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Harold Ford, Bredesen, Fincher Redux? P8

10.19.17 1495TH ISSUE

FREE Tyreke Evans

Coco Hames P18 Las Tortugas’ Jonathan Magallanes P30 The Florida Project P34

JOE MURPHY (NBAE/GETTY IMAGES)

THE

WAY FORWARD The Grizzlies begin a new era with a solid “Core Two” — and lots of questions — as the 2017-18 season tips off.


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October 19-25, 2017


OUR 1495TH ISSUE 10.19.17

JUSTIN RUSHING Advertising Director CARRIE O’GUIN HOFFMAN Advertising Operations Manager JERRY D. SWIFT Advertising Director Emeritus KELLI DEWITT, CHIP GOOGE Senior Account Executives ALEX KENNER Account Executive ROXY MATTHEWS Sales Assistant DESHAUNE MCGHEE Classified Advertising Manager BRENDA FORD Classified Sales Administrator classifieds@memphisflyer.com LYNN SPARAGOWSKI Distribution Manager ROBBIE FRENCH Warehouse and Delivery Manager BRANDY BROWN, JANICE GRISSOM ELLISON, ZACH JOHNSON, KAREN MILAM, RANDY ROTZ, LEWIS TAYLOR, WILLIAM WIDEMAN Distribution THE MEMPHIS FLYER is published weekly by Contemporary Media, Inc., 460 Tennessee Street, Memphis, TN 38103 Phone: (901) 521-9000 Fax: (901) 521-0129 letters@memphisflyer.com www.memphisflyer.com CONTEMPORARY MEDIA, INC. KENNETH NEILL Publisher JENNIFER OSWALT Chief Executive Officer JEFFREY GOLDBERG Director of Business Development BRUCE VANWYNGARDEN Editorial Director MOLLY WILLMOTT Special Projects Director KEVIN LIPE Digital Manager LYNN SPARAGOWSKI Distribution Manager MATTHEW PRESTON Social Media Manager BRITT ERVIN Email Marketing Manager ASHLEY HAEGER Controller CELESTE DIXON Accounting Assistant JOSEPH CAREY IT Director KALENA MCKINNEY Receptionist

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CARRIE BEASLEY Senior Art Director CHRISTOPHER MYERS Advertising Art Director JEREMIAH MATTHEWS BRYAN ROLLINS Graphic Designers

There’s been a lot of discussion lately about luring Amazon to build its second company headquarters, to be called Amazon HQ2, in Memphis. In early October, the city council voted to offer the mammoth online retail giant $60 million in cash incentives to move to the Bluff City. “Amazon, here we come,” said council chairman Berlin Boyd, after the vote. To which I say, slow your roll, Berlin. To put the council’s offer in perspective, consider that last summer, the Grizzlies paid $94 million to sign Chandler Parsons to a four-year deal. To put the offer in even more stark perspective, consider that Amazon is worth more than $500 billion (with a “b”), and Amazon founder Jeff Bezos’ personal worth is around $87 billion. Offering Amazon $60 million to come to Memphis is like offering to buy Chandler Parsons dinner at Folk’s Folly in order to get him to accept a trade to the Brooklyn Nets. Pardon me if I don’t have much optimism about this deal. Many cities around the country are eager to become home to Amazon’s HQ2, and why not? The company says it plans to spend $5 billion to build its new facility, which would theoretically create 50,000 new jobs, including 2,500 positions that would pay at least $60,000 a year. That’s a big game changer for any city. For Memphis, it would be transformative. According to city leaders, there could be other incentives from Shelby County, the state of Tennessee, and the Economic Development Growth Engine (EDGE) in the package, but few details have emerged. But let’s take a look at Memphis’ competition. Dallas is offering a $15-billion bullet-train-based headquarters. New Jersey Governor Chris Christie is putting together an incentive package worth $7 billion, including up to $10,000 for each job created. Philadelphia is offering three sites with 28 million square feet of development space in an area already served by transit, retail, and residential spaces. Chicago, Phoenix, and other major cities are also readying pitches for the October 19th deadline. And Stonecrest, Georgia, is offering to rename itself Amazon, which is certainly going the extra mile. Amazon has set forth several “key preferences” for its proposed new second home: Suitable buildings and sites are of “paramount importance.” Other preferences cited include a “stable and business-friendly environment and tax structure,” incentives from local and state governments, and finally, there’s this: “A highly educated labor pool is critical and a strong university system is required.” Oops. No offense to our fine local colleges and universities, but it would be difficult to make the case that Memphis has a highly educated labor force. In a 2017 WalletHub ranking of the country’s 150 “best-educated cities,” Memphis comes in at 114, just behind Montgomery, Alabama. Only 39 percent of Memphians have a college degree. Don’t get me wrong. I truly hope the city pulls off a Memphis miracle and lands the Amazon deal, but we’d be foolish to count on it. If, as seems likely, we don’t get it, we should look at the experience as a learning opportunity, a wake-up call to face the conjoined issues of poverty and a subpar education system that are holding so many of our citizens — and our city — back. This will no doubt be called a case of comparing apples to oranges, but what if we came up with a Payment-in-Lieu-of-Taxes (PILOT) Program to motivate local businesses and corporations to raise their minimum salary to $15 an hour? Or how about using some of those “cash incentives” to pay top-of-the-market N E WS & O P I N I O N teacher salaries in order to lure better THE FLY-BY - 4 educators to the city? Or, since carNY TIMES CROSSWORD - 5 centric cities are falling behind the POLITICS - 8 curve, how about coming up with ways EDITORIAL - 10 to combine county, state, and EDGE VIEWPOINT - 11 money to invest in a modern, high-tech COVER - “THE WAY FORWARD” BY KEVIN LIPE - 12 transportation system. WE RECOMMEND - 16 Memphis has a lot going for it and MUSIC - 18 I’m optimistic about the city’s future, AFTER DARK - 19 but if we don’t land the big one, maybe CALENDAR OF EVENTS - 22 we could seriously begin to think BOOKS - 28 outside the traditional box and create FOOD - 30 our own transformative change. SPIRITS - 33 Or maybe we could just get the FILM - 34 Grizzlies to sign us to a four-year deal. C L AS S I F I E D S - 36 Bruce VanWyngarden LAST WORD - 39 brucev@memphisflyer.com

CONTENTS

BRUCE VANWYNGARDEN Editor SUSAN ELLIS Managing Editor JACKSON BAKER, MICHAEL FINGER Senior Editors TOBY SELLS Associate Editor CHRIS MCCOY Film and TV Editor ALEX GREENE Music Editor CHRIS DAVIS, MICHAEL DONAHUE MAYA SMITH, JOSHUA CANNON Staff Writers JESSE DAVIS Copy Editor JULIE RAY Calendar Editor

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10/12/17 5:11 PM


THE

fly-by {

HELLO, KITTY Last week, a new animal joined the Mid-South’s pantheon of fantastic beasts. On behalf of Hugh Manatee, Zimm the Escape Monkey, Barksdale Beaver, Midtown Coyote, Murder Owl, #PipeKitty, Frayser Bear, and the Alleged Albino Raccoon, Fly on the Wall proudly introduces the Hernando Cat-Like Animal (HCLA).

“Poopline,” Amazon, & Weirich

“I’m Scott Madaus live in Hernando, Mississippi, where there’s been spottings of a cougar …” October 19-25, 2017

Edited by Toby Sells

f ly on the wall

The HCLA received a lot of coverage, but nobody covered this presumed cougar quite like Fox13’s Scott Madaus. Here’s his report in comic book form with captions.

“And that’s not it. That looks like a house cat. But we’re just feet away from where a local man rolled his cellphone video on what some say is a cougar …” And what others call the Hernando Cat-Like Animal.

4

Questions, Answers + Attitude

By Chris Davis. Email him at davis@memphisflyer.com.

W E E K T H AT W A S By Flyer staff

Pipeline to river protested, locals push for HQ2, Weirich involved in Lake County case. N EW PATH O N STATU ES The mostly white Tennessee Historical Commission (THC) voted down the city’s request last week to remove a statue of slave trader and Ku Klux Klan founder Nathan Bedford Forrest from a prominent Memphis park. But the THC voted to approve the city’s declaratory order to pursue a decision from an administrative law judge. The judge will decide, likely by November, if the 2013 law prohibiting the removal of war monuments is relevant to the Forrest statue. “It’s a monument to Jim Crow,” said Memphis Mayor Jim Strickland during nearly two hours of testimony before the vote. The move brought some to wear black and protest at FedExForum ahead of a Grizzlies game Friday night. See more on the vote in this week’s “Last Word.” P US H I N G AGAI N ST TH E “PO O P LI N E” State officials granted a 30-day delay last week of a project that would dump 3.5 million gallons of wastewater from Haywood County into the Mississippi River north of Memphis at Randolph. The pipeline would carry an estimated 3 million gallons of wastewater every day from a new factory that would be built on the Memphis Regional Megasite. It would also carry about 500,000 gallons of treated sanitary wastewater from the city of Stanton, Tennessee. Opposition to the plan has risen, including a Facebook page called “Say No to the Randolph Poopline,” and from Shelby County Commissioner Terry Roland. U P- S K I RT VI D EOS TR AP TR OTTE R Rick Trotter, the former Memphis Grizzlies announcer, was indicted Thursday on four counts of unlawfully photographing women under their skirts at a church where he was a worship leader, said Shelby County District Attorney General Amy Weirich. Downtown Church officials allege Trotter used his church-issued cellphone to take videos under a woman’s skirt as he kneeled behind her during a church service. Police found other up-skirt videos of church-goers on Trotter’s laptop. The victims’ ages ranged from 29 to 63. Trotter admitted his guilt to police and church officials.

M E M P H I S D E LIVE R S O N AMA Z O N Memphis Delivers, a new grassroots campaign by a coalition of community organizations, is launching a campaign to lure Amazon’s new headquarters to Memphis. The campaign, led by DCA, kicked off last week with the hashtag #MemphisDelivers and lighting up Big River Crossing in Amazon orange. WE I R I C H C ITE D I N M U R D E R R EVE R SAL A murder conviction in Lake County was overturned recently due, in part, to the actions of Shelby County District Attorney General Amy Weirich, whose actions, along with some others, were described as “inexplicable and improper” by a judge. A veteran Memphis Police Department lieutenant, Anthony Carter, was set to testify for the defense in a murder trial as an expert on gangs. Lake County District Attorney C. Phillip Bivens called Weirich about the situation, which she said was “unusual.” Weirich called then-MPD director Toney Armstrong — Carter’s boss — about the issue. Later, Carter’s commander and chief confronted him about it. Not wanting trouble, Carter rescinded his offer to testify, saying contact with his higher-ups “just took the steam out of me even wanting to get involved.” For this and other reasons, the Court of Criminal Appeals of Tennessee, overturned the trial court’s conviction and remanded the case for a new trial. Longer versions of our “Week That Was” stories and even more local news can be found at memphisflyer.com.


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Crossword

Edited by Will Shortz

Edited by Will Shortz

No.

No. 0206

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CITY REPORTER B y To b y S e l l s

New (and like new) paths take you to the river. Pieces of a connected Memphis riverfront are falling into place as one big project will open this weekend while another celebrates its first birthday. A new segment of the Wolf River Greenway (WRG), which will open Saturday, bookends the walkable section of the Memphis riverfront to the north. Big River Crossing, the southern bookend, opened on this weekend last year and has seen hundreds of thousands of walkers, runners, and cyclists since then. At 10 a.m. Saturday, officials will formally open a 1.2-mile paved trail of the WRG with speeches and a neighborhood festival. The new trail features asphalt and concrete paths that meander alongside the Wolf River with a boardwalk, picnic tables, benches, bicycle racks, and a bicycle repair station. The new trail will meet the Mississippi River Greenbelt Park trail on Mud Island right at the confluence of the Mississippi and Wolf Rivers, connecting the Greenway to the Memphis riverfront. “Rivers often serve as boundaries, dividing communities from each other, but they are just as capable of bringing together towns, neighborhoods, and diverse cultures,” said Keith Cole, executive director of the Wolf River Conservancy (WRC). The new site will be the western-most point of what

Big River Crossing & the Wolf River Greenway

will be a 36-mile WRG that will connect the Mississippi River in downtown Memphis to east Fayette County. By 2020, the Conservancy hopes to complete the rest of a $50 million, 25-mile trail along the Wolf River within the Memphis city limits. City taxpayers will help build that Memphis portion of the trail. Maria Munoz-Blanco, the city’s director of parks and neighborhoods, said the project is “creating corridors of opportunity for people to go out and enjoy healthy and active living without barriers.” It’s also helping to clean up the city. “Since construction on the trail began in 2016, the

Conservancy, volunteers, and Greenway contractors have removed nearly 100 tires, countless bags of trash, and invasive plants to improve conservation values of the downtown site,” Munoz-Blanco said. Down at the other end of the riverfront, Big River Crossing has settled into place as one of the city’s most popular places to escape outdoors. Officials began working on the project back in 2014 and secured $17.5 million for the bridge alone but $43 million in total for a larger, 10-mile project that connected downtown Memphis with West Memphis, Arkansas. The bicycle and pedestrian span across the Harrahan Bridge opened Saturday, October 22, 2016. As of early October 2017, 247,596 people have streamed across the roughly one-mile foot bridge. Of those, 85 percent were pedestrians and 15 percent rode across on bikes. To celebrate its first year, officials are hosting the Big River Crossing Half Marathon + 5K on Saturday. The half marathon will take runners from the foot of Beale Street on Riverside Drive, through South Main, across the river on Big River Crossing, through the Big River Trail on the Arkansas flood plain, along Dacus Lake, and then back over the bridge to Tom Lee Park.

