily relocated to a farm near Marion, she’s gained some perspective on those earlier struggles.

the human experience, to be open and talk about things that people are afraid to talk about. That makes for better songs, don’t you think? But is it tough to sing those songs once you’ve written them? I think it becomes like muscle memory, in a way, performing these things live. If I were to really dig in and relive those moments every time I played it live, I don’t think I’d make it through the performances. When I was recording “Let’s Call It Love,” we cut several vocal tracks and we were like, “Yeah, that’s fine. Pitch is good.” But I was thinking, “I’m not singing this how I felt it.” And that’s one of the worst things ever, where your voice isn’t delivering what you felt. I hate that. So I said, “Okay, just one more time.” And I remember how I channeled the take that I wanted to keep. It wasn’t by thinking of the person the song’s about. I did not want to picture that person at all. I thought to myself, “Sing to the girl who is

in the same place as you are. Sing to that person that it hasn’t happened to yet. She still has a chance to get out. Sing to that person that you were a year and a half ago when you didn’t see it.” So that’s what really got me to perform it the way I wanted to. I also get that feeling from the bonus track, “A Lot Like I Do” — “I remember a girl who looks a lot like you do” — as if you’re looking back at yourself. That was probably the hardest one for me to perform. That one still evokes strong emotions in me every time I play it live. It’s probably the most personal song I’ve ever written in my life. It doesn’t even say anything specific about what happened to me, but I think it tells it perfectly at the same time. I can’t rely on muscle memory with that. That’s a rough one. All three songs are about this transformative time in my life. But the person I was at the beginning of all those traumas is not who I am now.


Fridays & Saturdays

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ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT

Southern Hospitality combines with Traditional Southern Cuisine

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CALENDAR of EVENTS:

November 19 - 25

Memphis Arts Collective Pop-Up Holiday Show

T H EAT E R

Hattiloo Theatre

Featuring handcrafted holiday items, home décor, and artwork created by MAC artists Tatia Johnson, Mary Adcox, Brian Maness, Rick Cannon, and others. Nov. 19-21, 10 a.m.

Sarafina!, past production about human rights in the 21st century, written by Mbongeni Ngema. Ongoing. God’s Trombone, enjoy the original production of inspirational sermons by African-American preachers reimagined as poetry, reverberating with the musicality and splendid eloquence of spirituals. Free. Ongoing. Iola’s Southern Fields, enjoy an online past performance drawn from the writings of Ida B. Wells. Free. Ongoing.

WOMAN’S EXCHANGE ART GALLERY, 88 RACINE (327-5681).

Memphis Flyer Coloring Book Order your book today benefiting local artists and journalism. $35. Ongoing.

MEMPHISMAGAZINESTORE.COM.

Memphis Maker Mondays

37 S. COOPER (502-3486).

Live show featuring Crafts & Drafts makers and artists in their own studios via Memphis Flyer’s Facebook Live. Mondays.

Kudzu Playhouse

Kudzu Playhouse Virtual, join Kudzu social media for donation-based classes, games, scholarship opportunities, and more. Download the app for more fun theater activities and information. Ongoing.

FACEBOOK.COM/MEMPHISFLYER.

Memphis Modern Market Crafts Fair Pop-Up Shop

P.O. BOX 47 (888-429-7871).

Featuring MAC Artists Angi Cooper, Jan Shivley, and Jana Wilson. Fridays, Saturdays, 10:30 a.m.-5 p.m., and Sundays, 12-5 p.m. Through Dec. 27.

The Orpheum

Orpheum Virtual Engagement, join Orpheum staff, artists, and students for activities, interviews, and more on Facebook, Instagram, Twitter, and YouTube. Visit website for more information. Ongoing.

MEMPHIS PINK PALACE MUSEUM, 3050 CENTRAL (636-2362).

Metal Museum Online

203 S. MAIN (525-3000).

Playhouse on the Square

Playhouse on the Square at Home, a series of digital content through POTS website and social media platforms. View past performances, engage in quizzes, enjoy digital playwriting, and more. Free. Ongoing. 66 S. COOPER (726-4656).

Tennessee Shakespeare Company

A Little, Old-Fashioned Thanksgiving: Louisa May Alcott, salon curated by Stephanie Shine. tnshakespeare.org. Sun., Nov. 22, 3 p.m. 7950 TRINITY (759-0604).

Be a Santa to a Senior, drop off gifts for seniors at Carriage Crossing, through Saturday, December 12th Theatre Memphis

Online on Stage, a Theatre Memphis Facebook group that serves as a clearinghouse for performers wanting to share their talents. Featuring storytime, readings, or performance art. Ongoing.

University of Memphis, Department of Theatre & Dance

Trouble in Mind, a protest story against flagrant racism in commercial theater in the mid-1950s. A smart satire that will be filmed and then streamed online. memphis.edu. Free with registration. Sat., Sun. Through Nov. 22. 3745 CENTRAL (678-2576).

November 19-25, 2020

Bene�iting Le Bonheur Children’s Hospital

PINK PALACE WWW.MEMPHISMUSEUMS.ORG

OT H E R A R T HAPPE N I NGS

ArtSavvy: Drawing By Nature

Art-making with Angi Cooper. Participants will be inspired by this sensory and nature-infused class to observe, sketch, paint, write, and meditate. For ages 16 and up. Sun., Nov. 22, 2-4 p.m. GERMANTOWN PERFORMING ARTS CENTER, 1801 EXETER (751-7500).

