Page 1

The Fairgrounds Deal P6 • Luttrell-Shafer Lawsuit Battle P10 Griz Ownership Showdown P14 • Thor: Ragnarok P34

11.09.17 1498TH ISSUE

FREE Tubby Smith

LARRY KUZNIEWSKI

Tubby Time! Take Two. The Tigers’ coach takes on a fresh season with lots of new faces — and lots of question marks.


November 9-15, 2017

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Have we ever lived through an era when more lies were being foisted on the American public by their own government than now? Sure, we had Watergate, and the Vietnam years were filled with lies from several administrations. And, sure, governments have always covered up things they didn’t want the public to know. But I don’t believe there’s ever been a time in our history like what’s happening now, where we are told bold-faced, easily disprovable prevarications by our own president and his enablers on a daily basis. Trump lies so brazenly and so frequently that The New York Times, the Washington Post, CNN, Politico, and several other media organizations have set up webpages to track them. Trump’s tweets are in a class by themselves, filled with falsehoods, exaggerations, bluster, and (increasingly) transparent fear, as Robert Mueller’s Russian investigation begins to out the collaborators in his administration. But it goes beyond the president. Way beyond. Trump, in fact, has created a thriving growth industry of prevaricators who are paid to reiterate and/or explain his many falsehoods and misstatements. It began in the first week of his presidency, when the president sent out press secretary Sean Spicer, who proclaimed that Trump’s Inaugural crowd was the “largest audience to ever witness an inauguration, period.” It wasn’t, of course, not even close, but Spicer persisted, even berating reporters who dared point out the obvious evidence to the contrary. “Who you gonna believe,” Spicer seemed to be saying, “the facts or President Trump?” That moment set the tone for Trump’s entire presidency, thus far. In the ensuing weeks, Spicer’s daily press briefings became a sideshow, as the beleagured spokesman attempted to spin his boss’ misinformed tweets and daily blather into some semblance of reality. He eventually became a running joke on Saturday Night Live. But Spicer was only the first of many to sell his soul — or, at least, his Kellyanne integrity — for Donald Trump. Since Conway then, the list has become a lengthy one, and is growing each week, as the Russian plotlines unfold. Sarah Huckabee Sanders, who took over Spicer’s role as chief presidential explainer and apologist, is a much better liar. Not that she’s more believable; she’s just more comfortable at spewing bullshit with conviction and attitude. Spicer at least tried to be likeable. The truth is, anyone in this administration who wants to keep their job has to be willing to lie for their boss. For example, at Trump’s direction, Vice President Mike Pence spent tax-payer money to fly across country to a football game just so he could walk out during the national anthem. Pence’s soul (such as it is) has long been sold. And let’s not forget Kellyanne Conway, perhaps the most enthusiastic liar ever to appear on the national stage. Or Attorney General Jeff Sessions, who’s lied to Congress twice to protect his boss (and his own butt). And there’s Trump’s chief of staff, General John Kelly — once perceived as a beacon of truth and integrity in this administration — who’s now been outed as someone willing to make up lies for his boss, and defend them, even after they’ve been disproven. It’s gotten to the point where it’s difficult to name someone in this adminstration who hasn’t been caught in a lie. Go ahead, see if you can think of someone. Tom Price? Betsy DeVos? Steve Mnuchin? Scott Pruitt? Ryan N E WS & O P I N I O N Zinke? Wilbur Ross? All cabinet THE FLY-BY - 4 NY TIMES CROSSWORD - 5 members who’ve been outed as liars. POLITICS - 8 Steve Bannon? Jared Kushner? Mike EDITORIAL - 10 Flynn? The list is seemingly endless. VIEWPOINT - 11 This is the biggest crowd of liars ever COVER - “TUBBY TIME! assembled in any single administration. TAKE TWO.” And that’s not counting media sycophants BY FRANK MURTAUGH - 12 like Sean Hannity — and Fox News, which SPORTS - 14 has morphed into some sort of crazed WE RECOMMEND - 16 branch of state media. MUSIC - 18 AFTER DARK - 22 It’s been said that the truth will CALENDAR OF EVENTS - 24 out. And I have enough faith in the BOOKS - 30 American system to think that it will THEATER - 31 eventually, even with this bunch. But if SPIRITS - 33 I said I was confident it would happen FILM - 34 soon, I’d be lying. C L AS S I F I E D S - 36 Bruce VanWyngarden LAST WORD - 39 brucev@memphisflyer.com

CONTENTS

BRUCE VANWYNGARDEN Editor SUSAN ELLIS Managing Editor JACKSON BAKER, MICHAEL FINGER Senior Editors TOBY SELLS Associate Editor CHRIS MCCOY Film and TV Editor ALEX GREENE Music Editor CHRIS DAVIS, MICHAEL DONAHUE MAYA SMITH, JOSHUA CANNON Staff Writers JESSE DAVIS Copy Editor JULIE RAY Calendar Editor

m e m p h i s f l y e r. c o m

OUR 1498TH ISSUE 11.09.17

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THE

f

fly-by

ly on the wall

E Z WEAVES After years of chasing recognition, Memphis officially became a World Class City ™ last week when a large, purple vending machine for hair weaves arrived at Wolfchase Galleria. The Diamond Dynasty weave machine offers a variety of fancy hair options ranging in length and style and priced from $55-$80. TV newscasters said the vending machine will be a convenience for people who may need to change their look on the go. Like spies, maybe?

November 9-15, 2017

WE’R E #2... In a story about the city’s declining murder rate, the Associated Press ran with the headline, “Killings Down in Tennessee’s Second Most Populous City.” It seems unnecessarily baroque and maybe a little shady even.

VE R BATI M “Late at night and into the early morning hours, customers engage in so-called ‘money wars.’ The stacks of bills Dennis is bundling will be sold out of a duffel bag at the edge of the stage, minus 10 percent. In other words, $900 singles will cost you $1,000. In order to show off who has the most money to burn, customers will shower the girls with bills, competing with each other to make it rain money the hardest.” — Excerpted from “Money Wars at a Memphis Strip Club,” Forbes.

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By Chris Davis. Email him at davis@memphisflyer.com.

{

Questions, Answers + Attitude Edited by Toby Sells

W E E K T H AT W A S By Flyer staff

“Dreamers,” Guns, and “Riverline” No Coliseum use in new Fairgrounds plan, guns okay for Capitol, and a new downtown trail. P R OTECTI N G “D R EAM E R S” Presidents at four of Memphis’ higher education institutions signed a letter addressed to Tennessee members of Congress asking their support of legislation protecting Dreamers. After President Donald Trump’s administration rescinded the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals (DACA) program in September, nearly 800,000 would-be DACA recipients were left in uncertainty. They faced the possibility of losing educational and employment opportunities, as well as deportation. A new letter demanding that legislators support a “clean version” of the 2017 bipartisan Dream Act will soon be signed by Dr. Marjorie Hass of Rhodes College, Dr. Jay Earheart-Brown of the Memphis Theological Seminary, Dr. John Smarrelli of Christian Brothers University (CBU), and Dr. Tracy Hall of Southwest Tennessee Community College. Z O O LOT D E S I G N E D City officials dropped preliminary design plans late last week for an expanded Memphis Zoo parking lot, another step toward ending parking on Overton Park’s Greensward. Powers Hill Design worked up three different designs. All of them include 415 more parking spaces for the zoo, a mandate from the Memphis City Council. G U N N I N G FO R NAS HVI LLE Next time you’re visiting lawmakers in Nashville, bring your gun. Leading state lawmakers said last week that it’s now totally okay for gun-carry permit holders to bring guns with them in the new legislative offices in Nashville. In a joint statement, Lieut. Gov. Randy McNally and House Speaker Beth Harwell said Tennessee carry permit holders “are among the most law-abiding demographics in our state.” Still, to carry in the offices, gun carriers’ permits will go through a “thorough screening process.” John Harris, executive director of the Tennessee Firearms Association, said folks, including legislators, have long carried guns in and around Capitol Hill, but the Tennessee Highway Patrol looked the other way. He also wondered — with Republicans running the place — why

this all took so long. H I STO R I C C R E D IT A X E D The federal historic tax credit was axed in the new tax plan released last week by House Republicans, and Memphis Heritage hopes to save the tax credit like it has saved so many old buildings in Shelby County. In an email last week, Memphis Heritage said the tax credit has been used for 173 renovation projects in Tennessee, including 74 in Shelby County. MAS S ETS SAVE R EC O R D Memphis Animal Services achieved their highest save rate in October, saving a little over 89 percent of all pets last month, shelter officials said last week. The number is up more than 11 percent from last October. Adoptions were up 21 percent over October 2016. The shelter maintained a save rate of over 80 percent for the last 12 months. MAS’ goal is to save 90 percent of all pets each month and ultimately end animal euthanasia. “R IVE R LI N E” R EVEALE D Start seeing yellow signs. Here comes the Riverline. The Memphis riverfront may soon be connected in a new way with the Riverline, a new downtown trail system. City leaders are working toward the final approval of a series of signs, murals, markers, and more that will stitch together the trails and sidewalks from Mud Island to Big River Crossing. Find fuller versions of these stories and even more fresh, local news at the News Blog on memphisflyer.com.


For Release Saturday, May 6, 2017

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Sporting Grounds {

CITY REPORTER By Maya Smith

Youth sports center central to new plan for the Mid-South Fairgrounds.

November 9-15, 2017

To a packed room at the Kroc Center Monday, city officials outlined their plans to redevelop the 178-acre Mid-South Fairgrounds into a youth sports destination with an indoor sports complex, a hotel, retail, and other community spaces. Half of the $160-million project is an $80-million youth sports complex to be built on the southwest area of the Fairgrounds on the former Libertyland site. The plan also includes building retail spaces and a hotel space with a 500-car garage. The sports complex would include the multi-sport facility, a rehabbed Pipkin Building, a new and relocated trackand-football field, outdoor basketball and volleyball courts, walking trails, a playground, and community gathering spaces. Under the plan, the Liberty Bowl would also get $20 million worth of improvements. Tobey Park is expected to get about $8 million in upgrades, including renovated baseball fields and parking, a new bike safety school, and a competitionlevel BMX track. The city also plans to extend the Greenline from Flickr Street and Tobey Park, through the Fairgrounds and into Cooper-Young. Also, $2 million would be spent on preserving the historic Melrose High School for an adaptive re-use, like a museum. Infrastructure on Lamar and Airways would

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A concept image of a new Fairgrounds.

be improved to spur private investment in the area. Paul Young, director of the city’s Housing and Community Development (HCD) division, said his agency wants to ensure that the opportunity is maximized and that all stakeholders are appeased. However, some at Monday’s meeting weren’t sure the city needed a sports complex and were unclear about the benefits the project would bring to surrounding neighborhoods. They also asked about how much access the members of the surrounding neighborhoods would have to the complex. As a part of the project, the city would have to adhere to

a Community Benefits Agreement, a legal document outlining the specific benefits the community will receive as a result of the project. Young said because most of funding for the re-development would come from a Tourism Development Zone (TDZ), the project has to benefit tourists. Pending Memphis City Council and state approval, sales taxes generated in the zone would fund the project. The TDZ would extend to Cooper-Young, Crosstown, and Broad Avenue. When city officials touched on plans announced last week to mothball the MidSouth Coliseum, boos and shouts erupted in the room. The plan would not demolish it or open it immediately. Instead, the city would invest $500,000 to preserve it in its current state by repairing the roof and controlling illegal entry. Some said that they felt the Coliseum is a significant landmark in the city with a rich musical and cultural history and should have a role in the plans. “There’s a lot of passion that doesn’t line up with the numbers,” Young told the crowd. Young and others are slated to deliver the final plan to the council early next year and then to the Tennessee Building Commission after that. If all goes according to plan, construction could begin in early 2019.

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POLITICS By Jackson Baker

Pols Jockey for Position in Key Legislative Races Much of the action has to do with filling the vacated seats of Norris and Harris. Here’s how some key races for the General Assembly are shaping up for 2018: The District 96 House seat of first-term Democrat Dwayne Thompson is being targeted by Patricia Possel, a de-annexation activist who will be  running against him as a Republican. The seat, which overlaps southeast Memphis and adjacent suburban areas and has a somewhat mixed demographic population, formerly was occupied by the GOP’s Steve McManus, who was upset in 2016 by a Thompson campaign that was well-organized locally and well-backed by the state Democratic Party. The adjacent District 97 state House seat, currently held by Republican Jim Coley, is also regarded as contestable by the Democrats, and Allan Creasy, a party activist and a bartender by trade has announced he will make a run at it.  There was speculation that Coley, who suffered a serious heart attack earlier this year, would not be seeking reelection, a circumstance that would open the seat for other GOP contestants, but the latest word is that Coley, regarded by fellow Republicans as a major asset on the House Judiciary Committee, has

made a dramatic recovery and may well be seeking to return to Nashville for another term. The District 29 seat is one of two state Senate seats that will be wide open for newcomers in 2018. The seat is being surrendered by Democrat Lee Harris, who is making a run for his party’s nomination for Shelby County mayor. A passel of ambitious Democrats are eyeing it seriously — state representatives Raumesh Akbari, Joe Towns, and G.A. Hardaway, as well as termlimited County Commissioner Justin Ford.  The collective appetite of so many state representatives for promotion could well result in the opening-up of multiple opportunities for new faces in the House. It is already common knowledge that, should Akbari take aim at the Senate seat, London Lamar, the current state Young Democrats president, will seek to win her vacated District 91 House seat. District 32 in the Senate is the equivalent prize on the Republican side. The seat, based in heavily Republican eastern Shelby County, is due to be vacated by state Senate Majority Leader Mark Norris, who was nominated for a federal judgeship by President Trump and, with his testimony in a Senate hearing last week, has begun his passage through various hoops to an inevitable confirmation.  The known Republican aspirants for the seat (none of whom will declare until he is safely confirmed) are Shelby

County Commission chair Heidi Shafer, former Deputy Commerce Commissioner and ex-Shelby County GOP chair Bill Giannini, and Representative Mark White. Norris, an able parliamentarian, had long meditated on a run for governor, but he is also an accomplished constitutional lawyer, and he found the lure of the judgeship hard to resist. In last week’s confirmation hearing before the U.S. Senate Judiciary Committee, Norris made a point of distancing his new vista from the practice of politics: “I know, having served as a legislator, as an advocate for constituents, and as an attorney, an advocate for clients, the importance that the court not be a public policy-making body,” he said. And the social conservative had no difficulty telling the senators that he regarded as settled law the Supreme Court’s 2015 ruling legalizing same-sex marriage. • The well-liked W.C. “Bubba” Pleasant, a firefighter and longtime Republican state representative from Bartlett, was scheduled to be honored on Thursday at Bartlett’s Cedar Hall at a meeting of the Northeast Shelby Republican Club that is expected to draw influential Republicans (and maybe even some Democrats and independents) from all over. Pleasant, who has been retired from politics for more than a decade, will receive the “American Citizenship for Freedom and Excellence Award.”