Platelet Donors Needed Platelll

If you are between the ages of 18 and 50 and in good health, you may be eligible to donate platelets for support of important research activities. Eligible donors can donate every two weeks. Donations require about two hours of your time and you will receive $150 in compensation. Walk-in donations are not accepted. For more information or to make an appointment contact:

October 19-25, 2017

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THE STAGE IS SET FOR TWO EXTRAORDINARY PERFORMANCES Saturday, October 21 at 8 pm Matinee on Sunday, October 22 at 2 pm Germantown Performing Arts Center

JOIN IRIS ORCHESTRA AS VIOLINIST MAYU KISHIMA TAKES CENTER STAGE AT GPAC FOR A SPELLBINDING PERFORMANCE. FEATURING Mozart: Violin Concerto No. 5 Dvoˇrák: Symphony No. 9, “From the New World”

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7


POLITICS By Jackson Baker

New Names on the Marquee A longtime intimate of Harold Ford Jr. was asked the other day if the former Memphis congressman — who, as the Democratic nominee in 2006, lost a U.S. Senate race to Republican Bob Corker by a hair’s breadth — would trade the wealth and standing he has since acquired on Wall Street for the alternate biography that would have followed from a win over Corker. The answer was quick and unequivocal: “In a minute.” He might have said, but didn’t, “In a New York minute,” since the Empire State has, for some years now, been Ford’s abode. The man, who had worked in close harness with Ford for the duration of his political career in Tennessee, went on to say, “He wanted to be president.” Should “wanted” be “wants”? Whether it is a matter of his own uncooked seeds or just that various political talk shows want access to his expertise and/or residual star quality, Ford is a staple these days on cable TV — a frequent guest, for example, on MSNBC’s Morning Joe show, where he offers informed centrist commentary when queried on topical issues and affairs of state by the show’s host. Joe Scarborough is often peremptory with his guests but usually deferential with Ford, whom he

refers to familiarly as Harold. Upon the close of a recent colloquy with Ford, Scarborough, a former GOP congressman from Florida during the Tennessee Democrat’s own time there but an independent now and a member-in-good-standing of the resistance to Trump, smiled fondly and declared that Ford just might be the man to close the gap between right and left factions in the opposition. The same note was also struck recently on an installment of Real Time With Bill Maher, when the eponymous host ended a group discussion that included Ford with a statement to the effect that he and the audience could be looking at the Democrat who could mount a successful challenge to Trump. It must be said that in neither case did Ford respond with either a mock protest to the idea or a concurrence with it. With a certain modesty, he just allowed the sentiment to be expressed, while there were detectable murmurs of assent from others onstage or in the studio audience. But how? Ford, no longer an office-holder, lacks the usual political perch from which a Phil Bredesen in 2008 (above); Harold Ford Jr. in Memphis this year

bid for national office could be mounted. Just after his loss in 2006, in a race that saw him featured on the cover of Time as a possible avatar of something new in national politics, Ford taught politics at Vanderbilt University in Nashville and became titular head of the Democratic Leadership Council (DLC), a center-to-right party organization that had been the launching pad for Bill Clinton’s own ascent to the presidency. As Democratic politics shifted leftward during those years of a George W. Bush Republican administration, the DLC ceased to be much of a force and eventually ceased to be, period. Meanwhile, too, a new and ambitious young senator from Illinois named Barack Obama had seized the limelight and, along with it, first dibs on a quest to become the first black president (an honor Ford’s supporters had long assumed to be his). Ford’s views on fiscal matters had always tilted surprisingly rightward for a Democrat, and an African-American in particular. Indeed, that fact had been a sticking point with self-styled progressive Democrats in Tennessee and something of a brake on their ardor in Ford’s contest with Corker. But those views were consistent with Ford’s

Blood Donors Needed Platelll

If you are between the ages of 18 and 50 and in good health, you may be eligible to donate blood products for support of research that could lead to the development of new therapies for treatment of cancer and other diseases. Financial compensation is provided. Walk-in donations are not accepted.

kevin don’t

bluff

For more information or to make an appointment contact: 901-252-3434 info@keybiologics.com www.keybiologics.com

Kevin Lipe on the Memphis Grizzlies before, during, and after the game. @FlyerGrizBlog

8

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October 19-25, 2017

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Ford in the future, Bredesen in the present, and Fincher versus Blackburn?


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NEWS & OPINION

next move, which was to New York and Wall Street, where, a married man now with a family, he works as a rainmaker and managing director for the Morgan Stanley brokerage firm. Early on in his New York residence, Ford took a flyer at a possible run for the Senate seat held there by fellow Democrat Kirsten Gillebrand, but the conservative social views he had expressed as a candidate in Tennessee worked against him in New York despite his efforts to update them in conformity with his new milieu, and he was forced to abandon his trial run. So whither now? Lack of an office in government did not hinder Trump’s political ambitions, but Ford, for all his ubiquity on cable, is not on the same plane as a national celebrity. Ironically, were native son and periodic Memphis visitor Harold Ford still an official Tennessean, he might be the subject of renewed blandishments from Democrats anxious to field a candidate for the Senate seat which Ford’s former opponent Corker is abandoning. That may be happening, anyhow.   • Meanwhile, there is continued action in Tennessee on the Senate front and another possible blast from the past for Democrats, with no residential barrier to running. Phil Bredesen, the state’s last Democratic governor (and last Democratic winner of any statewide office) made no bones of his wish to remain in government following his term-limited exit from office in 2010, but the hoped-for invitation from the Obama administration never came. (Bredesen had been rumored for secretary of Health and Human Services.) Now, prodded by some of the aforesaid desperate Democrats — and notably by party moneyman Bill Freeman of Nashville — Bredesen announced Monday that, despite an earlier rejection of the idea, he is thinking seriously about a Senate run. Watch that space! Last week,  prior to Bredesen’s statement, James Mackler, the Nashville lawyer and Iraq war vet who is already a declared Democratic candidate, was the beneficiary of a fund-raiser at the East Memphis home of Brice Timmons, where he demonstrated significant gifts as a speechmaker, articulating a lively point-by-point case against both putative GOP nominee Marsha Blackburn and President Trump.  Mackler’s affair drew a fair number of longtime Democratic activists and donors. On the Republican side, the former 8th District Republican congressman Stephen Fincher is serious enough about a possible Senate run — despite the presence in the race already of a like-minded conservative, 7th District U.S. Rep. Blackburn —  to have embarked on a statewide “listening tour” which took him to Memphis this week. More about that anon.

9


E D ITO R IAL

Unintended Consequences Sometimes in this trade, the act of choosing a headline can be a difficult matter. Not so in this case. The headline of this editorial happens to be the phrase used by 7th District U.S. Rep. Marsha Blackburn to describe the ill effects of a

October 19-25, 2017

2016 law she sponsored that loosened regulations on the prescription of addictive opioids, and it constitutes a wonderful irony. Blackburn, now a declared Republican candidate for the soon-to-bevacated U.S. Senate seat currently held by Bob Corker, has found herself in hot water as a result of her role in passing the law — as documented over the last weekend in a collaborative effort by the CBS newsmagazine 60 Minutes and the Washington Post newspaper. Fallout from the investigation has been enormous and immediate and bipartisan and potent enough to force the withdrawal of Pennsylvania GOP Congressman Tom Marino as President Trump’s nominee to head the Office of National Drug Control Policy as the nation’s Drug Czar. Marino found himself in sudden and unexpected disgrace after the CBS-WaPo revelations that he had been among a handful of members who zealously pushed through Congress the Ensuring Patient Access and Effective Drug Enforcement Act of 2016. As the investigation demonstrated, that innocuously titled measure, pushed by self-serving drug manufacturers, camouflaged provisions that, according to former Drug Enforcement Administration official Joe Rannazzisi, purposely struck down important sageguards. The result, he said, was that “unscrupulous” pain-pill hucksters gained the virtually unlimited ability to ply their trade and inflate the nation’s current opioid-addiction crisis to pandemic proportions.

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Rannazzisi also told investigators that Marino and Blackburn, two of the bill’s 14 sponsors, had been especially active in pressing the DEA and the Justice Department to withhold their initial objections to the legislation, which went on to virtual unanimous passage by Congress. But, speaking of unintended consequences, “virtual” is a crucial qualifying word. To what may well be Blackburn’s future discomfort, a likely opponent of hers in the forthcoming GOP Senatorial primary is former 8th District congressman Stephen Fincher, who, either by choice or happenstance, happened not to be in Washington when the 2016 vote on the bill was taken. Unsurprisingly, perhaps, Fincher has elevated the burgeoning opioidaddiction crisis to the very top of his potential issues to run on. And whoever gets the Democratic nomination for the Senate is likely to follow suit. As one of the 2016 bill’s prime movers, Blackburn finds herself in the uncomfortable position of having been either classically negligent in relation to the bill’s dangerous provisions or willing to overlook them in the service of drug companies that had been especially generous in their donations to her political benefit. In any case, she — like other members of Congress who failed to interdict this pernicious measure — will have to provide some convincing explanations for their dereliction, and we can at least hope for some enlightenment on that score in next year’s campaign.

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Locally sourced community spaces and public art that are organic to Memphis sound pretty healthy to me. “Local” is all the rage these days: local businesses, farmers markets with locally sourced, organic food, etc. Why is this any different? Locally sourced community spaces and public art that are organic to Memphis sound pretty healthy to me. No artificial flavors wanted here. Just knowing that it’s created by locals instills pride. Plus, big bonus: locally created ensures authenticity and distinctiveness and adds to the sustainability of our renaissance, all of which best connects our community. So invest in yourself, Memphis. Till, nurture, and cultivate your own garden. You don’t need to ask others for advice, ideas, or inspiration, because, guess what! You’re no longer depressed! Write down “insecurity complex” on a piece of paper and then burn it. Know that you’ve got the goods right here and trust the force within. Are you what you are or what, Memphis? John Kirkscey is a community activist and the developer of memphisartpark.org.

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cilitate fruitful connections as local visions coalesce with local know-how and wherewithal. New collaborations may lead to innovative solutions. Fresh ideas could be sparked. New careers could be launched. Emerging creatives may be inspired. The incentive to stick around becomes greater. Such a movement would help build our community problem-solving capacity and boost our confidence. At his swearing-in ceremony, Mayor Jim Strickland pledged: “We will work harder than ever to renew our city’s sense of self-confidence.” Well, widening opportunities for locals and investing 100 percent of all disposable resources into our economy would be two surefire ways of doing that. When free ideas are expected from locals, then big bucks are paid to outof-town firms for theirs, that’s, as they say in soccer, an own-goal. Ditto commissioning out-of-town artists to create public art for local spaces. Every dollar is precious to the poorest large metro area in the nation. Why needlessly throw any away and risk being a me-too city at the same time? Why invest in the creative capacity and economy of another city with our scarce dollars when we need the stimulus more than they do? It just adds to our city’s cynicism and insecurity.

NEWS & OPINION

After decades of depression, Memphis finally finds itself in the early stage of a renaissance. We’re also blessed to have before us a once-in-a-generation opportunity to remake so many of our most prized public spaces. Yet Memphis is once again the poorest large metro area in the nation, according to the U.S. Census Bureau. How we go about finding the right solutions for Memphis at this defining moment will determine how authentic, inclusive, and sustainable our renaissance will be. Believing that the best visions for our city can come from any Memphian would help engender such a rich renaissance. After all, that’s how we became famous in the first place. So imagine this, Memphis: The city issues a request for proposal (RFP) for Tom Lee Park, the Fourth Bluff Promenade, Mud Island, the Fairgrounds, or any public space, where any local citizen can submit a proposal — be they a “highly qualified” developer, a University of Memphis student or class, an entrepreneur, a group of local creatives, or even a kid with a vision. The RFP could be done in stages, where proposals are voted on to see who makes the cut to the next stage. At each stage, seed money is kicked in to the winning participants, if needed, to help them further develop their proposals (creating equal opportunity), until a final winner is awarded. Rather than limiting the pool of ideas to established firms and community sticky notes, the city would be creating the optimal conditions to get the most innovative and visionary ideas that are organic to Memphis. As urbanist Carol Coletta said in an interview with the Smart City Memphis blog, to be successful, Memphis must be a place where “we all have the opportunity to develop all of our talent and put all of our talent to work.” So let a thousand local flowers bloom, Memphis! Open meritocratic exchanges are the future. Websites such as ideaconnection.com offer financial rewards to independents who solve problems or offer ideas to companies. So why not have an open, meritocratic, local RFP for public spaces — or even for public problems or issues? The city hands out incentives and subsidies to established firms. Why not incentivize our most creative, community-oriented minds? It’ll pay loads of dividends locally. Stoking entrepreneurial minds sounds more promising than subsidizing minimum-wage jobs. We need all the help we can get. It’s not easy being an independent creative in Memphis. Open RFPs would fa-

THE BEST

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10/12/17 8:45 AM


COVER STORY BY KEVIN LIPE

THE

PHOTOGRAPHS BY JOE MURPHY (NBAE/GETTY IMAGES)

WAY FORWARD N

The Grizzlies begin a new era with a solid “Core Two” — and lots of questions — as the 2017-18 season tips off. Chandler Parsons

October 19-25, 2017

ostalgia is a subtle nihilism. It denies the possibility that anything will ever be better than it was in the past and robs us of the ability to see what’s in front of us because we’re always comparing what is with what we remember. This season, there’s no way for the Memphis Grizzlies to avoid that trap. With Zach Randolph and Tony Allen gone and suiting up for other teams, you can’t deny that an era has ended and a new one has begun. The “Core Four” era has been, without question, the most successful in the history of the franchise — and the period in which the team’s fanbase finally blossomed into something bigger than a bunch of die-hards hoping the next Three Year Plan will finally be the one that works. The things that happened between the 2010-11 and 201617 seasons will not soon be forgotten. The catch, of course, is that all eras end. Players age out of their primes, injuries derail plans, wild swings of fate move the ground out from under even the bestlaid foundations. It was inevitable that eventually the most successful group of players in the team’s history would no longer be together in Beale Street Blue and that there’d be a season in which the Grizzlies first had to face that reality and build something for the future. This is that season. The Core Four is gone, and the Grizzlies — still helmed by Mike Conley and Marc Gasol and in the second year of head coach David Fizdale’s tenure — have to figure out what to do next. But regardless of what happens, will it hold up when compared to the glory days that just passed? Will the Grizzlies be able to succeed or fail on their own terms this season, or will they be judged harshly when they fall short of fan expectations because they can’t replicate the glory of the Grit & Grind Days? That’s the question that will be answered over the 12 next 82 games. What will the 2017-18 Grizzlies be, and will that be enough?

They’re faster, more athletic, and younger, but that doesn’t mean they’ll gel out of the gate.

