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FRESH STORIES DAILY AT MEMPHISFLYER.COM MAEVE BROPHY P16 • MATT BOWERS’ MEMPHIS P23 • AMERICAN UTOPIA P26

OUR 1652ND ISSUE 10.22.20

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It’s On! YOUR 2020 ELECTION GUIDE: the races, the candidates, the record turnout.

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October 22-28, 2020

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CARRIE O’GUIN Advertising Operations Manager/ Distribution Manager JERRY D. SWIFT Advertising Director Emeritus KELLI DEWITT, CHIP GOOGE Senior Account Executives MICHELLE MUSOLF Account Executive DESHAUNE MCGHEE Classified Advertising Manager ROBBIE FRENCH Warehouse and Delivery Manager JANICE GRISSOM ELLISON, KAREN MILAM, DON MYNATT, TAMMY NASH, RANDY ROTZ, LEWIS TAYLOR, WILLIAM WIDEMAN Distribution THE MEMPHIS FLYER is published weekly by Contemporary Media, Inc., P.O. Box 1738, Memphis, TN 38101 Phone: (901) 521-9000 Fax: (901) 521-0129 memphisflyer.com CONTEMPORARY MEDIA, INC. ANNA TRAVERSE FOGLE Chief Executive Officer ASHLEY HAEGER Controller JEFFREY GOLDBERG Chief Revenue Officer BRUCE VANWYNGARDEN Editorial Director MARGIE NEAL Production Operations Director KRISTIN PAWLOWSKI Digital Services Director MOLLY WILLMOTT Special Events Director LYNN SPARAGOWSKI Circulation and Accounting Manager KALENA MATTHEWS Marketing Coordinator

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CONTENTS

BRUCE VANWYNGARDEN Editor SHARA CLARK Managing Editor JACKSON BAKER Senior Editor TOBY SELLS Associate Editor CHRIS MCCOY Film and TV Editor ALEX GREENE Music Editor MICHAEL DONAHUE JON W. SPARKS Staff Writers JESSE DAVIS Copy Editor, Staff Writer JULIE RAY Calendar Editor MATTHEW J. HARRIS Editorial Assistant LORNA FIELD, RANDY HASPEL, RICHARD MURFF, FRANK MURTAUGH, MEGHAN STUTHARD Contributing Columnists AIMEE STIEGEMEYER, SHARON BROWN Grizzlies Reporters ANDREA FENISE Fashion Editor KENNETH NEILL Founding Publisher

OUR 1652ND ISSUE 10.22.20 “He’ll listen to the scientists,” Trump added in a mocking tone, before saying, “If I listened to the scientists, we would right now have a country that would be in a massive depression. Instead we’re like a rocket ship. Take a look at the numbers.” This is not a parody. It’s a paragraph from a news report on Donald Trump’s rally in Nevada on Sunday. He was mocking Joe Biden because Biden has said he will listen to scientists and medical experts about how to handle the pandemic that’s destroyed our economy and killed 220,000 Americans and counting. But for Trump, “listening to the scientists” is for suckers, and he’s telling his faithful that Biden is a fool for doing so. “Lock him up” is the crowd’s ever-reliable response. “Listen to me” is now the president’s only policy position. Listen to me, instead of the scientists or the doctors or the generals or the environmentalists or the hurricane forecasters or anyone else daring to cross him. This isn’t politics. It’s a one-ring circus. A traveling salvation show. Trump’s become the Garrison Keillor of the deplorables, bouncing around the country weaving tales and fables and jokes tailored to his faithful brood’s predispositions toward racism, xenophobia, angry patriotism, and sucker-bait religions. Scary Home Companion. And, in truth, Trump’s campaign is a perfect distillation of the great divide in American politics. Call it what you will — science versus faith; logic versus emotion; opinion versus fact — but the reason you can’t have a reasonable discussion about politics with your Trump-supporting friends on Facebook, the reason you’re now blocking and unfriending and unfollowing family members and friends, is because there are no agreed-upon “facts” to argue about any longer. There are two different realities, shaped by two different informational ecosystems. We speak different languages. We are warring tribes. If you argue with a Trumper, they’ll tell you your sources — New York Times, CNN, Washington Post, NPR, Wall Street Journal, or any mainstream media — are biased, as are your fact-checking sites, such as Snopes.com. I don’t argue anymore. It’s not worth the rise in blood pressure. But there’s no denying that one-third of the country appears to believe Trump is some sort of “tell it like it is” man of the people who can do no wrong, while the rest of us think he’s a lying, amoral con man with the ethos of a mob boss. That’s a serious divide. Members of my tribe read Trump’s statements like the one above and think, “What kind of idiot would believe such obviously disprovable lies? We are in a massive economic depression. Businesses are failing, millions of us are out of work. What numbers is he talking about? Taking off like a rocket ship? Seriously? And since when is not listening to scientists about science a good thing?” But Trump’s tribe believes that if their leader says scientists are wrong, then they’re wrong. End of story. And they can find plenty of supporting ammo for whatever bilge comes out of Trump’s mouth from their own information sources. Fox News, NewsMax, Alex Jones, Rush Limbaugh, Tucker Carlson, Sean Hannity, and others are all only too happy to prop up their Lyin’ King. Finding someone to say masks are worthless? Easy as pie. Need a story about how well herd immunity works? No problem. One might have hoped that Trump’s recent COVID infection might have sobered him up, might have given him some empathy for Americans who’ve lost loved ones to the disease. But no, just the opposite. Trump flaunts his recklessness at rallies, day after day, spouting his anecdotal riffs and bald-faced lies at the unmasked faces of his red-clad sycophants, packed together like lemmings near the cliff ’s edge. There is no strategy here. If Trump had an ounce of political sense, he’d be trying to attract new voters, maybe even moderating his brutish attacks on Democratic governors and members of his own party who dare to raise the slightest objection to his antics. But he’s doubling down, searing his own base down to the diamond core of true believers, preferring to bask in their cheers of adoration rather than reaching out for new voters. It’s a bizarre N E WS & O P I N I O N cult of personality, filled with rabid THE FLY-BY - 4 evangelicals, proud know-nothings, NY TIMES CROSSWORD - 6 SPORTS - 8 white supremacists, militia members, COVER STORY QAnon cultists, and other assorted “ANSWERING THE CALL” fruits and nuts. And I’m sure some are BY JACKSON BAKER - 10 fine people, but they’re not sending WE RECOMMEND - 14 their best. MUSIC - 16 Mark Twain once said (he really did, CALENDAR - 18 I swear): “How easy it is to make people BOOKS - 23 FOOD - 24 believe a lie, and how hard it is to undo BREWS - 25 that work again!” FILM - 26 It’s true. We need to undo that work C L AS S I F I E D S - 28 now. Vote. LAST WORD - 31 Bruce VanWyngarden brucev@memphisflyer.com

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THE

fly-by

MEMernet A roundup of Memphis on the World Wide Web. R E D D IT B O NAN Z A! Memphis dazzled on Reddit last week. Here are just a few examples. I NTE R ESTI N G AS D U C K

A gif of the Peabody Hotel duck march made the front page in a post to the r/interestingasfuck subreddit. In 24 hours, the post had more than 87,500 upvotes, 1,200 comments, and the gif had been viewed 3.5 million times.

October 22-28, 2020

M U R I CA

This old (2019) tweet resurfaced over on the r/Murica subreddit. TH I S. TH I S R I G HT H E R E. The winner of the snarkiest bumper sticker in Memphis goes to …

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POSTED TO R/MEMPHIS BY U/BETWEENTHEWINDS

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Questions, Answers + Attitude Edited by Toby Sells

W E E K T H AT W A S By Flyer staff

COVID, Schools, & Memphis in May “Fall wave” arrives, students get a break, and record losses recorded on canceled festival. WE E K LY VI R US C O U NTS Monday: new cases - 159, total cases - 33,134, total deaths - 537 Tuesday: new cases - 347, total cases - 33,481, total deaths - 537 Wednesday: new cases - 144, total cases, 33,625, total deaths - 539 Thursday: new cases - 85, total cases - 33,710, total deaths - 544 Friday: new cases - 250, total cases - 33,960, total deaths - 546 C OVI D -LES S LYF T Rideshare platform Lyft announced last week that the company developed its new “clean ride guide,” cleaning protocols for rideshare vehicles, with the Memphis-based University of Tennessee Health Science Center. ‘FALL WAVE I S H E R E’ Health officials said last week that Clockwise from top left: No negative consequences for student assessments, “the fall wave of COVID-19 is here.” “fall wave” of COVID arrives, gun crime is up, and stay home for Halloween New daily case counts of the virus are on the rise in Shelby County, just like other parts of the country. The most active growth its best financial year last year with revenues of more than $12 was in Bartlett, Lakeland, Arlington, and some outlying areas million, according to MIM’s annual report. of Millington. “The challenges presented by the pandemic represent the most difficult period our organization has ever faced, and C OVI D HALLOWE E N the challenges are ongoing,” said James Holt, MIM’s presiNeither trick-or-treating nor trunk-or-treating are recommenddent and CEO. ed this year in new guidelines issued last week from the Shelby To adjust to the economic challenges, MIM took federal PayCounty Health Department. Other activities — big parties, check Protection Program (PPP) loans, cut costs, and furloughed carnivals, festivals, and haunted houses — are already outlawed most of the staff. by health directives. Health officials recommended online parties, drive-by events, LE E G IVES S C H O O LS A B R EAK Halloween movie nights at drive-ins, and house decorations. Tennessee students and teachers won’t fear negative consequences for student assessments this year, Tennessee Governor Bill Lee G U N CR I M E R ISES announced Friday. However, student assessments will continue Gun crimes in Memphis rose in the first half of 2020, according for the 2020-2021 school year. to information released by the University of Memphis Public “Given the unprecedented disruption that the COVID-19 Safety Institute (PSI) last week. pandemic and extended time away from the classroom has had Violent crimes involving guns were down slightly in the first on Tennessee’s students, my administration will work with the quarter of 2020. They rose during the second quarter, though. [Tennessee General Assembly] to bring forward a solution for So, from January through June, violent gun crimes rose by 23 this school year that alleviates any burdens associated with edupercent this year over the same period in 2019. cator evaluations and school accountability metrics,” Lee said. M E M P H I S I N MAY LOS S ES The Memphis in May International Festival (MIM) reported a record loss of revenue this year after the cancellation of the festival on COVID-19 concerns. Last week, festival leaders said the nonprofit organization lost around $1.8 million in 2020, making it the worst financial year in the festival’s 44 years. The loss comes after the festival recorded

CAN NAB EAT Medical marijuana sales in Arkansas topped $163 million since May 2019, Arkansas officials said last week. So far, 87,413 Arkansans have a patient card and have bought more than 25,000 pounds of marijuana. Visit the News Blog at memphisflyer.com for fuller versions of these stories and more local news.


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For Release Monday, August 20, 2018

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The New York Times Syndication Sales Corporation 620 Eighth Avenue, New York, N.Y. 10018 For Information Call: 1-800-972-3550 For Release Thursday, August 30, 2018

ACROSS

35 Activating, as a security system 1 Write 37 Feature of two 4 Recipe details: lowercase letters Abbr. of the alphabet 8 Popular 38 Consumer newspaper 40 Yellow or gray puzzle 41 Dessert made 14 Words of promise primarily of flour, butter, eggs and 15 Respectful term sugar of address 43 K-12 school org. 16 Yoga poses 44 Ring-measuring 17 Bother devices 19 Black out, in a 47 Sign way 48 Astronauts’ 20 Accountant workplace 22 Much-overused 50 Comment filler word accompanying a shrug 23 Smartphones replaced them, 52 Sierra Club for short founder John 53 “Let’s go!” 24 German wheels 27 “It wasn’t me,” for 54 Numerical prefix … or, one with 62-Across, 30 Cirque du Soleil another name for performers this puzzle’s key symbol 34 Rival school of Winchester 57 Deadeyes

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Edited by Will Shortz Crossword Pinch Tower

62 Olympian Jim or Ian 65 Jack-of-all-trades 66 Plow and plant again 67 “Make room for life” sloganeer 68 “Am ___ understand …?” 69 Charm 70 & 71 Symbol used four times in this puzzle with four different meanings

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Online subscriptions: Today’s puzzle and more than 7,000 past puzzles, nytimes.com/crosswords ($39.95 a year). Read about and comment on each puzzle: nytimes.com/wordplay.