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November 9-15, 2017

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the-vest accounting of the county’s fund balance. Even after the budget of 2015 was finally signed, sealed, and delivered, the commission and administration clashed repeatedly over funding matters, with the commission wanting ever more information about and oversight over the process. In the ensuing struggle, the commission sought to hire an independent attorney to help monitor fiscal matters. In the end, former Commissioner Julian Bolton was allowed to come aboard as a kind of ad hoc “policy adviser” to the commission. He is now, as it happens, serving also as local counsel for Napoli Shkolnick, the firm with which Shafer executed her agreement on behalf of the county and one that, she says, is assisting the opioid-related legal efforts of numerous other governmental entities nationwide. Luttrell insists that the administration has been on course to develop its own timely legal strategy on behalf of Shelby County, has dutifully and fully kept the commission informed of its efforts, and that the current imbroglio can only create confusion and delay and impede a successful legal effort on the opioid issue. The disagreement will doubtless be resolved by mediation or judicial ruling, and the county charter, which was extensively revised in the recent past, may have to undergo further alterations by referendum or convention. At the moment, though, both the opioid crisis and the everworsening strains within county government are serious problems calling for some immediate solution, even if only a stopgap one.

C O M M E N TA R Y b y G r e g C r a v e n s

November 9-15, 2017

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with outgoing Mayor Mark Luttrell. That conflict has now entered an intense new phase, prompted by a disagreement between the warring entities over strategies for dealing with the ongoing opioid crisis. The current wrangle was precipitated last Thursday by commission chair Heidi Shafer’s independent action in signing on with a national law firm to prosecute a lawsuit against a variety of drug manufacturers, pharmacies, and physicians. Luttrell objected to what he saw as a usurpation of administrative authority under the county charter and — pending the outcome of a scheduled mid-week vote by the commission on a resolution of support for Shafer’s action — prepared legal action to abort it. Ostensibly, the dispute is over a choice of law firms to pursue remedies for damages resulting to Shelby County and its citizens from the ongoing opioid epidemic, as well as over the nature and scope of the recovery effort, and the timetable for prosecuting it. There are legitimate differences of opinion on these matters, and there is no denying the importance of the opioid crisis or its effect on Shelby County. The fundamental differences between the Luttrell administration and what would seem to be a majority of the 13-member commission are rooted in the aforementioned power struggle, one which has the potential to overshadow the longdistance future of local government. The basic conflict began during budget deliberations a couple of seasons back, when a majority of commission members chafed at what they saw as the county administration’s too-close-to-

Memphis • 61 South McLean • 901.725.4200


VIEWPOINT By Richard Cohen

Predatory Behavior Harvey Weinstein isn’t a “typical liberal”; he’s a typical beast. to associating with such a man. As we all know, besides wanting lower taxes, the two apparently had another thing in common. The Democrats clearly do not have Trump’s sang-froid. They rushed to either return Weinstein’s money — he has been a steady Democratic Party contributor — or donate the filthy lucre to charity. But why? Weinstein’s money was legitimately earned and, while it is not unconnected to the man himself, it is unconnected to what his accusers say he did — and it was accepted in good faith. The rush by Democrats to rid themselves of this supposedly tainted money is in itself an ex post facto confession of guilt by association and plays into the argument of conservatives that something is rotten about liberalism. After Representative Tim Murphy (R-Pa.), a vehement anti-abortion member of Congress, was revealed to have demanded that his mistress terminate a pregnancy, op-eds popped up informing us that Murphy was a typical conservative hypocrite. Some other conservatives were named, but of course we would not know the names of those who were ideologically consistent — maybe the vast majority.

Still, the urge to slander an entire class of people by using a single person is apparently so powerful it cannot be resisted. In Weinstein’s case, he has been used not only to accuse the press of inexcusable sloth but also to represent men in general, or maybe the man who lurks inside every man of power. Harvey Weinstein does not personify American liberalism any more than Bill O’Reilly personifies American conservatism. If anything, they personify the truism that sexual misbehavior is nonideological — as Republican as Warren Harding, who carried on an affair with Nan Britton in the White House, or as Democratic as Bill Clinton, who did the same with Monica Lewinsky. Weinstein is not a typical liberal nor a typical man. He’s a typical beast. Leave it at that. Richard Cohen writes for the Washington Post Writers Group.

m e m p h i s f l y e r. c o m

Harvey Weinstein does not personify American liberalism any more than Bill O’Reilly personifies American conservatism. If anything, they personify the truism that sexual misbehavior is non-ideological.

NEWS & OPINION

In 2004, I wrote a column about Bill O’Reilly’s alleged sexual harassment of Andrea Mackris, one of his producers. Her suit charged that O’Reilly pressured her to have telephone sex with him. Mackris had taped some of their conversations, including O’Reilly’s threat that he would destroy any woman who retaliated against him. A transcript of that call was conveniently available on the Internet. The consequence was hardly immediate: Thirteen years later, O’Reilly was fired. I exhume O’Reilly and, if I may, Fox News in general, as a rebuttal to the argument that something awfully pernicious and immoral about liberalism accounts for the Harvey Weinstein scandal. We are told over and over about how his alleged behavior was an open secret in show business but that the liberal press, in odious partnership with liberal politicians, looked the other way. Some of that is true — the bit about Weinstein’s behavior being an open secret. The man was known as a brute, possessed of a hair-trigger temper, shielded from the consequences of his behavior not by the press, but by a phalanx of lawyers and the purchased silence of his victims. Without an accuser — or witnesses — willing to talk on the record, the hands of journalists were tied. Ken Auletta, who profiled Weinstein in 2002 for The New Yorker, was consistently thwarted by an inability to get Weinstein’s alleged victims to say what had happened. But if Weinstein’s behavior was an open secret, then what about O’Reilly’s? He settled with Mackris for $9 million. Other women also agreed to settlements. In the end, he and 21st Century Fox paid out $32 million to settle sexual harassment suits. The predations of Roger Ailes, the late chairman of Fox News, cost the network even more — not to mention costing Ailes his job. The list of his victims was long and distinguished — Gretchen Carlson and Megyn Kelly, to name just two — and here, too, was yet another open secret. Ailes’ behavior was not only long-standing — TV producer Shelley Ross wrote that Ailes had made unwanted sexual advances to her back in 1981 — but it had been reported in a 2014 book by Gabriel Sherman, then of New York Magazine. The consequence? Ailes got raise after raise and, ultimately, a golden parachute worth about $40 million. Rupert Murdoch, the proprietor of Fox News and much else, never had to account for the frat house he was running on Manhattan’s Sixth Avenue, and Ailes reportedly prepped Donald Trump for last year’s presidential debates. Trump did not object

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COVER STORY BY FRANK MURTAUGH

Tubby Time! Take Two.

The Tigers’ coach takes on a fresh season with lots of new faces — and lots of question marks. This month marks the beginning of Tubby Smith’s 27th season as a college basketball coach. But only his second at the University of Memphis. His first on the Tiger bench ended with, at best, mixed reviews. The Tigers finished 19-13, good enough for fifth in the 11-team American Athletic Conference. (Smith will remind you this is precisely where the team was picked to finish.) But 19-win seasons that fall short of the NIT, let alone the NCAA tournament, are considered face-plants by much of the remaining Tiger fan base, a base that is dwindling if you count the empty seats at FedExForum on game nights. Smith’s second season in Memphis will be very different. The departure of three starters with eligibility remaining — most notably brothers Dedric and K.J. Lawson (along with their father, Keelon, who served as Smith’s director of player development) — forced a significant transformation of the Tiger roster. A pair of junior-college All-Americans — guard Kareem Brewton and forward Kyvon Davenport — will be among the new faces counted upon to help the Memphis program regain national traction. (In the preseason AAC coaches poll, the Tigers were picked to finish ninth in the now12-team league. Welcome aboard, Wichita State.) During a recent visit in his office on the U of M campus, Smith discussed his Tiger tenure to date, and what’s ahead for the embattled program.

Is it a relief for this season to arrive, for games to finally be played? Changes are inevitable in every organization, but in sports more than anywhere else. From junior high on up. People are moving; our society is mobile. It’s good to have signed the class we did, the No. 1 class in the American Athletic Conference. That was a big relief, knowing we have talented players coming in. You don’t want to lose anybody, but I can’t really pay attention to what people think or say. Everybody has an opinion. They don’t know the inner-workings. You may think you know about what’s going on at FedEx or with the Grizzlies. But you’re dealing with human beings, personalities. And then 17-to-20-year-olds, they’re being influenced by a lot of different stimuli. Social media. People don’t know how to interpret. Look at our president. And young people simply don’t know how to digest [it all]. Aside from years you’ve changed jobs, was it the most turbulent offseason of your career? It was the most changes, without any significant problems. It’s not like someone was arrested. We won 19 games. We weren’t expected to win the national championship. Every player’s stats improved, except one [in one area].

November 9-15, 2017

There was an exodus of players with eligibility remaining, most notably the Lawson brothers. With some months to reflect, how do you view this transition in the program? We signed three good freshmen last November, players I feel will contribute a lot: [guard] Jamal Johnson, [swingman] David Nickelberry, and [forward] Victor Enoh. I’ve been pleased with them. Then in the late signing period, we simply signed better athletes, the junior-college players.

Tubby Smith

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This is a bit personal, but are your feelings hurt when players choose to leave your program? No. Never. I’m disappointed, because I wonder what we did wrong. Did we not try and do everything we said we’d try and do? They might be disappointed with playing time or that we didn’t go to the postseason. We held them accountable for the most part. At your season-opening press conference (September 29th),

LARRY KUZNIEWSKI

Is the Tiger program better off without the Lawson family? I don’t want to comment about the Lawsons. It isn’t anyone in particular, because we had Markel [Crawford]. Think about Chad [Rykhoek]. We were going to try and get him a fifth year of eligibility. Sometimes you don’t know what the internal distractions are for players.


Have Jeremiah Martin and Jimario Rivers — the team’s returning starters — emerged as the kind of leaders this team will need? They’re trying. Jeremiah’s not one to be very vocal. But the best leaders lead by example. People would rather see a sermon than hear one. They want to see that your words and deeds match your responsibility. I’ve been impressed with Jeremiah, but I expect more, in all areas. Jeremiah’s in a unique position as a veteran leader but younger than some of those he’s expected to lead. People can lead at a young age. My son went to a [private academy], where 9th- and 10th-graders outranked him. I told him that’s the way it is. I’ve got younger people I have to answer to. Kareem Brewton was a leader for his team [Eastern Florida State College]. Malik Rhodes is a tough, hard-nosed guy. Mike Parks is big, physical. Karim Azab has been here a year now. These are mature men, and a lot bigger than we had last year.

“You gotta define roles. This is the biggest challenge for any coach, and [players] have to accept the roles.”

COURTESY OF U OF M ATHLETICS

Size and depth were ingredients your first Memphis team lacked. A glance at this year’s squad indicates it’s bigger. Will it be deeper too? Last year we tried to put in two or three guys at a time, and we’d see a dip. I was disappointed. The rotation was disrupted when Chad went down. The depth this year … I don’t know who will start. It’s a great problem. When I meet with guys, one-on-one, I tell them what they have to do to earn minutes. Not start; just earn minutes. That will evolve and can catapult you into being a starter. It’s going to be competitive. What style of basketball will this team play? You’ve said they’ll rebound well, play defense. Last year may have been the first team I’ve coached that got outrebounded for the season. That was a real problem. We got outrebounded by 21 against Connecticut last year … and won the game. This group includes guys who can rebound at every position. We’re bigger and taller at every position except point guard [where Martin returns]. Raynere Thornton [6’7” and 235 pounds] will play multiple positions. Kyvon Davenport is taller than Raynere and has perimeter skills. Players have evolved; they want to be versatile. They all want to be LeBron James! It’s our job to come up with an offense, a system that will utilize their skill sets. Mike Parks is a big man [6’9” and 270], but he can really shoot the ball.