THE CHANDLER PARSONS PROJECT As the Grizzlies look to reinvent themselves around Conley and Gasol, all eyes will be on the Grizzlies’ big $94M free agent signing from last summer, forward Chandler Parsons. After trying to rush back from a knee injury and then failing to ever reach playing shape, to say Parsons’ 2016-17 was a disappointment would be like saying the Titanic didn’t have a great maiden voyage. The hope is that this year, he’ll be able to contribute in some sort of meaningful way. That way didn’t make itself apparent during the preseason, and given how much Fizdale has talked about using Parsons as a power forward, it seems like his role this season (at least at first) will be coming off the bench to play that position in smaller, two-pointguard lineups. Obviously, no one thinks that paying $23M per year to the eighth man in the rotation is a successful outcome for Parsons, but at this point, the money is spent, so as long as he can contribute, he’ll play. But Fizdale has made clear that one thing won’t happen: the mandated 20 minutes of playing time while Parsons tried to rehab last season, which frustrated everyone and accomplished nothing. Parsons was signed to be a playmaker, a scorer with the starting unit that the Grizzlies never had in the Core Four days (apologies to late-period Tayshaun Prince and to the Platonic ideal of whatever people see in Jeff Green). It’s clear heading into this season that the 2015 Chandler Parsons is never, ever coming back, so now the challenge is to figure out a way to get something out of him. If he can play above replacement level, I’ll call it a “win” (and break out the Wild Turkey when it’s time to look at the salary cap numbers). But he won’t be the player they signed him to be — not this year, not ever again. ON A WING AND A PRAYER Don’t let the Parsons debacle cause you to give up hope, though, because there is something positive brewing in the wing


THE YOUNG AND THE RESTLESS On Monday, the Grizzlies cut their roster down to the 15 required for opening night, saying farewell to 2016 first-round pick Wade Baldwin IV and Serbian forward Rade Zagorac. Baldwin is a high-upside player who doesn’t seem to be developing toward that upside, and Zagorac was a young Euro player who didn’t seem to be able to make the leap to the faster, more athletic NBA game. But even though the ranks have thinned, the Grizzlies will still be relying on young guys to step up and produce. Some of these (Andrew Harrison and Wayne Selden, especially) stepped up last year. Others (thinking specifically of Dillon Brooks, who has looked very good in Summer League and in preseason action) are still mostly unknown quantities. But regardless, if the Grizzlies are going to be any good this year, it will take a burgeoning of player development the likes of which we haven’t seen since the days when O.J. Mayo was scoring 30 points a night for Marc Iavaroni. What the Grizzlies are doing, really, is rebuilding in place around Mike Conley

and Marc Gasol. The plan was to have a Big Three that included Parsons, but that plan’s no longer workable. That means the process of retooling is more important, because the young players have to be able to contribute more than was previously expected but also need to be able to do so on a much shorter timetable. It’s not the position the Grizzlies thought they’d be in when they signed Conley and Gasol to 5-year max deals, but they’re determined to make the most of it while they can.

Mike Conley

The process of finding the next great Griz core could be a long one, but they’ve got no choice but to start that journey.

(left to right) J.B. Bickerstaff, Dave Fizdale, Keith Smart

THE WEST It’s worth considering what the bestcase scenario would be for this season’s team before talking about what’s the most likely outcome. The top tiers of the Western Conference continue to become cartoonishly overpowered. Houston added Chris Paul over the summer. The Oklahoma City Thunder added Paul George and Carmelo Anthony to supplement Russell Westbrook. The Warriors will be the same as they were last year. The Spurs will continue to ride Kawhi Leonard’s dominance. And while the top teams will all be the same or better, there’s a new crop of younger teams looking to break into the postseason for the first time. Denver will be strong this year. Minnesota added Jimmy Butler to a team that was already brimming with young talent. Both teams look to make the leap this year. Where does that leave the Grizzlies? They won’t be in the top tier. They probably won’t be in the second tier of teams that could conceivably make it to the NBA Finals if they catch the right breaks or a top team suffers an injury. In this season of transition, they’re looking to make the playoffs and develop what they can with an eye toward maximizing the next two years. That’s not to say this year is a throwaway — just that it’s unreasonable to expect a team with this many question marks (even one that still features Conley and Gasol in their primes) to be much better than a low-end playoff team. Ultimately, the teams around the Grizzlies have (mostly) gotten better, while the Grizzlies rode the same venerated core for a long time, and now the Grizzlies are reloading while their peers are leveling up. That’s not an indictment of the Grizzlies — it seems unlikely that Carmelo Anthony would have come to Memphis, for example — but it does make the failure of the Parsons signing that much more real. The Grizzlies could’ve had that, too. They tried, and instead they’re scrambling to develop a rotation and a style of play. CONCLUSIONS So what’s the ceiling for this year’s Grizzlies team? How good can they be, given the challenges in front of them? I think an optimistic projection would put them somewhere around 44 wins, which I figure might be good enough to make the eight continued on page 14

COVER STORY m e m p h i s f l y e r. c o m

positions: a depth that the Grizzlies have not had in recent years. The offseason additions of Tyreke Evans and Ben McLemore helped to shore up a rotation already starting to come into its own with James Ennis’ decent season (I won't call it a “breakout,” really, but it was solid) and the emergence of Wayne Selden as a potential starter during last season’s ill-fated San Antonio playoff series. McLemore won’t be ready to play for a while yet — he broke his foot this summer in a pickup game, just part of the Grizzlies’ ongoing multi-season injury curse — and I wasn’t very excited about his addition on its own, but coupled with Evans, it’s a notable upgrade from the days of Tayshaun Prince and Austin Daye (or even Jeff Green and Matt Barnes, or the 2015 “can’t run” version of Vince Carter). Add the near-miraculous return of Mario Chalmers to the mix as another point guard, and you have a team poised to play smaller and faster with much greater skill at the positions needed to do so. The operating premise here is that even though none of these guys is particularly a star on his own — Evans is probably the closest thing, but he’s been too inconsistent and injury-prone to ever earn the title — together, as a unit, they’re better top-tobottom than anything the Grizzlies have been able to put on the court in a while. Since Parsons isn’t going to be the small forward of the Grizzlies’ dreams, Plan B will have to become Plan A. It’s a small victory, then, that there are so many decent-to-good role players ready to step in. For a team that has been so hard up for offensive production the last few seasons, the sudden presence of several versatile (if imperfect) players on the perimeter will feel like a sudden breath of fresh air, even considering the big piece (that is, Parsons) that will forever be missing.

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JaMychal Green

October 19-25, 2017

continued from page 13

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playoff spot in the West. They’re in a group of teams (also including the L.A. Clippers, the Portland Trail Blazers, and the Utah Jazz) that could all finish around the same place, teams with a lot of uncertainties yet to be ironed out that look decent on paper. That’s an optimistic projection. One serious injury to Mike Conley or Marc Gasol and things could get away from them in a hurry. They’re deep, but that depth is unproven. They’re tough, but that tenacity hasn’t been tested the way it will be over the course of the upcoming season. They’re faster, more athletic, and younger, but that doesn’t mean they’ll gel out of the gate. A pessimistic projection gets dark in a hurry. With two big-name players on what are likely the biggest contracts they’ll ever get, if the Grizzlies think the current configuration isn’t going to work, the smartest thing to do may be to trade them for picks and start over. If things are going poorly, you can expect the rumor mill to be churning out reports about Gasol trades left and right, but ultimately I’m not sure the Grizzlies “have” to make that trade the way national conventional wisdom would suggest. It’s the downside of being in this position, though. If it’s January and the team is significantly below .500 for

some reason, you will start hearing these rumors. It’s just the way the NBA works, for one thing, but also, it wouldn’t be the craziest move for the Grizzlies to make. That said, I honestly don’t expect things to come to that. The Grizzlies have been pronounced dead several times over the last five seasons, and they’ve always found a way to over-perform. They’re due for a year where that doesn’t happen, but until it does, it seems safe to bet on their success, at least “success” on the terms of this season. There’s a way forward for the Grizzlies, and they’re only now starting to discover it in the young talent on the roster. The process of finding the next great Griz core could be a long one, but they’ve got no choice but to start that journey. It’s tempting to compare this season to the seven before it, the best run of success in the history of the franchise. But to live in that (recent) past is to deny that this season can be a success on its own merits — even if that’s admittedly a smaller scale of success than the fanbase is used to. The Grizzlies will not contend for a title this year, but that’s not the interesting thing about them. What we should watch for is whether they learn what they’re going to be next. If you’re not watching for that, if you’re living in the past, you’ll probably be very disappointed.


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steppin’ out

We Recommend: Culture, News + Reviews

Monster Party

By Chris Davis

Is the 1967 Patterson-Gimlin Bigfoot film the most closely examined and hotly debated minute of film not connected to the JFK assassination? Did the shaky, grainy footage document the existence of an elusive primate strolling through the forest, or was it a fantastic hoax or maybe a warm-up for John Chambers, the special effects artist most famous for his work on the sci-fi classic Planet of the Apes? Chambers, whose ape masks won the Academy Award, weighed in on Patterson-Gilman in a 1997 interview. “I’m good,” he said. “But not that good.” Scientists and film experts who’ve given the footage serious attention are divided over authenticity. Fifty years after the fact, Memphis Flyer writer Toby Sells just wants to have a beer and talk about it. “Close friends have known my paranormal side for a long time,” Sells says, describing the Memphis Bigfoot Festival he’s organized, with some help from Memphis Made Brewing, as his “coming-out party.” Sells, who wears socks with Bigfoot on them, got hooked on Bigfoot in elementary school when he and a friend “who lived way out in the sticks” watched the low-budget 1970s “docudrama” The Legend of Boggy Creek. Then his “friend” locked him outside in the spooky country darkness. “It creeped me out, of course. But it also ignited a wonder,” Sells says. The DIY festival celebrates PattersonGimlin’s 50th with a panel discussion, Bigfoot encounter stories, a costume contest, the debut of a new podcast, trivia, beer, and more.

October 19-25, 2017

MEMPHIS BIGFOOT FESTIVAL AT MEMPHIS MADE BREWING COMPANY, SATURDAY, OCTOBER 21ST, 5-8 P.M., 207-5343

Kōbō Abe’s Beasts Head for Home. Books, p. 28

Mead-spirited. Spirits, p. 33

THURSDAY October 19

SATURDAY October 21

2017 Freedom Award The Orpheum, 7:30 p.m., $200 Annual event honoring those who make significant contributions to civil and human rights. Honored this year are MLK daughter Bernice King, South African jazz artist Hugh Masekela, and co-founder of the Southern Poverty Law Center Morris Dees.

The Music of Sarah Vaughan: Sassy’s Return Crosstown Arts, 7-9 p.m. Jamille Hunter performs the music of Sarah Vaughan. Part of the Crosstown Jazz Series.

Booksigning by Amanda Torres Novel, 6 p.m. Memphian and author of the Curious Coconut Amanda Torres discusses and signs her cookbook Latin American Paleo Cooking.

16

Wolf River Greenway Downtown Grand Opening Harbor Town, 10 a.m.-2 p.m. The official opening of the downtown section of the Wolf River Greenway.

Jonathan Magallanes: Making those flavors work. Food, p. 30

Art on Fire Dixon Gallery & Gardens, 7 p.m., $60-$75 Fall party with a bonfire and the Hot Off the Wall art sale.

Pints for Pits High Cotton Brewery, 4-8 p.m. Memphis Pets Alive sponsors this event, featuring live music, a silent auction, and discounted pints.

Costumes & Cocktails Art Village Gallery, 7 p.m., $45 Includes a silent disco, a tribute to Prince, and signature cocktails. Benefiting the Lupus Foundation of America-Midsouth.

Southland Steak Cook-off Southland Park Gaming & Racing, noon Annual steak cook-off, and guests can try the steaks in competition (!). Includes dart and cornhole tournaments, plus music by FreeWorld, Triplthret, and DSB, a Journey tribute band (!!).

An Evening with Styx Gold Strike Casino, 8 p.m., $55-$95 “Too Much Time on My Hands,” “Mr. Roboto,” “Come Sail Away” — ’80s hitmakers Styx perform tonight.


Buried Child

Dig

By Chris Davis

What if everything you believe about you, your family, your country, and everything else is just a half-buried memory and lies? It’s a recurring theme in plays by the actor, cowboy poet, filmmaker, and sometimes drummer Sam Shepard, who died earlier this year. It’s one that winds in and out of his Pulitzer-winning Buried Child, opening at TheatreWorks this week. With an ear for vernacular, taste for the absurd, and a gift for penning intense dialogue that plays out at the edge of slapstick, Shepard’s work ranges from bizarre Twilight Zone scenarios to epic American tragedies about broken homes, broken people, endless war, and a primal urge for new frontiers. This week, New Moon, an ambitious company that’s delivered jarring productions of Tracy Letts’ Bug and Killer Joe, turns its attention to Shepard. Buried Child is about a dysfunctional, dishonest, and partially dismembered family whose secrets come crawling out of the ground when grandson Vince brings his girlfriend Shelly home to meet the folks. “You know New Moon has done the zombie plays, and we did Frankenstein,” Buried Child director Gene Elliott says, describing his company’s dedication to great scripts and Halloween-season thrills. “But unless you want to do the same stuff over and over, there’s only so much of that available. But when you start looking at plays that are just really creepy, there’s a whole lot more to choose from. And a lot of that stuff is really good. “Buried Child’s got a little something to make everybody uncomfortable,” Elliott says. “And it’s so funny.” Elliott directs a top-shelf cast that includes Stephen Garret, Emily Peckham, Mersadies Burch, and James Dale Green as the sickly, couch-bound patriarch Dodge. NEW MOON THEATRE COMPANY PRESENTS “BURIED CHILD” AT THEATREWORKS OCTOBER 20TH-NOVEMBER 5TH, $15-$20. NEWMOONTHEATRE.ORG

WEDNESDAY October 25

Soulsville U.S.A. Festival Soulsville District, 11 a.m.-6 p.m. A festival dedicated to the history of soul music featuring three stages of music, free museum entry, games, jookin, demos, and more.

Stax 60 Keynote Lecture Stax Museum of American Soul Music, 7 p.m. Talk by music journalist Stanley Booth on Otis Redding, Stax, and Memphis music.

Booksigning by Philip Jett Novel, 6 p.m. Philip Jett signs and discusses The Death of an Heir: Adolph Coors III and the Murder that Rocked an American Brewing Dynasty.

Hocus Pocus The University Club, 7 p.m., $35-$50 A party celebrating the magic of birth control with food and drink and “magical surprises.” Benefiting the Step Ahead Foundation.

An American in Paris The Orpheum, 7:30 p.m., $25-$125 Musical based on the film An American in Paris.

Night of the Living Dead Malco Paradiso, 7:30 p.m. RiffTrax’ take on George Romero’s 1968 zombie classic.

Shout Your Choice The Haven (206 GE Patterson), 6:30 p.m., $10-$20 Open-mic-like event where participants share their stories of sexual health — abortions, birth control, child birth, transitioning, etc. Presented by CHOICES.

ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT

TUESDAY October 24

m e m p h i s f l y e r. c o m

The Florida Project, scenes from America’s underbelly. Film, p. 34

17


Hep C Home at Last M U S I C F E AT U R E B y A l e x G r e e n e

Screen $50

The long and winding road that brought Coco Hames to Memphis.

