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01.26.17 1457TH ISSUE

PROTESTS! PROTESTS! P7 ROMANTIC GETAWAYS P31 DRINK LIKE A SCOT P33 JARMUSCH'S PATERSON P34

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MEMPHIS ARTIST AND PERFORMER LARRY CLARK IS ONE OF A KIND — OR SEVERAL KINDS.


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OUR 1457TH ISSUE 01.26.17

DESHAUNE MCGHEE Classified Advertising Manager BRENDA FORD Classified Sales Administrator classifieds@memphisflyer.com LYNN SPARAGOWSKI Distribution Manager ROBBIE FRENCH Warehouse and Delivery Manager BRANDY BROWN, JANICE GRISSOM ELLISON, ZACH JOHNSON, KAREN MILAM, RANDY ROTZ, LOUIS TAYLOR WILLIAM WIDEMAN Distribution THE MEMPHIS FLYER is published weekly by Contemporary Media, Inc., 460 Tennessee Street, Memphis, TN 38103 Phone: (901) 521-9000 | Fax: (901) 521-0129 letters@memphisflyer.com www.memphisflyer.com CONTEMPORARY MEDIA, INC. KENNETH NEILL Chief Executive Officer MOLLY WILLMOTT Chief Operating Officer JEFFREY GOLDBERG Director of Business Development BRUCE VANWYNGARDEN Editorial Director KEVIN LIPE Digital Manager LYNN SPARAGOWSKI Distribution Manager JACKIE SPARKS-DAVILA Events Manager KENDREA COLLINS Marketing/Communications Manager BRITT ERVIN Email Marketing Manager ASHLEY HAEGER Controller CELESTE DIXON Accounting Assistant JOSEPH CAREY IT Director KALENA MCKINNEY Receptionist

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1456TH ISSUE

20<30:

FREE IUDs

CHO CES

Memphis Center for Reproductive Health

1726 Poplar Avenue Memphis, TN 38104 901/274-3550 www.memphischoices.org

THE CLASS OF 2017

m e m p h i s f l y e r. c o m

JUSTIN RUSHING Advertising Director CARRIE O’GUIN HOFFMAN Advertising Operations Manager JERRY D. SWIFT Advertising Director Emeritus KELLI DEWITT, CHIP GOOGE Senior Account Executives ALEX KENNER Account Executive ROXY MATTHEWS Sales Assistant

Screen $50

CONTENTS

CARRIE BEASLEY Senior Art Director CHRISTOPHER MYERS Advertising Art Director JEREMIAH MATTHEWS, BRYAN ROLLINS Graphic Designers

Hep C

JUSTIN FOX BURKS

BRUCE VANWYNGARDEN Editor SUSAN ELLIS Managing Editor JACKSON BAKER, MICHAEL FINGER Senior Editors TOBY SELLS Associate Editor CHRIS MCCOY Film and TV Editor CHRIS SHAW Music Editor RICHARD J. ALLEY Book Editor CHRIS DAVIS, JOSHUA CANNON, MICAELA WATTS Staff Writers JESSE DAVIS, LESLEY YOUNG Copy Editors JULIE RAY Calendar Editor

Last week, the Flyer threw a party to celebrate its 20<30 Class of 2017. It was held at the Old Dominick Distillery on Front Street, yet another old downtown building being beautifully and creatively retrofitted. Three hundred folks showed up, most of them young and full of sass, hope, and dreams. And Memphis has a lot to be hopeful about, if these young people are an indication of the talent pool living here. I was blown away by the diversity, the brains, and the ambition on display in that room. And then I met Senator Brian Kelsey. I’m kidding. Well, not about meeting Brian Kelsey. We did meet, and it wasn’t as awkward as either of us probably expected, given that I have written some less than complimentary things about the man’s politics. I congratulated him on his work with fellow senator — and Democrat — Lee Harris on behalf preserving our Memphis Sand aquifer, and we chatted pleasantly for a few moments with a mutual friend. And that gives me hope, too. I’m sure that I’ll have plenty of reasons to criticize Kelsey’s politics in the future, but it’s always a good thing when political opponents can find common ground — or water, in this case. That’s the way things used to work, before we all got funneled into our ideological information silos, before the era of fake news and “alternative facts.” A couple days later, on Saturday, the Memphis Women’s March brought hope to thousands more people in downtown Memphis. It was a cathartic and BUSKERS & #BABYKILLERS P6 / NORRIS FOR GOVERNOR? P8 COLLAGE’S RISE P31 / SCORSESE’S SILENCE P34 energizing demonstration, one that was replicated all over the globe, as women and their allies served notice 01.19.17 they wouldn’t quietly surrender to the FREE forces of regression that have taken power in the nation’s capitol. It’s easy to discount the power of protests, but people taking to the streets drove President Lyndon Johnson into retirement — and eventually ended the Vietnam War and helped bring down Richard Nixon. Change can happen from the bottom up. Sometimes we forget that. Now we have a president who lies like others breathe. I don’t think it’s a moral failing in Donald Trump’s case; Our annual look at 20 young Memphians who I think it’s a mental illness, a crippling are making the city a better place. narcissistic disorder. How else to explain his going into CIA headquarters and trying to gaslight intelligence workers? Who does that? Trump told them he hadn’t attacked or disparaged them. A lie. He said his Inauguration crowd was the largest in history. A lie. He said he’d been on the cover of Time magazine more than anyone else. A lie. He even lied about whether it rained while he was giving his Inaugural speech. He left thinking he’d won them over, but post-speech interviews with CIA leaders and workers revealed that he’d done just the opposite. People, this president’s disconnect with reality is a serious liability for all of us — liberal and conservative. He doesn’t have any discernible principles, except self-aggrandizement. Spouting alternative facts doesn’t work when you’re running a country. This will come to a head. It may take weeks. It may take months. But this level of madness won’t stand for four years. There is precedent. In December 1973, conservative Republican Senator Barry Goldwater wrote a private note that said, “I have reason to suspect that all might not be well mentally in the White House. This is the only copy that will ever be made of N EWS & O P I N I O N this; it will be locked in my safe.” In 1974, NY TIMES CROSSWORD - 4 after nearly two years of investigations THE FLY-BY - 6 and hearings, it had become clear that POLITICS - 8 Nixon had ordered the Watergate breakEDITORIAL - 10 in to Democratic headquarters and tried VIEWPOINT - 11 COVER — “CLOWN SHOW” to cover it up. Goldwater led a delegation BY CHRIS DAVIS - 12 to the White House to tell Nixon it was over, that he’d lost Congress and needed STE P P I N’ O UT WE RECOMMEND - 16 to resign. I will not be surprised if history MUSIC - 18 repeats itself. AFTER DARK - 20 For the country’s sake, I hope it’s CALENDAR OF EVENTS - 22 sooner than later. I don’t agree with Vice TRAVEL - 31 President Mike Pence on much, but I’d FOOD - 32 much rather have a president with whom SPIRITS - 33 I disagree politically than one who is of FILM - 34 questionable sanity. C LAS S I F I E D S - 36 Bruce VanWyngarden LAST WORD - 39 brucev@memphisflyer.com

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Crossword ACROSS 37 Auto with the 60 Once-ubiquito ACROSS 34 Former 62 “Taking you British P.M. places” network slogan 1 Not much red fixture see Douglas-Home 64 1999 Ron 1 Apelike 5 French writer 36 Old Olds Howard satire who co-founded “Zoom-zoom” along London 37 Subject of the newspaper medical research 66 Foxx of “Sanford Combat and Son” 7 “Ah, gotcha” since the 1980s streets 10 Adriatic port 40 Big cat in Narnia 67 Emphatic 14 Pronoun in follower of38 yes or ___ populi 43 It’s inclined “America the provide 11 4.0 is atoentertainment greatfor 68 noEvolved Beautiful” 62 Out of neutral 15 It covers the kids globe one, in brief 69 ___ fixe 39 2/29/16, e.g. … 44 It holds 5,148 16 Had too much potential flushes 70 “O.K., you caught 64 Feel sick ecstasy, for me” 48 “Will it play in or a hint to the short? ___?” 14 Frigid time, 71 “Antenna” 17 Former C.I.A. at the director Panetta 50 Exchange 65 Become less f circled squares altar climatically 18 Donizetti’s lady of 52 Hawaiian DOWN Lammermoor bowlful as the moon in this puzzle 1 N.B.A. div. speaking 19 Rolls for dogs 53 Gunning 2 John Donne 20 Old jalopy 55 Attack poem with a line 22 Spanish uncle starting “It suck’d 66 Quality of a di 57 Former 41 German article me first …” 2415 PastureRepair communications corp. 3 Wind-blown 25 Mounts Where Dodge 67 ___ Equis 4 Blue material 2616 Proficient, City is: Abbr. Male 5859sheep computerwise 42 Louvre pyramid 5 One side of a Mufti 28 Pro vote (Mexican beer diner? 60 Answer to the old 29 Jai ___ riddle architect 6 Shade of bleu 17 Witty remark “What’s round 31 Overplays one’s 7 Soft shoe, for on the ends role 27 Did a cobbler’s Wait-’em-out 42 When a sandbar 56 68 Things dyed fo short and high in the strategy may appear job on middle?” 32 In: Fr. 18 The past, from 8 Marxist above the 44 “Well, I ___ hand 30 “Ah, well” Easter waterline exhortation to ANSWER TO PREVIOUS PUZZLE 59 Saskatchewan “workers of the who voiced 45 F.D.A.-banned a feminist native it33 Lewis to Chop you …”weight-loss world” Lamb supplement 9 Polar bear 35 Sent a dupe 69 Call for help standpoint email to habitat 46 The drink’s on me 61 Shelley’s “To a Skylark,” for one 38 How contracts 10 Head motion 47 Young fox 45 Regret are signed on a 49 Andre who 20 Social slight 11 Put 39 Put on a pedestal pedestal wrote “Open: An 63 Jackie O’s man 40 Based on Autobiography” 12 Longtime deduction rather subscriber,46 Gullibility 51 Perform some than experience 21 Crafty Norse god 65 Bugs, e.g. … DOWN millwork maybe or a hint to this 41 Smoldered with puzzle’s theme rage 54 Up to 13 “Sounds right” 21 Ring master’s 1 Kids in the fam 22 Loud laughs 48 Kidnappers’ Online subscriptions: Today’s puzzle and more than 7,000 past org. puzzles, nytimes.com/crosswords ($39.95 a year). 23 “Jeez!” Read about and comment on each puzzle: nytimes.com/wordplay. 2 Clickable imag 23 “No more for 25 Dancer Charisse demands Crosswords for young solvers: nytimes.com/studentcrosswords. 26 Item often kept with cuff links me, thanks” 50 How to address a 3 Waiter’s hando king 26 ___ Crunch 4 ___ pentamete (Quaker cereal) 51 Area of a 5 Long, long ___ 28 Milan opera rectangle = What is the only event in Memphis that6 Ping-Pong tab house length x ___ HEATS YOU UP and COOLS YOU DOWN?divider 31 Reason to stare 52 Tiny bit 7 “Can we turn off into space on the A/C in 54 “Quickly!,” in an 34 Mine find here?!” order 35 Finnish telecom 8 Look for giant 56 Helper: Abbr. 9 Fermi of physi ANSWER TO PREVIOUS PUZZLE 10 Newspaper staffers, in bri T H I S J U S T I N C A L F 11 Where the 9/1 H A V E I T M A D E O L E O Memorial is A T A L L T I M E S S P A R 12 The “P” of Y E N L E T I N T A S K PRNDL Saturday, February 4, 2017 E R I S R E A T A A C H E Mud Island River Park 13 Schumer and R S V Benefitting P S Special S MOlympics I T HGreaterI Memphis. L E Poehler For E more E Kinformation I T onS this A great S Nevent A visit P 19 Highly D R E A M www.specialolympicsmem.org U P Y E L L O W S competitive, a R O C K I D O L A V E personality I M O S O W E D A W A I T 21 Possible result N A N S S H O E D S I N E a cracked pipe K N O T A P R I L R T E 24 More macho S I M I S T A M P A L B U M 25 ___ gin fizz T A I L P A R I S I E N N E O N C E A N D S O T O B E D 27 Tropical insect that “marches 65


ROOSTER

MONKEY

HAPPY CHINESE NEW YEAR from

1955, 1967, 1979, 1991, 2003, 2015, 2027: Elegant and creative. You are timid and prefer anonymity. You are most compatible with Boars and Rabbits, but never the Ox.

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HORSE

RAT

1954, 1966, 1978, 1990, 2002, 2014, 2026: Popular and attractive to the opposite sex. You are often ostentatious and impatient. You need people. Marry a Tiger or a Dog early, but never a Rat.

SNAKE

1953, 1965, 1977, 1989, 2001, 2013, 2025: Wise and intense with a tendency towards physical beauty. Vain and high tempered. The Boar is your enemy. The Rooster or Ox are your best signs.

BOAR

1959, 1971, 1983, 1995, 2007, 2019, 2031: Noble and chivalrous. Your friends will be lifelong, yet you are prone to marital strife. Avoid other Boars. Marry a Rabbit or a Sheep.

1948, 1960, 1972, 1984, 1996, 2008, 2020, 2032: You are ambitious, yet honest. Prone to spend freely. Seldom make lasting friendships. Most compatible with Dragons and Monkeys. Least compatible with Horses.

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1949, 1961, 1973, 1985, 1997, 2009, 2021, 2033: Bright, patient, and inspiring to others. You can be happy by yourself, yet make an outstanding parent. Marry a Snake or Rooster. The Sheep will bring trouble.

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DRAGON

1952, 1964, 1976, 1988, 2000, 2012, 2024, 2036: You are eccentric and your life complex. You have a very passionate nature and abundant health. Marry a Monkey or a Rat late in life. Avoid the Dog.

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RABBIT

1951, 1963, 1975, 1987, 1999, 2011, 2023, 2035: Luckiest of all signs, you are also talented and articulate. Affectionate, yet shy. You seek peace throughout your life. Marry a Sheep or Boar. Your opposite is the Rooster.

HAPPY

HOUR FROM

3-6PM M-F & 1-6PM SUN!

TIGER

1950, 1962, 1974, 1986, 1998, 2010, 2022, 2034: Tiger people are aggressive, courageous, candid, and sensitive. Look to the Horse and Dog for happiness. Beware of the Monkey.

m e m p h i s f l y e r. c o m

SHEEP

MULAN

1958, 1970, 1982, 1994, 2006, 2018, 2030: Loyal and honest, you work well with others. Generous, yet stubborn and often selfish. Look to the Horse or Tiger. Watch out for Dragons.

NEWS & OPINION

1956, 1968, 1980, 1992, 2004, 2016, 2028: You are very intelligent and are able to influence people. An enthusiastic achiever, you are easily discouraged and confused. Avoid Tigers. Seek a Dragon or a Rat.

DOG

1957, 1969, 1981, 1993, 2005, 2017, 2029: A pioneer in spirit, you are devoted to work and quest after knowledge. You are selfish and eccentric. Rabbits are trouble. Snakes and Oxen are fine.

5


THE

fly-by

Questions, Answers + Attitude Edited by Toby Sells

f l y o n t h e w a l l Race, Rape kits, Redbirds { MARCH MADNESS One little word can change the whole meaning of a sentence, completely turning a perfectly good piece of reportage into something entirely false. Take, for example, this story promo posted to the internet by the good folks at WMC Action News 5, which reads, “In just a few short hours thousands of women are scheduled to participate in a march through Memphis to protect President Trump’s presidency.”

Hmmmm. Judging by messages scrawled on some of the signs in the crowd, it doesn’t look like any of the thousands of people who showed up to protest Trump had protection on their mind. Messages like, “Punch more nazis” …

J a n u a r y 2 6 - Fe b r u a r y 1 , 2 0 1 7

“You can’t comb over racism.” … And Fly on the Wall’s favorite, a cartoon reproductive system flipping haters the bird. …

6

By Chris Davis. Email him at davis@memphisflyer.com.