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The Beckford Hotel will face Main Street, and will consist of seven to 10 51 floors of The Tower Project. The letter says, “The Beckford Hotel is our luxury hotel brand for the Tower High Rise on vacant property in the Pinch. building project.55 ” The proposal letter The property for the project is now describes the Beckford as a “new, luxury owned by the city. The group will ask the five-star hotel.” 57 58 59 council’s approval to buy it and get other “Residents and visitors alike will be approvals necessary to develop it. drawn to the project by the glass tower anThe Tower would feature about 85 choring the city and river view as well as 64 65 66 independently owned condominiums, the skyline of the tower,” reads the letter. a “chic style” hotel called The Beckford, “Locals and tourists will be encouraged to 20,000 square feet of ground-fl oor comexplore the commercial and public69 spaces 68 mercial space, a rooftop lounge, “highby the unobstructed glazed building and tech sky conference rooms, a state-of-the- architectural accent lighting. art interior tourist lobby/plaza, “Entry to the hotel facility along N. 71 and all of 72 that would be centered on a subterranean Main St. will be harmonious yet strikingly interior parking structure.” distinguishable from the commercial and “The Tower Project will invigorate the condominium entries.” Pinch District and remain within the city’s The project is slated to create 300 PUZZLE BY ERIK AGARD current planning dynamics,” reads a letter construction jobs. The hotel will bring to the council from The Tower Group Proj- 55 full-time employees. Overall, the ect. “We will also provide additional housproject would create 65-125 “total living ing diversity that complements the eclectic wage jobs with annual incomes ranging make-up of the area. The project will create from $35,000-$180,000,” according to both construction and long-term employthe proposal. ment opportunities. This development If the team can get the land and apwill also encourage use of multimodal provals, construction would begin on or transportation options and activate the before October 2021. The project would streetscape and river-side area.” take 30 months to complete. The structure will be engineered and The last major development news in designed by the HOK architectural firm, the Pinch came in late 2019 with the anwith that group’s Miami office serving as nouncement of a blockbuster, multi-block the lead. The project’s lead architect will be project from New York developer Tom InKennieth Richardson, a native Memphian trator with a price tag of $1.1 billion. That who now lives in Miami. The group’s letter plan would build nearly 1,000 residential says Richardson has “previously designed, units, two hotels, and office and retail coordinated, and built 40 percent of the space in the now largely vacant Pinch.

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on the study.

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57 Georgia’s 1 2 capital: Abbr. 14 58 Approach respectfully, in modern parlance 17 64 Indian yogurt dish 20 66 Boys’ school near Windsor 67 Of all time 27 28 68 Ringo of the Beatles 33 69 Political competition 36 is proA new, 30- to 45-story tower posed for the Pinch District in a $180 70 Farm structure million project that would reshape the 71 Weirdlycity’s spooky skyline. Memphis City Council members were 72 Space slated on toa hear a proposal from The Tower 50 Group Project on Tuesday.49 The group’s schedule new project, called “The Tower Project,” is glass, high-rise building to be built 73 Friend ainthin,war 54

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28 Musical Yoko 29 Alien 30 Fix, as an election 31 Picture holder 32 Dove’s sound 37 Item on a concert stage 38 Tending to one’s own well-being 40 Instagram

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45 R&B singer the hits “So Sick” and “M Independen 47 Princess’ headwear

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50 Bested in a dog contest

51 Stopwatche sand clocks


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NEWS & OPINION

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S P O R TS B y Fr a n k M u r t a u g h

Pandemic Series

“All we really need is something to be enthusiastic about.”

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two greatest World Series heroes in St. Louis Cardinals history — Lou Brock and Bob Gibson — died within four weeks of each other, just as this year’s postseason arrived. Earlier this month, Whitey Ford died, the most decorated pitcher in New York Yankees history. Three days later, Joe Morgan passed away. Playing for the fabled Big Red Machine of the 1970s (a team that featured Johnny Bench and Pete Rose), Morgan was named MVP after each of Cincinnati’s championship seasons. All of these men were Hall of Famers, all of them World Series heroes from a time that seems further away in 2020 than it did 12 months ago. A packed Busch Stadium cheering Gibson’s 17th strikeout to close Game 1 of the 1968 Series? That’s an image from a dimension we can’t seem to reach, one we now wonder if we’ll ever see again.

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e careful what you wish for in a sports column. For the better part of two decades, I’ve written in this space about the need for National Baseball Day, a holiday to recognize and celebrate this country’s longtime national pastime. The day would coincide each year with Game 1 of the World Series; Americans from coast to coast would be allowed to stay home with family and friends and — should they choose — watch the Fall Classic together, with the first pitch at 3 p.m. Eastern time, early enough for the youngest baseball fans to see the final out. How is it that a country so devoted to sports and leisure doesn’t have a day on the calendar to formally salute the rewards of recreation? National Baseball Day would check that box nicely. So, here we are in 2020, and more people will be at home for Game 1 of the World Series — by choice or by pink slip — than in any other year of our lifetimes. A pandemic has slammed doors shut both on business and recreation, those of us fortunate enough to be able to work from our dens and living rooms doing so, while those unable to earn a salary without gathering crowds and cheering audiences … endure the best they’re able. As for the World Series, all games will be played at a neutral site (a “bubble” in pandemic terms), Globe Life Field in Arlington, Texas. Major League Baseball and the state of Texas will allow small “pods” of fans to scatter at safe distances within the ballpark. So, yes, there will be some cheering when the Tampa Bay Rays and Los Angeles Dodgers take the field Tuesday for the 116th World Series. (Alas, the game is still scheduled to maximize ad revenue. So, first pitch will be in prime time.) In a year with so much on hold, can baseball’s showcase lift a nation’s spirits? For anyone with a modicum of affection for baseball history, 2020 has been an absolute kick in the teeth. Al Kaline — for many, the face of the Detroit Tigers franchise — died in April. Tom Seaver — for everyone, the face of the New York Mets franchise — died in August. The

The 2020 baseball season was abbreviated, of course. Reduced from 162 games to 60, the campaign was more of a sprint than baseball fans are used to, and 16 teams — six more than has been customary — made the playoff field, an attempt to make sure a rightful champion doesn’t get erased because of the sliced schedule (and yes, more televised playoff games to pad the sagging bank accounts of MLB owners). But the games have indeed been a happy distraction, particularly in the climate of a national election taking place in the most divisive America many of us have seen. The bitter debate over a Supreme Court nominee not your thing? Tune in to see former Memphis Redbird Randy Arozarena slug cowhide for the Rays. Worn out by a U.S. president downplaying a virus that’s killed almost a quarter-million Americans? You gotta see the exuberance Dodger outfielder Mookie Betts brings to the diamond. British writer Charles Kingsley said it best: “All we really need is something to be enthusiastic about.”


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NEWS & OPINION

m e m p h i s f l y e r. c o m


COVER STORY BY JACKSON BAKER

It’s On!

PHOTOGRAPHS BY JACKSON BAKER

Your 2020 Election Guide: the races, the candidates, the record turnout.

(left) Roadside stand, 2020-style; (right) Republican U.S. Representative David Kustoff at the podium

F

October 22-28, 2020

or Democrats, especially, the memories of four years ago are still very much alive — not just the nerve-crunching countdown of election night but the hopeful dawning of January 21st, just after Donald Trump’s inauguration, when, on an unseasonably warm day, multigendered masses of Memphians gathered for the Women’s March Downtown — not a protest of the new regime so much as an affirmation that a reckoning would come, that the historical moment could be reversed. It was the first act, enacted simultaneously in virtually every other American city, of what would come to be known as the Resistance, not just by those involved in it but by Trump, the intended target and unexpected winner of the presidency, who, clearly, could boast his own crowds, with a wholly different set of hopes and fears. The unprecedented rush of early voters to the polls this year, which began, locally, on Wednesday, October 14th, undoubtedly derives from both sources. Records will almost surely be broken by the end of early voting on Friday of next 10 week, October 29th. A big vote is also likely for Election Day itself — Tuesday,

November 3rd — and the real unknown quantity, undoubtedly huge and perhaps decisive, is expected to come in a flood of mail-in ballots, a volume made possible in Tennessee only through the tireless legal efforts of local activists. As was the case under the wholly different circumstances of 2016, the Democratic candidate — in this case former Vice President Joe Biden — is favored by the polls. Nationwide, that is. Here in Tennessee, where the Republican Party still dominates the electorate, it’s considered to be in the bag for Republican Trump.

in a bitterly fought Republican primary, with Hagerty, the handpicked candidate of President Trump, emerging triumphant. Hagerty, a former state industrial development commissioner and Ambassador to Japan, no doubt expected, like most other observers, that his Democratic challenger would be Nashville lawyer James Mackler, a former Iraq war pilot who had basically been running for two years. But Mackler would finish second in the year’s biggest upset, as unsung

The U.S. Senate Race

Nowhere has the generational seachange been more obvious than in races for the state’s major offices. In 2018, Republicans won decisive victories for governor and U.S. senator over name Democratic candidates after competitive Republican primaries in which the winners — Governor Bill Lee and Senator Marsha Blackburn — were actually decided. The action was similar this year when GOP senatorial candidates Bill Hagerty and Manni Sethi vied

Memphis environmentalist Marquita Bradshaw pulled off a win in the Democratic primary. Starting the general election with approximately $22,000 in funding, compared to Hagerty’s $12 million, the plucky Bradshaw has advanced her receipts to the level of just under $1 million — still far short of Hagerty’s current $14 million. The two Senate candidates had been scheduled for a statewide debate on the Nexstar television network, but mostly unexplained circumstances caused a cancellation.  Other Senate candidates on the ballot as independents are: Aaron James, Yomi “Fapas” Faparusi Sr., Jeffrey Alan Grunau, Ronnie Henley, G. Dean Hill, Steven J. Hooper, Elizabeth McLeod, Kacey Morgan, and Eric William Stansberry.

U.S. House Races

House candidate Torrey Harris at TV taping

Incumbent Congressmen David Kustoff and Steve Cohen are also up for re-election. Eighth District Representative Kustoff, a Republican, is opposed by Democratic nominee Erika Stotts Pearson and by independents


(left) Dems on display; (right) Republican Senate candidate Bill Hagerty with supporters in Millington

Legislative Races

In Shelby County itself, there are several competitive legislative races,

and, as is the case with the presidency, most of them involve comeback hopes on the part of Democrats, who over the last several decades have seen their ancestral control, in every place but the inner city, yield to a new breed of buttoned-down Republicans. The competitive races are those along the line where city and suburb meet in a zone of shifting populations. State House District 96, which is focused on Cordova, a sprawling mix

of blue- and white-collar ethnicities, reverted to the Democrats four years ago. Democratic State Representative Dwayne Thompson faces a challenge there from Republican regular Patricia Possel, well-known for her efforts in the de-annexation movement. In House District 83, a somewhat more glam neighboring district to the immediate south, incorporating hunks of East Memphis and Germantown, a largely managerial class of voters

will decide between incumbent GOP Representative Mark White, who heads the House education committee, and Jerri Green, a promising new Democratic face who hopes to punish White for his pro-voucher efforts in an area whose public schools are a major source of local pride. District 87, the third part of this triadic battle zone, lies to the north, continued on page 12

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Jon Dillard and James Hart. Ninth District incumbent Cohen, a Democrat, is opposed by Republican nominee Charlotte Bergmann and by independents Dennis Clark and Bobby  Lyons. Both incumbents are expected to win handily.