Peruse the art and craft of fine metalwork digitally. Featuring past gallery talks from previous exhibitions, interviews with artists, and demonstrations including “Beauty in the Boundary.” Free. Ongoing. METAL MUSEUM, 374 METAL MUSEUM DR. (774-6380).

Mighty Wurlitzer Homecoming

The Orpheum’s Mighty Wurlitzer pipe organ has returned from Chicago for the Orpheum’s 92nd birthday. Be the first to hear this powerful instrument at a free homecoming celebration. Free. Thurs., Nov. 19, 7-9 p.m.

Orpheum Mini Golf

Putt on nine socially distanced Broadway-themed holes, including Hamilton, The Phantom of the Opera, The Color Purple, Memphis, and more. $10. Saturdays, Sundays, 10:30 a.m.-10:30 p.m. Through Nov. 29. THE ORPHEUM, 203 S. MAIN (5253000), ORPHEUM-MEMPHIS.COM.

The Peace Project

Hear the peace offerings made up of artists voices, instruments, ambient noises, and reverberations in a healing space, featuring work by Hank Willis Thomas. Ongoing, 6 a.m.-6 p.m. MEMPHIS PARK (FOURTH BLUFF), FRONT AND MADISON, MEMPHISRIVERPARKS.ORG.

Ring Making Workshop with BMB Designs

Learn to navigate sizing bands, creating a ring with a decorative band and a fancy topper (perfect for you to meld your bezel setting skills and ring-making skills for your at-home project) and a fun wire ring. $135. Sat., Nov. 21, 10 a.m.-5 p.m. ARROW CREATIVE, 2535 BROAD.

St. Louis Holiday Arts & Crafts Fair Featuring MAC artists RhoMax Designs. Sat., Nov. 21, 9 a.m.-4 p.m. ST. LOUIS CATHOLIC CHURCH, 203 WHITE STATION (682-6606).

OPERA

“My Favorite Music”

Six Memphis singers are asked what they love to sing more than anything else. Hear their answers broadcasted live on Facebook, WKNO FM 91.1, or wknofm.org. Free. Third Thursday of every month, 7 p.m. Through Dec. 17. OPERA MEMPHIS, 6745 WOLF RIVER (257-3100), OPERAMEMPHIS.ORG.

THE ORPHEUM, 203 S. MAIN (525-3000).

630 PERKINS EXT. (682-8323).

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Send the date, time, place, cost, info, phone number, a brief description, and photos — two weeks in advance — to calendar@memphisflyer.com or P.O. Box 1738, Memphis, TN 38101. DUE TO SPACE LIMITATIONS, ONGOING WEEKLY EVENTS WILL APPEAR IN THE FLYER’S ONLINE CALENDAR ONLY.

HOLIDAY EXHIBIT November 21 - December 31. Photos with Santa, Holiday Movies & Planetarium Shows.


CALENDAR: NOVEMBER 19 - 25

From creative movement for 3-year-olds to advanced, preprofessional training under the guidance and direction of Mandy Possel. All levels invited to join fall classes. Saturdays, 9:30 a.m.-2:30 p.m., and Mondays-Fridays, 4-7 p.m. Through Dec. 12. BUCKMAN ARTS CENTER AT ST. MARY’S SCHOOL, 60 N. PERKINS EXT. (537-1483).

C O M E DY

Hi Tone

Live Weekly Comedy with John Miller, open mic style. Free. Tuesdays, 8-10 p.m.

THE BROOM CLOSET, 546 S. MAIN (497-9486), HISTORICALHAUNTSMEMPHIS.COM.

E X P OS / S A LES

Gifts of Green at the Garden

Seasonal pop-up shop inside the garden’s newly renovated visitors center. Through Dec. 30, 9 a.m.-4 p.m. MEMPHIS BOTANIC GARDEN, 750 CHERRY (636-4100).

Holiday Artisan Market

282 N. CLEVELAND (278-TONE).

Shop Levitt Shell-inspired works from local makers. Through Dec. 31.

L ECT U R E / S P EAK E R

LEVITT SHELL, 1928 POPLAR (9012722722), LEVITTSHELL.ORG.

Change the Paradigm: Drive Electric Tennessee

Want to hear about a transformation in the transportation industry? Join the conversation via Zoom. Meeting ID: 930 0919 2589. Free. Thurs., Nov. 19, 7-8:30 p.m. TENNESSEE.SIERRACLUB.ORG.

Zoo Dude

Hosted by Chief Zoological Officer Matt Thompson, Memphis Zoo updates. Free. Wednesdays, Sundays, 8 a.m., and Saturdays, noon. MEMPHIS ZOO, 2000 PRENTISS PLACE IN OVERTON PARK (3336500), MEMPHISZOO.ORG.

Madonna Learning Center Holiday Pop-Up Shops

Shop vendors benefiting Madonna adult and art programs and local businesses. Thurs., Nov. 19, 2-6:30 p.m., and Fri., Nov. 20, 2-6:30 p.m. MADONNA LEARNING CENTER, 7007 POPLAR (752-5767), MADONNA-LEARNING.ORG.

Virtual Crafts Fair

Featuring artists and brands from Memphis and the surrounding areas. From paintings and home decor to jewelry and candles. Through Dec. 12. MEMPHIS PINK PALACE MUSEUM, 3050 CENTRAL (636-2362).

TO U R S

Ghost Walk

Join the Historical Haunts Investigation Team and explore the macabre and dark history of Downtown Memphis. $20. Fridays-Sundays, 8 p.m. THE BROOM CLOSET, 546 S. MAIN (497-9486), HISTORICALHAUNTSMEMPHIS.COM.

