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THE BROOKS MUSEUM’S NEW LOOK P4 | THE COUNTY COMMISSION’S NEW MAP P8 | THE FRENCH DISPATCH P31

OUR 1707TH ISSUE 11.11.21

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OUR 1707TH ISSUE 11.11.21

JERRY D. SWIFT Advertising Director Emeritus KELLI DEWITT, CHIP GOOGE, HAILEY THOMAS Senior Account Executives MICHELLE MUSOLF Account Executive ROBBIE FRENCH Warehouse and Delivery Manager JANICE GRISSOM ELLISON, KAREN MILAM, DON MYNATT, TAMMY NASH, RANDY ROTZ, LEWIS TAYLOR, WILLIAM WIDEMAN Distribution THE MEMPHIS FLYER is published weekly by Contemporary Media, Inc., P.O. Box 1738, Memphis, TN 38101 Phone: (901) 521-9000 Fax: (901) 521-0129 memphisflyer.com CONTEMPORARY MEDIA, INC. ANNA TRAVERSE FOGLE Chief Executive Officer LYNN SPARAGOWSKI Controller/Circulation Manager JEFFREY GOLDBERG Chief Revenue Officer MARGIE NEAL Production Operations Director KRISTIN PAWLOWSKI Digital Services Director MARIAH MCCABE Circulation and Accounting Assistant KALENA MATTHEWS Marketing Coordinator

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CARRIE BEASLEY Senior Art Director CHRISTOPHER MYERS Advertising Art Director NEIL WILLIAMS Graphic Designer

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CONTENTS

JESSE DAVIS Editor SHARA CLARK Managing Editor JACKSON BAKER, BRUCE VANWYNGARDEN Senior Editors TOBY SELLS Associate Editor CHRIS MCCOY Film and TV Editor ALEX GREENE Music Editor SAMUEL X. CICCI, MICHAEL DONAHUE, JON W. SPARKS Staff Writers ABIGAIL MORICI Copy Editor, Calendar Editor LORNA FIELD, RANDY HASPEL, RICHARD MURFF, FRANK MURTAUGH, MEGHAN STUTHARD Contributing Columnists AIMEE STIEGEMEYER, SHARON BROWN Grizzlies Reporters ANDREA FENISE Fashion Editor KENNETH NEILL Founding Publisher

A little more than a week ago, I was at a small gathering. I would call it a Halloween party, but “party” seems to imply a raucousness that was definitely lacking. At some point, I ended up standing in the kitchen talking with singer/ guitarist Justice Naczycz, a former member of the great Memphis band the Secret Service and a nice guy to talk to at parties. We chatted about songwriting, guitar, the Flyer, and other things, and it took me a little while to realize that I had seen his band perform a half-dozen or so times. (Look, it’s been a while since the Service disbanded.) When, at last, I did make the connection, I told him I had been a fan, that the band’s live show had been one of my favorites back in the day. Then, I confessed I had seen a different group at the old Hi Tone on Poplar (now Growlers) by mistake, and I thanked Naczycz for inadvertently introducing me to a different group. A friend was visiting, so my friend Michael and I thought we would take him to see a real Memphis rock-and-roll show. The Secret Service, with their rockin’ riffage, seemed like just the ticket. And, those being the days of $5 covers, for local acts anyway, it wouldn’t break the bank either. So we went to the Hi Tone, stood in line (longer than I expected — maybe the Service were breaking big?), and paid our $7 admission. Wait — $7? Yes, the Service must be hitting the big times. Oh well, it will be worth it. Milling around before the show, we noticed a well-stocked merch table and thought we might as well go talk to the person working it. An increased ticket price, merchandise, and someone who’s not a band member to tend the merch table — it looked like one of my favorite Memphis bands was making moves. Well good for them. So we told the sandy-haired young man behind the folding table that we were excited for the show, that our friend from the middle-of-nowhere was in for a treat, and we asked how fortune was favoring the band. When he opened his mouth to reply, we were met with a melodious Scottish lilt. “We’re just so excited to be here. I mean, Memphis, right?” he said, or something along those lines. “To be here? Aren’t you from here?” I remember thinking. “Didn’t I see these guys at the New Daisy about a month ago? Where else would they be?” Then I did a little mental math. A little sleuthing. (Okay, I admit it should have been obvious, but I was under the influence of no little bit of alcohol — and the powerful urge to look like I had some idea of what was going on.) The increased cover charge, the Scottish accent, the multiple items of merchandise (much like what a band might bring on, say, an international tour) — it all began to add up. These folks weren’t from around here. Reader, we were not at a Secret Service show, but rather, had misjudged the date. We were something like 24 hours early to see the Secret Service, but right on time to see Scotland’s indie-pop darlings, Camera Obscura. Though I was prepared to have my face musically melted by Naczycz, Steve Selvidge, Mark Edgar Stuart, and John Argroves, I loved the dreamy, jangly pop of Camera Obscura. It should come as no surprise that a band named after an art history term and who draws comparisons to Belle and Sebastian was not in the business of melting faces, but they were wonderful. I will never forget the first time I heard “Country Mile,” accidentally on a Memphis night. All this is to say that, in Memphis, it’s easy to be spoiled. There’s a good chance you might bump into a musician you N E WS & O P I N I O N like at a party, art walk, or the grocery THE FLY-BY - 4 NY TIMES CROSSWORD - 6 store. I could list every local legend I’ve POLITICS - 8 met at a concert or interviewed for work FINANCIAL FEATURE - 9 or bought candles from or sold a movie AT LARGE - 10 ticket to, back in my college days, but COVER STORY why bother? I’m sure you have your own “FREE FALLING … WITH BEER” list. And that’s just in the music world. BY FLYER STAFF - 12 WE RECOMMEND - 16 We have a vibrant arts community that MUSIC - 18 would be the envy of any peer city. But CALENDAR - 20 we shouldn’t let that fact desensitize us ARTS - 24 to the unexpected. FOOD - 25 Magic can come along and surprise FILM - 27 us, and for that I’m thankful. C LAS S I F I E D S - 30 LAST WORD - 31 Jesse Davis jesse@memphisflyer.com

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THE

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MEMernet Memphis on the internet. IT’S A S I G N

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Questions, Answers + Attitude Edited by Toby Sells

CITY REPORTER B y A n n a Tr a v e r s e F o g l e

Brooks Unveiled A first look at the museum’s new home on the river.

POSTED TO INSTAGRAM BY @MEMPHISASF_CK

TESTI F Y

November 11-17, 2021

POSTED TO YOUTUBE BY MEMPHIS CITY COUNCIL

Joe Kent spent his two minutes before the Memphis City Council last week talking about tax incentives and “obscene” amounts of money spent on public parking here, while wearing that hat. By intent or accident, Kent in his cap is the video’s thumbnail. YO

POSTED TO YOUTUBE BY ROLLING STONE

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Rolling Stone said Memphis rapper Moneybagg Yo had a “massive 2021,” and in an interview he talked about his career, family, music, and spirituality.

PHOTO: © HERZOG & DE MEURON

Rendering of the night view of the Brooks’ plan for its new home In major news for the city’s cultural future, the Memphis Brooks Museum of Art unveiled Friday morning the official plans for its new home on the bluffs of the Mississippi River. The design for the new location was created by international firm Herzog & de Meuron, working in collaboration with local firm archimania. The museum is scheduled to open Downtown in 2026; until then, it will continue operations in its Overton Park structure, where it first opened 110 years prior, in 1916. The Downtown location promises expanded gallery space (allowing more of the permanent collection to be on view at once), a variety of spaces for community and educational events, and several outdoor spaces open to the public at no charge. In a release, the Brooks identified the move Downtown as part of a broader revitalization of Memphis’ riverfront. The base of the new structure is to be “forged out of the river bluff ” and will include parking and support for the museum itself. All the galleries will be accessible within a single floor of the museum, allowing for natural flow. The museum will circle a central outdoor courtyard and will also include a rooftop pavilion, café, museum store, a 175-seat box theater, and more.

In terms of the art the museum will contain, the Brooks has noted that it intends to “dissolve the usual dividing lines between eras and mediums,” weaving together art from a diversity of geographical areas and increasing visibility of African-American art in particular, of which it is in the process of acquiring new pieces (by Sanford Biggers, Rick Lowe, and Vanessa German, among others). Jim Strickland, mayor of Memphis, commented, “The new Brooks will become an essential civic space for the people of Memphis and visitors to our city. Our city has long been known for its rich culture and history; soon we will be able to better share the visual art of our region and the stories embedded in Memphis’ art collection at the Brooks.” Carl Person, president of the museum’s board of directors, said, “The Brooks asked the architectural team for an inspiring work of architecture that would welcome the local community, the surrounding tri-state region of West Tennessee, Arkansas, and Mississippi, and, indeed, the entire world. We got that, and more.” Groundbreaking will begin in 2023. The museum has reported that of the $150 million needed for the project, more than $90 million has been raised to date.


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The New York Times Syndication Sales Corporation 620 Eighth Avenue, New York, N.Y. 10018 For Information Call: 1-800-972-3550 For Release Thursday, November 1, 2018

Crossword ACROSS

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Electrified The city’s bike share system gets charged up.