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(left) House candidate Gabby Salinas (left) watches a belly dance in her honor; (right) State Rep. John DeBerry speaks to GOP group

continued from page 11

October 22-28, 2020

stretching from parts of East Memphis through Bartlett to the Gray’s Creek/ Eads area. The District 87 seat is open. Incumbent Republican state Representative Jim Coley, a teacher, is retiring. The contestants are the GOP’s John Gillespie, a Republican activist and grant coordinator at Trezevant Episcopal Home, and Gabby Salinas, a scientific researcher and former cancer patient at St. Jude Children’s Research Hospital whose backstory of immigration from Bolivia and survival has gained her abundant publicity and inspirational cachet over the years. Salinas came very close to upsetting GOP mainstay Brian Kelsey in a state Senate race two years ago, and her message of Medicaid expansion and her ample finances give her good chances again. State District 90 is where a fourth legislative race has attracted serious interest this year, and the main issue is party loyalty itself. For the last 26 years, minister/businessman John DeBerry has represented the highly diverse district, which connects Frayser and South Memphis with sections of Midtown and Chickasaw Gardens.

An African American (and uncle of the aforesaid Senate candidate Bradshaw), DeBerry has consistently opposed abortion and supported school vouchers, and his stand on those two issues was, along with his affiliation with the conservative American Legislative Exchange Council (ALEC), enough to provoke the state Democratic executive committee to remove him from the Democratic ballot this year. On the strength of his name recognition and with somewhat more than tacit encouragement from the local Republican establishment, DeBerry is campaigning for re-election as an independent. He is opposed by Democratic nominee Torrey Harris, a member of the LGBTQ community who works in human resources and has the declared support of numerous progressive sources to go with the party label. The other legislative races are either unopposed or pro forma cases. Incumbent Democrat Barbara Cooper is opposed by Republican Rob White in District 86, and Republican incumbent Kevin Vaughan has a Democratic opponent in Lynette Williams. Democrat Julie Byrd Ashworth

Records will almost surely be broken by the end of early voting on Friday of next week, October 29th. challenges GOP incumbent Paul Rose in District 32.

Municipal Races

Various local municipalities have elections on November 3rd, as well: In Bartlett, incumbent Alderwoman Paula Sedgwick in Position 6 is opposed by Kevin Quinn. Brad Ratliff, and Portia Tate are on the ballot for School Board, Position 1. In Germantown, here are several Alderman races: Sherrie Hicks vs. Terri Johnson for Position 3; John Paul Miles, Roderick Motley, and Brian Ueleke for Position 4; and Jon McCreery and Brandon Musso for Position 5. There is one Germantown School Board race: Brian Curry and Scott Williams for Position 3. In Lakeland, Jim Atkinson, Scott Carmichael, and Wesley Alan Wright are vying for the two open city

We Saw You.

commissioner positions. In Millington, the position of Alderman for Position 7 is sought by Mike Caruthers and Tom Stephens; school board races are between Marlon Evans and Greg Ritter for Position 1, and Mark Coulter and Deanna Speight for Position 3. In Collierville, Harold Curtis Booker, Thomas J. Swan, and John Worley are competing for Alderman Position 1. Position 3 is sought by William Boone, William Connor Lambert, Missy Marshall, Rick Rout, Scott Rozanski, and Robert Smith. Position 5 is contested by Gregory Frazier and John E. Stamps. For Collierville School Board, Position 3, the contestants are Madan Birla, Paul Childers, Rachelle Maier, and Kristina Kelly White. REMINDER: The deadline to request a ballot by mail is Tuesday, October 27th, and the completed ballot must be received by Tuesday, November 3rd, by close of polls. However, voters who are at least 60 years old, people with underlying health conditions including conditions arguing for a susceptibility to COVID-19, and those caring for others susceptible to the illness can apply for an absentee ballot. 

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12

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V I E W P O I N T B y B r y c e W. A s h b y and Michael J. LaRosa

Losing the Latinos There is no monolithic “Latino” vote, but Trump is managing to alienate most of it. dren) by the Trump administration may bring this divergent vote together. Trump’s actions include the following efforts: First, the deliberate policy, organized in the White House and executed through DOJ, of separating parents from children at our southern border and placing children (literally) in cages should serve to unite not only the Latino community against Trump but anyone with a soul. Second, Trump’s “Puerto Rican Paper Towel Toss” and his abandonment of aid to the island after Hurricane Maria in 2017; third, his early reference to Haiti and El Salvador as “shithole countries.” Fourth, “the beautiful wall” that was never funded and only haphazardly built. Lastly, the Trump administration, certainly in violation of the law, has unilaterally changed the arc of our immigration system so that we now essentially deny asylum-seekers the opportunity to plead their case before an American judge. This utter assault on core, fundamental, and established American values may serve as the impetus to mobilize the Latino vote. We can’t pretend to understand why, given the realities presented above, Latinos would support the president. Yet millions within the Latino categorization align with the Republican Party, and most Republicans continue championing the president heading into next month’s election. Here in Memphis, and in the nation writ large, both the health and economic disparities laid bare and exacerbated by the pandemic have highlighted the Trump administration’s galloping incompetence. Latinos need fewer platitudes, less paper towel showmanship, and more governmental support that translates to better employment, stronger healthcare access, and the best possible public schools that the wealthiest nation on the planet should provide. It’s not easy to understand how Latinos, in this city and in this nation, would eagerly vote for President Trump. This administration has been a catastrophe for those who view America as a nation of immigrants, as a welcoming refuge for people fleeing poverty, oppression, and political turmoil abroad. That dream endures in the American imagination, as the four-year nightmare of Trump and his policies of anger, division, and delusion ends. Soon. Bryce Ashby is a Memphis-based attorney and the board chair of Latino Memphis. Michael LaRosa teaches history at Rhodes College.

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The national media has reported recently (and erroneously) that Latino support for Joe Biden is flagging. These reports note that Hillary Clinton, in October 2016, held wider margins of support with Latino voters across the nation. First, “Latino” is a strange term and fails to adequately capture the vastness and diversity of the Hispanic/Latino/ Latinx communities living in this nation. “Latino” creates the appearance of a monolithic culture, when in reality people descended from Puerto Rico are called Americans or Puerto Ricans. Mexicans living here are more accurately Mexicans or Mexican-Americans. People from Brazil are “Brazilian”; labeling them as Hispanic is historically and culturally inaccurate, as Spain (for the vast majority of Brazilians) has nothing to do with their identity. Latino historical assimilation here in the USA is equally complicated. In Memphis, our Latinx community is relatively young (largely dating back to the early 1990s) and has evolved from a community mainly comprised of Mexican immigrants to one that increasingly draws from throughout Central America. The community here is younger demographically and poorer economically than the more established Cuban community in Miami. That community grew in direct proportion to the Cuban Revolution; the Miami community is relatively wealthy, virulently anticommunist, and politically powerful in the state. Miami Cubans, with a 60-year foothold in South Florida, tend to vote conservatively, but their children and grandchildren see the world beyond Cuba, which sits a mere 150 miles off their southern shore. These differences are critical, yet largely ignored when the media covers the Latino community. For example, a recent poll suggests that Hillary Clinton was about nine percentage points ahead of candidate Trump four years ago (late in the campaign) with the Latino vote compared to where Joe Biden is now. That figure is misleading and mostly meaningless as race/culture in the Latino community is too complicated to categorize (or poll) as a single entity. The groups comprising the Latino community have not shared a common unifying event or struggle like the African-American community to warrant polling the community as a single group. That could change, however, as the absolute horror bestowed on our Latino brothers and sisters (and chil-

13


steppin’ out (& stayin’ in)

We Recommend: Culture, News + Reviews By Julie Ray

Are you a nerdy librarian by day, sexy schoolgirl by night? Corporate executive during the work week, but a weekend Hell’s Angel? Here’s the perfect holiday photo opportunity for you. Bring the family in for a sweet autumn photo, then get your nobody-understands-me emo gear together to memorialize your first Halloween pandemic experience. How great is it? According to local creative Falon Karcher, “I think this is just a supercool idea. It just shows that when the going gets tough, theater people build their way through it. This does my heart good and I can’t wait to be back on that stage.” What Karcher and others are talking about is the work of Theatre Memphis resident and scenic designer Jack Netzel-Yates, who has created a Fall Harvest theme (great for families) and the Haunted Victorian (great for costumes) to create your next frame-worthy portrait. These photos will also look snazzy on the annual holiday cards that you’ll be sending in the next few months. Costumes are encouraged, and the whole gang can be in the shot, as this is a pet-friendly event. Whether you choose to come in costume or in classic autumnal attire, you’re sure to capture a delightful memory with this specialty Halloween photo shoot. HALLOWDAZE: PHOTO OPS & LOLLIPOPS, THEATRE MEMPHIS, 630 PERKINS EXTENDED, FRIDAY-SATURDAY, OCT. 23-24, BY APPOINTMENT, $10-$20, $5 ADDITIONAL PERSON.

Matt Bowers’ Memphis No. 2 features superpowered Memphians. Books, p. 23

What’s the buzz about Kelsey Johnson’s 901 Remedy honey? Food, p. 24

October 22-28, 2020

VARIOUS DAYS & TIMES October 22nd - 28th

14

Tom Lee Park: Public Presentation memphisriverparks.org, Thursday, Oct. 22, 4:30 p.m., free See the updated schematic designs presented by a Memphis River Parks Partnership staff member. AMERI’KANA amerikana.tv, Thursday-Saturday, Oct. 22-24, 8 p.m., free-$25 Psych-rockers Making Movies and Americana Music Association explore American music, featuring music, conversation, and music education. Live streamed on YouTube and Facebook.

Repair Days 2020 Metal Museum, 374 Metal Museum Drive, metalmuseum.org, Oct. 2225, 9:30 a.m.-5 p.m. Schedule a time to bring your metal items and have them restored to their former glory. All proceeds from repairs will directly support museum programming. Flea Market, Precious Treasures, and Silent Auction The Veterans’ Museum, 100 Veterans’ Drive, Halls, TN, FridaySunday, Oct.23-25, 10 a.m.-6 p.m. Featuring a silent auction each day at 4 p.m. offering collectibles, furniture, home decor, jewelry, clothing, glassware, antiques, knick-knacks, customized items, and food.

“Vet Advice on Common Pet Emergencies and How to Respond” hollywoodfeed.com, Friday, Oct. 23, 8-9:30 a.m., noon-1:30 p.m., and 5-6:30 p.m., free Learn from Dr. Mary Manspeaker about the most prevalent pet emergencies, how best to respond, and how pet parents can prevent these emergencies from happening.

Artist Reception for “Tree Lines 2020” The Grange at Wilson Gardens, 15 S. Jefferson, Wilson, AR, Friday, Oct. 23, 5:30-7:30 p.m., free Exhibition of paintings by Betsy Brackin Burch using different colors and compositions to reveal emotions that constantly linger in the South, consisting of subtle beauty despite the dark history.

Planting Party: Pumpkin Planters Memphis Botanic Garden, 750 Cherry, Friday, Oct. 23, 6 p.m., $25-$35 Create pumpkin planters that you can enjoy throughout the harvest season.

Virtual Family Day at the Metal Museum metalmuseum.org, Saturday, Oct. 24, 10 a.m.-noon, free In conjunction with the annual Repair Days, enjoy live instructional videos, demonstrations, and more online activities.

FACEBOOK/THEATRE MEMPHIS

Strike a Pose

Season 3 of What We Do in the Shadows looks lit.


Looking to learn some fungi facts?

By Julie Ray

Here’s something useful. Learn all about the science of mycology. Sounds boring. What is mycology and why do you want to know about it? Mycology is a branch of biology dealing with fungi. Still confused? It’s all about the ’shrooms, man. A friend who goes faithfully to the Memphis Farmers Market every Saturday and buys from the Bluff City Fungi vendor says she has a theory: that mushrooms are not really poisonous, they just tell you that because some are psychedelic. She tells me this as she picks a little umbrella-looking mushroom off the ground and pops it in her mouth. “Now we just wait and see if it’s one of those poisonous mushrooms,” she says. Meanwhile, I feverishly start googling mushroom identification websites with 911 on standby. My friend is (sometimes hazardously) obsessed with mushrooms for cooking as well as medicinal uses. Wouldn’t it be great to know the facts about mushrooms? Why yes, it would. Take a trip to the grassy park on the Vollintine-Evergreen Greenline at N. Auburndale this Sunday and listen to the experts with facts, not theories. Connect with like-minded people and learn about the ecosystem. The class will explore two fungi that are in season and growing in our region. Learn the common name, the Latin name, identifying characteristics, how to forage, harvest, or grow, medicinal qualities, recipes, and more. MYCOLOGY CLASS, VOLLINTINE-EVERGREEN GREENLINE AT N. AUBURNDALE, 673 N. AUBURNDALE, SUNDAY, OCT. 25, 2 P.M., FREE.