Metal Museum Audio Tour

Explore the newly updated Sculpture Garden and accompanying audio tour while adhering to safe social distancing. PWYC. Ongoing, 11 a.m.-5 p.m. METAL MUSEUM, 374 METAL MUSEUM DR. (774-6380).

Tour de Midtown

Join Breakaway Running for a group run starting from 2109 Madison. Free beer after the run. All paces are welcomed, and the distance of runs varies from 3 to 5 miles. Free. Thursdays, 6 p.m. OVERTON SQUARE, 2101 MADISON, OVERTONSQUARE.COM.

Tours for Very Small Groups

Elmwood Cemetery’s staff is ready to take you and your very small group on a tour around the grounds in groups of nine. Masks required. $5. Ongoing, 10 a.m. ELMWOOD CEMETERY, 824 S. DUDLEY (774-3212).

Walking Tour and Ghost Hunt

Part walking tour and part ghost hunt. Tour the South Main district and investigate

S P O R TS / F I TN ES S

Ballet Memphis Online Pilates and Ballet Classes

Visit website for more information. Classes offered include Espresso Flow, Stretch & Burn, Fascial Fun, Intermediate/Advanced Ballet, Intermediate Mat Flow, and Get Moving. $10. Ongoing, 7:30 a.m.-5:30 p.m. BALLET MEMPHIS, 2144 MADISON (737-7322).

Big River Crossing Half Marathon + 5K Starting at the foot of Beale Street on Riverside Drive, the half-marathon course takes runners over Big River Crossing and through Big River Trail. 5K route showcases Downtown Memphis. $25-$45. Sat., Nov. 21, 8 a.m.-noon.

TOM LEE PARK, OFF RIVERSIDE DR.

Chilly Chili Virtual 5K Benefiting Concord Academy. Nov. 20-30. CONCORD-ACADEMY.ORG.

JX2 Team Roping Fri.-Sun., Nov. 20-22.

AGRICENTER INTERNATIONAL, 7777 WALNUT GROVE (423-5752295), JX2EVENTS.COM.

Kick It 5K

Run or walk wherever and whenever you want during the two-week Kick It dates benefiting Herb Kosten Foundation. Register online. Through Nov. 19. KOSTENFOUNDATION.COM.

Kroc Center Online Fitness Classes

Classes will be offered free and online. From mediation and yoga to boot camp and kickboxing. Free. Ongoing. THE SALVATION ARMY KROC CENTER, 800 E. PARKWAY S. (729-8007).

Our Virtual Yoga Downtown

Join Charlie Baxter Hayden for yoga on IG Live, @downtownmemphis. Tues., 6 p.m. DOWNTOWNMEMPHIS.COM.

Crosstown Arts: Against the Grain — an online platform where viewers can watch new, made-at-home performance videos by Memphis musicians — now features more than 150 local musicians. View their videos for free, or show your support with a donation. 100% of donations on an artist’s page will go directly to the artist.

Taijiquan with Milan Vigil

This no-impact exercise integrates the mind, body, and breath promoting relaxation, balance, bone density, and aerobic benefits. On the South Lawn, weather permitting. Free with admission. Saturdays, 10:30 a.m. Through Dec. 19. THE DIXON GALLERY & GARDENS, 4339 PARK (761-5250).

Virtual Training & Group Fitness

YMCA of Memphis & the Mid-South offers workouts for anyone to try at home. Workouts include yoga, barre, boot camp, exercises for active older adults, and Les Mills training. Visit website to join. Free. Ongoing. YMCAMEMPHIS.ORG.

M E ETI NGS

crosstownar ts.org/againstthegrain

Churches from the Presbytery of the MidSouth: Sunday Worship Livestream Combined livestream worship. Visit website for more information and livestream link. Sun., 11 a.m. IDLEWILDCHURCH.ORG.

Crosstown Neighborhood Association Interest Meetings

Crosstown neighbors are holding two meetings for a potential new association. The first meeting will be held on Wednesday via Zoom. The second meeting will be held in person at the Crosstown Mound. Sat., Nov. 21, 10 a.m.

PAY IT FORWARD & GET PAID Seeking Blood & Cell Donors

CROSSTOWN CONCOURSE, 1350 CONCOURSE.

Virtual Dixon Book Club

Interactive discussion on great reads. Email for more information. Free with admission. Third Thursday of every month, 6-7:30 p.m.

Support important medical research focused on fighting life-threatening diseases. Make a big difference for patients seeking new hope.

THE DIXON GALLERY & GARDENS, 4339 PARK (761-5250), DIXON.ORG.

Qualified donors are

Virtual-T

compensated for their

Weekly Zoom gathering for anyone 18+ who identifies as a member of the trans or GNC community. For login information, email ahauptman@outmemphis.org. Tuesdays, 6 p.m.

time — from $50 to several hundred dollars depending on the study.

OUTMEMPHIS.ORG.

continued on page 22

901-252-3434

researchchampions.com

m e m p h i s f l y e r. c o m

Get Back to the Barre

a well-known site which was the scene of the brutal murder of patrolman Edward Broadfoot in 1918. 13+. $25. Saturdays, 7:30 p.m.

ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT

DAN C E

21


CALENDAR: NOVEMBER 19 - 25 continued from page 21 S P EC IAL EVE NTS

BACC 40th Birthday Bash

Featuring dinner, drinks, and games for members and guests only. Visit website to become a member. $25. Thurs., Nov. 19, 5-8 p.m. MAIN EVENT ENTERTAINMENT, 7219 APPLING FARMS (372-5000), BARTLETTCHAMBER.ORG.

