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Democrats Double Down P8 • All Saints in the Old Colony P28 • Jumanji: Welcome to the Jungle P34 01.11.18 • 1507TH ISSUE

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JUSTIN RUSHING Advertising Director CARRIE O’GUIN HOFFMAN Advertising Operations Manager JERRY D. SWIFT Advertising Director Emeritus KELLI DEWITT, CHIP GOOGE Senior Account Executives ROXY MATTHEWS Sales Assistant DESHAUNE MCGHEE Classified Advertising Manager BRENDA FORD Classified Sales Administrator classifieds@memphisflyer.com LYNN SPARAGOWSKI Distribution Manager ROBBIE FRENCH Warehouse and Delivery Manager BRANDY BROWN, JANICE GRISSOM ELLISON, ZACH JOHNSON, KAREN MILAM, RANDY ROTZ, LEWIS TAYLOR, WILLIAM WIDEMAN Distribution THE MEMPHIS FLYER is published weekly by Contemporary Media, Inc., 460 Tennessee Street, Memphis, TN 38103 Phone: (901) 521-9000 Fax: (901) 521-0129 letters@memphisflyer.com www.memphisflyer.com CONTEMPORARY MEDIA, INC. KENNETH NEILL Publisher JEFFREY GOLDBERG Director of Business Development BRUCE VANWYNGARDEN Editorial Director MOLLY WILLMOTT Special Projects Director KEVIN LIPE Digital Manager LYNN SPARAGOWSKI Distribution Manager MATTHEW PRESTON Social Media Manager BRITT ERVIN Email Marketing Manager ASHLEY HAEGER Controller CELESTE DIXON Accounting Assistant JOSEPH CAREY IT Director KALENA MCKINNEY Receptionist

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THE NIGHTOWLS

CONTENTS

BRUCE VANWYNGARDEN Editor SUSAN ELLIS Managing Editor JACKSON BAKER, MICHAEL FINGER Senior Editors TOBY SELLS Associate Editor CHRIS MCCOY Film and TV Editor ALEX GREENE Music Editor CHRIS DAVIS, MICHAEL DONAHUE MAYA SMITH, JOSHUA CANNON Staff Writers JESSE DAVIS Copy Editor JULIE RAY Calendar Editor

OUR 1507TH ISSUE 01.11.18 For the past 23 years, I’ve driven to work along the same route — west on Peabody Avenue from my Midtown home, then into downtown on Vance, before turning south on Front Street to the Flyer’s offices in an old coffee warehouse high on the bluff above Tom Lee Park. It was an ingrained routine — a 12-minute commute — one that seldom varied. It gave me just enough time to gather my thoughts for the day ahead. That all changed with the turning of the new year. On January 2nd, I drove to the Flyer’s new offices in the venerable Cotton Exchange Building at Union and Front. Our former landlord had decided he wanted to turn our huge, haphazard, and disorderly office space into condominium units. It’s hard to blame him, since the South end of downtown is booming with new condos and apartments. Why not cash in, I guess. So, after being in the same place for 35 years, our funky crew of writers, designers, ad sales folks, marketing people, and all the rest got fresh digs. Sure, we grumbled. We groused. We bitched. We’re experts at that. It’s what we do best. But we made it. The biggest fear we had — and the biggest change we faced — was adapting to a smaller space. We’re much closer to each other now; no longer do we have the long, rambling hallways of our former office, with its massive interior oak timbers and ever-popular warehouse loading dock for parties. Now our elevators are shiny and brass instead of being coated with warehouse-gray paint. And we have codes! — to the stairs and the elevators and the parking garage — and actual office windows, overlooking streets with actual people walking around! And we’re slowly but surely getting used to walking to lunch, with a couple dozen dining options within a block or two. We’re learning that downtown alleys are fun to explore — so many shortcuts! So it’s all nice, for the most part. Some other good things are happening, as well. The Flyer’s social media presence is booming these days, thanks to great fresh content — and our digital and content managers, Kevin Lipe and Matthew Preston. In fact, we’ve recently blown by The Commercial Appeal — and all other print media in town, for that matter — with our Facebook traffic numbers. Ad sales are up, year over year. Our paper pickup rate hasn’t changed in decades — and that’s a very good thing. It’s consistently over 92 percent, one of the highest rates in the country for papers like ours, and that’s thanks to constant monitoring by distribution and delivery managers Lynn Sparagowski and Robbie French. We’ve hired some new folks in the past year — including a great young reporter, Maya Smith, and two former CA stalwarts, Michael Donahue and Jon Sparks. Our arts coverage is second to none, thanks to Chris Davis (theater), Alex Greene (music), and Chris McCoy (film). And when you think politics in Memphis, only Jackson Baker comes to mind (or should). Wrangling their words (and assignments) are managing editor Susan Ellis and associate editor Toby Sells. And I’d be remiss in not mentioning copy editor Jesse Davis and our indomitable calendar editor, Julie Ray. None of it would happen without ad director Justin Rushing, sales execs Kelli DeWitt and Chip Googe, classified ad director DeShaune McGhee, and her sales folks, who keep us in business. And as long as this is turning into a name-check column, I have to toss big kudos to longtime art director N E WS & O P I N I O N Carrie Beasley and crew: Chris Myers, THE FLY-BY - 4 Bryan Rollins, and Jeremiah Matthews. NY TIMES CROSSWORD - 5 POLITICS - 8 There are many others, of course, who EDITORIAL - 10 make it possible to get the Flyer into your VIEWPOINT - 11 hands and online, but I’m running out COVER - “MEMPHIS 3.0” of space. Check the masthead to the left BY ALEX GREENE - 12 of this column. But since it’s a new year WE RECOMMEND - 16 and new day, and this is the first issue MUSIC - 18 produced from our new offices, I think AFTER DARK - 20 it’s only right to recognize those folks who CALENDAR - 22 are putting it all together for you. All of us THEATER - 28 are grateful for your support for the past FOOD - 30 29 years and look forward to many more, SPIRITS - 33 FILM - 34 especially now that my commute is only eight minutes. C L AS S I F I E D S - 36 LAST WORD - 39 Bruce VanWyngarden brucev@memphisflyer.com

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January 11-17, 2018

TE N N E S S E E G O P Scott Desjarlais, of Tennessee’s House of Representatives, has spent the last week being mocked online following claims that God has forgiven the Christian, pro-life conservative for having extramarital sex with his patients and pressuring women in his life to have abortions. @TheTweetOfGod responded to Desjarlis’ claim saying, “I most certainly did not, fat Vin Diesel.”