Special Drive-Thru Safari Hope Presbyterian Church, 8500 Walnut Grove, Saturday, Oct. 24, 11 a.m.-1 p.m., free Macky & Friends will be part of a very special drive-thru safari for families with kids and adults with special needs only. Enter at entrance No. 3. Virtual Poetry Society of Tennessee Festival poetrytennessee.org, Saturday, Oct. 24, 12:30-5 p.m., free Join workshop leader John Mannone, who will speak about the intersection of poetry and science. Visit the website for agenda and registration information.

Family Fun Saturday: Scarecrow Families Memphis Botanic Garden, 750 Cherry, Saturday, Oct. 24, 2 p.m., $15-$20 Create a scarecrow family to decorate your yard and learn the history of scarecrows. Each family will make one large scarecrow together and each child will make a mini scarecrow. Supplies provided. Virtual Art on Fire dixon.org, Saturday, Oct. 24, 6-7 p.m., $10 Featuring “Hot Off the Wall” art sale, auction, and fiery performances and demonstrations in a virtual setting. Benefits art and horticulture programs.

“Cocktails & Conversation: Votes for Women” memphislibraryfoundation. networkforgood.com, Tuesday, Oct. 27, 6:30 p.m., $150 A panel will focus on the 19th Amendment, better known as the Women’s Voting Act, from a historical to present-day perspective. Speakers include Gloria J. Browne-Marshall, Paula Casey, and Dr. Russell Wigginton. RISE! Music for Social Change gemantownchorus.com, Saturday, Oct. 24, continues through Oct. 31, free Featuring pre-recorded choral performances by under-represented composers with social justice themes.

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m e m p h i s f l y e r. c o m

Don’t worry about the government — Spike Lee films David Byrne (above) in David Byrne’s American Utopia. Film, p. 26

ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT

FACEBOOK/MEMPHIS MUSHROOM FESTIVAL

Shroomin’

15


MUSIC By Alex Greene

At Grandma’s House A talk with Crosstown Arts resident composer Maeve Brophy.

T

October 22-28, 2020

Memphis Flyer: It seems having a grand piano at Grandma’s house has given your time as resident composer a new direction. What are you focusing on now? Maeve Brophy: I do compose, as well, but then I thought maybe Grandma’s house would be a space where I could focus more on this other project. My goal is to help increase awareness of works by relatively unknown composers, who were not taken seriously in their lifetimes because they were either women or they were not white. That’s the body of work I’m drawing from. And this fall I’m focusing on women in particular. It’s something I can contribute to this great movement to right a great injustice of classical music, the fact that these composers were not taken seriously and had to fight to be recognized, and then their work became neglected after they died. That’s a great injustice and a great tragedy. I’m just trying to do what I can to right that wrong. How do you find these under-recognized compositions?

16 There’s a file sharing site that all classical musi-

cians use, called IMSLP. It’s for public domain sheet

music, including a lot of lesserknown composers. And that’s where I found a lot of the pieces that I’ve recorded. I imagine many of those works have never been recorded. Yeah. Or there might be, like, one recording. Actually, two of my Florence Price videos are the only existing recordings, at least that I can find, on the internet. My YouTube videos are all there is! [laughs]. And that’s kind of the point of this whole project.

Whose house? Crosstown Arts resident composer Maeve Brophy records from Grandma’s house.

Even among African-American composers like George Walker and William Grant Stills, there are remarkable stylistic contrasts. That’s educational in itself, just to see the diversity within the diversity. Yes, that is very true. For example, there are so many women composers, I don’t have the bandwidth to do all of them. Women have been writing since music was first written down. My favorite time is the early 20th century, but even within that period, you still have throwbacks to Romanticism mixed with modern approaches. Like Blanche Selva. Her piece, “Cloches dans la brume,” was written in 1904, which I was shocked to learn. It was very forward-looking. But there were also women writing in the classical era, contemporaries of Mozart and Beethoven. I just recorded a piece by Josephine Aurenhammer. Right before the lockdown, in February, I played a recital at Buntyn Presbyterian Church, featuring women and African-American composers. Her piece is a set of variations on a theme from The Magic Flute. It’s fun and brilliantly inventive. It seems you find Grandma’s house especially conducive to creating these videos. I didn’t have a good place to make classical videos. I was in an apartment, and it just wasn’t an ideal space. But when I saw photos of Grandma’s house, I thought, that would be a beautiful place to make videos, if I could just get a piano in there. That led to me contacting Lane Music. Now they’re my sponsor. They are providing me with that Kawai grand piano, and they’re the ones that moved it in there. Scott Lane has historically been very generous in providing pianos all over Memphis for all sorts of things. So I am very grateful that he generously agreed to sponsor me for three whole months. Over that time, in addition to posting videos on my YouTube channel, I’ll be performing live-streamed recitals on Facebook Live on October 24th, November 7th and 21st, and December 5th.

COURTESY OF MAEVE BROPHY

he residency program at Crosstown Arts draws artists in all media to the heart of Midtown every year, and, despite the limitations of the pandemic, it is carrying on this fall, albeit with fewer participants. Having been a resident last year, I can attest to the inspiring exchange of ideas that the program can bring, as artists typically gather for field trips, artist talks, and weekly meals and meetings. This fall, most such activities have gone virtual, but the real-world benefit of studio space in one of Memphis’ creative hotspots remains. For residents focused on music, such a space can be doubly attractive, as they gain access to one of two studio houses next to Crosstown Concourse, respectively known as Grandma’s and Grandpa’s houses. This fall saw a dramatic upgrade in Grandma’s house, with the temporary addition of a grand piano. Done at the behest of classical pianist and resident composer Maeve Brophy, it has transformed the house into the perfect venue for recording virtual recitals, and Brophy has modified her original plans to make the most of the opportunity, beginning with the posting of pre-recorded videos on YouTube, then complemented with live-streamed recitals, starting this Saturday, October 24th, at 7 p.m. on Facebook Live.


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CALENDAR of EVENTS:

October 22 - 28

Repair Days at the Metal Museum, Thursday-Sunday, October 22nd-25th

T H EAT E R

The Halloran Centre

Grandma’s Big Vote, musical by William Gandy Jr. about his grandmother, Mary Alice Gandy, who lived to cast her vote at 106 years old in the 2008 presidential election. $35-$40. Sun., Oct. 25, 7 p.m.

Virtual Art on Fire

Featuring “Hot Off the Wall” art sale, auction, and fiery performances and demonstrations in a virtual setting. Benefits art and horticulture programs. $10. Sat., Oct. 24, 6-7 p.m.

225 S. MAIN (525-3000).

Hattiloo Theatre

God’s Trombone, enjoy the original production of inspirational sermons by African-American preachers reimagined as poetry, reverberating with the musicality and eloquence of spirituals. Free. Ongoing. Sarafina!, past production about human rights in the 21st century, written by Mbongeni Ngema. Ongoing. Iola’s Southern Fields, enjoy an online past performance drawn from the writings of Ida B. Wells. Free. Ongoing.

THE DIXON GALLERY & GARDENS, 4339 PARK (761-5250), DIXON.ORG.

Virtual Family Day

In conjunction with the annual Repair Days, enjoy live instructional videos, demonstrations, and more online activities. Free. Sat., Oct. 24, 10 a.m.-noon. METAL MUSEUM, 374 METAL MUSEUM DR. (774-6380), METALMUSEUM.ORG.

O N G O I N G ART

37 S. COOPER (502-3486).

Art Museum at the University of Memphis (AMUM)

Kudzu Playhouse

Kudzu Playhouse Virtual, join Kudzu social media for donation based classes, games, scholarship opportunities, and more. Download the app for more fun theater activities and information. Ongoing. P.O. BOX 47 (888-429-7871).

Memphis Black Arts Alliance

Casting Call: Mob Scenes and Police Officers, untitled concept trailer to be shot October 24-25 in West Memphis, Tennessee, and Arkansas. Seeking 20- to 60-year-old white males and white females. Email headshots and resumes/experience with subject line: CONCEPT TRAILER CASTING to mbaa@memphisblackarts.org. Through Oct. 23. 985 S BELLEVUE BLVD.

October 22-28, 2020

The Orpheum

Orpheum Virtual Engagement, join Orpheum staff, artists, and students for activities, interviews, and more on Facebook, Instagram, Twitter, and YouTube. Visit website for more information. Ongoing. 203 S. MAIN (525-3000).

Playhouse on the Square Playhouse on the Square at Home, a series of digital content through POTS website and social media platforms. View past performances, engage in quizzes, enjoy digital playwriting, and more. Free. Ongoing. 66 S. COOPER (726-4656).

Tennessee Shakespeare Company

Shout-Out Shakespeare Series: Romeo and Juliet, experience the greatest love story ever told in outdoor settings. Visit the website for locations. Free. Through Oct. 24. 7950 TRINITY (759-0604).

18

Send the date, time, place, cost, info, phone number, a brief description, and photos — two weeks in advance — to calendar@memphisflyer.com or P.O. Box 1738, Memphis, TN 38101. DUE TO SPACE LIMITATIONS, ONGOING WEEKLY EVENTS WILL APPEAR IN THE FLYER’S ONLINE CALENDAR ONLY.

Theatre Memphis

Online on Stage, a Theatre Memphis Facebook group that serves as a clearinghouse for performers wanting to share their talents. Featuring storytime, readings, or performance art. Ongoing. 630 PERKINS EXT. (682-8323).

University of Memphis Theatre Building

Lest We Forget: Black Memphis History Through Dance/ Theatre, a journey through space and time exploring 120 years of rich, Black Memphis history through a series of site-specific, on-campus, outdoor performances. Free with reservation. Sat., Sun., 2-4 & 2:30-4:30 p.m. Through Oct. 25. 3745 CENTRAL AVE (901.678.2576).

A R TI S T R EC E P TI O N S

The Grange at Wilson Gardens

Artist reception for “Tree Lines 2020,” exhibition of new work by Betsy Brackin Burch. wilsongrange.com. Fri., Oct. 23, 5:30-7:30 p.m. 15 SOUTH JEFFERSON STREET (870.576.3079).

OTH E R A R T HA P P E N I N G S

Art + Environmental Justice Conversation Series

Weekly series featuring Cannupa Hanska Luger and Rita Harris, Shana M. Griffin, Shanai Matteson and Clean Memphis, and UAC and

Mural Arts Philadelphia. Free with registration. Thursdays, 6 p.m. Through Nov. 12. UACMEM.ORG.

Baron von Opperbean’s Exploratorium of Magic, Science, and the Multiverse

with artists, and demonstrations. Free. Ongoing. METAL MUSEUM, 374 METAL MUSEUM DR. (774-6380).

Open on Main: My Memphis View Art & Gallery

OFF THE WALLS ART, 358 WALNUT, CHRISTOPHERREYES.COM.

Visit artist Mary-Ellen Kelly online for “My Memphis View” products including books, prints, T-shirts, drink coasters, and posters. Featuring virtual gallery tour. Ongoing.

Book Talk with David Less & Robert Gordon

MY MEMPHIS VIEW ART & GALLERY, 5 S. MAIN, MARYELLENKELLYDESIGN.COM.

Interactive art installation that will take you on a magical journey. $15. Through Oct. 31.

Authors discuss Memphis Mayhem and It Came From Memphis on Zoom. Moderated by Pat Mitchell Worley. Wed., Oct. 28, 7 p.m.