W E E K T H AT W A S By Flyer Staff

Race motivated a Beale vote, the ’Birds get a new look, MPD nears end of rape kit backlog

Race played in Beale vote Some Memphis City Council members said a company was cheated out of a contract to manage Beale Street because the company’s leadership is mainly African American. Beale Street Tourism Development Authority board members recently voted against hiring local company, 21 Beale Street Inc., to run the street, deciding instead to continue with the Downtown Memphis Commission’s management. Council members and some elected state leaders said last Tuesday that 21 Beale did not get the contract because its leaders are black. “This is plain old, plain old, plain old racism,” said council member Joe Brown. “It’s simple. This is what this is all about.” Casey Shannon, legal counsel for the authority, said authority members were concerned that 21 Beale had little experience managing multiple leases, like there are with Beale Street tenants, and gave examples of situations that posed “red flags” for the authority. “I can understand everybody’s frustration. But there was not one iota of racism, or prejudice, or discrimination of 21 Beale or any other groups,” Shannon said. “It was an African-American member of the board who suggested that we end discussion with [21 Beale].” More discussion on the topic will come to city hall soon. But some council members seemed to want to remove the Beale board altogether. Redbirds Rebrand The ’Birds have left the bat, but they’re still red and, now more than ever, distinctly Memphis.

The Memphis Redbirds unveiled new branding last Wednesday afternoon at AutoZone Park. The logos and imagery emphasize the marriage between the Triple-A affiliate of the St. Louis Cardinals and a city world-famous for its music, in particular that which originated on Beale Street. A new hat and jersey will feature an M anchored by a pair of music notes; a jersey’s numbers will be lined as though they were neon-lit. All in the interest of further engaging the local professional baseball franchise with the city it represents. “We set out to capture the soul of Memphis and do it as authentically as possible,” said Redbirds principal owner Peter Freund. “And without losing our connection to the St. Louis Cardinals, which is very important to us.” The new uniforms mark the third such transformation since the Redbirds landed in Memphis for the 1998 season, and easily the most significant style change. Backlog nearly unclogged The final, untested rape kits from the city’s backlog of more than 12,000 should be sent to labs for review in a few months, Memphis City Council members were told last Tuesday. Memphis Police Department (MPD) director Michael Rallings said his team is sending an average of 200 untested kits to labs per month. At that rate, said council member Martavius Jones, the remaining 1,000 or so kits should be tested by mid-year. Council member Worth Morgan asked Rallings if he was satisfied with progress on the project in 2016. “We went from being a disaster to a model for the nation,” Rallings said. “[People] say, ‘how did y’all get this done?’”


Pro Protest {

CITY REPORTER By Joshua Cannon

“This is the most serious threat to the constitution ever in our lifetime,” Cohen said. “A threat to the environment, a threat to world peace, a threat to women’s rights, a threat to the rights of everyone. This is supposed to be a ‘non-truth’ period — but truth always wins in the long run.” Bailey said to the women in the audience that it is time to get to work. “It’s our time to rise up again,” Bailey said. “This is a party. This is a celebration, but it’s time to roll up our sleeves. Our work is just beginning.”

Three protests brought thousands to the Memphis streets.

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Thousands filled the Memphis streets last week in three separate protests all aimed (in one way or another) at President Donald Trump. Thursday - Environmentalists against EPA nom Members of the Sierra Club’s Tennessee Chapter gathered at the Clifford Davis Federal Building last Thursday to protest the nomination of Scott Pruitt, Trump’s choice to lead the Environmental Protection Agency. “We’re calling on [Tennessee Senators] Lamar Alexander and Bob Corker to reject the appointment of Scott Pruitt,” said Scott Banbury, the Sierra Club’s conservation program coordinator. “Pruitt has made a career of suing the agency to stop the implementation of rules that protect our water and air from pollution.” Sierra Club members feared Pruitt will oppose two air quality rules that Sen. Alexander has previously supported. Friday - Inauguration walk out at universities It started at the University of Memphis. They then moved to Christian Brothers University. After that, to LeMoyne-Owen College. And, by the time they made it to Rhodes College, a group of nearly 200 amassed and marched down University Street. Student organizers from four Memphis-area colleges — University of Memphis, Christian Brothers University, LeMoyne-Owen College, Rhodes College — led a walk-out protesting the inauguration of Donald Trump on Friday. The organizers, primarily women and people of color, issued a list of demands for their respective universities in an effort to spur progress locally during what some said they feared would be four years of regression. “Our administration does not prioritize faculty of color,” said Lindsey Smith, president of the U of M’s Progressive Student Alliance. “In a city that is primarily black, that is not okay. As students united, we have power, and we can hold our campuses accountable.” Saturday - Memphis Women’s March More than 3,000 people marched from the D’Army Bailey Court House to the National Civil Rights Museum Saturday in solidarity with the Women’s March on Washington. Memphis Congressman Steve Cohen and Adrienne Bailey, the former chief executive officer of Big Brothers Big Sisters of the Mid-South, took to the steps of the court house and spoke to a sea of people — parents and their toddlers, teenagers, the elderly — lifting signs and chanting.

Come enjoy a dessert tasting, live music and fabulous prizes!

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FitzgeraldsTunica.com • 1-662-363-LUCK (5825) • Must be 21. Management reserves the right to cancel, change or modify the event or offer. Tax and resort fee not included on listed price. Advance hotel reservations required and subject to availability. $50 credit or debit card is required upon hotel check-in. Arrivals after 6pm must be guaranteed with a credit card. Gambling Problem? Call 1-800-522-4700.

NEWS & OPINION

JUSTIN FOX BURKS AND JOSHUA CANNON

Memphians spoke with their feet (and funny signs) against Trump.

7


POLITICS By Jackson Baker

Unfinished Business It’s early in the year, but several urgent matters are hanging fire. The issue of the Tennessee Valley Authority’s drilling wells into the Memphis Sand aquifer may not be a done deal, after all. Though TVA’s application to complete four wells into the aquifer to acquire water to use as coolant for its forthcoming natural-gas plant was seemingly given the go-ahead in November by the Shelby County Board of Water Quality Control, concerns remain in important political places — on the Memphis City Council and the Shelby County Commission — and in the Tennessee General Assembly. A bipartisan duo of state senators from Shelby County — Democrat Lee Harris of Memphis and Republican Brian Kelsey of Germantown — last year made a point of expressing solidarity with local environmentalists on their fears of possible contamination of the aquifer and the need to resist the TVA drilling. On Tuesday, in tandem with a media contingent, they began a “fact-finding trip,” which began at the Center for Applied Earth Science and Engineering Research at the University of Memphis and included stops at MLGW’s Sheahan Pumping Station,and the current coal-burning TVA plant on President’s Island and TVA’s soon-to-be natural-gas plant there.

• The final form of the Shelby County Commission’s legislative agenda, to be presented to the General Assembly by the county’s lobbyists, was achieved on Monday, with the unanimous approval of a brief addendum, apropos the city-county EDGE board, which is responsible for making industrial-development decisions. The resolution called for “a member of the governing body of the municipality where the Industrial Development Board (IDB) was created to serve as a voting board member of the IDB.” Currently, the city council and county commission each have a non-voting member on the EDGE board. Conspicuously absent from the final legislative agenda, due to unresolved discord, was a previously floated item calling for approval of medical marijuana and a “second chance” policy for persons arrested for possession of minor amounts of pot. The General Assembly is expected to take up the issue of legalizing medical marijuana. Put off again were two resolutions having to do with the Shelby County Board of Education’s efforts to balance its books. One resolution was to receive and file the board’s first quarter report for the year ending June 30th. Another would ratify and approve amendments to the board’s budget for fiscal year 2017, adding on expenditures of $217,389. Neither had achieved any consensus from the commission’s education committee last Wednesday.

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• Citing what he said was a “critical need” for infrastructure improvements in the county and its municipalities, Shelby County Mayor Mark Luttrell endorsed Tennessee Governor Bill Haslam’s  proposed seven percent increase in the state’s gasoline tax in an appearance at the commission’s Monday meeting. The proposed tax hike would enable work to begin on a backlog of $10 billion worth of infrastructure projects that Haslam and Commissioner John Schroer of the Tennessee Department of Transportation deem long overdue but undone for lack of funding.  Along with new fees on electric vehicles and rental cars, the proposed tax increase would pay for an overhaul plan, which the governor has given the name “The IMPROVE Act” (“Improving Manufacturing, Public Roads, and Opportunities for a Vibrant Economy”).  The governor’s proposal calls for the gasoline-tax increase to be accompanied by a half-cent reduction in the state sales tax on groceries, by $113 million in cuts to the state’s business taxes, and by cuts to the Hall Income Tax. Luttrell said that Haslam’s proposal called for more than $9 million to be spent in Shelby County and in the county’s several municipalities. “There will be some opposition to it in the General Assembly,” Luttrell cautioned, adding that he would be coming back to the commission seeking “a more formal resolution for support” once the proposed measure was in its final form.

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NEWS & OPINION

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The Gateway Project One of the favorite nostrums of the hard right in this country, as foolishly reductionist as it is misleading, involves a description of the social and economic landscape as consisting entirely of two groups — “makers” (aka “job creators”) and “takers,” whom they imagine to be the unwashed masses who remain perpetually on some kind of government dole financed by “confiscatory” taxes on the makers. That American society, under whatever political administration and guided by whatever elective ideology, is a much more diverse and interrelated aggregation of people and social functions escapes these folks. A shining example of what the country and the system are really like, at best, was offered recently by a proposal involving the closest sort of cooperation between local and state government and one of Memphis’ — and the world’s — leading social institutions. The institution in question is the justly famous St. Jude Children’s Research Hospital, which draws upon a huge and carefully cultivated private-donor base to maintain and expand its operations but which is not averse to working in close cooperation with government to accomplish mutually beneficial objectives. A case in point is a freshly launched St. Jude project, known in some quarters as The Gateway Project — in speaking of it, Rick Shadyac, the CEO of ALSAC (American Lebanese Syrian Associated Charities), the hospital’s parent organization, prefers to use the homier expression “front door” in describing what the project will do. The less grandiose term is appropriate, considering that Shadyac is the first head of ALSAC, an organization founded by St. Jude creator Danny Thomas, to make his permanent home in Memphis. Shadyac’s residence is not far, as the crow flies,

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from the site of the new project, which involves close cooperation with state, city, and county government. What St. Jude wants to do is to carry out a six-year, $9 billion capital expansion, already underway, on its existing property, in tandem with modifications in existing downtown TDZ (Tourist Development Zone) and TIF (Tax Incremental Financing) projects that would accomplish a wholesale renovation of the Pinch district and Carnes neighborhoods. Extension of the TDZ under the plan would generate overdue infrastructure improvements in the Pinch. “Our hope is that what we’re doing on our campus and in the Pinch district will serve as a catalyst for third-party developers,” says Shadyac, who notes that the plan involves relaxation of the current moratorium on new development. Simultaneous expansion of the adjoining Uptown TIF district is expected to fund $13 million of infrastructure improvements in the Uptown and Carnes neighborhoods. If all goes as projected, St. Jude, which is funding its own parallel capital development, will have a handsome new front door, and so will the city, and, in the long run the TDZ and TIF projects are self-financing, since they are paid through increments in newly generated sales taxes and property taxes, respectively. It’s difficult to separate “makers” from “takers” in the arrangement. As is the case with most successful public-private partnerships, everybody — including just plain citizens — is a potential beneficiary.

1/19/17 4:25 PM


V I E W P O I N T B y L e s l e y Yo u n g

Nasty Women On the ground at the Washington Women’s March — a transformative experience. say, “We dedicate ourselves to collective resistance. Resistance to the billionaire mortgage profiteers and gentrifiers. Resistance to the health-care privateers. Resistance to the attacks on Muslims and on immigrants. Resistance to attacks on disabled people. Resistance to state violence perpetrated by the police and through the prison industrial complex.” I’m a little salty (well, a lot), and I felt a significant pull toward Ashley Judd, who recited a poem by Middle Tennessean Nina Donovan: “I am a naaaaasty woman. … I am not as nasty as racism, fraud, conflict of interest, homophobia, sexual assault, transphobia, white supremacy, misogyny, ignorance, white privilege … your daughter being your favorite sex symbol. … Yeah, I’m a nasty woman — a loud, vulgar, proud woman. … We are here to be respected. We are here to be nasty.”

Did I march? Sort of. There really wasn’t room to “march.” The parade route was not big enough to hold the multitude of people who showed up. Rumors were that there were people who couldn’t even exit the Metro. There was nowhere for them to go if they surfaced. It was a solar flare of people that will have ripple effects for years. And I put one foot in front of the other at a snail’s pace and joined 5 million of my fellow humans in saying this is unacceptable and we are going to change things. This is power. This is a movement. This is just the beginning. Perhaps my favorite sign was, “This Is Not Normal.” And this is my pledge. I will wake up every day remembering that this is not normal, no matter if a third of the population is willing to believe “alternative facts.” And I am going to be vigilant, and I am going to continue to donate my energy to a collective people of all genders, races, and action to do as Angela Davis said: “The next 1,459 days of the Trump administration will be 1,459 days of resistance.” I am woke AF. I am lit AF. And I am nasty AF. Lesley Young is a copy editor and food columnist for the Flyer and a Memphisbased freelance writer.

m e m p h i s f l y e r. c o m

This is power. This is a movement. This is just the beginning. Perhaps my favorite sign was, “This Is Not Normal.” And this is my pledge.

NEWS & OPINION

As I boarded the plane and wiggled my bags into the overhead compartment, the girl sitting in my row said, “I had mine laminated so it would be easier to carry on the plane.” Our eyes lit up, and we immediately began to chatter. She had noticed my rolled-up poster board, which I had no time to Sharpie before my departure from Nashville. I got into D.C. after midnight, so I never really got the chance to write something that would sum up in a few clever words exactly why I decided to miss work, spend all of my savings, risk weeks of pain from my disability, lose (lots and lots of) sleep, and be away from my dog for three days — because I have a problem with a sexual predator — who could and probably will be diagnosed with Psychopathic, Narcissistic Personality Disorder, Borderline Personality Disorder and who thinks it’s okay to sexualize his own daughter, insult a female reporter doing her job by dishonoring the fact that she menstruates, and not just gloat about but also carry out the act of grabbing women “by the pussy” — holding one of the highest offices in the world. Turns out, my sign wasn’t really necessary. More than a million (the numbers keep coming in) women, men, and transpeople of all races, classes, and abilities turned out in Washington, D.C., the day after the psychopath’s Inauguration, in pink pussyhats — knit toboggans with cat ears — and in resourcefulness, acumen, and potency. It was an endless sea of pink and signs: “A Woman’s Place Is in the Resistance,” “Um, It’s 2017 …,” “Sex Offenders Can’t Live in Government Housing” (with a drawing of the White House), “Grab ’Em by the Patriarchy,” “I Am Deliberate and Afraid of Nothing,” “Keep Your Tiny Hands off My Rights,” “Don’t You Dare Tell Me to Smile,” “Patriarchy Is for Dicks,” and on and on and on. Chants such as “We want a leader, not a creepy tweeter” were heard from all directions. Throughout the day, it was wave after wave of rally cries, every 10 minutes, and every time, a surge of electricity would course through my every cell. We the people, five million and counting, across the globe, on seven continents (yes, Antarctica), gathered in a collective spirit of resistance. I got to hear Gloria Steinem say, “Thank you for understanding that sometimes we must put our bodies where our beliefs are. Sometimes pressing ‘send’ is not enough.” I heard Angela Davis

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Clown Show MEMPHIS ARTIST AND PERFORMER LARRY CLARK IS ONE OF A KIND — OR SEVERAL KINDS.