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Vegetarian 27 28 29 30 31 32 choice 47 Crowd, they say 33 34 35 2 Early-blooming 49 Good standing 17 ornamental in the Navy? 36 37 38 39 40 41 20 Draw upon 3 Moolah 50 Break up a 21 Word that 42 43 44 45 46 plot? 4 “___ see you” sounds like 51 In times past 47 48 49 5 Highesta state when grossing 54 Munchkin accented on 50 51 52 53 54 animated film the second 55 “’Tis sad” of 2015 syllable rather 55 56 57 58 59 60 61 57 Hyundai model than the first 6 Tolkien tree 59 Rejuvenation 62 63 64 creatures 22 Place station 7 Pays for a 23 Noted Warhol 65 66 67 62 workout, say subject 65 Bean sprouts? 68 69 70 8 “Hah! Done!” 24 Spotted 66 Lambchop 26 Cause for a 9 Card letters 67 Bellyache shootout PUZZLE BY DANIEL KANTOR 10 Kind of black 68 Stuff from 27 Gives, as roles 30 Songs for one 56 Thwack 46 Permissible to 11 Light which some be eaten, in a suits are made? 12 Help in getting 32 Walt Whitman’s 31 Packing 58 Starbuck’s way “Song of ___” past a bouncer order giver ANSWER TO PREVIOUS PUZZLE 47 Spanish city 34 Added fuel to 13 Immigration or where El Greco 59 [Just like … B F A L O A F P A S S B Y lived health care 35 Leaves that!] O I L G A U G E E S C A L E 18 Brand concern 39 Fiver 48 Fastball, in baseball X X F A C T O R W A R M U P 60 One in custody, 19 One way to play 40 Follow informally C A R T E R R E S P I R E 50 Something you relentlessly something might kick after A T E D E V I L P A R K 41 Scripts, 61 African you pick it up R E D O C C S E C T I O N 23 During flight informally menaces 52 Complex U S S R A L L M A E 25 Org. whose 43 Lead-in to Latin purchase, in first-ever 63 Part of a dollar J J C R E W A A L I N E 44 Awareness brief sign presidential A M Y A A A O N M E 45 Rocks on the 53 Word next to an endorsement B B C O M P L E X E B B S edge arrow 64 Chill was Ronald S A L T E C O L I R O T Reagan R A T P A C K O K F I N E Online subscriptions: Today’s puzzle and more than 7,000 past O R D E A L E E R E A D E R 27 Hoofed animal puzzles, nytimes.com/crosswords ($39.95 a year). F I E R C E R A D A R G U N 28 ___-bear Read about and comment on each puzzle: nytimes.com/wordplay. F E S S E S D U E S E P A 29 Dip 42

Q&A B y To b y S e l l s

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The city’s bike share system has gone electric. Explore Bike Share (EBS) began exploring how to integrate electric bikes to its fleet more than two years ago. Now, 300 electric bikes idle in brandnew docking stations that make for a more user-friendly check-out. The electric bikes look almost identical to the original models with the step-through frame, curved bat-wing handlebars, adjustable seat, front basket, kickstand, and throttle bell. But it’s the battery and motor that set the electric bike miles apart from its lo-fi cousin. We caught up with Anton Mack, executive director of EBS, to find out why they went electric, what that means for Memphis riders, and what will happen to the non-electric bikes. — Toby Sells Memphis Flyer: What tipped the scales from conversation to action on the e-bike conversion? Anton Mack: There were a number of things that really made the difference for us, and most of that has to do with Memphis. Being in a city where it can get pretty hot and humid, we knew that a bike that could make the ride more pleasant would make the difference. I believe we’re the 22nd-largest geographic city in the country. We’ve got a lot of miles to cover. We knew that our riders would need to be able to ride longer. Does the electric function of it give the bikes a greater practicality? The first thing we noticed since people

PHOTO: TOBY SELLS

Explore Bike Share executive director Anton Mack started riding them is that ride duration has more than doubled. What is the top speed of the bikes? Seventeen miles per hour. What is the total range on a full charge? The range will be about 30 to 32 miles. EBS is trying to buy more electric bikes, right? We’re about launch a fundraiser to fill the gap to raise additional funding. Our sponsorship from Central Station and [Shelby County] is already going toward that support, and we’re hoping to increase the number of stations. How much money do you need to fill the gap? We would love to raise as much as $300,000. What is happening with the non-electric bikes these are replacing? Several of them have been set aside for the University of Memphis. They’ve been talking about launching a program. [The bikes] were purchased initially with them in mind. The other portion of them we really want to use in a new program. We’re calling it Breaking Barriers. … It will allow us to take some bikes into communities where folks have not been able to afford the bike rental. … The hope is to make them available for free.


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POLITICS By Jackson Baker

The County Commission’s New Map “If you try sometimes, you might get what you need.”

November 11-17, 2021

Although various rules of parliamentary order caused Monday’s special called meeting of the Shelby County Commission to open by fits and starts, the needed result, a final vote on commission redistricting, was achieved with relative dispatch. But that was after — in order — a commission meeting, an adjournment, a meeting of the general government committee, another adjournment, and a final commission meeting. Still and all, it got done, and on the November 9th deadline set by the Election Commission. Accommodations were made via amendment to oblige commissioners from Germantown and Collierville. Some precincts were shifted around in the area of East Memphis

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and western Germantown so as to keep incumbents Brandon Morrison, a Republican, and Michael Whaley, a Democrat, from having to run in the same district. Morrison has a district to herself, though it is fundamentally changed from the old District 13 she has represented — a conglomerate of largely East Memphis precincts. She objected last week that too many precincts from her original district were being shifted to District 4, essentially the Germantown district. In the amended version, those precincts are still moved east. But at least her own home precinct, the one she lives in, has moved along with them. District 4, containing a reliably Republican voting base, is now her district to run in, for better or for worse. District 5, Whaley’s designation in the old configuration, has become a brand-new district consisting essentially of Cordova

(the creation of a Cordova district being one of the stated aims of Commissioner Van Turner and other members of the Commission majority). The district Whaley inhabits, meanwhile, renumbered as District 13, is still situated at the junction, more or less, of East Memphis, Midtown, and Binghampton, and its population is presumed to be majority-Democratic, as his old district was. If the interested parties did not get all of what they wanted, they may have gotten the best of what was possible. Among the several parliamentary maneuvers pursued during this important but relatively brief commission meeting was a last-ditch effort by Morrison to get a previously discarded map (known for its original sponsor, District 2 Republican David Bradford of Collierville, as “the Bradford map”) up for a vote. In the amended map, Bradford had

gotten the return of the Collierville High School precinct from its earlier proposed relocation in District 12. But he and Morrison evidently felt obliged, for the record, to get a more idealized version of their hopes up for a vote. They did, but “Map 4,” as it was entitled, unsupported by any precinct data, went down to defeat predictably, with only 5 votes, only those of the commission’s Republicans, supporting it. (In the debate over Map 4, Democrat Tami Sawyer charged that the map had been shaped by Brian Stephens of Caissa Public Strategy, a conservative-oriented consulting firm.) The final vote for the amended redistricting map, a version of the CC4A3 map voted on last week, was 8-5, with Democrat Edmund Ford Jr. joining four Republicans as naysayers. The approved map will probably yield nine Democrats and four Republicans in the next elected commission.

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NEWS & OPINION

eceiving a financial windfall maintain your current lifestyle, you may seems like a good problem not have to supplement your investment to have — and it is — but the returns with income from a job any longer. question of what to do with To be clear, even a windfall much smaller it can be hard to solve. The easiest answer than 25 times your spending can make a is to pay down debt or put the money to big difference in your portfolio’s trajectory; work in a suitable diversified portfolio and you just can’t quit your job based on it. pretend it doesn’t exist. That’s also probably For people who keep their lifestyle in the hardest thing to do for most people. check and decide to put the money away The impulse to spend it can be hard for the future, the hardest thing can be to to resist. The problem with getting an actually invest it. For example, someone inheritance or settlement (or winning the with a $50,000 investment portfolio who lottery!) is that it is — by definition — a receives a $10,000 bonus might agonize one-time thing. Lifestyle creep is a real over putting the money to work in the problem, and adjusting lifestyle spending markets, even though they already have five upward is a sure way to get in trouble when times that amount invested. As financial the money runs out. It’s very easy to spend advisors, we always say, “it depends,” but it’s more but very difficult to spend less once unlikely that a windfall like this should be you’re accustomed to a more elaborate invested at all differently than the money lifestyle. If you do treat yourself, do it in a you’ve already put to work. You can always deliberate, one-time manner rather than dollar-cost average in over a few months or getting involved with years, but if history is any expensive hobbies or guide, it’s probably best to memberships that keep put the money to work as adding up. A windfall soon as possible, even if shouldn’t change your you are unlucky and get it lifestyle too much going invested just before a big forward unless it is very drawdown. You should be large. in it for the long run. How large is large and Windfalls can solve life-changing? There is a lot of problems, but a rule of thumb based they can cause a lot of on what is known as problems as well. The wellthe Trinity study that documented addictions determined how much and bankruptcies among BLOGGING GUIDE | UNSPLASH money would have lottery winners and Don't let a one-time thing professional athletes is been needed in various lead to a lifestyle creep. historical periods to testament to that. Just like retire and never run out everything in investing of money. The very rough rule of thumb and financial planning, the numbers is that you’d need 25 times your current matter, but ultimately the question is more annual spending. In other words, if you are behavioral than financial. invested in a reasonable portfolio and your If you’re fortunate enough to receive existing money plus the windfall is more a large windfall, take a deep breath, be than 25 times your annual spending, you patient, and come up with a plan — one could withdraw 4 percent of your portfolio that doesn’t involve a broad expansion of the first year, adjust that amount up for your lifestyle. Nobody says, “I sure wish I inflation each subsequent year, and be hadn’t invested all this money 10 years ago,” unlikely to ever run out of money. but there are countless variations of the To do this right, you have to work opposite sentiment. Gene Gard is Chief Investment Officer backwards. In other words, don’t look at Telarray, a Memphis-based wealth at your income and account balances to management firm that helps families determine your lifestyle. Figure out how navigate investment, tax, estate, and much you need to spend to be happy, and retirement decisions. Ask him your question then consider if your current balances plus at ggard@telarrayadvisors.com or sign up for the windfall are approaching 25 times your the next free online seminar on the Events annual spending. If so, then the money tab at telarrayadvisors.com. truly is life-changing, in the sense that to

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405 N Germantown Parkway, Memphis, TN 38018

AT L A R G E B y B r u c e Va n W y n g a r d e n

Mind Over Meta Musings on the Book of Face.