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DAM M IT, GAN N ETT! “The cat came back. But it wasn’t the next day. It was two years later.” — from “Cat Back With Joyful Owners After Two Years,” the story of a Clarksville family that lost their cat then got it back, printed in The Commercial Appeal. By Chris Davis. Email him at davis@memphisflyer.com.

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Questions, Answers + Attitude Edited by Toby Sells

CITY REPORTER B y To b y S e l l s

Confederates, “Citizen,” & the Landfill More statue protests, a new project ends blight at big corner, and a landfill may move. C O N F E D E R ACY OF C O N F E D E R ATE S A pair of much-hyped, pro-Confederate protests brought white nationalists and others to Memphis last weekend but no violence. The protests came after the the city’s removal of Confederate statues from two parks last month. Fewer than a dozen protesters shouted slogans in a police corral near Health Sciences Park on Saturday. The group, led by self-proclaimed white nationalist, Billy Roper, held a banner that read “diversity = white genocide.” Roper said he hoped the rally would provoke the state legislature to act against the city administration on the statues’ removal. Meanwhile, a non-associated caravan of about 50 vehicles decorated with Confederate flags paraded around the I-240 loop, protesting the removal of Nathan Bedford Forrest’s statue and the “desecration” of his grave. “C ITI Z E N” R I S ES In 2019, The Citizen will stand atop a long-blighted, newly vacant lot at Union and McLean. Developers announced last week that the $35 million project will contain 173 1- and 2-bedroom apartments, a parking garage, pool, gym, a residential common area, and a lounge. The Citizen will also offer 10,000 square feet of retail and restaurant space. The project earned a $6.6 million tax break for developers Belz HRP Partners, a union of Memphis-based Belz Enterprises and Georgia-based Harbour Retail Partners. The corridor is a hotspot for retail, said Adam Belz Groveman, Belz Enterprises’ director of project development, but he hoped the project’s name showed “that this space is not apart from the community but rather engaging it in a meaningful way.” N EW LAN D FO R LAN D F I LL A Memphis company announced last week it is looking for new sites for a landfill after many voiced concerns about its expansion plans near a North Memphis school. Memphis Wrecking Co. (MWC) leaders are now looking at five sites in Hickory Hill, Cordova, and Raleigh. Last

month, company officials asked the Memphis City Council to delay a hearing on its planned expansion in Frayser. Community members told company officials that the landfill’s location was the biggest concern “and they would rather have a new landfill opened somewhere else in the city.” “We still believe that it is less impactful to expand an existing landfill than open a new one, but we are trying to be responsive to the community,” said Carol Williamson, the company’s CEO. FO R M E R C H E F G ETS 25 YEAR S A former Memphis chef with a history of violent behavior was sentenced last week to 25 years in prison with no parole for breaking his then-three-month-old son’s skull in 2015. Jason Doty, 46, was convicted of aggravated child neglect in September. In 2015, he told investigators the baby fell off of a changing table onto a hardwood floor. However, doctors said the injuries were caused by blunt force trauma. Doty was once a baker at Bluff City Coffee. He attempted to open the Sweetlife Bakery in Cooper Young in 2011. I O BY F U N D S O U R BAC KYAR D Since ioby was launched here in 2012, it has been used to raise $610,000 for 203 projects around Memphis. Only four cities use the crowd-funding platform. In Memphis, it has been used to fund outdoor classrooms, bike trails, and more. Fuller versions of these stories and even more local news, can be found on the News Blog at memphisflyer.com.


For Release Saturday, May 6, 2017

The New York Times Syndication Sales Corporation 620 Eighth Avenue, New York, N.Y. 10018 For Information Call: 1-800-972-3550 For Release Saturday, March 25, 2017

Crossword

Edited by Will Shortz

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CITY REPORTER B y To b y S e l l s

Lawsuit claims gender discrimination by zoo president.

The suit names zoo president Chuck Brady.

A former employee sued the Memphis Zoo in federal court last month for gender discrimination and retaliation for alleged actions by Chuck Brady, the zoo’s president and CEO. Kimberly Terrell, a female conservation biologist, sued the zoo on Friday, December 22nd for damages in excess of $75,000. In November, she was fired from her job as the zoo’s director of research and conservation. She is seeking back pay, lost benefits, employment reinstatement, punitive damages, and all court fees. Terrell was hired by the Memphis Zoo in August 2015. In her time there, Terrell claimed a “strong record of success” evidenced by increasing conservation donations by about 300 percent and reducing fund-raising expenses by about 95 percent. She also established 15 new science projects in her two years with the zoo, published papers, and led regular talks with community groups. In July 2017, Terrell “became concerned about how [Chuck Brady] treated her in comparison to the men who worked for” the zoo. Brady criticized her budget and questioned her grant fundings requests, though both were in line with her male predecessor’s previous requests. “Dr. Brady repeatedly told her that she was ‘emo-

“Dr. Brady grew visibly angry as a result of her complaint of gender discrimination,” reads the suit. He denied calling Terrell “emotional,” said a cat fight isn’t a “gender thing” because cats can be male or female. Terrell’s suit claims Brady then began a “campaign of retaliation” against her. He withheld her annual salary increase, the suit says. When asked why, Brady told Terrell he was “not impressed” with her work. Terrell told Brady withholding her increase was retaliation, given her accomplishments and “the lack of any documented performance issues.” “At that point, Dr. Brady became visibly angry, interrupted Dr. Terrell, and told her to ‘be quiet,’” according to the suit. In November, Terrell was returning from a trip but was told by the human resources office that she was “not permitted to enter the Memphis Zoo.” She was fired and, later in November, Terrell filed a gender discrimination charge with the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission (EEOC). The original complaint was filed by Bryce W. Ashby with Donati Law PLLC in the U.S. District Court for the Western District of Tennessee. On December 22nd, the zoo was given 21 days to respond to the suit. Zoo officials did not respond to questions about the suit before our press deadline.

tional’ when she expressed an opinion with which Dr. Brady did not agree,” reads the suit. When Terrell expressed concern to Brady about “how a female marketing specialist had forged an email” to her, Brady gestured to the marketing building, “which is occupied almost entirely by women and said, ‘There’s always some kind of drama going on in that hen house.’” Brady was copied on an email in which Terrell was having a professional disagreement with a third party. He said, “I see you’re in a cat fight,” according to the lawsuit. In a July meeting, Terrell told Brady she thought he was treating her differently than her male predecessor and it was on account of her gender.