Birds of Prey Program

Meet some of Tennessee’s native birds of prey. Registering guarantees a spot. Adding a donation helps provide food and care for the birds. Free with registration. Saturdays, Sundays, 3 p.m. MEEMAN-SHELBY FOREST STATE PARK, NATURE CENTER, TNSTATEPARKS.COM.

DIG Memphis Mysteries While at home, do some investigative work to solve a mystery from a collection of images in the digital archives. New photo posted weekly. Ongoing.

BENJAMIN L. HOOKS CENTRAL LIBRARY, 3030 POPLAR (415-2700).

Friends Thanksgiving Trivia

Invite your friends to play Friends Trivia (The One with All the Questions About the Thanksgiving Episodes). $25 per car. Sat., Nov. 21, 6 p.m. MALCO SUMMER 4 DRIVE-IN, 5310 SUMMER (681-2020), CERRITOENTERTAINMENT.COM.

HappiDog Holiday Pop-Up Shoppe

Holiday gifts for friends, family, coworkers, and your pups. Featuring wine and appetizers, a huge selection of items at bargain prices, and swag bags, with every purchase benefiting HappiDog Animal Rescue. Free. Thurs., Nov. 19, 5-8 p.m. COLETTA’S, 2850 APPLING (383-1122).

“Just for the Health of it Bingo Challenge” Each participant will receive a bingo card with challenges to complete. The activity will be posted on Facebook. For prizes, take a picture completing the activity and email it to ocantre1@utk.edu. Tuesdays, Thursdays. EXTENSION.TENNESSEE.EDU.

Lament to Hope: Prayer and Reflection Participate in a communitywide call to prayer and reflection during the months of November and December online or in person at the historic Evans Chapel. Sundays, 9 a.m.-3 p.m., and Mondays-Fridays, 10 a.m.-3 p.m. Through Dec. 31. GERMANTOWN PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH, 2363 GERMANTOWN, GERMANTOWNPRES.ORG.

Lunchtime Meditations with Amy Balentine

Explore a variety of meditation practices designed to help you find balance and reduce

stress. Join live or enjoy past meditations online. Fridays, noon. DIXON.ORG.

Meritan’s MASKquerade Ball

Enjoy a night of laughter, music, a silent auction, and more via Zoom with a take-home event package that will include a cocktail and food kit. Sat., Nov. 21, 6 p.m. MERITAN.ORG.

“The Negro Motorist Green Book”

Exhibition highlighting an annual guide started in 1936 that helped African Americans travel the country and was a resource for the era’s Black-owned businesses. $10. Through Jan. 3, 2021. NATIONAL CIVIL RIGHTS MUSEUM, 450 MULBERRY (521-9699).

Outdoor Scavenger Hunts

Choose an outdoor familyfriendly scavenger hunt. A portion of the proceeds benefit HopeKids. $13-$40. Ongoing. LETSROAM.COM.

Pandemic Parenting: Staying Calm in a Year of Chaos

For those experiencing the unrelenting stress of the pandemic and finding themselves struggling to handle the excessive needs placed on them due to school closures and other

challenges. Free. Saturdays, 10-11 a.m. Through Nov. 28. ACEAWARENESS.ORG.

Prison Fellowship’s Angel Tree

Sponsor area children of incarcerated parents in the Greater Memphis area. Through Dec. 23. (800-55-ANGEL), PRISONFELLOWSHIP.ORG.

River Garden Bingo

Download a bingo card or make your own for a fun game while enjoying Mississippi River Park. Free. Ongoing. MISSISSIPPI RIVER PARK, OFF RIVERSIDE DRIVE, MEMPHISRIVERPARKS.ORG.

River Garden Guides

Download River Garden Field and Bird Guides and explore Mississippi River Park. Ongoing. MISSISSIPPI RIVER PARK, OFF RIVERSIDE DRIVE, MEMPHISRIVERPARKS.ORG.

United Way of the MidSouth: Driving The Dream

For those impacted by COVID-19. Puts callers in contact with essential services, without individuals having to repeat the circumstances for the call. Follow-up ensures those connections were made. MondaysFridays, 8:30 a.m.-5 p.m. (888-709-0630), CALL.DRIVINGTHEDREAM.ORG.

H O LI DAY EVE NTS

Arrow Creative Holiday Bazaar

Shop local artists and makers for the holidays. Nov. 19-Dec. 23. ARROW CREATIVE, 2535 BROAD.

Be a Santa to a Senior

Carriage Crossing will be collecting gifts for senior citizens. The tree with ornament wish lists will be in the Wonderland Experience lobby. Shop and return unwrapped gifts to the tree. Volunteer-based wrapping party on December 13. Through Dec. 12. CARRIAGE CROSSING, HOUSTON LEVEE & BILL MORRIS PKWY. (854-8240), SHOPCARRIAGECROSSING.COM.

Enchanted Forest Festival of Trees

Exhibit benefiting Le Bonheur Children’s Hospital. Photos with Santa, pandemic-style, with Santa behind a Plexiglass shield that looks like a holiday snow globe. Sat., Nov. 21, 12-5 p.m., and WednesdaysSaturdays, 10:30 a.m.-5 p.m. Through Dec. 31. MEMPHIS PINK PALACE MUSEUM, 3050 CENTRAL (636-2362).

Virtual Holiday Lighting Ceremony Go online and virtually help flip the switch on Graceland’s traditional Christmas lights and decorations. Thurs., Nov. 19, 6 p.m. GRACELAND, 3717 ELVIS PRESLEY (332-3322), GRACELAND.COM.