J a n u a r y 2 6 - Fe b r u a r y 1 , 2 0 1 7

COVER STORY BY CHRIS DAVIS / PHOTOGRAPHS BY JUSTIN FOX BURKS

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Larry Clark sits on a sofa in his artifact-cluttered Midtown house, leafing through a slender book of old photographs. “What a wild life,” he says, under his breath, thumbing past images that remind him of that time he pulled a squad of Russian showgirls from the wreckage of a derailed circus train. And of the time he pulled a man who dressed like Little Lord Fauntleroy from the wreckage of a derailed circus train. Not to mention the time he juggled fire and chainsaws on tour with Marilyn Manson and Nine Inch Nails. “I’ve been so lucky,” Clark says, showing a picture of himself as a happy teenager, wearing a bright yellow costume topped with an even brighter orange wig. “I’ve been able to do everything I ever wanted to do.” Some little boys want to drive fire trucks when they grow up. Some want to be doctors or inventors or pilots or businessmen. Some even want to be president of the United States. Larry Clark never wanted to be anything but a clown. And he pursued that dream relentlessly. “It was an obsession,” he says. From the time he was a toddler, he’d cry when a circus performance ended and his parents got up to go home. “I never wanted to leave the circus,” he says. “I always pleaded with my parents to take me back.” It’s been a tough few months for Clark, who also

Larry Clark is Memphis’ own chainsaw juggler, comedian, mentalist, storyteller, and clown extraordinaire.

performs as a comedian, juggler, mentalist, magician, and storyteller. First, he lost his grandfather in November. Shortly thereafter, his father died unexpectedly. He had to postpone a one-man show he’d been preparing to open at the end of January, and, just when it seemed like things could only get better, they got worse. Ringling Bros.

Barnum & Bailey Circus, an American institution older than Coca-Cola — older than baseball — announced it would shut down forever in May. While it was sad news for circus fans, it was devastating news for Clark, who’s worked on and off with the famous troupe for years, even performing as the company’s host clown. “Name another American brand that’s survived every world war,” Clark says. “[The circus] survived recession, the Great Depression. It survived more slings and arrows than you can ever imagine. “But the circus isn’t dead just because Ringling Bros. is shutting down,” Clark adds. “That just means a show with 400 people per unit, 18 lions, and two human cannonballs can’t survive in this climate. People still love going to circuses, and there are dozens of tented American circuses that are still doing very well. I’m sure Ringling Bros. could have cut the overhead and kept things going too, if they’d wanted to. They could have pared things down. But then it wouldn’t be the Greatest Show on Earth, would it?” Clark, who’s a collector of “marvels” and a scholarly champion of the variety arts, mourns the loss of Ringling Bros., but he’s not worried about his own future. “I’ll work, like I always have,” he says. Through the years, he’s taken Shrine Circus gigs,


Clark decided he wanted to be a clown early on. “You know, in kindergarten, how they make you lie down on a big piece of paper so they can draw your outline, then ask you to color in who you want to be? I already had my makeup designed. Only I gave myself a big scary jack-olantern smile because I was five.” Most artists spend at least some portion of their early years working day jobs to get by. Clark rarely took that kind of gig, and the ones he did take never lasted long. He’d eventually get fired for calling in sick to take freelance clown work or to catch a show when a circus was in town. That worried his parents, but by the time he was 12, Clark was already doing magic and making decent money working birthday parties, store openings, and other events. “There was one time when my dad decided I didn’t understand the value of hard work and money, and that was probably true,” he says. To remedy the situation, Clark was forced to apply for a job at the neighborhood Kroger on Mendenhall and instructed to take whatever job they offered. But Clark’s career as a bag boy ended on the same day it began — because no true clown can bear the sight of a crying child, particularly one wailing while his mom is in the checkout line. Reflexively, Clark snatched up a shopping cart and balanced it on his face. The child stopped crying and started laughing. The mother thanked him for accomplishing what she couldn’t. Unfortunately, the manager, who had no patience for clowning, fired Clark on the spot, sending him back to his chosen career path. Clark spent countless days in the old main branch of the Memphis Public Library on Peabody. “It sounds

cheesy to say, but I learned so much in the public library,” Clark says. He studied books on clowning, magic, and circus arts. He spent so much time pursuing his interests, he sometimes fell behind on his schoolwork. “I hated school,” Clark admits, although he did attempt one semester at the University of Memphis, where he failed every class but juggling. Who had time for college when Wolfchase Galleria was hiring performers for its grand opening, and he could make enough cash from that gig take all his newly minted college buddies to Destin for Spring Break? “I’ve never been very good with money,” Clark also admits.

“People love the circus. The circus isn’t going anywhere.” There’s a thread of loss running through Clark’s backstory. Libertyland, the place where he cut his teeth as a precocious teenage clown, closed down in 2005. “It closed for all the wrong reasons,” he laments. “Even in its last year, there were 200,000 visitors to the park. There were problems, but that’s not a failing business.” Mr. Giggles Jungle Adventure was the name of the show Clark performed in at Libertyland. He played a character named “Larry, Lord of the Apes” and used his circus skills to teach the show’s serious title character how to laugh. Recent Nobel laureate Bob Dylan bought out the whole park and enjoyed a private performance one night while he was in town for a concert. Vegas lounge singer Tom Jones tracked Clark down one day to pay his compliments, after watching the young clown sing Jones’ signature tune, “What’s New Pussycat,” to a couple of actors in lion costumes. Working at Libertyland gave Clark a chance to develop

his skills in front of an audience. “It was a great little theme park,” Clark says. “The shows were fantastic, it employed a lot of young people, and it was headquartered in Memphis. It was ours.” Not only did Clark go see every circus that came to town, he started going early to see how the shows were set up and staying late to see how they were broken down. Naturally gregarious, he’d volunteer to help and was never shy about asking the clowns and old side show performers to share a few tricks of the trade. In the absence of any real formal training, Clark tried his hand at everything. He did street performance on the Boardwalk in Atlantic City, New Jersey, where he also worked the “Wheel of Death” in daredevil shows for a family troupe called the Nerveless Nocks. He tried his hand (and face) at wince-inducing sideshow tricks with the Jim Rose Circus sideshow. Rose’s show became the face of modern freakdom in the 1990s when his company performed on the Lollapalooza tour. After Clark stretched the truth a bit and said he could juggle chainsaws, Rose was intrigued and invited him to join the show, forcing Clark to have to quickly figure out how to juggle chainsaws — and he did. “We’d perform in bars and smaller venues during the week,” Clark, said. In between juggling chainsaws, Clark paid close attention to his fellow performers and absorbed newer — and weirder — skills like a sponge. On weekends, the company went out on the road with alt-rockers Marilyn Manson and Nine Inch Nails. It was an eye-opening experience for Clark who says he “learned a lot really fast.” Clark dreamed of attending clown college, but Ringling Bros. shut it down in 1997. By that time, Clark was wearing his red nose for Royal Palace, a small Hungarian circus working mid-sized venues up and down the East Coast. His big break blew in with a hurricane that threatened to pummel Florida in 1998. “All of Florida was supposed to shut down,” Clark says. “The Royal Palace was supposed to play a show in Daytona when word got out that Disney was shutting down. We figured they must know something we didn’t.” continued on page 15

COVER STORY m e m p h i s f l y e r. c o m

worked for theme parks and carnivals, and performed with Cirque du Soleil. He’s seen American circus arts evolve, grow, and splinter off in dozens of directions. He’s also played his own small part in the resurrection of previously “dead” forms such as the ten-in-one sideshow and baggy-pants burlesque. “All the books I’ve ever read about being an entertainer say a good clown learns how to do everything, not just how to be funny,” he says. “So I juggle, do magic, and I even play some musical instruments.” He also drives nails up his nose and swallows scary things like lightbulbs, and fire, and swords. “I don’t like swallowing swords,” he says.

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continued from page 13

But Clark’s seen plenty of hard luck, and he can tell plenty of tales wherein everything goes sideways and everybody loses their money and ends with a twist nobody could have seen coming. For example … Clark describes his last days with Circus Nation, one of the most talent-stacked shows he’s ever hooked up with. “It was really too much circus,” he says. “We were all owed money.” There were already ownership problems when a week’s delay in Laredo, Texas, and ongoing hurricane threats (again) resulted in more cancelled shows. Eventually, like a scene from a John Irving novel, it ended with a bunch of broke circus people standing around on the side of the road, looking at the show’s parked trucks, wondering what they were going to do next. Clark had just enough cash to limp into Dallas, check into a hotel room, and start getting his life back together. That’s more or less the story of how Larry the teenage clown from Libertyland came to own and operate his own circus. Clark had been the spokesperson for Circus Nation. When the call center selling tickets for booked shows didn’t hear back from management, they called him. “I told them I didn’t know anything and was owed money,” Clark says. But when the ticket company couldn’t book a replacement crew to work a Shrine Circus date, they called Clark again and asked if he might produce a show. “So I called some of my friends,” he says. Not only did the show go well, it resulted in other Shrine Circuses hiring Clark to assemble their shows. “I’ve worked so hard all my life to not be in charge of anything,” he laughs. “Now I’m a producer.” Memphis has a lot of circus history. In addition to hosting its own companies, the city was also a popular port for one-ring circuses touring the Mississippi River on riverboats. Ringling Bros. opened the Mid-South Coliseum in 1954 and played there frequently. After the Pyramid

opened in 1991, its famous circus train — the largest privately owned train in the world — rolled into the Pinch District every 4th of July weekend. The Greatest Show on Earth may be going away for good, but

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COVER STORY m e m p h i s f l y e r. c o m

When Daytona cancelled, Clark went to Orlando to ride out the storm with his friends Wayne and Marty Scott, circus historians and purveyors of fine clown shoes. Only the hurricane never made landfall, and the next morning brought a surprise phone call from Ringling Bros. recruiter, Tim Holst, a modern-day Robert Ripley who traveled the world looking for marvels and oddities. Holst was looking for experienced clowns, knew of Clark’s work, and made him an offer to become the first non-clown-college graduate to work for Ringling Bros. in 40 years. Clark describes his years clowning, hosting, and doing advance work for Greatest Show on Earth as some of the best of his life. “It’s like, what do you do after you’ve won an Olympic medal?” he asks. “Go become a greeter at Walmart?”

a man who was a part of it still calls Shelby County home, and he likes to perform here whenever he can. “I’ve had the opportunity to visit a lot of places,” Clark says. “And Memphis is a good place to be.” In addition to his clowning, Clark’s also an accomplished burlesque show host. He’s performed with local improv groups such as the Wiseguys and the now-defunct Freak Engine. His infrequent one-man shows at venues such as TheatreWorks and the Brass Door downtown sell out faster than you can say, “That’s all, folks.” “People love the circus,” Clark insists, still flipping past images of clowns, aerialists, daredevils, freaks, and geeks. “The circus isn’t going anywhere.” And neither is he. So keep an eye out, Memphis. You never know when you might catch Larry Clark, a genuine local treasure, working out the kinks for his latest stand-up routine or clowning around at a street festival. Life is funny that way.

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We Recommend: Culture, News + Reviews

Shock of the New

Work by Vanessa German

By Susan Ellis

Organized by Bentonville, Arkansas, museum Crystal Bridges, “State of the Art” featured 100-plus works from emerging contemporary artists from across the United States. When the exhibition debuts at the Dixon this week, it will have roughly half (about 70) of the works on display. Among Dixon director Kevin Sharp’s favorites is Lenka Clayton’s 63 Objects Taken Out of My Son’s Mouth. “They’re literally installed on the wall. It’s just hilarious, but also kind of poignant in its way,” Sharp says. “That’s a piece I determined long ago had to be in the show.” Others include Shaker, a sculpture of a man extending his hand by Bob Trotman and Ghost of a Dream’s End of the Spectrum, a large collage made out of discarded lottery tickets. “It looks like an Oriental rug. It’s beautiful,” Sharp says. Contemporary shows like “State of the Art” draw people in, Sharp says, because the works speak to the viewer. “People are attracted to the art of our own time,” he says. “I’ve spent my whole career as a specialist of 19th-century art. As a museum visitor, I’m attracted to the new and the things that are expressive of my own era. I think that’s true of a lot of people. It’s certainly true of younger audiences who are starting to figure out what their personal aesthetics are — the things they want art to say. I think every generation invents the art it needs to make sense of the world.” Sharp says that “State of the Art” is not overtly political, but “There are definitely things in the show that are thought-provoking,” such as Vanessa German’s Artist Considers the 21st Century Implications of Psychosis as Public Health Crisis or, Critical/Comedic Analysis into the Pathophysiology of Psychosis. Plus, he says, it’s good to shake things up. “Because the Dixon is best known for its 19th-century collection, there’s a certain kind of shock of the new that filters through when we do these kinds of projects. We like that. We don’t want to become stale or predictable.”

BIANCA PHILLIPS

“STATE OF THE ART” AT THE DIXON GALLERY & GARDENS, JANUARY 29TH-MARCH 26TH. CHAD ALLIGOOD, CURATOR AT CRYSTAL BRIDGES, WILL GIVE AN OPENING LECTURE, SUNDAY, JANUARY 29TH, 2-3 P.M. DIXON.ORG

J a n u a r y 2 6 - Fe b r u a r y 1 , 2 0 1 7

Scots, Scotch ale, and High Cotton’s Scottish Ale Spirits, p. 33

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FRIDAY January 27

SATURDAY January 28

Incognito! Art Auction and Party Memphis Botanic Garden, 5:30-7:30 p.m., $35 Annual event hosted by the Artists’ Link, during which guests bid on non-signed (incognito!) artworks. Benefiting the garden’s environmental programming.

Miss Mustard Seed Bobby Lanier Farm Park Hay Barn 10 a.m.-5 p.m., $10 An appearance by DIY queen Marian Parsons, aka Miss Mustard Seed. Parsons will headline the fancy little fleamarket at the Bobby Lanier Farm Park Hay Barn, from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. The market will feature vendors selling vintage and homemade wares, and Parsons will sign her book Inspired You. Shaunna West, author of The $50 Home Makeover, will also be at the market.

Eudora Welty: Mississippi Myth-Southern Literary Salon For location, go to tnshakespear.org, 6 p.m., $55-$110 The Tennessee Shakespeare Company presents this evening of Southern literary fun, featuring writer-themed cocktails.

Eudora Welty: Mississippi Myth-Southern Literary Salon Calendar, p. 22

Eclectic Soul Series Memphis Slim House, 6 p.m., $5 An evening of poetry, soul, dance, and hip-hop hosted by Velisa Woods and featuring Suavo J, Kina Del Mar, 5th Child, Jacqueline Gladness, Toothbrush Jesus, and others. Magic Carpet Ride Buckman Arts Center at St. Mary’s School, 10 a.m., $5 Today’s Magic Carpet Ride is all about Chinese New Year, celebrating the year of the rooster.

Chocolate Fantasy Agricenter International, 11 a.m.-5 p.m., $20 Annual chocolate-tasting event benefiting the National Kidney Foundation of West Tennessee. Includes treats from Dinstuhl’s, H&M Dessert Lounge, Makeda’s, Frost, and many more. The Birds & the Seeds Lichterman Nature Center, 10 a.m.-2 p.m. Annual seed swap. Includes workshops on seed-starting basics, bird watching, and more.

CRYSTAL BRIDGES MUSEUM OF AMERICAN ART, EDWARD C. ROBISON III

steppin’ out


From Hamlet to Haint, great drama needs a good ghost.