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acebook is a daily presence in my life and has been since 2010 when I joined the social medium to post pictures of a trip my wife and I took to the Grammys in Los Angeles. I remember I created an “album” of photos, each carefully captioned: the beach at Malibu; the HOLLYWOOD sign; Tatine meeting Weird Al Yankovic. So exciting! It was around this time, I suppose, that most of us basically stopped shooting pictures with a camera. You remember that tedious process: You’d take your film to Walgreens, then wait a few days to go pick up your developed pictures (along with the negatives, in case you wanted to go crazy and print another copy). Then you’d sit out in the parking lot, looking through your vacation shots or whatever. No filters, no enhancements. What Walgreens gave you is what you got. How crude. Now, our phones take care of all of that. Instant sharing! Filters! Video! No more dusty sleeves of old photos stuck in drawers. And Facebook has all our shots organized by date and subject matter and helpfully suggests reposting them as “memories” for us, so we can amuse/bore our friends all over again. Around the world, three billion people are using Facebook to advertise their lives, faces, interests, writing, families, gardens, pets, food, businesses, music, vacations, politics. And Facebook uses all that free information we provide to make mega-billions of dollars from companies that want to advertise to us. It is a marketing behemoth with algorithms so advanced, you’d swear they’re reading our thoughts. That’s because they are, literally — the ones we write down for them. We are Facebook’s product and they’re getting top dollar for us, but we don’t seem to much care. Check out my new shoes, y’all! Facebook has made some huge blunders. When the company pushed for a “pivot” to video in 2015, thousands of journalists were laid off, replaced by video “content providers.” Three years later, Facebook had to tell advertisers (and newspapers and media organizations) that video was not working as they’d promised. People actually preferred reading to being spoon-fed videos. Oops, said Mr. Zuck-

erberg, give us some journalism again, please. And the company seems a little touchy these days, given all the bad press it’s gotten regarding its failure to remove political disinformation and racist, whitesupremacist content from its platform. I have a friend who was reprimanded by the Facebook popo last week for using the word “Chubby” in referencing the Sixties singer, Chubby Checker. Yes, it’s his name, but it breached some sort of algorithmic dog whistle. I’m guessing that typing “Porky Pig” would definitely get you 30 days in the hole.

PHOTO: BRUCE VANWYNGARDEN

Tatine hangs with Al Yankovic. Two weeks ago, I wrote a column about the daily emails I get from Donald Trump. The Flyer art director illustrated the column with an image of a Trump fundraising ad that had been emailed to me. Normally, when I post my column on Facebook on Wednesday morning, I start getting comments, likes, etc., within minutes, mainly because I’m followed by a few hundred people, so it shows up in their news feed. That week, however, nothing. By mid-morning, I’d had two comments, maybe three or four likes. Facebook was obviously suppressing the distribution of the column. When I figured it out and changed the art, things got back to normal quickly, but it gave me a real sense of how much Facebook can shape what all of us read in our news feeds — for good or evil. Here’s hoping they’re as vigilant at stopping nazi memes and hate speech as they are at keeping Donald Trump from getting a free ad — and at protecting Chubby Checker’s feelings.


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CRAFT BEER GARDEN

PICS WITH SANTA HOSTED BY

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Santa will be onsite 10a-12p Saturday

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NEWS & OPINION

CURATE

IN PARTNERSHIP WITH

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COVER STORY BY FLYER STAFF / PHOTOS BY CHRIS MCCOY & JESSE DAVIS

November 11-17, 2021

FREE FALLING …

WITH BEER AUTUMN HAS COME TO TOWN, AND WITH IT, OUR ANNUAL UNSCIENTIFIC GUIDE TO LOCAL BREWS.

C

old and dark, the fall weather is falling in line with our favorite fall beers. Autumn brings big transitions. Tropical IPAs and shandies give way to stouts and porters, those golden, carefree rays of summer unable to penetrate their contemplative depths. Yes, drinking seasonally is about variety, says Clark Ortkiese, co-founder of Crosstown Brewing Co., but it’s about seasonal psychology, too. “As the seasons change, our psyche 12 changes,” Ortkiese says. “Your mindset is

so different. As you get towards winter, you get more complacent. We’re all kind of hunkering down. “In the summer, you’re at the pool or you’re at a concert; you want a beer that you’re going to carry with you. It’s crushable. You want to have lower gravity because you’re having fun with your friends. In the winter, you are more likely to be sitting, cold in a bar or at your house, and you’re drinking something strong. So you want to sip it. You want to get that alcohol buzz.”

For this year’s fall beer guide, we rounded up a bunch of the best Memphis seasonal beers. All are available in cans almost anywhere you can find finer beers. Some brewers haven’t liked all of our staff comments in past beer guides, but our crew was asked to be honest. We taste and comment, not as beer experts, but as the typical Memphis beer consumer. But we did have expert help. This year Ortkiese helped us to understand the different styles and to pick out flavors


Meddlesome Brewing Co. STUPID GOOD SELTZER Sassy, tangy, light. If TikTok was a drink, it would be Stupid Good. — Bruce VanWyngarden Oddly enough, it’s fitting that we began our Fall Beer Guide tasting with a hard seltzer. True, it’s not actually a beer, but Meddlesome’s Stupid Good Seltzer comes on like the last hurrah of summer. In Memphis, home of Falsetober, where the seasons are indecisive at best, one last sip of summer isn’t out of place. Still, this would taste better poolside or after mowing the lawn. Bring on the falling leaves — and the darker beers please. — Jesse Davis In true seltzer style, this tastes like a hint of the fruits on the label. If you shout “Orange! Passion fruit! Guava!” from another room and add a kick of carbonation, this is that. As a seltzer fan, I love it. — Shara Clark Tastes a bit flat, but the fruit flavors aren’t too strong, which I like. Doesn’t have that weird tinny taste like a Truly or White Claw. An excellent seltzer for summertime, by the pool or at the beach. Maybe not for fall, though. — Samuel X. Cicci When you crack open one of these, it smells like a Bath & Body works hand sanitizer exploded, and to be frank, it tastes like one, too. — Abigail Morici This 4.5 ABV seltzer features an unusual combination of flavors: orange, passion fruit, and guava. It smells like baby aspirin and tastes like LaCroix

Clark Ortkiese (l) and Toby Sells (r) on the job in the undisclosed Midtown backyard, where staffers were drafted for a hefty, definitely not lightweight, assignment. sparkling water. I’m not a hard seltzer drinker, but I would choose this over White Claw. — Chris McCoy It’s dry, light, and bubbly. It’s a welldone, grown-up seltzer. — Toby Sells Grind City Brewing POPPY’S PILS Non-assertive, eager-to-please, needs seasoning. The intern of beers. — BV Poppy’s Pils American Pilsner is light, crisp, and bubbly. Here we have another example of a good pool beer. This pilsner invites some flavor to the party, but it’s not enough to make your taste buds do a double take. With the lower alcohol content and unobtrusive flavor profile, Poppy’s Pils would be a good fit for a music festival. Remind me of this one when Memphis in May rolls around again. — JD This smells more like beer than it

tastes? There’s cold carbonation on my tongue but not much flavor. Seems like the type of beer you could shotgun pretty easily because it goes down like water. — SC It feels like I’m drinking a domestic light beer. Not much taste, and a very thin, watery substance to it. Perfect if I’m rolling up to a frat party or a game of beer pong … but I’m not in college anymore. — SXC A golden color in the glass, at least it looks good. Are pilsners supposed to be nearly tasteless? If so, this one is a success. — CM This does what pilsners are supposed to do. As for flavor, it’s three shades paler than Tiny Bomb. — TS Crosstown Brewing Co. HATCH ME OUTSIDE This one’s crispy with a light smoky flavor

and a touch of heat. And it works. How ’bout that? — BV With this brew from Crosstown Brewing, we ratchet the intensity up a notch. Hatch Me Outside is a darker golden color. The brewery uses Hatch peppers, roasted on-site, which give the brew a faintly smoky flavor. Taken with the spicy kick from the peppers, this is the beer to grab for taco night. My advice? Swing by Crosstown to snap up a six-pack, cruise down Summer Avenue in search of tacos, and you’ve got a recipe for thankful taste buds. — JD Welcome to FlavorTown! This is pepper-forward, for sure. Initial taste reminds me of the pepper sauce you pour over greens. All I need now is a plate of hot wings. — SC A blonde ale but with Hatch green chile in it! The taste reminds me of my days growing up in New Mexico. The batch seems a bit spicier this year but never threatens to overtake it. My favorite beer. — SXC It’s like they took Hot & Spicy CheezIts and liquefied them, and I do like me some Hot & Spicy Cheez-Its. Turns out, I like them in liquid form, too. — AM Crosstown Brewing has refined this recipe after last year’s debut. There’s no hint of the peppers in the smell, but the flavor is richer and deeper, with just a hint of spice. It’s no longer a stunt beer but a mature product. — CM Wiseacre Brewing Co. MOON BISCUITS Foamy head with a malty finish. Deep amber color. Good fire pit beer. — BV As a fan of amber ales, I was predisposed to like Moon Biscuits. With a darker amber color, a biscuity thickness, and a hint of sweetness, this brew feels like a solid pick for a porch beer session in jacket weather. The continued on page 14 COVER STORY m e m p h i s f l y e r. c o m

of the beers we tasted in an undisclosed Midtown backyard as a few staffers drank beers from a cooler and wrote about them — as part of their job. Hell yeah. There are plenty of new and seasonal beers to love on this list — and we did love many. But don’t take our word for it. Light out into the dark cold and taste some for yourself. — Toby Sells

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continued from page 13 Georges Méliès “A Trip to the Moon”inspired can art doesn’t hurt Moon Biscuits’ chances of ending up in my shopping cart. — JD This kinda reminds me of eating dessert. Would totally drink this while admiring a full moon. — SC The best part of this beer is the orange/red color, like a fall sunset. I love amber beers, and this one is drinkable, but not particularly outstanding, flavorwise. — CM A warm, winter-holiday pastry in your glass. — TS