Senior’s Greetings

Letters to seniors initiative encourages customers to set aside one or more of the greeting cards they plan to send this holiday season and drop it off in the mailbox by Barnes & Noble. Through Dec. 13. CARRIAGE CROSSING, HOUSTON LEVEE & BILL MORRIS PKWY. (854-8240), SHOPCARRIAGECROSSING.COM.

Socially Distant Santa

Santa will return in person the weekend before Black Friday. Check Carriage Crossing’s event page for the schedule, photo package pricing, and private appointment booking. Nov. 21-Dec. 24. CARRIAGE CROSSING, HOUSTON LEVEE & BILL MORRIS PKWY. (854-8240), SHOPCARRIAGECROSSING.COM.

SoulsvilleUSA Annual Christmas Tree Lighting Sat., Nov. 21, 6:30 p.m.

SOULSVILLE, USA, CORNER OF MISSISSIPPI AND WALKER.

Thanksgiving Family Meals

Call or email your order by November 20th for curbside pickup or delivery. Through Nov. 20. (619-1196), PARADOXCUISINE.COM.

Wonderland: An Interactive Holiday Photo Experience

Immersive holiday photo experience from the minds of Memphis Escape Rooms.

TUT-UNCOMMON ANTIQUES

November 19-25, 2020

421 N. Watkins, Memphis, TN 38104 901-278-8965

GOING OUT OF BUSINESS SALE

EVERYTHING GOES AT 50% OFF Tuesdays - Saturdays 10am - 5pm

downtown Holiday TREE LIGHTING AND sAFE

Santa SIGHTING FRIDAY NOV. 27 -6 PM

CORNER OF PEABODY PLACE AND MAIN TREE LIGHTING AT SUNDOWN BRING YOUR LETTERS TO SANTA & MAIL THEM OFF FREE PHOTOS WITH SAFE SANTA INSIDE A SNOWGLOBE

22

*WITH ST. JUDE PATIENT ARTWORK!!* learn more at DOWNTOWNMEMPHIS.COM

scan to sign up for your safe santa photo!


CALENDAR: NOVEMBER 19 - 25 Located on the corner across from Forever 21 and H&M. Book your experience today. Through Jan. 10, 2021, 10 a.m. CARRIAGE CROSSING, HOUSTON LEVEE & BILL MORRIS PKWY. (854-8240), WONDERLANDMEMPHIS.COM.

FO O D & D R I N K EV E N TS

Campsite Grilling Classes

Ain’t Nothing Better Than a Potater, Breakfast of Champions, and Glamping Feast classes taught by Melissa Petersen, benefiting Church Health. Thurs., 5:30 & 6:30 p.m. Through Nov. 19. CROSSTOWN CONCOURSE, 1350 CONCOURSE.

Holiday Drive-In Series: A Charlie Brown Thanksgiving

MEMPHIS DAWAH ASSOCIATION, 837 CRAFT (601-672-0259).

Each vehicle will receive a goodie basket, bottled drinks, a toy, and a craft, plus coupons supporting the local Edge District businesses. $40 per car. Wed., Nov. 25, 6:30 p.m.

Memphis Farmers Market

Saturdays, 8 a.m.-1 p.m. MEMPHIS FARMERS MARKET, PAVILION OF CENTRAL STATION, S. FRONT & G.E. PATTERSON, MEMPHISFARMERSMARKET.ORG.

BOX LOT, 607 MONROE.

Indie Memphis Movie Club

Muddy’s Fun House: Super Fantastic at Home Bake-a-long and Variety Show

Weekly virtual screening opportunities (for brand-new films and classics), plus online Q&As on Tuesday evenings between programmers and special guests. Visit website for more information and schedule. Ongoing.

Visit blog for a new episode each week hosted by Kat. Thursdays. MUDDY’S COFFEE & BAKE SHOP, 585 S. COOPER (683-8844), MUDDYSBAKESHOP.COM.

INDIEMEMPHIS.ORG.

Turkey Day Market

Memphis Brew Bus

Visit three local craft breweries for tours, talks with the brewers, and a beer at each stop. Recorded narration on bus by DJ Ric Chetter with beer trivia, beer history, and local music. 21+ $49. Saturdays, 2 p.m. THE BROOM CLOSET, 546 S. MAIN (497-9486), HISTORICALHAUNTSMEMPHIS.COM.

Memphis Dawah Association: Mobile Food Pantry

10 a.m.-2 p.m.

Get late fall produce, shop prepared food vendors, and start your shopping for the season with hand-picked artisans and food trucks. Sat., Nov. 21, 9 a.m.-1 p.m. MEMPHIS FARMERS MARKET, PAVILION OF CENTRAL STATION, S. FRONT & G.E. PATTERSON (866-348-2226), MEMPHISFARMERSMARKET.ORG.

F I LM

Against the Tide

A weekly mobile food pantry organized by Memphis Dawah Association and Mid-South Food Bank. Volunteer opportunities available. Saturdays,

Also screening at the Collierville Grill. Thurs., Nov. 19, 7 p.m. MALCO PARADISO CINEMA, 584 S. MENDENHALL (682-1754).

Oxford Virtual Film Festival

Arrow Creative Holiday Bazaar at Arrow Creative, Thursday, November 19th, through Thursday, December 23rd Annie

Sun., Nov. 22, 4 p.m., and Mon., Nov. 23, 7 p.m. MALCO PARADISO CINEMA, 584 S. MENDENHALL (682-1754).

Coen Brothers Film Fest That’s just, like, your opinion, man. Fri.-Tue., Nov. 20-24, 8 a.m. MALCO PARADISO CINEMA, 584 S. MENDENHALL (682-1754).