You gotta define roles. This is the biggest challenge for any coach, and [players] have to accept the roles. A kid has to accept the truth. Memphis basketball fans have a short fuse at times. Were you taken aback by the criticism when last season turned sour over the final month? It didn’t bother me. We won 21 games at Minnesota and went to the NCAA tournament [in 2012-13] and they still question what you do. Are you able to shut off the noise when you go home? There’s nothing to shut off. It never enters. I’m too old for that. I’ve been around too long. It doesn’t help me to listen to it. The other day someone told me, “Someone wrote a nice article about you, Coach.” Oh, really? “Did you read it?” No. I’m reading scouting reports. I’m on the phone. I’ve got my own homework to do. I tell my players about this — distractions. People tell me I need to tweet more. I’ve done okay without tweeting. I want to be informed, but that’s what I have a staff for. What’s happening with recruiting? Who do I need to call? Has your wife, Donna, enjoyed Memphis? She loves it. We live a pretty comfortable life. My dad

Tiger guard Kareem Brewton Jr. (left) and forward Kyvon Davenport are among a large group of rookies. used to tell me, “Don’t you ever think what you’re doing is work.” I tell my guys: moderation. Everything in moderation. The great John Wooden talked about balance. My dad was a very proud man, a wise man. How did he raise 17 kids with a 9thgrade education? How did he build a Guffrie Smith legacy? If I can be half the man he was. What should expectations be for the 2017-18 Tigers? Sky’s the limit. I think we should win the national championship. That’s what every coach’s expectations should be. You’re not much of a coach if you don’t come in every day competing for championships. We have realistic goals. The league is going to be stronger than it’s been in a long time. We have six possible NCAA– tournament teams. There are so many good players back. Wichita State is going to increase everyone’s RPI. This league has that potential. We have to raise our level of play to be one of those postseason teams. I’m excited about this group.

Happy Anniversary Times Three To borrow an expression from former Tiger (and current Georgia Tech) coach Josh Pastner, the collective mood around the U of M program has “gone negative” of late. The Tigers have not played a postseason game since March 2014. When you include missing out on the NIT, this is the longest drought Memphis has experienced since a four-year dry spell from 1977-78 through the 1980-81 season. But history tells us things will get better. This season will culminate near the 45th anniversary of the Tiger program’s most famous team, the 1972-73 squad led by Larry Finch (right) that came one Bill Walton short of winning the national championship. It will also mark 25 years (this can’t be true) since Penny Hardaway delivered his last no-look pass in a Tiger uniform. Moving further along the Tiger-hoops timeline, this is the 10th-anniversary for the 2007-08 team, a group that reached No. 1 in the country and played for the national championship, banner or no banner. The Tigers experienced losing seasons — actual losing seasons, with more losses than wins — between each of those seminal moments that have come to define the program. Whether or not Tubby Smith leads the next memory-making season for U of M basketball remains to be seen. But it will happen. So deep breaths, Tiger fans. Raise a glass for three special anniversaries this winter, and be ready to mark the next. — FM

COVER STORY m e m p h i s f l y e r. c o m

LARRY KUZNIEWSKI

you emphasized that members of the current team are “our players.” What do the players share in common? By “our” I meant the community and the city and the university. They’re representing this city, this conference, and their families. I want players to believe in Tubby Smith. I believe in you [as a player]; that’s why we signed you to a scholarship. The relationship should continue to grow, and the experience will be wholesome, in a good environment. It’s not about being happy, but about achieving your dream. When you hear the negative stuff, they’re not part of our program. They may not be a fan of yours, may not be a fan of Tubby Smith’s.

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S P O R TS B y Ke v i n L i p e

Off-court Drama The Grizzlies’ looming ownership storm.

T

he Grizzlies’ buy/sell agreement is still behind the scenes, but you can expect it to take center stage. On October 25, 2017, the Memphis Grizzlies passed a curious milestone in the history of the franchise: They entered the window of time in which Griz minority owners Steve Kaplan and Daniel Straus could trigger a “buy/sell” clause in their partnership agreement with Grizzlies controlling owner Robert Pera. The agreement, put in place when the current ownership group took over the team in 2013, allows Kaplan and/or Straus to come up with a valuation for the team — to name their price, essentially — and then Pera has to either buy out the minority owner’s share at that valuation or allow the minority owner to buy out his controlling (25.1 percent according to initial 2012 reporting by Chris Herrington) interest in the team at that same valuation. Either Kaplan or Straus (who each owned 14.22 percent of the franchise initially) can trigger the clause, saying, for example, “the Grizzlies are worth $1 billion,” and then Pera can buy them out at $140,000,000, or they can buy him out at $251,000,000. Normally an ownership change of a franchise is newsworthy in and of itself. But this particular wrinkle, coming at this point in time, is primed to make noise if and when it’s triggered. Kaplan partnered with ousted former Grizzlies CEO Jason Levien to buy a majority stake of Swansea, a club in the English Premier League. The dismissal of Levien, by all accounts, created a rift between Kaplan and Pera that remains unresolved, as seen most recently when Kaplan and Levien attempted to get together the funds to purchase a minority stake in the Minnesota Timberwolves. It’s worth examining some of what happened around the time of Levien’s dismissal in the context of what might be coming if and when the buy/sell clause is triggered. Levien, in particular, is very well connected to many national NBA writers, as a former agent and an executive for multiple teams. Immediately after he was let go by the Grizzlies, multiple national outlets (notably Sporting News and Adrian Wojnarowski, then of Yahoo! Sports and now with ESPN) ran vicious takedowns of Robert Pera, painting him as a lunatic with no idea how the NBA works. You may remember the bit about having Dave Joerger wear a headset while he coached, like he was on a football sideline, or the part about firing Joerger and having Mike Miller be the player-coach.

Is Robert Pera an ideal owner? I’m not sure there is such a thing, but he’s proven himself to be plenty capable. It’s totally fair to criticize basketball operations leadership for this decision or that (especially as they let yet another first-round pick go this preseason), and his absence from Memphis has not done him any favors with locals who’d like him to show his face from time to time, but in no way has the way he’s run the team aligned with the stuff we heard back in 2014. In the years since that acrimonious breakup, Pera has shown himself to be a competent owner, and one willing to invest a great deal in uncapped areas. The Grizzlies have spent millions of dollars renovating the practice facilities and locker rooms and improving the training staff. They continue to be at the forefront of creating new statistics with SportVU data and other motion-tracking stuff. It also can’t be denied that they’re willing to spend on basketball talent, with Mike Conley, Marc Gasol, and Chandler Parsons all playing on blockbuster deals.

An ownership change of a franchise is newsworthy in and of itself. But this wrinkle is primed to make noise. It’s no secret that Kaplan wants to run an NBA franchise. By triggering the clause now, he either gains control of the Grizzlies or he gets a nice payout on his initial Grizzlies investment. Straus is more of a mystery, but my sense is that his investment in the Grizziles was just that: an investment, not a bid for control. The clause is a win-win for Kaplan. Once triggered, the process will not be a quick one. Each step has baked-in 60-day review periods, and the whole thing could take months to resolve. But my assumption is that if and when it’s triggered, you’ll start seeing all kinds of stories pop up from otherwise reputable sources about how poorly Pera runs the Grizzlies, how tight the team’s finances are, and maybe some blatant blind-item ad hominem about other Grizzlies higher-ups. It seems to be what happens every time there’s a national story about Grizzlies ownership — enough so that it seems naive to assume a coincidence. There’s no love lost between the parties involved, but for the sake of the Grizzlies and the sake of their still-burgeoning fanbase, one hopes the process plays out with as little drama as possible.


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steppin’ out

We Recommend: Culture, News + Reviews

Pigs Rule!

Animal Farm

By Chris Davis

Animal Farm director Alice Berry doesn’t want to be a propagandist. Although her small, indefatigable company’s known more for its dedication to Southern literature than its politics, with original creations like Sister Myotis and the plays of Jerre Dye, Voices of the South has always married smart commentary with pure populism. As a co-founder and longtime collaborator, Berry wants to start conversations, and she worries that a facile connection of George Orwell’s barnyard fable of revolution and the rise of the Soviet state to current events would start arguments instead. “Voices has always been about language,” Berry explains. “And so much of Animal Farm is about the manipulation of language and how that manipulation of language works on all of the animals. How it changes the choices they make. Like, after the animals build the windmill, they start to realize their lives aren’t getting any better, they’re just getting older, and tireder, and instead of working less they work more and more, but they still believe things are going to change.” “All animals are equal, but some animals are more equal than others” is the ultimate governing principle of Manor Farm, where ranking pigs mingle with neighboring human farmers and are, in fact, indistinguishable. Although it’s only 72 years old and was written in response to Stalinism, Orwell’s self-described fairy story has so far proven to be durable, adaptable, and uncomfortably current. “It’s so full of details,” Berry says. “And every one of them matters.”

November 9-15, 2017

DAN WIREMAN

VOICES OF THE SOUTH’S GEORGE ORWELL’S “ANIMAL FARM” AT THEATRE SOUTH NOVEMBER 9TH-11TH, 8 P.M. AND NOVEMBER 12TH AT 4 P.M. $10, VOICESOFTHESOUTH.ORG

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Dave Grohl, fighter of foo The Last Word, p. 39

Ancho Reyes Verde Spirits, p. 33

Celebrating the career of Memphis blues legend Earl “the Pearl” Banks Music, p. 18

THURSDAY November 9

FRIDAY November 10

Booksigning and Talk by Amanda Lucidon Benjamin L. Hooks Central Library, 5:30 p.m. Amanda Lucidon, White House photographer whose subject was Michelle Obama, will discuss and sign her book Chasing Light: Michelle Obama Through the Lens of a White House Photographer. Her images will be on display at the library through November 10th.

Dinner at the Hibiscus Salon Old Dominick Distillery, 6-10 p.m., $65 Launch event and benefit for the Center for Southern Literary Arts with a multidisciplinary reach — food, poetry, music, and visual arts.

“Wild in the City: Animals Real and Imagined” Playhouse on the Square, 5:30-7 p.m. Opening reception for this show of the imaginative assemblages and paintings (a tiger on a bike!) by Angi Cooper.

“Turnout” FLY Studio, Ballet Memphis, 7:30 p.m., $12-$20 A new informal event in the new Ballet Memphis building. Includes four favorites: Trey McIntyre’s “In Dreams,” Steven McMahon’s “The Lovely Story of Us,” Brandon Ramey’s “The Good Life,” and Joseph Jefferies’ “Cupid Revealed.”

A Night to Stand with the Nations Second Presbyterian Church (4055 Poplar), 6 p.m., $65 Banquet dinner supporting refugee resettlement and immigration legal services presented by World Relief Memphis. Includes an exhibit of photography and live performances.

The Music of Phineas Newborn and Calvin Newborn: Memphis Legends Crosstown Arts (Concourse), 6:30-9 p.m., $15 Celebrating the music of Phineas and Calvin Newborn with Gerard Harris, Alvie Givhan, Sylvester Sample, and Renardo Ward. Part of the Crosstown Jazz Series. “Icons and Illuminations: A Year of Art as Resistance” Midtown Crossing Grill, 6-9 p.m. Reception for this show created in response to the election of Donald Trump.


STD TEST

By Susan Ellis The third installment of Crafts & Drafts happens this Saturday at Crosstown. Craft vendors selling their wares, beer vendors selling their wares. Heavenly, no? One of those crafts vendors is Insectsy, which sells these cool displays featuring exotic tropical butterflies and insects as well as very pretty jewelry with butterfly wings encased in glass or resin. We spoke with Insectsy’s Stacey McNiell in preview of Saturday’s event. You were a biology major. How did you get into working that into art? I’ve always had a fascination with insects. … In college, I was lucky enough to be able to take a fantastic entomology class offered by an amazing professor. We did things like collect aquatic insects and macro invertebrates to gauge the health of local lakes. We also went out with nets and jars to compile collections of local insect species. So, at the end of this, I had a vast array of beautiful butterflies, velvet ants, beetles, etc., and I hated the idea of them just sitting under my bed in a styrofoam box. I started cutting up vintage thrift store clothes with funky retro patterns to use as backgrounds in shadowboxes and began making displays to give as gifts to family and friends. It seems like delicate work working with insects. Can you explain your process? When I receive my butterflies in the mail, they are dried and folded and wrapped in paper. I put them in a rehydration chamber (a fancy way of saying I put them in Tupperware with some damp paper towels) for a few days. At this point, they are usually pretty pliable. … I have special tools that I use, such as rounded forceps, which help me to pin them and spread their wings on a butterfly pinning board. I use strips of paper pinned in place to hold the wings in position. After a couple of weeks, I remove the pins and paper and — voila! CRAFTS & DRAFTS AT CROSSTOWN SATURDAY, NOVEMBER 11TH, 10 A.M.-4 P.M. MEMPHISCRAFTSANDDRAFTS.COM

Cate Blanchett (above) plays Hela, Thor’s estranged older sister in Taika Waititi’s heroically funny Thor: Ragnarok. Film, p. 34 SATURDAY November 11

SUNDAY November 12

Fair Trade Alternative Market Trinity United Methodist Educational Center (1738 Galloway), 5-7 p.m. Toys, jewelry, scarves, crafts, coffee, chocolate, and more from artisans and farmers in Third World countries.

David Porter & Friends Horseshoe Casino, 8 p.m., $95 An all-star soul evening with the presentation of the 2017 Epitome of Soul Award to William Bell by Stevie Wonder, plus appearances by Richard Roundtree (!) and Ray Parker Jr. (!!).

“Art/Race/Violence: A Collaborative Response” Crosstown Arts (Concourse), 2-5 p.m. Reception for this exhibit in which artists teamed up to explore themes of race and violence.

A Krisko County Christmas The Evergreen Theatre, 8 p.m., $25 A Friends of George’s production following Maybelline and Mary Kay, the owners of George’s Truck Stop and Drag Bar. One of them gets bad news that puts her application for the Krisko County Ladies Auxiliary into question. Benefits Friends for Life.