November 11-17, 2021

Beale Street Brewing Co. BORN UNDER A BAD SIGN MEMPHIS MULE I love Beale Street Brewing’s Hopnotizing Minds and Love & Hoppiness beers, so I know I’m a fan of that brewery. That said, Born Under a Bad Sign did not do much for me. It’s got a minty flavor that was an automatic “no” from me. This brew might be for someone, but that someone isn’t me. — JD Incredibly confusing for my palate. Lime, peppermint; sour, minty. Somehow these don’t seem to belong together. — SC This one is all over the place with hints of ginger, lime, and peppermint. Slightly too busy. Needs to settle down and behave itself. — BV Lime? Peppermint? Ginger? What? I’m no opponent of strange flavor mixes, but there’s a lot going on here. It’ll reel me in out of curiosity, but whew, I’m not sure I can handle a whole can. I’ll leave it to the more adventurous types. — SXC

This is what I want when I’m sitting around a fire, and it’s the only beer I went in for seconds during our outdoor tasting session. — Chris McCoy You can tell from the title that there’s too much going on with this beer. It has little carbonation, no legs, and smells like menthol. It’s confused, gimmicky, and kind of a mess. — CM Yes, there’s a lot going on here. But Beale Street said so on the can. The ginger/peppermint thing hits in a holiday way. — TS

Hook Point Brewing 14 CAT SHOT KOLSCH A little cloudy in the glass. Crisp and

tasty and finishes with a light bitterness. It can sleep in your lap. — BV Beer! It tastes like beer! This is an unassuming brew. It’s a kölsch, which Crosstown Brewing’s Clark Ortkiese, our guide on this beertasting adventure, explained is a hybrid between an ale and a lager. Cat Shot is light and a bit bitter. It’s less adventurous than some of the brews on display, but that might be a good thing. Cat Shot is tasty without quite being a favorite. I don’t mean to be catty, but it’s not quite the cat’s meow. Or the cat’s pajamas. Good though. — JD This would be more of a summer beer for me. As bitter as your ex. — SC A bit bitter? Are they supposed to be this bitter? Not quite what I want from a kölsch. — SXC Kölsches are somewhere between ales and lagers, kind of a light version of an Altbier. This one is a little more bitter than most kölsches, so if that’s your jam, you might like it. — CM Hampline Brewing Co. BOCK SEAT DRIVER Starts out sweet and finishes with a woody flavor that’s not at all unpleasant. It can take the wheel. — BV The Bock Seat Driver is more than just a punny name. This beer packs an 8.8 percent ABV punch, so if you’re drinking these, you better be prepared to sit in the backseat. (Please drink responsibly and don’t drive.) Hampline’s offering has a darker amber color, and it’s a little cloudy. It’s a little malty, a little sweet, and would be a nice addition to a build-your-own six-pack of local fall brews. — JD Woah! A lot going on here. Big flavor. Sits on the tongue like an inflatable water slide. What does that mean? I’m not entirely sure. — SC Huh. Interesting. Very malty, but a little on the fruity/sweet side for a bock,

personally. But it did get me thinking about some cool punny names if I were ever to make a bock. — SXC There’s not much to the nose in this bock, but when you taste it, it becomes a big-ass beer with a light mouthfeel, although it’s a little on the sweet side. At 8.8 percent ABV, Bock Seat Driver is an intense experience. — CM This bock is sweet and clean. At 8 percent ABV, there’s no surprise it’s a bit boozy, too. — TS Memphis Made Brewing Co. PLAID ATTACK Sure, and it’s a smooth beer, me laddie. Non-aggressive and laid-back. A muted plaid. — BV Plaid Attack had the deck stacked against it before I popped the top on the can. First, Memphis Made’s Fireside is one of my favorite beers. Second, High Cotton’s Scottish Ale is something of the local gold standard for the style. So I was pleasantly surprised when I enjoyed this one. Again, we see a darker amber color. Plaid Attack comes on with a mellow beginning, with a tang to the aftertaste. This would be a good beer for soup night. — JD Super carbonated, and light and drinkable for a Scottish, in my opinion. I could drink this one year-round. — SC It’s a solid Scottish Ale, but I just can’t avoid comparisons with High Cotton’s take, which is king in this town. Now, Fireside, on the other hand ... — SXC I wouldn’t say I have a mature palate by any means, but the aftertaste from this tastes a bit like pool water — specifically pool water from a rich person’s pool. Maybe I drank too much pool water as a kid, but I didn’t hate it. — AM The label says Scottish ale, but the color is more like an amber, and the mouthfeel is on the lighter side of the spectrum. Still, it’s a pleasing, if pedestrian, drink. — CM

High Cotton Brewing Co. CHOCOLATE RYE PORTER A rich, dark, chewy brew that will ride along nicely from fall into the cold months ahead. —BV This porter smells like chocolate. It’s sweet, but not overwhelmingly so, and lighter than you might expect when looking at the dark brown color. Another great porch beer, when temperatures dip below 70 degrees, I’m heading for High Cotton’s Chocolate Rye Porter. This is one of my favorites of the night. — JD Get out your head lamp and gather the kindling. This is the beer for your fall fire pit. — SC Not that sweet, which is nice, and intermingles chocolate and some coffee notes, dare I say. A fairly heavy blend that goes down pretty smoothly. It’s a perfect beer to sip while sitting around a campfire or fire pit. One might say a perfect beer for fall. We have a winner! — SXC I had low expectations for this one — I like to keep my chocolate separate from my beer. But I have to say, I could go for seconds and thirds of this. — AM No Memphis breweries do dark beers better than High Cotton, and this one is dark AF. More chocolate, less rye, this is a rich, thick beer that eats like a meal. This is what I want when I’m sitting around a fire, and it’s the only beer I went in for seconds during our outdoor tasting session. — CM This beer is a time machine straight to the heart of the holidays. Chocolate, spice, and everything nice. — TS Ghost River Brewing Co. No new Ghost River releases could be found during our beer guide shopping trip. But their Grind-N-Shine Coffee Cream Ale is fall in your glass all year long. It’s light, frothy, and the coffee flavor is not hard to find. Easy to drink. Easy to enjoy. — TS


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steppin’ out (& stayin’ in)

We Recommend: Culture, News + Reviews

Zeros and Ones

PHOTO: TENNESSEE SHAKESPEARE COMPANY

Rachel Cendrick as Ada

By Abigail Morici

“She walks in beauty, like the night / Of cloudless climes and starry skies,” read the first lines of Lord Byron’s “She Walks in Beauty” — lines that double as the first lines to Tennessee Shakespeare Company’s newest production, Ada and the Engine, which revolves around Ada Lovelace, Lord Byron’s forgotten daughter. “What gives Ada life is the heartbeat of her father’s literature,” says Dan McCleary, director of the show. “She never actually met him. Her mother was intent on her never being like her father and forced her into a life of science and mathematics. And that’s not where women go at this time in London, but Ada is adept at it — more than adept.” As such, Ada went on to coming up with binary coding — those zeros and ones that are the foundation of modern technology. Because of her continued role in our technology two centuries later, the play is a “fantastical marriage between the historical and the modern, and so it’s a production unlike any we’ve done before. Audiences will get a sense of true-fact history on stage, but also you’ll see the modernity in the costumes, in the lighting projections, on the set, in Edison bulbs on stage, and in the music. There’s a lot of modern dancing in the piece. There’re musical pieces that audiences will have heard and original music. ... There’s even a bit of time travel where Ada ultimately meets her father and sees the past, present, and future.” Like her father, Ada was interested in poetic, rhythmic patterns, which allowed her to recognize the patterns of binary coding. In that way, McCleary says, “The show becomes a beautiful, artistic argument for ensuring that reading fiction, reading poetry, and studying the humanities should be as central to every child’s education as science and math.”

MICHAEL DONAHUE

COURTESY NIKII RICHEY

ADA AND THE ENGINE, TENNESSEE SHAKESPEARE COMPANY, 7950 TRINITY, OPENING NOVEMBER 11TH, 7:30 P.M., $20-$35.

November 11-17, 2021

Sit still and pretty, says artist Nikii Richey. Arts, p. 24

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Bibby’s Bakes serves up healthy food with a junk-food taste. Food, p. 25

VARIOUS DAYS & TIMES November 11th - 17th Little Shop of Horrors Playhouse on the Square, 66 S. Cooper, Thurs., Nov. 11, 8 p.m., $27 After Covid thwarted two previous attempts of this performance, Playhouse on the Square is finally able to bring Little Shop of Horrors to its stage. And you won’t want to miss Seymour in his search for love despite the man-eating plant that terrorizes his flower shop. Performances will run through December 22nd, Thursdays-Sundays, with Sunday matinees at 2 p.m. Purchase tickets online or call the box office at 901-726-4656.

Raleigh CommUNITY Walk Against Gun Violence Raleigh-Egypt High School, 3970 Voltaire, Sat., Nov. 13, 10 a.m. Join Pledge to Protect 901 in its sixth neighborhood walk to take steps toward reducing gun violence. Led by an active and proven community leader, these walks support local grassroots organizations specific to each neighborhood and create better access to resources. Bring your “why,” and stand up against gun violence. Free resources and food will be available. Registration begins at 9:30 a.m.

Crafts and Drafts Crosstown Concourse Plaza and Atrium, 1350 Concourse, Sat.-Sun., Nov. 13-14, 10 a.m.-4 p.m. Presented by yours truly, this unique shopping experience showcases a curated group of independent local artists, makers, and crafters. This year, we’ve expanded the festival to two days, so we can include twice as many creators as before. Plus, we’ll be featuring the very best local craft beers, curated by our friends at Cash Saver.