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POLITICS By Jackson Baker

Democrats Doubling Up in Primary Races A renascent party does not lack for available candidates. Tennessee may be a certifiably red (i.e., Republican) state, and, indeed election results in recent years, even in Shelby County, which has a theoretical Democratic majority, have generally been disappointments to the oncedominant Democratic Party. And the official Party itself has only been reconstituted in the county for a few months after various internal fissures and dissensions caused it to be decertified by the state party in mid-2016. But none of that has stopped a veritable flood of would-be Democratic office-holders from declaring their candidacies for election year 2018 as the filing season gets going in earnest. Most unusually for a minority party, in fact, many of the races on the ballot this year are being contested by multiple Democratic entries. That starts at the top of the ballot, as two name Democrats — former Nashville Mayor Karl Dean and current state House minority leader Craig Fitzhugh of Ripley — are vying for the office of governor. (Even more Republicans are running: six gubernatorial candidates in all, most of them

with serious networks and campaign funding at their disposal.) It seemed for a while that there might be a Democratic primary contest for U.S. Senator as well, until the well-backed entry of former two-term Governor Phil Bredesen convinced a promising newcomer, Nashville lawyer James Mackler, to withdraw in favor of Bredesen, whose second gubernatorial win in 2006 was his party’s most recent statewide hurrah. (At least two name Republicans — 7th District U.S. Rep. Marsha Blackburn and former 8th District congressman Stephen Fincher are vying for the GOP nomination.) In any case, Democrats are also doubling up — and not just in the marquee races. There are competitive Democratic primary races at virtually every election level. Take the case of state Senator Brian Kelsey’s reelection bid in Senate District 31. The long-serving Germantown Republican sent out

Gabby Salinas at the 2016 Democratic National Convention

Forrest fan Jenna Bernstein taking her leave

several S.O.S. emails to supporters this week informing them that he has a Democratic challenger and asking for campaign donations. The opponent Kelsey had in mind was Democratic activist Gabriela “Gabby” Salinas, who did indeed announce her availability last week as a Democratic candidate in District 31. And she has a backstory that gives Kelsey reason for his concern. Salinas, who survived childhood cancer as a patient at St. Jude Children’s Research Hospital and went on to do research work herself at St. Jude, was also a survivor later on of an automobile accident that took the lives of family members. Nor is Salinas the only Democrat seeking to unseat Kelsey. Another declared candidate for the seat is David Weatherspoon, one of several first-time office-seekers on the Democratic side. On Monday, one of the Democratic Party’s recognized stars in Nashville,

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• Monday’s first county commission meeting of the year was an abbreviated affair, starting at the late hour of 4 p.m. to accommodate attendees at the well-attended funeral at Idlewild Presbyterian church of the late public figure, Lewis Donelson. On a day when the city was visited by groups of protesters partial to the now-removed statue of Confederate General Nathan Bedford Forrest, the commission was the site of one such protest — from one Jenna Bernstein of Tampa, who said she had come all the way from Florida to call for the expulsion from the commission of Van Turner, head of Memphis Greenspace Inc., which purchased two parks from the city prior to removing their Confederate monuments. Bernstein’s mission received fairly short shrift, resulting only in a brief debate between Commission chair Heidi Shafer (nay) and Commissioner Walter Bailey (yea) as to the right of a non-resident to be heard. Shafer’s view prevailed. 

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state Representative Raumesh Akbari, announced she would seek to fill the state Senate seat left vacant by Lee Harris, who is running for Shelby County mayor. And Akbari has a Democratic opponent in the primary, her House colleague, Joe Towns. There are numerous other races on the ballot in which Democrats are competing with each other for the honor or capturing an open seat or one currently held by a Republican. One such case is the Shelby County Commission District 13 seat, a swing seat now occupied by Republican Steve Basar. Both former Election Commissioner George Monger and political newcomer Charles Belenky are competing for that one. Monger, a former boy wonder who became a music manager at 15 and ran for the City Council at 18, declared his candidacy over the weekend, while Belenky turned up as a citizen critic of a purchasing contract at the commission’s regular public meeting. And where a seat is traditionally considered Democratic, the infighting can be brisk indeed; two Democrats — Eric Dunn and Tami Sawyer — are vying for the Commission District 7 seat; four seek the seat in Commission District 8: David Vinciarelli, Daryl Lewis, J.B. Smiley Jr., and Mickell Lowery; while Commission District 9, vacated this year by the termlimited Justin Ford, is being sought by no fewer than five Democrats — Edmund Ford Jr., Ian Jeffries, Jonathan L. Smith, Jonathan M. Lewis, and Rosalyn R. Nichols.