Ghosts

JANUARY 25

By Chris Davis With Haint, Memphis playwright Justin Asher hopes to share the story of a woman who holds on to the past so tightly that she can’t live in the present. Mercy, the central character used to be a well-known root worker and healer. Now she secludes herself in her home and depends on her 30-year-old son Charlie as her only link to the outside world. After her son dies, she’s forced to deal with life again. Along the way, she discovers the secrets that Charlie kept from her for years. From that point on, Charlie, acting as the narrator, watches as his mother learns to trust people again and let go of the fear and anger she’d been a slave to for years. Germantown Community Theatre, where Asher serves as artistic director, is reviving Haint, which was originally produced by the New Moon Theatre Company at TheatreWorks, where it received encouraging notices. It’s less a traditional ghost story than a drama that just happens to have a ghost woven into it. “It doesn’t try to be scary. It does, however, try to make you uncomfortable at moments,” Asher said prior to the show’s first production. Asher picked up the word “haint” from his granddad, who used to tell rural ghost stories adorned with bits of hoodoo and other folk traditions. Memphis seems to have developed a taste for new work. It’s good to see the trend spreading east. “HAINT” AT GERMANTOWN COMMUNITY THEATER JANUARY 27TH-FEBRUARY 12TH. SUNDAYS, 2:30 P.M. AND FRIDAYS, SATURDAYS, $24, WWW.GCTCOMEPLAY.ORG

TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 14

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JAN 25

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JOHN PAUL KEITH & CO. 6PM

2017 Taste of Korea Vision Tree Center (7565 Macon), 2-5 p.m., $20 Korean food tasting, including the mandu (dumpling).

TUESDAY January 31

“Tributaries: Caitie Sellers” Metal Museum, 2-5 p.m. Opening reception for this exhibition by latest “Tributaries” artist, Caitie Sellers, whose jewelry deals in architecture and urban infrastructure. Sellers will be on site to discuss her work.

Southern Insecurities Tour P&H Cafe, 8-10 p.m., $5 Comedy show from Krish Mohan and David Coulter addressing race, religion, mental health, and more.

Balé Folclórico da Bahia Germantown Performing Arts Center, 7-9 p.m., $38 Performance by this Brazilian folk dance company whose work is based around Bahian dances.

International Blues Challenge Various locations and times, see blues.org for more details Annual event featuring blues artists from around the world. Continues through Saturday.

FEB 1

MARCELLA AND HER LOVERS 8PM M A K E YO U R R E S E R VAT I O N S N O W F O R

VALENTINE'S DAY 2119 MADISON AVENUE MEMPHIS, TN 38104 (901) 207-5097 LAFAYETTES.COM

m e m p h i s f l y e r. c o m

BarkHappy Memphis Celtic Crossing, 11 a.m.-2 p.m. A “yappy hour” benefiting the Humane Society of Memphis and Shelby County, featuring drawings for prizes like a Kong toy and cocktails.

SUNDAY January 29

JAN 31 JOHN KILZER 8PM

ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT

Golshifteh Farahani (left) and Adam Driver star in Jim Jarmusch’s quiet new film, Paterson. Film, p. 34

17


MUSIC By Chris Shaw

Curren$y plays the Hi-Tone on Wednesday, February 1st.

The Week in Live Music Hip-hop, indie rock, and more. DJ Zirk Memphis rap legend DJ Zirk is pulling out all the stops for his birthday party Thursday at the Hi-Tone. In addition to a performance from the DJ himself, Memphis legends DJ Squeeky, Gangsta Blac, Kingpin Skinny Pimp, Gangsta Pat, DJ Spanish Fly, Tommy Wright III, and Nasty Nardo are all set to perform, making this a underground blowout you won’t want to miss. For the unfamiliar, DJ Zirk has been in the city’s underground rap game since the early ’90s, and is most known for his collaborations with Tha 2 Thick Family, including the classic Lock Em’ in da Trunk. DJ Zirk, Thursday, January 26th, at the Hi-Tone, 9 p.m., $10.

J a n u a r y 2 6 - Fe b r u a r y 1 , 2 0 1 7

Rickie & Aimee, Masc 4 Masc Midtown couple Rickie & Aimee take

18

over Bar DKDC this Friday for their first episode of the Rickie & Aimee Show. The show will serve as the Rickie Lane album release, and will also feature Aimee Easter’s first solo performance. There will also be a dance party and the debut of Masc 4 Masc, who claim to be Memphis’ “newest boi band.” As often times is the case at Bar DKDC, expect this party to go late into the night. As for the Rickie & Aimee Show, they have the Cooper-Young bar booked once a month through March. Rickie & Aimee, Friday, January 27th at Bar DKDC, 10:30 p.m., $7 Human Radio, Jimmy Daddy Davis Human Radio’s latest album Samsara has been a long time coming, as the band has reportedly been working on the album since 2013. Formed in

1988, longtime Memphis music fans will remember Human Radio as one of the first Memphis bands to get signed to a major label post-Big Star, and their song “Me and Elvis” reached #32 on the Billboard Mainstream Rock chart in 1992. The band will have LP and CD versions of Samsara available on Friday, but don’t expect Human Radio to be playing shows on the regular, as the band’s website says they aren’t planning on performing as a live band henceforth. That would make Friday’s show all the more special, but if you

can’t make it, the band will be playing in Nashville at the Mercy Lounge the following night. Advance tickets for both shows are available through the Human Radio website. Human Radio, Jimmy Daddy Davis, Friday, January 27th at Minglewood Hall, 8 p.m., $10. Joyce Manor Epitaph rockers Joyce Manor will hit the Hi-Tone this Tuesday in support of their new album Cody. Produced by Grammywinning producer Rob Schnapf (Beck, Booker T. Jones, Elliott Smith), Cody picks


TH E WE E K I N LIVE M US I C up where their albums Never Hungover Again and Of All Things I Will Soon Grow Tired left off, meaning their mostly positive pop-punk is still very much intact. The band is touring with Phoenix, Arizona’s, AJJ and a band called Mannequin Pussy — Google that last one at your own risk. Joyce Manor, Tuesday, January 31st at the Hi-Tone, 8 p.m., $16.

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ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT

Curren$y Closing out this stacked lineup of shows is New Orleans rapper Curren$y. Curren$y got his start as a member of the great hip-hop act the 504 Boyz before working on songs with Master P, Soulja Slim, and C-Murder. He can also be heard on the 2005 Lil Wayne album Tha Carter II. Fast forward about a decade, and Curren$y is still making hits and dropping mixtapes, the latest being Andretti 12/30 which dropped on, you guessed it, December 30th of last year. Now releasing music under his own label Jet Life, you can expect new music from Curren$y early and often, as the rapper dropped numerous mixtapes last year. The opener for the show is still to be announced, but advance tickets are available through the Hi-Tone’s website. Curren$y, Wednesday February 1st at the Hi-Tone, 9 p.m., $20-$25.

19


RICKIE AND AIMEE FRIDAY, JANUARY 27TH BAR DKDC

JOYCE MANOR TUESDAY, JANUARY 31ST HI-TONE

BILLY JOE SHAVER SUNDAY, JANUARY 29TH MINGLEWOOD HALL

After Dark: Live Music Schedule January 26 - February 1 Alfred’s 197 BEALE 525-3711

Gary Hardy & Memphis 2 Thursdays-Saturdays, 6-9 p.m.; Karaoke Thursdays, TuesdaysWednesdays, 9 p.m.-1 a.m., and Sundays-Mondays, 10 p.m.-2 a.m.; Mandi Thomas Fridays, Saturdays, 6-9 p.m.; The 901 Heavy Hitters Fridays, Saturdays, 10 p.m.-2 a.m.; Flyin’ Ryan Fridays, Saturdays, 2:30 a.m.; Memphis Jazz Orchestra Sundays, 6-9 p.m.

B.B. King’s Blues Club 143 BEALE 524-KING

The King Beez Thursdays, 5:30 p.m.; B.B. King’s All Stars Thursdays, Fridays, 8 p.m.; Will Tucker Band Fridays, Saturdays, 5 p.m.; Family Day with Backbeat Tours Saturday, Jan. 28, 11 a.m.-2:30 p.m.; Lisa G and Flic’s Pic’s Band Saturdays, Sundays, 12:30 p.m.; Blind Mississippi Morris Sundays, 5 p.m.; Memphis Jones Sundays, Wednesdays 5:30 p.m.; Doc Fangaz and the Remedy Tuesdays, 5:30 p.m.

Blue Note Bar & Grill 341-345 BEALE 577-1089

Queen Ann and the Memphis Blues Masters Fridays, Saturdays, 8 p.m.-midnight.

J a n u a r y 2 6 - Fe b r u a r y 1 , 2 0 1 7

Blues City Cafe

20

138 BEALE 526-3637

Blind Mississippi Morris Fridays, 5 p.m. and Saturdays, 5:30 p.m.; Brad Birkedahl Band Thursdays, Wednesdays, 8 p.m.; Earl “The

Pearl” Banks Saturdays, 12:30 p.m. and Tuesdays, 7 p.m.; Brandon Cunning Trio Sundays, 6 p.m., and Mondays, 7 p.m.; FreeWorld Sundays, 9:30 p.m.

Club 152 152 BEALE 544-7011

Live Music WednesdaysSundays, 7-11 p.m.; Live DJ Wednesdays-Sundays, 11 p.m.; Third Floor: DJ Tubbz Fridays, Saturdays, 10 p.m.

Handy Bar

162 BEALE 521-1851

David Bowen Thursdays, 5:309:30 p.m., Fridays, Saturdays, 6:30-10:30 p.m., and Sundays, 5:30-9:30 p.m.; Sensation Band Friday, Jan. 27, 9:30 p.m.-1 a.m.; Cowboy Neil Saturday, Jan. 28, 9:30 p.m.-1 a.m.; Highway 11 Records Showcase: Lovebird Acoustic Duos Tuesday, Jan. 31, 6-10 p.m.

King’s Palace Cafe Patio 162 BEALE 521-1851

200 BEALE 527-2687

Bad Boy Matt & the Amazing Rhythmatics Tuesdays, Thursdays-Sundays, 7 p.m.-1 a.m.

Hard Rock Cafe 126 BEALE 529-0007

Savannah Long Thursday, Jan. 26, 6-9 p.m.; Borderline Friday, Jan. 27, 7-10 p.m.; EDM Show Saturday, Jan. 28, 10 p.m.1 a.m.

Itta Bena 145 BEALE 578-3031

Kayla Walker Thursdays, 67 p.m.; Susan Marshall Fridays, Saturdays, 7-10 p.m.; Nat “King” Kerr Fridays, Saturdays, 910 p.m.; Susan Marshall Wednesdays, 6-8 p.m.

King Jerry Lawler’s Hall of Fame Bar & Grille 159 BEALE

King’s Palace Cafe

Sonny Mack Mondays-Fridays, 2-6 p.m.; Cowboy Neil Mondays, Thursdays, 7-11 p.m., and Saturdays, Sundays, 2-6 p.m.; Sensation Band Tuesdays, Fridays, 7-11 p.m.; Fuzzy and the Kings of Memphis Saturdays, 7-11 p.m.; Chic Jones and the Blues Express Sundays, 711 p.m.; North and South Band Wednesdays, 7-11 p.m.

King’s Palace Cafe Tap Room

Jan. 26, 7-11 p.m.; FreeWorld Friday, Jan. 27, 8 p.m.-midnight, and Saturday, Jan. 28, 8 p.m.midnight; Tas Cru and His Band of Tortured Souls Sunday, Jan. 29, 7-11 p.m., and Monday, Jan. 30, 7-11 p.m.; Generation blues Jam hosted by Tas Cru Tuesday, Jan. 31, 7 p.m.

Rum Boogie Cafe Blues Hall 182 BEALE 528-0150

Memphis Bluesmasters Thursdays, Sundays, 8 p.m.-midnight; Vince Johnson and the Plantation Allstars Fridays, Saturdays, 4-8 p.m., and Sundays, 3-7 p.m.; North and South Band Friday, Jan. 27, 9 p.m.-1 a.m.; Chic Jones Saturday, Jan. 28, 48 p.m.; Little Boys Blue Saturday, Jan. 28, 9 p.m.-1 a.m.; Brian Hawkins Blues Party Mondays, 8 p.m.-midnight; McDaniel Band Tuesdays, Wednesdays, 8 p.m.-midnight; International Blues Challenge Tuesday, Jan. 31, 8 p.m.-midnight.

168 BEALE 576-2220

Big Don Valentine’s Three Piece Chicken and a Biscuit Blues Band Thursdays, Tuesdays, 8 p.m.-midnight; Cowboy Neil Friday, Jan. 27, 8 p.m.-midnight; North and South Band Saturday, Jan. 28, 8 p.m.-midnight.

Silky O’Sullivan’s 183 BEALE 522-9596

Dueling Pianos Thursdays, Wednesdays, 9 p.m.-1 a.m., Fridays, Saturdays, 9 p.m.-3 a.m., and Sundays, Tuesdays, 8 p.m.midnight.

Discoland feat. Dude Called Rob Saturday, Jan. 28, 10 p.m.; Chippendales Wednesday, Feb. 1, 7:30 p.m.

Center for Southern Folklore

Rum Boogie Cafe

123 S. MAIN AT PEABODY TROLLEY STOP 525-3655

182 BEALE 528-0150

Mississippi Bigfoot Thursday,

St. Mary’s Cathedral

Dirty Crow Inn

The Acclaimed St. Mary’s Wednesday Morning Musicians Sunday, Jan. 29, 4-5 p.m.

855 KENTUCKY

Bobbie & Tasha Wednesdays, 8-11 p.m.

Earnestine & Hazel’s 531 S. MAIN 523-9754

Amber Rae Dunn Hosts: Earnestine & Hazel’s Open Mic Wednesdays, 8-11 p.m.

700 POPLAR 527-3361

South Main Loflin Yard 7 W. CAROLINA

The Nightowls Friday, Jan. 27.

Flying Saucer Draught Emporium 130 PEABODY PLACE 523-8536

Songwritters with Roland and Friends Mondays, 7-10 p.m.

Huey’s Downtown 77 S. SECOND 527-2700

Anni Piper Sunday, Jan. 29, 8:30-11:45 p.m.

Paulette’s RIVER INN, 50 HARBOR TOWN SQUARE 260-3300

Bar DKDC 964 S. COOPER 272-0830

The Margins Thursday, Jan. 26, 8 p.m.; Rickee and Aimee Variety Show Vol 1 Friday, Jan. 27; All the Colors of the Dark: A Goth Dance Party Saturday, Jan. 28; Lovelight Orchestra Sunday, Jan. 29; Devil Train Monday, Jan. 30.

Boscos

Live Pianist Thursdays, 5:308:30 p.m., Fridays and Saturdays, 5:30-9 p.m., Sundays, 11 a.m.-2 p.m., and MondaysWednesdays, 5:30-8 p.m.

Sunday Brunch with Joyce Cobb Sundays, 11:30 a.m.2:30 p.m.

Purple Haze Nightclub

903 S. COOPER 274-5151

2120 MADISON 432-2222

Celtic Crossing

140 LT. GEORGE W. LEE 577-1139

Jeremy Stanfill and Joshua Cosby Sundays, 6-9 p.m.; Candy Company Mondays.

Rumba Room

2559 BROAD 730-0719

DJ Dance Music MondaysSundays, 10 p.m.

New Daisy Theatre 330 BEALE 525-8981

Chris Gales Solo Acoustic Show Mondays-Saturdays, 12-4 p.m.; Eric Hughes Thursdays, Fridays, 5-8 p.m.; Karaoke MondaysThursdays, Sundays, 8 p.m.; Live Bands Fridays, Saturdays, 8 p.m.

Jan. 30, 8-11 p.m.

303 S. MAIN 523-0020

Salsa Night Saturdays, 8:30 p.m.-3 a.m.