Artist Talk: “Better Than a Stick in the Eye” David Lusk Gallery, 97 Tillman, Sat., Nov. 13, 11 a.m. Join Greely Myatt in a discussion about his latest show. The sculptures in this show are mostly carved and assembled wood with other materials like alabaster, steel, aluminum, bricks, and found objects. The pieces, the artist says can be viweed as “short stories,” with each carrying a specific meaning — “personal, nostalgic, found, made, but all hopefully universal.”


Live music at

PHOTO: JACKIE NERREN

Global Goods’ fair trade items for sale

A Good Day

By Abigail Morici

“Justice here and justice everywhere” — that’s the thinking behind First Congo’s Global Goods shop, says Jackie Nerren, who coordinates the store’s happenings. “We sell stuff that is certified fair trade,” she says. “All the goods have been made under healthy circumstances by adults who are paid a fair wage in the country they come from. Almost all our stuff comes from third world countries, and it’s usually recycled, reused, repurposed materials. We only have one supplier in the states — the [social enterprise] Women’s Bean Project in Denver.” Because of ongoing renovations, the shop has recently only been open on Sundays, but this Saturday, Global Goods is having an open house and its full stock will be out and ready for the taking. The store will sell bean soup mixes from the Women’s Bean Project, children’s sweaters from Ecuador, wall art made from oil cans in Haiti, baskets from Ghana, and other handmade goods, mostly made by women. “We also sell [Blessed Bees] honey that’s actually made at our church from bees that live in hives on the roof,” Nerren says. “And we sell some fig jam made by a couple at our church.” The shop’s prices are reasonable, Nerren adds. “We don’t have to make a profit. We barely mark stuff up. It’s pretty nice to be able to help people all over the world. You get cool stuff, and we want people to be able to buy it.” Global Goods takes cash, card, and checks. After perusing the shop, Nerren suggests heading over to the CooperYoung Community Farmers Market, which is held in the church’s parking lot. “Then you can go eat brunch somewhere on Cooper-Young,” she continues. “See? I’m just planning a great day for you.” GLOBAL GOODS ANNUAL HOLIDAY OPEN HOUSE, SANCTUARY OF FIRST CONGREGATIONAL CHURCH, 1000 S. COOPER, SATURDAY, NOVEMBER 13, 10 A.M. -2 P.M.

November 12th - 8:00pm Gangstagrass

November 13th - 8:00pm The Nth Power and Chinese Dub Connection Embassy

11/10 - 6:30pm

Duwayne Burnside Blues Hour

11/11 - 7pm

Max Kaplan and The Magics

11/12 - 8pm

Pop Up for Pups The Cove, 2559 Broad, Sun., Nov. 14, 4-8 p.m. Enjoy Chef Kunal Jadhav’s menu of Indian-inspired takes on classic bar food like pizza and burritos. Vegan and vegetarian options will be available, and so will a wide menu of alcoholic and non-alcoholic beverages at the bar. Entrees are $15. There will also be a silent auction. Benefiting volunteer-based New Beginnings Animal Rescue, which is funded solely through donations.

Pokeweed Comedy Presents: Mandee McKelvey Lamplighter Lounge, 1702 Madison, Sun., Nov. 14, 7:30-9:30 p.m., $10 Mandee McKelvey is in from Louisville to headline a fun lineup of Memphis’ best comedians at the Lamplighter Lounge, hosted by Charlie Vergos. As one of the Midwest’s most acclaimed stand-up comedians and a Memphis Comedy Festival favorite, McKelvey is revered for her ability to spin tragedy into comedy, from growing up poor in South Carolina to becoming a widow in her 20s.

Disney’s The Lion King: Kids Night on Broadway Orpheum Theatre, 203 S. Main, Tues., Nov. 16, 6:30 p.m., $35-$154 This Tony Award-winning musical is bringing the Serengeti to the Orpheum’s stage November 11th28th. And on Kids Night, kids can enjoy pre-show crafts, a photo booth, a special introduction-to-the-theater packet, and more. The performance begins at 7:30, and you catch Memphian and Evangelical Christian School student Jaylen Lyndon Hunter as Young Simba in certain performances.

11/13 - 8pm

The Nth Power and Chinese Dub Connection Embassy

11/17 - 6:30pm

Duwayne Burnside Blues Hour

11/18 -7pm

Pocket Funk

11/19 - 8pm NOLA 901

railgarten.com 2 1 6 6 C e n t r a l Av e . Memphis TN 38104

ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT

Wes Anderson’s The French Dispatch is a love letter to the golden age of magazine journalism. Film, p. 27

m e m p h i s f l y e r. c o m

Gangstagrass

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MUSIC By Alex Greene

The Royal Brothers Band Boo Mitchell helps bring a songwriter’s musical dreams to life.

BOBBY RUSH WITH SPECIAL GUEST

MEMPHISSIPPI SOUNDS WEDNESDAY NOVEMBER 17 7PM FOR TICKETS & INFO: BBKINGS.COM/MEMPHIS OR CALL 901.524.5464 143 BEALE ST. MEMPHIS, TN 38103

November 11-17, 2021

@BBKINGSMEMPHIS

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Y

eah, boy! We’ve got some material, man!” When Rev. Charles Hodges, organist with the Hi Rhythm Section, says that, you’d best give the material a listen. “I’m telling you: Gary’s a great writer.” High praise indeed from a keyboard virtuoso who worked so closely with Willie Mitchell, one of the greatest writers and producers in the history of popular music. The man Hodges speaks of is one Gary Bolen, not exactly a household name. And yet, though he’s in his golden years, there’s a good chance he could be before long, due to a project happening at Royal Studios now. Bolen’s songs are coming to life in a way he never could have imagined. The songs Bolen has crafted over the years have prompted the formation of a supergroup of sorts, now in the final stages of recording three albums’ worth of material. The rhythm section features Steve Potts on drums and Jackie Clark on bass; the keyboards are handled by Rev. Hodges and longtime Hi Records arranger Lester Snell; and the guitarist is Bolen himself, with an assist from Memphis great Michael Toles III. The singers include Bobby Rush, Charlie Musselwhite, Wendy Moten, Jim Lauderdale, and Tower of Power’s Marcus Scott. And in the control room are Boo Mitchell and Gary’s older brother, Richard. Richard had the organizational skill to make it all come together. Though he had a successful career in film production and marketing, music was always a great love of his. As he puts it, “It started when my brother was in his early twenties, and he started writing some of his first songs.” This would have been in the early ’70s. “I realized that my brother had some real talent. Even his first songs touched me, they had significant meaning. That caused me to stop everything and get ready for him, so I went out and bought a copy of This Business of Music. In 1975, I put a band together around my brother’s songs. Arista almost signed us, but it fell apart.” Still, even as he took other work to survive, Gary kept writing. And the two brothers stayed close. “We both lived in Lake Tahoe — I could see out of my house into my brother’s — but we had to move to Clarksdale, Mississippi, because of our parents’ age. Now, because we were military kids, I left Clarksdale when I was 5 [years old], but my extended family has always

PHOTO: MAXENE HARLOW

Boo Mitchell, Gary Bolen, Wendy Moten, and Richard Bolen lived here. The house I was born in has had four generations of my mother’s side of the family in it since my great grandparents. So that was always home.” Gary, for his part, set up a studio in the old family home, and soon they were putting it to use, having recruited the old band from Austin to make demos. Still, the brothers were thinking bigger than that. A few years earlier, Richard had seen the musical documentary Take Me to the River, shot primarily at Royal Studios, and now those impressions fired his imagination. “I really wanted to go to Royal to get this done. I even talked about it when we were doing the demos. Some of these guys from Austin just don’t play well enough for us to say we did the best we possibly could with this record,” Richard says. “Early on, we realized we needed another bass player and another drummer. So I interviewed Jackie

Clark first, then Steve Potts. They heard those demos, and two stanzas into ‘Bad Alligator,’ they both said, ‘I’m in!’ They were very passionate.” The new rhythm section in turn led the Bolen brothers to Royal Studios’ Boo Mitchell, and work has progressed steadily on making their dreams a reality ever since. The band, now called the Royal Brothers, is a songwriter’s dream team. “You get the right folks,” Gary says, “and you go, ‘Wow! Did I have anything to do with that? That sure sounds good!’” “Once the nucleus of the band formed a year and a half ago,” Richard says, “the lineup hasn’t changed. There’s nobody there that’s wrong. And all of the people are basically Boo Mitchell’s extended musical family. Lifelong friends of Boo and his father. Gary and I can’t believe we’ve been invited into that family.”


Our turn to applaud you. Big thanks to the fans, sponsors and musical artists for an amazing season of Live at the Garden.

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CLUE

MYSTERY – COMEDY – FUN

NOV. 19, 20 / 7:30PM – NOV. 21 / 2:00PM

Based on the iconic movie inspired by the board game, CLUE. Try to figure out WHO did it, WHERE did it happen, & with WHAT! This comedy whodunit will leave you in stitches! Featuring JUSTIN BIXLER – JORGE CONSEJO – GRETA ENGLERT – KINON KEPLINGER JIMBO LATTIMORE – MELISSA WALKER – SHANNON WALTON – KORTLAND WHALUM And Thousands of Actors – (OK, well 7 other talented actors) Director Producer EMILY CHATEAU MICHAEL BOLLINGER

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ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT

Call the Shelby County Health Department at 901-222-9263, A, B, C’s of Safe Sleep Babies should sleep Alone, on their Back, and in their Crib.

2021-2022

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Send the date, time, place, cost, info, phone number, a brief description, and photos — two weeks in advance — to calendar@memphisflyer.com or P.O. Box 1738, Memphis, TN 38101. DUE TO SPACE LIMITATIONS, ONGOING WEEKLY EVENTS WILL APPEAR IN THE FLYER’S ONLINE CALENDAR ONLY.