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King Day 2018

E D ITO R IAL

City of Good Abode

Celebrating the life and legacy of Dr. King

Monday, January 15 8am-6pm National Civil Rights Museum

Temple — the venerable edifice that served as a point of assembly for striking sanitation workers and their supporters a half century ago. For some months now, the Temple, which has been undergoing renovation, has, by a profound moral choice of the Rotarians, been the club’s official meeting place. It is also, as Madden explained, next door to the commemorative site, I Am a Man Plaza, now under construction with appropriate monuments, and hard by another development underway, the Martin Luther King Reflection Site, which, as the name implies, will contain memorials that will allow visitors both to recall the events of 1968, that pivotal year of the Memphis sanitation strike and the assassination here of Dr. King, and, by means of reflective devices, to insert their own images into these reminders of history. It will all be part of MLK50, the city’s commemoration of that history and its formal embrace of the motives that prompted Memphis sanitation workers to demand of their fellow townsfolk simple dignity, an elementary appreciation of their contributions to the city’s life, and workplace justice. “I AM A MAN,” the strikers’ slogan, incorporated all those ideas, and it jibed entirely with King’s humanitarian goals. Fifty years ago, those ideas and those goals were not the common property of Memphians — or, for that matter, of much of the rest of

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Well, this new year isn’t going to start the way things did 50 years ago. Mayor Jim Strickland’s communications director, Ursula Madden, made that clear Tuesday in remarks to a luncheon of the Rotary Club of Memphis at Clayborn

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the world. It is largely forgotten now, but the Memphis sanitation strike, though it had its own trigger in the unfortunate deaths of three workers trapped in defective machinery, was something of a sequel to a similar strike that had convulsed New York City early in 1968. It was not just Memphis but the Big Apple — and in some ways mankind itself — that was uncharitable enough to flout the basic humanity of its most humble citizens. But here we are a half century later, and the city, on behalf of mankind, has taken it upon itself to raise that slogan of “I AM A MAN” — captured so eloquently in the photographs by Ernest Withers that went around the world — into the very consciousness of the human race. Indeed, a necessary concomitant of the forthcoming celebration, as Madden acknowledged on Tuesday, was the city’s parallel action, accomplished in the last days of the old year, of renouncing and expunging two flagrant memorials to inequality— the statues of Nathan Bedford Forrest and Jefferson Davis, those paragons to a defeated Confederacy. In the year to come, the slogan of the striking sanitation workers will be reinforced by a parallel slogan of sorts: I AM MEMPHIS. And, finally, at the site of the National Civil Rights Museum and I AM A MAN Plaza, the city will have moved closer to living up to the phrase it has long claimed: City of Good Abode.

January 11-17, 2018

450 mulberry st. • Memphis, tN 38103 • civilrightsmuseum.org

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VIEWPOINT By Richard Cohen

Liar’s Paradox Michael Wolff ’s Fire and Fury doesn’t tell us anything we didn’t know.

As every journalist knows, news is not that a dog bit a man but that a man bit a dog. In the same vein, it would be news if someone confided to an author or journalist that Trump was a reasonable man, self-effacing, considerate of others, cautious in his approach to major decisions, knowledgeable about the grand issues of national security, or, even, aware that his hero, Andrew Jackson, did not live to see the Civil War. This would be startling stuff. It would be similar in a way to the revisionist assessment of Dwight D. Eisenhower, considered a mumbler in his time, but understood now as a president who cleverly

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The Liar’s Paradox has spun out of control, with liars lying to a liar who believed the lie.

shielded his intentions by being purposely inarticulate. Maybe so. From the White House and in the House of Lies known as the Republican National Committee have come denials aplenty. Who believes them? The president himself has gone into his Rumpelstiltskin act, stomping his foot and tweeting his innocence, but who believes him, either? Trump has effectively lent credence to Wolff ’s reporting by having his lawyer threaten to sue Wolff for, of all things, “outright defamatory statements … about Mr. Trump, his family members, and the Company.” So huffed lawyer Charles Harder. How is it possible to defame Trump? When Secretary of State Rex Tillerson called the president a “moron,” was that defamatory or merely the prosaic truth? When others in the White House said something similar, was that defamatory, or was it a statement of fact? Actually, these statements would constitute matters of opinion so clearly protected by the First Amendment that only a Supreme Court packed by Trump with caddies from his golf courses could rule in his favor. That same holds for the effort to restrain Wolff ’s publisher from publishing the book. Ain’t going to happen. As the eminent First Amendment lawyer Floyd Abrams reminded me, the issue of prior restraint was settled by the Supreme Court in the famous Pentagon Papers case. If Trump and his legal team want, I will arrange for them to see The Post, the Steven Spielberg movie about how The Washington Post came to publish the Pentagon Papers. The question there revolved around national security — not a president’s hurt feelings — and still the court supported the Post and The New York Times. Trump’s anger has clouded his PR sense. In essence, he’s promoting the Wolff book. The president and the presidency are unraveling. Trump is unloved in his own house. A figure of ridicule, a theatrical creation, he is almost sympathetic. He was told by the greedy and the outright stupid that he would make a swell president. The Liar’s Paradox has spun out of control, with liars lying to a liar who believed the lie. What would that be called? Fox News, I think. Richard Cohen writes for the Washington Post Writers Group.

NEWS & OPINION

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Until recently, the famous liar’s paradox was a liar saying, “I am lying.” Now, though, it has to be when any of Donald Trump’s friends or associates claims not to have called the president an ignoramus, a liar, an egomaniac, or heroically unsuited for the presidency. Their choice is either to confirm the obvious or to appear a liar. Michael Wolff ’s new book, Fire and Fury, has put them all on the spot. Wolff is a controversial figure whose journalistic reputation falls somewhat short of impeccable. What matters at the moment, though, is that most everything he has written in the excerpts I’ve read of Fire and Fury strikes me as true and, moreover, has already been said by others.