Dinosaurs of Antarctica The story of a changing environment at the bottom of the world. In ancient times, dinosaurs and other prehistoric creatures roamed freely in a lush landscape. $10. Sundays, 2:30 p.m. Through Nov. 30. CTI 3D GIANT THEATER, IN THE MEMPHIS PINK PALACE MUSEUM, 3050 CENTRAL (636-2362).

Disney’s Moana 2D

An adventurous teenager sails out on a daring mission to save her people. Moana meets the once-mighty Maui who guides her in her quest to become a master wayfinder.

$10. Sundays, 4 p.m. Through Nov. 30. CTI 3D GIANT THEATER, IN THE MEMPHIS PINK PALACE MUSEUM, 3050 CENTRAL (636-2362).

Great Barrier Reef

OXFORDFILMFEST.COM.

Spanning more than 1,400 miles off the coast of Australia and home to unique species of aquatic life. Experience the awe of this natural cityscape. Narrated by Australian actor Eric Bana. $10. Sundays, 1 p.m. Through Nov. 30. CTI 3D GIANT THEATER, IN THE MEMPHIS PINK PALACE MUSEUM, 3050 CENTRAL (636-2362).

Presentation includes 24-hour rental period and filmmaker Q&A. New releases until the end of the year. $10, $40-$175 virtual passes. Ongoing.

Submissions for The Sweded Film Festival for Creative Re-Creations Submit films for festival of classic movies, remade by amateurs who replace A-list stars and CGI with whatever is laying around their houses. Visit website for more information. Through Nov. 22. ROWHOUSE.ONLINE.

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FOOD By Michael Donahue

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Toddler enjoys “grownup” meals on Instagram.

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ustin Dorroh and his wife, Paige, cooked up highchair_ gourmet when their daughter, Lottie, was old enough to eat like a grownup. Or almost like a grownup. His wife began posting his photos of Lottie eating in her high chair on Instagram during quarantine, Justin says. “My daughter was coming into an age where she could eat virtually everything we could eat. So, food being what it is to our family, what we wanted to do was introduce her to a lot of food and textures and flavors and ingredients.” Justin began with thin, steamed purées when their daughter was six months old. That led to “more elaborate” dishes when she reached one year old. “You don’t introduce too much too quickly. You keep it basic and see how they tolerate it.” But, he says, “Everything I put in front of her, she was willing to try. We built on that. Really, whatever I was cooking for me and her mom.”

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Lottie Dorroh eating restaurant-style pasta in her high chair

Justin began plating up their daughter’s food restaurant-style and serving it to her in her high chair. “Just something fun to do and for her to play with and mess around. And her mom started taking pictures of it.” His wife initially began posting them on Instagram for their family and friends. “Over time, they started sharing our posts and different bloggers started sharing our posts.” Salmon with sweet potato purée was the first series of photos his wife posted on the highchair_gourmet Instagram. “I just put a dollop of sweet potato and smeared it and set the salmon down in it. So it was in line with what you’d

see at a restaurant. You see the plated dish. It starts off nice, orderly, neat. As it progresses, she tests it. By the end, she completely destroys it.” One of his favorites was when he served cacio e pepe to his daughter. “A classic Italian dish. A very basic pasta. Basically, you take oil and black pepper and create an emulsion with pasta water and pecorino. You toss pasta in it and it becomes this creamy, velvety sauce.” Lottie began pulling out each bucatini noodle one by one. Then she tasted them. “By the end, she was spreading it throughout the high chair.” Not all of Justin’s photos make it to Instagram. “She may be more fussy and she eats in our lap versus eating in the high chair. Most of the time, as I’m putting it on the high chair, she runs over with excitement and peeks over the top to see what I’m doing and can’t wait to get in the chair.” Justin shoots all his photos with his iPhone. “She is not shy with the camera. She is full of personality.” Their Instagram followers include New York Times bestseller Alex Snodgrass, author of The Defined Dish. “She’s following our humble little blog of sorts.” Justin, who was a co-owner of the old Elemento restaurant, also is interested in doing food reviews of kids’ menus at restaurants. The food list for children usually is “sub-par for what restaurants can do,” he says. The Dorrohs are planning to make some little coffee-table books that will include their favorite photos from highchair_ gourmet as gifts for their family. Their high chair was a baby shower gift, but, Justin says, “We’ve kind of gotten people interested in possibly sponsoring the high chair.” And, he says, “We had a couple of people reach out to us about different baby clothes. We’d love to do a collaboration.” But, Justin says, “At the end of the day, this is just something special to do with my daughter. And if nothing else comes of it — I don’t know what that may be — it’s just for fun. But, for now, it’s just dinner time with my daughter.” It won’t be long before highchair_ gourmet will include dinner with their daughter — and their son. “We had our son June 1st. Porter. And he’s about old enough to start into food.” And, Justin says, “There will need to be a second high chair.”