STAX MUSEUM OF AMERICAN SOUL MUSIC, 926 E. MCLEMORE (946-2535), STAXMUSEUM.COM.

First Brush of Fall: Plein Air Season at the Garden

Bring your supplies and create work for consideration into the Plein Air exhibition in December. Free. Sun., 3-5 p.m. Through Oct. 25. MEMPHIS BOTANIC GARDEN, 750 CHERRY (636-4100).

Memphis Flyer Coloring Book Order your book today benefiting local artists and journalism. $35. Ongoing.

MEMPHISMAGAZINESTORE.COM.

Metal Museum Online

Peruse the art and craft of fine metalwork digitally. Featuring past gallery talks from previous exhibitions, interviews

Read to Relate

Register to participate in virtual discussions about the literary and social context found in the text and production qualities of selected plays. $15. Tues., Oct. 27, 7 p.m. THEATRE MEMPHIS, 630 PERKINS EXT. (682-8323).

Repair Days

The museum will offer a variety of virtual programming including volunteer highlights, a virtual family day, and annual art auction. Thur.-Sun., Oct. 22-25. METAL MUSEUM, 374 METAL MUSEUM DR. (774-6380), METALMUSEUM.ORG.

Virtual Art Auction

Register and bid on items for yourself or your home benefiting Metal Museum’s programs and initiatives in the coming year. $25-$75. Through Oct. 24. METAL MUSEUM, 374 METAL MUSEUM DR. (774-6380), METALMUSEUM.ORG.

“Africa: Art of a Continent,” exhibition of African art from the Martha and Robert Fogelman collection. Ongoing. “IEAA Ancient Egyptian Collection,” exhibition of Egyptian antiquities ranging from 3800 B.C.E. to 700 C.E. from the Institute of Egyptian Art and Archaeology collection. Ongoing. 142 COMMUNICATION & FINE ARTS BUILDING (678-2224).

ArtsMemphis

“Unfolding: The Next Chapter in Memphis,” exhibition of visual art by local Memphis artists, curated by Kenneth Wayne Alexander. artsmemphis.org. Ongoing. 575 S. MENDENHALL (578-2787).

“Beauty and Terror” by Anne Siems at David Lusk Gallery, through November 17th

Beverly and Sam Ross Gallery at Christian Brothers University

“Inside-Out,” exhibition of work by Khara Woods. Viewings are available to the public by appointment only or online. Email Scott Carter for an appointment. cbu.edu. Through Nov. 21. 650 EAST PARKWAY SOUTH (321-3243).

Buckman Arts Center at St. Mary’s School

“Magellan’s Medicine,” exhibition of hand-painted ceramics by Dr. Malini Gupta. Through Dec. 14. 60 N. PERKINS EXT. (537-1483).

Clough-Hanson Gallery

“Interiors: A Study of Domestic Quarantine,” exhibition of work by Art 260: Curation in Context artists Paula Kovarik and Sophia Mason. Curated by Jenna Gilley. Visit Facebook page to view virtually. rhodes.edu. Ongoing. “Quarantine Couple,” exhibition of work by Art 260: Curation in Context artists Lacy Mitcham Veteto and Gregory Allen Smith. Curated by Ben Aquila. Ongoing. “Second Life, Third Life,” exhibition of work by Art 260: Curation in Context artists Meredith Potter, Melissa Wilkinson, and Emily C. Thomas. Curated by Roland Donnelly-Bullington. Ongoing. “Eyesolation: Seeing and Looking in Quarantine,” exhibition of work by Art 260: Curation in Context artists Melissa Dunn, Alexander Paulus, Emily C. Thomas, Mary K VanGieson. Curated by Katie Clark. Ongoing. “Home is Where the Art Is,” exhibition of work by Art 260: Curation in Context artists Nick Peña, Ryan Steed, and Nancy Cheairs. Curated by Julia Conway. Ongoing. “All by Myself,” exhibition of work by Art 260: Curation in Context artists Jesse Butcher


CALENDAR: OCTOBER 22 - 28 and Emily C. Thomas. Curated by Marlo Morales. Ongoing. “Landscapes in Isolation,” exhibition of work by Art 260: Curation in Context artists Clare Johnson, Maysey Craddock, and Susan Maakestad. Curated by Caroline Koch. Ongoing. “playground,” exhibition of work by Art 260: Curation in Context artists Elizabeth Alley and Susan Maakestad. Curated by Dresden Timco. Ongoing.

THIS WEEK AT

SPREAD OUT

RHODES COLLEGE, 2000 N. PARKWAY (843-3000).

David Lusk Gallery

WORK OUT

“Beauty and Terror,” exhibition of work by Anne Siems. Through Nov. 17. 97 TILLMAN (767-3800).

4339 PARK (761-5250).

Jay Etkin Gallery

Permanent Collection: “The Flow Museum of Art & Culture,” Ongoing. 942 COOPER (550-0064).

L Ross Gallery

“Amor Fati,” exhibition of new works by Margaret Munz-Losch. (767-2200), Wednesdays-Saturdays, 11 a.m.-3 p.m. Through Nov. 14. 5040 SANDERLIN (767-2200).

Memphis Botanic Garden

“Color Obsession,” exhibition of paintings by Claudia Tullos-Leonard. Through Oct. 31.

Virtual Art on Fire at dixon.org on Saturday, October 24th, 6-7 p.m.

Mid-South Artist Gallery

Becky McRae, exhibition of works by featured artist. Ongoing. Lyle and Bob McCabe, exhibition of work by featured artists. Through Oct. 31. Pat Turner, exhibition of watercolors by October featured artist. Through Oct. 31. Michelle Lemaster, exhibition of works by local featured artist. Ongoing. Sandra Horton, exhibition of works by featured artist. Free. Ongoing. 2945 SHELBY (409-8705).

Palladio International Antique Market and Gallery

“The Poetry of Horses,” exhibition of work by Fletcher Golden and Jeanne Seagle reminiscent of Golden’s epic six-month journey on Brooks the Wonder Horse. palladiomemphis.com. Through Nov. 6. 2169 CENTRAL (276-3808).

The Grange at Wilson Gardens

“Tree Lines 2020,” exhibition of new work by Betsy Brackin Burch. Oct. 23-Nov. 22.

750 CHERRY (636-4100).

15 SOUTH JEFFERSON STREET (870.576.3079).

Memphis Brooks Museum of Art

Tops Gallery

“Arts of Global Africa,” exhibition of historic and contemporary works in a range of different media presenting an expansive vision of Africa’s artistry. Through June 21, 2021. “Drawing Memory: Essence of Memphis,” exhibition of works inspired by nsibidi, a sacred means of communication among male secret societies in southeastern Nigeria by Victor Ekpuk. Ongoing. 1934 POPLAR (544-6209).

Memphis College of Art

“Intrepidly Yours,” exhibition of Spring 2020 BFA work by last graduating class. mca2020bfa.com. Through Feb. 28, 2021. 1930 POPLAR (272-5100).

Luther Hampton, exhibition of 17 sculptures made between 1968 and 2000. By appointment. Through Dec. 31. 400 S. FRONT.

Tops Gallery: Madison Avenue Park Luther Hampton, exhibition of 17 sculptures made between 1968 and 2000. Through Dec. 31. 151 MADISON (340-0134).

Various locations

“We Deliver for Memphis,” exhibition of work honoring essential workers on digital billboards along I-55 near Downtown Memphis, West I-55, I-55 at Hyw. 61, and 240 at Airways. uacmem.org. Ongoing. SEE WEBSITE FOR MORE INFORMATION.

DA N C E

Get Back to the Barre

From creative movement for 3-year-olds to advanced, preprofessional training under the guidance and direction of Mandy Possel. All levels invited to join Fall classes. Saturdays, 9:30 a.m.-2:30 p.m., and Mondays-Fridays, 4-7 p.m. Through Dec. 12. BUCKMAN ARTS CENTER AT ST. MARY’S SCHOOL, 60 N. PERKINS EXT. (537-1483).

Neko Mew’s Belly Dance Classes

Need to stay active while social distancing? Local artist and belly dancer Jen Russell offers weekly video tutorials via Facebook Live. Donations accepted, payable through Venmo. Available via Facebook group Neko Mew’s Belly Dance Classes. Viewers can also receive individualized instruction by donating $5 for the first video lesson and $10 for each subsequent video. Wednesdays.

EAT OUT FIND SOME B R E AT H I N G ROOM CROSSTOWN

CONCOURSE

CROSSTOWN ARTS

PO E T RY / S PO K E N WOR D

Virtual & Online

Virtual Poetry Society of Tennessee Festival, join workshop leader John Mannone who will speak about the intersection of poetry and science. Visit website for agenda and registration information. poetrytennessee.org. Free. Sat., Oct. 24, 12:30-5 p.m. POETRYTENNESSEE.ORG.

L E CT U R E / S P E A K E R

“Cocktails & Conversation: Votes for Women”

A panel will focus on the 19th Amendment, better known as the Women’s Voting Act, from a historical to present-day perspective. Speakers include Gloria J. Browne-Marshall, Paula Casey, and Dr. Russell Wigginton, with Deidre Malone as moderator. $150, $250 couple. Tues., Oct. 27, 6:30 p.m.

N OW H I R I N G:

D I R E C T O R of O P E R AT I O N S The Director of Operations is responsible for managing the non-programming functions at Crosstown Arts including: finance, business functions, facilities, real estate, technology, and human resources.

For more information or to apply, go to crosstownarts.org/opportunities/careers

MEMPHISLIBRARYFOUNDATION. NETWORKFORGOOD.COM.

continued on page 20

CROSSTOWNCONCOURSE.COM/EVENTS

m e m p h i s f l y e r. c o m

“The Beauty of Calligraphy,” exhibition by the Memphis Calligraphy Guild celebrating calligraphy and the resulting gestural art. Through Jan. 3, 2021. “Illuminating the Word: The Saint John’s Bible,” exhibition of the first handwritten Bible that interprets and illustrates scripture from a contemporary perspective. A reflection of a multicultural world and strides in science, technology, and space travel. Through Jan. 10, 2021. “Made in Dixon / Hecho en Dixon,” exhibition of artwork by Dixon program participants of all ages, diverse cultural backgrounds, and interests. Through Dec. 20.

ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT

The Dixon Gallery & Gardens

19


CALENDAR: OCTOBER 22 - 28 continued from page 19 Tom Lee Park: Public Presentation

See the updated schematic designs presented by a Memphis River Parks Partnership staff member. Free with registration. Thurs., Oct. 22, 4:30 p.m. MEMPHISRIVERPARKS.ORG.

“Vet Advice on Common Pet Emergencies and How to Respond” Learn from Dr. Mary Manspeaker about the most prevalent pet emergencies, how best to respond, and how pet parents can prevent these emergencies from happening. Free. Fri., Oct. 23, 8-9:30 a.m., 12-1:30 & 5-6:30 p.m.

HOLLYWOOD FEED, 2013 UNION (591-1795), HOLLYWOODFEED.COM.

TO U R S

Ghost Walk

Join the Historical Haunts Investigation Team and explore the macabre and dark history of Downtown Memphis. $20. Fridays-Sundays, 8 p.m. THE BROOM CLOSET, 546 S. MAIN (497-9486), HISTORICALHAUNTSMEMPHIS.COM.

History by Bike: A Bicycle Tour through Elmwood Cemetery

Bring your bicycle and ride through time with a tour guide who is ready to share the secrets of the cemetery. $20. Sat., Oct. 24, 10:30 a.m. ELMWOOD CEMETERY, 824 S. DUDLEY (774-3212).

Metal Museum Audio Tour

Explore the newly updated Sculpture Garden and accompanying audio tour while adhering to safe social distancing. PWYC. Ongoing, 11 a.m.-5 p.m. METAL MUSEUM, 374 METAL MUSEUM DR. (774-6380).

Old Forest Hike

Walking tour of the region’s only urban oldgrowth forest. Last Sunday of every month, 10 a.m. OVERTON PARK, OFF POPLAR (276-1387).

