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10.20.16 | 1443rd Issue

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OUR 1443RD ISSUE 10.20.16 So, who’ve you got in the Supreme Court Death Pool? I mean, you know one of those old black-robed folks is going to pass on soon, and we’ll be down to seven justices. If four of them are conservative, it’s a win for the GOP. If the first one to die is conservative, then the Democrats will have the edge. Sound crazy? Get used to it. SCOTUS Death Pool Roulette appears to be the way of the future. When Justice Antonin Scalia inconveniently died on a hunting trip earlier this year (or Killery had him taken out, if you’re not one of the sheeple who believes the lamestream media), it meant we were down to eight justices, which means almost every SCOTUS decision is now gridlocked at four-to-four. And that just doesn’t work. Our Founding Fathers knew this, because they could do math. They knew an odd number of justices, say, nine, would lead to, you know, actual decisions. But judging from remarks made this week by Senator John McCain and Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell, we’re going to be stuck at eight for a while. At best. According to these fine legislators, there will no longer be a SCOTUS selection process, at least not until a Republican is elected president. McCain pledged in a radio interview in Pennsylvania that the Senate would not confirm any justices nominated by Hillary Clinton. McConnell said in a Fox News interview with Chris Wallace that he “couldn’t see” the Senate ever confirming a nominee opposed by the National Rifle Association and the National Federation of Independent Business. He was referring specifically to President Obama’s current nominee, Merrick Garland, but one suspects the NRA and NFIB will pretty reliably oppose any nominee put forward by a Democratic president. Which could be a problem, if we are to believe the polls. They currently show Hillary with massive leads in the popular vote and in every key swing state. If McCain and McConnell are to be taken at their word, we won’t see any new justices until at least 2020, when the Republicans will do their best to nominate someone who’s not a delusional 70-yearold sexual predator. Of course, thanks to the GOP’s innovative SCOTUS Death Pool system, we might be down to five justices by then. I’ve tried to wrap my head around the dilemma forced upon the GOP by this Trump thing. Every day, it seems, another prominent Republican finds a conscience. Last week, our own Governor Bill Haslam finally had enough and said he couldn’t vote for the GOP nominee. But we still haven’t heard a peep out of our Tennessee senators, Lamar Alexander and Bob Corker, and I can’t, for the life of me, figure out what their thinking is. Neither is up for reelection this cycle. There are no two safer seats in the U.S. Senate than theirs. Are they on board with the SCOTUS Death Pool strategy? Are they afraid Donald Trump will grab them by the pussy? They shouldn’t be. Trump is down to a bunker mentality. He’s unraveling, preaching paranoia to his rabid base: The polls are fake, the debate monitors are biased, the election is going to be rigged, all those women accusers are liars (except the ones accusing Bill Clinton), and, at least according to Melania Trump, Access Hollywood svengali Billy Bush egged him into that “locker room talk.” And last, but not least, the media hate him. There’s an old saying: Never get into an argument with people who buy ink by the barrel. Here’s a corollary: Never point to the folks covering your campaign at your rallies and call them out as the “enemy” and urge your supporters to attack and demonize N E WS & O P I N I O N them. They might just put a little more effort NY TIMES CROSSWORD - 4 into fact-checking your daily stream-ofTHE FLY-BY - 6 consciousness horse puckey. POLITICS - 10 But hey, maybe Alexander and Corker EDITORIAL - 12 and McCain and McConnell and Paul Ryan VIEWPOINT - 13 COVER - “THE CHICKEN ISSUE” and all the other GOP establishment weasels EDITED BY SUSAN ELLIS - 14 who bravely denounce Trump’s words but who are too timid to stand up to him, are STE P P I N’ O UT WE RECOMMEND - 20 onto something. Maybe they think the MUSIC - 22 election really will be rigged. At this point, AFTER DARK - 24 that appears to be the only way Trump BOOKS - 28 could win. Maybe they know something we ART - 29 don’t know. Maybe they’re actually looking CALENDAR OF EVENTS - 30 forward to confirming President Trump’s BAR REPORT - 37 SCOTUS nominees. SPIRITS - 39 “Justice Billy Bush” has a nice ring to it, FILM - 40 don’t you think? C L AS S I F I E D S - 44 Bruce VanWyngarden LAST WORD - 47 brucev@memphisflyer.com

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Crossword

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No. 0223

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NEWS & OPINION

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October 20-26, 2016

CHICKEN ISSUE In case the cover wasn’t a dead giveaway, this is the Memphis Flyer’s “Chicken Issue,” with a cover package devoted to all kinds of fowl play. So it’s probably appropriate — or maybe wildly inappropriate — to draw readers’ attention to a drama that unfolded on Jackson last week that demonstrates just how much this tasty bird means to people. Sixty-year-old David Haslett was standing in the street when police arrived. He was still brandishing his knife, and covered in goop where he’d been sprayed with a fire extinguisher. Haslett had stabbed Ibrahima Sene, a convenience-store employee, in the leg for allegedly selling him “bad chicken.” Haslett, who demanded his chicken money back, was arrested. Sene was taken to the hospital in non-critical condition.

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VERBATIM “By not helping out Donald Trump he’s practically supporting Hillary Clinton.” — defeated, often-deplorable former Tennessee Senator turned Donald Trump surrogate Stacey Campfield on the Tennessee governor’s refusal to support the Republican presidential candidate, who is leading in Tennessee. Haslam may be expressing symptoms of a political phenomenon called “term-limititis.” Or conscience. Hard to tell. NEVERENDING ELVIS It’s spook season and time to check in on which dead celebrities made the most money this year. Elvis is still hanging in there earning $27 million before taxes in 2015 so far. He’s in fourth place just below golf guru Arnold Palmer and just ahead of Prince. Michael Jackson’s reigning king of the dead, raking in upwards of $82 million, according to Forbes. By Chris Davis. Email him at davis@memphisflyer.com.

Questions, Answers + Attitude Edited by Toby Sells

W E E K T H AT W A S By Flyer Staff

Kratom, Greenline, U of M DEA backs off kratom, the Greenline may expand westward, U of M gets a new board.

Kratom, Cohen, and the Liberal Redneck Kratom won’t (yet) be listed alongside illegal drugs like heroin and LSD, and at least two Tennesseans — Memphis Rep. Steve Cohen and Trae Crowder (aka the Liberal Redneck) — are happy about that. Kratom is a drug derived from the leaves of a tropical tree and is usually taken as a powder or drunk in a tea. Some say the drug can help with depression, anxiety, and opioid addiction.

It is banned in Tennessee and a handful of other states. Kratom was slated to be outlawed nationally by the Drug Enforcement Agency (DEA) and listed on the Schedule I list, alongside heroin and other drugs, at the end of September. But the DEA has backed down on the move after a public backlash. A public comment period will extend to December. Cohen said the DEA’s scheduling decisions can be misguided, and pointed to marijuana as evidence. “When marijuana was placed on Schedule I, it was supposed to be temporary until the science was in. That was 1970,” Cohen said. “The science has been in for a long time, and keeping marijuana on Schedule I — with heroin and LSD — is ludicrous.” Crowder, the Knoxville comedian, tweeted last week, “I can’t believe the DEA has listened to the people.” Crowder’s character, the Liberal Redneck, ranted against the DEA’s Schedule I decision in a September YouTube video called “Talkin Bout Drugs.” “It’s the only tea I fuck with that you can’t get at a chicken buffet,” Crowder said. Greenline bridge expands west Design planning was set to begin this week for a new bridge over

Q&A with Nicholas Oyler The city’s new Bikeway and Pedestrian Program manager Before taking over Kyle Wagenschutz’s position as Memphis’ Bikeway and Pedestrian Program manager, Nicholas Oyler spent six years living in Germany and Texas. The experiences couldn’t have been more opposite. Texans cursed him for biking in the street. Germans scolded him for stepping into the bike lane. But Oyler learned abroad that walking and biking are engrained in everyday life — a vision he told the Flyer that he sees for Memphis. — Joshua Cannon Memphis Flyer: What is your professional and personal background prior to this job? Nicholas Oyler: I was away from Memphis for about six years, with most of that time in Germany and the rest in Texas. Along the way, I worked as an urban planner with the goal of one day returning home with a collection of experiences and lessons applicable toward improving Memphis. After returning three years ago, I worked at the Memphis Metropolitan Planning Organization and reacquainted myself with my hometown and the changes that had occurred while away.

Perhaps the greatest change was a heightened sense of awareness in the community on the importance of these issues and the fact that an alternative to the car-dominated status quo was possible. During my undergraduate studies at the [University of Memphis], I hoped that the city would adopt something as simple as Share the Road signs; the thought of bike lanes was wishful thinking. So, imagine my astonishment and renewed optimism when I learned the city was experimenting with some of the most cutting-edge designs for bicycle facilities in the country. If anything, these improvements fueled my belief that Memphis really could become the sustainable, livable city I envisioned.

What improvements did you see in terms of cycling and walkability? As you expect, a lot had changed by the time I returned.

How is Germany’s biking and walking culture different from America’s, specifically in Memphis? There are no perceptions against or stigmas toward


Tillman that would connect the Shelby Farms Greenline to Flicker. The project would also establish a new Greenline trailhead on Flicker under the Union Avenue viaduct. The expansion could lay the groundwork for the Greenline to one day connect to the Memphis Fairgrounds. Napoleon Opens Hotel Napoleon began booking guests last week in the renovated building that once housed the Memphis Press-Scimitar. The 36,500 square-foot boutique hotel includes 56 rooms and two suites and is located at 179 Madison. Haslam names U of M board Tennessee Governor Bill Haslam named eight Hotel Napoleon members to the first, local board of trustees for the University of Memphis (U of M). The move will allow the university board to appoint the school’s president, set tuition, and make other key operational decisions. Memphis is now one of six public universities under the Tennessee Board of Regents that operate with its own independent board. The board members are Douglas Edwards, senior advisor at BBH Capital Partners; Marvin Ellison, CEO of J.C. Penney Company, Inc.; Alan Graf, chief financial officer for FedEx Corp.; Cato Johnson, senior vice president of public policy and regulatory affairs for Methodist Healthcare; Brad Martin, former interim president of the U of M and retired chairman and CEO of Saks Inc.; David North, CEO for Sedgwick Claims Management Services; Carol Roberts, chief financial officer for International Paper Co.; and Susan Springfield, chief credit officer for First Horizon National Corporation.

How do you commute? I walk to work every day, rain or shine. The walk takes about five minutes, and the only traffic I encounter are some squirrels on Main Street. On days when I have a morning meeting outside of downtown, I ride a bike or take the bus. Of course, many people in Memphis don’t have these choices readily available to them as convenient or practical options. My wife and I prioritized living in a walkable neighborhood that was within easy access to our places of work, but, in my opinion, that desire shouldn’t immediately limit our choices to a couple of neighborhoods. Memphis has a handful of truly walkable neighborhoods, but in most, current conditions don’t provide safe or comfortable connections. Because of this, one of my responsibilities is to oversee the implementation of the city’s Pedestrian and School Safety Action Plan, a planning document that recommends strategic improvements to our pedestrian network and will lead to a much more walkable city overall. Read the full interview at memphisflyer.com.

NEWS & OPINION

walking and biking as a poor person’s, child’s, or — I dare say — hipster’s mode of transportation. These are simply ways to get around. But what makes this taken-for-granted attitude possible is a well-connected, safe, and efficient infrastructure network, not to mention land-use regulations that encourage denser development. Even the home country of BMW, Mercedes, and Porsche acknowledges that the transportation network should work for all people, regardless of their ability or desire to drive a car. The pedestrian, bicycle, and transit networks in German cities are extensive and connected well enough that no person faces limited mobility without a car. Girls as young as 8 years old and women as old as 80 ride bikes in the street. Kindergarteners walk themselves home from school. Memphis and most U.S. cities are a long way from these conditions, but I believe it’s a vision worth striving toward.

m e m p h i s f l y e r. c o m

Memphis is energy burdened Across the country, low-income households pay proportionately more than the average household in energy costs, and that divide is the greatest right here in Memphis. That’s according to an April report from the American Council for an EnergyEfficient Economy (ACEEE). The average Memphis household pays about 6 percent of its annual income on energy costs, according to ACEEE. But low-income households here pay an average of 13 percent, and some of them pay more than 25 percent of their annual income on energy costs. “It’s unacceptable to me to see our poorest citizens paying upwards of 25 percent of their paychecks each month just on their utility bill,” said council member Patrice Robinson.

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CITY REPORTER B y M i c a e l a Wa t t s

Blue Review

PAUL GARNER

Allegations of police misconduct get public hearings.

A video still shows MPD officers at Manna House in 2013.

A N N U A L FA L L S A L E BIGGEST SALE OF THE SEASON

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One Memphian claimed Memphis Police Department (MPD) officers arrested him for filming them, another alleged an abusive arrest. The Civilian Law Enforcement Review Board (CLERB) will continue gathering evidence on both of these complaints against MPD officers and present it during its meeting in November. CLERB hears cases of police misconduct in Memphis and can recommend punishment for officers to the police director, but it cannot enforce penalties. The board had gone dormant but was revived last year and given new investigative powers earlier this year. The board met last week to review a case involving Paul Garner, a local grassroots organizer, and Ashley Moore, a volunteer with Manna House. Both were arrested on Oct. 21, 2013 while police were searching for a possible robbery suspect at Manna House, which provides hygiene essentials and food to homeless Memphians. Garner said he was charged with disorderly conduct because, “there is no charge (you can use) for filming the police.” Moore was running Manna House that evening and was arrested after she denied MPD officers entry to the house without a warrant. Both were charged with obstruction of a highway or passageway. During Moore’s arrest, Garner arrived on the scene and began filming the interaction. He said this act alone earned his arrest. Both Garner and Moore had their cell phones confiscated at the scene. The charges were dropped within 24 hours, and

Garner subsequently filed a complaint with the MPD’s Internal Affairs Bureau. Central to CLERB’s deliberation on Garner’s complaint is whether or not MPD had its policy regarding bystander’s filming police activity made accessible to the public. An archived story from WREG News Channel 3 shows MPD released its policy to the public on Dec. 19, 2013, nearly two months after Garner’s arrest. Local criminal defense attorney and CLERB member John Marek spearheaded many of the questions into Garner’s complaint, at one point musing aloud, “I don’t know why, but for some reason it seems that when officers can’t find anything to arrest someone on, they go for disorderly conduct.” Though it is unclear what will happen if CLERB concludes that MPD officers have been inconsistent with upholding their filming policy, Garner would like to see the board make policy recommendations to the MPD. CLERB also reviewed a case filed by Robert Howard, who asserts that a police officer intentionally and abusively cuffed him around his right leg. Howard said he had a blood clot in the area and pleaded with the officer not to cuff him there. He alleges that his arresting officer threw water on his face and kicked him on his backside while attempting to revive him. “I only want to know why,” said Howard, “Why would you put that clamp around my leg, knowing that there was a blood clot there and being warned that it would be dangerous to do so?”


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NEWS & OPINION

(901) 327-6000 / LiteracyMidSouth.org

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October

9


POLITICS By Jackson Baker

It’s On! Early voting guide; Wharton gets award; Commission approves Pascover.

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1141 S. Barksdale Greater Lewis Street Baptist Church, 152 E. Parkway North Greater Middle Baptist Church, 4982 Knight Arnold Mississippi Blvd. Church-Family Life Center, 70 N. Bellevue Blvd. Mt. Zion Baptist Church, 60 S. Parkway East Raleigh United Methodist Church, 3295 Powers Riverside Missionary Baptist Church, 3560 S. Third Shelby County Office Building, 157 Poplar White Station Church of Christ, 1106 Colonial BARTLETT: Waypoint (formerly Bethel) Church, 5586 Stage COLLIERVILLE: Collierville Church of Christ, 575 Shelton GERMANTOWN: New Bethel Missionary Baptist Church, 7786 Poplar Pike LAKELAND: The Refuge Church, 9817 Huff n Puff MILLINGTON: Baker Community Center, 7942 Church There are races on the ballot for the presidency, for Congress, and for state legislative positions. There are also elections for municipal and school board positions in Bartlett, Collierville, Germantown, and Millington, as well as several referenda — on term limits (Lakeland ballot only), on revising

JACKSON BAKER

October 20-26, 2016

Creates an interconnected neighborhood between the riverfront and South Main

This year’s terminal election — for a variety of positions and issues, local, state, and federal, including the presidency of the United States — has already begun, with the onset of early voting on Wednesday, October 19th, of this week. The early voting period will conclude on Thursday, November 3rd, and election day itself is Tuesday, November 8th.  Below is a list of the 21 early voting locations, all of which this year will keep the same hours — 10 a.m. to 7 p.m. on weekdays; 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. on Saturday, October 22nd; and 8 a.m. to 4 p.m. on Saturday, October 29th. The polling locations will be closed on Sunday, October 23rd, and Sunday, October 30th. LOCATIONS (in alphabetical order: MEMPHIS: Abundant Grace Fellowship Church, 1574 E. Shelby Drive Agricenter International, 7777 Walnut Grove Anointed Temple of Praise, 3939 Riverdale Bellevue Baptist Church, 2000 Appling (Cordova) Berclair Church of Christ, 4536 Summer Dave Wells Community Center, 915 Chelsea Ed Rice Community Center, 2907 Watkins Glenview Community Center,

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636 South Front Street Memphis, TN 38103 901.486.1595 southlinememphis.com

Former Shelby County and Memphis Mayor A C Wharton received an award on Monday from the Shelby County Commission lauding him for his years of service to city and county government. Here Commissioner Van Turner presents the award in the presence of Wharton’s friends, family, and well-wishers. The former mayor responded with gratitude but allowed as how the opportunity to provide public service was itself the greatest reward he’d ever received.


with Luttrell — as suggested by Milton’s statement at a previous meeting that he was “tired of the fight” — or merely a vote of confidence in Pascover itself. There may in fact still be a commission majority in favor of the body’s possessing its own attorney — a matter of continuing dispute. In any case, two ordinances before the commission for the second of three requiring readings, each of which called for greater say for the commission over Luttrell’s appointive powers, were referred back to the commission’s general government committee for a further once-over. That could mean merely a postponement of an inevitable

reckoning, or it could mean a general lessening of passions. Whatever the case, the commission came up with rare unanimity on three resolutions that in effect began a transition away from an outsourced arrangement for ambulance services with American Medical Response (AMR), which had hit up the commission to approve a hefty fee increase. Funds were appropriated via the resolutions on behalf of a countyoperated service. Roland summed up the result of those votes: “Mr. Chairman, we’re in the ambulance business.”