Okraboy Saturday, Jan. 28, 8-11 p.m.; SOBO Monday,

The Cove Ed Finney and the U of M Jazz Quartet Thursdays, 9 p.m.; Mr. Adams Friday, Jan. 27, 10 p.m.; Hope Clayburn and the Soul Scrimmage Saturday, Jan. 28, 10 p.m.; Justin White Mondays, 7 p.m.; Don and Wayde

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MONSTER JAM FEBRUARY 17 – 18

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The multi-show return of America’s most powerful concert force with special guest Trisha Yearwood. Check fedexforum.com for tickets & showtimes!

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Christian Music’s largest annual tour returns for its 22nd year of touring with a spectacular lineup. Suggested $10 donation at the door!

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After Dark: Live Music Schedule January 26 - February 1

613 UNIVERSITY 274-3740

Faculty Concert Series Sunday, Jan. 29, 3 p.m.; Rhodes Less Travelled: Blueshift Ensemble Monday, Jan. 30, 7:30 p.m.

Hi-Tone

2092 TRIMBLE PLACE MEMPHIS, TN 38104

Acoustic Courtyard Last Thursday of every month, 6:30-9:30 p.m.

Wild Bill’s 1580 VOLLINTINE 207-3975

The Wild Bill’s Band Fridays, Saturdays, 11 p.m.-3 a.m.

412-414 N. CLEVELAND 278-TONE

Fridays, Saturdays, 6-10 p.m.

Huey’s Poplar 4872 POPLAR 682-7729

The Settlers Sunday, Jan. 29, 4-7 p.m.; Gary Escoe’s Atomic Dance Machine Sunday, Jan. 29, 8:30 p.m.-midnight.

Tuesdays, 6-10 p.m.; Elmo and the Shades Wednesdays, 8 p.m.-midnight.

Owen Brennan’s THE REGALIA, 6150 POPLAR 761-0990

Lannie McMillan Jazz Trio Sundays, 10 a.m.-2 p.m.

Mortimer’s 590 N. PERKINS 761-9321

Van Duren Solo Thursdays, 6:30-8:30 p.m.

Rizzi’s/Paradiso Pub 6230 GREENLEE 592-0344

Live Music Thursdays, Wednesdays, 7-10 p.m.; Karaoke and Dance Music with DJ Funn Fridays, 9 p.m.

2130 W. POPLAR 854-4455

Bartlett

Cordova

Bartlett Performing Arts and Conference Center 3663 APPLING 385-6440

Melinda Doolittle Saturday, Jan. 28, 8 p.m.

DJ Zirk Bday Bash with special guests Thursday, Jan. 26, 9 p.m.; Refreshingly Heavy Saturday, Jan. 28, 4 p.m.; Lovewhip Monday, Jan. 30, 10 p.m.; Joyce Manor, AJJ, Mannequin Pussy Tuesday, Jan. 31, 8 p.m.; Curren$y Wednesday, Feb. 1, 8 p.m.

Huey’s Southwind 7825 WINCHESTER 624-8911

Young Petty Thieves Sunday, Jan. 29, 8:30 p.m.-midnight.

Huey’s Germantown 7677 FARMINGTON 318-3034

Charley Mac’s Six String Lovers Sunday, Jan. 29, 811:30 p.m.

2119 MADISON 207-5097

Minglewood Hall 1555 MADISON 866-609-1744

Human Radio CD Release with Jimmy Daddy Davis Friday, Jan. 27, 8 p.m.; Billy Joe Shaver, Mark Edgar Stuart Sunday, Jan. 29, 7 p.m.

Murphy’s 1589 MADISON 726-4193

North Mississippi/ Tunica Hollywood Casino 1150 CASINO STRIP RESORT, TUNICA, MS 662-357-7700

P&H Cafe Rock Starkaraoke Fridays; Open Mic Music with Tiffany Harmon Mondays, 9 p.m.midnight.

The Phoenix 1015 S. COOPER 338-5223

The Phoenix Blues Jam Tuesdays, 8-11 p.m.

Rockhouse Live Midtown 2586 POPLAR

The Rusty Pieces Saturday, Jan. 28, 9 p.m.

Live Entertainment Fridays, Saturdays, 9 p.m.-1 a.m.; The After Party Friday, Jan. 27, 9 p.m.-1 a.m., and Saturday, Jan. 28, 9 p.m.-1 a.m.

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Huey’s Southaven 7090 MALCO, SOUTHAVEN, MS 662-349-7097

Vintage Sunday, Jan. 29, 8 p.m.-midnight.

Thirsty Lizard 6541 US-51 662-536-6054

Teacher’s Pet Wednesday, Feb. 1, 7:45-11 p.m.

Tunica Roadhouse 1107 CASINO CENTER, TUNICA, MS 662-363-4900

Live Music Fridays, Saturdays.

Raleigh Young Avenue Deli 2119 YOUNG 278-0034

Agori Tribe with Opposite Box Friday, Jan. 27, 9 p.m.

River City Cadillacs Friday, Jan. 27, 6-9 p.m. 1532 MADISON 726-0906

The Dantones Sunday, Jan. 29, 8 p.m.-midnight.

Germantown

Lafayette’s Music Room

Memphis Ukelele Meetup Tuesdays, 6-7:30 p.m.

Huey’s Cordova 1771 N. GERMANTOWN PKWY. 754-3885

8071 TRINITY 756-4480

The Chaulkies Sunday, Jan. 29, 4-7 p.m.; Erin Harpe and the Delta Swingers Sunday, Jan. 29, 8 p.m.-midnight.

394 N. WATKINS 443-0502

Delta Rain Sunday, Jan. 29, 8-11:30 p.m.

The Southern Edition Band Tuesdays.

Huey’s Midtown

Midtown Crossing Grill

Huey’s Collierville

T.J. Mulligan’s Cordova

1927 MADISON 726-4372

5th Kind Thursday, Jan. 26, 9 p.m.; Nick Schnebelen Friday, Jan. 27, 10 p.m.; Susan Marshall & Friends Saturdays, 11 a.m.; The River Bluff Clan Saturdays, 3 p.m.; Heath ‘N Justin Saturday, Jan. 28, 6:30 p.m.; Ghost Town Blues Band Saturday, Jan. 28, 10 p.m.; Joe Restivo 4 Sundays, 11 a.m.; Susan Marshall with Special Guests (Birthday Bash) Sunday, Jan. 29, 8 p.m.; John Paul Keith and Co. Mondays, 6 p.m.; Brandon McGovern Tuesday, Jan. 31, 5:30 p.m.; John Kilzer Tuesdays, 8 p.m.; Breeze Cayolle and New Orleans Wednesdays, 5:30 p.m.; Marcella and Her Lovers Wednesday, Feb. 1, 8 p.m.

Collierville

TJ Mulligan’s 1817 KIRBY 755-2481

Slap Junior Band Friday, Jan. 27, 9:30 p.m.-1:30 a.m.

Poplar/I-240 East Memphis Dan McGuinness Pub 4694 SPOTTSWOOD 761-3711

Dantones Duo Thursday, Jan. 26, 9 p.m.-1 a.m.; Karaoke Wednesdays, 8 p.m.

Folk’s Folly Prime Steak House 551 S. MENDENHALL 762-8200

Intimate Piano Lounge featuring Charlotte Hurt Mondays-Thursdays, 59:30 p.m.; Larry Cunningham

East Tapas and Drinks 6069 PARK 767-6002

Eddie Harris Thursdays, Fridays, 6:30-9:30 p.m.; Elizabeth Wise Tuesdays, 7-9 p.m.; Van Duren Solo Tuesdays, 7-9 p.m.

Neil’s Music Room 5727 QUINCE 682-2300

Jack Rowell’s Celebrity Jam Thursdays, 8 p.m.; Eddie Smith Fridays, 8 p.m.; Pulse: A Pink Floyd Tribute Saturday, Jan. 28, 8 p.m.; Tora Tora’s Blue-Ray Release Party Sunday, Jan. 29, 2-4 p.m.; Flashback Sunday, Jan. 29, 4-7 p.m.; Debbie Jamison & Friends

Summer/Berclair Cheffie’s Cafe

Hadley’s Pub 2779 WHITTEN 266-5006

483 HIGH POINT TERRACE 202-4157

Twin Soul Friday, Jan. 27, 9 p.m., and Saturday, Jan. 28, 9 p.m.; Almost Famous Sunday, Jan. 29, 5:30 p.m.

High Point Pub

5709 RALEIGH-LAGRANGE 386-7222

Leigh Ann Wilmot and Dave “The Rave” Laman Fridays, 6-9 p.m. 477 HIGH POINT TERRACE 452-9203

Pubapalooza with Stereo Joe Every other Wednesday, 8-11 p.m.

RockHouse Live Live Bands Fridays, Saturdays, 8 p.m.; Open Mic Mondays Mondays, 8 p.m.-midnight; Live Music Tuesdays, Wednesdays, 8 p.m.-midnight.

Shelby Forest General Store 7729 BENJESTOWN 876-5770

Arlington/Eads/ Oakland/Lakeland

Tony Butler Fridays, 6-8 p.m.

Stage Stop 2951 CELA 382-1576

Blues Jam hosted by Brad Webb Thursdays, 7-11 p.m.; The Suburban Trunk Monkeys Saturday, Jan. 28, 9 p.m.1 a.m.; Open Mic Night and Steak Night Tuesdays, 6 p.m.midnight.

West Memphis/ Eastern Arkansas The New Backdour Bar & Grill 302 S. AVALON 596-7115

Karaoke with Tim Bachus Mondays, 8 p.m.-1 a.m.; DJ Stylez Wednesdays, 8 p.m.1 a.m.

m e m p h i s f l y e r. c o m

Evergreen Presbyterian Church

The Tower Courtyard at Overton Square

ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT

Tuesdays, 7-10 p.m.; Karaoke Wednesdays, 10 p.m.

21


The Birds & the Seeds Winter Workshops and Seed Swap At Lichterman Nature Center Saturday, January 28 10am - 2pm

CALENDAR of EVENTS:

January 26 - February 1 TH EAT E R

Circuit Playhouse

Hand to God. Adults only. playhouseonthesquare. com. $25-$40. Fridays, Saturdays, 8 p.m., and Sundays, 2 p.m. Through Feb. 19. 51 S. COOPER (725-0776).

The Evergreen Theatre

Courtin’ Time. www.theatreworksmemphis.org. $20. Sun., 3 p.m., and Fri., Sat., 7:30 p.m. Through Jan. 29. 1705 POPLAR (274-7139).

Germantown Community Theatre

Haint. gctcomeplay.org. $24. Sundays, 2:30 p.m., and Fridays, Saturdays, 8 p.m. Through Feb. 12. 3037 FOREST HILL-IRENE (453-7447).

Hattiloo Theatre

Blueprints to Freedom: An Ode to Bayard Rustin. www.hattiloo.org. $22-$28. ThursdaysSaturdays, 7:30 p.m., Saturdays, 2 p.m., and Sundays, 3 p.m. Through Feb. 12. 37 S. COOPER (502-3486).

Hernando High School Performing Arts Center

Romeo and Juliet. www.kudzuplayers.com. $17. Sun., 2 p.m., and Fri., Sat., 7 p.m. Through Jan. 29. 805 DILWORTH LANE, HERNANDO, MS.

New Discovery Christian Church

Auditions for Mary Poppins, come prepared to sing 16 bars of a song of your choosing that is in the same genre as this show. Danceheavy performance scheduled for July. www. kudzuplayers.com. Sat., Jan. 28, 9 a.m. 961 VINSON ROAD.

North Library

It’s a Shel-e-Bration!, celebration of the beloved poet and author Shel Silverstein. www.memphislibrary.org. Thurs., Jan. 26, 4 p.m. 1192 VOLLINTINE (415-2775).

The Orpheum

The Bodyguard: The Musical. www.orpheum-memphis.com. $25-$125. Through Jan. 29. 203 S. MAIN (525-3000).

Playhouse on the Square

Rock of Ages. www.playhouseonthesquare. org. $25-$45. Thursdays-Saturdays, 8 p.m., and Sundays, 2 p.m. Through Feb. 12. 66 S. COOPER (726-4656).

Theatre Memphis

J a n u a r y 2 6 - Fe b r u a r y 1 , 2 0 1 7

5992 Quince Rd / Memphis 38119

The 39 Steps. www.theatrememphis.org. $25. Fridays, Saturdays, 8 p.m., Sundays, 2 p.m., and Thursdays, 7:30 p.m. Through Feb. 5.

Call to Artists for Nasty Women Art Exhibition

Seeking artwork for February exhibition. For more information and submission, visit website. Through Jan. 27. WWW.NASTYWOMENMEMPHIS.COM.

Send the date, time, place, cost, info, phone number, a brief description, and photos — two weeks in advance — to calendar@memphisflyer.com or P.O. Box 1738, Memphis, TN 38101. DUE TO SPACE LIMITATIONS, ONGOING WEEKLY EVENTS WILL APPEAR IN THE FLYER’S ONLINE CALENDAR ONLY. OPERA

WKNO Preview & Party

Behind-the-scenes look at upcoming production of The Pirates of Penzance. Free. Tues., Jan. 31, 6-8 p.m. CLARK OPERA MEMPHIS CENTER, 6745 WOLF RIVER PARKWAY, WWW.OPERAMEMPHIS.ORG.

David Malkin: Guided Tour

Exhibition of oil on paper. Sat., Jan. 28, 2-3 p.m. JAY ETKIN GALLERY, 942 COOPER (550-0064).

Eudora Welty: Mississippi MythSouthern Literary Salon

Featuring writer-specific libations, light fare, and at least 30 Southern-inspired minutes of influential writers in a private, gracious home. $55-$110. Fri., Jan. 27, 6 p.m. WWW.TNSHAKESPEARE.ORG.

Incognito! Art Auction and Party

Join special guest host Kacky Walton, of WKNO’s Checking on the Arts, for an evening of art, drinks, and hors d’oeuvres. Purchase your favorite painting outright or during silent auction. $25 members, $35 nonmembers. Fri., Jan. 27, 5:30-7:30 p.m. MEMPHIS BOTANIC GARDEN, 750 CHERRY (636-4131), WWW.MEMPHISBOTANICGARDEN.COM.

Kudzu Playhouse Scholarships

Two awards are available to graduating high school seniors, as well as current and rising college freshmen and sophomores. Applications available on website. Through April 1. WWW.KUDZUPLAYERS.COM.

Opening Lecture: Chad Alligood, Learning from “State of the Art”

Meet in Winegardner Auditorium as curator at Crystal Bridges Museum of American Art in Bentonville, Ark. focuses on the collection, presentation, and scholarship of American art. Sun., Jan. 29, 2-3 p.m. THE DIXON GALLERY & GARDENS, 4339 PARK (761-5250), WWW.DIXON.ORG.

DAN C E

Balé Folclórico da Bahia

The only professional folk dance company in Brazil, 38-member troupe of dancers, musicians, and singers perform a spectacular repertory based on “Bahian” folkloric dances of African origin. $38. Sun., Jan. 29, 7-9 p.m. GERMANTOWN PERFORMING ARTS CENTER, 1801 EXETER (751-7500), GPACWEB.COM.

Chippendales 2017: Best Night Ever Tour

$12.50-$65. Wed., Feb. 1, 7:30 p.m. NEW DAISY THEATRE, 330 BEALE (525-8981).

Youth Classical Concert

Presented by Ballet on Wheels Dance School & Company, the Cordova High School Orchestra, and the Prizm Ensemble. Free. Fri., Jan. 27, 7-8:30 p.m. BUCKMAN ARTS CENTER AT ST. MARY’S SCHOOL, 60 N. PERKINS EXT. (870-4348), WWW.BALLETONWHEELS.ORG.