CALENDAR of EVENTS:

November 11 - 17

ART AN D S P EC I A L E X H I B ITS

“47 Rockets”

Work by Raina Belleau and Caleb Churchill. Through Nov. 19. 2021 PROJECTS

“A Come Apart”

Nikii Richey presents new work. The gallery is accessible on Monday, Wednesday, and Friday from 9 a.m. to 2 p.m. Through Nov. 28. MEDICINE FACTORY

“Art with Class”

A show by Gay Jemison Rhodes and students of her MBG acrylics class for all levels. Through Dec. 29. MEMPHIS BOTANIC GARDEN

“A Walk in the Park”

Work created by Larry Hughes in art residencies at several national parks and monuments. Through Nov. 30. WKNO.ORG

“Better Than a Stick in the Eye”

Exhibition of sculptures by Greely Myatt. Through Nov. 20. DAVID LUSK GALLERY

“Black Artists in America: From the Great Depression to Civil Rights”

This exhibition is the first of three that examine the AfricanAmerican experience in the visual arts through the last 70 years of the 20th century. Through Jan. 2. THE DIXON GALLERY & GARDENS

November 11-17, 2021

“Borders”

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hand turned toward combinations of colors, marks, and gestures that seem more distant from one another. Through Nov. 30.

“Fearsome Flora and Graveyard Flowers”

Pieces by Jimmy Crosthwait, complementing The Little Shop of Horrors. Through Dec. 29.

ART MUSEUM AT THE UNIVERSITY OF MEMPHIS (AMUM)

PLAYHOUSE ON THE SQUARE

“Inside the Walt Disney Archives”

A R T HA P P E N I N G S

Exhibition celebrating the legacy of The Walt Disney Company archives. Through Jan. 2.

Artist Reception for “Wanderings”

How did three artists navigate a pandemic year? By wandering. Sunday, Nov. 14, 3-5 p.m.

GRACELAND EXHIBITION CENTER

Master Metalsmith: Kim Cridler | Held

MEMPHIS BOTANIC GARDEN

Artist Talk: “Better Than a Stick in the Eye”

An annual exhibition celebrating the most influential contemporary metal artists. Through Mar. 6.

Exhibition of sculptures by Greely Myatt. Saturday, Nov. 13, 11 a.m.

METAL MUSEUM

DAVID LUSK GALLERY

“Mona Hatoum: Misbah”

Exhibition of a contemporary art installation where the viewer stands in a darkened room, lit only by a rotating lantern dangling from the ceiling. Through Jan. 9.

B O O K EVE NTS

Temple Israel Presents: A Conversation with Katie Couric

Temple Israel’s fundraiser featuring Katie Couric, who will discuss her new memoir, Going There. Tuesday, Nov. 16, 7 p.m.

MEMPHIS BROOKS MUSEUM OF ART

“On Christopher Street” Exhibition of portraits of transgender residents by Mark Seliger. Through Jan. 9.

GERMANTOWN PERFORMING ARTS CENTER

MEMPHIS BROOKS MUSEUM OF ART

Greely Myatt’s outdoor sculpture Breeze is on display at David Lusk Gallery. The piece is made from aluminum traffic signs.

“Sacred Faces: Masks of West Africa”

Experience the spirit of Africa. Through Nov. 30. JAY ETKIN GALLERY

THE DIXON GALLERY & GARDENS

Exhibition of photography by Sam Wang. Through Nov. 29

For this exhibit, Donnie Copeland suggests that his eye and

Exhibit explores the ways in which the ancient Egyptian approach to solving the meaning of life involved a complex framework of balance and counterbalance. Through Nov. 29.

EAST ARKANSAS COMMUNITY COLLEGE

Exhibition of metal sculptures by Steinunn Thorarinsdottir. Through April 23.

“Discordant, Clashing, and Found: Painted Collage”

“Writing in Three Dimensions: Myth and Metaphor in Ancient Egypt”

“Sam Wang: Acts of Persistent Discoveries”

ART MUSEUM AT THE UNIVERSITY OF MEMPHIS (AMUM)

“Southern Landscapes” Exhibition of works by Jim Henderson. Through Dec. 2. MEMPHIS BOTANIC GARDEN

“The Photographer’s Shadow”

Exhibition that centers the role of the caretaker and explores the implications of deep devotion. Through Nov. 17 CLOUGH-HANSON GALLERY

“Wanderings - Boger, Free, and Stern”

C O M E DY

Comedian A-Train

This hilarious headliner is bringing the laughs to The Junt. Friday, Nov. 12, 8 p.m. THE COMEDY JUNT

How did three artists navigate a pandemic year? By wandering. Through Nov. 30. MEMPHIS BOTANIC GARDEN

continued on page 22


21

ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT

m e m p h i s f l y e r. c o m


CALENDAR: NOVEMBER 11 - 17 continued from page 20 Pokeweed Comedy presents: Mandee McKelvey at the Lamplighter Lounge

Nationally touring comedian Mandee McKelvey headlines a fun lineup at the Lamplighter Lounge $10. Sunday, Nov. 14, 7:30-9:30 p.m. LAMPLIGHTER LOUNGE

Top Comic

Wednesday, Nov. 17, 7 p.m. B-SIDE

Raleigh CommUNITY Walk Against Gun Violence

Take steps in reducing gun violence. Bring your “why” and engage with the community resources who will be in attendance. Saturday, Nov. 13, 10 a.m. 3970 VOLTAIRE AVE

South Memphis Senior Walking Club

Calling all seniors for #SeniorEdition walking club. Earn a free Fitbit after one month of walking. Tuesday, Nov. 16, 8-9 a.m. CORNER OF MISSISSIPPI AND

COM M U N ITY

GAITHER

Community Garden Day in Orange Mound

E X P O/ S A LE S

Volunteer for a great community service opportunity, meet other people, learn from expert gardeners, and reap the harvest from your labor. Sunday, Nov. 14, 9-11 a.m. ORANGE MOUND COMMUNITY GARDEN

Herbal Work Studies: Seed Cleaning

Weeding, grooming, thinning, planting, or whatever else needs doing in the Herb Garden or Iris Garden. As you work, you will learn about the topics listed. Saturday, Nov. 13, 8:3011:30 a.m.

Crafts & Drafts Holiday Market

A unique shopping experience that showcases a curated group of independent local artists, makers, and crafters. Guests will enjoy local shopping, creative family activities, and tasty local brews. Thursday, Nov. 11, 10 a.m. CROSSTOWN CONCOURSE

Gifts of Green

Memphis Botanic Garden will once again host its seasonal pop-up shop. Through Dec. 30. MEMPHIS BOTANIC GARDEN

MEMPHIS BOTANIC GARDEN

Helen Brett Mid-South Jewelry & Accessories Fair

With more than 200 booths of accessories and jewelry to browse, buyers from throughout the Memphis area can experience a holiday bargain bonanza at wholesale prices. Friday, Nov. 12, 10 a.m. AGRICENTER INTERNATIONAL, SHOWPLACE ARENA

from “Black Artists in America.” Saturday, Nov. 13, 10 a.m.

of the passing of Abdu’l Baha. Saturday, Nov. 13, 4-6 p.m.

THE DIXON GALLERY & GARDENS

BENJAMIN L. HOOKS CENTRAL LIBRARY

Wacky Hollow

Features a life-sized board game for the whole family. Children are guided through the forest maze to uncover the identity of a mysterious prankster. Through Nov. 28. THE CHILDREN’S MUSEUM OF MEMPHIS

FA M I LY

FI LM

DramaDay: Fairy Tale Fun

Crosstown Arthouse presents Funeral Parade of Roses

Explore the environments and character decisions of popular fairytales like “Little Red Riding hood” and “The Three Little Pigs” in this interactive theatre workshop. Ages 2.5-6 (or with sibling). $35. Saturday, Nov. 13, 10 a.m.-noon. TRANSFORMAMA STUDIO

Flower Tots

Story-time for pre-K and kindergarten-aged children (with an adult) followed by a motion activity or show and tell. Thursday, Nov. 11, 10-11 a.m. MEMPHIS BOTANIC GARDEN

Movers and Shakers Family Day

Visit the Dixon to choose your own adventure and learn more about some of the trailblazers

A deep dive into gay subculture in late 1960s Tokyo. $5. Thursday, Nov. 11, 7:30-9:30 p.m. CROSSTOWN ARTS AT THE CONCOURSE

EXPLORE: MoSH Film Festival

Explore wildlife, nature, outer space, and more in 3D and 2D. Enjoy a talk before each movie from professionals related to each film. Saturday, Nov. 13, 11 a.m.-4 p.m. MUSEUM OF SCIENCE & HISTORY

“Race Amity – Past/ Present/Future”

Video “Roots of The Race Amity Movement” followed by a panel discussion in commemoration of the centenary

Rocky Horror Picture Show

See the spectacle of Memphis Rocky Horror and come watch “Absent Friends” bring you a reason to love this cult classic. You can throw stuff! Prop bags are available for $5 each. $10. Friday, Nov. 12, 11:30 p.m. THE EVERGREEN THEATRE

FO O D A N D D R I N K

Pop Up for Pups

Benefiting New Beginnings Animal Rescue. Enjoy Chef Kunal’s menu of Indian-inspired takes on classic bar food like pizza and burritos. Vegan and vegetarian options available. $15. Sunday, Nov. 14, 4-8 p.m. THE COVE

Whiskey Warmer

Features 40 labels of whiskey, bourbon, and Scotch plus local food trucks, a cigar lounge and bluegrass music benefiting Volunteer Memphis. 21+. $39. Friday, Nov. 12, 6-9 p.m. OVERTON SQUARE

H EA LT H A N D F IT N ES S

Zumba in the Edge with David Quarles

Shake up your Saturday with a free Zumba class led by David Quarles. The first 30 registrants will receive an Edge District giveaway at the event. Space is limited and registration is required. Free. Saturday, Nov. 13, 1-2 p.m. EDGE MOTOR MUSEUM

LECT U R E

University of Memphis MOCH Presents: “Backlash: What Is at Stake in the Attacks on Gender and Academic Freedom?”