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distribution of utility-tax revenues (Memphis ballot only); on revising the Shelby County charter to give the County Commission co-authority with the county mayor on dismissal of the county attorney (countywide ballot); and on legalizing wine sales in grocery stores (unincorporated Shelby County only).  Ballots for all these circumstances are available at each early voting site. A sample ballot listing all races and referenda is available for inspection on the Shelby County Election Commission website at shelbyvote.com/ documentcenter/view/1840.    • Even in an election season in which its own elective positions are not at stake, the Shelby County Commission manages to revel in politics — partly of the sort that has a bearing on future elections, partly of the sort that bears more on internal county-government power struggles. Two cases of the latter sort were evident at Monday’s public meeting. The first was a resolution asking the commission for an up or down vote on county Mayor Mark Luttrell’s nomination of Kathryn Pascover, who has been serving on an interim basis, as the permanent county attorney. Right off the bat was an extended interrogation of Pascover from Republican Commissioner Heidi Shafer, the current vice-chair of the body and something of an unofficial leader of an on-again/off-again commission majority determined to assert its prerogatives against those of Luttrell. Shafer’s questions covered the waterfront of possible interactions between the county attorney’s office and the commission, but the essential thrust of all of them was whether Pascover would insist on precluding the commission’s efforts to consult and be guided by its own legal sources and whether she regarded her office as the ruling legal authority on actions taken or contemplated by the commission. Experienced lawyer that she is, Pascover gave guarded and somewhat equivocal answers to Shafer’s questions, the essence of which was, as she stated in one of her answers, “I would have to look at particulars.” But, on balance, she seemed to assert the overriding pre-eminence of her office on legal matters. That was enough for Shafer to conclude, as she put it, “I will not be able to vote for Ms. Pascover. I do not believe the attorney general’s opinion will bind a legislative body.” But Shafer’s remarks were followed in short order by statements from three commissioners who, more often than not, have voted with her on matters of commission prerogatives vis-à-vis those of the county administration. And all three — Democrats Van

Turner, Reginald Milton, and Walter Bailey — either praised Pascover and/ or said they saw no reason not to support her nomination. The final speaker was Republican Commissioner Mark Billingsley, sponsor of the resolution, who said the résumé of Pascover, a labor/ management specialist who was most recently associated with the FordHarrison law firm, “speaks for itself.” It evidently spoke via the commission vote, which was unanimous for Pascover, save for Shafer’s nay vote and an abstention from GOP Commissioner Terry Roland. Time will tell whether the vote signaled a falling away from the confrontation

NEWS & OPINION

POLITICS

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E D ITO R IAL

Tubby Talk It seems entirely appropriate that, at a time when we are confronted with the need to choose a national leader, we should have fresh examples of leadership in our midst. Such was the case Tuesday on the occasion of the regular

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Tuesday luncheon of the Rotary Club of Memphis, when the speaking guest was one Tubby Smith, the new coach of the University of Memphis basketball team, at a time when his Tigers are on the very threshold of their 2017-18 season. Smith gave a virtual seminar on the art of inspiring a constituency and winning its confidence. His first rhetorical move was artfulness itself, when he said that he made it a habit to be “always moving up” in his career changes. This, to say the least, gave a boost to his audience of Memphians, who are thoroughly used to hearing poor-mouthing about the city’s prospects from too many of their fellow townsfolk. The boost was all the higher, inasmuch as the speaker of those words was a celebrated, even legendary coach, a 1998 winner of the NCAA annual basketball tournament at the University of Kentucky who has taken five different teams to the NCAA tournament, and who, as recently as last year, while coaching Texas Tech, was voted college basketball Coach of the Year by the Sporting News. As University of Memphis president David Rudd said in his introduction of the coach, Smith is a guaranteed future Hall of Famer. After that good start, Smith went on to tell self-deprecating stories about his time as a high school football player. He explained that his position was “tailback,” a fact which he illustrated by claiming that, every time he tried to head out onto the field, his

coach would call out, “Smith, get your tail back!” That’s the kind of modesty, of course, which reinforces people’s sense that the speaker is so self-confident that he need not boast of himself. Not to overstate the case, but compare that to a certain presidential candidate whose campaign seems to consist entirely of braggadocio. While we’re on that analogy, a further point of comparison: The candidate in question is notorious for winging it and not doing his homework on issues of the day. Tubby Smith made a case for planning and preparation as the necessary precursors of success and told the Rotarians how, from the time of his first coaching gig at Virginia Commonwealth University, he demanded of his players that they keep, maintain, and strictly observe a daily planner — both as athletes and in their daily lives, later on. As Smith dilated further about his recruiting methods and his rituals, routines, and serious commitment to the Xs and Os of his craft, it became obvious that here was a man who not only knew what he was talking about, but had gone through a highly disciplined process to acquire that knowledge. That, plus his becoming modesty, plus a record that speaks for itself were all things that make clear that Tubby Smith is a proven leader. Would that we could say the same thing about the politicians we have to choose from this election year.

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V I E W P O I N T By Happy Jones, Jocelyn Wurzburg, and Paula Casey

Vote No to Misogyny! Local activists abandon long-standing nonpartisan recommendations to urge GOP’s defeat.

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m e m p h i s f l y e r. c o m

support abolition of slavery and women’s suffrage. The grandfather of Alice Paul, a prominent suffragist, helped found the GOP in New Jersey. U.S. Senator Margaret Chase Smith, a Republican who represented Maine for 24 years in the Senate, believed in compromise and governing. She also called out Republicans when they were wrong. Senator Smith’s “Declaration of Conscience” in 1950 condemned Wisconsin Republican Senator Joseph McCarthy. Smith stated she didn’t “want to see the Republican Party ride to political victory on the Four Horsemen of Calumny — Fear, Ignorance, Bigotry, and Smear.” Those words are just as important to heed now as they were back then. Two of the three of us whose bylines are above — Happy and Jocie — were once active Republicans. We all now see Donald Trump’s nomination and support as a culmination of racist overtures dating back to the late Lee Atwater’s Southern strategy. It was appalling back then, and the GOP deserves the meltdown it is experiencing now. There used to be liberal and conservative Jeremy ways to solve problems. Durham Now we are seeing a complete failure by the GOP to even acknowledge a problem exists or that government has a role to help solve it. We grieve this turn of events and hope the Republican Party can reconstitute itself and its legitimate role in our democracy. They don’t need another sham “autopsy,” such as the one written after the 2012 election. They also need to stop the obstructionism and begin to participate in governing again. We believe in robust debate among the parties. We also believe reasonable people can disagree without being disagreeable. The November 8th sample ballot is posted online at shelbyvote.com. Read it and learn more about who is running, and for which offices. Early voting starts October 19th and runs through November 3rd. Election Day is November 8th. Please vote. It’s never been more important. Happy Jones is a retired family therapist; Jocelyn Wurzburg is a professional mediator; and Paula Casey is a speaker/ writer/editor. An original, shorter version of this column appeared on MemphisFlyer.com.

NEWS & OPINION

When people have asked for our recommendations in prior election cycles, we have always prided ourselves on supporting candidates regardless of party, gender, race, or ethnic background. We look for the most qualified candidates to serve the public. We study the issues and the candidates’ backgrounds and qualifications. This year, we have been appalled that the most unqualified, vile, misogynistic, xenophobic, and racist candidate to ever seek the presidency continues to receive support from local Republicans. We were also appalled that no local Republican state legislators sought to oust the despicable State Representative Jeremy Durham before the state attorney general’s report revealed the depths of Durham’s depravity. These two sexual predators do not deserve to be in elective office. Thank goodness the GOP finally grew a spine and ousted Durham. It should have happened much sooner. They only did it after there was a public outcry. Republicans running for state and federal office continue to state their support for the unqualified and embarrassing GOP presidential nominee, Donald Trump. Shameful. In response, we are recommending that this year you vote only for Democrats. It is the only way to show disgust with what the Republicans have done. We think they deserve to be defeated for their support of two sexual predators. The legislature wouldn’t have ousted Durham if they hadn’t had to do so in order to keep him from receiving a legislative pension. Lots of people knew about his antics and turned a blind eye, including our local GOP legislators. It has been extremely disappointing to see the Grand Old Party and all of our elected Republican officials, with the exception of Governor Bill Haslam, twist themselves into knots to support their presidential nominee. They want to have it both ways. They think they can disavow what Trump says and still endorse him, so as to keep his supporters voting for them. The Republican nominee’s campaign has normalized the abnormal. These are troubling times, politically. The history of the Republican Party was once a proud one. It was the first party to

13


The

C OV ER S T O RY B Y FLYER S TA F F PHOTOGR APHS BY FLYER STAF F

& JUSTIN F OX BURK S

Issue

The Bird’s the Word

TEN GREAT CHICKEN DISHES, CHICKEN SONGS, CHEF SUGGESTIONS, AND THE PIRTLES.

«

O

ver the weekend, a man was arrested for stabbing a gas station worker over “bad chicken.” Now we’re not ones to condone violence —no stabbing! — but people around these parts have certain expectations that their chicken is going to be good. This issue is all about good chicken. Plenty of words have been written about Gus’s and Uncle Lou’s, so we decided to explore Memphis’ other chicken avenues. We guarantee that you’ll be hungry after reading this.

October 20-26, 2016

The Smoked Chicken Debris PoBoy @ The Dirty Crow Inn If heaven ain’t a lot like The Dirty Crow Inn, I don’t want to go. (I checked, and it’s fine to rip off Bocephus when you’re talking chicken. “He wouldn’t mind,” is what the rule book says.) I’d heard tell of a chicken Philly sandwich at the Inn. It’s a special sometimes, the bar man told me, but not part of the regular menu. At that low moment, a ray of hope cut those rainy clouds — the word “debris.” The Inn keepers have called it the “Chicken Debris PoBoy” online, but the Dirty Crow menu said, “smoked chicken debris” sandwich. To me, debris is debris any way you cut it (or don’t, I guess). And I’ve seen it swimming in the serving pan at Mother’s, the famed New Orleans restaurant that invented debris (the term anyway). My sandwich at the Dirty Crow was 14 every bit a po’boy, beautifully smoked

chicken bathed in an earthy brown gravy riding two light (and lightly toasted) pieces of French bread from Gambino’s, that fine and famed New Orleans bakery. Sometimes “smoked” menu items, even in Memphis, don’t taste that way. The Crow’s chicken debris sandwich does not leave you guessing. Its smoke flavor is present but delicate, the way it ought to be. It blends seamlessly with that gravy and a nice dose of melted cheese that pulls away in a pizza-commercial string as you pull the sandwich from your mouth. The place is heaven for dive-bar aficionados (like me). The food makes it a before-you-die destination for all Memphians. — Toby Sells Dirty Crow Inn, 855 Kentucky, 207-5111, facebook.com/thedirtycrowinn Fried Chicken @ Cash Saver Sometimes, you just gotta have fried chicken. Last week, I was so desperate I went to the KFC drive-thru and ordered a

Fried Chicken at Cash Saver

box. “Thlbetwtyminawtfcxx” came back over the microphone. “What?” “Thlbetwtyminawtfcxx” “What?” After several attempts, the fellow managed to get the message to me: “There will be a 20-minute wait for chicken.” Right. At a chicken restaurant. So … I’ve been hearing about Cash Saver’s fried chicken for more than a year now. Midtowners who I know and trust have said to me, “That fried chicken is the real deal. And cheap!” Some said it was the best in town. I don’t know about that, but I’m here to tell you, they were right about it being very good. And very cheap. I ordered

two breasts and two thighs. Total cost? $5.19. The pieces were very large, crispy on the outside and perfectly moist on the inside. The flavor of the skin was savory, lightly seasoned but with a little bite. In short, great fried chicken — the real deal. Highly recommended. I’ll be back for more. — Bruce VanWyngarden Cash Saver, 1620 Madison, 2720171, memphiscashsaver.com Romaine Salad with Chicken Skins @ Hog & Hominy Anytime I see someone slip off and discard the skin from an otherwise perfect piece of fried or baked chicken (but especially fried), I inwardly pray for their poor soul and


wonder who it was that set you down a path of self-deprivation. It’s not only that they are missing out on some heart-healthy unsaturated fats, it’s that they might still fall victim to this woefully false myth that this is something you have to do to make your chicken healthy enough to consume (spoiler, it’s not). Well, someone at Hog & Hominy decided, “Screw that, we’re devoting a dish solely to chicken skins.” And just to round it out, lest the consumer grew up under the anti-skin mythology, that someone decided to build their chicken dermis homage on a bed of Romaine lettuce. The result is an unexpectedly cohesive salad, misleadingly and simply titled, “Romaine.” The chicken skins used are more akin to a pork rind rather than the double-breaded crunchiness of most fried chicken pieces. These puffy morsels are strewn atop a decent portion of lettuce, which is in turn covered in snowy Parmesan and drizzled with pecorino vinaigrette. The skins are lightly seasoned so the vinaigrette can come in and work its magic by introducing a low level of spice and tang, two flavors that pair surprisingly well with the fried fat essence of the skins. The Romaine lettuce does what Romaine

was put on this earth to do, namely, trick us into thinking we’re consuming something mega-healthy when we are not. And, of course, it’s the perfect semi-crunchy vehicle that supports the crispiness of the skins. Be warned, though, this is not the type of salad loaded down with auxiliary vegetables and croutons. It’s not going to fill you up. But it will deliver piquancy worthy of what I have determined to be the greatest part of the chicken. — Micaela Watts Hog & Hominy, 707 W. Brookhaven, 207-7396, hogandhominy.com Chicken Tamales from Tacqueria La Guadalupana food truck Tamales were among the earliest food imports from south of the border to make it onto Norde Americano menus, and they remain a staple, whether in supermarket cans or on restaurant tables. Something of a debate rages as to whether the meat base in those wraparound masa cylinders should be beef or pork, but there is a third possibility — chicken — and a good place to sample it is from the Tacqueria La Guadalupana food truck that sets up daily on the north side of the shoppingcenter lot where Cordova Road intersects with Germantown Parkway — in an area

Wood Roasted Half Chicken at the Kitchen Bistro

Romaine Salad with Chicken Skins at Hog & Hominy

that is more multi-ethnic than you might imagine. (The internationally focused Cordova Farmers Market is the big-box anchor on the lot.) The La Guadalupana truck offers numerous cooked-while-you-wait specialties, several involving chicken. Order tamales, and what you get, for a mere $7.99, is three YUGE tamales, each with a generous and succulently breaded tortilla coating, within which is packed none of that minced mystery-meat filling you get at so many places, but steamed and tender morsels of freshly carved, fresh-off-the-bone-looking chicken meat. Two sauces are available as condiments, the green one appears to mix guacamole with chili; the red one (maybe laced with habanero) is scalding hot. — Jackson Baker Taqueria La Guadalupana at the corner of Cordova Road and Germantown Parkway Wood Roasted Half Chicken @ Gary The Kitchen Bistro Williams Served in a round ceramic casserole the color of red clay, the Kitchen’s woodroasted chicken earns it $29 price tag with looks, smarts, and personality. First, cornbread panzanella sets the dish with a seasonal cacophony of tomatoes, onions, and olives. Next comes the chicken, brined, flattened, and wood-roasted to a deep and rustic char. And what swirls on top with magical brushstrokes of taste and color? The dressing, a pesto of sorts made with garlic, olive oil, lemon, and anchovies. “You don’t want to eat the chicken and think the chicken tastes like fish,” explains head Chef Dennis Phelps. “You want to eat the chicken and think the chicken tastes delicious.” — Pamela Denney The Kitchen Bistro, 415 Great View Drive East, 729-9009, thekitchen.com General Tso’s Chicken @ Mulan It’s a conundrum every office has had to face as they order takeout lunch: What’s the deal with General Tso’s Chicken? Who was the eponymous military man? What’s his connection with poultry? How do you even pronounce it? If these questions have ever prompted debate at your workplace, take heart. The answers are out there, in the form of Ian Cheney and Jennifer Lee’s 2014 documentary The Search for General Tso. It’s a fascinating look into the ways immigrant communities adapt to American life that also tells you everything you need to know about the sweet and spicy Hunan-style dish which, it turns out, is virtually continued on page 16

Chefs

Speak Out

It’s not easy to eat your way through Memphis, one piece of chicken at a time, especially if you’re trying to go veg (I’m at about a week this go around). That’s why I asked some of my favorite chefs in town to serve as my chicken-chowing proxy and name the chicken dishes they go for when they get a break from the grind. Chef Kelly English, who can do things with chicken that grant him James Beard Semifinalist awards and spots on television and in Bon Appetit, can’t say enough nice things about the magic that happens in the kitchens of Memphis visionary chef Karen Carrier. “I just had my favorite chicken dish ever at the Beauty Shop — Karen’s smoked chicken dish,” English says. He’s referring to the Hickory Grilled Chicken, which comes in a Thai green curry broth with candied garlic chips, pickled red onion, watermelon, Thai basil, mint, cilantro, and corn fritter. “It was fan-frickin’-tastic. It is my favorite chicken dish I’ve ever had at a restaurant.” He may or may not have posted on Facebook that “Karen Carrier is the coolest kid in school.” Chef Gary Williams, of DeJaVu legendari-ness, has done his share of traveling and sharing his New Orleans recipes with A-listers, and points to several restaurants who serve up chicken goodness in Memphis, including Cozy Corner’s Cornish Hen, Uncle Lou’s honey chicken, and HM Dessert Lounge’s ability to take chicken and waffles to the nth degree. “I’m a chicken connoisseur,” he says. But there’s one spot in particular that has his heart. “There’s this little spot called Pho Binh on Madison, and they do this chicken dish that has pineapple and is a little spicy, served over rice. That is one of my favorite places. It’s a gem,” Williams says. — Lesley Young