C O M E DY

Chuckles Comedy Club

Kountry Wayne, www.chucklescomedyhouse. com. $22.50. Fri., Jan. 27, 7:30 & 10 p.m., Sat., Jan. 28, 7:30 & 10 p.m., and Sun., Jan. 29, 7 p.m. 1700 DEXTER.

High Cotton Brewing Co.

Hannah Hogan, known in Canada as “the lady in those commercials” and “that writing credit on that comedy show.” Free. Tues., Jan. 31, 7:30-9:30 p.m. 598 MONROE (896-9977).

ONGOI NG ART

Memphis College of Art

“Beloved, Quirky, and Covered in Paint: Peter Bowman, 1942-2015,” exhibition in memory of MCA alumnus Peter Bowman, former art instructor and beloved artist within the Memphis community. Through Jan. 26. “Whole Being,” exhibition of small-scale bronze sculptures by alumna Sheila Bailey (BFA ’92). www.mca.edu. Through Jan. 26. 1930 POPLAR (272-5100).

P&H Cafe

Open Mic Comedy, Thursdays, 9 p.m. Southern Insecurities Comedy Tour with Krish Mohan & David Coulter. (301-792-0677). $5. Tues., Jan. 31, 8-10 p.m. 1532 MADISON (726-0906).

continued on page 24

630 PERKINS EXT. (682-8323).

901.636.2221

A R TI ST R E C E PT I O N S

Art Village Gallery

Artist reception for “Out of Africa,” featuring work by Tayo Adenaike, Adewale Adenle, Upjohn Aghaji, Stacey Okparavero, and Adeboba Afolabi. (521-0782), www.artvillagegallery.com. Fri., Jan. 27, 6:30-8:30 p.m. 410 S. MAIN (521-0782).

Circuitous Succession Gallery

Closing reception for Richard Knowles and Annabelle Meacham, www. circuitoussuccessiongallery.com. Thurs., Jan. 26, 2-6 p.m. 500 S. SECOND.

Memphis Slim Collaboratory

Artist reception for “Either They Don’t Know or Don’t Show,” exhibition of prints by Lawrence Matthews. Fri., Jan. 27, 6-8 p.m.

HEAR HERE! 22 2160 YOUNG AVE. | 901.207.6884 HALFORDLOUDSPEAKERS.COM

1130 COLLEGE (590-4591).

OTH E R A R T H A P P E N I N G S

Art Trolley Tour

Tour the local galleries and shops on South Main. Last Friday of every month, 6-9 p.m. SOUTH MAIN HISTORIC ARTS DISTRICT, DOWNTOWN.

Hannah Hogan at High Cotton Brewing Co., Free, Tuesday


Tickets and showtimes at jccmemphis.org/film 6560 Poplar Avenue, Memphis, TN 38138 (901) 761-0810 • jccmemphis.org

WINTER SALE

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BRUSHES BRUSHES CANVAS SETSSTRETCHED & SETS & Art Alternatives OPEN OPEN STOCK STOCK

Fredrix Red Label & Gallery Wrap Princeton Brush Princeton Brush Winsor & Newton Winsor & Newton OPEN DAILY 901-276-6321 • Signet www.ArtCenterMemphis.com Robert Simmons Signet Robert Simmons SALE PRICES EFFECTIVE THROUGH FEBRUARY 28, 2017

60%60% OFFOFF STRETCHED CANVAS

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Gamblin Oil 37ml Tubes Gamblin Mediums Various Sizes Winsor & Newton Artist Oil 37ml Tubes Rembrandt Oil 40ml Tubes STARRING

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(901) 525-3000 • ORPHEUM-MEMPHIS.COM Broadway Season sponsored by:

ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT

OIL PAINT & MEDIUMS Gamblin OilOIL Tubes& MEDIUMS OIL PAINT &37ml MEDIUMS PAINT GamblinOilMediums Various Sizes Gamblin 37ml Tubes Oil Gamblin 37ml Tubes WinsorMediums & Newton Artist 37mlSizes Tubes Gamblin Various SizesOilVarious Gamblin Mediums Winsor & Newton Oil 37mlArtist Tubes Oil 37ml Tubes Winsor & Newton Rembrandt Oil Artist 40ml Tubes

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23


C A L E N DA R: JA N UA RY 2 6 - F E B R UA RY 1 continued from page 22 “Beloved, Quirky, and Covered in Paint” at Memphis College of Art

ON SALE NOW

L E CT U R E / S P E A K E R

“Ask the Trainer” Q&A with Positive Dog Trainers of the Mid-South

Bring your questions about dog behaviors and training to a panel of experts. People only. No dogs, please. Mon., Jan. 30, 6-8:30 p.m. MEMPHIS ANIMAL SERVICES, 2350 APPLING CITY CV 636-1416, MEMPHISANIMALSERVICES.COM.

A Broken System: Perspectives on the Death Penalty in Tennessee

Panel discussion with Stacy Rector, Amy Lawrence, Sabrina Butler Porter, and Cynthia Vaughn followed by Q & A. Wed., Feb. 1, 5 p.m. RHODES COLLEGE, PAUL BARRET JR. LIBRARY, 2000 N. PARKWAY (843-3000), WWW.RHODES.EDU.

A Step Ahead Foundation Lunch and Learn Community members learn about A Step Ahead Foundation’s program, how to use as a community resource, and volunteer. Register online. Fri., Jan. 27, 11 a.m.-1 p.m. A STEP AHEAD FOUNDATION, 326 ELLSWORTH (729-7044), ASTEPAHEADFOUNDATION.ORG.

Walking tour of the region’s only urban old-growth forest. Last Sunday of every month, 10 a.m. OVERTON PARK, OFF POPLAR (276-1387).

J a n u a r y 2 6 - Fe b r u a r y 1 , 2 0 1 7

F EST IVA LS

Clarksdale Film & Music Festival

CLARKSDALE, MISSISSIPPI, WWW. CLARKSDALEFILMFESTIVAL.COM.

The Crown Jewels Fest

Vintage collectors offer the very best selection of vintage clothing, accessories, and home decor in Memphis. Featuring local art, music, and snacks. Through Jan. 31, 10 a.m.-6 p.m.

True Story:

Repticon Memphis: Reptile & Exotic Animal Show

$5, $10 weekend pass. Thur.Sat., Jan. 26-28.

E X PO S/ SA L E S

Tickets available online at Ticketmaster.com or by calling 1-800-745-3000.

MRSJONESPAINTEDFINISHES.COM.

LANDERS CENTER, 4660 VENTURE, SOUTHAVEN, MS (863-268-4273), WWW.REPTICON.COM.

Old Forest Hike

101 S. MAIN, SOUTH MAIN ARTS DISTRICT.

Workshop on Friday and flea market on Saturday at Memphis and Germantown locations with Marian Parsons. Fri.-Sat., Jan. 27-28.

$10. Sat.-Sun., Jan. 28-29, 10 a.m.

TO U R S

Grand Opening for Tako’s Treasures

Me & Mrs. Jones: A Fancy Little Flea Market

Featuring music from local artists Lil Wyte, Z Dougie, Flirting with Sincerety, Terry Wall & the Wall Bangers, Tony Manard, Justin Vinson & the Wayward Saints, and others to help raise awareness for testicular cancer. $10. Fri., Jan. 27, 8 p.m.-3 a.m. HI-TONE, 412-414 N. CLEVELAND (278-8663), HITONECAFE.COM.

$30-$50. Sat., Jan. 28, 7:30 p.m. THE FITZ, 711 LUCKY LANE (1-800-766-LUCK), WWW.FITZGERALDSTUNICA.COM.

Gender Inclusive Derby Boot Camp

Adults of all genders aged 18 and over are invited to learn about six-week training program. Recruiting skaters for upcoming men’s team and officials (skating and nonskating). Q&A, sign waivers. Bring skates. Thurs., Jan. 26, 7-9 p.m. PIPKIN BUILDING, MID-SOUTH FAIRGROUNDS, WWW. MEMPHISROLLERDERBY.COM.

Go Ape Treetop Adventure

Course in Shelby Farms Park open for its second season. Ongoing.

SHELBY FARMS, 500 N. PINE LAKE (767-PARK), WWW.GOAPE.COM.

Hula Hooping

Enjoy free 25-minute demos of all of our hula hooping classes. Free. Sat., Jan. 28, 11 a.m.-3 p.m. CO-MOTION STUDIO, 416 N. CLEVELAND (316-7733), WWW.COMOTIONMEMPHIS.COM.

continued on page 26

First Congregational Church

Life feels better.

www.firstcongo.com Phone: 901.278.6786 1000 South Cooper Memphis, TN 38104 Sunday Worship 10:30 am

24

2047_STA_T3_4.575x12.4_4c_Ad_V1.indd 1

Fights at the Fitz

Love one another. It’s that simple.

They wanted a church where faith was more than talk. Now, each week they feed hungry people. Must be 21 years or older to gamble or attend events. Know When To Stop Before You Start.® Gambling Problem? Call 1-800-522-4700. ©2017, Caesars License Company, LLC. All rights reserved.

S PO R TS / F IT N ES S

1/19/17 4:23 PM


Week Long passes for all events - $100 (purchase at www.blues.org) Daily Wristbands - $10 / $15 â&#x20AC;&#x201C; available on Beale Street each night Finals Tickets will go on sale in early January through the Orpheum Box Office

m e m p h i s f l y e r. c o m

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ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT

260 blues acts from all over the world struttinâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; their stuff on Beale Street

25


C A L E N DA R: JA N UA RY 2 6 - F E B R UA RY 1 continued from page 24

States Department of Energy (DOE) Solar. Thurs., Jan. 26, 6-7:30 p.m.

BarkHappy Memphis Happy Hour at Celtic Crossing, Saturday

Kittens v. Unicorns Mashup

Bring an item to donate to the Humane Society of Memphis & Shelby County. Sat., Jan. 28, 7 p.m. PIPKIN BUILDING, MID-SOUTH FAIRGROUNDS, WWW.MEMPHISROLLERDERBY.COM.

Lisa Lassandrello 5K

Benefiting: Grace-St. Luke’s Episcopal School, St. Agnes-St. Dominic, and UT/West Institute WINGS. Sat., Jan. 28, 9 a.m. GRACE-ST. LUKE’S EPISCOPAL SCHOOL, 246 S. BELVEDERE (278-0200).

AFRICAN AMERICAN INTERNATIONAL MUSEUM FOUNDATION, 1098 FIRESTONE, WWW.CLEANENERGY.ORG.

M E E TI N G S

Green Matters Women’s Group

S P EC IA L EVE NTS

Featuring guest speaker Christine Donhardt, Communications Director, Agricenter International. Lunch provided if you RSVP by email, cdonhardt@ agricenter.org. Wed., Feb. 1, 12-1 p.m.

“Back to the Moon for Good” $7. Through June 2.

SHARPE PLANETARIUM, MEMPHIS PINK PALACE MUSEUM, 3050 CENTRAL (636-2362), MEMPHISMUSEUMS.ORG.

AGRICENTER INTERNATIONAL, 7777 WALNUT GROVE (452-2151), WWW.AGRICENTER.ORG.

The Birds & the Seeds

A Tipping Point: Targeting Blight in Frayser

Join Pizza with Planners for latest information on Frasyer CDC blight fight. Tues., Jan. 31, 5:30 p.m. UNIVERSITY NEIGHBORHOODS DEVELOPMENT CORP., 480 S. HIGHLAND (452-8864).

United States Department of Energy (DOE) Solar in Your Community Challenge

Opportunity to be a national leader expanding solar electricity access to low and moderate income (LMI) households through participation in the United

MILITARY MONDAYS Fitz salutes and thanks all active military and veterans for serving and defending the USA.

$10 PROMO CASH

Instantly receive at the Cashier • Players Club

$15 HOTEL ROOM RATE ON SUNDAYS & MONDAYS Call 662-363-LUCK (5825), and reference “Military Mondays”

As a special THANK YOU, Mondays at the Fitz are now “Military Mondays.” Show your military ID to receive these great offers:

50% BUFFET DISCOUNT

Instantly receive at the Riverview Buffet

15% GIFT SHOP DISCOUNT

Instantly receive at the Fitz Gift Shop

$

LICHTERMAN NATURE CENTER, 5992 QUINCE (767-7322), WWW.MEMPHISMUSEUMS.ORG.

Conversation. Connections. Impact: Making Change in our Backyards

Program about making change in our backyards. Including speakers, interpretative storytelling, performance by transformative theater group Playback Memphis, and opportunity to participate and formulate next steps. Free with RSVP. Sat., Jan. 28, 2-6 p.m. CLAYBORN TEMPLE, 294 HERNANDO, WWW.IOBY.ORG.

Extreme Deep: Mission into the Abyss

Interactive exhibit that highlights the adventure of deep-sea exploration and discovery. Through May 6. MEMPHIS PINK PALACE MUSEUM, 3050 CENTRAL (636-2362), WWW.MEMPHISMUSEUMS.ORG.

Fourth Bluff Ice Rink $10. Through Jan. 31.

MISSISSIPPI RIVER PARK (FORMERLY JEFFERSON-DAVIS PARK), OFF RIVERSIDE DRIVE, WWW.MEMPHISRIVERFRONT.COM.

IMB CEO of the Year Awards

Honorees will be featured in the February/March 2017 issue of Inside Memphis Business magazine. Breakfast included. $25. Fri., Jan. 27, 8 a.m.

45,000

MEMPHIS BOTANIC GARDEN, 750 CHERRY (636-4100), WWW.INSIDEMEMPHISBUSINESS.COM.

Mardi Gras Ball XIV: Welcome to Fabulous Las Vegas

PROMO CASH SWEEPSTAKES

Mardi Gras collides with the nonstop energy of Las Vegas featuring hors d’oeuvres, cocktail reception, and show benefiting Transformations Autism Treatment Center. $65. Sat., Jan. 28, 6:30-11 p.m.

FRIDAYS & SATURDAYS

JANUARY 27-28 & FEBRUARY 3-4, 10-11, 24-25 • 6pm – 10pm Twenty winners of $250 in Promo Cash between 6pm - 9pm. Five winners of $500 in Promo Cash at 10pm.

Annual seed swap featuring fun new workshops, seminars, and demonstrations. Sat., Jan. 28, 10 a.m.-2 p.m.

MINGLEWOOD HALL, 1555 MADISON (866-609-1744).

TUESDAYS IN JANUARY & FEBRUARY ALL DAY. ALL NON-VIDEO POKER MACHINES

Memphis Astronomical Society Observing Sessions

Dark sky observing, weather permitting. Sat., Jan. 28, 7 p.m. BURTON SUGAR FARM, 9714 HWY 72 (662-224-8212), WWW.MEMPHISASTRO.ORG.

J a n u a r y 2 6 - Fe b r u a r y 1 , 2 0 1 7

Mid-South King of My Craft Barber Battle

Prizes and trophies for 1st, 2nd, and 3rd place winners. See website for competition entry and registration. $15. Sun., Jan. 29, 12-6 p.m. AGRICENTER INTERNATIONAL, 7777 WALNUT GROVE (4522151), WWW.901CHOPMOB.COM.

FO O D & D R I N K EVE NTS

2017 Taste of Korea

The community is invited to make and experience Korean food benefiting Vision Tree Center. $20. Sat., Jan. 28, 2-5 p.m. FitzgeraldsTunica.com • 1-662-363-LUCK (5825) •

VISION TREE CENTER, 7565 MACON (292-0430), WWW.VISIONTREECENTER.ORG.

Must be 21 and a Key Rewards member. See Cashier • Players Club for rules. Management reserves the right to cancel, change and modify the event or promotion. Gaming restricted patrons prohibited. Gambling Problem? Call 1-800-522-4700.

BarkHappy Memphis: Winter Yappy Hour Benefiting the Humane Society of Memphis & Shelby County

SUNDAY – THURSDAY

50% OFF LUNCH OR DINNER BUFFET CANNOT BE COMBINED WITH ANY OTHER OFFER.