A roundtable on the recent backlash against critical race theory, feminism, and the humanities at large. Free. Thursday, Nov. 11, 6 p.m. MEMPHIS.EDU

P E R FO R M I N G ARTS

Fall-Back Fall Dance Series

Get old-school in the park. Free. Saturday, Nov. 13, 5-6 p.m. FOURTH BLUFF PARK

Bene�iting Le Bonheur Children’s Hospital

Nov. 20 - Dec. 31

November 11-17, 2021

WWW.MOSHMEMPHIS.COM

22

Holiday Movies & Planetarium Shows Get your photo made with Santa.


CALENDAR: NOVEMBER 11 - 17

GERMANTOWN PERFORMING ARTS CENTER

The Magic Basement by Jeffrey Day

This is not just a magic show. This is where the limited seating audience is so close to the stage, they can not only touch the magic, the magic will happen in their own hands. $40. Friday, Nov. 12, 7-9 p.m. WOODRUFF-FONTAINE HOUSE MUSEUM

S P EC IAL EVE N TS

Stargazing

Get a closer look at the night skies with Memphis Astronomical Society (MAS). Telescopes provided to help view constellations, planets, and star clusters. Saturday, Nov. 13. SHELBY FARMS PARK

The Salvation Army Red Kettle Kickoff Concert

You’re invited to the 2021 Red Kettle Kickoff free Christmas concert. Sunday, Nov. 14, 4-5 p.m. SECOND PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH

Memphis Grizzlies vs. Phoenix Suns Friday, Nov. 12, 7 p.m.

Greely Myatt’s Hero consists of broom handles, discarded signage, neon lights, and metal scraps.

FEDEXFORUM

North Carolina Central at Memphis Tigers Mens Basketball

Shockheaded Peter

Presented by New Moon Theatre, this musical is an adaptation of “Der Struwwelpeter” by Heinrich Hoffman, an 1845 German children’s book about the disastrous consequences of misbehavior. $25. Friday, Nov. 12-Nov. 14, 2 p.m. THEATREWORKS

Saturday, Nov. 13, 3 p.m. FEDEXFORUM

TO U R S

Tree Tour of Elmwood

TH EATE R

Some of the trees that live in Elmwood are older than the cemetery itself. They lived through the changes taking place around them, silently, majestically, for sometimes over 300 years. $20. Saturday, Nov. 13, noon.

Ada and the Engine

Brings to the stage historical figures Ada Byron Lovelace, her parents Lord Byron and Annabella Byron, her husband Lord Lovelace, and the esteemed inventor Charles Babbage. $20, $40. Thursday, Nov. 11-Nov. 13, 7:30 p.m.

ELMWOOD CEMETERY

Twilight Tour

TENNESSEE SHAKESPEARE COMPANY

As the sun sets on Adams Avenue, slip into a bygone era while strolling the mansion’s darkened halls. $50. Wednesday, Nov. 17, 7-9 p.m.

Disney’s The Lion King

Giraffes strut. Birds swoop. Gazelles leap. The entire Serengeti comes to life as never before. And as the music soars, Pride Rock slowly emerges from the mist. $34, $154. Thursday, Nov. 11-Nov. 28

WOODRUFF-FONTAINE HOUSE MUSEUM

THE ORPHEUM

Little Shop of Horrors

When a man-eating plant lands in your flower shop, what do you do? Thursday, Nov. 11-Nov. 22. PLAYHOUSE ON THE SQUARE

SIT DOWN A GAMBLER

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m e m p h i s f l y e r. c o m

The Memphis Wind Symphony and its 65 members serve greater Memphis performing music of all genres and styles. Thursday, Nov. 11, 6:30 p.m.

S P O R TS

ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT

Memphis Wind Symphony: A Veterans Day Tribute

23


ARTS By Abigail Morici

Painfully Pretty Nikii Richey’s “A Come Apart” explores trauma and the need for beauty despite it.

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Y

ou look like somebody That intuition led Richey to creating the threw you away,” artist works in her latest show, “A Come Apart.” Nikii Richey’s mother “That’s something else my mother would said to her in passing say: ‘I’m just having a come apart,’” she says. when she was young. “It’s a mental state phrase — when things “I’ve never forgotten that,” Richey says. get to be a little too much, and you have to “She probably didn’t even know she ever ‘take to the bed.’” said that and probably would have denied In this show, Richey plays with the comit if I ever brought it up, but the way she fort of old linens in her sculptures, but then reacted to me was always centered around she pokes and bends wires through them my looks and how I looked.” and sprays those wires with vinegar to rust Richey’s relationship with her mother them from the inside out. “If my intuition was tense, to say the least. “She had a lot of tells me to take out a blow torch and burn her own struggles,” Richey says. “She was it,” she says, “that’s what I do, and I see what an alcoholic, smoked her whole life, probhappens after that. Maybe I need to burn it, ably undiagnosed bipolar.” So, when Richey so I can repair it.” And she might bleach the had the opportunity to attend college in fabric; she might wax it; she might dye it or South Carolina, she left her Mississippi add makeup or spray it with hair spray; she hometown and estranged herself from her might stretch it out and pull it back with mom. ribbon. But, in the last five years of her mother’s “All those treatments represent what life, Richey assumed the role women do to their bodies,” of caretaker and brought she says. “I like to play with her mom to Memphis, her the difference between the home for the past 20 or so way that trauma leaves scars years. During that time, behind and how we still Richey says, “we were able try to be pretty through all to reconcile, and I was able of life’s trauma instead of to understand where all just being. … I think about of that came from. It was women and their bodies passed down from her and their stresses a lot, so mother.” that definitely plays into my Richey’s mother — Retta work [outside the studio], — grew up in the ’50s and too.” ’60s as a bona fide beauty In 2015, Richey coqueen. “I was reading some founded Sister Supply, letters that her mother which supplies pads and wrote to her in college,” tampons to menstruators Richey says, “and it was all in need, and currently, she about the next beauty conis designing the interiors of PHOTO: COURTESY NIKII RICHEY test and what dress she was Hub Hotel, a new transiButtercup (Penneys) going to wear and what they tional housing space for were going to do with her women, which she says will hair, and it was never how are you, how are include a salon to provide “luxury, comfort, your classes.” That focus on beauty never and safety for these women.” But, she left Retta. She was married to her second ponders, “What’re the social implications of husband for a year, Richey says, and he needing to have your hair and nails done to never saw her without makeup on. feel good about yourself as a woman, even Retta passed away a little over two years after all they’ve been through?” ago, and a year later, Richey knew that “That’s the basis of this show — this she had to make something, to move her forced societal and motherly demand for hands. “I just thought to myself, I’m gonna beauty and display,” she adds. “And every make this big braid,” she says. “I was thinksingle piece in this show I can relate back to ing about my mother and her fixing my my mother.” “A Come Apart” is on display at the hair and pulling it through a cap and frostMedicine Factory through November 28th, ing it when I was 7 years old. I just quieted Mondays, Wednesdays, and Fridays, 9 a.m.my mind and let my emotions take control 2 p.m. Call 484-6154 for entry. of my hands. I followed my intuition.”


FOOD By Michael Donahue

A

nna Netri thanks keto, the pandemic, and her mother for Bibby’s Bakes. Netri and her mother, Libby “Bibby” Brown, are partners in the business, which offers more than 50 glutenfree, sugarless baked items, which they sell online at bibbysbakes.com and at the Memphis Kitchen Co-Op at 7946 Fischer Steel Road in Cordova. They introduced their frozen pizzas Wednesday, November 10th. “The crust is my invention,” Netri says. “We make cheddar biscuits and turn that into a biscuit bread. It’s really delicious and airy and crunchy, and we pile it high with toppings.” In 15 minutes, “you’re eating something that is mind-blowing.”

PHOTO: MICHAEL DONAHUE

Libby Brown and Anna Netri Netri isn’t a fan of “healthy” food. “I don’t want it to taste healthy. When you put something from us in your mouth, it tastes like you’re eating junk. And it should.” She didn’t cook much before the pandemic, Netri says. “I’d never call myself a cook. I always understood how flavors worked together.” Netri and Brown got on the high-fat, low-carb, gluten-free ketogenic “keto” diet before the pandemic. Before that, she says, “I would binge when nobody was looking and often it would be on crap like chips and bread. Keto was a good way of eating because it eliminated a lot of those trigger foods.” Her mother found gluten-free recipes on the internet. “She made a lot of different kinds of breads and biscuits. They were delicious. And they were made with almonds.” Netri was a life coach for years until the pandemic. “I was doing some re-evaluation of my life before I decided to start it up again. And I just kind of let it go with no

real plans of what to do.” She thought about her mother’s biscuits. “So, last year, I just looked at her one day and said, ‘I wonder if we could sell these biscuits?’ People on these diets don’t have anything like this and don’t know where to get them.” And, she adds, “Most gluten-free things taste like dirt.” Netri, who has “the entrepreneurial brain,” wondered what else they could make. “I take the different recipes of things she did and develop them further to make our own unique recipes. Our biscuits went through tweaks for eight months before they finally got to be our signature biscuits.” They began selling the biscuits on Nextdoor. “Within 10 minutes we had two people who wanted some of these biscuits.” The business “took off.” They added cookies and other desserts, including little cakes with whipped cream in the middle and covered with ganache. They are constantly coming up with more items. “We do stuff for breakfast. We sell sausage and biscuits, sausage and egg and cheese biscuits, which are so good. We’ve got tons of desserts, muffins, cookies. And then we do casseroles and dinners. We do a keto shepherd’s pie that’s amazing, a meatloaf, and one of the people’s favorites — my signature recipe —a Mexican chicken and rice fajita casserole.” They also make full-size cakes and a French silk pie, which Netri describes as “melt in your mouth.” Their cauliflower mashed potatoes would be “perfect for a Thanksgiving meal. It tastes just like mashed potatoes.” Bibby’s Bakes was “just a cottage bakery” until Netri and Brown moved into a commercial kitchen, Memphis Kitchen Co-Op. In addition to selling at the Memphis Kitchen Co-Op and online, Netri says. “In just a few weeks, we’re going to be in Crossroads Vendor Market in Olive Branch.” But they don’t want to get too big, Netri says. “It’s just the two of us. We do all the work. And we just got into this thing for a little extra money.” Working at Bibby’s Bakes does have its benefits, Netri says. “I eat way too much of our food. Nobody should eat as much almond flour as I do. But I still haven’t had sugar in over three years. I don’t miss it because my life is filled with sweet treats.”