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MEMPHIS 3.0

COVER STORY BY

wealth tend to concentrate around a “cone” expanding from downtown to the east along Poplar, how do we spread it out? How do we encourage businesses in underdeveloped neighborhoods. How do we improve transit to serve them better? How s this just another study?!” can we make all neighborhoods more The question brought a hush livable and more sustainable? to the proceedings. Everyone John Paul Shaffer, executive director realized that the woman asking it had of BLDG Memphis (a nonprofit that cut to the quick of the matter. I was facilitates community development attending one of the public outreach corporations and projects), says, “You sessions sponsored by Memphis 3.0, a can look at our peer cities and model new initiative to develop a comprehensive cities, and there’s not a single one of plan for the city’s third century, which them that doesn’t have some sort of begins in 2019. Such public meetings tend Meet the architects of Memphis 3.0: (from l to r) Lauren guiding document for how they’re doing to attract the same few citizens who have Kennedy, John Paul Shaffer, and Ashley Cash are pooling business. And how they’re making the mindset and the time to get involved, development decisions. ” and this woman was clearly a veteran city resources to design a plan for a better Memphis. Th e only such plan Memphis has is of many such gatherings. Her question nearly 40 years old. immediately conjured up the ghosts of Community input has become de rigueur for such plans. “Of course, public meetings past bureaucrats and academics, however well intentioned, that raised hopes for change, are the tried and true method to reach people,” says Cash. “But we’ve also tried to partner only to offer more business as usual after the data was collected. with a lot of agencies who have existing networks.” That includes the two chief nonprofit But Ashley Cash, a veteran of neighborhood planning herself, and head administrator partners in the Memphis 3.0 initiative: BLDG Memphis and the UrbanArt Commission. at the city’s Office of Comprehensive Planning (OCP), was confident and quick with her If that third partner strikes you as unconventional, you’re correct. Only a few cities have response: “Whatever is written in this plan gets transferred to the policy and code of the pioneered the tactic of having planners work with artists. (In fact — full disclosure — that’s city.” This was, she insisted, going to be a plan with follow-through. how I came to be involved with Memphis 3.0, as a consulting musician.) But that’s not all And it was perhaps the first time that one could honestly say this about such a that’s innovative about the project. The biggest leap forward has been to simply take the document. idea of a comprehensive plan seriously, initiating community involvement across the vast While municipal planning is nothing new, it has only evolved in fits and starts in area that Memphis has become, from Presidents Island to Cordova. Memphis. A comprehensive plan like Memphis 3.0 aims to coordinate various project12 Shaffer sums up the city’s history this way: “The city has grown by this cycle of flight specific plans with a holistic vision of how to best grow the entire city. If our growth and

ALEX GREENE

January 11-17, 2018

“I


What's in store?

and annexation. And that goes all the way back to people getting out of downtown to the streetcar suburbs, and then it continued through the civil rights era, through white flight, and bussing and all these kinds of things that played into it. And it’s all been facilitated by government policy — how government spent money on programs that were accessible mainly to middle-class white families. Then they built highways and all these things that spurred this development and encouraged it. Memphis ate it up to some extent, and that’s how we grew in the entire 20th century.” Coping with the sheer sprawl of Memphis is the key challenge to planners. City limits that encompassed only 51 square miles in 1945 have grown more than six-fold today. In the 1960s, plenty of federal money was available to subsidize municipal planning departments, but soon after they had to function independently, at the mercy of the economy. This wasn’t always a bad thing, given that one of the major planning goals of the 1970s was to demolish Beale Street. That initiative foundered, but by the late 1970s, there were still enough resources to begin work on the city’s most recent comprehensive plan — completed in 1981 and updated the year after. The city’s commitment to this plan was rarely resolute, possibly because widespread public input was not a priority. And without citizen involvement, there was no accountability. “If you look at our last comprehensive plan,” says Cash, “there really wasn’t a lot of community engagement in that. That’s just the way the profession was at the time.” As Shaffer sees it, “It’s not like community engagement didn’t exist back then. I just don’t know that locally it was highly valued the way this project values it. I’m sure there were probably constituent groups that were at the table, and maybe that’s because they’d always been at the table.” What makes Memphis 3.0 different, he says, is “thinking about new approaches and bringing artists into the equation and doing pop-up meetings and

“Bringing artists into the equation” is the ideal way to express the process by which aesthetics are brought to bear on a discipline that has traditionally been the realm of number-crunchers. And it brings us to the third primary player in Memphis 3.0, the UrbanArt Commission (UAC). Executive director Lauren Kennedy recalls the evolution of her thinking: “Several years ago, the UAC budgeted for a public art master plan. When I came on board, I didn’t know exactly what to do with that money, because at that point — this was 2015 — there wasn’t really a planning department. There wasn’t some comprehensive city plan to tie it to, and I didn’t want to produce a public art master plan that just lived in a vacuum. So I didn’t move on it that year. Then we got a new mayor, a new administration. Jim Strickland came in and basically rebuilt the Planning Department and the Office of Comprehensive Planning. Also, when I was thinking about how to use that funding, I was starting to follow work in Calgary and Minneapolis, where artists and designers had been plugged into city departments to think about things differently, to come at things from a different approach and perspective, and to consider some of the aesthetics of the way the cities were operating.” The work in Minneapolis’ Creative CityMaking program that inspired Kennedy ranged from street theater to a “rolling foot cam” video project that recorded pavement-level images. The public interest in such projects was so impressive that Kennedy and John Zeanah (who had recently helmed the Mid-South Regional Greenprint and Sustainability Plan) made a trip to Minneapolis to see it firsthand. What they saw was enough to convince them that artists could take public engagement to a new level. At the same time, Zeanah’s Greenprint project was making a new comprehensive plan for the city seem doable. “I feel like that was kind of a turning point,” says Shaffer. While his BLDG Memphis had been calling for a comprehensive plan for years, “the Greenprint showed a lot of people who had never seen that comprehensive approach or hadn’t seen it in three decades, and kinda put that back on the table for folks. Where we’re looking at this through the lens of green spaces, but we’re looking at housing, transportation, and workforce and education and health and equity and these kinds of things that make a comprehensive view.” Thus, with some additional encouragement from Paul Young, director of the city’s Division of Housing and Community Development, a perfect storm of influences led to the founding of Memphis 3.0. And in an innovative move, the UAC was at the heart of the operation. “I’m grateful to the city for being open to this experience and the journey with us,” Kennedy says. She wasted no time in putting out a call for artists. Out of more than 50 applicants in March of last year, three were selected, and bless my soul if I wasn’t one of them. And while we artists are just beginning our engagement events, we’ve worked out some interesting ways to re-imagine our city in creative ways. I am in very good company. Yancy Villa-Calvo, a native of Mexico City, has done public art installations for some time, continued on page 14

COVER STORY m e m p h i s f l y e r. c o m

The city is creating a roadmap for Memphis' third century.