IUDs

CHO CES

Memphis Center for Reproductive Health

October 19-25, 2017

1726 Poplar Avenue Memphis, TN 38104 901/274-3550 www.memphischoices.org

18

Coco Hames

if we want to! So that was a cool project. I didn’t think beyond it. But eventually I was like, ‘Well, when you stop playing with a band, you do a solo record, right?’ So that’s what I did.” In 2016, she began work on her eponymous solo album at The Bomb Shelter in Nashville, which was released in March. “It was this massive leap of faith for me,” she admits. “After being in a band for so long, this time I was on my own — no gang to hide behind or fall back on.” Hames co-produced the record with Andrija Tokic, whose production credits include the Alabama Shakes, Hurray for the Riff Raff, and others. Playing guitar, piano, and electric harpsichord, Hames enlisted bassist Jack “LJ” Lawrence (The Raconteurs), drummer Julian Dorio (The Whigs), lead guitarist Adam Meisterhans (The Weight), and veteran organist Dave Amels of Reigning Sound. “I grew up listening to ’60s pop, like Dusty Springfield, but also classic country music, like Patsy Cline, and things that bridged both worlds, like Bobbie Gentry,” notes Hames. “With this record, the end result doesn’t fit into any one category,

which is an exciting thing to me.” Indeed, the record evokes those artists and their times, but what’s most notable is her openness to the simple beauties of ensemble playing without the de rigueur noise or aggression of le garage. “I just tried to put together a batch of good songs,” she explains. “And being in the studio with Julian and LJ, I had no idea how they were gonna turn out. And some things turned out like, ‘Is this funky? Is this funky? I don’t know.’ Because Julian and I would just be feeling something out, and then if LJ liked it and Andrija liked it and it was driving somewhere, I would hop onto it.” The result has the earthiness and historical resonance of many longtime Memphis artists, which made her move to the Bluff City a natural one. And not just for musical reasons: “Well, then I fell in love,” she smiles. “Which, you know, can be very inconvenient, but …” She trails off, wistfully. Coco Hames, with opening band Little Bandit, will make her Memphis debut at the River Series at the Harbortown Amphitheater on Sunday, October 22nd, at 3 p.m.

RACHEL BRIGGS

L FREE

et it be known: Lindsay “Coco” Hames is now a Memphian. Though it may have been difficult for the native Floridian to identify with any particular place over the years, since moving here to be with her husband, music writer Bob Mehr, she feels an affinity for the green spaciousness of Memphis. Of course, she is strongly associated with Nashville, adopted home of the Ettes, the band she helped found in Los Angeles in 2003. And she still feels a connection to the place where she first discovered what it was to feel settled. After years of living on the road, the Ettes visited Music City and realized “We could stay here! We could get a house, and we could rehearse in the basement, and there’s a yard!” recalls Hames. “I started baking, and [bandmate] Poni [Silver] started sewing, and we’re doing these very normal, domestic things, and we were speaking to other human beings. It was really great. And so we stayed. We definitely wanted to establish some life off the road, because we didn’t have one.” Hames notes that the very things that made the Ettes a strong touring unit were also obstacles to developing a richer life. “We were so co-dependent. It wasn’t just like a band. We called it the three-headed monster. We did not have lives; we did not have relationships. All we did was tour. We lived in the van; we didn’t have apartments. I thought that’s what everybody did. But life has a way of making itself clear to you, and we knew we had to dismantle the three-headed monster. It was hard, but we had to learn how to be human people.” Though the band continued a strong career out of Nashville for some time — along with baking, sewing, and even opening the record store Found Object together — it was “learning to be a human person” that ultimately led Hames to chafe at the constraints of the style she ironically dubs le garage. After releasing four albums and garnering much respect on the trash rock scene, “it had run its course,” she reflects. “I was done writing songs for that construct. It’s great to write songs in that formula; you can write ’em forever. Just listen to [garage rock compilations] Pebbles and Nuggets and just write ’em.” A collaborative project in 2010 with Reigning Sound’s Greg Cartwright, the Parting Gifts, helped expand her horizons. “We can do anything,” she thought at the time. “We can write prog operas


SPOON WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 18TH MINGLEWOOD HALL

KIRK WHALUM SUNDAY, OCTOBER 22ND NEW DAISY THEATRE

After Dark: Live Music Schedule October 19 - 25

197 BEALE 525-3711

Gary Hardy & Memphis 2 Thursdays-Saturdays, 6-9 p.m.; Karaoke Thursdays, TuesdaysWednesdays, 9 p.m.-1 a.m., and Sundays-Mondays, 10 p.m.-2 a.m.; Mandi Thomas Fridays, Saturdays, 6-9 p.m.; The 901 Heavy Hitters Fridays, Saturdays, 10 p.m.-2 a.m.; Flyin’ Ryan Fridays, Saturdays, 2:30 a.m.; Memphis Jazz Orchestra Sundays, 6-9 p.m.

B.B. King’s Blues Club 143 BEALE 524-KING

The King Beez Thursdays, 5:30 p.m.; B.B. King’s All Stars Thursdays, Fridays, 8 p.m.; Will Tucker Band Fridays, Saturdays, 5 p.m.; Lisa G and Flic’s Pic’s Band Saturdays, Sundays, 12:30 p.m.; Blind Mississippi Morris Sundays, 5 p.m.; Memphis Jones Sundays, Wednesdays 5:30 p.m.; Doc Fangaz and the Remedy Tuesdays, 5:30 p.m.

Blue Note Bar & Grill 341-345 BEALE 577-1089

Queen Ann and the Memphis Blues Masters Fridays, Saturdays, 8 p.m.-midnight.

Blues City Cafe 138 BEALE 526-3637

Blind Mississippi Morris Fridays, 5 p.m. and Saturdays, 5:30 p.m.; Brad Birkedahl Band Thursdays, Wednesdays, 8 p.m.; Earl “The Pearl” Banks Saturdays, 12:30 p.m. and Tuesdays, 7 p.m.; Brandon Cunning Band Sundays, 6 p.m., and Mondays, 7 p.m.; FreeWorld Sundays, 9:30 p.m.

King’s Palace Cafe 162 BEALE 521-1851

Live Music WednesdaysSundays, 7-11 p.m.; Live DJ Wednesdays-Sundays, 11 p.m.; Third Floor: DJ Tubbz Fridays, Saturdays, 10 p.m.; The Rusty Pieces Wednesdays, 6-9 p.m.

David Bowen Thursdays, 5:309:30 p.m., Fridays, Saturdays, 6:30-10:30 p.m., and Sundays, 5:30-9:30 p.m.

King’s Palace Cafe Patio 162 BEALE 521-1851

FedExForum 191 BEALE STREET

Foo Fighters Tuesday, Oct. 24, 7:30 p.m.

Handy Bar 200 BEALE 527-2687

The Amazing Rhythmatics Tuesdays, Thursdays-Sundays, 7 p.m.-1 a.m.

Hard Rock Cafe 126 BEALE 529-0007

Sonny Mack Mondays-Fridays, 2-6 p.m.; Cowboy Neil Mondays, Thursdays, 7-11 p.m., and Saturdays, Sundays, 2-6 p.m.; Sensation Band Tuesdays, Fridays, 7-11 p.m.; Fuzzy and the Kings of Memphis Saturdays, 7-11 p.m.; Chic Jones and the Blues Express Sundays, 7-11 p.m.; North and South Band Wednesdays, 7-11 p.m.

Big Don Valentine’s Three Piece Chicken and a Biscuit Blues Band Thursdays, Tuesdays, 8 p.m.-midnight.

Itta Bena

New Daisy Theatre

King Jerry Lawler’s Hall of Fame Bar & Grille 159 BEALE

Chris Gales Solo Acoustic Show Mondays-Saturdays, noon-4 p.m.; Eric Hughes solo/acoustic Thursdays, 5-8 p.m.; Karaoke Mondays-Thursdays, Sundays, 8 p.m.; Live Bands Fridays, Saturdays, 8 p.m.

South Main

182 BEALE 528-0150

130 PEABODY PLACE 523-8536

Ghost River Brewing

Memphis Bluesmasters Thursdays, Sundays, 8 p.m.midnight; Vince Johnson and the Plantation Allstars Fridays, Saturdays, 4-8 p.m., and Sundays, 3-7 p.m.; Brian Hawkins Blues Party Mondays, 8 p.m.-midnight; Chris McDaniel Tuesdays, Wednesdays, 8 p.m.-midnight.

Silky O’Sullivan’s 183 BEALE 522-9596

Dueling Pianos Thursdays, Wednesdays, 9 p.m.-1 a.m., Fridays, Saturdays, 9 p.m.-3 a.m., and Sundays, Tuesdays, 8 p.m.midnight.

168 BEALE 576-2220

330 BEALE 525-8981

Nat “King” Kerr Fridays, Saturdays, 9-10 p.m.

Flying Saucer Draught Emporium

King’s Palace Cafe Tap Room

Adam Levin Thursday, Oct. 19, 7-10 p.m.; Brad Birkedahl Trio Friday, Oct. 20, 6:30-9:30 p.m.; The Mandy Vixen Trio Saturday, Oct. 21, 8-11 p.m.; Laramie Sunday, Oct. 22, 7-10 p.m. 145 BEALE 578-3031

Rum Boogie Cafe Blues Hall

Yngwie Malmsteen Saturday, Oct. 21, 7 p.m.; Larry Carlton, Kirk Whalum Sunday, Oct. 22, 6 p.m.

Rum Boogie Cafe 182 BEALE 528-0150

Young Petty Thieves Thursdays, 8 p.m.-midnight; Eric Hughes Band Mondays, 8 p.m.-midnight; Gracie Curran Tuesdays, 8 p.m.midnight; Plantation Allstars Wednesdays, 8 p.m.-midnight.

Blind Bear Speakeasy 119 S. MAIN, PEMBROKE SQUARE 417-8435

Live Music Thursdays-Saturdays, 10 p.m.; The Rusty Pieces Friday, Oct. 20, 10 p.m.-1 a.m.

Dirty Crow Inn 855 KENTUCKY

Songwriters with Roland and Friends Mondays, 7-10 p.m.

The Halloran Centre 225 S. MAIN 529-4299

Music Cities Convention Oct. 25-27.

Huey’s Downtown

Loflin Yard 7 W. CAROLINA

Electric Church Sundays, 2-4 p.m.

South Main Sounds

Paulette’s

Anna Jordan, Christine DeMeo and the Truehearts duo Friday, Oct. 20, 7-9 p.m.

Inna Gorilla Sunday, Oct. 22, 8:30 p.m.-midnight.

550 S. MAIN 494-6543

RIVER INN, 50 HARBOR TOWN SQUARE 260-3300

Live Pianist Thursdays, 5:30-8:30 p.m., Fridays and Saturdays, 5:30-9 p.m., Sundays, 11 a.m.-2 p.m., and Mondays-Wednesdays, 5:30-8 p.m.

Purple Haze Nightclub 140 LT. GEORGE W. LEE 577-1139

DJ Dance Music MondaysSundays, 10 p.m.

Rumba Room

Nancy Apple Thursdays, 8 p.m.; Christine DeMeo and Anna Jordan Friday, Oct. 20, 9 p.m.midnight; The Po Boys Saturday, Oct. 21, 9 p.m.-midnight; Bobbie & Tasha Wednesdays, 8-11 p.m.

Earnestine & Hazel’s

DJ Cody Fridays, Saturdays, 10 p.m.

Amber Rae Dunn Hosts: Earnestine & Hazel’s Open Mic Wednesdays, 8-11 p.m.

Sunday Evening With Jason Freeman Sunday, Oct. 22, 5-7:30 p.m.

77 S. SECOND 527-2700

303 S. MAIN 523-0020

531 S. MAIN 523-9754

827 S. MAIN 278-0087

Salsa Night Saturdays, 8:30 p.m.-3 a.m.

The Silly Goose 100 PEABODY PLACE 435-6915

The Vault 124 GE PATTERSON

Bar DKDC 964 S. COOPER 272-0830

Goner Record Third Thursdays Thursday, Oct. 19; Marcella & Her Lovers with New Orleans’ DJ Pasta, Matti & Mitch Friday, Oct. 20; Redondo Beat with Tyler Keith & the Apostles Saturday, Oct. 21; Art Edmaiston’s Mean Scooter Sunday, Oct. 22; Devil Train Monday, Oct. 23; Dave Cousar Tuesday, Oct. 24; Sean Murphy’s 1Breath Quartet Wednesday, Oct. 25.

Blue Monkey 2012 MADISON 272-BLUE

Karaoke Thursdays, 9 p.m.midnight; #ChrisCrosswalk Benefit Monday, Oct. 23, 6-10 p.m.

The Pistol and the Queen Friday, Oct. 20, 8-11 p.m.

continued on page 20

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m e m p h i s f l y e r. c o m

Alfred’s

Club 152 152 BEALE 544-7011

ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT

LABRO BY ANNA WEBBER; KIRK WHALUM BY RAJ NAIK

JULIEN LABRO THURSDAY, OCTOBER 19TH THE BUCKMAN ARTS CENTER

19


After Dark: Live Music Schedule October 19-25 continued from page 19

Hi-Tone 412-414 N. CLEVELAND 278-TONE

Boscos 2120 MADISON 432-2222

Sunday Brunch with Joyce Cobb Sundays, 11:30 a.m.2:30 p.m.

Canvas 1737 MADISON 443-5232

Karaoke Thursdays, 9:30 p.m.; Kyle Pruzina Live Mondays, 10 p.m.-midnight.

Celtic Crossing 903 S. COOPER 274-5151

Jeremy Stanfill and Joshua Cosby Sundays, 6-9 p.m.; Candy Company Mondays.

The Cove 2559 BROAD 730-0719

David Collins Jazz and Deborah Swiney Thursday, Oct. 19, 8 p.m.; Blackwater Trio Friday, Oct. 20, 9 p.m.; The Bluff City Backsliders Saturday, Oct. 21, 10 p.m.; David Collins & the Frog Squad Sunday, Oct. 22, 6 p.m.; Bruce Barham & Ronnie Parsons Tuesday, Oct. 24, 6 p.m.; Ben Minden-Birkenmaier Wednesday, Oct. 25, 6 p.m.; Karaoke Wednesdays, 9 p.m.

Growlers 1911 POPLAR 244-7904

Crockett Hall Tuesdays with the Midtown Rhythm Section Tuesdays, 9 p.m.

The New Respects Thursday, Oct. 19, 9 p.m.; Truth Da God, K.I.M. Friday, Oct. 20, 6 p.m.; Not Tight, So Far It’s Friday, Maybe Saturday, Future Losers Friday, Oct. 20, 9 p.m.; Matthew Mayfield Saturday, Oct. 21, 9 p.m.; Pinact, Euphonic, Joybomb Sunday, Oct. 22, 9 p.m.; Elder with special guests King Buffalo and Namazu Tuesday, Oct. 24, 7:30 p.m.; Corey Feldman & the Angels Wednesday, Oct. 25, 8 p.m.

Huey’s Midtown

24, 5:30 p.m.; Susan Marshall CD Release Party Tuesday, Oct. 24, 7 p.m.; 3RD Man Wednesday, Oct. 25, 5:30 p.m.; Brandon Taylor & Radio Ghost Wednesday, Oct. 25, 8 p.m.