My City, 4 Ways Prop Cellar, noon-5 p.m. An event presented by Essence magazine and featuring four AfricanAmerican women influencers representing music, fashion, art, and food. Kelis will be one of the guests.

Wok’n in Memphis Chinese Food Takeover Porcellino’s, 5:30-9 p.m., $20 Chinese food pop-up. The menu features pork dumplings, fried Brussels sprouts with Chinese sausage, General Tso’s chicken, Mapo tofu, beef and broccoli, and more.

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CHO CES

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kevin don't bluff Kevin Lipe on the Memphis Grizzlies before, during, and after the game.

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Buggin’

ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT

Insectsy’s insect art

@FlyerGrizBlog memphisflyer.com/blogs/BeyondTheArc

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M U S I C F E AT U R E B y A l e x G r e e n e

Earl the Pearl A Memphis blues legend gets his due.

November 9-15, 2017

So you grew up in Germantown? Earl Banks: I was born on Joe Kirby’s place. As in Kirby Road, Kirby Woods Mall. I was born March 17th. He named me Pat. It was St. Patrick’s Day. But my mother named me Earl. I guess in the early ’60s they gave me the nickname Earl the “Earl the Pearl.” Pearl

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And you originally played piano, right? I started out on piano. When I was about five years old, my grandfather, he bought my aunt a piano, and she never did learn how to play it. And I learned how to play it. After I got a certain age, I got in a lot of bands, and the club didn’t have a piano sometimes. I had to go over in the corner and just sit there and look. I said, “All right, I’m gonna play guitar.” Long about 1955 or ’56, I went and bought me a guitar and an amplifier. Cost $315 in those days. And I learned how to play that guitar. I been messing with guitar ever since. You were playing piano with Joe Hill Louis? Right! Right, when I was 10 years old. You know, I never hear nobody talk about him now. He was a one-man band. He’d come on WDIA, I think on Saturdays, and play 15 minutes. He was Joe Hill Louis the Be Bop Boy. He didn’t pay me, but I was helping him sound good. But he messed around, and I think he passed away. You know, he used to work for D. Canale. Back in those days, he was playing in Moscow, Tennessee. I was in Moscow every Friday and Saturday night when he’d be up there. It wasn’t nothing but corn fields and corn liquor. You know, whiskey. It was government-funded whiskey. Back in them days, it wasn’t nothing but the crapshoot goin’

on, and corn liquor in the juke joint. It was a nice crowd. People from Brownsville, Covington, Somerville, Bolivar, they would come down. One way in and one way out. Joe Hill Louis’ guitar tone was amazing. When you picked up guitar, did you try to get his sound? No, really it was a guy named Fred Ingram. He had a Fender; it was a good looking guitar. He was a little short, dark fellow. I guess he was about four-foot something, and, man, he could play that thing. And I said I wanna play like him. Well, he called me Pat. He said, “Pat, if you wanna learn how to play a guitar, stop using them clamps.” Cheaters, they called ’em. Clamps, you know where you clamp down on the neck of it?

DAN WIREMAN

A

t 81 years old, Earl “The Pearl” Banks is one of the most seasoned blues guitarists in the Mid-South, with experience reaching back to the 1940s. He can typically be seen plying his craft on Beale Street, where he is memorialized with a brass note, but this Wednesday, he moves to Midtown, as Lafayette’s Music Room hosts a tribute to his career. After arriving by police escort, he’ll receive a gift from the city and then proceed to knock the socks off any blues fan within a half-mile radius.

Like a capo? Yeah, somethin’ like that. Some people used to have pencils and put em around. I call ’em cheaters. So I quit using that thing, and I did very well. When I was in Germantown, my band was Banks and the Blue Dots. That was back in the ’50s. That was Teenie Hodges, his daddy Leroy Hodges, Ottie Golden, and Willie Moody. So I took Teenie Hodges when he was 12 years old and learned him how to play the guitar and put him in my band. He’s the one who wrote all the hits with Al Green. Who was your favorite guitar player back in the day? I admired Fred Ingram and B.B. King. Then Albert King came along, and I started listening to him. But B.B. King, he really is my idol. I still try to play like him now. I hit some licks, but I know it ain’t like him. I got my own thing going. It ain’t went too far. But I’m still moving. A Blues Celebration of Earl “The Pearl” Banks, Lafayette’s Music Room, Wednesday, November 8th, 8 p.m.


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November 9-15, 2017

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JESUS AND MARY CHAIN BY STEVE GULLICK

JESUS AND MARY CHAIN FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 10TH NEW DAISY THEATRE

112 SATURDAY, NOVEMBER 11TH MINGLEWOOD HALL

DAVID PORTER SATURDAY, NOVEMBER 11TH HORSESHOE CASINO’S BLUESVILLE

After Dark: Live Music Schedule November 9 - 15 Alfred’s 197 BEALE 525-3711

Gary Hardy & Memphis 2 Thursdays-Saturdays, 6-9 p.m.; Karaoke Thursdays, TuesdaysWednesdays, 9 p.m.-1 a.m., and Sundays-Mondays, 10 p.m.-2 a.m.; Mandi Thomas Fridays, Saturdays, 6-9 p.m.; The 901 Heavy Hitters Fridays, Saturdays, 10 p.m.-2 a.m.; Flyin’ Ryan Fridays, Saturdays, 2:30 a.m.; Memphis Jazz Orchestra Sundays, 6-9 p.m.

B.B. King’s Blues Club 143 BEALE 524-KING

The King Beez Thursdays, 5:30 p.m.; B.B. King’s All Stars Thursdays, Fridays, 8 p.m.; Will Tucker Band Fridays, Saturdays,

5 p.m.; Lisa G and Flic’s Pic’s Band Saturdays, Sundays, 12:30 p.m.; Blind Mississippi Morris Sundays, 5 p.m.; Memphis Jones Sundays, Wednesdays 5:30 p.m.; Doc Fangaz and the Remedy Tuesdays, 5:30 p.m.

Blue Note Bar & Grill 341-345 BEALE 577-1089

Queen Ann and the Memphis Blues Masters Fridays, Saturdays, 8 p.m.-midnight.

Blues City Cafe 138 BEALE 526-3637

Blind Mississippi Morris Fridays, 5 p.m., and Saturdays, 5:30 p.m.; Brad Birkedahl Band Thursdays, Wednesdays, 8 p.m.; Earl “The Pearl” Banks Saturdays, 12:30 p.m., and Tuesdays, 7 p.m.; Brandon Cunning Band Sundays, 6 p.m., and Mondays, 7 p.m.; FreeWorld Sundays, 9:30 p.m.

Club 152

Itta Bena

King’s Palace Cafe Patio

152 BEALE 544-7011

145 BEALE 578-3031

162 BEALE 521-1851

Live Music Wednesdays-Sundays, 7-11 p.m.; Live DJ WednesdaysSundays, 11 p.m.; Third Floor: DJ Tubbz Fridays, Saturdays, 10 p.m.; The Rusty Pieces at Club 152 on Beale Wednesdays, 6-9 p.m.

Handy Bar 200 BEALE 527-2687

The Amazing Rhythmatics Tuesdays, Thursdays-Sundays, 7 p.m.-1 a.m.

Hard Rock Cafe 126 BEALE 529-0007

Chris Johnson Duo Thursday, Nov. 9, 7-10 p.m.; Tori Tollison Friday, Nov. 10, 6-9 p.m.; A Night of R&B and Soul Friday, Nov. 10, 10 p.m.-1 a.m.; Hard Rock Cafe Memphis’ 20th Anniversary featuring Saving Abel Saturday, Nov. 11.

Nat “King” Kerr Fridays, Saturdays, 9-10 p.m.

King Jerry Lawler’s Hall of Fame Bar & Grille 159 BEALE

Chris Gales Solo Acoustic Show Mondays-Saturdays, 12-4 p.m.; Eric Hughes solo/acoustic Thursdays, 5-8 p.m.; Karaoke Mondays-Thursdays, Sundays, 8 p.m.; Live Bands Fridays, Saturdays, 8 p.m.

King’s Palace Cafe 162 BEALE 521-1851

David Bowen Thursdays, 5:309:30 p.m., Fridays, Saturdays, 6:30-10:30 p.m., and Sundays, 5:30-9:30 p.m.

Sonny Mack Mondays-Fridays, 2-6 p.m.; Cowboy Neil Mondays, Thursdays, 7-11 p.m. and Saturdays, Sundays, 2-6 p.m.; Sensation Band Tuesdays, Fridays, 7-11 p.m.; Fuzzy and the Kings of Memphis Saturdays, 7-11 p.m.; Chic Jones and the Blues Express Sundays, 7-11 p.m.; North and South Band Wednesdays, 7-11 p.m.

King’s Palace Cafe Tap Room 168 BEALE 576-2220

Big Don Valentine’s Three Piece Chicken and a Biscuit Blues Band Thursdays, Tuesdays, 8 p.m.-midnight; Cowboy Neil Friday, Nov. 10, 9 p.m.-1 a.m.; Delta Project Saturday, Nov. 11, 9 p.m.-1 a.m.

New Daisy Theatre 330 BEALE 525-8981

The Jesus and Mary Chain Friday, Nov. 10, 7 p.m.; Downtown Live! Kim Waters & Kayla Waters Saturday, Nov. 11, 711 p.m.; August Alsina Sunday, Nov. 12, 7 p.m.

Rum Boogie Cafe 182 BEALE 528-0150

Young Petty Thieves Thursdays, 8 p.m.-midnight; Pam and Terry Friday, Nov. 10, 5:30-8:30 p.m., and Saturday, Nov. 11, 5:30-8:30 p.m.; Sensations Friday, Nov. 10, 9 p.m.-1 a.m., and Saturday, Nov. 11, 9 p.m.-1 a.m.; Sensation Band Sunday, Nov. 12, 7-11 p.m.; Eric Hughes Band Mondays, 8 p.m.-midnight; Gracie Curran Tuesdays, 8 p.m.-midnight; Plantation Allstars Wednesdays, 8 p.m.-midnight.

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After Dark: Live Music Schedule November 9 - 15 Rum Boogie Cafe Blues Hall 182 BEALE 528-0150

Memphis Bluesmasters Thursdays, Sundays, 8 p.m.-midnight; Vince Johnson and the Plantation Allstars Fridays, Saturdays, 4-8 p.m. and Sundays, 3-7 p.m.; Myra Hall Band Friday, Nov. 10, 9 p.m.-1 a.m.; Cowboy Neil Saturday, Nov. 11, 9 p.m.-1 a.m.; Brian Hawkins Blues Party Mondays, 8 p.m.-midnight; Nick Hearn Band Monday, Nov. 13, 8 p.m.-midnight; Chris McDaniel Tuesdays, Wednesdays, 8 p.m.midnight.

Karaoke Wednesdays, 9 p.m.

Purple Haze Nightclub 140 LT. GEORGE W. LEE 577-1139

DJ Dance Music MondaysSundays, 10 p.m.

The Silly Goose 100 PEABODY PLACE 435-6915

The Rusty Pieces Thursday, Nov. 9, 10 p.m.-1 a.m.; DJ Cody Fridays, Saturdays, 10 p.m.

Growlers Bar DKDC 964 S. COOPER 272-0830

Luke White Thursday, Nov. 9; Mike Doughty’s Moticos Friday, Nov. 10; Will Sexton and Friends Sunday, Nov. 12; Devil Train Monday, Nov. 13; Dave Cousar Tuesday, Nov. 14.

1911 POPLAR 244-7904

Crockett Hall Tuesdays with the Midtown Rhythm Section Tuesdays, 9 p.m.

Hi-Tone 412-414 N. CLEVELAND 278-TONE

Clay Otis Benefit Show Friday, Nov. 10, 8 p.m.; HOOPS, China Gate, Melinda Friday, Nov. 10, 9 p.m.; The Rural Alberta Advantage, Yukon Blonde Saturday,

Red Sunday, Nov. 12, 8 p.m.; Jenn and Brian Monday, Nov. 13, 6 p.m.; McKenna Bray with Will Tucker Tuesday, Nov. 14, 8 p.m.; Breeze Cayolle & New Orleans Wednesday, Nov. 15, 5:30 p.m.; Brandon Taylor & Radio Ghost Wednesday, Nov. 15, 8 p.m.

Midtown Crossing Grill 394 N. WATKINS 443-0502

Natalie James and the Professor Saturdays, Sundays, 11 a.m.-3 p.m.; “The Happening” Open Songwriter Showcase Tuesdays, 6:30-9:30 p.m.

Silky O’Sullivan’s

Railgarten 2160 CENTRAL

Live Band Karaoke with Public Record Wednesdays, 7 p.m.

Rhodes College, Tuthill Performance Hall 2000 N. PARKWAY 843-3000

Faculty Concert Series: Bob Sunda Tuesday, Nov. 14, 7 p.m.

Wild Bill’s 1580 VOLLINTINE 207-3975

The Wild Bill’s Band with Tony Chapman, Charles Cason, and Joyce Henderson Fridays, Saturdays, 11 p.m.-3 a.m.

Young Avenue Deli

183 BEALE 522-9596

2119 YOUNG 278-0034

Dueling Pianos Thursdays, Wednesdays, 9 p.m.-1 a.m., Fridays, Saturdays, 9 p.m.-3 a.m., and Sundays, Tuesdays, 8 p.m.midnight.

Guy Marshall Saturday, Nov. 11, 10:30 p.m.

University of Memphis Blind Bear Speakeasy

The Bluff

119 S. MAIN, PEMBROKE SQUARE 417-8435

535 S. HIGHLAND

DJ Ben Murray Thursdays, 10 p.m.; Bluegrass Brunch with the River Bluff Clan Sundays, 11 a.m.