“Bringing artists into the equation” helps keep Memphis 3.0 planners thinking outside the box: Yancy Villa-Calvo (top), the artist behind GEMS (short for Go Explore Memphis Soul), works with Memphis youth to design a stylized map of the city; Roger Porter (below) works with local students at Promise Academy to practice making a plan for the city. bus tours. Even serving meals at community meetings is new. Some of these new approaches are exciting to see at the local level. These approaches have been around for a while; it’s just nice to see them come home.”

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continued from page 13

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the most recent being her “Barrier Free” project, which used a movable wall and mirrored silhouettes of families to urge participants to empathize with the immigrant experience. For Memphis 3.0, she has devised an installation called GEMS (Go Explore Memphis Soul). She’ll be visiting neighborhoods with the GEMS mobile, a crystalline-like art piece superimposed on a map of the city, using eye-catching images that encourage people to draw or write what they love, dislike, and hope for in their neighborhood. Neili Jones, a Raleigh/Frayser native, has studied design, fashion, and brand management, but her real interest is stories. “My goal is to ensure that as many voices get involved as possible,” says Jones. “I meet the people where they are — community meetings, rallies, groceries stores, or at bus stops. My art is about utilizing space and collecting the visual story.” Having most recently done activist art in Atlanta, her work for Memphis 3.0 uses creative set pieces to elicit narratives from residents concerning the history and development (or lack thereof) of their neighborhoods. As for me, a native of Memphis, Nebraska, my public art (aside from performing in rock or jazz bands) has always centered on sound design for independent movies, modern dance pieces, or gallery installations. My engagement project for Memphis 3.0 focuses on the environmental sounds that surround us. “ReMix Memphis” is a traveling audio experience, using field recordings of Memphis in a user-friendly app that allows participants to mix together the sounds they’d like to hear (or not hear) around them. A way of thinking aurally, not visually, it encourages people to re-imagine the livability of their community. The best part? I’m crowd-sourcing my field recordings. Use your phone to record things like trains, planes, automobiles, playgrounds, or what have you, then email them to remix.memphis@gmail.com. As one of the artists for Memphis 3.0, I’ve had a front row seat to its implementation. A particularly inspiring moment came during a retreat by the entire team of Memphis planners and artists in St. Louis. One community organizer there, based in Chuck Berry’s old neighborhood, told us: “Every community has a heartbeat. Find it!” And we have followed that counsel. Divvying up the city into 14 districts, three planning teams, each one armed with an artist, are setting up local headquarters as the year unfolds. The teams also benefit from a small army of expert planners, aside from the professionals already working for the OCP, including local design firms brg3s, Ray “If we adopt a plan that Brown, and Self+Tucker, the University citizens and communities of Memphis School of Urban Affairs and Public Policy, and the Berkeley, don’t feel like they have any California-based firm Opticos. The latter ownership in, it’s not somehave consulted with many cities, based on thing implementable.” the key insight that “walkable places are critical for healthy, resilient, and equitable communities.” And, in a departure from old-school urban planning that would have sacrificed whole neighborhoods at the altar of progress, Opticos operates with a “focus on social, environmental, and economic responsibility — a triple bottom line.” Noble goals indeed, but as I joined the first tour of neighborhoods in the North District (a sprawling administrative fiction stretching from Harbor Town to Hyde Park and Douglass), I wondered how we could bring such values to bear on what we saw. Ray Brown and local residents spoke about significant places on our route (and I spoke about significant musical sites, such as Manassas High School, what was once Johnny Curry’s Club, and the former American Sound Studios, now a Family Dollar). What struck me most was the tragedy of what North Memphis has endured at the hands of collapsed or departed industries. All that’s left of Firestone, one-time employer of thousands, are the ruins of a factory and the brownfields around it, too polluted for cost-effective remediation. Its looming smokestack made me wonder: Could any amount of planning remedy this history? And yet the mood was upbeat as we tooled up and down Chelsea. When I spoke to community members who attended, they felt their concerns were falling on sympathetic ears, by and large. Quincey Morris, of the Klondike Community Development Corporation, felt that the Memphis 3.0 workshops could have been scheduled better, so as to include seniors who don’t go out in the evenings, or single parents. “Other than that,” she said, “I think that they did listen, especially in my one-on-one interview with [OCP planner] Trey Wilburn. And as 3.0 moves forward, we do intend to stay involved and participate. We have an opportunity to have input and hold people accountable. And I think that’s the only way that you can do it.” Indeed, as Cash notes, accountability is key: “We can continue the conversation. The process ends in 2019, on the tail end of 2018, but, really, what we wanna be able to say is, ‘Okay, it’s 2020, and we’re still engaged in the community.’” Shaffer adds, “If we adopt a plan that citizens and communities don’t feel like they have any ownership in, it’s not something that’s easily implementable. It’s an uphill battle. Bringing people in for the whole process and the whole ride, it helps get it adopted and makes sure that decision makers are following this guiding document, because it’s something the entire community has come together and said: ‘This is our vision for our city and for our neighborhoods.’” Visit www.memphis3point0.com to learn more and see when workshops and artists’ events are scheduled near you.


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COVER STORY m e m p h i s f l y e r. c o m


steppin’ out

We Recommend: Culture, News + Reviews

Life of Brian

Comedian Brian Regan builds comedic themes.