COVER STORY m e m p h i s f l y e r. c o m

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Mulan General Tso’s Chicken

with a maple bacon encrusted waffle — $12 well spent. Sticky as it is, the hot honey sauce slides from the chicken and blends with the maple syrup, creating a sweet and spicy combination that brings magic to a dish which otherwise would have been too obvious. The chicken isn’t flaky but smooth, and each piece shines beneath the sauce. Slice the waffle, cut the chicken, and fork ’em together. Sauce and syrup united, the waffle coats the chicken, and bacon bits provide a necessary crunch.— Joshua Cannon The HM Dessert Lounge, 1586 Madison, 290-2099, facebook.com/fashionablysweetlounge

continued from page 15

October 20-26, 2016

unknown in China. The first two things I noticed about the General Tso’s Chicken at Mulan is that the garnish contained a glowing LED and a dearth of broccoli on the plate. Many Chinese restaurants include plentiful broccoli with the stir-fried dark meat, and the florets come in handy for sopping up the sauce that gives the dish its deep red color. But once I bit into the succulent chunks of chicken, I realized the vegetable would have been a distraction from the main show. Each morsel was just a little crispy on the outside, tender on the inside. It was outstanding. I got the standard spice level for scientific purposes, so the sweetness and heat were finely balanced. But if you like it spicy, they’ll be more than happy to oblige. For the record, the Chinese character transliterated as “Tso” or “Zho” means “left.” It’s a syllable that English does not contain, but it is roughly pronounced as “jowh.” However, to avoid confusion with your server, you should probably just go with “so.” — Chris McCoy Mulan, 2149 Young, 347-3965 mulanmidtown.net

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Chicken and waffles @ The HM Dessert Lounge I’m aware of no other restaurant in Memphis where one can dine surrounded by paintings of the late, great Prince hung on purple walls. I discovered the Chicken and waffles at The HM Dessert Lounge

promised land, and it’s named HM Dessert Lounge. The restaurant’s focus is in its name, with one exception: chicken and waffles. The chicken is dipped in double honey hot sauce, Jamaican jerk sauce, or spicy peach glaze. It’s then paired with a regular, cornbread, honey butter biscuit, blueberry, sweet potato, or a maple bacon waffle. Options, indeed. I settled on four chicken breasts bathed in double hot honey sauce and coupled

Being Pirtle So what’s it like being a Pirtle? It’s good, say Cordell and Tawanda Pirtle. And as they go over the past, present, and future of Pirtle’s Fried Chicken, a couple approaches and asks for a picture. As they move on, the woman exclaims in a whisper, “Oh my goodness!” “Happens all the time,” Tawanda says. Cordell is the only child of Jack Pirtle, the founder, with his wife Orva, and the force behind Jack Pirtle’s. Cordell describes his father as an outgoing man, a doer and a creator. Jack opened his first restaurant near the Firestone plant in the 1940s and then hooked up with Colonel Harland Sanders of Kentucky Fried Chicken. Jack sold Kentucky Fried Chicken using Sanders’ special seasoning, alongside Pirtle’s burgers and hotdogs. Cordell says the first contract with Sanders was a single page, doublespaced. Later, when KFC sought a more formalized agreement, Jack decided to move on, eventually phasing out the KFC part of the business. “He couldn’t use the same cooking equipment because it was part of the process for KFC. He built his own cooking equipment, pressurized cookers, and then my mother had a degree from the University of

Smoke Chicken @ Picosos There are fewer words in the English language sadder than, “Sorry, not today.” Especially if those words are spoken with genuine disappointment in a Mexican accent at Picosos, a terrific little southof-the-border diner on Summer Avenue. The restaurant’s “Smoke Chicken” is an old-Memphis-meets-old-Mexico delicacy that sells fast, is only available on the weekends, and so succulent and good it’s worth heading out early to get your order in before the Saturday lunch crowd arrives. Served with rice and refried beans

Tennessee in home economics, so she and he together tried different formulas. They went through a lot of different formulas and came up with this and varied it some for the first year as they saw how it did. That started in 1964,” says Cordell. Pirtle’s seasoning was originally mixed in a device Jack built that looked like a concrete mixer. The recipe is top secret. “That’s what Pirtle’s is known for, that taste that we have,” Tawanda says. “It’s the same seasoning that the gravy is made out of. It’s a huge deal for us. And the spices have to be mixed up for a period of time for all of them to combine correctly.” Cordell, who started working at Pirtle’s at 13, took over the business in 1979. “It was doing well. We had six stores at the time. When I took it over, I had been a store manager for 17 years. So I had pretty much been there/done that on almost everything,” Cordell says. “When I took it over it was almost more of an organizational change.” “Your daddy thought you were going to go broke,” Tawanda interjects. “Precisely,” Cordell agrees, noting his father’s concern over the purchase of expensive cash registers and a centralized warehouse. Pirtle’s didn’t go broke. There are now eight stores. They get approached a lot about franchising — about three

and topped with a handful of french fries, the meal is exactly what it sounds like — a quarter, half, or whole chicken covered with a heady-not-hot spice rub that’s a little on the salty side and slow-smoked to barbecue-lover’s perfection. It’s tempting to just wolf the whole thing down, but advisable to savor every spicy, smoky, chickeny bite. — Chris Davis Picosos, 3937 Summer, 323-7003 The Family Chicken Dinner @ SuperLo It was a snobby Midtowner’s dilemma. Our Target basket was full. The kids were getting pissy. We were all hungry, but the grown-ups didn’t want to make lunch. “But there’s nothing to eat in East Memphis,” we whined without saying a word. Wheeling through the parking lot, my wife caught a scent on the wind. “Oh my god, somebody’s fried chicken smells GOOD!” she said. We both whirled, like castaways searching the skies for a rescue plane. The only thing that made sense was the deli counter of the Target-adjacent SuperLo. We’d been there infrequently, but I thought I remembered a big deli case. I remembered correctly. The star of the SuperLo show was a continued on page 19

Cordell and Tawanda Pirtle times a week, says Tawanda. They’ve resisted franchising, as they want to work out the best deal for them and the franchisee. While none of their kids (he’s got three, she’s got two) have shown any interest in the business, they’re hoping that one of their grandkids or great-grandchildren will sign on and take on franchising. As for the future, they’re considering more stores. They’ve thought about opening a Jack Pirtle’s Cafe. Cordell is 72 and retired. Sort of. “I tell everybody they’ve got the tired part right,” he says, laughing. “But, no, as far as being totally retired, when you’re involved in a business your entire life and you’ve grown up in it and you know all the people, you really can’t just simply say, I’m done. It’s always there. It’s always on your mind.” — Susan Ellis


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NACHO ORDINARY COFFEE is a local roaster proud to call Memphis home. We are committed to providing superior coffee using high quality beans, proper roasting and fresh techniques. Beans are selected based on an understanding of the farm, processing and shipping. Each coffee is roasted in small

batches with attention to detail. This brings out the nuances and delicious flavors of each coffee based on origin, varietal and processing technique. Every coffee is delivered promptly after roasting, resulting in peak flavor. We sincerely appreciate your support.

— Gary Order at nachoordinarycoffee.com

“Life’s too short for ordinary coffee.”

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fried chicken dinner, perfect for a Sunday lunch. Plenty of dark-brown-fried breasts and thighs lined a warming tray. But we wanted the eight-piece meal and the case offerings would not do for our wonderful deli helper. “Nuh-uh. Give me two minutes, baby,” the woman said to my wife. “I’m going to make you up some fresh.” Two minutes later, she filled a white, cardboard service box with two breasts, two thighs, two drummies, and two wings, like a Memphis-style Noah’s Ark. That Ark came with big-ole sides of green beans, mashed potatoes, and four King’s Hawaiian rolls. (They even added two cookies for my son. No charge.) The chicken was crunchy-crispy on the outside, fork-tender and moist on the inside, warmly spiced, but not too spicy. It was that eye-rolling, soul-feeding, conversation-stopping, back-home-style kind of good. And all of it for about $14. Who says there’s nothing to eat in East Memphis? — Toby Sells SuperLo, 4744 Spottswood, 683-6861, superlofoods.com Fried Buffalo Chicken Slider (add peanut butter) @ The Slider Inn The first thing you need to know about Slider Inn’s Buffalo Chicken Slider is that you should order it fried. They’ll serve it grilled, but that’s your loss. As is, the sandwich comes with a palm-sized chicken breast drenched in buffalo wing sauce and topped with American cheese, lettuce, tomato, and ranch. Here’s the second thing you need to know — hidden off the menu, secret but paramount. Ask for peanut butter, and the sandwich will come with a layer of crunchy goodness spread across the bottom bun. The ranch, buffalo sauce, and peanut butter assemble in your mouth upon first bite. It’s manna on the tongue. For all its glory, there’s no way around it, you’ll smack your way through this mess of a meal. The peanut butter serves as a medium between the milky ranch and hot and tangy buffalo sauce, softening the spice to let the flavors shine. — Joshua Cannon The Slider Inn, 2117 Peabody, 725-1155, facebook.com/sliderinn

Smoke Chicken at Picosos

Chicken

Playlist

THE BEST

ENTERTAINMENT IN TUNICA

Oblivians — “Call the Police” We’ll kick this thing off with an instant classic from the Oblivians. This track was on the band’s last album Desperation. Listen close for the chicken reference. The Meters — “Chicken Strut” One of the best Meters songs happens to have some squawking in it, but I would include this in any playlist because the Meters rule, plain and simple. Those Darlins — “The Whole Damn Thing” Before Those Darlins went all Fleetwood Mac on us, this was arguably their most popular song. This simple tune about eating a whole chicken was catchy enough to get the band some notoriety and is worth revisiting while raiding the fridge. Hasil Adkins — “Chicken Walk” If you haven’t heard Hasil Adkins before, do yourself a HUGE favor and track down the album Out to Hunch. Charles Mingus — “Eat That Chicken” A classic from jazz legend Charles Mingus.

TONI BRAXTON OCTOBER 21

OLIVIA NEWTON-JOHN NOVEMBER 4

GOO GOO DOLLS

CELTIC WOMAN

WITH SPECIAL GUEST SAFETYSUIT

HOME FOR CHRISTMAS – THE SYMPHONY TOUR

DECEMBER 2

DECEMBER 10

BOYZ II MEN & EN VOGUE DECEMBER 17

THE COMMODORES DECEMBER 30

Project Pat — “Chicken Head” Hell yeah I included this song in this playlist. Project Pat for life. Billy Swan — “I Can Help” By now you’re going to need some help getting out of that chicken coma. Let this classic from Billy Swan get you moving again. Rufus Thomas — “Do the Funky Chicken” A classic from Rufus Thomas. The live footage on YouTube of his performing this song is amazing and should be played on a big screen at every chicken restaurant from now on. Patrick Hernandez — “Born to Be Alive” We’ll close this thing out with a toast to any vegetarians or vegans who picked up the Chicken Issue. If you believe that all animals are born to be alive, dance around with your fake chicken nuggets to this obscure ’70s classic. — Chris Shaw

Tickets available online at Ticketmaster.com or by calling 1-800-745-3000.

COVER STORY m e m p h i s f l y e r. c o m

continued from page 16

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19

UPCOMING SHOWS NOVEMBER 11 | DWIGHT YOAKAM

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10/10/16 4:01 PM


steppin’ out

We Recommend: Culture, News + Reviews

Take Me to the River

Across the Great Divide

B y To b y S e l l s

Big River Crossing is your next, most-favorite place in Memphis. It’s almost hard to believe that construction on the mile-long bike and pedestrian pathway across the Mississippi River began nearly two years ago in November 2014. But now the span is mostly complete and will open to the public on Saturday at 1 p.m. The BRX (yes, that’s the official acronym for it, according to project officials) span alone cost more than $17.5 million. But it is only one part of the larger, $43 million Main Street to Main Street Multi-Modal Connector project, a 10-mile project linking downtown Memphis with downtown West Memphis, Arkansas, with more walkable and bike-able streets, pathways, and trails. BRX it ain’t no museum piece. Walking it is a journey in the elements. You feel the steady breeze on your face, see the river flowing silently many stories below your feet, and feel the vibrations of the car and train traffic passing on the nearby bridges. A lookout is notched out about halfway across the span (it’s disputed whether or not this is the Tennessee/Arkansas border) — the Memphis skyline on one side and the endless, green Arkansas floodplain on the other. At best, it’ll inspire an awe of our area’s natural beauty and geography. At least, it’ll be the most selfied spot in Shelby County. The BRX will open as two other events — River Arts Festival and the St. Jude Ride — are underway nearby. So, parking could get hairy. The Memphis Area Transit Authority will run a special trolley up and down Main Street from the site all the way to Bass Pro Shops at the Pyramid. A celebration at Martyrs Park will begin at 4 p.m. with food trucks and live music. A fireworks show will begin at 7 p.m. BIG RIVER CROSSING OPENS AT CHANNEL 3 DRIVE, SATURDAY, OCTOBER 22ND AT 1 P.M., BIGRIVERCROSSING.COM

Tim Sampson says, “Be nice.” The Last Word, p. 47

35 years of AMUM Art, p. 29

FRIDAY October 21

October 20-26, 2016

THURSDAY October 20

20

PechaKucha Amurica, 6 p.m. This could be delightfully awkward as tonight’s theme is “Dear Diary.” Presenters tell their story in 20 slides with 20 seconds per slide. Masculinity/Femininity Overby Center, University of Mississippi, 7 p.m., $10 Oxford Film Festival presents this screening which examines the “normative notions of gender, sexuality, and performance.” Evening includes Q&A with director Russell Sheaffer.

Make tracks to RP Tracks for vegetarian barbecue tofu nachos. Bar Report, p. 37

Mark Twain at Large Germantown Performing Arts Center, 7 p.m. An ArtSavvy event featuring Ron Jewell as Mark Twain at his Twainiest, sharing tall tales and wisdoms.

Killer of Sheep Baobab Filmhouse, 7 p.m., $12 Screening of the this classic 1978 film set in Los Angeles about a man whose work in a slaughterhouse interferes with his life outside of work.

10th Annual RiverArtsFest South Main Arts District, 6-10 p.m. Massive art festival with live music and tons of food. Tonight’s entry is free, and the Squirrel Nut Zippers are performing. Continues through Sunday.

“Born-Again, Seen-Again James Baldwin” University Center, University of Memphis, 6 p.m. A lecture by William Maxwell subtitled “State Surveillance, AfroPessimism, and the Literary History of Black Lives Matter.”

Sweeney Todd in Concert Germantown Community Theatre, 8 p.m., $28 The Demon Barber of Fleet Street is back and ready to cut some throats.

Free Speech! (While Supplies Last) Germantown Performing Arts Centre, 8 p.m., $30 Political and social satire, everybody!


K

Disturbing, cuddly vampires

Blood Sisters By Chris Davis Cuddles, which opens this week at TheatreWorks, is a different kind of vampire story. The two-woman drama can be unsettling and hard to talk about without giving away the things that set it apart in a genre done to (un)death. Even director Tony Isbell keeps a pretty tight lip, referencing a quote by the show’s original British producer. It’s “part horror film, part domestic tragedy, part romantic comedy,” Isbell says. “And it’s very disturbing.” Classic English understatement. Cuddles is an exercise in creeping, gut-strangling dread. It tells the story of two sisters — one human, one vampire. They have a strict system of rules created to keep both of them alive and together — tenuously in every sense. These rules are repeated like a catechism, lest anybody forget or backslide, and if Eve, the younger sister and vampire, breaks them, she’s tied to the squalid bed in her squalid attic until the lesson’s learned. Eve’s also taught to avoid the company of humans who may kill her with sunlight, decapitation, or a stake through the heart. The latter two, the young monster notes in a moment of gallows humor, probably work on just about anybody. “The thing about the rules in this show is they are there to protect Eve from the outside world, to keep her safe,” Isbell elaborates. “And both sisters follow the rules. Until they don’t. And then things start to go awry.” Although he’s never actually seen, a man enters the picture, and the sisters’ relationship begins to change in unexpected and potentially catastrophic ways. Cuddles is an ironically cute name for this troubling revisionist bloodsucker, which, over the course of 90 creepy/funny minutes, creates a whole new mythos for vampires. It stars New Moon heavy hitter Tracie Hansom (Bug, Orpheus Descending) as Tabby, the older sister, and University of Memphis student Hayley Hellums as Eve. THE NEW MOON THEATRE COMPANY PRESENTS “CUDDLES” AT THEATREWORKS OCTOBER 21ST-NOVEMBER 6TH.

GREAT MUSIC OCTOBER 29 & DELICIOUS ROCKIN' HORROR CUISINEPARTY HALLOWEEN ALMOST FAMOUS 10PM

COSTUME CONTEST DRINK SPECIALS

OCT 19

DETECTIVE BUREAU 8PM OCT 20

BLUE MOTHER TUPELO 9PM OCT 21

GRAHAM WINCHESTER & THE AMMUNITION 11PM OCT 22

DIANE COFFEE 8PM OCT 23

Finding Memphis: Tiny Dances/ Hidden Spaces Jay Etkin Gallery, 7 p.m., $10 Project: Motion delves into the art-making process in this collaboration with Carla McDonald and Courtney Oliver of FindMemphis. Art on Fire Dixon Gallery & Gardens, 7 p.m., $75 Annual fall party with a great bonfire, live music, a silent auction, and lots of food. Participating restaurants include Acre, Amerigo, the Grove Grill, Sweet Grass, Swanky’s, Mosa, Frost, Cheffie’s, Ecco, Interim, and many, many more.