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agreed: He hates IPAs on the grounds that they taste like IPAs. Which I suppose they do. I found out later that he was geeked up on a lively psychoactive. For my money, Causeway IPA goes well with oysters, but it’s possible it doesn’t play well with psychedelic mushrooms. Lunches down here are long and lingering, and competitive sailing is not. It’s not a relaxing sport — I can’t remember the last time I didn’t leave the boat with a few bruises. This isn’t the time for lingering contemplation over an artisanal brew. This is time for an action beer, whether you win or not. I mean a good, refreshing cooler beer that you never have to think about, just enjoy. It’s hot; you’ve got some sporting wounds and are wearing wet shorts. You want a Heineken. It’s a Dutch lager and one of those great mass-market beers that used to be considered premium but, in a craft beer world, tends to sail under the radar (see what I did there?). In a beer universe of very powerful tastes, it is light but still holds its own. It’s not novel, it’s just exactly what it’s supposed to be. Holland, like Germany and Belgium, never joined in the accountant-led American race to the bottom of the beer market by coming up with cheaper and cheaper ways to churn the stuff out. As a result, Dutch and German mass-market beers, the good ones at any rate, were never awful in the first place. They taste exactly like they tasted back when they were considered premium. For those of us of a certain age, though, Heineken is known for the high margin of error for “skunky” beer. This didn’t have anything to do with quality control in the brewing, rather it was thanks to those green bottles that didn’t filter out light as well as the brown ones. While the bottles are still green, they are now treated and have essentially become high-quality sunglasses for the beer, filtering light as well as the brown bottles do. Personally, I’ve always liked the taste of beer in glass bottles over cans. Brewers keep telling me that cans taste as good as bottles these days. Maybe. They also say that cans keep out 100 percent of the harmful light — which is hard to argue. If you are on a boat, however, you’re drinking your action beer out of a can anyway. And if your blood is really up, it truly is better to crush a can on your skull than a bottle.

ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT

D

ue to the lingering plague, as well as a violent grab-bag of hurricanes on the Gulf Coast, my topsiders have been drying out for over a year. At long last, though, a regatta in Fairhope, Alabama, got to its date without either running afoul of an outbreak, a hurricane, or the sort of Mach 8 winds that hurl logs, sailboats, and other debris through the air where they are really not supposed to be. Before you start sneering — sailing is a fairly COVID-friendly sport, with plenty of fresh air and Vitamin D-brewing sunlight. The whole point of the exercise is to get as far away from the other boats as possible — ideally a lot further than six feet. Add some beer to stave off pellagra, and it can be downright healthy. Lunch, however, is another matter. After a hurricane season churned up the local waters something ugly, I suspected that ordering the oysters might be ill-advised. Still, 2020 hasn’t killed me yet, so I went all Charlie Sheen/ Tiger Blood and ordered the little stinkers anyway. As a preventative, I had a Causeway IPA from Fairhope Brewing Company. If you are in the area, I highly recommend it; it’s one of those refreshing IPAs that is hoppy but with nothing to prove. One of my lunch companions dis-

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TV By Chris McCoy

The Queen’s Gambit Sex, drugs, and … chess?

S

November 19-25, 2020

ome artists’ talent emerges fully formed, while others’ takes time and practice to come to fruition. The Queen’s Gambit is a story about the former, created by the latter. The project that would become the Netflix limited series is also a late-bloomer. Walter Tevis, whose novels have been adapted into films such as The Hustler and The Man Who Fell to Earth, published The Queen’s Gambit in 1983. The film rights were quickly snapped up, but the writer’s death the next year put production in limbo. Many have tried to adapt it over the years — at one point, it was to be Heath Ledger’s directorial debut — but it was the Netflix money machine that finally greenlit it with veteran writer Scott Frank at the helm. Frank is the quintessential journeyman screenwriter who broke through with 1991’s Dead Again for Kenneth Branagh and who wrote classics like Get Shorty, Out of Sight, and Minority Report. The Queen’s Gambit marks the

60-year-old’s debut as a showrunner, and the results are absolutely immaculate. Beth Harmon (Anya Taylor-Joy) is, like most great protagonists, an orphan. Her mother, Alice (Chloe Pirrie), dies in a car crash during the first episode “Openings,” but Beth (played as a child by Isla Johnston) emerges unscathed. She is delivered to an orphanage run by Helen Deardorff (Christiane Seidel), where her life only comes further unglued. It’s the mid-1950s, so Helen’s child-rearing philosophies are, shall we say, much less enlightened than she thinks they are. In the spirit of “better living through chemistry,” the orphans are all given tranquilizers to help head off any behavioral problems. The drugs don’t seem to work for Jolene (Moses Ingram), one of the few Black girls at the orphanage. Jolene befriends Beth by advising her to save the green pills for a bedtime binge, and then seals their friendship by teaching her how to cuss and explaining what a penis is. It’s the stuff millions of middleschool friendships are made of, but perhaps Beth and Jolene’s “friendship” should be in quotation marks. Young Beth is one of the most withdrawn and solitary characters

(above) Anya Taylor-Joy plays an orphaned chess prodigy in The Queen’s Gambit; (bottom left) Thomas Brodie-Sangster and Taylor-Joy

ever put to screen. Even before she was orphaned, it’s doubtful she ever spent a happy day in the care of her clearly mentally ill mother. At age 8, she is tightlipped and fiercely controlled. The only joys in her young life at the orphanage are benzo-induced outof-body experiences and sneaking into the basement to play chess with the janitor, Mr. Shaibel (Bill Camp). Shaibel is a fellow loner, and an amateur scholar of the game. He is startled as Beth’s talents become instantly apparent. In a matter of weeks, she goes from not knowing the rules to regularly beating him. But her strategic mind remains a secret until the state bans the orphanage from feeding the kids tranquilizers. Desperate for some more of those little green pills, Beth hatches a plan to secure a supply. The sequence where she attempts her drug heist is flawless, and it sets up her character for the rest of the series. She plans each move in advance and executes with cold-blooded precision — until she gets her hands on the giant jar of feel-good candy. Even with her endgame in sight, she’s still shoveling pills into her mouth when she’s caught by essentially the entire orphanage. She’s banned from playing chess until she’s adopted by Alma Wheatly (Marielle Heller), a neglected housewife whose crushed dream was to be a piano player. For the rest of the seven episodes, Beth struggles to