By Chris Davis

Brian Regan’s an old-school observational comic and a master craftsman. Humorous anecdotes establish subtle themes, leading to satisfying gags and glorious, often unexpected callbacks. Whether or not this hard-touring veteran performer dedicated to the art of stand-up makes you grin, titter, roll your eyes, or LOL — and he can command all of the above — you’ve got to admire the architecture. “I guess I think about building my jokes and my overall sets like builders think about building buildings,” says Regan, who’s recorded specials for Comedy Central and Netflix and appeared with Jerry Seinfeld on “Comedians in Cars Getting Coffee.” “If I had thought more about that answer, I would’ve thought of a way to avoid using a form of the word ‘build’ four times in one sentence,” he adds. “I like to put several jokes together within a theme,” Regan continues, addressing some of the ideas in his Netflix special Flamethrowers and Nunchucks, which touches on everyday topics like weight gain, underwear waistbands, and trips to Disneyland, but is also a lightly rendered portrait of order descending into anarchy.  “A theme can last a few minutes,” he says. “Usually, the individual jokes come first; then I try to organize them in a way that makes sense. Sports? Okay, let’s listen to some sports jokes. Politics? Okay, let’s listen to some political jokes. Buildings? Okay. … ” Regan’s bringing his act to Memphis’ Orpheum Theatre Thursday, January 11th. No joke. BRIAN REGAN AT THE ORPHEUM THEATRE, THURSDAY, JAN. 11TH, 7:30 P.M. $37.50-$47.50. ORPHEUM-MEMPHIS.COM, (901) 525-3000

Blackstone Brewing Company is back in business. Spirits, p. 33

A family exorcises old demons in the excellent All Saints in Old Colony. Theater, p. 28 SATURDAY, January 13

January 11-17, 2018

FRIDAY, January 12

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The Temptations Horseshoe Casino & Hotel, 8 p.m. “My Girl,” “Papa Was a Rolling Stone,” classic hits from this legendary soul group tonight. “The Sunny Side” Ross Gallery, Christian Brothers University, 5:30-7:30 p.m. Opening reception for this exhibition of work by Niles Wallace.

“Forge Cast Fabricate” Metal Museum, 5:30-7:30 p.m. Group show from museum artists, featuring Lewis Body, Kary Ganley, Jeannie Tomlinson Saltmarsh, Jim Masterson, and others. DreamFest Weekend: The Concert 1884 Lounge, 7-11 p.m. Celebrating diversity in our music scene, tonight’s concert features performances by Gerald Morgan Jr., Queen Tyki X, Beata, Akronym Est 1990, Ron Greer, and Stixx.

Sunset Baby Hattiloo Theatre, 7:30 p.m. A play about fathers and daughters revolving around Nina who dismisses the work of her parents in the black liberation movement. Then her father reaches out. Science of Beer Pink Palace, 6 p.m., $55 Annual party all about beer and how to make it. Including lectures, demos, activities, and tastings. Designated driver ticket is $35.

mark-ology Dixon Gallery & Gardens, 1:30 p.m., $45 Drawing and mark-making class in charcoal, ink, and pastels. I Can Fix That Revolutions Community Bicycle Shop, First Congo, 9 a.m.-noon A class in roadside maintenance.


Dream Time There were moments when Memphis in 2017 resembled Memphis in 1968. Protesters took to the streets. Police mobilized to contain them. Confederate flags were raised in anger. Fists were raised in solidarity. And two icons of the city’s Confederate, slave-selling past were removed from their places of honor in city parks. It was a symbolic victory, so hard won we can only begin to imagine the institutional barricades to meaningful social and economic justice. On Monday, January 18th, three months before the 50th-anniversary of his assassination in Memphis, America celebrates the life and service of Martin Luther King Jr., who so memorably taught us how to bring down the icons of oppression, saying, “Darkness cannot drive out darkness; only light can do that. Hate cannot drive out hate; only love can do that.” Well, love and a whole lot of hard work. The National Civil Rights Museum is always a hub of activity on the national MLK day of service. This year, the museum is hosting a variety of entertainments and service-oriented activities including a food drive for the Mid-South Food Bank and opportunities to donate to Lifeblood. A community pavilion in the museum’s parking lot will provide a variety of services including health screenings and information from organizations ranging from Just City and the New Memphis Institute to Latino Memphis and the NAACP. Performers scheduled to appear include Will Graves & Soul, Mighty Souls Brass Band, Stax Music Academy, African drummers, and Watoto Academy of Performing Arts. MLK DAY OF SERVICE AT THE CIVIL RIGHTS MUSEUM MONDAY, JANUARY 18TH. ALL DAY. CHECK CALENDAR LISTINGS FOR MORE EVENTS.

Piano Man Pictures Roadshow Crosstown Arts (1350 Concourse Ave., #280), 7 p.m. A screening of four short films involving the mentally ill, a kidney transplant patient, greed, and conspiracy theories. Muddy Magnolias Halloran Centre, 7:30 p.m., $15 Mississippi funk meets Nashville twang.

SUNDAY, January 14

TUESDAY, January 16

Kevin Hart: The Irresponsible Tour Landers Center, 7 p.m. A concert by comedian Kevin Hart.

34th Annual International Blues Challenge various locations and times The best of blues performers flaunt their stuff during this annual bluestastic event culminating in the finale Saturday at Orpheum.

m e m p h i s f l y e r. c o m

Kevin Hart (above, l to r), Dwayne Johnson, Karen Gillian, and Jack Black star in Jumanji: Welcome to the Jungle. Film, p. 34

ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT

GINO SANTA MARIA / SHUTTERFREE, LLC | DREAMSTIME.COM

By Chris Davis

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M U S I C F E AT U R E B y J e s s e D a v i s

Blues Invasion The International Blues Challenge brings the world’s best to Beale Street.

F

January 11-17, 2018

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The Souliz Band

JAYNE DOOGER

or one week each year, there is a sudden, temporary population spike in the number of blues musicians on Beale Street. This year, it’s January 16-20, and Delta blues cats, aficionados of the bottle-neck slide, and 12-bar and 16-bar enthusiasts of every variety will descend on Memphis from all over the globe to compete in the International Blues Challenge (IBC). They will come from the Oslo Bluesklubb, the Kalamazoo Valley Blues Association, France Blues, and Mojo Station — and from Austin, Texas, and Tampa, Florida. Each year, for 34 years running, Memphis’ own Blues Foundation has brought the most talented musicians from its affiliate organizations to the Bluff City to compete in the IBC. In addition to hosting the IBC, the Blues Foundation has tasked itself with preserving and celebrating the legacy of the blues, a uniquely American musical tradition. The Foundation has 200 affiliated blues societies spread across the globe, and it is from that pool that the entrants for each year’s IBC are drawn. Bands and solo performers compete in regional competitions held by Foundation affiliates and are whittled down until only the best and bluesiest bands remain. Those 200 blues players then head to Memphis for a week of wailing saxophones, screaming guitars, soulful harmonicas — and tearing up the dance floor — until, at last, the IBC judges — industry professionals distinguished by their knowledge and experience — crown a winner. With 200 competitors in both the full-band and solo/duo categories, it’s a near impossibility to interview every performer. One story among many is that of the Tampa-based Souliz Band featuring Sugar and Spice — returning this year for a second bite at the proverbial apple. Last year, the sextet came within a hair’s breadth of snagging the first-place prize in the IBC. They went home to Tampa with second place — second out of 200 competitors being nothing to scoff at — but this year, bassist/multi-instrumentalist and bandleader Tony Fullwood wants to win the ultimate prize. “We