TUESDAY October 25 Boos + Booze Shelby Farms, 7 p.m.-9 a.m., $90 An adult sleepover just in time for Shelby Farm’s Spooky Nights. Includes witches’ brew, zombie paintball hayrides, fortune telling, ghost hunting, and more. Peppa Pig The Orpheum, 5-7 p.m., $30-$150 Musical featuring Peppa and her friends who try to fix a leaking roof in the nursery.

Jersey Boys The Orpheum, 7:30 p.m., $25-$130 The musical following the rise of Frankie Valli and the Four Seasons returns to the Orpheum. Booksigning by Marisa Baggett The Booksellers at Laurelwood, 6:30 p.m. Local sushi chef Marisa Baggett signs and discusses her new cookbook, Vegetarian Sushi Secrets: 101 Healthy and Delicious Recipes. Baggett will also give a demo!

JOHN PAUL KEITH & CO. 6PM OCT 25

JOHN KILZER 8PM OCT 26

CHICKASAW MOUND 8PM

BOOK YOUR HOLIDAY PARTY WITH US! 2 1 1 9 M A D I S O N AV E N U E MEMPHIS, TN 38104 (901) 207-5097 L A FAY E T T E S . C O M

ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT

SATURDAY October 22

OCT 24

m e m p h i s f l y e r. c o m

RAGBIRDS 8PM

The Girl on the Train — will last year’s hit novel be this year’s hit film? Film, p. 40

21


MUSIC By Chris Shaw

Down by the River The River Series goes with the flow.

N

The Harbor Town Amphitheater

AMURICA.COM

ow in its third year, the River Series at the Harbor Town Amphitheater behind the Maria Montessori School has quickly become one of the best places to see live music in Memphis. Featuring some of the best live bands the city has to offer (the Reigning Sound’s original lineup, NOTS, Chickasaw Mound, etc.), River Series shows are fun for the whole family, drawing a diverse crowd made up of rock-and-roll enthusiasts of all ages. This Sunday night, the African Jazz Ensemble will take the waterfront stage. Made up of members who have toured with Michael Jackson, Al Green, B.B. King, Eric Clapton, the Dells, Luther Allison, and Rufus Thomas, the African Jazz Ensemble originally played as the soul group the Exotic Movement before changing their name to Galaxy. The

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DOWN BY THE RIVER

I wanted it to be more diverse and push boundaries — find different bands that people don’t usually get to see.

something out of it. I know what I’m going to like, but I want to think about it in terms of “What’s my mom going to want to come out and watch? What are my kids going to want to watch? What are the parents going to want to watch?” One of my favorite things about the River Series is it seems like you’re constantly trying to outdo the last show. Do you think that’s true? Yeah, it probably is. The idea of having the African Jazz Ensemble play actually came to us from another parent. The band rarely plays live, and the members have musical ties that go back to the early ’70s. They were all in soul bands, but at some point they wanted to work on more Africaninfluenced music. They play a little bit of everything — taking the soul and R&B that they played in huge bands and mixing it with the stuff that they do now in African Jazz Ensemble. They are basically this cosmic jazz, 10-piece band with all different kinds of instruments. They don’t play very often. Their first show was at the Stax Museum, and this is the first time the band has played this year. African Jazz Ensemble at the Harbor Town Amphitheater, Sunday, October 23rd, 6 p.m. $5.

m e m p h i s f l y e r. c o m

Memphis Flyer: How did the River Series start? Zac Ives: I was trying to figure out a way to do something to give back to the school. We’d done these school events in that location on campus at the amphitheater behind the school, but they were always private. There are Memphis musicians who have students who go there, and the shows were always awesome. It’s one of the best places to see a show, but it had never been open to the public. After we decided to start having public shows there, I went to the Downtown Music Commission to find some funding for it, and I got them to give me a starter fund to pay bands. Then I went to Wiseacre, who agreed to sponsor the series, and so did Miss Cordelia’s. After that, I got with Robby [Grant] and came up with a handful of bands we wanted to see play. It’s grown organically from that into what it is now. The cool thing about it is that’s how shows started there in the first place. The teachers [at the Maria

Montessori School] are parents first, and they wanted to teach their kids in a different way. I think the River Series is a reflection of that. How do you decide who’s going to play? The longer the series has gone on, it seems like the more diverse the shows have gotten. Would you agree with that? I think when we initially started there were enough interesting bands that it was cool, and there was a fee that made people want to play it. I didn’t want it to just be a Goner set up. It was important to have other people’s input on the lineup too. I wanted it to be more diverse and push boundaries — find different bands that people don’t usually get to see. It’s fun to throw those things out there, because we can count on different people showing up each time. We’re curating it interestingly enough so that people can always get

ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT

10-piece band rarely performs live, and this is their only scheduled 2016 show. I caught up with River Series founder Zac Ives to find out more about the outdoor concert series.

23


TECH N9NE SATURDAY, OCTOBER 22ND NEW DAISY

BALKAN BEAT BOX SUNDAY, OCTOBER 23RD LEVITT SHELL

ALLISON CRUTCHFIELD & THE FIZZ SUNDAY, OCTOBER 23RD MURPHY’S

After Dark: Live Music Schedule October 20 - 26 Alfred’s 197 BEALE 525-3711

Gary Hardy & Memphis 2 Thursdays-Saturdays, 6-9 p.m.; Karaoke Thursdays, TuesdaysWednesdays, 9 p.m.-1 a.m., and Sundays-Mondays, 10 p.m.2 a.m.; Roxi Love Thursday, Oct. 20, 9:30 p.m.-1:30 a.m.; Mandi Thomas Fridays, Saturdays, 6-9 p.m.; The 901 Heavy Hitters Fridays, Saturdays, 10 p.m.-2 a.m.; Flyin’ Ryan Fridays, Saturdays, 2:30 a.m.; Memphis Jazz Orchestra Sundays, 6-9 p.m.

B.B. King’s Blues Club 143 BEALE 524-KING

The King Beez Thursdays, 5:30 p.m.; B.B. King’s All Stars Thursdays, Fridays, 8 p.m.; Will Tucker Band Fridays, Saturdays, 5 p.m.; Memphis Mojo Tour Saturdays, 11:30 a.m.-4 p.m.; Lisa G and Flic’s Pic’s Band Saturdays, Sundays, 12:30 p.m.; Blind Mississippi Morris Sundays, 5 p.m.; Memphis Jones Sundays, Wednesdays 5:30 p.m.; Doc Fangaz and the Remedy Tuesdays, 5:30 p.m.

Blue Note Bar & Grill 341-345 BEALE 577-1089

October 20-26, 2016

Queen Ann and the Memphis Blues Masters Fridays, Saturdays, 8 p.m.-midnight.

Blues City Cafe

Itta Bena

King’s Palace Cafe Patio

138 BEALE 526-3637

145 BEALE 578-3031

162 BEALE 521-1851

Blind Mississippi Morris Fridays, 5 p.m., and Saturdays, 5:30 p.m.; Brad Birkedahl Band Thursdays, Wednesdays, 8 p.m.; Earl “The Pearl” Banks Saturdays, 12:30 p.m., and Tuesdays, 7 p.m.; Brandon Cunning Trio Sundays, 6 p.m., and Mondays, 7 p.m.; FreeWorld Sundays, 9:30 p.m.

Club 152 152 BEALE 544-7011

1st Floor: Mercury Boulevard Mondays-Thursdays, 7 p.m.; DJ Dnyce Sundays, 11 p.m., and Thursdays, 11:30 p.m.; DJ Tubbz Mondays-Wednesdays, 11 p.m., and Fridays, Saturdays, 10 p.m.; 3rd floor: DJ Crumbz Fridays, Saturdays, 10 p.m.; 2nd Floor: DJ Spanish Fly Fridays, Saturdays, 11 p.m.; 1st Floor: DJ Toonz Fridays, Saturdays, 11 p.m.; Sean Apple Sundays, 1 p.m.; Adam Levin Sundays, 1 p.m.; After Dark Band Sundays, 6 p.m.

FedExForum 191 BEALE STREET

Bellator MMA Friday, Oct. 21.

Handy Bar 200 BEALE 527-2687

Bad Boy Matt & the Amazing Rhythmatics Tuesdays, Thursdays-Sundays, 7 p.m.-1 a.m.

Hard Rock Cafe 126 BEALE 529-0007

Purple Affair Benefit for Victims of Domestic Violence Monday, Oct. 24, 6-9 p.m.

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Kayla Walker Thursdays, 6-7 p.m.; Susan Marshall Piano Fridays, Saturdays, 6-9 p.m.; Susan Marshall Fridays, Saturdays, 7-10 p.m.; Nat “King” Kerr Fridays, Saturdays, 9-10 p.m.; Susan Marshall Wednesdays, 6-8 p.m.

Jerry Lee Lewis’ Cafe & Honky Tonk 310 BEALE 654-5171

The Johnny Go Band Thursdays, Sundays, 7-11 p.m.; Rockin’ Rob Haynes & the Memphis Flash Fridays, Saturdays, 7-11 p.m.; Live Band Karaoke Fridays, Saturdays, 11 p.m.-3 a.m.; The Memphis House Rockers Saturdays, 3-7 p.m., and Wednesdays, 7-11 p.m.

King Jerry Lawler’s Hall of Fame Bar & Grille 159 BEALE

Eric Hughes Thursdays, Fridays, 5-8 p.m.; Karaoke Mondays-Thursdays, Sundays, 8 p.m.; Live Bands Fridays, Saturdays, 8 p.m.

King’s Palace Cafe 162 BEALE 521-1851

David Bowen Thursdays, 5:309:30 p.m., Fridays, Saturdays, 6:30-10:30 p.m., and Sundays, 5:30-9:30 p.m.; Eric Hughes Band Friday, Oct. 21, 9:30 p.m.; Memphis Style Saturday, Oct. 22, 9:30 p.m.

Sonny Mack Mondays-Fridays, 2-6 p.m.; Cowboy Neil Mondays, Thursdays, 7-11 p.m., and Saturdays, Sundays, 2-6 p.m.; Sensation Band Tuesdays, Fridays, 7-11 p.m.; Fuzzy and the Kings of Memphis Saturdays, 7-11 p.m.; Chic Jones and the Blues Express Sundays, 7-11 p.m.; North and South Band Wednesdays, 7-11 p.m.

King’s Palace Cafe Tap Room 168 BEALE 576-2220

Big Don Valentine and the Hollywood Allstars Thursdays, Tuesdays, 8 p.m.midnight; Myra Hall and the Players Friday, Oct. 21, 8 p.m.midnight, and Saturday, Oct. 22, 8 p.m.-midnight.

New Daisy Theatre 330 BEALE 525-8981

Marty Stuart & His Fabulous Superlatives Thursday, Oct. 20, 8 p.m.; TECH N9NE Saturday, Oct. 22, 6 p.m.; Baauer Saturday, Oct. 22, 10 p.m.; Beats Antique Wednesday, Oct. 26, 8 p.m.

Rum Boogie Cafe

Oct. 23, 7-11 p.m.; Gracie Curran and the High Fallutin Band Monday, Oct. 24, 8 p.m.-midnight; Jeff Jensen Band Tuesday, Oct. 25, 8 p.m.midnight, and Wednesday, Oct. 26, 8 p.m.-midnight.

Rum Boogie Cafe Blues Hall 182 BEALE 528-0150

Memphis Bluesmasters Thursdays, Sundays, 8 p.m.-midnight; Vince Johnson and the Plantation Allstars Friday, Oct. 21, 4-8 p.m.; Plantation Allstars Fridays, 4-8 p.m.; Little Boys Blue Friday, Oct. 21, 9 p.m.-1 a.m.; Chic Jones and the Blues Exrpress Saturday, Oct. 22, 4-8 p.m.; Brian Hawkins Blues Party Mondays, 8 p.m.-midnight; McDaniel Band Tuesdays, Wednesdays, 8 p.m.-midnight.

Silky O’Sullivan’s 183 BEALE 522-9596

Dueling Pianos Thursdays, Wednesdays, 9 p.m.-1 a.m., Fridays, Saturdays, 9 p.m.-3 a.m., and Sundays, Tuesdays, 8 p.m.midnight.

Tin Roof 315 BEALE

Roxi Love Tuesday, Oct. 25, 6-10 p.m.

152 MADISON 572-1813

Live Music Fridays.

Cannon Center for the Performing Arts MEMPHIS COOK CONVENTION CENTER, 255 N. MAIN TICKETS, 525-1515

Jagged Edge Sunday, Oct. 23, 8 p.m.

Center for Southern Folklore 123 S. MAIN AT PEABODY TROLLEY STOP 525-3655

Java Trio Saturday, Oct. 22, 8-11 p.m.

Center for Southern Folklore Hall 119 S. MAIN AT PEMBROKE SQUARE 525-3655

Carlos Elliot Jr. with Bobby Gentilo and Cameron Kimbrough Wednesday, Oct. 26, 7-10 p.m.

Earnestine & Hazel’s 531 S. MAIN 523-9754

Amber Rae Dunn Hosts: Earnestine & Hazel’s Open Mic Wednesdays, 8-11 p.m.

Huey’s Downtown 77 S. SECOND 527-2700

Memphis All Stars Sunday, Oct. 23, 8:30 p.m.-midnight.

182 BEALE 528-0150

Young Petty Thieves Thursday, Oct. 20, 8 p.m.-midnight; Pam and Terry Friday, Oct. 21, 5:30-8:30 p.m., and Saturday, Oct. 22, 5:30-8:30 p.m.; Freeworld Friday, Oct. 21, 9 p.m.-1 a.m., and Saturday, Oct. 22, 9 p.m.-1 a.m.; Mercury Blvd. Sunday,

Brass Door Irish Pub

Maria Montessori School Blind Bear Speakeasy 119 S. MAIN, PEMBROKE SQUARE 417-8435

Live Music Thursdays-Saturdays, 10 p.m.

740 HARBOR BEND 527-3444

The River Series at the Harbor Town Ampitheater Sundays.

Pick it up. Put it on. Do it right. FreeCondomsMemphis.org


Blue Monkey

Huey’s Midtown

Murphy’s

2012 MADISON 272-BLUE

1927 MADISON 726-4372

1589 MADISON 726-4193

Sunday Brunch with Joyce Cobb Sundays, 11:30 a.m.-2:30 p.m.

Canvas 1737 MADISON 443-5232

Karaoke Thursdays, 9:30 p.m.; Boxers for Boobies Sunday, Oct. 23, 5:30 p.m.

Celtic Crossing 903 S. COOPER 274-5151

MAC MILLER Mac Miller returns to Memphis this Friday night, bringing his Divine Feminine tour to Minglewood Hall. A native of Pittsburgh, Miller first gained mainstream attention with his 2011 album Blue Slide Park, an indie-tinged hip-hop record that debuted at No. 1 on the Billboard 200. Miller swapped the independent label Rostrum Records for Warner Bros. following the album’s success, and has since released Watching Movies with the Sound Off, GO:OD AM, and most recently The Divine Feminine — released last month. The Divine Feminine doesn’t stray from the quirky, R&B-influenced rap that Mac Miller has built an empire on, but the album does boast a bevy of some of the biggest names in hip-hop, including Ty Dolla $ign, Kendrick Lamar, and Ariana Grande, the singer who Miller is reportedly in a relationship with, even though Grande has recently refuted that claim (awkward). So what’s so special about a rapper who can proudly release a single simply titled “Dang” with a straight face? That’s a question that his cult-like fan base will gladly answer for you. Miller has created a “relatable, nice-guy-next-door” vibe with his music, and his comparisons to Drake aren’t entirely unfounded. He’s also become a complete YouTube sensation and a verified star — perhaps through his close friendship with fellow Steel City stoner Wiz Khalifa. Between Minglewood Hall and the New Daisy Theater, Memphis has been getting a fair share of toptier rap concerts, and Friday’s gig should reflect the growing mainstream rap scene. Lakim and Clockwork DJ open. — Chris Shaw Mac Miller, Friday, October 21st at Minglewood Hall. 7 p.m. $30-$33 The Orpheum

Purple Haze Nightclub

203 S. MAIN 525-3000

140 LT. GEORGE W. LEE 577-1139

Anthony Hamilton with Lalah Hathaway and Eric Benet Thursday, Oct. 20, 7:3010 p.m.; Bonnie Raitt Friday, Oct. 21, 8-11 p.m.

DJ Dance Music MondaysSundays, 10 p.m.

Rumba Room 303 S. MAIN 523-0020

Paulette’s RIVER INN, 50 HARBOR TOWN SQUARE 260-3300

Live Pianist Thursdays, 5:30-8:30 p.m., Fridays and Saturdays, 5:30-9 p.m., Sundays, 11 a.m.-2 p.m., and MondaysWednesdays, 5:30-8 p.m.

Salsa Night Saturdays, 8:30 p.m.-3 a.m.

The Silly Goose 100 PEABODY PLACE 435-6915

DJ Cody Fridays, Saturdays, 10 p.m.

GRIZZLIES VS. TIMBERWOLVES WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 26

It’s time. Time to recognize Grind City. The season is here and the Grizzlies are back. GRIND CITY T-SHIRT to first 10,000 fans in attendance. GRIZZLIES.COM

Celtic’s Fall Patio Session, Episode 5: Marcella Simien Trio Friday, Oct. 21, 6-9 p.m.; Jeremy Stanfill and Joshua Cosby Sundays, 6-9 p.m.; Candy Company Mondays.