Tour de Midtown

October 22-28, 2020

Join Breakaway Running for a group run starting from 2109 Madison. Free beer after the

run. All paces are welcomed, distance of runs vary from 3-5 miles. Free. Thursdays, 6 p.m.

Visit website for more information and livestream link. Sun., 11 a.m.

OVERTON SQUARE, 2101 MADISON, OVERTONSQUARE.COM.

IDLEWILDCHURCH.ORG.

Tours for Very Small Groups

Weekly Zoom gathering for anyone 18+ who identifies as a member of the trans or GNC community. For login information, email ahauptman@ outmemphis.org. Tuesdays, 6 p.m.

Virtual-T

Elmwood Cemetery’s staff is ready to take you and your very small group on a tour around the grounds in groups of 9. Masks required. $5. Ongoing, 10 a.m.

OUTMEMPHIS.ORG.

ELMWOOD CEMETERY, 824 S. DUDLEY (774-3212).

S P EC IA L EVE NTS

Walking Tour and Ghost Hunt

Birds of Prey Program

Meet some of Tennessee’s native birds of prey. Registering guarantees a spot. Adding a donation helps provide food and care for the birds. Free with registration. Saturdays, Sundays, 3 p.m.

Tour the South Main district and investigate a well-known site which was the scene of the brutal murder of patrolman Edward Broadfoot in 1918. 13+. $25. Saturdays, 7:30 p.m. THE BROOM CLOSET, 546 S. MAIN (497-9486), HISTORICALHAUNTSMEMPHIS.COM.

MEEMAN-SHELBY FOREST STATE PARK, NATURE CENTER, NATURE CENTER, TNSTATEPARKS.COM.

Breakout Games’ Dispatch

E X P OS / S A LES

Crafts Fair Pop-Up Shop

Featuring 30-plus artists and brands from Memphis and the surrounding areas. From paintings and home decor to jewelry and candles in a safe and socially distanced pop-up experience. Fridays, Saturdays, 10:30 a.m.-6:30 p.m., and Sundays, 12-5 p.m. Through Dec. 27. MEMPHIS PINK PALACE MUSEUM, 3050 CENTRAL (636-2362).

Online Fall Plant Sale

Featuring plants for immediate color in the autumn landscape including mums, pansies, ornamental kale and cabbage. Perennials and a selection of trees and shrubs adapted to our Mid-South climate will also be available. Order online. Curbside pickup. Through Oct. 29. MEMPHIS BOTANIC GARDEN, 750 CHERRY (636-4100).

Vesta Home Show

Visit Boyle’s master-planned 820-acre development in the rural preserve area of Collierville. Tour four homes that redefine excellence in new home design and construction. $15-$25. Sun., 1-6 p.m., and Tues.-Sat., 11 a.m.-6 p.m. Through Oct. 25. GRAND MANOR OF SPRING CREEK RANCH, ALONG JACK STRAW, WESTTNHBA.COM.

F E ST IVA LS

AMERI’KANA fest

An exploration into American music featuring music, conversation, and music education. Starring Los Lobos, Flor De Toloache, Marcella and Terrance Simien, and others. Experience the rich DNA within the American music story. Free-$25. Through Oct. 24, 8 p.m. AMERIKANAFEST.COM.

S PO R TS / F IT N E S S

Ballet Memphis Online Pilates and Ballet Classes

Visit website for more information. Classes offered include Espresso Flow, Stretch & Burn, Fascial Fun, Intermediate/Advanced Ballet, Intermediate Mat Flow, and Get Moving. $10. Ongoing, 7:30 a.m.-5:30 p.m. BALLET MEMPHIS, 2144 MADISON (737-7322).

Classes will be offered free and online. From mediation and yoga to Bootcamp and kickboxing, find the right class for you. Free. Ongoing. THE SALVATION ARMY KROC CENTER, 800 E. PARKWAY S. (729-8007).

Our Virtual Yoga Downtown

Join Charlie Baxter Hayden for yoga on IG Live, @downtownmemphis. Tues., 6 p.m. DOWNTOWNMEMPHIS.COM.

Virtual PuppyUp Memphis Walk

Walk to promote awareness of canine cancer and fundraise for cancer research to benefit both pets and people. Through Nov. 14.

“Cocktails & Conversation: Votes for Women,” online, Tuesday, October 27th, 6:30 p.m. aerobic benefits. On the South Lawn, weather permitting. Free with admission. Saturdays, 10:30 a.m. Through Dec. 19. THE DIXON GALLERY & GARDENS, 4339 PARK (761-5250).

Virtual Training & Group Fitness

YMCA of Memphis & the Mid-South offers workouts for anyone to try at home. Workouts include yoga, barre, bootcamp, exercises for active older adults, and Les Mills training. Visit website to join. Free. Ongoing. YMCAMEMPHIS.ORG.

PUPPYUPWALK.ORG.

Taijiquan with Milan Vigil

This no-impact exercise integrates the mind, body, and breath promoting relaxation, balance, bone density, and

M E ETI N G S

Churches from the Presbytery of the MidSouth: Sunday Worship Livestream

Combined livestream worship.

DISPATCH.BREAKOUTGAMES.COM.

Dia de los Muertos Reverse Parade

Memphis Brooks Museum of Art and Cazateatro Bilingual Theatre Group hold this annual event, where families are invited to honor ancestors and celebrate the cycle of life and death. Free. Oct 24, noon-4 p.m. OVERTON PARK, 2080 POPLAR.

Special Drive-Thru Safari

Macky & Friends’ very special Drive-Thru Safari for families with kids and adults with special needs only. Enter at entrance No. 3. Free. Sat., Oct. 24, 11 a.m.-1 p.m. HOPE PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH, 8500 WALNUT GROVE (INFO, 7557721, EXT. 1900), HOPEPRES.COM.

Early Voting for General & Municipal Election

Visit website for mail-in ballot, voting locations, and more information. Through Oct. 29. SHELBYVOTE.COM.

continued on page 22

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CALENDAR: OCTOBER 22 - 28 Flea Market, Precious Treasures, and Silent Auction

while enjoying Mississippi River Park. Free. Ongoing.

River Garden Guides

THE VETERANS’ MUSEUM, 100 VETERANS’ DRIVE (731-836-7400).

Tennessee R.E.A.D.S.

Local businesses have put together vintage finds and fresh designs for T-shirts. Each shirt sale provides 24 meals provided through Mid-South Food Bank. $25-$29. Ongoing. GRINDCITYDESIGNS.COM.

Lunchtime Meditations with Amy Balentine

Explore a variety of meditation practices designed to help you find balance and reduce stress. Join live or enjoy past meditations online. Fridays, noon. VIRTUAL & ONLINE, VIRTUAL/ONLINE, DIXON.ORG.

“The Negro Motorist Green Book”

Exhibition highlighting an annual guide started in 1936 that helped African Americans travel the country and was a resource for the era’s Black-owned businesses. $10. Through Jan. 3, 2021. NATIONAL CIVIL RIGHTS MUSEUM, 450 MULBERRY (521-9699).

Outdoor Scavenger Hunts

Choose an outdoor familyfriendly scavenger hunt. A portion of the proceeds benefit HopeKids. $13-$40. Ongoing. LETSROAM.COM.

Reptile Program

Meet some of Tennessee’s native reptiles. Register to guarantee a spot. Free. Saturdays, Sundays, 3:30 p.m. MEEMAN-SHELBY FOREST STATE PARK, NATURE CENTER, NATURE CENTER, TNSTATEPARKS.COM.

River Garden Bingo

THE ORPHEUM, 203 S. MAIN (525-3000).

MISSISSIPPI RIVER PARK, OFF RIVERSIDE DRIVE, MEMPHISRIVERPARKS.ORG.

Halloween Movie Tuesdays

Featuring movies, popcorn, hot dogs, nachos, and full menu. Socially distanced seating and masks required. Free. Tuesdays, 7-10 p.m. Through Oct. 31.

Use your library card to check out ebooks and audiobooks. Includes Big Library Read connecting readers around the world with the same book at the same time. Ongoing.

GROWLERS, 1911 POPLAR (244-7904).

READS.OVERDRIVE.COM.

Indie Memphis Film Festival

Twilight Thursdays: Food Trucks

Enjoy independent films both online and outdoors. Featuring film, forums, and more. $25-$150. Through Oct. 29.

Furry-friendly hours on the second and fourth Thursday of the month. All are welcome with or without a pet. Food trucks will be on site. Fourth Thursday of every month, 6-8 p.m.

VARIOUS LOCATIONS, SEE WEBSITE FOR MORE INFORMATION, INDIEMEMPHIS.ORG.

Indie Memphis Movie Club

MEMPHIS BOTANIC GARDEN, 750 CHERRY (636-4100).

United Way of the MidSouth: Driving The Dream

For those impacted by COVID-19. Puts callers in contact with essential services, without individuals having to repeat the circumstances for the call. Follow-up ensures those connections were made. MondaysFridays, 8:30 a.m.-5 p.m. (888-709-0630), CALL.DRIVINGTHEDREAM.ORG.

H O LI DAY EVE N TS

Family Fun Saturday: Scarecrow Families

Create a scarecrow family to decorate your yard and learn the history of scarecrows. Each family will make one large scarecrow together and each child will make a mini scarecrow. Supplies provided. $15 members, $20 nonmembers. Sat., Oct. 24, 2 p.m. MEMPHIS BOTANIC GARDEN, 750 CHERRY (636-4100).

Planting Party: Pumpkin Planters Create pumpkin planters that you can enjoy throughout the harvest season. $25 members,

PINK PALACE WWW.MEMPHISMUSEUMS.ORG

22

An afterlife therapist and his daughter meet a friendly young ghost when they move into a crumbling mansion to rid the premises of wicked spirits. $6$8. Sat., Oct. 24, 2 p.m.

Download River Garden Field and Bird Guides and explore Mississippi River Park. Ongoing.

October 22-28, 2020

Download a bingo card or make your own for a fun game

Casper

MISSISSIPPI RIVER PARK, OFF RIVERSIDE DRIVE, MEMPHISRIVERPARKS.ORG.

Silent auction each day at 4 p.m. featuring collectibles, furniture, home decor, jewelry, clothing, glassware, antiques, knickknacks, customized items, and food. Call for vendor opportunities. Free. Fri.-Sun., Oct.23-25, 10 a.m.-6 p.m.

Grind City Designs and Dixie Picker T-Shirt Benefit

F I LM

$35 nonmembers. Fri., Oct. 23, 6 p.m. MEMPHIS BOTANIC GARDEN, 750 CHERRY (636-4100).

Wicked Ways Haunted House

Memphis’ largest, most disturbing indoor haunted house. Masks required. $23$35. Fridays-Sundays, 7 p.m. Through Nov. 8. CUMBERLAND WAREHOUSE, 160 CUMBERLAND, WICKEDWAYSHAUNTEDHOUSE.COM.

Zoo Boo

Activities for the whole family including pumpkin patch, Magic Mr. Nick, and more. $13 members, $15 nonmembers. Fridays-Sundays, 6-9 p.m. Through Oct. 31. MEMPHIS ZOO, 2000 PRENTISS PLACE IN OVERTON PARK (333-6500).

FOOD & DR I N K E V E N TS

Crosstown Food and Grocery Delivery

Meals from Global Café or

Saucy Chicken and groceries from Curb Market delivered to your front door. Delivery available within a 4-mile radius of Concourse. To order, visit website to contact the restaurant or market directly. Saturdays, 11:30 a.m.-8 p.m., and MondaysFridays, 11:30 a.m.-7:30 p.m. CROSSTOWN CONCOURSE, 1350 CONCOURSE.

Downtown Dinner + Music Series

Dine in or carry out at one of Downtown Memphis’s restaurants and enjoy safely distanced, outdoor, and unplugged live music. Thursdays, 5 p.m. Through Oct. 29. MEMPHISTRAVEL.COM.