CODE: MFBUF

Ticket holders will get a free KONG tennis ball, a mimosa or bloody mary, access to a paw print resolution station, and entered for a raffle prize benefiting. $12. Sat., Jan. 28, 11 a.m.-2 p.m.

CELTIC CROSSING, 903 S. COOPER (274-5151), HTTPS://MEMPHISYEAROFTHEDOG.EVENTBRITE.COM.

Brunch with Live Music

Live musicians play while guests enjoy brunch. Saturdays, Sundays, 10 a.m.-1 p.m. Through July 16. STONE SOUP CAFE, 993 S. COOPER (273-5352).

26

To redeem, present to Buffet Cashier. Must be 21 and a Key Rewards member. Limit one offer per person. Valid only at Fitz Tunica. Management reserves the right to change or discontinue this voucher at any time. Not redeemable for cash. Gaming restricted patrons prohibited. EXPIRES FEBRUARY 9, 2017. Gambling Problem? Call 1-800-522-4700.

continued on page 28


Premier Sales Event JAN 27th - 30th

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Memphis

Collierville

2858 Poplar Ave Memphis, TN 38111 (901) 623-3520

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Mon.-Fri. 9:30 AM-7:00 PM | Sat. 9:00 AM - 6:00 PM Sun. 12:00 PM - 5:00 PM

m e m p h i s f l y e r. c o m

extra

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27


C A L E N DA R: JA N UA RY 2 6 - F E B R UA RY 1 continued from page 26 Chocolate Fantasy

Enjoy music, entertainment, live auction, games, and taste chocolate desserts, candies, cookies, ice cream, pastries, and other chocolate treats benefiting the National Kidney Foundation of West Tennessee. $20. Sat., Jan. 28, 11 a.m.-5 p.m. AGRICENTER INTERNATIONAL, 7777 WALNUT GROVE (452-2151), WWW.NKFWTN.ORG.

Concoctions: Toast and Taste Supper Club

Wine and Dine a Mile High in the Sky Join us for Valentine’s Day 4-course dinner • Drinks Live Entertaiment

Make a toast with tiki cocktails and savor the taste with pairing appetizers. Gathering for rum lovers and foodies. Include handcrafted cocktails, food, giveaways, and good times. $40. Sat., Jan. 28, 4:30-8:30 p.m. BELLE TAVERN, 117 BARBORO ALLEY (826-2376), WWW. CITYTASTINGTOURS.COM.

Cupcakes and Crafting Craft giant paper flowers to be donated to the Autism Lives Foundation’s Autism Awareness Brunch. Sat., Jan. 28, 1-4 p.m. NATIONAL COLLEGE, 2576 THOUSAND OAKS (363-9046).

Call 901.620.4600 or visit Big-Cypress.com for more information.

Be a star at LipSync Plus 2017! J a n u a r y 2 6 - Fe b r u a r y 1 , 2 0 1 7

The top lipsyncers and local celebrities will perform live at the Hard Rock Cafe on April 20, 2017 and compete for the LipSync Plus Grand Championship.

28

Visit lipsyncplus.com for more information.

Latasha Peeples 2016 LipSync Plus Grand Champion

Ferrari Carano Wine Dinner

Hosted by Southern Glaziers featuring five wines paired with four courses. Advance tickets required. $25. Thurs., Jan. 26, 7-8:30 p.m.

THE PASTA KITCHEN, 875 W. POPLAR (316-5119), WWW.THEPASTAKITCHEN.NET.

Soup Sunday

Sample delicious soup, bread, dessert, and other delicacies from more than 50 of the best area restaurants and caterers benefiting Youth Villages’ programs $20. Sun., Jan. 29, 11 a.m. FEDEXFORUM, 191 BEALE STREET.

Southern Prohibition Tap Takeover

Join Cory York with Southern Prohibition for swag and a tap up of Crowd Control Imperial IPA, Devils Harvest, Fire Ant Red Ale, and Milk Stout. Sat., Jan. 28, 4-8 p.m. HAMMER & ALE, 921 S. COOPER (410-8223), WWW.HAMMERANDALE.COM.

Spaghetti Dinner

Informal Italian dinner catered by A Moveable Feast. Annual family event, a tradition since 1955. Pre-purchase tickets only. No tickets will be sold at the door. $12. Tues., Jan. 31, 5-7 p.m. LAUSANNE COLLEGIATE SCHOOL, 1381 W. MASSEY (474-1032), WWW.LAUSANNESCHOOL.COM.

F I LM

The Bugs Bunny/Road Runner Movie $9. Sat., Jan. 28, 2 p.m.

MEMPHIS BROOKS MUSEUM OF ART, 1934 POPLAR (544-6209), WWW.BROOKSMUSEUM.ORG.

The Lord of the Rings: Fellowship of the Ring

$9. Sat.-Sun., Jan. 28-29, 4 p.m. CTI 3D GIANT THEATER, IN THE MEMPHIS PINK PALACE MUSEUM, 3050 CENTRAL (636-2362), WWW.MEMPHISMUSEUMS.ORG.

Monty Python and the Holy Grail $9. Sun., Jan. 29, 2 p.m.

MEMPHIS BROOKS MUSEUM OF ART, 1934 POPLAR (544-6209), WWW.BROOKSMUSEUM.ORG.

Screenagers

Documentary film that reveals how tech time impacts kids’ development. Free. Thurs., Jan. 26, 7 p.m. HUTCHISON SCHOOL, 1740 RIDGEWAY (507-2460), WWW.HUTCHISONSCHOOL.ORG.

Sign Painters

Celebrates hand-painted signage, history, and artists and designers keeping the craft alive. Fri., Jan. 27, 7 p.m. EMERGEMEMPHIS, 516 TENNESSEE (312-7700).

Wild Africa 3D

Audiences will be plunged into fantastic places and meet amazing creatures while exploring the most dramatic continent on earth. Through March 3. CTI 3D GIANT THEATER, IN THE MEMPHIS PINK PALACE MUSEUM, 3050 CENTRAL (636-2362), WWW.MEMPHISMUSEUMS.ORG.


WIN YOUR SHARE OF 40,000! 00 $

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BIG DRAWING TOMORROW JANUARY 27!

Even more www.ballystunica.com

Must be 21 or older. Bally’s Tunica and RIH Acquisitions MS II, LLC have no affiliation with Caesars License Company, LLC and its affiliates other than a license to the Bally’s name. Gambling Problem? Call 1-888-777-9696.

Memphis Theological Seminary FEB 9

Awards Celebration 7:00 pm

FEB 7 & 8

Holmes Lecture Series feat. Dr. Eboni Marshall Turman Professor of African American Religion & Theology -Yale Divinity School

- Feb 7 7:00 pm Mt. Moriah East Baptist Church - Feb 8 11:10 am Lindenwood Christian Church

For tickets and more information go to www.MemphisSeminary.edu or call (901) 458-8232

ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT

The Guest House at Graceland Luncheon speaker, Dr. Traci Blackmon Pastor -Christ the King UCC-Florissant, MO 12:00 noon

m e m p h i s f l y e r. c o m

30th Anniversary Dr. Henry Logan Starks Scholarship Celebration

29


Celebrate With That Special Someone at The Guest House at Graceland

ACA Enrollment Assistance

Church Health can help you determine if an ACA plan is best for you and your family. We can even help you enroll during open enrollment (Nov. 1 – January 31). For more information or to schedule your appointment, call 901-272-7526. You may also schedule your appointment at churchhealth.org/ACAappointments.

churchhealth.org/give

Love Me Tender

Includes your guest room accommodations, Champagne and strawberries amenity, breakfast buffet at Delta’s Kitchen and a commemorative Love Elvis CD. From $249 a night.

R O M A N C E PA C K A G E FEB 1 – 28, 2017

Visit GuestHouseGraceland.com or call 800-238-2000 for reservations © EPE. Graceland and its marks are trademarks of EPE. All rights reserved. Elvis™ and Elvis Presley™ © 2016 ABG EPE IP LLC

mphis.Flyer.ad.1.9.17.indd 1

BeauSoleil avec Michael Doucet

J a n u a r y 2 6 - Fe b r u a r y 1 , 2 0 1 7

Sunday, February 12, 7 p.m., $28 Since forming in 1975, Grammy winners BeauSoleil avec Michael Doucet has claimed its undisputed role as the most esteemed Cajun group in music. The ensemble takes the rich traditions of Louisiana and artfully blend elements of zydeco, New Orleans jazz, TexMex, country, blues and more into a satisfying musical gumbo. From The Grand Ole Opry to Newport Folk Festival, from concert hall to dance floor, BeauSoleil continues to captivate audiences the world over.

Tickets 30

BuckmanArtsCenter.com (901) 537-1483 60 Perkins Extended Memphis, TN 38117

1/9/2017 1:29:08 PM


the south’s grand staycation

T R A V E L B y L e s l e y Yo u n g

Love You

Valentine’s retreats right at home.

Cozy up for a romantic staycation with your sweetie.

hen a tour through the luxurious purples and piercing blues of Graceland Mansion is just not enough, fans of the King can now extend their appreciation of Elvis’ unique style and Southern hospitality by staying at the new 450-room neighboring Guest House at Graceland hotel. Just a few steps away from the mansion, the Guest House at Graceland is as elegant and luxurious as the King’s colonial-style home. After all, he was the inspiration for the contemporary and refined feel of the place, with a winding white staircase and a glittering chandelier replicated from the mansion and themed rooms using the Graceland color palette. The 20 suites are relegated mostly to The Upstairs, a collection partially designed by Priscilla Presley and so called after the private quarters of Elvis at Graceland, including one suite with televisions on the ceiling. There are two restaurants in the large hotel, including Delta’s Kitchen and EP’s Sports Bar & Grill as well as a Starbucks with grab-and-go items named Shake Rattle and Go. The Guest House also houses a 464-seat theater, event and conference spaces, a large outdoor pool and event area, shuttles, and a special VIP program known as The Founders, which includes early exclusive access to room reservations, priority admission to VIP events, and exclusive access to Graceland. To make your reservation today, call (800) 238-2000, (901) 443-3000 or visit www.graceland.com/lodging/guesthouse.

Add a Room Service package with roses, champagne and chocolate-covered strawberries.

901.529.4000 peabodymemphis.com

Forecast Your Win!

Guest House at Graceland

The Italianate Victorian mansion located at 690 Adams in the historic Victorian Village was built in 1848 and has ties by its various former owners to the Lee Line Steamboats, Union Planters Bank, Memphis College of Art, and the inventor Powell Crosley Jr., of Crosley radios fame. Each suite is named for and inspired by these historic affiliations, including a Crosley radio in the Crosley Suite and doodles from former art students preserved on the bathroom door of the Isabel Suite. Services include a gourmet breakfast, gated private parking, and a gallery showcasing work by Memphis artists in the entry hallway. The James Lee House is centrally located in downtown Memphis, just steps away from the Mallory-Neely House Museum and the Woodruff-Fontaine House Museum, both Victorian mansions in a similar style to the James Lee House. To book a room, call (901) 359-6750 or visit jamesleehouse.com.

Wednesday, February 1st

10

Earn 100 points and you can swipe at any promotional kiosk to determine if the groundhog will see it's shadow. Guess correctly and

$

in Free Play!

will be loaded to your account by noon on February 2nd! 800.467.6182 • West Memphis, AR southlandpark.com See Player Rewards for details. Players must be 21 years of age or older to game and 18 years of age or older to bet at the racetrack. Play responsibly; for help quitting call 800-522-4700.

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The Peabody Hotel is known the world over, not just for its marching ducks, but also for its finely appointed interiors, its splendid food offerings, and for its hospitality and charm. Within the walls of this historic and unique hotel, visitors can also find a full-service, resort-style spa with nearly every amenity imaginable. The salon at the Feathers Spa offers hair styling from color and straightening to updos and cut and styles; nail services including shellac and SpaRitual nail lacquers; and makeup services including tutorials, applications, and lash treatments. Choose relaxation, hot stone, deep tissue, Ashiatsu barefoot, or couple massages, or a combo to feel extra relaxed. Pevonia facials such as sensitive skin, es-

Why not stay in one of Memphis’ original mansions? Meticulously preserved with original marble mantels, shaped moldings, plaster trim, and plaster ceiling medallions, the James Lee House in Victorian Village could be mistaken as a gallery of sumptuousness rather than a bed and breakfast. Its five elaborate suites boast Tempur Choice Luxe mattresses, spaciousness marked with original wood floors and fireplaces, and the perfect mixture of modern amenities with an old-world opulence.

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sential deep-cleaning, peel and recapture retinol, microdermabrasion, and gentlemen’s are available, as are a full range of wax treatments. Spa hours are Sunday and Monday, 9 a.m. to 6 p.m., and Tuesday through Saturday, 8 a.m. to 8 p.m. To book an appointment or find out more about the Peabody’s Feathers Spa offerings, call (901) 261-4400 or visit peabodymemphis.com.

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1/9/17 11:07 AM


Mark Your Calendars This week: Soup Sunday and Latte Art Throwdown.

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outh Villages, a private nonprofit which finds mentors to build relationships with children in foster care, is hosting its annual Soup Sunday event January 29th at the FedExForum. The event is now in its 28th year and has grown to boast 42 presenters from area restaurants and nearly 3,000 attendees. Danny Sumrall, owner of the Half Shell, teamed up with longtime Youth Villages supporter Mike Warr to come up with the idea of a soup tasting in order to bring the restaurant community of Memphis together and to support a good cause. “We are happy to be their cause,” Youth Villages development coordinator Amanda Mullen says. Over the years the event has changed venues, setting up at the Pyramid or at Woodland Hills Event Center, and grown to include more than just soup. It wouldn’t be a Soup Sunday without the Half Shell’s lobster and shrimp bruschetta. One year there were so many gumbo offerings that event planners held a gumbo competition. Each year there are also winners of best soup, best bread, best dessert, and best specialty item, as well as a

Souper Spirit Award, offered to the restaurant that brings the most energy and spirit to the event. “Last year, one restaurant had a cornhole game, which Soup Sunday benefits really got the patrons involved,” Youth Villages Mullen says. “We’ve had restaurants where the entire booth dressed in gowns and tuxedos. It’s really cool when the restaurants get into it and bring the competition with them.” Proceeds from the event go toward Youth Villages’ mentoring program. Tickets are $20 for adults, $10 for ages 6-12 prior to the event. Prices will slightly increase the day of the event, which will run 11 a.m. to 2 p.m. For more information, to donate, or to become a mentor, visit youthvillages.org. When I order my occasional almond-milk, double-shot latte (I’m more of a short, double-shot Americano girl, myself), terms such as “free pour,” “flow rate,” and “a 2-2-1 halo-topped tulip” don’t pop into my head. But when it comes to lattes, those terms do exist, and Memphis is about to get a fun lesson in latte culture. The first Latte Art Throwdown in Memphis will go

down Friday, January 27th at 387 Pantry on South Main. The idea is to bring the Memphis coffee community together and to put Memphis on the coffee map. “It’s a statement to the coffee world that Memphis is not a stop but a destination,” said the event’s coordinator Lance Hedrick. Memphis is in good hands with Hedrick leading the charge. He’s competed in latte art world championships and gave up pursuing a PhD in philosophy in Canterbury to pursue coffee full-time. He will also be head barista in charge when Dr. Bean’s opens its doors on Madison later this year. “It’s a friendly competition that brings the coffee community together and brings cohesion between the shops and creates a deeper customer-barista relationship than just across the bar,” Hedrick says. It’s $5 to enter, and prizes including $400 for first place, $100 for second, and $50 for third will be awarded to the baristas who come up with the best “Rosetta” or “Tulip.” Though this is Memphis’ first Latte Art Throwdown, newbies shouldn’t be intimidated. All are welcome, and it’s an opportunity to exchange information and skills. High Cotton will provide two kegs, Monkey Train Grazing Co. food truck will provide the food, and several coffee shops will provide the coffee, including French Truck, Ugly Mug, J. Brooks, and Dr. Bean’s. And yes, the artfully designed lattes will be for consumption at no charge. The event, which is from 6 to 10 p.m. is free to attend. Latte Art Throwdown at 387 S. Main, Friday, January 27th, 6 to 10 p.m.