Levitt Shell OVERTON PARK 272-2722

The Blue Stones Friday, Oct. 20, 7-8:30 p.m.

Midtown Crossing Grill 394 N. WATKINS 443-0502

Natalie James and the Professor Saturdays, Sundays, 11 a.m.-3 p.m.; “The Happening” Open Songwriter Showcase Tuesdays, 6:30-9:30 p.m.

1927 MADISON 726-4372

Davis Coen and the Change Sunday, Oct. 22, 4-7 p.m.; JWJones Sunday, Oct. 22, 8:30 p.m.-midnight.

Lafayette’s Music Room

Murphy’s 1589 MADISON 726-4193

DJ Graflin and Justin Hand Friday, Oct. 20; Dalevis Tuesday, Oct. 24.

P&H Cafe

2119 MADISON 207-5097

Patty Harper & Faultline Thursday, Oct. 19, 6 p.m.; The Spazmatics Thursday, Oct. 19, 9 p.m.; Kasey Tyndall Friday, Oct. 20, 10 p.m.; Pam & Terry Saturday, Oct. 21, 6:30 p.m.; Groovement Saturday, Oct. 21, 10 p.m.; Joe Restivo 4 Sunday, Oct. 22, 11 a.m.; Jeffrey & the Pacemakers 10 Year Anniversary Celebration Sunday, Oct. 22, 4 p.m.; Short in the Sleeve Sunday, Oct. 22, 8-10 p.m.; Memphis Knights Big Band Monday, Oct. 23, 6 p.m.; David Cousar Tuesday, Oct.

1532 MADISON 726-0906

Rock Starkaraoke Fridays; Open Mic Music with Tiffany Harmon Mondays, 9 p.m.midnight.

The Phoenix 1015 S. COOPER 338-5223

The Phoenix Blues Jam Tuesdays, 8-11 p.m.

Railgarten 2160 CENTRAL

Winchester & the Ammunition with Lights May Flicker Friday, Oct. 20, 8 p.m.; Bluegrass with

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After Dark: Live Music Schedule October 19 - 25 Tennessee Ripple Saturday, Oct. 21, 4:20 p.m.; Amy LaVere Saturday, Oct. 21, 8 p.m.; Me & Lean Sunday, Oct. 22, noon; The Rusty Pieces Tuesday Fam Jam Tuesday, Oct. 24, 5-8 p.m.

Summer/Berclair

Bartlett

Collierville

Frayser/Millington

Cheffie’s Cafe

Bartlett Performing Arts and Conference Center

Huey’s Collierville

Old Millington Winery

2130 W. POPLAR 854-4455

6748 OLD MILLINGTON 873-4114

483 HIGH POINT TERRACE 202-4157

3663 APPLING 385-6440

2866 POPLAR 249-3739

Songwriter Night hosted by Leigh Ann Wilmot and Dave “The Rave” Saturdays, 5-8 p.m.

High Point Pub

Hadley’s Pub 2779 WHITTEN 266-5006

Wild Bill’s

477 HIGH POINT TERRACE 452-9203

Senses Nightclub Unique Saturday Saturdays, 10 p.m.-3 a.m. 1580 VOLLINTINE 207-3975

The Wild Bill’s Band with Tony Chapman, Joyce Henderson, and Charles Cason Fridays, Saturdays, 11 p.m.-3 a.m.

Pubapalooza with Stereo Joe Every other Wednesday, 8-11 p.m.

Hotel California — A Salute to the Eagles Friday, Oct. 20, 7:30 p.m.

That One Band Friday, Oct. 20, 9 p.m.; Full Circle Saturday, Oct. 21, 9 p.m.; The No Hit Wonders Sunday, Oct. 22, 5:30 p.m.;

Vintage Sunday, Oct. 22, 8-11:30 p.m.

Cruising Heavy Sunday, Oct. 22.

Tony’s Trophy Room

Shake Rag Bar

929 W. POPLAR 457-7134

8902 RANKIN BRANCH 876-5255

Brian Johnson Band Friday, Oct. 20, 8 p.m.-midnight.

Paige & Case Friday, Oct. 20, 8 p.m.-midnight; The Memphis Yahoos Sunday, Oct. 22, 2-6 p.m.

North Mississippi/ Tunica BankPlus Amphitheater at Snowden Grove 6285 SNOWDEN, SOUTHAVEN, MS (662) 892-2660

Cole Swindle with Raelynn and Adam Craig Friday, Oct. 20.

The Crossing Bar & Grill 7281 HACKS CROSS, OLIVE BRANCH, MS 662-893-6242

Karaoke with Buddha Tuesdays, Thursdays, 8 p.m.-midnight; Dantones Friday, Oct. 20, 8:30 p.m.-12:30 a.m.

Gold Strike Casino 1010 CASINO CENTER IN TUNICA, MS 1-888-245-7829

An Evening with Styx Saturday, Oct. 21, 8-9:30 p.m.

University of Memphis

Hollywood Casino 1150 CASINO STRIP RESORT, TUNICA, MS 662-357-7700

The Bluff

Live Entertainment Fridays, Saturdays, 9 p.m.-1 a.m.

535 S. HIGHLAND

DJ Ben Murray Thursdays, 10 p.m.; Bluegrass Brunch with the River Bluff Clan Sundays, 11 a.m.

Horseshoe Casino & Hotel AT CASINO CENTER, SOUTH OF MEMPHIS, NEAR TUNICA, MS 1-800-303-SHOE

East Memphis Buckman Arts Center at St. Mary’s School

Trace Adkins Saturday, Oct. 21.

Huey’s Southaven

60 N. PERKINS EXT. 537-1483

Jason Vieaux and Julien Labro Thursday, Oct. 19, 7-8:30 p.m.

7090 MALCO, SOUTHAVEN, MS 662-349-7097

Hillbilly Mojo Sunday, Oct. 22, 8:30 p.m.-midnight.

Folk’s Folly Prime Steak House

Tunica Roadhouse

551 S. MENDENHALL 762-8200

1107 CASINO CENTER, TUNICA, MS 662-363-4900

Intimate Piano Lounge featuring Charlotte Hurt Mondays-Thursdays, 5-9:30 p.m.; Larry Cunningham Fridays, Saturdays, 6-10 p.m.

Live Music Fridays, Saturdays.

Raleigh Stage Stop

Huey’s Poplar

2951 CELA 382-1576

West Memphis/ Eastern Arkansas

Van Duren Solo Thursdays, 6:30-8:30 p.m.

Poplar/I-240

Mound City

East Tapas and Drinks

COUNTRY RD. 27, MOUND CITY, ARKANSAS

6069 PARK 767-6002

Eddie Harris Thursdays, Fridays, 6:30-9:30 p.m.; Van Duren Solo Tuesdays, 6-8 p.m.

Neil’s Music Room 5727 QUINCE 682-2300

Jack Rowell’s Celebrity Jam Thursdays, 8 p.m.; Eddie Smith Fridays, 8 p.m.; On the Patio: Off the Tracks Saturday, Oct. 21, 4-8 p.m.; Rob Caudill’s Tribute to Rod Stewart Saturday, Oct. 21, 8 p.m.; Michael Townsend Sunday, Oct. 22, 6:30-9:30 p.m.; Debbie Jamison & Friends Tuesdays, 6-10 p.m.; Elmo and the Shades Wednesdays, 8 p.m.-midnight.

Owen Brennan’s THE REGALIA, 6150 POPLAR 761-0990

Lannie McMillan Jazz Trio Sundays, 10 a.m.-2 p.m.

Whitehaven/ Airport Marlowe’s Ribs & Restaurant 4381 ELVIS PRESLEY 332-4159

Karaoke with DJ Stylez Thursdays, Sundays, 10 p.m.; Trio Plus Third Friday of every month.

Furious George Wednesday, Oct. 25, 8 p.m.

RockHouse Live 5709 RALEIGH-LAGRANGE 386-7222

Live Bands Fridays, Saturdays, 8 p.m.; Open Mic Mondays Mondays, 8 p.m.-midnight; Live Music Tuesdays, Wednesdays, 8 p.m.-midnight.

Shelby Forest General Store 7729 BENJESTOWN 876-5770

Arlington/Eads/ Oakland/Lakeland Rizzi’s/Paradiso Pub 6230 GREENLEE 592-0344

Live Music Thursdays, Wednesdays, 7-10 p.m.; Karaoke and Dance Music with DJ Funn Fridays, 9 p.m.

Steak Night with Tony Butler and the Shelby Forest Pioneers Fridays, 6-8 p.m.; Possum Drifters Saturday, Oct. 21, 12-3 p.m.; Evening Shade Sunday, Oct. 22, 12:30-3:30 p.m.; Robert Hull Sundays, 12:30-3:30 p.m.

Cordova

Germantown

Huey’s Cordova

Huey’s Southwind

1771 N. GERMANTOWN PKWY. 754-3885

7825 WINCHESTER 624-8911

Memphis All Stars Sunday, Oct. 22, 8:30 p.m.-midnight; Patio Pirates Tuesday, Oct. 24, 6-9 p.m.

Neshoba Unitarian Universalist Church 7350 RALEIGH-LAGRANGE 266-2626

Roy Zimmerman Friday, Oct. 20, 7:30 p.m.

T.J. Mulligan’s Cordova 8071 TRINITY 756-4480

The Southern Edition Band Tuesdays.

Bluff City Soul Collective Sunday, Oct. 22, 8:30 p.m.midnight.

Huey’s Germantown 7677 FARMINGTON 318-3034

Young Petty Thieves Sunday, Oct. 22, 8-11:30 p.m.; Gerry Finney Wednesday, Oct. 25, 6-9 p.m.

Bailey Bigger Friday, Oct. 20, 6-8 p.m.; Live Music, Corn Maze, Pumpkin Patch MondaysSundays, 6-8 p.m.

Southland Park 1550 N. INGRAM, WEST MEMPHIS, AR 800-467-6182

Live Music Fridays, Saturdays, 10 p.m.; Live Band Karaoke Wednesdays, 7 p.m.

The New Backdour Bar & Grill 302 S. AVALON 596-7115

The NeVeRs Saturday, Oct. 21, 8 p.m.-midnight; Karaoke with Tim Bachus Mondays, 8 p.m.1 a.m.; DJ Stylez Wednesdays, 8 p.m.-1 a.m.

ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT

Mortimer’s 590 N. PERKINS 761-9321

m e m p h i s f l y e r. c o m

Blues Jam hosted by Brad Webb Thursdays, 7-11 p.m.; Fingertrick Friday, Oct. 20, 9 p.m.-1 a.m.; Open Mic Night and Steak Night Tuesdays, 6 p.m.-midnight.

4872 POPLAR 682-7729

The Heart Memphis Band Sunday, Oct. 22, 8:30 p.m.midnight.

21


At Lichterman Nature Center

CALENDAR of EVENTS:

Oct. 19 - 25

SCARECROWS September 15 November 17

Send the date, time, place, cost, info, phone number, a brief description, and photos — two weeks in advance — to calendar@memphisflyer. com or P.O. Box 1738, Memphis, TN 38101. DUE TO SPACE LIMITATIONS, ONGOING WEEKLY EVENTS WILL APPEAR IN THE FLYER’S ONLINE CALENDAR ONLY.

Art on Fire 2017

TH EAT E R

The hottest night of the year. 21plus. Sat., Oct. 21, 7 p.m.

Briarcrest Christian School

Baskerville: A Sherlock Holmes Mystery, classic by Arthur Conan Doyle dramatized by Ken Ludwig into a murderously funny adventure. www.briarcrest.com. $15. Thurs., Oct. 19, 7 p.m., Fri., Oct. 20, 7 p.m., and Sat., Oct. 21, 2 p.m.

THE DIXON GALLERY & GARDENS, 4339 PARK (761-5250), WWW.DIXON.ORG.

Call to Artists for Art Village Gallery Juried Group Exhibition

Opportunity for artists to contribute to the ongoing social and political discussion to inform and influence the perspective of others through art. For more information, visit website. Through Dec. 1.

6000 BRIARCREST.

Cannon Center for the Performing Arts

Akeelah and the Bee, an 11-yearold girl from Chicago, Akeelah, must turn to family, friends, and mentors to survive the final round of the Scripps National Spelling Bee. Benefits Hattiloo Youth Programs. $30. Thurs., Oct. 19, 7 p.m.

WWW.URBANARTCOMMISSION.ORG.

Caged Birds Writing Competition

MEMPHIS COOK CONVENTION CENTER, 255 N. MAIN (TICKETS, 525-1515).

Circuit Playhouse

Heathers: The Musical, based on the 1989 film, darkly delicious story of the students of Westerburg High, ruled by the fearsome trio of Heather, Heather, and Heather — the cruelest and hottest girls in all of Ohio. www. playhouseonthesquare.org. $25-$45. Thursdays-Saturdays, 8 p.m., and Sundays, 2 p.m. Through Oct. 29. 51 S. COOPER (725-0776).

Court Square

Shake(s), Rattle & Roll, creatively links Memphis music to the works of Shakespeare. www.tnshakespeare.org. Free. Fri., Oct. 20, noon. AT N. MAIN AND COURT.

Landers Center (DeSoto Civic Center)

Willy Wonka Jr., www.dftonline. org. $12. Sundays, 2 p.m., and Fridays, Saturdays, 7 p.m. Through Oct. 29. 4560 VENTURE, SOUTHAVEN, MS (662-280-9120).

5992 Quince Rd / Mem., TN 38119

October 19-25, 2017

901.636.2210

Honky Tonk Angels, www.gctcomeplay.org. $13-$24. Fridays, Saturdays, 8 p.m., and Sundays, 2:30 p.m. Through Oct. 29. 3037 FOREST HILL-IRENE (453-7447).

Germantown Municipal Park

Shake(s), Rattle & Roll , creatively links Memphis music to the works of Shakespeare. www.tnshakespeare.org. Sat., Oct. 21, 4 p.m. 1900 S. GERMANTOWN.

recycle we do. this issue is printed on partially-recycled paper.

22

Germantown Community Theatre

memphis flyer | memphisflyer.com

Hattiloo Theatre

Sassy Mamas, comedy about three longtime girlfriends who find themselves living single. One widowed, one abandoned for another woman, and one career-driven, they use social status and wealth to ensnare younger male suitors. www.hattiloo.org. $26-$30. Sun., 3 p.m., Sat., 2 & 7:30 p.m., and Thurs., Fri., 7:30 p.m. Through Oct. 22. 37 S. COOPER (502-3486).

Lester Community Center

Romeo and Juliet, timeless exploration of surprising young love and mortal violence. www.tnshakespeare. org. Free. Fri., Oct. 20, 6:30 p.m. 317 TILLMAN (324-2639).