Memphis Brew Bus

Visit three local craft breweries for tours, talks with the brewers, and a beer at each stop. Recorded narration on bus by DJ Ric Chetter with beer trivia, beer history, and local music. 21+ $49. Saturdays, 2 p.m. THE BROOM CLOSET, 546 S. MAIN (497-9486), HISTORICALHAUNTSMEMPHIS.COM.

create

Dia de los Muertos Reverse Parade at Overton Park, Saturday, October 24th, noon-4 p.m. Memphis Dawah Association: Mobile Food Pantry

A weekly mobile food pantry organized by Memphis Dawah Association and Mid-South Food Bank. Volunteer opportunities available. Saturdays, 10 a.m.-2 p.m. MEMPHIS DAWAH ASSOCIATION, 837 CRAFT (601-672-0259).

Zootoberfest

Guests can purchase a Zoo stein to sip German beer. Local breweries will offer Oktoberfest beers. Draft root beer and root beer floats will also be available. $8 stein, $3 refills. Sat., Sun., 11 a.m.-6 p.m. Through Oct. 25. MEMPHIS ZOO, 2000 PRENTISS PLACE IN OVERTON PARK (3336500), MEMPHISZOO.ORG.

Weekly virtual screening opportunities, plus online Q&As on Tuesday evenings between programmers and special guests. Visit website for more information and schedule. Ongoing. INDIEMEMPHIS.ORG.

Jaws

When a killer shark unleashes chaos on a beach community, it’s up to a local sheriff, a marine biologist, and an old seafarer to hunt the beast. $6$8. Sun., Oct. 25, 7 p.m. THE ORPHEUM, 203 S. MAIN (525-3000).

Night of the Living Dead

A ragtag group of Pennsylvanians barricade themselves in an old farmhouse to remain safe from a bloodthirsty, flesh-eating breed of monsters. $6-$8. Fri., Oct. 23, 7 p.m. THE ORPHEUM, 203 S. MAIN (525-3000).

Oxford Virtual Film Festival

Presentation includes 24-hour rental period and filmmaker Q&A. New releases until the end of the year. $10, $40-$175 virtual passes. Ongoing. OXFORDFILMFEST.COM.

CRAFTS FAIR POP UP SHOP Open Fridays, Saturdays, & Sundays Crafters on the Mezzanine Sat & Sun Sponsored by BANK OF AMERICA

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continued from page 20


GREAT VARIETY OF PANSIES & VIOLAS

Matt Bowers delivers with the second issue of Memphis.

B

luff City-based comic book artist Matt Bowers released the debut issue of his Memphis comic last year on 901 Comics’ Bad Dog Comics publishing label. The series — written, illustrated, and lettered by Bowers — got off to a good start. But, as is often the case with independent ventures, fans found themselves waiting for the series’ second issue. That wait is over. Bowers and Bad Dog Comics released Memphis No. 2 Wednesday, October 14th.

anyway. You can always correct your mistakes later. But I lay out each issue all at once in very loose, rough thumbnails. Almost stick figures honestly. At that stage, it’s more about pacing and figuring out what’s going to work, layout-wise. How far in advance do you have the story planned out? I actually have the first 50 issues plotted out. As I complete each issue, I come up with new ideas and sometimes lose interest in others, so I’m always updating. Issues No. 1 and 2 were originally meant to be just one issue, for example.

SHANNON MERRITT

Gaps between publications are standard for independent comics, but what would you say to the people who are used to the Netflix business model, being able to binge a whole story in a night? I sometimes save comics up and then read several issues at once. A lot of modern comics work better that way. Memphis No. 1 and 2 should work well if read back to back. No. 3 is a stand-alone issue, but there will always be ongoing subplots in every issue.

Memphis No. 2

The second issue of Bowers’ series is an evolution. The art and character design are excellent, and the action is nicely balanced. Plus there’s a fight between a woman who’s shape-shifted to become a panda and a hulking android called a Warbot. What more could one ask for? Memphis owes much to alternative comics of the ’80s and ’90s (Love and Rockets, for example), but there are shades of more mainstream titles as well. There’s a resemblance between Memphis’ Pigeon and X-Men’s Archangel. Killjoy would have been right at home in Grant Morrison’s The Invisibles. Overall, though, Bowers is making something new in Memphis, albeit with loving homages to other works. I spoke with him about the new issue, plotting ahead, and producing in a pandemic. Memphis Flyer: The art is incredible. Is it a challenge laying out pages, or does it just come naturally to you? Matt Bowers: Both, actually. Some days it’s a breeze and other days it’s like I’ve never drawn before. The key is to do it

What’s it like creating during a pandemic? It was tough at first. I sheltered in place with my family back at the beginning for about three weeks. I feel I was shell-shocked the first couple of days but then eventually realized that I needed to take advantage of being at home. So during the remaining time at home I was able to finish the pencils and inks for the next issue of Memphis, issue No. 3. Working on pages was definitely better for my mental well-being than obsessing with what was happening with the pandemic. Did you have plans to go to any conventions that had to be put on hold? I was going to do Midtown Con, but that eventually got canceled. Bad Dog Comics had plans to attend Dragon Con as a group, but that also couldn’t happen. You’re two issues into your partnership with Bad Dog Comics now. How is it working with them? Shannon [Merritt] is great, but I’m used to doing everything myself with the digital versions of my comics. It can sometimes be frustrating, but overall I am very happy with the process. Shannon and Gabe DeRanzo have done a lot for my comic that I couldn’t have gotten done on my own.

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It’s Here

ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT

BOOKS By Jesse Davis

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FOOD By Michael Donahue

Honey Do

How Kelsey Johnson became a beekeeper.

K

A Very Tasteful Food Blog

October 22-28, 2020

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elsey Johnson was a honey hater. “I didn’t start liking honey until maybe my early 20s,” she says. That’s when she began using honey to sweeten her tea. “I fell in love with it. I learned how bad sugar was. I had terrible allergies. Not anymore. “Now I can even tell what season it’s from. The flavor notes. I guess it’s similar to someone who is a wine connoisseur. I can tell if it’s fall honey versus summer.” Johnson, 25, owner/founder of 901 Remedy, makes her own honey and tinctures. She will start selling her second batch of honey for the fall season and her first tincture on October 21st. A native Memphian, Johnson began gardening as a child with her grandparents. “Everywhere I’ve lived since I moved out of my parents’ home, I’ve had some sort of garden.” She learned beekeeping while working at Thistle & Bee, a nonprofit for women who’ve been victims of sex trafficking and prostitution. Her first job was doing hive checks, making sure there was enough sugar water to get the bees started. “They sometimes need help in the early spring to make it to when things start to bloom.” She heard the buzzing after she lifted the lid. “I always had this fear of bees. I had to walk off for a second and come back. I looked at the hives, and there was nothing to fear. It was really therapeutic.” And, she says, “I would say being in a bee suit helped.” She learned about the queen bee, who mates with the drone bees and lays about 20,000 eggs a week, and the worker bees, all female, who “go out and forage for nectar.” The nectar gets broken down into sugars, which are stored in the waxy honeycomb. “Moisture changes the nectar to honey.” Johnson began attending Memphis Area Beekeeping Association meetings. She got her first hive and ordered two families of bees — “about 10,000 bees.” She wasn’t sure what she was going to do with the honey. She could make extra money and, if nothing else, she’d “never have to buy honey again.” The taste of the honey depends on what season it is, she says. “This time of year is goldenrod and aster. In spring, clover. White clover is everywhere. It’s lighter in taste and not as pungent. It has a more robust flavor in the fall.” She named her business 901 Remedy because of “the healing property of honey.”

For allergies and other respiratory ailments, honey has been found “to help the immune system adjust to the local pollen.” Local honey also is better than most store-bought honey, which could contain high-fructose corn syrup. Johnson’s fall honey batch, Goldenrod Aster Floral Notes 901 Remedy, comes in 9- and 16-ounce jars. Her tincture is made from the propolis — a resin mixture honeybees make from parts of trees and other plants. “It covers the inside of hives. It’s the bee’s glue to seal cracks to keep out wind, bugs.”

Kelsey Johnson and 901 Remedy honey

She mixes propolis with high-grain alcohol and “really good glycerine. Pour that over whatever herb you want to make a tincture out of — hibiscus, spearmint, rosemary. The tinctures extract the medical properties every herb has in its highest form.” Her first tincture is Propolis and Echinacea Throat Spray. “It’s basically an anti-inflammatory immune booster. And I mix it with honey.” Johnson, who would like to open a brick-and-mortar store, says, “Next spring I’ll be expanding my hives. I’m going from three to nine. So I’ll have more honey. Eventually, I’m going to start selling bulk tea, tea blends.” Johnson’s biggest challenge wasn’t starting a business; it was “overcoming the fear of getting stung,” she says. “I do get stung.” She was stung 10 times last summer. “If they sting you once and your ‘smoker’ — the device the beekeeper uses to conceal his smell — is out, you’ll get at least two more. You can’t disguise the scent of being stung. Then they’re out to get you.” Visit 901remedy.com to order.


BREWS By Richard Murff

Is it Fall?

RICHARD MURFF

High Cotton Chocolate Rye Porter

It’s not like you can tell by the weather around here. And, by the way, your fall wardrobe may very well be hiding some nasty surprises about exactly how much you’ve fleshed out during the late unpleasantness. It’s the middle of October and we’re all still walking around like beach bums. Or I am, at any rate. May I suggest that we all get in the proper fall spirit with a proper fall beer? And for a proper fall beer, you don’t have to go much further than High Cotton’s Chocolate Rye Porter. On the front end, I should say that while I like rye in bread, and love it in whiskey, I’ve never been very impressed with it in beer; it always tastes like someone put pepper in my drink. Not enough to ruin it, just enough to verily annoy me. It just doesn’t work for me in an IPA. In a

porter, however, rye has a cozy home. High Cotton’s take on a chocolate porter has just enough of that rye to create a neat spice finish to an otherwise classic porter, with hints of chocolate and coffee going on. With an ABV of 5 percent, this porter will make you warm where you need it, but won’t try to poleaxe you while you aren’t looking. If nothing else, this is a beer that feels like fall, even if you haven’t covered your knees since April. And yet, since we’re certainly going to hit 80 degrees again, you haven’t made too much of a commitment. For some historical color on the porter style, you should know it’s a traditional beer for the working class in England, where it’s fall 10 months out of the year. But not even the English can live on porter alone, so what do you eat with it? I’d steer clear of anything light and summery, as it would just be overwhelmed. What I’d like to have a glass with is some wild game, even some fowl if you’re throwing everything on the grill these days. A glass will also play well with sausages, good stews of roasted root vegetables, and braised meat. You hear about a lot of people pairing porters with barbecue, but I’m not so sure. With this chocolate rye porter, it seems like that would be an awful lot going on, but you do you. In sum, it’s a roasty, hearty brew that is still medium-bodied, not heavy. For those of you looking for what we used to call a breakfast beer, you’re looking for a bigger “stout” — which for the modern drinker has come to mean a beer with roughly the same color and a wee bit more heft. Historically speaking, the styles are very intertwined. Even the name “stout” is a shortened version of “stout porter.” If you are looking for a solid local version of the latter, crack open one of Wiseacre’s You Gotta Get Up to Get Down. Which is made with local coffee, so you can actually drink for breakfast if you are still Zooming your way through what you’re still calling a career. Of course, if you’re still carrying on like that seven months into this hellscape, then knowing the seasons isn’t your problem. You likely don’t even know what time it is.

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can’t wait to write a fun-filled and informational column in these pages about the perfect New Year’s beer. It’s not that I’m a fan of the holiday (I’m not — it’s amateur night), but that foolishness will signal the end of this damn year. Now I understand that Halloween is being downgraded to “Well, we’d better not. You know, for the kids.” Meanwhile, we all wait for the alert-level for Thanksgiving to rise to: “It will make you sicker than the candied yams.” All of which raises the question: What the hell season are we even in?

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ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT

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FILM By Chris McCoy

American Utopia Spike Lee and David Byrne team up for an ecstatic concert film.