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S P I R ITS By Richard Murff

Hop Scots

Scottish Ale vs. Scotch Ale? It’s a matter of “size.”

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is the lighter of the two, with a lower alcohol content, but it still delivers a big flavor — a beer you can drink all night, as it were. Scotch Ale — also called a Wee Heavy — is made from the same ingredients, in the same style, only more so. It is a big, booming brew, higher in alcohol — the bagpipe of ales, these days, described as the IPA of the malt. After a couple, you’ll be gripped with the twin urges to shave your tongue and then tell them what you really think. Do us all a favor and resist these impulses. For all the associations the world has with Scots and their uisgebeathas (water of life) these rich ales have a much longer history than the country’s whiskey. There is evidence that the Picts were producing heather beer long

before the Romans showed up to plant their vineyards. There is even a legend of a Pictish chieftain taking his beer recipe to the grave with him. The art of distillation, on the other hand, arrived in Scotland with St. Columba in 563. Two years later, in 565, the same monk claimed to have seen a “water beast” in Loch Ness. You do the math. Whisky-fueled fish tales aside, up until the 19th century, most beer brewing in Scotland was done by women, old-school “housewives,” if you will. They worked with what ingredients were handy. The unforgiving climate produced a lot of barley and oats (that were dried with peat fires), but precious little hops. As a result, the ales were smoky and very malty. Having a great many other things to do, these put-upon home brewers also boiled the wort (the beer before we call it beer) for much longer than their southern counterparts, which carmelized the ingredients into that rich color and flavor that shows up in your glass. The last twist was the use of ale yeast, followed by cellaring the beer in a climate more akin to Bavarian lagers. I asked Cayleigh, the taproom manager at HCB about their version of this classic. “We love the style,” she says, “but our take on it is a little different.” Cayleigh will modestly tell you she’s not an expert, but she knows all the technical answers, anyway. HCB does a little roasting on the front end; this lightens the ABV (there is a state law to abide) but keeps that big flavor, one that will go with hearty foods. “Ours is made to pair well with, well, barbecue,” she says. And it does. These are rich flavors that rest on a complex sweetness. The nice thing about HCB’s Scottish Ale is that you up fill up on pork, not beer. For the more traditionally minded, there is always the maxim, “What grows together goes together.” Try one with that infamous highland widowmaker the Scotch Egg: It’s a hard-boiled egg wrapped in a sausage and deep-fatfried. On trying one for the first time, an uncle of mine exclaimed, “Where have you been all my life!” Evidently, in Scotland.

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t was raining like stink and I was fighting with my tweed coat when I stepped into the taproom at High Cotton Brewing (HCB), so I felt Scottish, though being something of a skinflint, I always feel that way. I ordered one of HCB’s standards, its Scottish Ale. Because nothing in the booze industry can be straightforward, this is not to be confused with Scotch Ale. Like “English Muffins” in Britain, neither term is used much in the old country. Calling a person Scotch is something that even the British concede is insulting as hell. The people are Scots — and they will correct you. Still, this is about as good a way as any to keep the two straight. Scottish Ale

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FILM REVIEW By Chris McCoy

Mystery Bus Adam Driver leads Jim Jarmusch’s quiet masterpiece Paterson.

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o soothe my jangled, post-election nerves, I recently rewatched Jim Jarmusch’s Mystery Train. Released in 1989, the film was on the vanguard of the American indie revolution. It pioneered the indie trope of preferring multiple, small stories over one, big, overarching plot, providing an inspiration to Richard Linklater’s 1991 Slacker; as well as the interlocking, timeshifted narrative structure that Quentin Tarantino would put to effective use in 1994’s Pulp Fiction. Jarmusch’s quiet, humane, observational style would resonate in films from Harmony Korine’s Kids (1995) to Sofia Coppola’s Lost in Translation (2003). It was also the Big Bang for a lot of Memphis filmmakers who caught the bug while working on the South Main set or chased rumors of Joe Strummer shooting pool at the P&H. Jarmusch’s new film, Paterson, is something of a spiritual successor to Mystery Train. It is a celebration of place, only where Mystery Train winds through Memphis’ mythicized landscape, Paterson rambles through the working class town of Paterson, New Jersey, in a battered old bus. Both films have a time constraint: Mystery

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Train takes place in the course of one eventful day at the flophouse, while Paterson is one week’s worth of poetic journal entries. The biggest difference between the two films is perspective. Mystery Train views Memphis through the eyes of rockabilly-obsessed Japanese tourists and down-on-their-luck street thugs. Paterson’s POV stays strictly with its protagonist, a bus driver named, appropriately enough, Paterson, played by Adam Driver. Paterson (the character) is a quiet introvert. In the opening shots, Jarmusch establishes him as a highly ordered, simple, light sleeper who is, like the actor who portrays him, a Marine veteran. We watch him go about the rhythms of his day: He gets to work early, jots down a few lines of poetry in his journal while he’s waiting to roll out of the station, exchanges words with his perpetually aggrieved supervisor, Donny (Rizwan Manji), drives the good people of New Jersey around on their daily chores, returns home to dinner with his wife, Laura (Golshifteh

Adam Driver is a quiet bus driver and poet in Paterson, Jim Jarmusch’s spiritual sequel to Mystery Train. Farahani), and then walks Marvin, their bulldog, to the neighborhood watering hole, run by Doc (Barry Shabaka Henley), where he nurses a single beer. It’s a simple life, but it suits Paterson just fine, because it gives him time to pay attention to the two things he is devoted to in life: his poetry and Laura. I am wary of movies about writers for a couple of reasons. First, movies are written by writers, and writers can self-mythologize in pretty ugly ways. Second, there is the inevitable scene where the guy (it’s almost always a guy) whom the movie has been setting up as a genius finally reads his writing aloud, and it’s terrible. Refreshingly, Paterson focuses on the poet’s process. Lines appear onscreen as they are written in Paterson’s journal, and we see the fits and starts fol-

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FILM REVIEW By Chris McCoy lowed by a sudden outpouring of words. Even better, the poetry actually sounds like it was written by a talented bus driver who idolizes William Carlos Williams. Driver’s stoic, subtle performance will go a long way towards cementing his status as America’s Dreamy Boyfriend. On the surface, Farahani’s character skews toward manic pixie dream girl territory, but it becomes clear that we’re seeing her through the eyes of Paterson, who adores her unconditionally. She’s not perfect, he just paints over her foibles and doesn’t mind that she’s not as good a cook as she thinks she is. The third outstanding performance is from the dog, Marvin, who consistently brings the best schtick to this low-key, almost comedy. If the rise of Trump signals a resurgence of toxic masculinity, Paterson brings an antidote. Driver’s Paterson is

a compassionate, intelligent everyman without a greedy bone in his body. He’s quietly interested in the people around him — the conversations he overhears on the bus and at the bar provide Jarmusch’s signature micro narrative moments — and is heroic in the Hemingway sense of the word: He does his duty. Paterson is not a self-aggrandizing world conqueror, but one of the quiet heroes with hidden depth that make the world go around. Paterson may end up being one of the definitive films of our time, a careful character study of a man who makes a tough job look easy, kinda like Jarmusch himself. Paterson Now playing Studio on the Square

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LEGAL NOTICE • HELP WANTED LEGAL NOTICES

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NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE WHEREAS, Ronald L. King and Richard D. King, by Deed of Trust (the “Deed of Trust”) recorded June 17, 2015, of record, at Instrument Number 15082554, Register’s Office for Shelby County, Tennessee, conveyed to Renasant Bank and Michael E. Goldstein, Trustee, and thereafter to Amy L. Wood, Esq., as Successor Trustee, the hereinafter described real property to secure the payment of a certain Promissory Note (the “Note”) described in the Deed of Trust, which Note was payable to Renasant Bank. Recorded subsequent to said Deed of Trust was an Assignment of Rents, recorded on April 26, 2016, and of record in Instrument Number 16095991, in said Register’s Office; WHEREAS, Renasant Bank is the current owner, holder and beneficiary of said Note aforesaid, secured by the Deed of Trust aforesaid; WHEREAS, Renasant Bank maintains interest in this Note and Deed of Trust; WHEREAS, default has occurred with respect to the Note; and WHEREAS, the owner and holder of the Note has demanded that the hereinafter described real property be advertised and sold in satisfaction of indebtedness and costs of foreclosure in accordance with the terms and provisions of the Note and Deed of Trust. NOW, THEREFORE, notice is hereby given that Renasant Bank, pursuant to the power, duty and authority vested in and conferred upon it, by the Deed of Trust, will on February 27, 2017, on or about 11:00 A.M., at the SOUTHWEST CORNER, ADAMS AVENUE ENTRANCE OF THE SHELBY COUNTY COURTHOUSE, MEMPHIS, TENNESSEE, offer for sale to the highest bidder FOR CASH, and free from all legal, equitable and statutory rights of redemption, exemptions of homestead, rights by virtue of marriage, and all other exemptions of every kind, all of which have been waived in the Deed of Trust, certain real property located in Shelby County, Tennessee, described as follows: Being Lot 3, Section A, Maler Subdivision, as shown on the plat of said subdivision of record in Plat Book 90, Page 9, in the Register’s Office for Shelby County, Tennessee, to which plat reference is hereby made for a more particular description. Being the same property conveyed to Richard D. King and Ronald L. King,

of Memphis; SunTrust Bank (as Successor-in-Interest to National Bank of Commerce); Regions Bank (as Successor-in-Interest to Union Planters Bank); the United States Department of Justice; King Furniture Company, Inc.; Commercial Bank & Trust Company (as Successor-in-Interest to Industrial Bank of Memphis); Bank of America (as Successor-in-Interest to Boatmen’s Bank). DATED this 19th day of January, 2017. Amy L. Wood, Esq., Successor Trustee 513 3rd Avenue South Nashville, TN 37210

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DAVID LENOIR SHELBY COUNTY TRUSTEE This notice pertains to delinquent 2015 Shelby County and (if applicable ) Town of Arlington, City of Bartlett, Town of Collierville, City of Germantown, City of Lakeland, City of Memphis and City of Millington Realty taxes only.

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by Quitclaim Deed from Ruth L. King Living Trust dated May 6, 2003, dated September 6, 2007, and of record at Instrument Number 07141690, in the Register’s Office for Shelby County, Tennessee. THIS IS IMPROVED PROPERTY KNOWN AS 3080 Lamar Avenue, Memphis, TN 38114. The above described property will be sold subject to any and all unpaid taxes, any matter on any applicable recorded plat, restrictions, easements and building setback lines, and to any prior or superior liens, judgments or Deeds of Trust. The proceeds of the sale will be applied in accordance with the terms and provisions of the Deed of Trust. Should the highest bidder fail to comply with the terms of the bid at the public sale, then the Trustee shall have the option of accepting the second highest bid, or the next highest bid with which the buyer is able to comply. The right is reserved to reject all bids as insufficient. The sale held pursuant to this Notice may be rescinded at the Successor Trustee’s option at any time. The right is also reserved to adjourn the sale to another day certain, without publication, upon announcement before or during the sale. Interested parties include: Renasant Bank; the Shelby County Trustee; the City

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ENGINEERING SMITH & NEPHEW, INC. (Memphis, TN) seeks Sr. Manufacturing Engineer w/ B.S. in engg. or engg. tech. +5 years as mechanical engineer. Must have experience with each of the following: 1. Machine and process validation protocols including IQ, OQ, PQ, FDS and URS; 2. Minitab; 3. Processes related to knee implant production and finishing including drag and finishing process; 4. Kaizen including VSM, SMED and standard work; and 5. Working with cross functional teams from operations and engineering to finance. Apply online at www.smith-nephew.com

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THE LAST WORD by Jen Clarke

Forward, March

m e m p h i s f l y e r. c o m

I wasn’t sure what to expect when I arrived downtown Saturday morning. I had some reservations but decided to attend the march at the last second. I didn’t even make a sign. If I had, it would have said something like “Oh, FFS.” Or “Meryl Streep Is Properly Rated.” Or “Make America Read Women’s March Again.” There’s always next time. Believe me, there will be a in Memphis next time. It wasn’t my first rally or protest, but it was definitely the biggest. I don’t think I’ve ever been part of such a large group of women before. But if it was truly a “woman’s march,” the crowd should have been much larger. I say this because it was about as diverse as an East Memphis yoga class. People get defensive when this is brought up, and I don’t mean to sound dismissive. Yes, people of varying ages, races, and genders showed up. I’m proud of the thousands of marchers who gave their time to stand up for women. It was a good first step. The next step is intersectionality. As I was leaving, I overheard a conversation between two black women. “This was good. I needed this.” “Me too, but I wish I’d seen this many people out for MLK Day.” “Yeah … Wonder why that is?” This is where I wanted to butt in and say “Because racism,” but I am pretty sure it was a rhetorical question. As King wrote, the white moderate “prefers a negative peace which is the absence of tension to a positive peace which is the presence of justice.” I feel bad if women of color didn’t feel welcome or included in last Saturday’s march, but I can’t exactly blame them. Why should they trust white women who keep siding with white men? Fifty-two percent of us voted for a candidate who openly boasted about “grabbing them by the pussy” without their consent. Four years prior, more than half of us voted for a guy who counted women by the binder-full in a debate. Too many white women either don’t vote with their own interests at heart or are counting on everyone else to get it right. Now we’ve got a mess to clean up. The day after the march, I attended a friend’s birthday brunch. I didn’t know everyone at the table, which is always a bit of a social landmine for me because I have no poker face. Here’s what happens: Someone says something with which I disagree. I am physically unable to supress an eyeroll. People I know either engage me or move along. People who don’t ask if there’s something I’d like to say. Cue rant, followed by debate or awkward silence. We were talking about safe topics like football (well, not safe in the literal sense, but you know what I mean) and work. Everything was fine. And then a woman at the other end of the table said “So, like, these — air quotes — marches. What are they protesting exactly?” That’s when the room started spinning and everything went dark. All was silent but for the echo of her voice. What are they protesting? Really? And what’s with the air quotes? I should have told her people protested for Black Lives Matter, gun control, criminal justice reform, and a whole slew of issues that are important to them. I should have told her I can’t speak for anyone else, but here are a handful of the reasons I went: Because the new president needs to be reminded at every turn that he is accountable to the entire country, not just the people who voted for him. Because the Affordable Care Act insures millions of people, and if the GOP has a better idea, well, what’s the holdup? And if we can’t have health insurance for all, we need Planned Parenthood more, not less. Because our bodies belong to us, and we’re smart enough to make choices for ourselves. We want to be able to start our families on our own terms with affordable reproductive care and child care. Because Idiocracy wasn’t supposed to be a documentary. Because democracy doesn’t end the day after the election. Or the inauguration. You don’t have to agree, but this is how I feel. And this is America, and it’s our right. But I didn’t want to ruin my friend’s brunch, so I bit my tongue and stared at my plate. Yes, that’s right. In less than 24 hours I went from “We won’t be silenced” to “I don’t want to make it weird.” That approach won’t work anymore.

THE LAST WORD

JUSTIN FOX BURKS

The women’s march was a good first step, but much remains to be done.

39


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Memphis Flyer 1.26.17  

This week: A profile of Memphis artist and performer Larry Clark! Also: coverage of a week of protests, shows this week, our review of "Pate...