The Cove 2559 BROAD 730-0719

Ed Finney and the U of M Jazz Quartet Thursdays, 9 p.m.; Andrew Cabigao Friday, Oct. 21, 10 p.m.; Hope Clayburn and the Soul Scrimmage Saturday, Oct. 22, 10 p.m.; Second Hand Street Band Sunday, Oct. 23, 6-9 p.m.; Justin White Mondays, 7 p.m.; Don and Wayde Tuesdays, 7-10 p.m.; Karaoke Wednesdays, 10 p.m.

Dru’s Place 1474 MADISON 275-8082

Karaoke Fridays-Sundays.

Eternal Peace Missionary Baptist Church 1251 S. WILLETT

52nd Church Anniversary Sunday, Oct. 23, 8:30 a.m.-6 p.m.

Hi-Tone 412-414 N. CLEVELAND 278-TONE

Bar DKDC 964 S. COOPER 272-0830

Deering and Down Thursday, Oct. 20, 7 p.m.; Steve Selvidge Friday, Oct. 21; All the Colors of the Dark Saturday, Oct. 22; MD’s Sunday, Oct. 23; David Cousar Monday, Oct. 24; Some Sons of Mudboy Wednesday, Oct. 26.

BELLATOR MMA FRIDAY, OCTOBER 21

Former middleweight champion Alexander “Storm” Shlemenko, will meet Kendall Grove inside the Bellator cage. TICKETS AVAILABLE!

Crosstown and Goth Babe Thursday, Oct. 20, 9 p.m.; Citizen, Nicole Dollanganger, Free at Last, Pillow Talk Friday, Oct. 21, 7 p.m.; Icon For Hire with Stitched Up Heart Friday, Oct. 21, 7 p.m.; Bands for Progress Saturday, Oct. 22, 8 p.m.; Jungle Boogie | special guest | Salah Ananse Saturday, Oct. 22, 10 p.m.-3 a.m.; Jaden Carlson Monday, Oct. 24, 9 p.m.; AJJ with Diners and Chris Farren Wednesday, Oct. 26, 7 p.m.

Lafayette’s Music Room 2119 MADISON 207-5097

Anne McCue Thursday, Oct. 20, 6 p.m.; Travis Roman Tuesdays, 5:30 p.m., and Thursday, Oct. 20, 6 p.m.; Blue Mother Tupelo Thursday, Oct. 20, 9 p.m.; Alston Meeks Friday, Oct. 21, 5:30 p.m.; Johnny Mac Friday, Oct. 21, 7:30 p.m.; Graham Winchester and the Ammunition Friday, Oct. 21, 11 p.m.; Susan Marshall & Friends Saturdays, 11 a.m.; The River Bluff Clan Saturdays, 3 p.m.; Diane Coffee Saturday, Oct. 22, 8 p.m.; Joe Restivo 4 Sundays, 11 a.m.; Ragbirds Sunday, Oct. 23, 8 p.m.; John Paul Keith & Friends Mondays, 6 p.m.; Paul “Snowflake” Taylor Tuesday, Oct. 25, 5:30 p.m.; John Kilzer Tuesday, Oct. 25, 8 p.m.; Breeze Cayolle and New Orleans Wednesdays, 5:30 p.m.; Chickasaw Mound Wednesday, Oct. 26, 8 p.m.

Levitt Shell OVERTON PARK 272-2722

The Blind Boys of Alabama Friday, Oct. 21, 7-8:30 p.m.; Eleanor Tallie Saturday, Oct. 22, 7-8:30 p.m.; Balkan Beat Box Sunday, Oct. 23, 7-8:30 p.m.

Midtown Crossing Grill 394 N. WATKINS 443-0502

Memphis Ukelele Meetup Tuesdays, 6-7:30 p.m.

Minglewood Hall

Jimmy David with Eric Lewis Thursday, Oct. 20; Twin Sages with Blackberry Wednesday Thursday, Oct. 20; The Fast Mothers Friday, Oct. 21; Faux Killas with Those Far Out Arrows Saturday, Oct. 22; Allison Crutchfield Sunday, Oct. 23; M.D.C. with Evil Army, Hauteur, Wartorn Tuesday, Oct. 25.

P&H Cafe 1532 MADISON 726-0906

Rock Starkaraoke Fridays; Open Mic Music with Tiffany Harmon Mondays, 9 p.m.midnight.

Rhodes College, Tuthill Performance Hall 2000 N. PARKWAY 843-3000

21st Century Original Jazz Compositions Tuesday, Oct. 25, 7:30 p.m.

RockHouse Live Midtown 2586 POPLAR

Karaoke with DJ Lil Egg Roll Thursday, Oct. 20, 10 p.m.; Open Mic Comedy with Amanda Walker Wednesday, Oct. 26, 9 p.m.

Wild Bill’s 1580 VOLLINTINE 207-3975

The Soul Connection Fridays, Saturdays, 11 p.m.-3 a.m.

WISEACRE Brewery 2783 BROAD

Fall Music Lineup Mondays, 7-10 p.m.

Young Avenue Deli 2119 YOUNG 278-0034

Grape Saturday, Oct. 22.

1555 MADISON 866-609-1744

Mike Stud Thursday, Oct. 20, 8 p.m.; Big Gigantic Thursday, Oct. 20, 8 p.m.; Mac Miller Friday, Oct. 21, 7 p.m.; Loreena McKennitt Saturday, Oct. 22, 6:30 p.m.; The Devil Wears Prada and Memphis May Fire Wednesday, Oct. 26, 5:30 p.m.

PENTATONIX THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 3

Multi-Grammy Award winning a capella sensation, and platinum record selling artist is slated for FedExForum. TICKETS AVAILABLE!

University of Memphis Ubee’s 521 S. HIGHLAND 323-0900

Karaoke Wednesdays, 9 p.m.-2 a.m.

continued on page 27

BON JOVI THURSDAY, MARCH 16

THIS HOUSE IS NOT FOR SALE TOUR will bring the Grammy award-winning band to FedExForum. TICKETS ON SALE SAT, OCT. 22 AT 10AM

25

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m e m p h i s f l y e r. c o m

Boscos 2120 MADISON 432-2222

The Rusty Pieces Sunday, Oct. 23, 4-7 p.m.; The Deftonz Sunday, Oct. 23, 8:30 p.m.midnight.

ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT

Karaoke Thursdays, 9 p.m.-midnight; Richard James and the Special Riders Friday, Oct. 21.

10/14/16 1:44 PM


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MIDSOUTHCLEANAIR.ORG 26


After Dark: Live Music Schedule October 20 - 26 continued from page 25

Hadley’s Pub 2779 WHITTEN 266-5006

East Memphis

Intimate Piano Lounge featuring Charlotte Hurt Mondays-Thursdays, 59:30 p.m.; Larry Cunningham Fridays, Saturdays, 6-10 p.m.

Fox and Hound Sports Tavern 5101 SANDERLIN 763-2013

Karaoke Tuesdays, 9 p.m.

Huey’s Poplar 4872 POPLAR 682-7729

The Dantones Sunday, Oct. 23, 8:30 p.m.-midnight.

Marlowe’s Ribs & Restaurant 4381 ELVIS PRESLEY 332-4159

Karaoke with DJ Stylez Thursdays, Sundays, 10 p.m.

Huey’s Collierville

Haystack Bar & Grill

2130 W. POPLAR 854-4455

6560 HWY. 51 N. 872-0567

Cordova

Old Millington Winery

Charley Mac’s Six String Lovers Sunday, Oct. 23, 8-11:30 p.m.

Fox and Hound Sports Tavern 819 EXOCET 624-9060

Karaoke Tuesdays, 9 p.m.

Dantones Band Friday, Oct. 21, 9 p.m.-1 a.m. 6748 OLD MILLINGTON 873-4114

Rice Drewry and the Degrees Sunday, Oct. 23.

2016 OPTIMA $219mo

Mesquite Chop House 3165 FOREST HILL-IRENE 249-5661

Pam and Terry Wednesdays, 7-10 p.m.

Russo’s New York Pizzeria & Wine Bar 9087 POPLAR 755-0092

Live Music on the patio Thursdays-Saturdays, 7-10 p.m.

North Mississippi/ Tunica BankPlus Amphitheater at Snowden Grove 6285 SNOWDEN, SOUTHAVEN, MS (662) 892-2660

Blues Traveler with Blind Melon, G Love & Special Sauce, Soul Hat Friday, Oct. 21, 6 p.m.

Mortimer’s

Dan McGuinness

590 N. PERKINS 761-9321

3964 GOODMAN, SOUTHAVEN, MS 662-890-7611

Van Duren Solo Thursdays, 6:30-8:30 p.m.

Acoustic Music Tuesdays.

T.J. Mulligan’s

Gold Strike Casino

1817 KIRBY 755-2481

1010 CASINO CENTER IN TUNICA, MS 1-888-24K-PLAY

Karaoke Tuesdays, 8 p.m.

Martina McBride Friday, Oct. 21, 8 p.m.

The Windjammer Restaurant

Hollywood Casino

786 E. BROOKHAVEN CIRCLE 683-9044

1150 CASINO STRIP RESORT, TUNICA, MS 662-357-7700

Karaoke ongoing.

Live Entertainment Fridays, Saturdays, 9 p.m.-1 a.m.

Poplar/I-240

Horseshoe Casino & Hotel

East Tapas and Drinks 6069 PARK 767-6002

Eddie Harris Thursdays, Fridays, 6:30-9:30 p.m.; Carlos & Adam from the Late Greats Thursdays, 7-9 p.m.; Elizabeth Wise Tuesdays, 7-9 p.m.; Van Duren Solo Tuesdays, 7-9 p.m.

Neil’s Music Room 5727 QUINCE 682-2300

Jack Rowell’s Celebrity Jam Thursdays, 8 p.m.; Eddie Smith Fridays, 8 p.m.; Glory Dayz with Jack Rowell and Triplthret Friday, Oct. 21, 8:30 p.m.; Eddie Smith Saturday, Oct. 22, 8 p.m.; Debbie Jamison & Friends Tuesdays, 6-10 p.m.; Elmo and the Shades Wednesdays, 8 p.m.-midnight.

AT CASINO CENTER, SOUTH OF MEMPHIS, NEAR TUNICA, MS 1-800-303-SHOE

Toni Braxton Friday, Oct. 21.

Huey’s Southaven

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Owen Brennan’s THE REGALIA, 6150 POPLAR 761-0990

Lannie McMillan Jazz Trio Sundays, 10 a.m.-2 p.m.

Summer/Berclair Barbie’s Barlight Lounge 661 N. MENDENHALL

Possum Daddy’s Karaoke Saturdays, 9 p.m.-2 a.m.

High Point Pub 477 HIGH POINT TERRACE 452-9203

Pubapalooza with Stereo Joe Every other Wednesday, 8-11 p.m.

Arlington/Eads/ Oakland/Lakeland Rizzi’s/Paradiso Pub 6230 GREENLEE 592-0344

Live Music Thursdays, Wednesdays, 7-10 p.m.; Karaoke and Dance Music with DJ Funn Fridays, 9 p.m.

Bartlett Bartlett Performing Arts and Conference Center 3663 APPLING 385-6440

Your Town on Stage Saturday, Oct. 22, 8-10 p.m.

RockHouse Live

Huey’s Cordova

5709 RALEIGH-LAGRANGE 386-7222

1771 N. GERMANTOWN PKWY. 754-3885

Karaoke with Ricky Mac Thursday, Oct. 20, 8 p.m.; Live Bands Fridays, Saturdays, 8 p.m.; Grand Theft Audio Friday, Oct. 21, 9:30 p.m.; Terry Wall and the Wallbangers Saturday, Oct. 22, 9:30 p.m.; Open Mic Mondays Mondays, 8 p.m.-midnight; Live Music Tuesdays, Wednesdays, 8 p.m.-midnight.

Shelby Forest General Store 7729 BENJESTOWN 876-5770

Tony Butler Fridays, 6-8 p.m.; Gary Keith Saturday, Oct. 22, 12-3 p.m.; Robert Hull Sunday, Oct. 23, 12:30-3:30 p.m.

Jamison, Nunez, and Caldwell Sunday, Oct. 23, 8:30 p.m.midnight.

Neshoba Unitarian Universalist Church 7350 RALEIGH-LAGRANGE 266-2626

Germantown Germantown Performing Arts Center 1801 EXETER 751-7500

Paul and Linnea Bert Classic Accents: Dvorak & Copland Sunday, Oct. 23, 2:30-4 p.m.

Tunica Roadhouse 1107 CASINO CENTER, TUNICA, MS 662-363-4900

Live Music Fridays, Saturdays.

Raleigh Stage Stop 2951 CELA 382-1576

Open Mic Blues Jam with Brad Webb Thursdays, 7-11 p.m.

West Memphis/ Eastern Arkansas

Huey’s Southwind

Southland Park 1550 N. INGRAM, WEST MEMPHIS, AR 800-467-6182

The Sensations Sunday, Oct. 23, 8:30 p.m.-midnight.

T.J. Mulligan’s Cordova

7677 FARMINGTON 318-3034

8071 TRINITY 756-4480

The Tommy Akers Duo Sunday, Oct. 23, 8 p.m.-midnight; Karaoke Night Mondays, 8-10 p.m.

7825 WINCHESTER 624-8911

This Machine with Roy Zimmerman Friday, Oct. 21, 7:15-9:30 p.m.

The Southern Edition Band Tuesdays.

7090 MALCO, SOUTHAVEN, MS 662-349-7097

Huey’s Germantown

Live Music Fridays, Saturdays, 10 p.m.; Live Band Karaoke Wednesdays, 7 p.m.

Young Petty Thieves Sunday, Oct. 23, 8-11:30 p.m.

The New Backdour Bar & Grill

Ice Bar & Grill

Karaoke with Tim Bachus Mondays, 8 p.m.-1 a.m.; DJ Stylez Wednesdays, 8 p.m.-1 a.m.

4202 HACKS CROSS 757-1423

Unwind Wednesdays Wednesdays, 6 p.m.-midnight.

302 S. AVALON 596-7115

m e m p h i s f l y e r. c o m

551 S. MENDENHALL 762-8200

Whitehaven/ Airport

Frayser/Millington

ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT

Folk’s Folly Prime Steak House

Charlie Belt and friends Thursday, Oct. 20, 7 p.m.; Almost Famous Friday, Oct. 21, 9 p.m.; Full Circle Saturday, Oct. 22, 8 p.m.; Thump Daddy Sunday, Oct. 23, 5:30 p.m.; Swingin Leroy Wednesday, Oct. 26, 8 p.m.

Collierville

27


B O O KS By Richard J. Alley

Born to It

Two new books on two iconic musicians.

October 20-26, 2016

B

28

orn to Run by Bruce Springsteen (Simon and Schuster) and Traveling Soul: The Life of Curtis Mayfield by Todd Mayfield with Travis Atria (Chicago Review Press) are two books that don’t require comparison for any reason other than that they were published in the same week of October this year, the subjects’ active periods overlap, and they have both been influential to legions of musicians who have come after them. So compare we will. Mayfield and Springsteen were born seven years apart, in 1942 and ’49 respectively. And while Springsteen’s book plays up the hardscrabble life of a blue-collar family in New Jersey, Mayfield’s son Todd paints a picture of his father truly living hand-to-mouth in Chicago. Both musicians were influenced by the church — Mayfield through his grandmother, a practitioner of “spiritualism” who embraced gospel music; and Springsteen down the street from St. Rose of Lima Church (and the most holy of altars in his neighborhood, his father’s local saloons of choice). The common denominator between the two is their singular drive to succeed and to own their visions. They came of age before American Idol, before YouTube and social media and a thousand ways to get your name, face, and music in front of fans. They plied their trade, they traveled, they practiced, and they hustled. Over the course of seven years, Mayfield “scored twenty-two hit singles on the pop and R&B charts with the Impressions, including four R&B number ones, and a dozen charting albums,” writes Todd Mayfield. “He’d written more than forty hits for other artists, toured the world, and become a major voice of his generation. He had fought and clawed his way to something only a handful of black musicians had ever attained in the business — autonomy.” He would eventually found his own publishing company, Curtom Records. In 1971, Mayfield was offered the job of scoring the blaxploitation film Super Fly. With singles such as “Pusherman” and “Freddie’s Dead,” Mayfield was able

to call upon his upbringing in Chicago’s Cabrini-Green and White Eagle housing complexes where he’d struggled as a child with his family. “He wasn’t just writing about [characters] Priest and Freddie; he wasn’t just writing about junkies and pushers; he was writing about himself and his childhood.” At the same time Mayfield was working on the soundtrack, Springsteen was getting his first whiff of real success by signing with Columbia Records, forming the E Street Band, and recording his first album, Greetings From Asbury Park, N.J. Like Mayfield, Springsteen craved total control over his life and music — he needed to be The Boss. “Clarity ruled and allowed us to forge a bond based on the principle that we worked together, but it was my band,” Springsteen writes. “I crafted a benevolent dictatorship; creative input was welcomed within the structure I prepared, but it was my name on the dotted line and on the records.” In the end, Springsteen’s songs are about hope, about breaking free of the cage that holds us, his characters on a last chance power drive: “Together we could break this trap, we’ll run till we drop, baby we’ll never go back.” Mayfield’s songs are about survival with characters battling institutionalized racism and the violence and drugs in the street, doing what they have to do merely to stay alive: “Everybody’s misused him, ripped him off, and abused him. Another junkie playin’, pushin’ dope for the man.” Mayfield was involved in a freak accident on stage in Brooklyn in 1990 when a hurricane-force wind blew a lighting rig onto him, paralyzing him from the neck down. He died in 1999, shortly after being inducted into the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame. His music has lived on through the sampling of today’s rap and hip-hop artists and in the influence of R&B chart-toppers. Springsteen, of course, continues to record and tour at a punishing pace for a 67-year-old man, often playing four-hour shows night after night. Worlds collide: If you search YouTube for the 1994 Grammy awards tribute to Curtis Mayfield, you’ll see an all-star band led by Bruce Springsteen.