F

October 22-28, 2020

rom the beginning, America has been a utopian project. The Founders had come of age in an era that highlighted the problems of monarchy and what we now call authoritarianism. They saw decades in England dominated by civil war, with only the cast of unyielding megalomaniacs changing from time to time. They threw off a haughty monarchy interested only in exploitation and indifferent to the needs of its subjects in far-flung colonies. They embraced the ideals of science and the Enlightenment to create a system of democratic self-rule in the hopes that these United States could be a better place than those that came before. In 1790, George Washington wrote to a supporter that, “The establishment of our new Government seemed to be the last great experiment for promoting human happiness.” From the beginning, America did not live up to the ideals espoused by our founding documents. All men were created equal — except the Black slaves. People were endowed by their creators with the inalienable right to life — except the natives who had to be slaughtered so we could take their land. Everyone had a right to vote — except for women, who made up half the population. But the ideas unleashed by the American Revolution proved

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infectious and hard to kill, sparking a pandemic of democratic thought all over the world. Like science, there is no end state to democracy; it’s a process. America is a 244-year-old work in progress. Embracing the will to change is a theme that runs throughout American Utopia. It might sound strange to claim that a concert film has a theme besides “get up and dance,” but this is no ordinary concert film. David Byrne, who gained fame as the frontman for the greatest of the 1970s art punk bands, Talking Heads, crafted a Broadway show out of the unique tour he designed for his 2018 album. When Byrne played at 2018’s Memphis in May, the contrast between his act and the dozens of other pop, rock, and hip-hop acts was striking. Instead of a stage full of musicians tethered to the instruments, Byrne and company started out with a blank stage surrounded on three sides by curtains of silver links. The musicians, carrying their instruments in harnesses like a marching band, moved freely about the stage, executing choreography that took from both the

This must be the place — A-list director Spike Lee documents former Talking Heads frontman David Byrne’s (above, center) vision of his adopted home in American Utopia. freedom of the New York modern dance scene and the rigid precision of color guards and drum corps. Once the show moved to the Great White Way, it was refined into a blockbuster, which was selling out the historic Hudson Theatre.

Byrne wants to show that we are much more alike than we are different. He points out that most members of his band are immigrants. The American experiment has produced horrors and violence, but our openness has also led to the greatest flowering of creativity the world has ever seen. Talking Heads were the subject of what is, for my money, the greatest concert film ever made, 1983’s Stop Making Sense, directed by the late Jonathan Demme. To document American Utopia, Byrne reached out to fellow New Yorker Spike Lee. Filming a Broadway show might seem like a waste of talent for someone on the shortlist of America’s greatest living directors, but Stop Making Sense proved the concert film is a unique and subtle challenge for a filmmaker. Fortunately for us, Lee said yes, and he was more than equal to the task. This is not a three-camera shoot feeding a Bonnaroo live-stream. Lee and cinematographer Ellen Kuras have an uncanny knack for putting their cameras in exactly the right place to capture the drama and spectacle of the choreography. We get views from the wings, closeups of the dancers’ bare feet, and even a rotating overhead camera. The film’s 20 songs span Byrne’s career, from the twitchy “Don’t Worry About the Government” from


FILM By Chris McCoy

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In his opening description of the brain, he pays special attention to the corpus callosum, the groove that both separates the two hemispheres and carries messages back and forth. Byrne wants to show that we are much more alike than we are different. He points out that most members of his band, including himself, are immigrants. The American experiment has produced horrors and violence, but our openness has also led to the greatest flowering of creativity the world has ever seen. In this time of darkness, Byrne and Lee say we can once again come together to pursue that elusive dream of utopia. With this singularly joyous film, they are leading by example. American Utopia is airing on HBO, and streams on HBO Max.

ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT

the Talking Heads’ debut in ’77, to “Everybody’s Coming to My House” from 2018. The nestled polyrhythms and Dada poetry of “I, Zimbra” sound made for the percussion-heavy band, led by frequent Byrne collaborator Mauro Refosco. Songs from American Utopia, which sounded a little halfbaked on the record, come into their own before the packed theater. Byrne begins the show holding a model of a human brain. As New Wave’s poster boy, he weaponized what he now describes as mild autism into a persona that fit the confrontational CBGB punk scene where the Heads first emerged. The arc of American Utopia echoes his experiences growing up in public as a perpetual outsider trying to relate to the neurotypical.

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THE LAST WORD by Chris McCoy

Rhodes Scholar

When White House Press Secretary Kayleigh McEnany mistakenly called Supreme Court nominee Amy Coney Barrett a “Rhodes Scholar” a couple weeks ago, I nodded in recognition. I came to Rhodes in the fall of 1989, a time of great change in America. After two Ronald Reagan landslides and the election of George H. W. Bush, the conservative revolution was in full swing. Generation X, as we would come to be called, grew up in the shadow of the Cold War. I was in a political science class when we got word that the Berlin Wall had fallen, making our textbooks instantly obsolete. In the 1970s, when Rhodes was called Southwestern, the student body had a hippie reputation. In the 1990s, things were different. The college’s president, James Daughdrill, was involved in a push to eliminate the term “liberal arts college” because it contained the word “liberal.” This was a place where the Kappa Alpha fraternity dressed up as Confederate soldiers to throw an annual “Old South” party. Meanwhile, the biggest band on campus — Neighborhood Texture Jam — sang “Wanna see the rebel flags?/Wanna go see ’em?/ They’re next to the swastikas/In a museum!” The divisions on campus presaged the divisions of today, starting with class. Rhodes is an expensive, selective college. Many Memphians think of Rhodes students as a bunch of stuck-up rich kids, but that’s not entirely true. If you qualify academically, the school is generous with need-based financial aid. As a working-class kid from a rural Tennessee public school, I had never been around such wealth and privilege. The student body was mostly white, but it was much more diverse than where I grew up. Reading Toni Morrison in a literature class with the first Black teacher I ever had was an eye-opening experience. The most important course I ever took was called Global Change. Only three years after NASA climate scientist James Hansen’s testimony before Al Gore’s Senate committee, we were creating models of the Earth’s climate in Rhodes’ computer lab. Watching my carefully balanced simulation go haywire after adding a little extra CO2 to the atmosphere taught me the precariousness of life on Earth. The 1980s saw the emergence of the AIDS epidemic, which Reagan’s conservative administration had ignored because it mostly affected gay people. By the early 1990s, it was obvious that using condoms could stop the spread of AIDS, yet Daughdrill’s conservative Rhodes administration forbade student groups from distributing them. Some of my friends, including Ashley Coffield, the current CEO of Planned Parenthood of Tennessee and North Mississippi, took to the weekend party circuit toting buckets of free condoms camouflaged by a layer of candy on top. Like Amy Coney Barrett, I was an English major. I am sure we had classes together, but I don’t remember her. Those who do remember her describe her as quiet and studious. Rhodes was a competitive environment. People could be jealous and petty; I used to say the most popular intramural sport was character assassination. If she had been a monster, we would know it by now. Academically, Rhodes is difficult. To this day, my anxiety dreams are still set in those Gothic collegiate classrooms. I barely managed to graduate with a 3.0 GPA; Barrett was summa cum laude. The Honor Code, which forbids lying, cheating, and stealing, is taken very seriously. Barrett was vice president of the Honor Council. Producing a second Supreme Court Justice (after Abe Fortas in 1965) would increase Rhodes’ prestige. But I was one of more than 1,500 alumni to sign a letter opposing Barrett’s nomination. My reasons are rooted in the education I received on North Parkway. In her Senate hearing, Barrett, whose father was an oil company lawyer, refused to admit climate change is real, saying, “I’m not a scientist.” That alone is disqualifying for someone whose decisions have the potential to affect the fate of civilization. As a freelance writer, I depend on the Affordable Care Act. The Trump administration, having failed to legislatively strip 20 million people of healthcare, is currently suing to have the ACA declared unconstitutional. It will be one of the first cases Barrett hears on the Supreme Court. Trump wouldn’t have nominated her if he thought she would rule against him. Her record indicates that her attitudes toward a woman’s right to choose and same-sex marriage have the potential to gut Americans’ individual liberties. And finally, accepting this nomination against the dying wish of Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg, from an impeached president who is openly threatening the rule of law, is unworthy of someone who signed the Rhodes Honor Code. Barrett has put her personal ambition over the needs of the nation, and I fear her appointment to the highest court of the land will be a permanent stain on the honor of the college that I hold dear. Chris McCoy is the Flyer’s film and TV editor.

m e m p h i s f l y e r. c o m

Amy Coney Barrett before the Senate Judiciary Committee

THE LAST WORD

WIKIPEDIA: CSPAN

The college that made Amy Coney Barrett.

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MEMPHIS MADE BREWING CO.

NOW OPEN

Wednesdays: 4-7 p.m. Thursdays: 4-7 p.m. Fridays: 4-10 p.m. Saturdays: 1-10 p.m. Sundays: 1-7 p.m 768 S. Cooper • 901.207.5343

Cheers! We can now deliver some delicious alcoholic drinks right to your door alongside your to-go meal or have them available for curbside pickup! Don’t want to leave the house, that’s okay - twobrokebartenders.com will be happy to deliver it to you. You may also buy gift card for all locations online. We are going to make it through this together.

IG/FB/TW @cocoandlolas Memphis’ Top Lingerie Shop 710 S. Cox|901-425-5912|Mon-Sat 11:30-7

CURBSIDE PICKUP TUE thru FRI 11A-2P a 4-9P SAT 1-9P | SUN 11A-9P See Menus online at CELTICCROSSINGMEMPHIS.COM. BYOGROWLER TO TAKE HOME BEER! GUINNESS CANS ALSO AVAILABLE. CALL 901-274-5151 TO ORDER BROUGHT TO YOUR CAR UPON ARRIVAL

GO GLOBAL! @

www.xm7digital.com Address: 320 Monroe Ave • Entrance on Floyd Alley • Park in Stop345 Lot on Madison • West of Danny Thomas • 901.730.0290 • Take Sally to the Alley..

GONER RECORDS

New/Used LPs, 45s & CDs. Shopping By Appointment.

We Buy Records!

2152 Young Ave - 901-722-0095 Goner-Records.com

MEDICINAL CANNABIS AVAILABLE NOW! BePainFreeGlobal.com

Call (888) 420-3848 for a private consultation. Ask how to receive 10% off your first order.

ANTIQUES & COLLECTIBLES 21,000 sq ft. 100 + booths • 5855 Summer Ave. (corner of Summer and Sycamore View ) exit 12 off I-40 | 901.213.9343 Mon-Sat 10a-6p | Sun 1p-6p

WE BUY RECORDS 45’S, 78’S, LP’S

Don’t “give them away” at a yard sale We Pay More Than Anyone Large Quantities No Problem Also Buying Old Windup Phonographs Call Paul 901-734-6111

Advertise ONLINE * WEBSITE * MOBILE PHONE

call us @ (877)-879-9XM7

ALL ABOUT FEET $35-$55

Mobile foot care service, traveling to you for men & women, ages 50+. Over 25 years of experience. Traveling hours M-F, 9a-6p. Call now 901-270-6060

*TEAM CLEAN*

All natural cleaning for your home • office • studio environment Contact Candace @ 901-262-6610 or teamcleanmemphis@gmail.com

TUT-UNCOMMON ANTIQUES

421 N. Watkins St. 278-8965 GOING OUT OF BUSINESS SALE Everything Goes at 50% OFF! 1500 sq. ft. of Vintage & Antique Jewelry. Retro Furniture and Accessories. Original Paintings, Sculpture, Pottery, Art & Antiques. We are the only store in the Mid-South that replaces stones in costume jewelry.

Open Tues - Sat 10a-5p

SIMPLY HEMP SHOP

We carry a variety of CBD products. Full Spectrum oil, sprays, skin care, and even CBD for Pets. Find us at Oothones at 410 N Cleveland St or online at simplyhemp.shop 901-443-7157

Profile for Contemporary Media

Memphis Flyer 10/22/2020  

It's On! - Your 2020 Election Guide: the races, the candidates, the record turnout. Maeve Brophy Matt Bowers' Memphis American Utopia

Memphis Flyer 10/22/2020  

It's On! - Your 2020 Election Guide: the races, the candidates, the record turnout. Maeve Brophy Matt Bowers' Memphis American Utopia