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from the comfort of your home or office for the

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LESLIE ODOM, JR. Tony and Grammy award-winning artist best known for his starring role as Aaron Burr in the smash hit Broadway musical, Hamilton

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to Cold War-era Las Vegas, Paris, and Moscow to play for bigger and bigger purses, and fight for respect from the sexist chess bros who can’t fathom getting beaten by a girl. In an age of padded narratives designed to maximize streaming engagement, The Queen’s Gambit remains taut up until the last two episodes, when Beth’s addictions hit bottom as she preps for a championship match against Russian champion Vasily Borgov (Marcin Dorocinski). The Queen’s Gambit probably could have wrapped in six episodes, but when a show’s world is rendered so beautifully, you won’t mind a little extra time to look around. The Queen’s Gambit is streaming on Netflix.

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ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT

find a balance between her prodigious genius and the emotional pain that stalks her every move. After an incredible start by Isla Johnston, who plays Beth as a child, Taylor-Joy plays her as an alien observing the puny humans around her. Like Leonard Nimoy’s Spock, she is not so much emotionless as she is sacrificing all feeling to keep a deep, horrible rage in check. Scott’s direction is clearly Kubrickian, and Taylor-Joy knows how to deliver a dead-eyed stare. She’s gorgeous and elegant as she conquers the world of competitive chess, but you never doubt for a second that there is a huge, throbbing brain behind those eyes — dissecting your every move. The production design is off-the-charts good as Beth travels

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THE LAST WORD By Jesse Davis

It was Dean Browning all along!

By now, surely you’ve heard about Dean Browning’s Twitter slipup of last week. If you got distracted by the renewed cascade of post-election disinformation (the race was not close), sobering COVID numbers (going up), and grim statistics about economic mobility in Tennessee (it stinks), here’s a quick summary: Browning, a former commissioner in Lehigh County, Pennsylvania, tweeted some standard right-wing rhetoric about President-elect Joe Biden destroying, in four months, everything that President Trump built in four years. Then someone pointed out that many of Trump’s oft-trumpeted “wins” were actually benefits inherited from the tenure of the Obama administration. That’s when things got good. Browning replied: “I’m a black gay guy and I can personally say that Obama did nothing for me, my life only changed a little bit and it was for the worse. Everything is so much better under Trump though. I feel respected — which I never do when Democrats are involved.” The problem? Browning had forgotten to log out of his personal account and into his “sock puppet” account, as these accounts are called, so this very white and ostensibly straight man was caught red-handed pretending to be something he’s not. All in service of casting doubt on valid observations. It’s reality under assault. And who could forget Memphis’ own “Bob Smith,” the Memphis Police Department’s undercover social media account? The long and short of it? There was no Bob Smith, just a low-resolution image of a Guy Fawkes mask, the most conspicuous fake name of all time, and some MPD officers presumably huddled around a computer or smartphone. The account friended more than 200 Facebook users and was used to monitor local activists and organizers. At least, it was before a judge ruled that the account was a violation of the 1978 consent decree that bars the MPD from surveilling non-criminals for political reasons. There exists an overwhelming abundance of examples. Glenna Milberg, reporting for Local 10 in Miami, last week broke the story that some Floridian candidates in the recent election were not, in fact, real people. She wrote, “Local 10 News has found evidence to suggest three such candidates in three Florida Senate district races, two of them in Miami Dade County, were shill candidates whose presence in the races were meant to syphon votes from Democratic candidates.” There is, for example, a José Javier Rodriguez (D) and also an Alex Rodriguez (Independent) running for state senator in District 37. As Milberg writes, “In one of those races, District 37, a recount is underway because the spread between the Democratic and Republican candidates is only 31 votes. The third party candidate received more than 6,300 votes.” Even without bringing up the specter of foreign election interference, it’s becoming increasingly clear that we have a problem. And if you still don’t believe me, try this on for size: I’m guilty, too. Years ago, I made a bevy of faux Facebook accounts to “like,” share, and otherwise build engagement with my band’s posts. It was a free way to gin up a little buzz about a band who’d made the grotesquely huge mistake of trying to make money by playing guitar-based music in the 2010s. It wasn’t exactly an online blitz — in fact, the whole thing made up the smallest percentage of my “outreach,” but it was a tactic nonetheless. My point here is that if a buzzed rhythm guitarist can independently execute a “sock puppet” campaign for his Yo La Tengo-wannabe band, isn’t it likely that bad actors with substantially bigger budgets can do the same? I bet half the people we’re arguing with on Twitter or Facebook or wherever aren’t even people. Look, I’m going to be honest — I’m probably the least tech-savvy millennial alive. This week I was bested by a Google calendar. (If anyone knows how to make events show up on shared calendars and not just your personal Google calendar, feel free to email me.) But even I know we have got to find a way to fact check and regulate our online interactions, or we’re going to keep getting gamed by the least scrupulous among us. Until then though, as a bare minimum, please at least check the date and source before sharing a story online. That is, unless it’s an invite to like my band. Jesse Davis is the Flyer copy editor and book editor.

m e m p h i s f l y e r. c o m

Be careful what you read — and post — on the internet.

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Memphis Flyer - 11/19/2020  

WRONG TURN - How a misdemeanor traffic violation became one man's nightmare. Election Commission End-Run Bailey Bigger The Queen's Gambit

Memphis Flyer - 11/19/2020  

WRONG TURN - How a misdemeanor traffic violation became one man's nightmare. Election Commission End-Run Bailey Bigger The Queen's Gambit