ART By Jane Schneider

35 and Counting “This May Surprise You” at AMUM.

m e m p h i s f l y e r. c o m

textiles given by cotton magnate and avid hunter Berry Boswell Brooks. Then, a monetary gift enabled the university to purchase an Egyptian collection of antiquities being decommissioned by the Museum of Fine Arts, Boston in the early 1980s. “It was a small group [of artifacts], but it was primo and these items hadn’t been shown at all,” Luebbers says. Now on permanent display, the collection continues to spur academic research of Egyptian art and archaeology. AMUM’s small space made storing acquisitions problematic, so it stopped receiving material for a number of years. That changed in 2008, when a diverse, 180-piece collection of Sub-Saharan African art textiles and cultural artifacts was donated by Martha and Robert Fogelman. A second gift in 2012 came from Patricia Cloar Milsted of Carroll Cloar’s lithographs, and then there was Huff’s collection in 2013. A sampling of these works can be seen in the show. It was moving their entire holdings for repair work last summer that helped to reacquaint Luebbers with the breadth of materials the museum had amassed over its 35-year history. It also convinced her to better share that largess with students. “I feel the need to at least introduce 18- and 19-year-olds to museums and what they do, so they can get their fingers in it.” Should AMUM enlarge its footprint, something Luebbers is hoping will happen when the university’s new music center opens, she anticipates being able to do more art education with undergraduates. She mentions one student who suggested mounting an exhibition on propaganda, using AMUM’s collection. “That’s the kind of thing I find delightful and valuable, that we can have a platform for contemporary relevance.” “This May Surprise You” at Art Museum of the University of Memphis through December 17th. For more information, call 678-2224 or go to memphis.edu/amum.

Friday, October 28 @ 8 PM Cannon Center Tickets available at the Cannon Center Box Office. All Ticketmaster Outlets or By Phone 1-800-745-3000

ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT

I

f you’ve never been to the Art Museum of the University of Memphis (AMUM), now is the time to go. The gallery is celebrating its 35th anniversary this fall, a noteworthy occasion for which AMUM has mounted an eclectic exhibition of rarely seen and newly acquired work. From intense, modernist paintings to colorful African textiles and intricate, 16th-century pen-and-ink drawings of Aztec life, the show is appropriately titled “This May Surprise You.” It runs through December 17th. What draws you into the gallery are the vibrant works of Josef Albers, a Bauhaus painter from Germany who later became a Yale professor. Introducing elements of modernism to a new generation of artists, his series, Homage to a Square, are a concentrated study in color and light. His paintings were given to AMUM by William S. Huff, a colleague of Albers at Yale who taught architecture. The work came to Memphis vis-à-vis Huff’s great uncle, painter Samuel Hester Crone, whose drawings you can see as well. Crone was a Memphian who studied in Europe in the late 1800s, eventually becoming a noted artist. While Huff grew up with Crone’s paintings, he knew little about his life. So he has worked to document the places Crone lived and painted. AMUM’s holdings reflect Memphis and the interests of some of its more adventurous residents, but the museum’s original purpose was to showcase contemporary art. “This show represents transition, from the high focus on contemporary work to being more versatile. When we opened in October 1981, we were the only one to display this kind of work,” says AMUM’s director Leslie Luebbers. Now that contemporary galleries are more prevalent locally, it seemed appropriate to refocus the museum’s mission. In the early years, AMUM was a repository for collections like the Native American, South American, and African

“This May Surprise You” exhibit at AMUM through December 17th

“We Gonna Party Like It’s 1999”

29


SCARECROWS at Lichterman Nature Center

CALENDAR of EVENTS:

October 20 - 26

Sweeney Todd: In Concert at the Germantown Community Theatre, Oct. 21st-Nov. 6th

Through November 18

Southwest Tennessee Community College Theater

A Hero Ain’t Nothing But a Sandwich, adaptation of the novel by Alice Childress about a family dealing with drugs and crime. Directed by Evelyn Little. www.southwest.tn.edu. Free. Fri., Oct. 21, 12:30-1:45 p.m., Sat., Oct. 22, 7-8:45 p.m., and Sun., Oct. 23, 3-4:45 p.m. 737 UNION (333-5159).

Theatre Memphis

TH EAT E R

Bartlett Performing Arts and Conference Center

Your Town on Stage, experience fun facts and history of Bartlett through local community leaders, music, and video presentation. www.bpacc.org. Sat., Oct. 22, 8 p.m. 3663 APPLING (385-6440).

Circuit Playhouse

Sisters of Swing: The Story of the Andrews Sisters, $25$40. Thursdays-Saturdays, 8 p.m. Through Oct. 30. Cows Don’t Fly and Other Known Facts, www. playhouseonthesquare.org. Sat., Oct. 22, 10 a.m. & 2 p.m. 51 S. COOPER (725-0776).

The Evergreen Theatre

Intervention (One Weird Halloween Story), adult suspenseful drama and comedy. www.theatreworksmemphis.org. $20. Oct. 22-29, 8 p.m. 1705 POPLAR (274-7139).

Germantown Community Theatre

Sweeney Todd: In Concert, presented as a music concert. An infamous tale of an unjustly exiled barber who returns to 19th century London seeking vengeance against the lecherous judge who framed him and ravaged his young wife. www. gctcomeplay.org. Oct. 21-Nov. 6. 3037 FOREST HILL-IRENE (453-7447).

Germantown Performing Arts Center

5992 Quince Rd / Mem., TN 38119

ArtSavvy: Mark Twain at Large, stunning one-man theatrical performance that introduces us to the 70-plus-year-old Twain on a stormy night in his Connecticut home. www.gpacweb.com. Free with required reservation. Thurs., Oct. 20, 7-8 p.m. 1801 EXETER (751-7500).

The Historic Ruffin Theater

901.636.2211

113 W. PLEASANT (504-8889).

October 20-26, 2016

LE S IONS

New Moon Theatre Company

Cuddles, dark tale of two sisters who go on an emotionally harrowing journey. www.newmoontheatre.org. $20. Fridays, Saturdays, 8-9:30 p.m., and Sundays, 2-3:30 p.m. Through Nov. 6. AT THEATREWORKS, 2085 MONROE (484-3467).

The Orpheum

olunteer.

PEOPLE REAL PEOPLE REAL PEOPLE REAL NEEDS NEEDS REAL NEEDS REAL SOLUTIONS REAL SOLUTIONS REAL SOLUTIONS

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30

The Rocky Horror Show, (504-8889), officialruffintheater.com. $10. Fridays, Saturdays, 7 p.m. Through Oct. 29.

Peppa Pig, based on the television series, a fully immersive musical production featuring songs and a sing-a-long. www.orpheum-memphis.com. $30-$150. Sat., Oct. 22, 5-7 p.m. Jersey Boys, musical about Rock and Roll Hall of Famers Frankie Valli, Bob Gaudio, Tommy DeVito, and Nick Massi. www.orpheum-memphis. com. $25. Tues., Oct. 25, 7:30-10 p.m., and Wed., Oct. 26, 7:30-10 p.m. 203 S. MAIN (525-3000).

Poplar Pike Playhouse

Urinetown, musical satire of the legal system, corporate mismanagement, and musical theater itself. www.ppp.org. $15. Oct. 20-29. GERMANTOWN HIGH SCHOOL, 7653 POPLAR PIKE (755-7775).

The City of Conversation, gives a peek at a political hostess who really pulls the strings behind the scenes in Washington, D.C. www. theatrememphis.org. $25. Fridays, Saturdays, 8 p.m., and Sundays, 2 p.m. Through Nov. 6. 630 PERKINS EXT. (682-8323).

Send the date, time, place, cost, info, phone number, a brief description, and photos — two weeks in advance — to calendar@memphisflyer.com or P.O. Box 1738, Memphis, TN 38101. DUE TO SPACE LIMITATIONS, ONGOING WEEKLY EVENTS WILL APPEAR IN THE FLYER’S ONLINE CALENDAR ONLY. OT H E R A R T HA P P E N I N G S

Art on Fire

Fall party with a bonfire, food, live music, silent auction, and more. Sat., Oct. 22, 7-11 p.m. THE DIXON GALLERY & GARDENS, 4339 PARK (761-5250), WWW.DIXON.ORG/ARTONFIRE.

Arts in the Alley

Featuring plein air artists, music, food, and more. $50. Thurs., Oct. 20, 6-9:30 p.m. COLLIERVILLE TOWN SQUARE, COLLIERVILLE, WWW.COLLIERVILLEARTSCOUNCIL.ORG.

BIG STAR – Isolated in the Light Release Party

Join First Third Books, Big Star drummer Jody Stephens, and photographers Michael O’Brien, Maude Schuyler Clay, and David Bell for a celebration of the release . Thurs., Oct. 20, 5:30 p.m. MEMPHIS BROOKS MUSEUM OF ART, 1934 POPLAR (544-6209), WWW.BROOKSMUSEUM.ORG.

A Century of Fashion Part II

A R T I ST R E C E PT I O N S

Fashion show benefiting Brooks League. $45. Sun., Oct. 23, 2-5 p.m.

Crosstown Arts

MEMPHIS BROOKS MUSEUM OF ART, 1934 POPLAR (544-6209), WWW.BROOKSMUSEUM.ORG.

Artist reception for “Nights in Blew,” exhibition of paintings and photography by Manew Blew. www.crosstownarts.org. Thurs., Oct. 20, 2-8 p.m., and Fri., Oct. 21, 6-9 p.m. 430 N. CLEVELAND (507-8030).

Fogelman Galleries of Contemporary Art, University of Memphis Opening reception for “Dépaysement,” MFA thesis work by Laura J. Lawson. (678-3052), www.memphis.edu. Fri., Oct. 21, 5-7:30 p.m. 3715 CENTRAL.

Ross Gallery

Opening reception for “Forge, Cast, Fabricate,” (321-3243). Fri., Oct. 21, 5:30-7:30 p.m. Opening reception for “Abstract Thoughts,” by Sandra Horton. https://www.cbu.edu/gallery. Fri., Oct. 21, 5:30-7:30 p.m. CHRISTIAN BROTHERS UNIVERSITY, PLOUGH LIBRARY, 650 E. PARKWAY S. (321-3000).

Scottish Rite

Artist reception for “Circuitous Succession Epilogue lll,” exhibition and third installment curated by Jason Miller. www.circuitoussuccession.com. Fri., Oct. 21, 6-9 p.m. 825 UNION.

Gallery talk for “The Embodied Line” Exhibition of neon wall sculptures and painted digital photographs by Hans Schmitt-Matzen. Sat., Oct. 22, 11 a.m. DAVID LUSK GALLERY, 97 TILLMAN (767-3800), WWW.DAVIDLUSKGALLERY.COM.

Meet the Artists

Sun., Oct. 23, 1:30-3 p.m. THE SALVATION ARMY KROC CENTER, 800 E. PARKWAY S. (729-8007), WWW.KROCMEMPHIS.ORG.

River Arts Fest

See more than 100 artists, and support their work. $5. Fri., Oct. 21, 6-10 p.m., Sat., Oct. 22, 10 a.m.-5 p.m., and Sun., Oct. 23, 10 a.m.5 p.m. SOUTH MAIN ARTS DISTRICT, CORNER OF G.E. PATTERSON AND TENNESSEE (261-5334), WWW.RIVERARTSFEST.ORG.

O N G O I N G ART

The Annesdale Park Gallery

“Night Women,” exhibition of mixed-media portraits of Black women depicting haunting gazes that captivate and command attention. www. theannesdaleparkgallery.com. Through Nov. 30. 1290 PEABODY (208-6451).

Finding Memphis: Tiny Dances/Hidden Spaces at Jay Etkin Gallery, Oct. 22nd and 23rd

continued on page 33


CELESTE

October 28, 2016 Halloran Centre at the Orpheum

6:30pm

Recommended Ages: 5+

This performance is SENSORY FRIENDLY and is welcoming to all families and children with autism or with other sensory sensitivities.

Tickets: (901) 525-3000 or Orpheum-Memphis.com

DELIVERS DOWNTOWN 5-777-PIE (743) WWW.ALDOSPIZZAPIES.COM

ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT

m e m p h i s f l y e r. c o m

MIDTOWN 725-PIES (7437)

31


care for one another

churchhealth.org/give

October 20-26, 2016

AD.Flyer.Half.Page.Rebrand.8.24.16.indd 1

32

10/3/2016 9:16:49 AM


CALENDAR: OCTOBER 20 - 26

“This May Surprise You,” exhibition featuring Aztec culture. www.memphis.edu/amum. Through Dec. 17. “Africa: Art of a Continent,” permanent exhibition of African art from the Martha and Robert Fogelman collection. Ongoing. 142 COMMUNICATION & FINE ARTS BUILDING (678-2224).

Benjamin L. Hooks Central Library

“Vision from Heaven,” exhibition of paintings which give visual context to several scriptures from Revelation depicting the tragic plight of African-American men in America today by Roy Hawkins, Jr. (415-2700), www.memphislibrary.org. Through Oct. 31. 3030 POPLAR (415-2700).

David Lusk Gallery

“The Embodied Line.” Through Nov. 12. “Fall,” exhibition of oils on panel, watercolors on paper, and large scale installation showcase by Carlyle Wolfe. www. davidluskgallery.com. Through Nov. 12.

3715 CENTRAL.

Jay Etkin Gallery

“Idle Speed Only,” exhibition of paintings by Marc Rouillard. Through Nov. 1. 942 COOPER (550-0064).

L Ross Gallery

“Off the Wall,” abstract paintings by Cathy Lancaster. www. lrossgallery.com. Through Oct. 29. 5040 SANDERLIN (767-2200).

DA N C E

Finding Memphis: Tiny Dances/Hidden Spaces

Project: Motion collaborates with FindMemphis to bring spectacular Memphis photographs to life through dance. $10. Sat., Oct. 22, 7-9 p.m., and Sun., Oct. 23, 6-8 p.m.

EACC Fine Arts Center Gallery

“Retrospective,” by Dan and Anne Thornhill . www.eacc. edu. Through Nov. 11. EAST ARKANSAS COMMUNITY COLLEGE, 1700 NEWCASTLE, FORREST CITY, AR.

Flicker Street Studio

Edwin Owre, exhibition of recent sculpture work. www. flickerstreetstudio.com. Through Nov. 12. 74 FLICKER (767-2999).

Fogelman Galleries of Contemporary Art, University of Memphis

“Home of Future Things,” featuring small-scale works on paper, floor-to-ceiling vinyl panels, and decals that transform the gallery into the interior of an ideal, modern home by Sue Johnson. (6782216). Through Nov. 11. “Dépaysement,” MFA thesis work by Laura J. Lawson. (6783052), www.memphis.edu.

P&H Cafe

Open Mic Comedy, Thursdays, 9 p.m. 1532 MADISON (726-0906).

PO E T RY / S PO K E N WOR D

Amurica World Headquarters

Spillit: Dear Diary, evening of personal, embarrassing, awkward, and hilarious stories culled from presenters’ diaries. Presenters will have slides that correspond with their diary entries. www.crosstownarts.org. Thurs., Oct. 20, 6-9 p.m. 410 CLEVELAND.

B O O KS I G N I N G S

Mahogany Covergirls: Framed

Author reads and signs Water Tossing Boulders. Tues., Oct. 25, 6 p.m.

Burlesque villainess-charged show tells the story of bad girls

Booksigning by Adrienne Berard

BENJAMIN L. HOOKS CENTRAL LIBRARY, 3030 POPLAR (415-2726).

Booksigning by Anne Sebba

Author discusses and sign Les Parisennes: How the Women of Paris Lived, Loved, and Died Under Nazi Occupation. Sat., Oct. 22, 10:30 a.m.

The Dixon Gallery & Gardens

4339 PARK (761-5250).

1801 EXETER (751-7500).

JAY ETKIN GALLERY, 942 COOPER (214-5327), WWW.PROJECTMOTIONDANCE.ORG.

97 TILLMAN (767-3800).

“A Sense of Wonder,” sculptural works out of natural objects that reference organic elements of Earth and its atmosphere by Wayne Edge. Oct. 23-Jan. 15. “Wild Spaces, Open Seasons: Hunting and Fishing in American Art ,” exhibition exploring the multifaceted meanings of outdoor subjects in both painting and sculpture, ranging from the Colonial era to World War II. www. dixon.org. Oct. 23-Jan. 15.

music, and improvisation. (751-7500), www.gpacweb. com. $30. Fri., Oct. 21, 8-10 p.m.

MEMPHIS BROOKS MUSEUM OF ART, 1934 POPLAR (544-6209), BROOKSMUSEUM.ORG.

Booksigning by Marisa Baggett

Author discusses and signs Vegetarian Sushi Secrets: 101 Healthy and Delicious Recipes. Tues., Oct. 25, 6:30 p.m.

“Nights in Blew” at Crosstown Arts, Oct. 20th and 21st through dance, costume, and music revealing the circumstances of their lives that led to being framed. $15-$20. Fri., Oct. 21, 8-11 p.m. THE DEN, 656 MARSHALL (714-485-5039).

Next Steps

A choreographer’s chat, with wine & cheese with Steven McMahon before the Oct. 15th opening, free with ticket. Community Day Matinee Oct 22nd, 2 p.m. $45. Fri.-Sun., 2 & 8 p.m. Through Oct. 23. PLAYHOUSE ON THE SQUARE, 66 S. COOPER (726-4656), WWW.BALLETMEMPHIS.ORG.

C O M E DY

Germantown Performing Arts Center

Second City: Free Speech! (While Supplies Last), performing social and political satire in acts of original scripted scenes,

THE BOOKSELLERS AT LAURELWOOD, 387 PERKINS EXT. (683-9801), WWW.THEBOOKSELLERSATLAURELWOOD.COM.