Live Music Thursdays-Saturdays, 10 p.m.; The Rusty Pieces Friday, Nov. 10, 10 p.m.-1 a.m.

East Memphis

Bozwell+Lily Pop-Up Shop

Folk’s Folly Prime Steak House

7 N. MAIN

Living Room Session with the Band CAMINO Thursday, Nov. 9, 7-10 p.m.

551 S. MENDENHALL 762-8200

Intimate Piano Lounge featuring Charlotte Hurt MondaysThursdays, 5-9:30 p.m.; Larry Cunningham Fridays, Saturdays, 6-10 p.m.

Cannon Center for the Performing Arts MEMPHIS COOK CONVENTION CENTER, 255 N. MAIN TICKETS, 525-1515

Huey’s Poplar

The U.S. Naval Academy Glee Club Saturday, Nov. 11, 7:30-9:30 p.m. and Sunday, Nov. 12, 2:304:30 p.m.

4872 POPLAR 682-7729

The Chaulkies Sunday, Nov. 12, 8:30 p.m.-midnight.

Mortimer’s

Dirty Crow Inn

590 N. PERKINS 761-9321

855 KENTUCKY

Van Duren Solo Thursdays, 6:30-8:30 p.m.

Nancy Apple Thursdays, 8 p.m.; Jen and Brian Friday, Nov. 10, 9 p.m.; Eric Hughes Saturday, Nov. 11, 9 p.m.; Bobbie Stacks & Her Assets Wednesdays, 7-10 p.m.; Bobbie & Tasha Wednesdays, 8-11 p.m.

Earnestine & Hazel’s 531 S. MAIN 523-9754

Amber Rae Dunn Hosts: Earnestine & Hazel’s Open Mic Wednesdays, 8-11 p.m.

The Vault

Boscos

124 GE PATTERSON

2120 MADISON 432-2222

Adam McClelland Friday, Nov. 10, 8 p.m.

Flying Saucer Draught Emporium

South Main

130 PEABODY PLACE 523-8536

Loflin Yard 7 W. CAROLINA

Songwriters with Roland and Friends Mondays, 7-10 p.m.

Electric Church Sundays, 2-4 p.m.

Huey’s Downtown

South Main Sounds

77 S. SECOND 527-2700

El Ced and Groove Nation Sunday, Nov. 12, 8:30 p.m.-midnight.

Paulette’s RIVER INN, 50 HARBOR TOWN SQUARE 260-3300

Live Pianist Thursdays, 5:30-8:30 p.m., Fridays and Saturdays, 5:309 p.m., Sundays, 11 a.m.2 p.m., and Mondays-Wednesdays, 5:30-8 p.m.

550 S. MAIN 494-6543

Sunday Brunch with Joyce Cobb Sundays, 11:30 a.m.2:30 p.m.

Canvas 1737 MADISON 443-5232

Karaoke Thursdays, 9:30 p.m.; Kyle Pruzina Live Mondays, 10 p.m.-midnight.

Celtic Crossing 903 S. COOPER 274-5151

Grace Askew, Michael Graber, Mark Wikland, Brian Blake Friday, Nov. 10, 7-9 p.m.

Jeremy Stanfill and Joshua Cosby Sundays, 6-9 p.m.; Candy Company Mondays.

Spindini

The Cove

383 S. MAIN 578-2767

Lannie McMillian Friday, Nov. 10 and Saturday, Nov. 11.

2559 BROAD 730-0719

David Collins Jazz and Deborah Swiney Thursday, Nov. 9, 8 p.m.; Faith Ruch Friday, Nov. 10, 9 p.m.; David Collins & the Burners Saturday, Nov. 11, 9 p.m.;

Nov. 11, 8 p.m.; Blood Like Wine, Kake & the Zero Point Star Tuesday, Nov. 14, 9 p.m.; Mountains Like Wax, Little Image Wednesday, Nov. 15, 9 p.m.

Huey’s Midtown 1927 MADISON 726-4372

Dinallo and Prine Sunday, Nov. 12, 4-7 p.m.; Dikki Du and the Zydeco Krewe Sunday, Nov. 12, 8:30 p.m.-midnight.

Lafayette’s Music Room 2119 MADISON 207-5097

Cassette Set Thursday, Nov. 9, 6 p.m.; Pullman Standard Thursday, Nov. 9, 9 p.m.; The Bluff City Bandits Friday, Nov. 10, 6:30 p.m.; That 1 Band Friday, Nov. 10, 10 p.m.; Next2Rock Saturday, Nov. 11, 7 p.m.; Forever Abbey Road Saturday, Nov. 11, 10 p.m.; Joe Restivo 4 Sunday, Nov. 12, 11 a.m.; Royal Blues Band Sunday, Nov. 12, 4 p.m.; Ladies of Seeing

Minglewood Hall 1555 MADISON 866-609-1744

Backup Planet Thursday, Nov. 9, 8 p.m.; Courage Thru Cancer Friday, Nov. 10, 8 p.m.; Ladies Night Out with 112 & Avant Saturday, Nov. 11, 7 p.m.

Murphy’s 1589 MADISON 726-4193

Overlake Friday, Nov. 10; Data Drums with Yesse Yavis and Greg Ashley Monday, Nov. 13.

Overton Square MIDTOWN

Fall Music Series Fridays.

P&H Cafe 1532 MADISON 726-0906

Rock Starkaraoke Fridays; Open Mic Music with Tiffany Harmon Mondays, 9 p.m.-midnight.

Jack Rowell’s Celebrity Jam Thursdays, 8 p.m.; Eddie Smith Fridays, 8 p.m.; Pulse (A tribute to Pink Floyd) Saturday, Nov. 11, 8 p.m.; Wayne Russell’s Art Show feat. The Reba Russell Trio Sunday, Nov. 12, 4-8 p.m.; Debbie Jamison & Friends Tuesdays, 6-10 p.m.; Elmo and the Shades Wednesdays, 8 p.m.midnight.

North Mississippi/ Tunica Horseshoe Casino & Hotel AT CASINO CENTER, SOUTH OF MEMPHIS, NEAR TUNICA, MS 1-800-303-SHOE

“David Porter & Friends” Honor William Bell Saturday, Nov. 11.

ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT

Neil’s Music Room 5727 QUINCE 682-2300

m e m p h i s f l y e r. c o m

Poplar/I-240

23


SEE IT AT THE

PINK PALACE

CALENDAR of EVENTS:

Nov. 9 - 15

Send the date, time, place, cost, info, phone number, a brief description, and photos — two weeks in advance — to calendar@memphisflyer. com or P.O. Box 1738, Memphis, TN 38101. DUE TO SPACE LIMITATIONS, ONGOING WEEKLY EVENTS WILL APPEAR IN THE FLYER’S ONLINE CALENDAR ONLY.

“Asian-American Art, Activism, and the Turn to Transnationalism”

TH EAT E R

The Evergreen Theatre

A Krisko County Christmas, story of Maybelline and Mary Kay, co-owners of George’s Truck Stop and Drag Bar. Maybelline receives some disturbing news about her past which puts her application to the Krisko County Ladies Auxiliary into jeopardy. Proceeds benefit Friends for Life. (5506205), www.friendsofgeorges.org. $25. Fridays, Saturdays, 8-10 p.m. Through Nov. 18.

Art Historian Margo Machida’s lecture examines how AsianAmerican frameworks for thinking about identity, identity politics, and arts activism shifted between the 1960s and 1990s. Free. Fri., Nov. 10, 5:30-7:30 p.m. FOGELMAN GALLERIES OF CONTEMPORARY ART, UNIVERSITY OF MEMPHIS, 3715 CENTRAL (678-2216), WWW.MEMPHIS.EDU.

Caged Birds Writing Competition

1705 POPLAR (274-7139).

Currently accepting submissions for the fall 2017 competition organized by graduates from the MFA program of the University of Memphis to encourage at-risk teens to write and affirm their literary voices. For more information, visit website or email cagedbirds901@gmail.com. Through Nov. 15.

McCoy Theatre

Theophilus North, based on the novel by Thornton Wilder set in Newport, RI, during the height of the Jazz Age in the 1920s as the title character searches for adventure and his place in the world. www.rhodes.edu. Free. Thurs.-Sat., 7 p.m., and Sun., Nov. 12, 2 p.m. Through Nov. 12.

Planetarium Show Opens September 9, 2017

RHODES COLLEGE, 2000 N. PARKWAY (843-3000).

WWW.CAGEDBIRDSWRITINGCONTEST. WORDPRESS.COM.

Overton Square

Casting Demonstration

Shakespeare Shout-Out Series: Julius Caesar, seven actors perform Shakespeare’s epic Roman story of fate, friendship, and honor. Dedicated to service veterans. www. tnshakespeare.org. Free. Fri., Nov. 10, 5:30 p.m. Shakespeare Shout-Out Series: Romeo and Juliet, timeless exploration of surprising young love and mortal violence unfolds in this fast, physical, and daring performance near the parking garage, just south of Madison Ave. www. tnshakespeare.org. Free. Fri., Nov. 10, 8 p.m. MIDTOWN.

Playhouse 51

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November 9-15, 2017

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The Littlest Light on the Christmas Tree, takes place on Christmas Eve in 1946 as families adjust to the end of World War II. Story of a little boy who believes in all that Christmas truly means and helps others to know as well. www. playhouse51.com. $12. Fridays, Saturdays, 7:30 p.m., and Sundays, 2 p.m. Through Nov. 19. 8077 WILKINSVILLE (872-7170).

TheatreSouth

Animal Farm, famous tale of livestock insurrection and regime change in an agrarian community. Cautionary parable of revolution and tyranny performed by Voices the South. www.voicesofthelife! of south.org. $10-$15. Nov. 9-11, 8-10 p.m., and Sun., Nov. 12, 4-6 p.m. INSIDE FIRST CONGREGATIONAL CHURCH, 1000 S. COOPER (726-0800).

TheatreWorks

Marjorie Prime, 2015 Pulitzer Prize finalist, performed for the first time in Memphis. Explores troubling issues about aging in the digital age. By Jordan Harrison, writer-producer of Orange is the New Black. (272-9323), www.theatreworksmemphis.org. $15. Fridays, Saturdays, 8-10 p.m., and Sundays, 2-4 p.m. Through Nov. 26. 2085 MONROE (274-7139).

Saturdays, Sundays, 3 p.m.

METAL MUSEUM, 374 METAL MUSEUM DR. (774-6380), WWW.METALMUSEUM.ORG.

Crosstown Arts Digital Lab

Artist reception for Dirty Deltans Art Show at A2H, Saturday, November 11th A R T I ST R E C E PT I O N S

A2H

Artist reception for Dirty Deltans Art Show, exhibition of work by Randall Andrews, Gerald Deloach, Stan Street, and Joey Young of Clarksdale, MS. Featuring hors d’oeuvres, drinks, and live music. RSVP by email, LanieS@a2h.com. www.a2h.com. Sat., Nov. 11, 6-8 p.m. 3009 DAVIES PLANTATION (372-0404).

Crosstown Concourse (formerly Sears Crosstown)

Opening reception for “Art/ Race/Violence: A Collaborative Response,” exhibition of multidisciplinary art in collaboration with visual culture historian Dr. Earnestine Jenkins and artist Richard Lou. Curator talks, performances, and reception on the second floor. www.crosstownarts.org. Sun., Nov. 12, 2-6 p.m. N. CLEVELAND AT NORTH PARKWAY.

David Lusk Gallery

Opening reception for “Angst,” exhibition of painted photographs by Catherine Erb. www.davidluskgallery.com. Fri., Nov. 10, 6-8 p.m. 97 TILLMAN (767-3800).

FireHouse Community Arts Center

Artist reception for Michael McDonald, www.mbaafirehouse.org. Sat., Nov. 11, 4 p.m. 985 S. BELLEVUE (948-9522).

Metal Museum

Opening reception and gallery talk for “Everyday Objects: The evolution and innovations of Joseph Anderson,” www.metalmuseum. org. Sun., Nov. 12, 3-5 p.m. 374 METAL MUSEUM DR. (774-6380).

Midtown Crossing Grill

Artist reception for “Icons and Illuminations: A Year of Art as Resistance,” exhibition series of work created in response to the election of Donald Trump. Sales benefit social justice organizations. Fri., Nov. 10, 6-9 p.m. 394 N. WATKINS (443-0502).

Overton Park Gallery

Artist reception for “The Art of Serving,” exhibition of work by Stephanie Savic Polk and gallery open house. www.dianesartgifthome.com. Fri., Nov. 10, 6-8 p.m. 1581 OVERTON PARK (229-2967).

OT H E R A R T HAPPE N I NGS

Art After Dark

Galleries and gardens will be open late. Featuring light refreshments, entertainment, and a cash bar. Free with admission. Every third Thursday, 6-8 p.m. THE DIXON GALLERY & GARDENS, 4339 PARK (761-5250), WWW.DIXON.ORG.

Call to Artists for Art Village Gallery Juried Group Exhibition

Opportunity for artists to contribute to the ongoing social and political discussion to inform and influence the perspective of others through art. For more information, visit website. Through Dec. 1. WWW.URBANARTCOMMISSION.ORG.

Six-station computer lab supports Memphis’ creative community by providing artists and musicians full access to industry-standard art- and music-making technology. Tuesdays-Thursdays, 10 a.m.-9 p.m., and Fridays, Saturdays, 10 a.m.-6 p.m. CROSSTOWN ARTS, 430 N. CLEVELAND (507-8030), WWW.CROSSTOWNARTS.ORG.