The Orpheum

Momma’s Boy, what happens when a mother holds on to her son too long? That’s precisely what we learn in this story of a young man who takes pride in being macho but really is a momma’s boy. www. orpheum-memphis.com. $53. Fri., Oct. 20, 8 p.m., and Sat., Oct. 21, 3 & 8 p.m. An American in Paris, an American soldier, a mysterious French girl, and an indomitable European city yearn for a new beginning in the aftermath of war. www. orpheum-memphis.com. $25$100. Tuesdays-Thursdays, 7:30 p.m. Through Oct. 29. 203 S. MAIN (525-3000).

Overton Park

Shake(s), Rattle & Roll, creatively links Memphis music to the works of Shakespeare. www.tnshakespeare.org. Sat., Oct. 21, 10 a.m. OFF POPLAR.

Theatre Memphis

Stage Kiss, romantic comedy about two actors thrown together as romantic leads in a forgotten 1930s melodrama. They quickly lose touch with reality as the story onstage follows them offstage. www.theatrememphis.org. $25. Fri., Sat., 8 p.m., Sun., 2 p.m., and Thurs., 7:30 p.m. Through Oct. 22. 630 PERKINS EXT. (682-8323).

TheatreWorks

Buried Child, a cranky, sarcastic, ill alcoholic argues with his wife who has an unusually close relationship with the local minister. The prodigal grandson returns after six years, and secrets rise to the surface. (484-3467), www.newmoontheatre.org/. $20. Fridays, Saturdays, 8-10 p.m., and Sundays, 2-4 p.m. Through Nov. 5. 2085 MONROE (274-7139).

Universal Parenting Place

PlayBack Memphis, bringing stories to life in a safe space to unlock healing, transformation, and joy. Families welcome. (207-3694), Free. Third Thursday of every month, 4:30-6 p.m. LEMOYNE-OWEN COLLEGE, 990 COLLEGE PARK.

An American in Paris at the Orpheum, through October 29th A R T I S T R EC E PT I O N S

Circuitous Succession Gallery

Opening reception for “Anima/ Persona,” exhibition of digital collage portraits by Annette E. Fournet. www.circuitoussuccessiongallery.com. Fri., Oct. 20, 6-8 p.m. 1789 KIRBY PARKWAY.

Crosstown Arts

Artist reception for “Better Homes and Gardens,” exhibition of new work by Natalie Hoffmann, Alex Paulus, and Nick Peña featuring collage, painting, and mixed-media work. www. crosstownarts.org. Fri., Oct. 20, 6-9 p.m. 430 N. CLEVELAND (507-8030).

Jay Etkin Gallery

Currently accepting submissions for the fall 2017 competition organized by graduates from the MFA program of the University of Memphis to encourage at risk teens to write and affirm their literary voices. For more information, visit website or email cagedbirds901@gmail.com. Through Nov. 15. WWW.CAGEDBIRDSWRITINGCONTEST. WORDPRESS.COM.

Casting Demonstration Saturdays, Sundays, 3 p.m.

METAL MUSEUM, 374 METAL MUSEUM DR. (774-6380), WWW.METALMUSEUM.ORG.

Crosstown Arts Digital Lab

Six-station computer lab supports Memphis’ creative community by providing artists and musicians full access to industry-standard art- and music-making technology. Tuesdays-Thursdays, 10 a.m.-9 p.m., and Fridays, Saturdays, 10 a.m.-6 p.m. CROSSTOWN ARTS, 430 N. CLEVELAND (507-8030), WWW.CROSSTOWNARTS.ORG.

Hot Off the Wall Art Sale

Discover and purchase works by nationally known and emerging artists. Wed.-Sat., Oct. 18-21. THE DIXON GALLERY & GARDENS, 4339 PARK (761-5250), WWW.DIXON.ORG.

Opening reception for “Treasures Along the Path,” exhibition of paintings by John Torina featuring art essay by Fredric Koeppel. www. jayetkingallery.com. Fri., Oct. 20, 6-9 p.m.

“Stargazer Garden” Flower-Folding

942 COOPER (550-0064).

CROSSTOWN CONCOURSE (FORMERLY SEARS CROSSTOWN), N. CLEVELAND AT NORTH PARKWAY, WWW.CROSSTOWNARTS.ORG.

Metal Museum

Opening reception and gallery talk for “The Tributaries: Zachery Lechtenberg,” exhibition of enameling techniques applied to jewelry and illustration combined creating brightly colored cartoon style imagery. www.metalmuseum.org. Sun., Oct. 22, 3-5 p.m. 374 METAL MUSEUM DR. (774-6380).

OT H E R A R T HAPPE N I NGS

Art After Dark

Galleries and gardens will be open late. Featuring light refreshments, entertainment, and a cash bar. Free with admission. Every third Thursday, 6-8 p.m. THE DIXON GALLERY & GARDENS, 4339 PARK (761-5250), WWW.DIXON.ORG.

Stop by and fold a paper flower for collaborative art installation. Mondays-Fridays, 9:30 a.m.5:30 p.m.

Unwind For Hope

Includes wine, Memphis food, and access to an art sale featuring local female artists benefiting Hope House. $25. Thurs., Oct. 19, 6-9 p.m. HOPE HOUSE, 15 S. IDLEWILD (2722702), WWW.HOPEHOUSEMEMPHIS.ORG.

Words Matter

Several teams begin the creative process with a literary contribution from a writer. From there, a combination of artists and performers extend that creation into their own media. Wed., Oct. 25, 6-9 p.m. CROSSTOWN ARTS, 430 N. CLEVELAND (507-8030), WWW.CROSSTOWNARTS.ORG.


ET Round 1

CALENDAR: OCTOBER 19 - 25

“Desert to Delta: Saudi Contemporary Art in Memphis,” exhibition by 20 artists and a video artist collective from the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia. www.memphis.edu/amum. Through Jan. 6, 2018. “Africa: Art of a Continent,” permanent exhibition of African art from the Martha and Robert Fogelman collection. Ongoing. 142 COMMUNICATION & FINE ARTS BUILDING (678-2224).

ANF Architects

“RiverArtsFest Invitational,” exhibition featuring the work of Beth Edwards (2017 poster artist), Eli Gold, Judy Vandergrift, Karen Bottle Capps, Maggie Russell, and Terry Lynn. www.anfa.com. Through Nov. 2. 1500 UNION (278-6868).

Belz Museum of Asian and Judaic Art

“Chinese Symbols in Art,” ancient Chinese pottery and bronze. www.belzmuseum. org. Ongoing. 119 S. MAIN, IN THE PEMBROKE SQUARE BUILDING (523-ARTS).

Bingham and Broad

“My Kin Is Not Like Yours,” exhibition of works by Debra Edge. Ongoing. 2563 BROAD (323-3008).

Brickwood Hall

“Triptych Memphis,” exhibition of work by London Thomas, Nicole Maron, Samilia Colar, Alesandra Bellos, Colleen Couch-Smith, Bree Mayes, and others benefiting Alzheimer’s & Dementia Services of Memphis. Through Dec. 17. 391 S. FRONT.

Buckman Arts Center at St. Mary’s School

“At Peace: Nature’s Calming Presence,” exhibition of landscapes by Ian Hendry. www.buckmanartscenter. com. Through Oct. 30. 60 N. PERKINS EXT. (537-1483).

Circuitous Succession Gallery

“Anima/Persona,” exhibition of digital collage portraits by Annette E. Fournet. www. circuitoussuccessiongallery. com. Oct. 20-Nov. 20. 1789 KIRBY PARKWAY.

Crosstown Arts

“Better Homes and Gardens,” exhibition of new work by Natalie Hoffmann, Alex Paulus, and Nick Peña featuring collage, painting, and mixed-media work. Sat., Oct. 21, 12-5 p.m. 430 N. CLEVELAND (507-8030).

David Lusk Gallery

“Full Circle Stories On Paper,” exhibition of mixedmedia paintings on paper by Dorothy

97 TILLMAN (767-3800).

The Dixon Gallery & Gardens

“Isabelle de Borchgrave: Fashioning Art from Paper,” exhibition of recreated historic fashions. www.dixon. org. Through Jan. 7, 2018. “Boukay,” exhibition of mixed-media works by Justin Bowles. www.dixon.org. Through Jan. 7, 2018. “Made in Dixon,” exhibition showcasing the colorful and joy-filled artwork created by artists of all ages in the Dixon’s educational programs. www.dixon.org. Ongoing. 4339 PARK (761-5250).

Eclectic Eye

“Immeasurably More,” exhibition of photography by Rachel Rieves. www.eclecticeye.com. Through Nov. 1. 242 S. COOPER (276-3937).

FireHouse Community Arts Center

Mosal Morszart, exhibition of works by Black Arts Alliance artist. www.memphisblackartsalliance.org. Ongoing. 985 S. BELLEVUE (948-9522).

Fogelman Galleries of Contemporary Art, University of Memphis

“Sally Heller: Mind over Mayhem,” exhibition of largescale installations out of everyday matter. These improbable landscapes, made of artificial debris, reflect the chaotic state of mass market culture, nature, and consumerism. (678-2216), www.memphis. edu/fogelmangalleries. Free. Through Nov. 9. “There May Be No Before at All,” exhibition of selected moving image work by an international roster of artists exploring physical transgression, gender expression, the death drive, and the archive. (678-2216), www.memphis. edu. Through Oct. 27. 3715 CENTRAL.

Zachery Lechtenberg exhibition at the Metal Museum

Germantown Performing Arts Center “The Most Beautiful Color of All,” exhibition of works by Kelly Fischer. www.gpacweb. com. Through Oct. 30.

MOONSHINE

BALL

1801 EXETER (751-7500).

Jay Etkin Gallery

“Treasures Along the Path,” exhibition of paintings by John Torina featuring art essay by Fredric Koeppel. www. jayetkingallery.com. Oct. 20-Nov. 20. 942 COOPER (550-0064).

L Ross Gallery

“Southern Horizons,” exhibition of landscape works by Matthew Hasty. www. lrossgallery.com. Through Oct. 28. 5040 SANDERLIN (767-2200).

Lucius E. & Elsie C. Burch Jr. Library

“Squared: The Digital Abstract Art of Jon Woodhams,” www.colliervillelibrary.org. Through Oct. 31. 501 POPLAR VIEW, COLLIERVILLE (901 457-2600).

THE FABULOUS THUNDERBIRDS NOVEMBER 10

Marshall Arts Gallery

“Local Talent: Memphis, Tennessee,” exhibition of work by Dan Ball, Birdcap, Dwayne Butcher, Jason Miller, Greely Myatt, Pinkney Hurbert, and other local artists. www.bdartcur.com. Through Nov. 4. “Love of Art” and “Memphis,” exhibition of work by Nikki Gardner and Debra Edge by appointment only. (6479242), Ongoing. 639 MARSHALL (679-6837).

Memphis Botanic Garden

“Our Tour de France, an Encore,” exhibition of paintings from the artists’ trips to France by Ann Aldinger and Michele Allen. www. memphisbotanicgarden.com. Through Oct. 30.

PAUL THORN DECEMBER 2

750 CHERRY (636-4100).

Memphis Brooks Museum of Art

“Coming to America: Lachaise, Laurent, Nadelman, and Zorach, 1914-1945,” exhibition of sculptures. www.brooksmuseum.org. Through Jan. 7, 2018. “By the Book: A Tribute to Dolph Smith,” exhibit focusing on Dolph Smith’s artist notebooks, featuring six on display. Also includes the work of 11 artists who have worked with Smith. Through Nov. 26. “About Face,” exhibition located in the Education Gallery highlighting the different ways artists interpret the connection between emotion and expression. www. brooksmuseum.org. Ongoing. “Drawing Memory: Essence of Memphis,” exhibition of works inspired by nsibidi, a sacred means of communication among male

continued on page 24

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m e m p h i s f l y e r. c o m

Art Museum at the University of Memphis (AMUM)

Strum. www.davidluskgallery. com. Through Nov. 4. “Recent Paintings,” exhibition of water-media works and monograph by George Dombek. www.davidluskgallery.com. Through Nov. 4.

ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT

O N G O I N G ART

23

10/12/17 8:40 AM


CALENDAR: OCTOBER 19 - 25 continued from page 23 secret societies in southeastern Nigeria by Victor Ekpuk. www. brooksmuseum.org. Ongoing. 1934 POPLAR (544-6209).

Memphis College of Art

“Le Monster, Part Boo,” exhibition by MCA community of students, faculty, and staff who have reimagined drawings of monsters originally created by Le Bonheur Children’s Hospital’s child patients. www.mca. edu. Through Nov. 4. 1930 POPLAR (272-5100).

Metal Museum

“A Few of Our Favorite Things,” exhibition of selections by employees, apprentices, interns and volunteers from permanent collections. www.metalmuseum. org. Through Nov. 5. “Cascadian Lines,” exhibition of works by Christopher Gerber in the museum store. Through Nov. 12. Master Metalsmith: David Secrest, exhibition by sculptor and blacksmith well known for his incorporation of textures and patterns in forged iron, fabricated steel and bronze sculptures, and furniture. Through Dec. 31. “The Tributaries: Zachery Lechtenberg,” exhibition of enameling techniques applied to jewelry and illustration combined, creating brightly colored cartoon-style imagery. www.metalmuseum.org. Oct. 22-Jan. 14.

Orange Mound Gallery

Booksigning by John M. Kovach

“Maintaining Place | Making Space,” exhibition of work by Felicia Wheeler, Matthew Thomas, and Lawrence Thomas III. www.artsmemphis.org. Through Nov. 4.

Author discusses and signs Women’s Baseball. Tues., Oct. 24, 6 p.m. NOVEL, 387 PERKINS EXT. (922-5526), WWW.NOVELMEMPHIS.COM.

2232 LAMAR.

Playhouse on the Square

Booksigning by Philip Jett

“I’m Truly Sorry for Your Loss & Other Pleasantries,” exhibition of new work by Kristen Rambo. mca.edu. Through Oct. 24.

Author discusses and signs The Death of an Heir: Adolph Coors III and the Murder That Rocked an American Brewing Dynasty. Wed., Oct. 25, 6 p.m.

66 S. COOPER (726-4656).

NOVEL, 387 PERKINS EXT. (922-5526), NOVELMEMPHIS.COM.

Ross Gallery

“Forgotten Fables and Footlong Fractals,” exhibition of works by Jimmy Crosthwait. www.cbu.edu/ gallery. Through Dec. 6. “Noumenon and Beyond,” exhibition of 18 paintings inspired by the writings of Native American author Vine DeLoria Jr., other Native writers, and the teachings of the Buddha by Tom Murray. Through Nov. 12. CHRISTIAN BROTHERS UNIVERSITY, PLOUGH LIBRARY, 650 E. PARKWAY S. (321-3000).

Slavehaven Underground Railroad Museum

“Images of Africa Before & After the Middle Passage,” exhibition of photography by Jeff and Shaakira Edison. Ongoing. 826 N. SECOND (527-3427).