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ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT

Bibby’s Bakes

SO MUCH.

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with MICHAEL DONAHUE


November 11-17, 2021

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FILM By Chris McCoy

Twee AF The French Dispatch is Wes Anderson’s ode to journalism.

“Revisions to a Manifesto” stars Léa Seydoux, Frances McDormand, and Timothée Chalamet (above, l-r); Jeffrey Wright (left) plays writer Roebuck Wright. Frances McDormand plays journalist Lucinda Krementz who abandons neutrality by having an affair with student revolutionary leader Zeffirelli (Timothée Chalamet) of the 1968 “chessboard revolution.” Due to the students’ lack of demands — beyond unlimited access to the girls’ dorm — Krementz drafts the revolutionary manifesto herself. “The Private Dining Room of the Police Commissioner” is the least coherent episode, but it features a killer James Baldwin imitation by Jeffery Wright as Roebuck, a writer whose assignment to do a profile on chef/gendarme Lt. Nescaffier (Stephen Park) spirals off into a tale of kidnapping and murder, with very little actual food content. “Twee” implies closed off, hermetically sealed, and precious. The French Dispatch is anything but claustrophobic, even in the scenes set in an actual prison. This is Anderson’s most expansive and generous work, teeming with life in all directions. Heavy hitters like Willem continued on page 28

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m e m p h i s f l y e r. c o m

Anderson’s latest film is The French Dispatch. I’m going to go ahead and cop to being biased toward this one because it’s about magazine writers, and that’s what I am. (Read me in the pages of Memphis magazine!) Befitting the eclecticism that is the magazine form’s bread and butter, it’s an anthology movie — an exceedingly rare bird these days. It begins with the death of publisher Arthur Howitzer Jr. (a magisterial Bill Murray), whose will specified that his magazine, described in the original title of the film The French Dispatch of the Liberty, Kansas Evening Sun (Okay, that’s kind of twee), would shutter after one final issue, which re-runs the best stories from its long history. First, we get Owen Wilson narrating a cycling tour of the fictional French city of Ennui, which lies on the Blasé river, because of course it does. Then, Tilda Swinton delivers an art history lecture on the origin of the French Splatter-School Action Group. The wild painters were inspired by Moses Rosenthaler (a brilliant Benicio Del Toro), an insane, violent felon who takes up painting to pass the time during his 30-year prison sentence. His first masterpiece, a nude portrait of Simone (Léa Seydoux), a prison guard who becomes his lover and muse, is discovered by Julian Cadazio (Adrien Brody), an art dealer imprisoned for tax evasion. In “Revisions to a Manifesto”

ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT

M

ention director Wes Anderson, and eventually someone will say he’s “twee.” What does that mean, exactly? “Affectedly or excessively dainty, delicate, cute, or quaint,” says Merriam-Webster. Anderson’s films, which began in 1996 with Bottle Rocket, were retroactively lumped into a poptimist mini-movement that arguably began with a 2005 Pitchfork article titled “Twee As Fuck.” But I’ve never thought of Anderson as particularly twee in the way, say, Shirley Temple was twee. Yes, he’s meticulous in his visuals, and childhood has been a recurring subject for him. You can tell he’s someone who has cultivated what the Buddhists call “the beginner’s mind,” staying in touch with the awe of youth most people lose as they grow older. But there has always been a darkness underneath the curated surface of his films. The Royal Tenenbaums is about a family trying to deal with the aftermath of growing up with an abusive drunk father. The Life Aquatic with Steve Zissou is about failing to deal with failure. At the end of The Grand Budapest Hotel, the hero M. Gustave is summarily executed by Nazis, and the narrator, Zero’s wife, and child die in a flu epidemic. Moonrise Kingdom is … okay, I’ll give you Moonrise Kingdom. But it’s also a fan favorite, and one of the director’s biggest financial successes.

27


FILM By Chris McCoy continued from page 27 featuring

JENNA BUSH HAGER & BARBARA PIERCE BUSH Join us for lunch and an inspiring conversation with sisters, former First Children, best-selling authors & health equity advocates Jenna Bush Hager Award-winning daytime TV host and correspondent, bestselling author, and women’s and children’s health and rights advocate

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Dafoe, Griffin Dunne, Christoph Waltz, Elisabeth Moss, and the unexpectedly dynamic duo of Henry Winkler and Bob Balaban appear for only seconds at a time. The dizzying array of faces flashing across the screen led me to count the acting credits on IMDB. I gave up at 300. While there are some great shots of the actual French countryside, most of the action takes place on soundstages. Nobody does set design like Anderson, and all kinds of wonders are on display, from tiny dioramas

to livable multi-story cross sections. The French Dispatch is a love letter to the golden age of magazine journalism, and it made me think I was born in the wrong era. But the underlying theme is revolution in all its forms, from the students manning the barricades to new artistic movements springing from a prison riot. Maybe the critics are right, and all this stylized attention to detail designed for aesthetic shock and awe really is “twee,” but if so, it’s twee AF. The French Dispatch Now playing Multiple locations

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T H E L A S T W O R D B y Pa t r i c i a L o c k h a r t

A Flocking Good Time

1 ear-hustling (v.): listening and being nosy to every conversation around you. 2 un-share (v.): the intention of sharing with someone, but deciding against it. 3 happy plate (adj.): a plate that is happy because all the food has been consumed off of it. 4 soul-watering (adj.): something that is good to all your senses and your soul! Patricia Lockhart is a native Memphian who loves to read, write, cook, and eat. Her days are filled with laughter with her four kids and charming husband. By day, she’s a school librarian and a writer, but by night … she’s alseep. @realworkwife @memphisismyboyfriend

THE LAST WORD

Have you ever been to a restaurant and were just sitting there minding your own business? No? Well, me neither! I stay ear-hustling1 to everyone around me. One night, a friend and I were celebrating everything, and at the same time absolutely nothing, at the Hen House Wine Bar on S. Mendenhall. Although we made reservations, we found the bar to be much more inviting. I promise this had nothing to do with the barmen Matt and Patrick, but … if you know, you know. The way they shake the cocktails is mesmerizing. I decided to start the night off with the cocktail, Hound Dog Unleashed. It is made with Blue Note Bourbon whiskey, which is crafted right here in Memphis. When you start a night with anything made by Memphis, you know you have to sip and savor. And that’s exactly what I did. I nursed this cocktail for most of the night. Trying to chug it would have left me thinking my lemon-pepper-steppers were blue suede shoes walking on the cobblestones Downtown. My friend started her night off with a gorgeous glass of red wine. And if you’re into wine, this is the place to be. (Duh?! It has “Wine Bar” in the name.) They even offer wine flights! The next time I go, which will be soon, I’m going to get one of those to un-share2. For our appetizer, we both decided to go with the Brussels sprouts. You know, we gotta get our greens in because veggies are important. These greens were fried on Mount Olympus by the personal head chef of Zeus and drizzled with sweet hot honey nectar of the forbidden fruit. (Lifts hands in praise!) These are the best Brussels sprouts I have PHOTOS: PATRICIA LOCKHART, BETSY SPRING ever had. I don’t know how something can be crispy and succulent at the same time, but the chef did that! We also What started out as a date with Memphis ended in a had the Brie with poached pears, honey, and sourdough bread. Needless to say, we sent back a happy plate3. Yum! salacious affair with Brussels sprouts. Because we weren’t sure if we were in love with the sprouts or if it was just an infatuation, we thought it would be best to try them again. Trust me, nothing is worse than falling head over heels for something only to realize that the love was fleeting and circumstantial. But alas, they did not disappoint. It is safe to say that I will begin a mildly unhealthy situation-ship, or obsession, with Hen House’s Brussels sprouts. Via ear-hustling, I discovered that the ladies next to us ordered the poutine. It’s a bowl of fries, topped with braised beef and cheese curds in a red wine and mushroom gravy. In my attempt not to eye-hustle as well as ear-hustle, I just stared out of my peripheral. These ladies were eating this dish with a gusto and audible moaning. Yes, audible moaning. So you know this was good, good! When our food arrived, I noticed the people at the table behind me to the left do the look, point, and whisper. I said to myself, “Yeah, I know you want this. But it’s mine, allllllll mine.” I ordered the local beef cut with puréed cauliflower. Bless the whole cow who sacrificed themselves so I could eat such a divine piece of meat. The meat was so tender and flavorful. I had inner battles whether to eat the meat by itself or use it to sop up some of the puréed cauliflower. Which was equally delicious and soul-watering4. I wish I could give you more information about the fried chicken sandwich my friend ordered, but I was so caught up in my own heavenly experience, I couldn’t ear-hustle properly. After a great meal, my friend and I retired to our cars to witness a truly hilarious end to our date with Memphis. Instead of reversing out of their parking spot, some of our fellow diners decided to drive forward. Over the shrubbery, over the sidewalk, and straight onto Mendenhall. But they didn’t drive away. Instead they circled back to the very same parking lot that they took an illegal exit from. Gotta love Memphis, mane!

m e m p h i s f l y e r. c o m

Memphis is My Boyfriend: Episode 1: Of Brussels sprouts, Blue Note Bourbon, and ignoring the rules of the road.

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