Dinner at the Hibiscus Salon

Poet Derrick Harriell, chef Phillip Dewayne, and DJ and visual artist Siphne Aaye join the Center for Southern Literary Arts for curated meal and performance followed by a conversation with the artists. $65. Fri., Nov. 10, 7-10 p.m. OLD DOMINICK DISTILLERY, 305 S. FRONT (491-1317), WWW.SOUTHERNLITERARYARTS.ORG.

Next2Rock2017

Register as a solo artist, band, or fan for competition that ends with a national live finale in Los Angeles. For competition registration and fan voting details, visit website. Through Dec. 12. WWW.981THEMAX.COM.

St. George’s Art Show and Sale

Featuring work by over 50 regional and national artists benefiting St. George’s Independent School. Thurs., Nov. 9, 7-9 p.m., Fri., Nov. 10, 7-9 p.m., and Sat., Nov. 11, 10 a.m.-3 p.m. ST. GEORGE’S INDEPENDENT SCHOOL, 1880 WOLF RIVER (457-2000), WWW.SGIS.ORG.

“Stargazer Garden” Flower-Folding

Stop by and fold a paper flower for collaborative art installation. Mondays-Fridays, 9:30 a.m.-5:30 p.m. CROSSTOWN CONCOURSE (FORMERLY SEARS CROSSTOWN), N. CLEVELAND AT NORTH PARKWAY, WWW.CROSSTOWNARTS.ORG.

continued on page 26


ET Round 1

MOONSHINE

BALL

THE FABULOUS THUNDERBIRDS NOVEMBER 10

AMERICAN SCULPTURE COMMUNITY DAY AT BROOKS ·

Lisa Hoke’s Pie in the Sky

·

Art-Making

·

Live Jazz Band

·

Kids Interactive Dancing

FREE ADMISSION

Saturday, November 11 10 a.m. - 2 p.m. ·

Sculpture exhibition, Coming to America: Lachaise, Laurent, Nadelman, and Zorach, 1914-1945.

·

New installation, Rotunda Projects: Lisa Hoke.

·

Art-making activities designed by the University of Memphis Art Education students.

·

Performance by the University of Memphis Faculty Jazz Band Trio.

·

Project: Motion will lead a kids interactive dance exploration centered around recycling and perform SPOON, created by Louisa Koeppel.

THE YING YANG TWINS DECEMBER 31 TICKETS AVAILABLE AT TICKETMASTER.COM OR BY CALLING 1-800-745-3000.

brooksmuseum.org Elie Nadelman, United States, born Poland, 1882-1946, Dancer, 1918, Cherry, mahogany, gesso, stain, and paint, 28 1/4 inches (height), Wadsworth Atheneum Museum of Art, Hartford, CT, The Philip L. Goodwin Collection, Gift of James L. Goodwin, Henry Sage Goodwin, and Richmond L. Brown, 1958.224 © Estate of Elie Nadelman, Photo by Allen Phillips / Wadsworth Atheneum.

Must be 21 years or older to gamble or attend events. Know When To Stop Before You Start.® Gambling Problem? Call 1-800-522-4700. ©2017, Caesars License Company, LLC. All rights reserved.

8592_T3_4.575x12.4_4c_Ad_V1.indd 1

m e m p h i s f l y e r. c o m

55 Jazzy Sculptures

DECEMBER 2

ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT

·

PAUL THORN

25

10/12/17 8:40 AM


DeltaARTS

CALENDAR: NOVEMBER 9 - 15

Crittenden Youth Theatre Production of

Director & Choreographer

Emma Crystal

Thursday NOV 16, 12:30PM ($5 Thursday Only) Friday NOV 17, 7PM Saturday NOV 18, 7PM Tickets

Music Director

Amanda Daly Stage Manager

Chat Adaway

Adult $12 Student $6 (12 & under)

Asst. Stage Manager

Erica Richardson

Sponsored by State Rep. Deborah and Dr. Scott Ferguson Book by Thomas Meehan

Academies of West Memphis Performing Arts Center 501 West Broadway West Memphis Music by Charles Strouse

Lyrics by Martin Charnin

Presented on Broadway by Mike Nichols Irwin Myer Alvin Nederlander Associates, Inc.

Originally Produced by Stephen R. Friedman The John F. Kennedy Center for the Performing Arts

Lewis Allen Icarus Produtions

Based on “Little Orphan Annie” ® By Permission of The Tribune Content Agency, LLC Annie JR is presented through special arrangement with Music Theatre International (MTI). All authorized performance matierials are also supplied by MTI.

continued from page 24 ONGOI NG ART

Art Museum at the University of Memphis (AMUM)

“Desert to Delta: Saudi Contemporary Art in Memphis,” exhibition by 20 artists and a video artist collective from the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia. www.memphis.edu/amum. Through Jan. 6, 2018. “Africa: Art of a Continent,” permanent exhibition of African art from the Martha and Robert Fogelman collection. Ongoing. 142 COMMUNICATION & FINE ARTS BUILDING (678-2224).

True Story:

Love one another. It’s that simple.

First Congregational Church

Bingham and Broad

“My Kin Is Not Like Yours,” exhibition of works by Debra Edge. Ongoing. 2563 BROAD (323-3008).

Brickwood Hall

She wanted her retirement years to be her best years. As a volunteer at First Congo

she’s creating the legacy she dreamed of.

www.firstcongo.com Phone: 901.278.6786 1000 South Cooper Memphis, TN 38104

November 9-15, 2017

Sunday Worship 10:30 am

“Triptych Memphis,” exhibition of work by London Thomas, Nicole Maron, Samilia Colar, Alesandra Bellos, Colleen Couch-Smith, Bree Mayes, and others benefiting Alzheimer’s & Dementia Services of Memphis. Through Dec. 17. 391 S. FRONT.

Clough-Hanson Gallery

“Celebrating 100 Years of Women at Rhodes College,” exhibition of work by 12 current and former faculty alongside alumni, including Mary Sims, Erin Harmon, Alex Carter, Esther Ruiz, and Daisy Craddock. www. rhodes.edu. Through Dec. 2. RHODES COLLEGE, 2000 N. PARKWAY (843-3000).

eat local

Crosstown Concourse

“Art/Race/Violence: A Collaborative Response,” exhibition of multidisciplinary art in collaboration with visual culture historian Dr. Earnestine Jenkins and artist Richard Lou. www.crosstownarts. org. Nov. 12-Jan. 14. N. CLEVELAND AT NORTH PARKWAY.

support your community. go to memphisflyer.com for complete restaurant listings.

26

memphis flyer | memphisflyer.com

The Dixon Gallery & Gardens

“Isabelle de Borchgrave: Fashioning Art from Paper,” exhibition of recreated historic fashions. www.dixon.

Greenline Half Marathon and 5K at Shelby Farms, Saturday, November 11th org. Through Jan. 7, 2018. “Boukay,” exhibition of mixed-media works by Justin Bowles. Through Jan. 7, 2018. “Made in Dixon,” exhibition showcasing the colorful and joy-filled artwork created by artists of all ages in the Dixon’s educational programs. www.dixon.org. Ongoing. 4339 PARK (761-5250).

EACC Fine Arts Center Gallery

“The Whole Ball of Wax,” exhibition of encaustic paintings primarily made of melted beeswax on wooden panels by artist Kimberly Shawn. www.eacc.edu. Through Nov. 10. EAST ARKANSAS COMMUNITY COLLEGE, 1700 NEWCASTLE, FORREST CITY, AR.

Fogelman Galleries of Contemporary Art, University of Memphis

“Sally Heller: Mind over Mayhem,” exhibition of large-scale installations out of everyday matter. These improbable landscapes reflect the chaotic state of mass-market culture, nature, and consumerism. (678-2216), www.memphis.edu/fogelmangalleries. Free. Through Nov. 9. 3715 CENTRAL.

Memphis Botanic Garden

“In the Midst,” exhibition of abstract paintings by Sophie (Kauerz) Canale. www. memphisbotanicgarden.com. Through Nov. 29. 750 CHERRY (636-4100).

Memphis Brooks Museum of Art

“By the Book: A Tribute to Dolph Smith,” exhibit focusing on Dolph Smith’s artist notebooks, featuring six on display. Through Nov. 26. “Coming to America: Lachaise, Laurent, Nadelman, and Zorach, 1914-1945,” exhibition of sculptures. Through Jan. 7, 2018. “About Face,” exhibition located in the Education Gallery. Ongoing. “Drawing Memory: Essence of Memphis,” exhibition by

Victor Ekpuk. www.brooksmuseum.org. Ongoing. 1934 POPLAR (544-6209).

Metal Museum

“Cascadian Lines,” exhibition of works by Christopher Gerber in the museum store. Through Nov. 12. Master Metalsmith: David Secrest, exhibition by sculptor and blacksmith. Through Dec. 31. “The Tributaries: Zachery Lechtenberg,” exhibition of enameling techniques applied to jewelry and illustration combined creating brightly colored cartoon-style imagery. Through Jan. 14, 2018. “Everyday Objects: The evolution and innovations of Joseph Anderson,” exhibition of works by artist-blacksmith and sculptor. www.metalmuseum.org. Nov. 12-April 22. 374 METAL MUSEUM DR. (7746380).

Overton Park Gallery

“Vietnam 65 66 67,” exhibition of photography by Donald Earl Bailey (1939-2011). Through Nov. 24. 1581 OVERTON PARK (229-2967).

Ross Gallery

“Forgotten Fables and Footlong Fractals,” exhibition of works by Jimmy Crosthwait. Through Dec. 6. “Noumenon and Beyond,” exhibition of 18 paintings inspired by the writings of Native American author Vine DeLoria Jr., other Native writers, and the teachings of the Buddha by Tom Murray. www.cbu.edu/gallery. Through Nov. 12. CHRISTIAN BROTHERS UNIVERSITY, PLOUGH LIBRARY, 650 E. PARKWAY S. (321-3000).

Slavehaven Underground Railroad Museum

“Images of Africa Before & After the Middle Passage,” exhibition of photography by Jeff and Shaakira Edison. Ongoing. 826 N. SECOND (527-3427).

TOPS Gallery

“Late Works,” exhibition of sculptures and collages by Marja Vallila. www.topsgallery.com. Through Nov. 11. 400 S. FRONT.

continued on page 29


FREE ACTIVITIES FOR KIDS And Open to the Public!

Santa, decked like the King of Rock ‘n’ Roll, to meet and take pictures with the kids.

THURSDAY, NOV. 16, 6:00 PM Bring your family to experience an annual Memphis tradition as we flip the switch on the Christmas lights at Elvis Presley’s Graceland.

Visit Graceland.com/Holidays for more information!

Memphis: A Very Tasteful Food Blog by Susan Ellis

Dishing it out daily at

MemphisFlyer.com

IMPROVE LIVES. SHOP FAIR-TRADE. The Alternative Market at Trinity United Methodist Church

THREE DAYS: NOVEMBER 10 - 12 FRI, NOV 10, 5 - 7 PM SAT, NOV 11, 9 AM - 5 PM AND SUN, NOV 12, 12 - 3 PM

Coffee / Chocolate / Textiles / Jewelry / Gifts / Toys / Home Decor TRINITY UNITED METHODIST CHURCH 1738 GALLOWAY AVENUE | MIDTOWN | 901.274.6895

m e m p h i s f l y e r. c o m

Hungry

© EPE. Graceland and its marks are trademarks of EPE. All Rights Reserved.

ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT

*Scheduled to appear. Subject to change.

27


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Church Health Christmas Card 2017

by Nancy Cheairs suggested donation

GLORY TO GOD I N T H E H I G H E S T, AND ON EARTH

10

$

PEACE AND GOOD WILL

November 9-15, 2017

TOWARD ALL. LUKE 2:14

It’s always the season of giving. churchhealth.org/christmascards

28


CALENDAR: NOVEMBER 9 - 15 continued from page 26 B O O KS I G N I N G S

A Krisko County Christmas at the Evergreen Theatre, through November 18th

Booksigning by Amanda Lucidon

Author discusses and signs Chasing Light. Accompanying photo exhibit of former First Lady Michelle Obama with former White House photographer. Thurs., Nov. 9, 5:30-7 p.m. BENJAMIN L. HOOKS CENTRAL LIBRARY, 3030 POPLAR (415-2700), WWW.MEMPHISLIBRARY.ORG.

Booksigning by Carolyn Wood

Author discusses and signs Tough Girl: An Olympian’s Journey as part of Seniors Out for Coffee. Sun., Nov. 12, 11:30 a.m.-2:30 p.m. OUTMEMPHIS: THE LGBTQ CENTER OF THE MID-SOUTH, 892 S. COOPER (278-6422), OUTMEMPHIS.ORG.

Booksigning by Joy Mangano

W. C. Handy Heritage Awards

Celebrate Handy’s 144th birthday. Call for tickets or email, heritagetours@bellsouth.net. $50. Sun., Nov. 12, 5:30 p.m. GUEST HOUSE AT GRACELAND, 3600 ELVIS PRESLEY (527-3427).

F O O D & D R I N K E V E N TS

Downtown Dining Week

Enjoy three-course dinners, special menus, and two-for-one lunch specials. $10.17 lunch, $20.17 dinner. Nov. 13-19. DOWNTOWN MEMPHIS, VARIOUS LOCATIONS, WWW.DOWNTOWNDININGWEEK.COM.

Memphis Flyer’s Crafts & Drafts

Enjoy handmade arts-and-crafts shopping opportunities as well as a great selection of beers available for purchase. Sat., Nov. 11, 10 a.m.-4 p.m. CROSSTOWN ARTS, 430 N. CLEVELAND (507-8030), WWW.MEMPHISCRAFTSANDDRAFTS.COM.