L E CT U R E / S P E A K E R

“Born-Again, SeenAgain James Baldwin: State Surveillance, Afro-Pessimism, and the Literary History of Black Lives Matter”

This lecture will explore the reasons behind Baldwin’s resurrection, from his elevated place in the cultural memory of the Black Lives Matter movement, to his function as an antidote to the frozen time. Free. Thurs., Oct. 20, 5:30 p.m. UNIVERSITY OF MEMPHIS, UNIVERSITY CENTER, 255 UNIVERSITY CENTER, PARIS THEATER, WWW. MEMPHIS.EDU/MOCH.

Child Development: Janna Hacker

Presenter will speak on topics such as speech/language issues, sensory and motor skills, and social behavior. Learn how to recognize age-appropriate skills and how to help your

continued on page 34

We’re upgrading our system. MLGW is replacing all one million meters in its system. Thirty days before work begins in your area, you’ll receive a notice. In most cases, you will not need to be home. Once your meter is upgraded, you will be able to take advantage of enhanced features like PrePay, time-of-use rates and daily online usage reports. It can mean significant utility savings for customers who use the usage reports to conserve and a seven-figure reduction in operating costs for MLGW, which will ultimately save everyone money. Best of all, you won’t have to remember to leave your gate unlocked on meter reading day.

We are getting better for you! After you receive your notice, if you choose to decline the upgrade you can follow the instructions to opt-out without any additional costs by completing the appropriate paperwork.

m e m p h i s f l y e r. c o m

Art Museum at the University of Memphis (AMUM)

Oct. 21-Nov. 4.

ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT

continued from page 30

33


CALENDAR: OCTOBER 20 - 26 continued from page 33

E X P OS / S A LES

F E ST IVA LS

child if they are showing some delay. Tues., Oct. 25, 6 p.m.

Booth & Bruce Trunk Show

Blues, Brews, & BBQ

LUCIUS E. & ELSIE C. BURCH JR. LIBRARY, 501 POPLAR VIEW, COLLIERVILLE (457-2600), WWW. COLLIERVILLELIBRARY.ORG.

TO U R S

11th Annual Costume Twilight Tour

Costumed characters portraying Elmwood residents will introduce you to the history of Memphis’ oldest active cemetery. $20. Sat., Oct. 22, 3:30-5 p.m. ELMWOOD CEMETERY, 824 S. DUDLEY (774-3212), WWW.ELMWOODCEMETERY.ORG.

Judge D’Army Bailey Courthouse Tour

Historian Jimmy Ogle leads a free tour of the historical Courthouse. Meet at the southwest steps (Adams & Second). Free. Thurs., Oct. 20, noon. SHELBY COUNTY COURTHOUSE, ADAMS AND SECOND STREET (604-5002), WWW.JIMMYOGLE.COM.

Overton Square Walking Tour

Historian Jimmy Ogle leads a free tour of Overton Square. Meet up at the Tower Courtyard Stage on Trimble. Free. Sun., Oct. 23, 4:30 p.m. OVERTON SQUARE, MIDTOWN (604-5002), WWW.JIMMYOGLE.COM.

Midtown store show will be held on Saturday. Brand representative Cyril will have the brand’s entire collection. For more information, visit website. Fri.-Sat., Oct. 21-22, 10 a.m. ECLECTIC EYE COLLIERVILLE, 3670 S. HOUSTON LEVEE, #102 (8533213), WWW.ECLECTIC-EYE.COM.

Friends of the Library Fall Book Sale

Fri.-Sat., Oct. 21-22, 10 a.m.4:30 p.m. BENJAMIN L. HOOKS CENTRAL LIBRARY, 3030 POPLAR (415-2700), WWW.MEMPHISLIBRARY.ORG.

Memphis Comic Expo Cosplay contest, Sunday at 2 p.m. $20-$75. Sat.-Sun., Oct. 22-23.

MEMPHIS COOK CONVENTION CENTER, 255 N. MAIN (576-1200), WWW.MEMPHISCOMICEXPO.COM.

Mid-South Wedding Show and Bridal School

Plan the perfect wedding. For more information, visit website. $15. Sun., Oct. 23, 1-5 p.m.

Sample food and beers. Enjoy live entertainment. $5-$20. Sat., Oct. 22, 2-7 p.m. THE FITZ, 711 LUCKY LANE (1-800-766-LUCK), WWW.FITZGERALDSTUNICA.COM.

Fall Festival

SHEPHERD’S HAVEN, 175 SHEPHERD’S HAVEN WAY (347-5296), WWW.SHEPHERDSHAVEN.ORG.

Step Up for Down Syndrome

Mile fun walk, live music, cookout, inflatables, petting zoos, prizes to be won, and more. Sun., Oct. 23, 12-4 p.m. CHRISTIAN BROTHERS UNIVERSITY, 650 E. PARKWAY S. (321-3335), WWW.DSAMEMPHIS.ORG.

S PO R TS / F IT N E S S

Bellator Fighting Championships

Join us for an hour-long vinyasa yoga flow. Be sure to come prepared with a mat, towel, and water $15. Wed., Oct. 26, 6:307:30 p.m.

Overstock Yard Sale

SUMITS YOGA MEMPHIS, 6645 POPLAR, SUITE 208, (729-7146).

THEATRE MEMPHIS, 630 PERKINS EXT. (682-8323), WWW.THEATREMEMPHIS.ORG.

October 20-26, 2016

Making Strides Against Breast Cancer

LIBERTY BOWL MEMORIAL STADIUM, 335 S. HOLLYWOOD (729-3586), MAKINGSTRIDESWALK.ORG/MEMPHISTN.

St. Jude Ride Memphis

Unites bikers of all ages and ability levels benefiting St. Jude Children’s Research Hospital. Fri.-Sat., Oct. 21-22. TOM LEE PARK, OFF RIVERSIDE DR., WWW.STJUDE.ORG.

Midtown Legal Clinic

FEDEXFORUM, 191 BEALE STREET.

WHISPERING WOODS HOTEL AND CONVENTION CENTER, 11200 GOODMAN, OLIVE BRANCH, MS (368-6782), MIDSOUTHWEDDINGSHOW.COM.

Sat., Oct. 22.

SHELBY FARMS, 500 N. PINE LAKE (767-PARK), WWW.GOAPE.COM.

M E ETI NGS

$53. Fri., Oct. 21, 6 p.m.

Glow with the Flow

Course in Shelby Farms Park open for its second season. Ongoing.

5K walk benefiting the American Cancer Society. Family-friendly activities begin at 1:30 p.m., and the walk starts at 3 p.m. Sun., Oct. 23, 1:30-5:30 p.m.

$5. Sat., Oct. 22, 3-6 p.m.

Donate Blood. Support Research. Get Paid.

34

Go Ape Treetop Adventure

Free legal advice to those in need. Sat., Oct. 22, 10 a.m.noon. IDLEWILD PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH, 1750 UNION (544-0221).

KIDS

Parents Night Out: Kids Yoga

Mammos ’Til Midnight

SUMITS YOGA MEMPHIS, 6645 POPLAR, SUITE 208, (729-7146).

Extended appointment hours available for annual screening mammogram includes wine, cheese, and hors d’oeuvres. Appointments made by calling location. Saint Francis HospitalBartlett (10/21), 820-7575. Saint Francis Hospital-Memphis (10/29), 765-3279. Physician referral is not required. Fri., Oct. 21, 5 p.m.-midnight.

S P EC IA L EVE NTS

SAINT FRANCIS HOSPITALBARTLETT, 2986 KATE BOND (820-7000).

For ages 6-11. Two hours of ageappropriate songs, movement, stories, crafts, and relaxation. Bring a yoga mat. Sign up now to save your spot as class size is limited. $29 first child, $12 sibling. Fri., Oct. 21, 7-9 p.m.

Big River Crossing Grand Opening

Project Homeless Connect-Memphis

Featuring food, entertainment, and fireworks. Sat., Oct. 22, 1-7 p.m. MARTYRS PARK, CHANNEL 3 DRIVE AT THE RIVER (312-9190), WWW.BIGRIVERCROSSING.COM.

Freedom Award

Featuring award ceremony and gala. Student Forum at 10 a.m., Mississippi Blvd. Christian Church. Thurs., Oct. 20, 5 p.m. CANNON CENTER FOR THE PERFORMING ARTS, MEMPHIS COOK CONVENTION CENTER, 255 N. MAIN (TICKETS, 525-1515), WWW.CIVILRIGHTSMUSEUM.ORG.

MEMPHIS COOK CONVENTION CENTER, 255 N. MAIN (527-1302), WWW.CAFTH.ORG/PHC-2016.

Village Creek Star Party Public observing session rain date. Sat., Oct. 22, 7:30 p.m.

VILLAGE CREEK STATE PARK, CO. ROAD 754 (870-238-9406), WWW.MEMPHISASTRO.ORG.

LGBTQ Speed Dating

Early Childhood Open House

Suggested donation is $5. All proceeds benefit the Metamorphosis Project. Thurs., Oct. 20, 6-8 p.m.

SECOND PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH, 4055 POPLAR (454-0034), WWW.PDSMEMPHIS.ORG.

CLUB SPECTRUM, 616 MARSHALL AVENUE (292-2292), WWW.OUTMEMPHIS.ORG.

Sat., Oct. 22, 1-3 p.m.

Allows individuals who are experiencing homelessness access to resources and services needed to leave homelessness. Includes healthcare, dental care, mental health services, housing referrals, employment services, legal advice, and more. Thurs., Oct. 20, 8 a.m.-3 p.m.

H O LI DAY EVE NTS

Boos + Booze

Bring your own tent for an overnight adventure featur-

continued on page 36

Purse

TM

A U C T I O N

1256 Union Avenue Suite 200 Memphis, TN 38104 901-252-3434

Fun, Food and Fashion 2016 Power of the Purse™ Auction Thursday, October 27, 2016 6:30 – 8:30 p.m. The University Club of Memphis 1346 Central Avenue Memphis, TN 38104

TICKETS $50 General Admission $75 VIP

Visit www.wfgm.org for more information.


OCTOBER 25-30 • THE ORPHEUM THEATRE 901-525-3000 • ORPHEUM-MEMPHIS.COM • GROUPS 10+ TICKETS 901-529-4226

Tue, Nov 1 • 8:00pm

Susan Silverman Luncheon

Thu, Nov 3 • 11:30am

Bryan Schwartz Sun, Nov 6 • 3:00pm

Christopher Noxon

Thu, Nov 10 • 7:00pm

Chanan Tigay

Mon, Nov 14 • 7:30pm

Alicia Ybarbo and Mary Ann Zoellner Sat, Nov 19 • 7:30pm

More info, tickets, and series packages at jccmemphis.org/LitFest

Play Trick or Treat to Win Your Share of

Over $30,000 in Free Play & Prizes!

Monday, October 31st • 10am – 10pm

Swipe at any promotional kiosk for every 100 points earned! See Player Rewards for details.

800.467.6182 • West Memphis, AR • southlandpark.com SeetoPlayer Rewards forPlayer details. Players must be 21 years of age or older to game and 18 years of age or older bet at the racetrack. Rewards card and valid ID are required. Management reserves all rights. Play responsibly; for help quitting call 800-522-4700.

m e m p h i s f l y e r. c o m

Jonathan Safran Foer

Festival

ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT

Jewish Literary and Cultural Arts

35


CALENDAR: OCTOBER 20 - 26 continued from page 34

Mozart’s

THE MARRIAGE OF FIGARO

ing drinks, food, and Spooky Nights attractionsbenefiting Shelby Farms Park Conservancy. 21+ $90. Sat.-Sun., Oct. 22-23. SHELBY FARMS, 500 N. PINE LAKE (767-PARK), WWW.SHELBYFARMSPARK.ORG.

and Mon., Oct. 24, 7 p.m. Through Nov. 5. CUMBERLAND WAREHOUSE, 160 CUMBERLAND (909-515-6649), WICKEDWAYSHAUNTEDHOUSE.COM.

FO O D & D R I N K EVE NTS

Downtown Food Tours

Fall Paw Fest

Halloween fun fur the whole family featuring trick-ortreating, a petting zoo, canine costume contests, and more. Free. Sat., Oct. 22, 1-4 p.m.

Nov. 4 & 5, 2016 at 7:30pm Germantown Performing Arts Center

Gilbert & Sullivan’s

THE PIRATES OF PENZANCE

CARRIAGE CROSSING, HOUSTON LEVEE & BILL MORRIS PKWY. (854-8240), WWW.SHOPCARRIAGECROSSING.COM.

Haunted Bus Tour

We will make a stop in Victorian Village along the way, and there will be multiple photo opportunities. $25. Fridays, Saturdays, 7:30-9:30 p.m. Through Nov. 11. TATER RED’S LUCKY MOJOS AND VOODOO HEALING, 153 BEALE (497-9486), WWW.HISTORICALHAUNTSMEMPHIS.COM.

Savor tastings at five popular eateries, interact with chefs and managers, and sample a range of local flavors while learning about Memphis historic landmarks. Meeting location disclosed with ticket purchase. $55. Saturdays, 1:30 p.m. WWW.CITYTASTINGTOURS.COM.

Ladies Fall Luncheon & Fashion Show $25. Thurs., Oct. 20, noon.

THE VETERANS’ MUSEUM, 100 VETERANS’ DRIVE (731-836-7400), WWW.DYAAB.US.

Memphis Seafood Week

Through Oct. 21, 11-midnight. (278-0881).

CELEBRATING 60 YEARS OF STORIES 901-257-3100 | OPERAMEMPHIS.ORG October 20-26, 2016

Spooky Nights Fri., Sat., 7-10 p.m. Through Oct. 24.

SHELBY FARMS, 500 N. PINE LAKE (767-PARK), WWW.SHELBYFARMSPARK.ORG.

Underwater Pumpkin Carving Contest

Featuring snacks, beverages, and live music benefiting Creative Aging. Sat., Oct. 22, 12-3 p.m. THE DIVE SHOP, 999 SOUTH YATES (763-3483), WWW.CREATIVEAGINGMIDSOUTH.ORG.

Wicked Ways Haunted House

36

Skin-crawling insects, overgrown man-eating vegetation, hoards of zombies in Massive Military Zombie Containment Base. Benefits St. Jude. $18. Thursdays-Sundays, 7 p.m.,

In an urban and mostly African-American section of Los Angeles, Stan spends his days toiling away at a slaughterhouse. His macabre profession seeps into his personal life as he struggles to keep his family afloat. $12. Fri.-Sun. Through Oct. 23. BAOBAB FILMHOUSE, 652 MARSHALL, WWW.BAOBABFILMHOUSE. CCOM.

National Parks Adventure 3D

Ultimate off-trail adventure into the nation’s awe-inspiring great outdoors and untamed wilderness. Through Nov. 11.

Mid-South Corn Maze

CLARK TOWER, TOWER ROOM, 5100 POPLAR, WWW.REALGOODDOGRESCUE.COM.

Killer of Sheep

MALCO PARADISO CINEMA, 584 S. MENDENHALL (6821754), WWW.MALCO.COM.

THE PONY, 3918 WINCHESTER.

Costumes are welcome, face painting provided. Benefits Real Good Dog Rescue. $35. Tues., Oct. 25, 6-9 p.m.

LEVITT SHELL, OVERTON PARK (272-2722), WWW.LEVITTSHELL.ORG.

Sat., Oct. 22, 11:55 a.m., and Wed., Oct. 26, 7 p.m.

Costume contest and freakshow. $45. Wed.Sat., Oct. 26-29.

The Muttster Mash

Thursdays, 7 p.m. Through Oct. 31.

Metropolitan Opera 2016: Don Giovanni

Memphis Horror Story: BJ McNaughty

AGRICENTER INTERNATIONAL, 7777 WALNUT GROVE (452-2151).

Indie Memphis Music Film Series

MALCO PARADISO CINEMA, 584 S. MENDENHALL (6821754), WWW.MALCO.COM.

MEMPHIS ZOO, 2000 PRENTISS PLACE IN OVERTON PARK (333-6500), WWW.MEMPHISZOO.ORG.

Thursdays-Sundays. Through Oct. 31.

MEMPHIS BROOKS MUSEUM OF ART, 1934 POPLAR (544-6209), WWW.BROOKSMUSEUM.ORG.

Mon., Oct. 24, 7 p.m.

Featuring hayrides, candy stations, straw mazes, and more for ghosts and goblins of all ages. $13 members, $15 nonmembers. FridaysSundays, 5:30-9:30 p.m. Through Oct. 31.

2016/17 SEASON

Documentary film about the downfall of former New York Governor Eliot Spitzer. $5. Fri., Oct. 21, 1 p.m.

Kirk Cameron’s REVIVE US

Le Bonheur Zoo Boo

Feb. 17 & 18, 2017 at 7:30pm and Feb. 19 at 3:00pm Germantown Performing Arts Center

Client 9: The Rise and Fall of Eliot Spitzer

Killer of Sheep at Baobab Filmhouse, Oct. 21st-23rd Pink Tie Wine Affair

Try 100+ wines. Benefiting Susan G. Komen foundation. $60. Sat., Oct. 22, 6 p.m. CARREFOUR SHOPPING CENTER, POPLAR AT KIRBY PARKWAY, WWW.DOCSMEMPHIS.COM.

Vine to Wine at the Garden: Spooky Spirits Come in costume for prizes. $30 members, $45 nonmembers. Tues., Oct. 25, 6-8 p.m.

MEMPHIS BOTANIC GARDEN, 750 CHERRY (636-4100), MEMPHISBOTANICGARDEN.COM.

CTI 3D GIANT THEATER, IN THE MEMPHIS PINK PALACE MUSEUM, 3050 CENTRAL (636-2362), WWW.MEMPHISMUSEUMS.ORG.