Booksigning by P.L. Seawright Talbot Heirs

C O M E DY

99 S. SECOND (527-9772).

Memphis Made Brewing Company

Debra Edge Art. Ongoing.

Drafts and Laughs XVIII, with Comma Comedians. Free. Thurs., Oct. 19, 7-9:15 p.m.

DA N C E

Take Shape

Premiere of George Balanchine’s Square Dance matched with Fingers of Your Thoughts by Julia Adam and Reassuring Effects (of Form and Poetry) by Trey McIntyre. $10$45. Fri., Oct. 20, 8-10 p.m., Sat., Oct. 21, 2-4 & 8-10 p.m., and Sun., Oct. 22, 2-4 p.m. PLAYHOUSE ON THE SQUARE, 66 S. COOPER (737-7322), WWW.BALLETMEMPHIS.ORG.

768 S. COOPER (207-5343).

PO E T RY / S PO K E N WOR D

Amurica World Headquarters

Spillit Center Stage: Making Peace, evening of true stories. www.spillitmemphis.com. Sun., Oct. 22, 7-9 p.m. 410 CLEVELAND.

Harvest Festival at the Agricenter International, Saturday, October 21st B O O KS I G N I N G S

Booksigning by Amanda Torres

Author discusses and signs Latin American Paleo Cooking: Over 80 Traditional Recipes Made Grain and Gluten Free. Thurs., Oct. 19, 6 p.m. NOVEL, 387 PERKINS EXT. (922-5526), WWW.NOVELMEMPHIS.COM.

Author discusses and signs Behind Locked Doors. Tues., Oct. 24, 12-1 p.m. SOUTH MAIN BOOK JUGGLER, 548 S. MAIN (249-5370).

Booksigning by Russell Rickford

Author gives lecture and signs We Are an African People: Independent Education, Black Power, and the Radical Imagination in River Room (300). Thurs., Oct. 19, 11:30 a.m.-1:30 p.m. UNIVERSITY OF MEMPHIS, UNIVERSITY CENTER, 255 UNIVERSITY CENTER, PARIS THEATER (678-3974), WWW.MEMPHIS.EDU.

continued on page 27

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We Saw You.

October 19-25, 2017

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24


with special guests

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In October, meet our residents and party with history. Saturday, October 14, Costume Twilight Tour, residents put on their best and tell their best stories, thanks to ArtsMemphis and the Tennessee Arts Commission. Live, you might say. Friday, October 27, Spirits With The Spirits, once a year, we party for all eternity, presented by Raymond James. Food and frivolity. Music and mystery. This is the party to die for. Go online or call for details and ticket information.

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ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT

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25


TWO STATE S. ONE RACE.

THOUSANDS OF FUTURE S.

OCT 21 ST

Make history as one of the first racers to run Big River Crossing and support the life-changing work of Peer Power’s student-to-student mentorship. Empower Memphis’ youth. Sign up today at

PeerPowerFoundation.org Bo & Allison Braswell Freeman Family Foundation Paul & Gloria Plescher

Josh & Llewelyn Hall

Half marathon finishers’ medals,

Deupree Family Foundation

t-shirts for all racers, and after-party food & beers from Cheffie’s, Swanky’s, & Ghost River Brewing Co.

THURSDAY, OCTOBER 19

FILM: BEETLEJUICE October 19-25, 2017

S P O N S O R E D B Y:

FRIDAY, OCTOBER 20

THE BLUE STONES S P O N S O R E D B Y:

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NOVEMBER 3

8PM • MEM, TN

26

CONCERTS BEGIN 7PM UN LESS OTH ERWISE NOTED

NOVEMBER 4

8PM • MEM, TN


CALENDAR: OCTOBER 19 - 25 continued from page 24 L ECT U R E /S P EAK E R

Breast Cancer Policy Forum: “Leveling the Playing Field: How MBCC Can Set the Bar for Health Equity in Breast Care”

Discuss breast cancer disparities among African Americans and how policies impact early detection and survival. Free. Tues., Oct. 24, 4:30-6:30 p.m. UNIVERSITY OF MEMPHIS, UNIVERSITY CENTER (6846011), WWW.COMMONTABLEHEALTH.ORG.

Stax 60 Keynote Lecture: An Evening with Stanley Booth — The Memphis Soul Sound

Fifty years after his initial visit to Stax, Stanley Booth returns to read his original piece. Bob Mehr will introduce Booth. Free. Tues., Oct. 24, 7 p.m.

National Civil Rights Museum Freedom Award

Museum’s signature event that honors outstanding individuals for their significant contributions to civil and human rights. $203. Thurs., Oct. 19, 7:30 p.m. THE ORPHEUM, 203 S. MAIN (525-3000), WWW.ORPHEUMMEMPHIS.COM.

H O LI DAY E V E N TS

Harvest Festival

Pumpkin-painting, kid’s activities, arts and crafts, hayrides, food, and educational workshops. Sat., Oct. 21, 10 a.m.-2 p.m. AGRICENTER INTERNATIONAL, 7777 WALNUT GROVE (7577777), WWW.AGRICENTER.ORG.

Mid-South Maze

Featuring corn maze, haunted hayride, and haunted maze. $5-$15. Through Nov. 4. AGRICENTER INTERNATIONAL, 7777 WALNUT GROVE (7577777), WWW.MIDSOUTHMAZE.COM.

Monster Market

Find your Halloween fix at Lauren Holtermonster’s pop-up shop. Through Oct. 31.

F I LM

1948: Creation & Catastrophe

Screening and Q&A with Director and Dr. Ahlam Muhtaseb for Palestine Solidarity Week. Free. Fri., Oct. 20, 6:30-9:30 p.m. RHODES COLLEGE, BLOUNT AUDITORIUM IN BUCKMAN HALL, 2000 N. PARKWAY (843-3000), WWW.1948MOVIE. COM.

MONSTER MARKET, 88 N. MAIN, WWW.HOLTERMONSTER. COM.

Wicked Ways Haunted House

Benefiting St. Jude Children’s Research Hospital. $20. Through Oct. 31. CUMBERLAND WAREHOUSE, 160 CUMBERLAND, WWW. WICKEDWAYSHAUNTEDHOUSE.COM.

STAX MUSEUM OF AMERICAN SOUL MUSIC, 926 E. MCLEMORE (946-2535), WWW.STAXMUSEUM.COM.

es Exclusive

A Fitz Table Gam

F ES T IVALS

0 0 0 , 0 $1 Money

2017 Soulsville U.S.A. Festival

Three stages of live music, free museum entry, educational talk backs and activities, ARTent with demos from an array of visual artists, vendors, and more. Sat., Oct. 21, 11 a.m.-6 p.m. SOULSVILLE, USA, CORNER OF MISSISSIPPI AND WALKER, WWW.SOULSVILLEUSAFESTIVAL.COM.

Make Out

Memphis Bigfoot Festival

Featuring local panelists, Bigfoot footage, “Bigfoot town hall” to hear your stories, costume contest, and Toby Sells will perform the first episode of his new podcast, “The Southern Dark.” Sat., Oct. 21, 5-8 p.m. MEMPHIS MADE BREWING COMPANY, 768 S. COOPER (207-5343).

with the

Cash & Promo Chips Giveaway

Palestinian Block Party Free. Sat., Oct. 21, 6-10 p.m.

Saturday, October 28 • 9:30pm

FIRST CONGREGATIONAL CHURCH, 1000 S. COOPER (278-6786).

Receive entries with winning hands October 1 through October 27 while playing Blackjack, Craps, 3-Card Poker, Roulette and Mississippi Stud.

S P O R TS / F IT N ES S

The Fast & the Furriest 5K Run/Walk

Dog-friendly 3.1-mile run or one-mile fun walk benefiting the Humane Society of Memphis & Shelby County. $10-$30. Sat., Oct. 21, 9 a.m.-noon.

CASINO PROMOTIONS

MEMPHIS SHELBY COUNTY HUMANE SOCIETY, 935 FARM RD. (937-3900), WWW.MEMPHISHUMANE.ORG.

NOW - DEC 31

Making Strides Against Breast Cancer 5K Walk

MAKINGSTRIDESWALK.ORG/MEMPHISTN.

OVER 700 PRIZES WILL BE AWARDED. 3 WAYS TO WIN!

KIDS

Disney Jr. at the Movies: HalloVeen Party Sat., Oct. 21, 10 a.m.

MALCO PARADISO CINEMA, 584 S. MENDENHALL (6821754), WWW.MALCO.COM.

Pinkalicious

Family fun musical about Pinkalicious, who can’t stop eating pink cupcakes. She eats so many she gets Pinkititis. $10-$15. Sun., Oct. 22, 2:30 p.m. BARTLETT PERFORMING ARTS AND CONFERENCE CENTER, 3663 APPLING (385-6440), WWW.BPACC.ORG.

S P E C IAL EVE N TS

Hocus Pocus: Celebrate the Magic of Birth Control

Wicked night of food, live music, cocktails, and spooky surprises. Add an open bar pass for $20. $35-$50. Sat., Oct. 21, 7-10 p.m. UNIVERSITY CLUB OF MEMPHIS, 1346 CENTRAL (7297044), WWW.ASTEPAHEADFOUNDATION.ORG.

FitzgeraldsTunica.com • 1-662-363-LUCK (5825) • Must be 21 and a Key Rewards member. See Cashier•Players Club for rules. Tax and resort fee not included in listed price. Advance hotel reservations required and subject to availability. $50 credit or debit card is required upon hotel check-in. Arrivals after 6pm must be guaranteed with a credit card. Management reserves the right to cancel, change and modify the event or promotion. Gaming restricted patrons prohibited. Gambling Problem? Call 1-800-522-4700.

ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT

TIGER LANE, 335 SOUTH HOLLYWOOD (278-2091), WWW.

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Free family-friendly fun activities begin at 1:30 p.m., and the walk starts at 3 p.m. Free. Sun., Oct. 22, 1:30-5 p.m.

27


BOOKS By Corey Mesler

Places Unknown Kōbō Abe’s Beasts Head for Home.

K OCTOBER 8TH, 2017 JANUARY 6TH, 2018 ART MUSEUM OF THE UNIVERSITY OF MEMPHIS

3750 NORRISWOOD AVE, MEMPHIS, TN 38152

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October 19-25, 2017

UP NEXT! “DESERT TO DELTA” SYMPOSIUM: NOVEMBER 5, 2017

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ōbō Abe (1924-1993) was a Japanese writer known for such postmodern novels as The Face of Another, The Ark Sakura, The Box Man, and his masterpiece, The Woman in the Dunes. The latter was made into a film by the great Hiroshi Teshigahara, with a screenplay by Abe, the second of four collaborations between the two. Kōbō Abe, or Abe Kōbō as he is called on the cover of this novel, was Japan’s post-World War II international literary star, their Kafka, Beckett, or Camus. He also wrote poetry and experimental plays and was a photographer and inventor. For many years, it was rumored that he would win the Nobel Prize, but he died before that could happen. His sensibility was neoteric, often absurd, and his sense of displacement and disorientation was Kafkaesque. Yet, his midto late-career novels are also playful, and easy to read, even when challenging. Beasts Head for Home is an earlier novel, his third, and is more realistic and more rooted in place (where the later novels seem to take place in dreamland, with unnamed locations and more surreal elements). It is also, apparently, autobiographical and perhaps explains the author’s sense of being displaced. This translation, by Richard F. Calichman, is available for the first time. The story concerns a Japanese soldier named Kyuzo, who witnesses the end of World War II and the beginning eruptions of the Chinese Civil War, as he makes a trip home to Japan, a place where his people live but from which he has mostly been estranged. It is this trek from Manchuria, where he’s been stationed for years, that takes up most of the novel’s narrative. He travels by train, until it is derailed amid a skirmish, and then he travels by foot with an inscrutable companion, a man initially nameless but who creates his own identity, Ko. Identity is fluid when the world goes pear-shaped. This long march seems more Dostoevsky (one of Abe’s heroes) than Beckett. He trudges on, heading for a home that may not still be his home. The world has changed utterly, more so in Japan, perhaps, than anywhere

else on Earth. In an essay on Abe, Colin Marshall wrote, “The Typical Abe Protagonist (TAP), perhaps a shoe salesman or a schoolteacher, gets swept up, by little fault of his own, into potentially alarming circumstances. Maybe he’s importuned to find an unusual missing person; maybe he misses the last bus home; maybe leaves begin growing from his flesh.” There are no fantastic elements like leaves growing from flesh in Beasts Head for Home, but our TAP is an average man overwhelmed by unusual circumstances, in this case the destruction of his country. Even if more true-to-life, the world of the novel is still nightmarish. Kyuzo is a prisoner of horrors, man-made, irrational, and murderous. War is hell. Other people are hell. Kyuzo himself, during the privations of his trudge through a desolate landscape, is transformed into one of the beasts heading home. And the ancestral home he seeks, Japan, is a place unknown to him, eventually, perhaps, unknowable. Abe is asking if home is one way we identify ourselves, one way we become ourselves. Ko, the enigmatic fellow traveler, tells Kyuzo, “For me, the towns where the twolegged beasts lurk are far more dangerous than the fields where the wolves roam.” But to survive their treacherous journey, each man must become more feral. And later, with their goal seemingly within sight, Kyuzo says to an Army officer, “Please help me. I’ve walked such a long way without food.” And the officer answers: “But, really, nothing can be done. It’s not the same as before, you see.” Nothing will ever be the same again, of course. As Kyuzo continues his slog down the road that goes nowhere, the book itself becomes a bit of a slog. Beasts Head for Home is a good novel, but it feels like a preparation for the greater novels to come. Abe seems to be licking around the edges of the surrealism that would characterize his later work, the way some of Nabokov’s early novels feel like a preparation for Lolita. Still, this is a necessary part of Abe’s important body of work, a book of vivid scenes and strange characters, a book that feels like the hollow terror after a nightmare passes.


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FOOD By Michael Donahue

Mountain Out of a Mole

J

Of motorcycles and mole sauces — Jonathan Magallanes shakes up the menu at Las Tortugas.

onathan Magallanes is a big dog rider in the kitchen. With warp speed he can whip up a mole or a salsa. Instead of roosting in crash padding on a superslab, Magallanes is in a chef ’s jacket working at breakneck speed at the stove. An avid motorcyclist (hence the lingo), Magallanes, 42, who got his first motorcycle when he was five years old, is chef/owner with his dad, Pepe Magallanes, of Las Tortugas restaurant. Born in Memphis but living for a while in Mexico City, Jonathan rode his little yellow 50-cylinder Yamaha, participated in Boy Scouts, practiced piano, and took karate. Cooking sparked his interest after he made a pizza in an extracurricular cooking class at St. George’s Independent School. He remembered “preparing food being this exciting, really creative thing” when he lived in Mexico. “My dad was in the kitchen doing a million things at once and preparing food for a lot of different people. The kitchen was a fun place to be.”