F I LM

The Aristocats

Sat., Sun., 4 p.m. Through Nov. 12. CTI 3D GIANT THEATER, IN THE MEMPHIS PINK PALACE MUSEUM, 3050 CENTRAL (636-2362), WWW.MEMPHISMUSEUMS.ORG.

Soul Cinema: Cooley High

Pay what you can. Mon., Nov. 13, 7 p.m. STAX MUSEUM OF AMERICAN SOUL MUSIC, 926 E. MCLEMORE (9462535), WWW.STAXMUSEUM.COM.

Author discusses and signs Inventing Joy at this ticketed event with two separate components: a $40 ticket includes a copy of the book and grants entry to in-conversation portion of the event, $30-$40. Sat., Nov. 11, 11 a.m.-1 p.m. NOVEL, 387 PERKINS EXT. (922-5526), WWW.NAWBOMEMPHIS.ORG.

C O N F E R E N C ES/ C O NVE NTI O N S

Our Time, Our Voice: An MLK50 Youth Convening

More than 350 local high school students are expected to participate. Internationally recognized activists Xiuhtezcatl Martinez and DJ Cavem will headline the event. Fri., Nov. 10, 8 a.m.-4 p.m. FIRST BAPTIST CHURCH, 2835 BROAD (323-2429), WWW. CIVILRIGHTSMUSEUM.ORG.

E X P OS/ SALES

Shop for the Shelter

Benefiting Hernando Animal Shelter. Sat., Nov. 11, 9 a.m.-3 p.m. GALE COMMUNITY CENTER, 2601 ELM (662-429-2688).

F ES T IVALS

Binghampton International Festival

Celebrate the eclectic and global diversity found in Binghampton featuring food, art, and fellowship. Experience what happens when cultures from all over the world converge in one community. Free. Sat., Nov. 11, 12-5 p.m.

CASINO PROMOTIONS

BINGHAMTON UMC, 258 N. MERTON.

Jewish Literary and Cultural Arts Festival

Featuring book signings, workshops, special exhibitions, and Empowered Women Luncheon included in premium series package, and more. Visit website for schedule of events. $12-$40 members, $15-. Through Nov. 19.

S P O R TS / F IT N ES S

Fore the Kids Golf Tournament

Rhodes College Tri Delta tournament benefiting St. Jude Children’s Research Hospital. $150. Sat., Nov. 11, 8 a.m.-3:30 p.m. MIRIMICHI GOLF COURSE, 6195 WOODSTOCK-CUBA, MILLINGTON (630-549-5959), WWW.RHODES.EDU.

Greenline Half Marathon and 5K $25-$65. Sat., Nov. 11, 8 a.m.

SHELBY FARMS, 500 N. PINE LAKE (767-PARK), WWW. SHELBYFARMSPARK.ORG.

Sugar Run 5K

Prizes awarded in male, female, and junior/high student categories benefiting Juvenile Diabetes Research Foundation. Sat., Nov. 11, 10:30 a.m. W. C. JOHNSON PARK, 419 W C. JOHNSON PARK (4572777), WWW.JDRF.ORG.

S P E C IAL EVE N TS

Courage Thru Cancer

Benefiting St. Jude Children’s Research Hospital. $55. Fri., Nov. 10, 8 p.m. MINGLEWOOD HALL, 1555 MADISON (866-609-1744), WWW.MINGLEWOODHALL.COM.

FitzgeraldsTunica.com • 1-662-363-LUCK (5825) • Must be 21 and a Key Rewards member. See Cashier•Players Club for rules. Tax and resort fee not included in listed price. Advance hotel reservations required and subject to availability. $50 credit or debit card is required upon hotel check-in. Arrivals after 6pm must be guaranteed with a credit card. Management reserves the right to cancel, change and modify the event or promotion. Gaming restricted patrons prohibited. Gambling Problem? Call 1-800-522-4700.

ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT

m e m p h i s f l y e r. c o m

MEMPHIS JEWISH COMMUNITY CENTER, 6560 POPLAR (761-0810), WWW.JCCMEMPHIS.ORG.

29


B O O KS By Richard J. Alley

1980-Something A blast from the past might just be anything but.

November 9-15, 2017

S

30

We Saw You.

with MICHAEL DONAHUE memphisflyer.com/wesawyou

ometimes I read books so you don’t have to. Such is the case with Runnin’ With the Devil: A Backstage Pass to the Wild Times, Loud Rock, and the Down and Dirty Truth Behind the Making of Van Halen (Dey Street Books). As I tumble down the far side of my 40s on the way to 50, I have to believe it was my 14-year-old self who dug deep into his pockets for the lawn-cutting money to buy this book. That awkward and anxious kid would not have been disappointed. Written by the band’s David Lee Roth-era manager, Noel Monk (with music journalist Joe Layden), the book is the age-old story of a young band on the rise while riding a wave of sex, booze, drugs, more sex, even more drugs, and tanker trucks full of booze. And then, in chapter two, we begin with sex and drugs and booze. Ad infinitum. The last 30 pages would have been a shock to 14-year-old me (spoiler alert): The band breaks up! It’s the telling of this story that is the most interesting and enlightening, particularly how three-fourths of the band — a band that, admirably, always shared equally in songwriting credit and revenue — treated that fourth, bassist Michael Anthony (not to mention Monk). In the end, we come away with what we already knew: Eddie Van Halen is a guitar god, Roth is a hyperkinetic sex machine, Alex Van Halen plays drums, and Anthony plays bass. And they’re all, for the most part, assholes. I read the novel Ready Player One (Crown) simultaneously. I admit I’m late to the game on this book that is closer now to becoming a film than it is to its first publication date in 2011. It was recommended to me by a number of my peers, and all with the same sales pitch: “You’ll love it. It’s full of ’80s trivia and culture. The music, the movies … blah, blah, blah.” So I put on my parachute pants,

slipped on a Members Only jacket, gelled up my hair Flock of Seagulls style, and dived in. And they were right, it is resplendent with video game, music, and film references from the era I entered at the age of 9 and exited at 19. But is that enough to make a book interesting? Author Ernest Cline clearly thinks so. Ready Player One is set in the dystopian world of 2044, but protagonist Wade Watts, himself a teenager, lives in a nostalgic haze of 1980s culture. It comes in handy as he embarks on a quest for an “Easter egg,” a hidden digital treasure found in video games and films. The orchestrator of the quest and its riddles is the late James Halliday, inventor of a social media platform unlike any we know today. It’s an immersive world where players become whomever they wish to be and do whatever they wish to do. It’s a way to escape the miserable world left for them by those who were in charge during the ’80s. The Easter egg Watts and an army of “gunters,” as the egg hunters are known, is Halliday’s massive fortune, left in a cryptic will to be had by the “winner” of his game. Like the game’s inventor, I came of age in the ’80s, and that decade produced a lot of crap. A lot. But the upshot of aging is the curation of memories and blurring hindsight so we focus only on the good: Purple Rain (the album), The Joshua Tree, Paul’s Boutique, Appetite for Destruction, Die Hard, Airplane!. I met my future wife in 1987. Nostalgia and sentimentality, though, aren’t enough to hold my interest for 750 pages across two books. I can no more stomach the seemingly endless loop of Modern English’s “I Melt with You” today or spend hours on end in an arcade, than I could a viewing of any John Hughes film in its entirety. But this is only one middle-aged reviewer’s opinion, and he’s curmudgeonly and unsentimental. The teenager within finds these books as bitchin’ as an episode of Square Pegs.


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in the poor woman’s brain. It’s just the right tone for Trina, a woman whose ex-husband’s a control freak who left her for another man but still wants a normal family life with the kid. And for her to still behave like a dutiful wife, while he’s off selffulfilling. There’s a lot to work through, and Chateau’s technically excellent, unfussy run through this reliable show-stopper is perfectly isolated by Yates’ simple structures and lifted by a dynamic lighting design that’s gorgeous when it needs to be but never afraid to be a garish as life. It’s hard to muster much sympathy for abusers, and when we meet him, this ensemble musical’s functional protagonist meets the criteria. Marvin’s newfound liberty casts a chilling shadow over ex-wife Trina and his less-than-monogamous lover Whizzer. Nothing can grow in its shade, and Marvin’s struggling to connect with his precocious son Jason — terrifically acted and sung by Joshua Pearce. When the abuse gets physical, Marvin appears past redemption. But community intervenes. Growth and grave circumstances make room for a lot of grace, and Cary Vaughn’s subtle performance as Marvin commands sympathy even when forgiveness is off the table. Director Jerry Chipman also gets great performances from Greg Earnest as the doomed Whizzer, Joshua Charles McGowan III as Pearce in Mendel, the romantically Falsettos compromised family shrink, and Jaclyn Suffel and Christina Hernandez as the friendly lesbians next door. There’s no easy way to summarize Falsettos other than to say it’s a musical that should appeal even to folks who are usually suspect of musicals. Ellen Inghram and Jared Johnson’s hilariously half-assed choreography looks like it was custom made for everyday people living ordinary lives in an alternate dimension where people sing at each other. If there is a message in the sprawl, it’s that life’s more complicated than a three-part mini-opera wrapped inside a four-part modern operetta. That and “everybody’s gotta go sometime.” You should go make reservations soon; seating is limited. Falsettos is at Theatre Memphis through November 18th.

ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT

A

well-deserved standing-O to Theatre Memphis for reviving Falsettos, William Finn and James Lapine’s nearly perfect musical about flawed people living through confusion and catastrophe as the obsessive 1970s crash into the excessive ’80s. Additional applause for producing an intimate show that could nevertheless fill a big room in their little black box where audiences can experience things up close. With its pop-operatic score and lyrics that sound as fresh today as they did 36 years ago, the show’s a gift, and TM’s beautifully designed, effortlessly performed take is enhanced by proximity. Audiences don’t so much watch the many trials and tribulations of Marvin and his family, as live through them like friends and neighbors. Laughter during good times is shared, and handkerchiefs are recommended, particularly if you remember the dawn of the AIDS era, before the killer disease had a name. A sickening sense of dread sets in about halfway through Falsettos, slice-of-life contrivance about life and death in the wake of sexual revolution. Composed and set in the uneasy period just before HIV was identified and AIDS entered the mass-vocabulary, it conveys awareness that “something bad is happening.” Something vast and terrifying that, being nameless, also seems unknowable. This is the horror stamped on top of Falsettos’ domestic drama, and every piece of it’s as real as anything that’s ever been sung front-to-back. The program for Falsettos identifies Jack Yates as the scenic designer while Mandy Heath is credited for lighting, but this is a full-on environmental collaboration. Yates has built a flat cutout skyline, outlined in color-changing LED rope-lights. But Heath’s illumination paints in all the details, frames the action, and amplifies this rollercoaster show’s emotional content. When Emily Chateau sings “I’m Breaking Down,” a whimsically rendered but very intense monologue from a woman on the verge, shadows fall and slashes of multicolored light crackle across the rooftops of sickly green and yellow buildings, like an electrical storm

31


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S P I R ITS By Andria Lisle

Chile Today

Ancho Reyes Verde liqueur is hot stuff for cool drinks.

A COST COST PLUS PLUS FOOD OUTLET

KEEP MORE OF YOUR MONEY m e m p h i s f l y e r. c o m

Think of it, as L.A. Weekly food writer Brad Japhe says, “as bartender’s Sriracha … a way to infuse spicy flavor into any recipe.” The herbaceous flavor of Ancho Reyes Verde makes it a perfect match for Hendrick’s or any of the boutique gins on the market. I love the Ancho Gimlet, which combines equal parts of Ancho Reyes Verde, Hendrick’s, and lime juice with a half-part of simple syrup. The ingredients are shaken with ice, then strained and garnished with a cucumber slice to cut the heat. I don’t have a juicer, but I’d love to try a Night of the Iguana, a cocktail that calls for two ounces of Hendrick’s, ¼ ounce Ancho Reyes Verde, ¾ ounce celery juice, 1/3 ounce cucumber juice, ¾ ounce lemon juice, ¾ ounce simple syrup, and a pinch of sea salt. Like the Ancho Gimlet, all the ingredients are shaken with ice, then garnished with cucumber. Quick and easy is more my speed, which is why I gravitated toward the vodka-soda-Verde recipe I found on Food & Wine’s website. The recipe calls for 1 ounce vodka, ½ ounce of Ancho Reyes Verde, ½ ounce simple syrup, and ¾ ounce fresh lime juice, plus a dash of Angostura bitters. The ingredients are shaken and stirred, then strained into a tall glass with ice and topped with club soda and a lime wedge. Right now, it’s my current favorite Sunday afternoon drink, part of my recovery ritual after spending an intense hour on the soccer field as part of the over-35 women’s indoor league. Ancho Reyes Verde also works well in a daiquiri as a counterpart to a good white rum, or in a traditional margarita. Add it to anything citrus-based, such as a Paloma or a Greyhound. Get crafty, or transform your favorite traditional cocktail recipe. It’ll knock your proverbial socks off — I guarantee it.