Pandemonium Cinema Showcase

Featuring retro video games, roller derby, Halloween marathon, and a tribute to Willy Wonka & the Chocolate Factory. Sat., Oct. 22, 111:30 p.m. COSSITT LIBRARY, 33 S. FRONT (415-2766), WWW.MEMPHISLIBRARY.ORG.

Psycho

Classic film. $9. Wed., Oct. 26, 7 p.m. MEMPHIS BROOKS MUSEUM OF ART, 1934 POPLAR (544-6209), WWW.BROOKSMUSEUM.ORG.

The Shining (1980) F I LM

ArtSavvy: 20 Feet from Stardom

2014 Oscar Best Documentary Feature follows the behindthe-scenes of backup singers and stars. Free. Tues., Oct. 25, 7-7:45 p.m. GERMANTOWN PERFORMING ARTS CENTER, 1801 EXETER (751-7500), GPACWEB.COM.

Sun., Oct. 23, 2 p.m., and Wed., Oct. 26, 7 p.m. MALCO PARADISO CINEMA, 584 S. MENDENHALL (682-1754), WWW.MALCO.COM.

Vertigo

Classic film. $9. Sat., Oct. 22, 2 p.m. MEMPHIS BROOKS MUSEUM OF ART, 1934 POPLAR (544-6209), WWW.BROOKSMUSEUM.ORG.


BAR REPORT By Susan Ellis

Right on Track Meet the new(ish) owners of RP Tracks.

JUSTIN FOX BURKS

T

New(ish) owners, Mary (left) and Bernard Laws, the same neighborhood bar by the tracks off. Never. It’s always been a buck off when the train goes by.” Bernard, 41, started at Tracks in

1997 as a dish washer, eventually continued on page 38

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m e m p h i s f l y e r. c o m

talked to Rick and Peter about it many, many, many times, and they have said it has never been $1 shooters or half

ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT

he “R” and “P” of RP Tracks stand for Rick (Johnson) and Peter (Moon), the founders of the venerable college bar, which has operated near the University of Memphis for 29 years. Last year in June, Bernard and Mary Laws bought the place, and they immediately determined that BM Tracks would not work at all. And so it goes. Under new ownership, RP Tracks is still RP Tracks through and through. The Laws claim that not a change has been made. There are the great burgers, that photo collage on one wall, the English prof plaques on another. The famous vegetarian barbecue nachos are still around, of course, and every time a train goes by … “Okay, so that’s an urban legend. Everybody seems to think they get a shooter for a dollar or a free shooter or a shooter half off,” Mary says. “I have

37


RIGHT ON TRACK continued from page 37

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making it to the front of the house. He left, came back, left again. Meanwhile, Mary, 40, started in 2000 and left and returned as well. For a long time, their paths never crossed, until they did. And did they ever. They got married three and half years ago. “We had always talked about owning our own place, but we had never thought it would be here,” Mary says. “Never in a million years had we thought we would own it, ever. It just never seemed like that was in the realm of possibilities.” It was Johnson and Moon who approached them about buying Tracks and RP Billiards across the street. Mary recalls, “I said, Do you want to buy it? And he said, Do you want to buy it? And we both said, Yes, let’s do it. So we did. “We’re here all the time anyway,” she adds. The decision was made to keep the sale of RP Tracks quiet for a year. “Rick and Peter didn’t want us to get overwhelmed right on the front end,” Mary explains. “They knew what we were walking into, so we kind of all just agreed that the first year would be a learning curve.”

And, yes, it was stressful. Though both the Laws had worked at Tracks and knew the business well, they didn’t know everything. (Also, Mary found out she was pregnant the week the contract was signed.) “There were a lot things that Rick and Peter did that we had no idea they were doing, and they made it look so easy all the years that they did it,” Mary says. “And then they say, Here you go and handed it over to us, and I was like, What does this mean? “It’s like having a giant baby, a very expensive, giant baby,” Mary continues. “It does sleep from 3:30 to 8:30 a.m. a day.” RP Tracks attracts a revolving set of college students, young professionals, and longtime regulars. It’s about the cleanest, well-lit college bar you’ll ever see. “It’s a college bar, but it’s also a neighborhood bar,” Mary says. “I would say that 75 percent of the people who come in here live in the neighborhood. “The overall thing I like about Tracks is that it’s just easy. Coming in here is easy. You feel at home right when you walk in.” RP Tracks, 3547 Walker, 327-1471 rptracks.com

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S P I R ITS By Andria Lisle

Drinking Matters Filmmaker Robert Gordon on alcohol and politics.

JUSTIN FOX BURKS

It’s well documented that Gore Vidal favored 12-year old Macallan singlemalt Scotch and that the conservative William F. Buckley Jr. preferred fine wine to hard liquor. What’s your favorite drink? My summer drink is usually vodka with soda water and some squeezed lime or lemon juice. But as we transition into shorter, colder days, I shift over to the browns, usually beginning the season with Scotch and a splash of soda water and then eventually getting rid of the polluting soda water. Robert Gordon And red wine always warms the heart. During the summer of 1968, when Vidal and Buckley debated, Scotch and soda, dry gin martinis, and Manhattans were on every bar menu. What have you been drinking as you’ve watched this year’s presidential debates? When we were making Best of Enemies, we changed the question from, “Who would you rather have a beer with?” to, “Who would you rather have a martini with?” That seems to get at the difference between those guys and our present pundits. As for a drink during the final presidential debates, I’d go with a bota bag full of tequila and an open throat. There is no hope. Whom would you rather have a drink with, Vidal or Buckley? I’d have thought Vidal, until I had a drink with Vidal, and so now I think Buckley. If your candidate doesn’t get elected, how would you handle the next four years? I’m unable to believe that a majority of this country would fall for the bluster of a sexist, racist, selfish demagogue. Unless Trump abdicates the race, I see it as steady cocktails ahead. What time is it?

What’s your favorite place to drink? I purposely didn’t mention the Lamplighter in It Came From Memphis because I didn’t want the beauty of its local flavor disturbed. And my only regret about shooting the Cat Power video in there (“Lived in Bars”) is that when we lit the ceiling, Anne saw how the nicotine had colored the tile. When she renewed her lease, she got new ceiling tile put in. Oh, that ceiling was beautiful! The luster of that golden glow, the hue was 50 years in the making. Where my wife Tara and I usually drink and dine now, it’s rarely crowded, and since we usually luck into our favorite table, I can’t reveal the name. But I’ll say it’s in Midtown. And shout out to past Memphis haunts: the Toast, Charlotte’s, the Bull Shotte, Jefferson Square.

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You’ve become a prolific filmmaker as well as an author. When you’re in work mode, do you tend to drink anything in particular? Does that choice change as you shift between mediums? I rarely drink while working, unless the work is public speaking. My drink choices are determined more by the clime than by my mode or medium. A day editing video is usually more tense than a day of writing. Writing, it’s unmediated. It’s me and the laptop. Film, first off, there’s another person involved. And we’re working toward a mutual vision that hasn’t yet formed, so the communication is intense. Plus, there’s the machine. When you’re moving big pieces of data around, the machines get clunky. So the rhythm you and your editor are creating can be crushed by the machine. A drink is a lovely way to take the edge off. Really, I’m only drinking for the benefit of everyone around me. Writing is intense, but it never requires a boilermaker. Sometimes the editing room does.

ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT

A

s we near November 8th, the battle between Donald Trump and Hillary Clinton is rising to new levels — and so is our blood alcohol content. We turn to Memphis-born author and filmmaker Robert Gordon, co-director of Best of Enemies, the 2015 documentary about the 1968 political debates between ideological opposites William F. Buckley Jr. and Gore Vidal, to see what wets his whistle this election season.

39


FILM REVIEW By Chris McCoy

Three Women and a Baby The Girl on the Train is more admirable than lovable.

October 20-26, 2016

I

40

was standing in the checkout line at Kroger when I saw the perfect tabloid headline: ANGELINA: TOO SKINNY TO CONCEIVE? As a wordsmith, I appreciate its beauty in the same way a metalsmith might appreciate a katana. It is perfectly designed for its cruel purpose. Let’s break it down. “ANGELINA” defines the audience — women to whom Angelina Jolie is already a character in their minds, a beautiful, privileged woman with a complex personal life who is in every way more interesting and perfect than you. Then the colon delivers the warhead: “TOO SKINNY TO CONCEIVE?” Angelina Jolie is skinny. I wish I was as skinny as she is. But it’s bad that she is so skinny, because she can’t have a baby, which is the end-all, be-all of feminine existence. I have a baby, therefore I’m better than Angelina Jolie. But having the baby made me fat, and Angelina Jolie is so skinny, she has Brad Pitt. Or had, anyway. The beauty of the headline is that it allows women to feel both superior and inferior at the same time toward a famous woman, and then feel guilty about it. It’s a self-destructive psychodrama in five words, weaponized to make women pick up a trashy tabloid and read a complete nothingburger of a story. I feel the same kind of grudging admiration toward that headline as I do toward The Girl on the Train. The film is adapted from the 2015 bestseller by Paula Hawkins, which was hawked as “The Next Gone Girl.” I didn’t read the book, but the film adaptation, directed by The Help’s Tate Taylor with the screenplay

adapted by Erin Cressida Wilson of Secretary, seems like it took “The Next Gone Girl” not as a description, but as marching orders. It’s a buttonpushing, potboiler thriller, the same material that formed Alfred Hitchcock’s career. A female friend said it was “A Lifetime movie times 100, but I liked it. It’s a girl thing.” Structurally, at least, The Girl on the Train is a lot more sophisticated than Mother, May I Sleep with Danger. (“No! You can’t sleep with danger! It’s literally called DANGER! Why are we even having this conversation?”) Taylor and Wilson take a fair stab at adapting Hawkins’ literary conceit of three narrators. There’s Rachel (Emily Blunt), the literal girl on the train, whom we meet in the midst of her commute to New York City. Despite the trappings of a successful professional life, she’s hopelessly depressed, living mostly through

Emily Blunt goes off the rails as Rachel in The Girl on the Train. the fantasies she cooks up about the prosperous people she sees in the cookie-cutter houses along the train’s route. Then there’s Megan (Haley Bennett), the blonde bombshell who inspires Rachel’s envy with her perfect house, handsome husband, and seeming life of leisure. But our third narrator, Anna, has the one trapping of success that the other two lack: a baby. The only thing wrong in her idyllic Anthropologie catalog life is that her handsome, high-earning, baby-making husband Tom (Justin Theroux) has a crazy, drunk ex-wife, whom, we find out, just happens to be Rachel. None of these three women are reliable narrators or very nice people, but the not-so-functioning alcoholic Rachel is the least reliable of all, because she spends most of her nights blackout blitzed. When she wakes up bloodied and half-clothed one morning and finds weird voicemails on her phone from Tom, she has no answers for Police Detective Riley (Allison Janney), who comes around asking why Megan has gone missing. The Girl on the Train hops around both in time and point of view to slowly dole out plot points at the most disorienting moments, and usually I’m on board with that, but in this case, all the structural continued on page 42


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trickery just serves to highlight the characters’ cynical shallowness. Rachel, Megan, and Anna are like Angelina Jolie in the headline: blank hooks where target audiences hang their anxieties about wealth, status, body image, and fertility. Calling a film “manipulative” is not necessarily an insult (see: Hitchcock), but when the manipulation is as openly cynical as The Girl on the Train, it spoils the fun.

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CLEAN AND PINK Is a upscale residential cleaning company that takes pride in their employees & the clients they serve. Providing exceptional service to all. The application process is extensive to include a detailed drug test, physical exam, and background check. The training hours are 8am-6pm Mon-Thur. 12$-19$hr. Full time hours are Mon - Thu & rotating Fridays. Transportation to job sites during the work day is company provided. Body cameras are a part of the work uniform. Uniform shirts provided. Only serious candidates need apply. Those only looking for long term employment need apply. Cleaning is a physical job but all tools are company provided. Send Resume to cleannpink@msn.com COPELAND SERVICES, L.L.C. Hiring Armed State Licensed Officers/ Unarmed Officers. Three Shifts Available. Same Day Interview. 1661 International Place 901-258-5872 or 901-818-3187 Interview in Professional Attire LOOKING FOR A CAREER in a fun environment where you can make 50k in your first 2 years with loads of travel opportunities? Fred Astaire Dance Studio is looking for a Full-Time Ballroom Dance Instructor. The hours of the position are Monday through Friday from 1-10 PM. Applicants must complete 4-week training course M-F from 3-6 PM. We train at NO cost to you! Email resume to fredastairememphis@gmail. com or call the studio to schedule and personal interview at 901-753-2158.

SAM’S TOWN HOTEL & Gambling Hall in Tunica, MS is looking for the next Direct Marketing Pro, is it you? We need someone who has excellent organizational skills, knows Direct Mail and Database Marketing, previous Casino Marketing experience preferred. Must have strong written and oral communication skills and the ability to meet deadlines in the fast paced casino environment, proficient in Microsoft Office, CMS and LMS. Must be able to obtain and maintain a MS Gaming Commission Work Permit, pass a prescreening including but not limited to background and drug screen. To apply, log on to boydcareers.com and follow the prompts to Tunica. Boyd Gaming Corp is a drug free workplace and equal opportunity employer. Must be at least 21 to apply. USIC LOCATE TECHNICIAN Daytime, full-time Locate Technician positions available! • 100% PAID TRAINING • Company vehicle & equipment provided • PLUS medical, dental, vision & life insurance Requirements: Must be able to work outdoors, HS Diploma or GED, Ability to work OT and weekends, Must have valid driver’s license with safe driving record. Apply today: www.usicllc.com EEO/AA

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TH E LAST WO R D by Tim Sampson

Farewell. Be Nice.

Tim Sampson

THE LAST WORD

So this is very strange. I’ve been staring at a blank page on my computer for some time now, wondering exactly how to retire from writing a newspaper column I’ve written for 27 years now. Yes, TWENTY-SEVEN YEARS. It might even be TWENTY-EIGHT. I have really, really good friends who weren’t even born when I helped start this newspaper as its first editor 100,000 years ago and have been writing a regular column ever since. But I’m not going to go there. I’m not going to write about being old and all the things that have happened during these almost three decades of writing for this paper. Suffice it to say that, to the best of my recollection, Ronald Reagan was president of the United States when I started. Ouch. So enough is enough is enough. I am done (for now). I want to hand this off to someone who can write about the Republican presidential nominee without having to take five hot showers while scrubbing with Comet. I just can’t do it. So I’m going to part ways with just a little bit of advice for those who care to read, because these are very interesting times we’re in. Just be nice. Be a good, nice person. Be as nice to the person at the Krystal drive-through window as you would be to someone giving you a check for a million dollars. Be as nice as Cookie and Terrence at Ballinger’s at Cooper and Union, sometimes the center of my strange universe. Always be nice to restaurant servers and bartenders. Leave them big tips. They work hard. Just because they are serving you doesn’t mean they are your servants. Have pets. Have lots of pets in your life. There’s not one thing in this world I can think of that makes me smile as much as a kitten running sideways. I have a new cat named Shirley Chisholm, and she has gone from being totally feral to sleeping on my lap. And don’t worry if your pets scratch the furniture or tear up things. Things are just things. I was on that idiotic nextdoor.com website not long ago, and someone was actually whining because squirrels were eating her decorative pumpkins and she was trying to find a way to repel them. Don’t repel squirrels. And, frankly, don’t buy decorative pumpkins every fall. It’s not very original. If you have kids, don’t spoil them. Don’t buy them every video game. Give them crayons and colored pencils and a sketchbook, and give them pets. Make them watch reruns of Green Acres. And don’t worry if they scratch the furniture or tear up things. Don’t smoke cigarettes. I’ve been smoking cigarettes for 40 years, and now I’m trying to quit and I think it might not even be possible. And don’t smoke those e-cigarettes. If you’re going to smoke those, just smoke plain old cigarettes, so just don’t smoke either. Go to Baltimore. Everyone should go to Baltimore. It’s a great city. I just went for the first time last month while in Washington, D.C., with the Stax Music Academy (when the students performed for three days on the National Mall during the grand opening festival for the Smithsonian’s new National Museum of African American History and Culture). Baltimore is awesome and gritty like Memphis. And the people there are nice. As you should be. Speaking of the Stax Music Academy, always, always go see them when they perform. The students are the nicest people in the world, and they work hard. They are phenomenally talented — and nice. Listen to all of the hip-hop and alt-country singer-songwriter rock you want, but also listen to Dusty Springfield. Listen to her sing “Breakfast in Bed.” Eat some leeks in your bed while you listen to her. Listen to opera. For God’s sake, listen to Mavis Staples. Listen to yourself. And do NOT tell anyone if you are a supporter of the Republican nominee running for president right now. That doesn’t make you appear to be rebellious. It makes you appear to be — well, it actually makes you a subhuman like he is. It doesn’t make you interesting. Regurgitating your own feces would be interesting. Well, I guess supporting him does make you interesting, because if you do support him you’re probably already regurgitating your own feces. You’re probably also having to use a wheelbarrow to practice walking on just your legs. I watched a documentary the other day about people who support this man (by the way, I’ve never met one, or at least never met anyone who would admit it out loud), and there was a guy who collected rare toy monsters. He had made a small donation to the nominee’s campaign and in return got a Christmas card. And he really believed the nominee sent it himself. I felt bad for the dude. But now we have these Neanderthals calling for bloodshed and a revolution if he loses. One Wisconsin sheriff even took to social media suggesting that his supporters respond to his loss with “pitchforks and torches.” How in the hell did we get to this place? How could this have happened? I’m still not totally convinced it’s not a huge practical joke. I would just hate to be part of the punchline this time.

m e m p h i s f l y e r. c o m

Tim Sampson says this is his last column. So read it.

47


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Memphis Flyer 10.20.16  

This week: The Chicken Issue! Ten great dishes, a visit to the Gus's in LA, the Pirtles, and more! Also: Tim Sampson's last column, Springst...

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