MICHAEL DONAHUE

Jonathan Magallanes: Making those flavors work.

Jonathan thought, “I can do this. This is something I have complete creative liberty with.” He didn’t pursue cooking. “With so many things going on, I think it sort of went on the back burner — no pun intended — for a long time.” He went to Mexico for a year of school when he was at Kenyon College. “We went to Africa and Greece and Western Europe. I think that trip was really where I sort of discovered this exciting world of food and exotic food. I really think I developed a love of food in a new way.”

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M O U N TA I N O U T O F A M O L E After graduating with a business degree, Jonathan moved to Naples, Florida, where his parents lived, and got a job in sales with a paint company. He also waited tables at high-end restaurants. His parents moved back to Memphis, where his dad opened Las Tortugas. Jonathan also returned, but he wanted Memphis to be a home base to network and do resumes. While helping his dad at Las Tortugas, Jonathan “saw this book on Mexican cooking that was in the office and was just flipping through it. I came across a dish called Mole Verde, which is a green mole that has pumpkin seeds, and it was really exciting to me. I think the fact that it had a ton of ingredients. Then it was really up to you to make all those flavors work. It was also exotic. Sort of rustic.” They served it as a special. “One of the first people who had it was a lady. And she said, ‘That’s one of the best moles I’ve ever had in my life.’ When she said that, it was this jolt of electricity and I felt alive in a way that, professionally, I had not really had. It was such a great feeling that I wanted to feel it again.” He decided to go into the restaurant business with his dad, who let him “change the menu in ways that we both agreed on. I wanted to add more variety to it. Add more depth to it. Maybe add some things that people aren’t familiar with. Like moles that are done with seeds and nuts and not chocolate. I trusted my intuition. I thought that if I really liked something, people are going to like it.” His style became dishes with a “ton of flavor” but light and colorful. “At the same time being traditional.” In 2014, Jonathan was invited by Felicia Willett, owner of Felicia Suzanne’s restaurant, to be included in a team to cook at the James Beard House. “That was, in many ways, a career-defining experience. The friendship and respect of all your peers is what it’s all about. It keeps me motivated to do the best job that I can. And to know that you’re part of a community of people who are really trying to change how people perceive Memphis. They really are proud that they’re from Memphis. And proud that Memphis is up and coming as a food town.” Jonathan’s contribution to that James Beard dinner was the same Mole Verde recipe he discovered in a cookbook years before. “It was really the dish that set off my culinary journey.” Las Tortugas, 1215 S. Germantown, 751-1200

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S P I R ITS By Richard Murff

Mead-Spirited Honey, I drank the kids.

Saturday, October 21st

out. The final St. Ambrose selection I tried was X. R. Cyser. Cyser is a style of mead made with apple juice, and this was a draft style that included thistle honey and maple syrup. It tasted Join us as teams from all over the Mid-South put their exactly like an apple pie in a glass. Don’t reputation at “steak”! PLUS, don’t miss… misunderstand — it was a really good • A chance to taste test all of the delicious steaks apple pie, and I can see how it would hit the spot after a long, lingering Sunday and to Vote for your favorite! lunch in the fall or winter. But quaffing • The $2,500 Dart Tournament! a glass o’ pie while watching the game seems a bit off. • The $1,500 Cornhole Tournament! For all you hopheads, Boulder’s • All day entertainment featuring Redstone Meadery has a sparkling FreeWorld, Triplthret and mead — Nectar of the Hops — which DSB: America’s #1 Journey Tribute Band they pitch as a “Mead IPA.” It was the lightest — weighing in at 8 percent tickets are available at the door ABV — and medium sweet. There the day of the event • Gates open at noon! was a lot going on in the glass. Given that I generally like IPAs, strangely, it 800.467.6182 • West Memphis, AR was not my favorite. Boulder, for the southlandpark.com record, hosts the annual Mazer Cup See Player Rewards for details. Players must be 21 years International Mead Competition. It of age or older to game and 18 years of age or older to features more than 300 homemade bet at the racetrack. Play responsibly; for help quitting call 800-522-4700. meads, which is believable, and 200 commercial ones, which is baffling. The trophy (or battle-axe, or chainmail shirt, or whatever Viking swag SOUTHL-58418 Flyer 2 4.575x6.1 Steak Cook-Off Ad.indd 1 they give out) for my personal favorite would go to the Monk’s Mead. Made 901-278-0034 • 901-274-7080 by Monk’s Meadery in that center youngavenuedeli.com of Scandinavian-American culture, Monday thru Sunday 11AM - 3AM Atlanta. They claim to be Georgia’s LATE NIGHT FOOD: Kitchen open til 2AM first meadery and, without any DELIVERY until midnight fact-checking on my part, that 7 nights a week just about has to be true. Monk’s Mead is a wonderful drink that sits somewhere between champagne and beer in effervescence. It’s made w/ New beers every week with Wildflower honey, but it’s dry Monday - Friday at the same time, with a hint — and just a hint — of fruitiness. This was the mead that made Thursday Nights 8pm-10pm with me think I could sit back and Memphis Trivia League drink a glass of the stuff, not out of novelty, but because it was just good. At nearly 13 percent ABV, it 10/27: was dangerously HAPPY HOUR easy to drink, Monday - Friday 4PM-7PM $2 dollar domestic and after a w/ Chinese Connection bottled beer and flagon or three, $3 well liquor Dub Embassy I can clearly see $3 BLOODY MARY’S why you’d want 10/31: AND MIMOSA’S to get into some Sundays 11AM-3PM old-fashioned Nordic “impulse w/ River City Camaro shopping” or go Wednesdays 7PM-Close Club colonize Iceland. Or grab a battleaxe and reread Beowulf.

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o … there are 350 meaderies in the United States — which is about 348 more than my most liberal previous estimate. I was walking down the famous King Street in downtown Charleston, South Carolina, when something caught my eye in the gleaming window of the Savannah Bee Company: mead tasting. Well, what can I say? They had my attention. Mead is an incredibly out-of-fashion beverage made from fermented honey and water. Over here, stateside, it is most associated with Vikings and the Britons they terrorized because, for the average American, it got stuck in their head while they were trying to nap through a high school lecture on Beowulf. The truth is that mead was made widely across Europe and Africa, and there is good evidence that the Chinese were enjoying the stuff as far back a 7,000 BC. To put this into perspective, what was happening in Denmark at the time was pretty much nothing. While mead is, more or less, just honey, water, and yeast, it can still be sparkling like champagne or as carbonated as beer. Across styles, the alcohol content can swing from 8 percent to 20 percent, and that, coupled with the fact that none of varieties I tried tasted particularly boozy, is why you ought to keep an eye on the ABV. I started with something called Tupelo Ambrosia, brewed by St. Ambrose Cellars in Michigan. Made with Tupelo honey, it is like a super-smooth dessert wine, floral and buttery. St. Ambrose also puts out a draftstyle mead called Black Madonna, which tastes and feels like a sour blackberry beer, except not awful. Strangely, given my opinion on sour beers, I thought it was pretty good, as the sweet and sour balanced the whole thing

33


FILM By Ben Siler

Tacky Wonderland

Orlando grifters live on the edge in The Florida Project.

The kids of The Florida Project

October 19-25, 2017

I

34

t’s a neat trick in storytelling to have emotions come in late. Frontload your story with the crassness of everyday human interaction, then sucker punch the audience in the home stretch with the emotions drama usually has from the start. Comedies like Withnail and I or In the Loop do it. It mirrors how life is: Your routine predominates, but entropy leaks it away to reveal passion or despair. Sean Baker’s breakout hit Tangerine pulled this off well, sketching a comic, over-the-top Los Angeles skid row but slowly winding its way to the emotional concerns of its lead prostitutes and john. Baker’s follow-up, The Florida Project, is longer and more pastel, with twice the scenes that veer into humorous non sequiturs about life in the cheap hotels next to Disney World. This time, it’s a little long in the buildup. It keeps its heart off its sleeve almost all throughout. Our gateways are impish six-yearolds who appear at first as the annoying kids of Magic Castle and Futureland, de facto housing projects originally for tourists. The kids are introduced spitting on a car from a balcony. When its owner threatens to come after them, they tell her, “Go ahead, you ratchet bitch. You are shit” and other phrases humorously beyond their years. They speak mostly in one-sentence jokes and behave like little con men, telling blatantly false sob stories for ice cream money, turning electrical breakers off for fun, and setting an abandoned building on fire. But slowly they become more likeable. Beleaguered apartment manager Bobby (Willem Dafoe) shifts from

responding to their infractions to being protective, letting their zest for life infect his own. Both their joy and terror are imitations of little nightmare Moonee’s (Brooklynn Prince) mom, Halley (Bria Vinaite), who never stops grifting, but can never pay the rent. Halley is the movie’s central figure, resolute against the quieter notes of a more traditional struggling film mom. She sells thrift perfume in parking lots and steals Disney World passes from her johns. Unlike Tangerine’s Sin-Dee, who constantly shot off one-liners and whose hard edges eventually showed softness, Halley’s lust for life long ago curdled into self-rationalization. She encourages the kids’ reign of terror. Bobby also never quite makes the obvious dramatic step of covering for the family and endangering his job. Instead it blinds him. He sneers as he puts Halley’s rent money under UV light and coldly films her vacated room to prevent her from establishing residency. The characters’ place on the cooler end of the spectrum is a clue to the film’s larger themes: People who can’t make money get tossed aside, and those who endanger others’ ability to obtain it are the highest-order threats. This keeps ostensibly good people like Bobby from reacting humanely. The kids are like the free spirits of Daisies, Los Olvidados, Looney Tunes, or the credits suggest, Our Gang. They are


FILM REVIEW By Ben Siler less characters than just tiny factories of funny observation and unchecked will. They can only afford one ice cream cone and share it, then fight adults over cleaning up drops. They call asbestos “ghost poop” and free associate pet alligator names. Moonee wipes ketchup on her pillow and declares it her right. This is a follow-up to a hit in every sense. It has a higher budget, a famous actor, and plays many of the same tricks to less effect. But those tricks are worthwhile. The universe the kids inhabit is tacky: They walk repeatedly through wide shot compositions of rundown tourist traps, one with a giant plastic wizard perched atop. The hotel they live in is purple. The people are slightly less garish. Is it exploitation? The movie’s wry in how it presents them. It certainly does not

give them the level of dignity Moonlight did. Baker has a People of Walmart aesthetic. There’s an element of “look at these crazy poor people and revel in their pluck.” But there is a humanity, even with characters who keep their inner selves hidden and present only hard edges. Late in the story, when Halley gets a hug, she looks bewildered. When one of the kids reacts to the unfairness of her situation, it’s a long, uncomfortable close-up of a crying child — and well-acted. Life does not present itself as a series of speeches but rather as humdrum interactions that reveal themselves piecemeal. Slowly, you learn about a person.

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THE LAST WORD by Maya Smith

Which History?

At Friday’s meeting, Mayor Strickland referenced this article from the Memphis News-Scimitar that was published when the Forrest statue was erected in 1905.

THE LAST WORD

As I drove down the winding highway to the small East Tennessee city of Athens last Thursday, I wondered what the next day’s Tennessee Historical Commission meeting would hold. Under no circumstances did I think the members of the commission would approve Memphis’ waiver request to remove Nathan Bedford Forrest’s statue from our public park. And as I anticipated, the waiver was denied, and “leave history alone” was a recurring theme of the morning. After Mayor Jim Strickland pleaded with the commission to vote on the city’s request and other officials spoke both for and against the statue, a pro-Forrest teacher from Memphis was the first to take the podium for public comment. She began her two minutes by saying, “It seems that this day and time everyone is trying to make everything pleasant and fair for everyone.” I was baffled. Why is it wrong that people of color want a pleasant and fair experience sans a monument of a Ku Klux Klan grand wizard when visiting a public park? Isn’t that what America is supposed to be all about? Do civil rights not grant everyone the privilege of fairness — especially in public places, if, after all, we live in a country with “liberty and justice for all”? Continuing to justify why Forrest should be glorified and his statue untouched, the teacher went on to talk about the general’s late-life conversion to Christianity, how he begged for forgiveness for the number of people he mistreated, and turned his life around as a result. “Didn’t Christ forgive us for our many sins? If God can forgive Nathan, why can’t we?” she asked the room. I can’t speak for everyone in this city or all people of color, but I forgive Nathan. I don’t hate him. I, like many others, would just prefer for him not to be memorialized with such grandeur in a public space in my city. Also, what Forrest did in his personal and religious life is not our concern or a relevant justification for having a statue of him in a public park. He might have repented for his wrongdoings, but that doesn’t change what he did, who he was, and what he stood for. “The next thing y’all will want to remove are the crosses from our many churches. When does the insanity stop?” the teacher asked rhetorically, as her allotted speaking time ran out. Was she legitimately putting Nathan Bedford Forrest in the same category with Jesus Christ? How does a Confederate army general and KKK grand wizard compare to a man who only preached and practiced love. That’s insanity. After the teacher’s two minutes were up, Lee Millar, the spokesperson for the Sons of the Confederate Veterans, was the next to speak. He claimed that “thousands and thousands” of Memphians support the statue and the history it represents, saying that the statue and history should be left alone. I understand that history is important. But I don’t understand why someone on the losing side of history deserves a statue. And I definitely don’t understand why the statue of an oppressor is the kind of history that people want to hold on to. Also, if keeping history in place is the argument for keeping the statue where it is, then it’s faulty. The only history that ever took place where Forrest is buried is the empowerment of whites and the demoralizing of blacks. Which part of history does the statue really honor? Not the Civil War. As Mayor Strickland pointed out earlier in the meeting, the park where Forrest and his wife are buried now was not a Civil War battle site. The statue was not erected until years after the war, just as Jim Crow laws were becoming enacted in the South. It was 40 years after the war when the bodies of Forrest and his wife were disinterred from Elmwood Cemetery and moved to the park where the statue was dedicated. The mayor said the park was a landmark that many African Americans passed daily on the way to work, ensuring that Forrest would be ever present and so would the laws of Jim Crow. “Simply put: This is a monument to Jim Crow,” Strickland said. I agree. The statue’s got to go. Move Forrest and his wife to a museum, back to a cemetery, or anywhere else but a public park in a majority black city. Maya Smith is a Flyer staff writer.

m e m p h i s f l y e r. c o m

The Tennessee Historical Commission’s decision on the Nathan Bedford Forrest statue was misguided and wrong.

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MINGLEWOOD HALL

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Memphis Flyer 10.19.17  

This week: It's our annual Grizzlies preview as they kick off the 2017-18 season. Also: the TN senate race heats up on both sides, our revie...