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ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT

I

’m more of a diehard traditionalist than an experimenter when it comes to cocktails. I like what I like, and my liquor cabinet is stocked with standards that you’d find anywhere. It’s not even a cabinet, per se, but two trays — one on a cart in my dining room, the other on my kitchen counter. The dining room tray contains varietals that I use less often, such as Vermouth and Cachaça, and the kitchen tray bears the basics — gin, tequila, and vodka — plus whatever I’m into at the moment. Right now, that moment is spicy, thanks to Ancho Reyes Verde, a chile liqueur that has migrated from Mexico to Tennessee liquor store shelves this fall. The elixir, which has roots in Puebla de Zaragoza, Mexico, actually dates back to 1927. It just took 90 years to find its way to Memphis, thanks to Milagro Tequila’s Daniel Schneeweiss and Moises Guindi, who unearthed the forgotten recipe that utilizes Puebla’s signature crop, the ancho chile. Ancho Reyes Verde is made from chiles that were harvested early, then fire roasted while still green. They’re soaked in neutral sugarcane spirits for six months, mashed during the maceration process, then filtered through mesh and paper. The 80-proof greenishamber liqueur that results tastes fresh and bright and packs a twangy, unforgettable kick. It’ll do all the heavy lifting for drinking this fall. The versatile liqueur mixes well with clear liquors, such as tequila, gin, or vodka. It packs a welcome punch that elevates cocktails like margaritas and gimlets to a higher plane. Like citrus zest, the flavor of a vegetable you’ve just picked in your own garden, or the promise of a crisp fall afternoon, it adds a transformative zing that, until you taste it, you don’t realize that you’ve been missing.

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33


FILM REVIEW By Chris McCoy

Ham of the Gods

Taika Waititi takes Thor: Ragnarok in a comedic direction.

S

ince superheroes first ventured onto screens, one name rises above all others. He was the single most influential figure in the development of the tone and character of the genre, and his name was not Thor — it was Adam West. From 1966 to 1968, West played Batman on ABC. He was a hero to millions of children all over the world, and he was still remembered fondly and respected throughout Hollywood at the time of his death last summer at age 88. The real genius in West’s portrayal of the Caped Crusader was that he realized exactly how ridiculous the premise of Batman was. A millionaire dresses up as a bat to fight crime because his parents were killed? Not only that, but there are a bunch of other people whose life experiences have led them to obsessively play themed dress-up and try to take over the world, from whom this Batman must protect us? It’s ludicrous. West managed to look like he was taking the whole thing seriously on the surface, and yet still wink at the audience. Okay, yeah. A bubble with the word “POW!” appears every time I punch this guy wearing

a “HENCHMAN” shirt. Just go with it and have fun. West was magnetic on screen and was zealous about making sure the Batman he portrayed was a good guy, even if that sometimes meant making fun of how square that made him. The 1960s Batman series was a product of its time. The comic book industry had been creatively neutered after the Seduction of the Innocent Congressional hearings decided violent comics were the cause of juvenile crime and the Comics Code Authority was established. West’s Batman, as wildly popular as it was, cemented the image of the comic book superhero as a joke for kids. It wasn’t until Frank Miller and Alan Moore’s work in the 1980s that costumed vigilantes began to be scary again. Tim Burton’s 1989 Batman cast Michael Keaton as a brooding PTSD case in an attempt to get as far as possible from West’s vision of the World’s Greatest Detective. But that’s exactly what makes an artist influential — all subsequent people working in the same field or genre have to respond to him or her. In the influence game, total negation is just as powerful as embrace and emulation.

Australian Chris Hemsworth (above) plays Thor in New Zealander Taika Waititi’s Thor: Ragnarok. Over the years, Batman got grittier and grittier. His darkness infected even Superman, replacing Christopher Reeve’s charismatic blue Boy Scout with Henry Cavill’s charisma-free brood-a-thon. On the Marvel side, the X-Men traded their yellow spandex for Burton-esque black leather. The grimdark trend crested with Christopher Nolan’s insanely paranoid The Dark Knight Rises. In 2014, the worm finally turned with Guardians of the Galaxy, which made the argument that saving the universe in tights should be fun again. Which brings us to Thor: Ragnarok. Despite the hunky presence of Chris Hemsworth, the Thor films have easily been the weakest link in the Marvel Cinematic Universe. But last year’s Ghostbusters reboot proved that Hemsworth has comedic chops to spare, so Marvel mastermind Kevin Feige hired Taika Waititi, a New Zealander whose What We Do in the

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FILM REVIEW By Chris McCoy Shadows and Hunt for the Wilderpeople are two of the decade’s sharpest comedies, to take the franchise in a new direction. In Thor: Ragnarok, Waititi lets Hemsworth go full Adam West. That’s not to say Hemsworth has adopted West’s glorious deadpan, but he has perfected the art of convincing the audience that we’re all in on the same joke. No longer a glowering tower of muscle, Thor now cracks wise and flashes lopsided smiles at the slightest provocation. When he and Loki (Tom Hiddleston) do schtick together, you believe they’re brothers. Thor’s main job is to protect his home Asgard from Hela (Cate Blanchett), his estranged older sister who helped their father Odin (Anthony Hopkins) conquer the realm

with violence before being banished as a threat to peace, but a pleasing subplot takes him to Sakkar, a garbage dump ruled by the Grandmaster (Jeff Goldblum, in fine form) where he is forced into battle against his fellow Avenger the Hulk (Mark Ruffalo). As usual for these $100-million Marvel monstrosities, Thor: Ragnarok is busy and overstuffed, both visually and with characters. But it’s at its best when it’s being irreverent and meta — Waititi’s speciality. He recognized that the best thing that could happen to Thor is for the pendulum to swing back toward West.

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THE LAST WORD by Randy Haspel

FEATUREFLASH | DREAMSTIME

Dave Grohl

Did you hear the Foo Fighters are coming to Memphis on May 3rd? I have — more than a hundred times now. In fact, every time they cut to a commercial during a Grizzlies’ game, there’s Dave Grohl’s ugly mug staring back at me. I’m guessing that I’m going to have to watch that commercial for the remainder of fall and all of winter and spring. Do you think they gave us enough advance notice? I understand that the Foo Fighters are America’s favorite rock band and have been protecting this nation from foo since 1994, but personally, I can’t stand them, in general, and Dave Grohl in particular. All my musician friends tell me what a great service Grohl did with his 2014 mini-series, Sonic Highways, traveling to eight cities with unique musical histories and interviewing luminaries from those locations. He went to Chicago, Nashville, Austin, and New Orleans — but bypassed Memphis, aka “Soulsville,” primarily because he has no soul. He hammers on that guitar just like he used to pound those drums for Nirvana. At least Kurt Cobain wrote songs incorporating dynamics, using delicate melodies, before plunging into thrash and crash. Grohl copped that much from him, but to me, the songs of the Foo Fighters sound like U2 on crank. I’m not expecting anyone to agree with me. After all, the band has nine albums and 11 Grammys, but this power-chord, neo-hard rock is not for me. So now, every time I want to watch a basketball game, I have to sit through several commercials while enduring the screaming of Dave Grohl, greasy hair streaked across his contorted face, resembling someone who’s masturbating with steel wool. To each his or her own, but May? If they sell the thing out, perhaps the ads will cease, but I’m holding on to that “mute” button until the playoffs. Speaking of annoyances on television, did you see that World Series? I’m not referring to the games, which were sensational, but the traditional “Seventh Inning Stretch.” I used to love watching Harry Caray sing “Take Me Out to the Ball Game,” when he was the beloved announcer for the Chicago Cubs. It was part of the joy of the game. Shortly after 9/11, sporting events in this country began taking on a militaristic air. I don’t know why they have to play the National Anthem before a ball game in the first place, but replacing a jolly sing-a-long with “God Bless America” is a bridge too far. Maybe they sang them both, but all I heard was the announcer saying, “Please stand and remove your caps for the singing of ‘God Bless America.’” In the words of Cee Lo Green, “F U.” I already stood and removed my cap; why should I have to repeat the exercise to an Irving Berlin song written in 1918 during WWI? We don’t stand for “White Christmas” or “Easter Parade” or even “Alexander’s Ragtime Band.” Why this particular Irving Berlin tune? Funny you should ask, so I’ll tell you. Shortly after the 9/11 attacks, an assistant media relations director with the San Diego Padres suggested that the song replace “Take Me Out to the Ball Game,” and Major League Baseball instituted it league-wide. It’s now supposed to be on a voluntary basis, but consider this: On August 26, 2008, at Yankee Stadium, a fan was detained by the NYPD and ejected from the game for walking to the restroom during the playing of the song, resulting in a lawsuit. Among the provisions was a court order demanding that the Yankees no longer restrict the movement of fans during the song. That hasn’t stopped the National Hockey League from taking up the practice. Now, they even sing “God Bless America” before the Indy 500. Nothing like a patriotic song before burning lots of rubber and gas. Speaking of anthems, the player protests in the National Football League continue, despite the idiocy of vocal team owners like the Cowboys’ Jerry Jones or Houston Texans owner, Bob McNair, who recently said, “We can’t have the inmates running the prison.” There’s many a slip between the tongue and the lip, and McNair accidentally let slip that the NFL is nothing more than a billionaire’s private boys’ club, and you’re not in it. Ornate stadiums dot the land, playing the role of giant plantations, while the team owner is the straw boss. In 1969, when St. Louis Cardinals’ outfielder Curt Flood was fighting for free agency, he said, “A well-paid slave is still a slave.” Currently, there is a lawsuit pending against the NFL by Colin Kaepernick, who began kneeling during the anthem in 2016 to protest police brutality against African Americans. The suit accuses several NFL owners, including Jones, McNair, and Trump pal Robert Kraft, of collusion to prevent Kaepernick from playing in the league. Despite a spate of injuries to quarterbacks and sub-par performances by their replacements, Kaepernick (once considered a premier quarterback) has not played for the past two seasons. The court has ordered seven team owners to be deposed and to turn over all cellphones and email records pertaining to Kaepernick or the players’ protest. This might get good. If I were a black athlete in the NFL, or any player with a conscience, I’d take a knee before the “Star-Spangled Banner,” too, because our National Anthem is blatantly racist and needs to be changed. It stirs the hearts of millions who never paid attention to the third verse, which literally celebrates the deaths of slaves. I’ll save you the trouble of looking it up: “No refuge could save the hireling and slave/From the terror of flight or the gloom of the grave/And the star-spangled banner in triumph doth wave/O’er the land of the free and the home of the brave.”  If you were a descendant of slaves, would you stand up for that? The author, Francis Scott Key, was a lawyer from a Maryland plantation, who, according to Smithsonian.com, “not only profited from slaves, he harbored racist conceptions of … human potential.” Serving as District Attorney for the city of Washington, Key said that Africans in America were “a distinct and inferior race of people, which all experience proves to be the greatest evil that afflicts a community.” Key’s song was only established as the National Anthem in 1931. That was just a few years before Irving Berlin wrote “Heaven Watch the Philippines,” but we don’t remove our caps for that. They don’t teach you this stuff in White History. Speaking of white history, perhaps Dave Grohl could pen a new alt-rock national anthem and debut it during his visit to Memphis next May. He’s only got six months. I can hardly wait. Randy Haspel writes the “Recycled Hippies” blog.

m e m p h i s f l y e r. c o m

In which the author grumbles about Dave Grohl, the NBA, and standing for patriotic songs.

THE LAST WORD

Fooey!

39


MINGLEWOOD HALL

JUST ANNOUNCED: NXT LIVE! [12/15]

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MEMPHIS MADE BREWING Taproom hours:

Mon 4 - 7 p.m., Thurs & Fri 4 - 10 p.m., Sat 1 - 10 p.m., Sun 1 - 7 p.m.

768 S. Cooper • 901.207.5343 FREE BREWERY TOURS 4 P.M. SATURDAY & SUNDAY

GONER RECORDS New/ Used LPs, 45s & CDs. We Buy Records! 2152 Young Ave 901-722-0095

PRESSURE WASHING Patios, Siding, Decks, Sidewalks, Driveways, Fences ans More!

Five Piece Band available for weddings, corporate events, parties etc... in Memphis and Nashville. Song list on website. More information including song lists and booking information at www.rick.business or call 407.608.8015. Calendar will fill up fast so act now. Special discounts for veterans.

TUT-UNCOMMON ANTIQUES 421 N. Watkins St. 278-8965 1500 sq. ft. of Vintage & Antique Jewelry. Retro Furniture and Accessories. Original Paintings, Sculpture, Pottery, Art & Antiques. We are the only store in the Mid-South that replaces stones in costume jewelry.

The Coach House @ Loflin Yard

loflinyard.com • 7 W. Carolina Ave • 249-3046

Call or text Steve 901-277-2442

D & D ELECTRIC All Electrical services provided. Indoor/Outdoor lighting, repairs, remodels, additions, panel change outs. No job too small. 901-489-6745

ACOUSTIC SUNDAY LIVE! THREE WOMEN AND THE TRUTH

featuring: Gretchen Peter, Kathy Mattea and Mary Gauthier with very special guest Grammy® Lifetime Achievement Recipient TOM PAXTON, with the Don Juans. Sun, Dec. 17, 2017 - 7pm (doors open at 6:15). Halloran Centre for Performing Arts 225 S. Main St. Memphis, TN 38103 Tickets visit orpheum-memphis.com or call 901.525.3000.

Need a DJ? Call DJ FM 901-603-7325 | www.fmdjservice.com

11/8 - Live Band Karaoke w/Public Record at 7p 11/9 - Game Night 11/10 - Amy LaVere & Will Sexton at 8p 11/11 - Sat Night Showcase w/John Paul Keith at 8p 11/12 - Brunch w/The Neatos, 12p-3p railgarten.com • 2166 Central Ave • 231-5043

FABULOUS CARPET CARE Steam Clean 3 Rooms For $99. “It’s Thorough, Dries Quickly & Stays Clean Longer - Or It’s Free.” Call 901.282.5306

CHIP N’ DALE’S ANTIQUES 3457 Summer Avenue • Memphis, TN 38122 EVERYTHING ON SALE! Open Tues-Sat | 901-452-5620 “Celebrating 30 years in Business”

Memphis Flyer 11.9.17  

This week: Tubby Time, Take Two: our look at what awaits the Memphis Tiger basketball team this season, and a chat with coach Tubby Smith. A...