need to win first place. Second place is first-place loser,” Fullwood says before he chuckles. “Second place is great, don’t get me wrong. I’m just a type-A personality. I don’t like to take a back seat.” Originally from upstate New York and with roots in jazz and fusion, the multi-instrumentalist took note of the talent on hand at the IBC last year. “There was some great competition there. Everybody had a different style, and I was quite impressed. “To me, it’s not about who’s better; it’s about what you do and how you do it,” Fullwood says. “Everybody has a different style. Everybody has their own creative flow.” Souliz Band’s style, Fullwood says, tends to lean toward a Southern soul sound. But the blues is always an influence. “The singers, [sisters Myra and Velma Glover] their mother [Loretta Glover] was a blues singer,” Fullwood says. “She was very prominent here in Tampa. She passed away

onstage singing, actually.” Loretta passed on her serious vocal chops to her daughters, whose confident and heartfelt take on Sam & Dave’s “Hold On, I’m Comin’” at 2017’s IBC elevated the now-classic soul song to a frenetic assurance. “Of course, it’s all one style,” Fullwood says of jazz, soul, and R&B, all of which have a common root in the blues. “After you hit Virginia, everything coming down is basically blues until you hit the West Coast.” But the well-traveled bandleader of Souliz says he’s excited to be in Memphis. His voice sounds determined and confident, like a boxer on the eve before a big match. “Just know that Souliz is coming back to town,” Fullwood says. “And we need to have that Number One.” The 34th National Blues Challenge takes place in multiple venues on Beale Street, January 16th through 20th. (blues.org/international-blues-challenge/)


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JAN 16-20, 2018 • MEMPHIS • TICKETS AND INFO AT BLUES.ORG

ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT

250 blues acts from all over the world struttin’ their stuff on Beale Street

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MUDDY MAGNOLIAS SATURDAY, JANUARY 13TH HALLORAN CENTRE

RUSSELL HALL FRIDAY, JANUARY 12TH GPAC

THE TEMPTATIONS FRIDAY, JANUARY 12TH HORSESHOE CASINO’S BLUESVILLE

After Dark: Live Music Schedule January 11 - 17 Alfred’s 197 BEALE 525-3711

Gary Hardy & Memphis 2 Thursdays-Saturdays, 6-9 p.m.; Karaoke Thursdays, TuesdaysWednesdays, 9 p.m.-1 a.m. and Sundays-Mondays, 10 p.m.-2 a.m.; Mandi Thomas Fridays, Saturdays, 6-9 p.m.; The 901 Heavy Hitters Fridays, Saturdays, 10 p.m.-2 a.m.; Flyin’ Ryan Fridays, Saturdays, 2:30 a.m.; Memphis Jazz Orchestra Sundays, 6-9 p.m.

B.B. King’s Blues Club 143 BEALE 524-KING

The King Beez Thursdays, 5:30 p.m.; B.B. King’s All Stars Thursdays, Fridays, 8 p.m.; Will Tucker Band Fridays, Saturdays, 5 p.m.; Lisa G and Flic’s Pic’s Band Saturdays, Sundays, 12:30 p.m.; Blind Mississippi Morris Sundays, 5 p.m.; Memphis Jones Sundays, Wednesdays 5:30 p.m.; Doc Fangaz and the Remedy Tuesdays, 5:30 p.m.

Beale Street DOWNTOWN MEMPHIS 529-0999

34th International Blues Challenge Tues.-Sat., Jan. 16-20.

Blue Note Bar & Grill 341-345 BEALE 577-1089

King’s Palace Cafe 162 BEALE 521-1851

Blind Mississippi Morris Fridays, 5 p.m. and Saturdays, 5:30 p.m.; Brad Birkedahl Band Thursdays, Wednesdays, 8 p.m.; Earl “The Pearl” Banks Saturdays, 12:30 p.m. and Tuesdays, 7 p.m.; Brandon Cunning Band Sundays, 6 p.m., and Mondays, 7 p.m.; FreeWorld Sundays, 9:30 p.m.

Club 152 152 BEALE 544-7011

Live Music WednesdaysSundays, 7-11 p.m.; Live DJ Wednesdays-Sundays, 11 p.m.; Third Floor: DJ Tubbz Fridays, Saturdays, 10 p.m.

Handy Bar

David Bowen Thursdays, 5:309:30 p.m., Fridays, Saturdays, 6:30-10:30 p.m., and Sundays, 5:30-9:30 p.m.

King’s Palace Cafe Patio 162 BEALE 521-1851

Sonny Mack Mondays-Fridays, 2-6 p.m.; Cowboy Neil Mondays, Thursdays, 7-11 p.m. and Saturdays, Sundays, 2-6 p.m.; Sensation Band Tuesdays, Fridays, 7-11 p.m.; Fuzzy and the Kings of Memphis Saturdays, 7-11 p.m.; Chic Jones and the Blues Express Sundays, 7-11 p.m.; North and South Band Wednesdays, 7-11 p.m.

200 BEALE 527-2687

King’s Palace Cafe Tap Room

Hard Rock Cafe

Big Don Valentine’s Three Piece Chicken and a Biscuit Blues Band Thursdays, Tuesdays, 8 p.m.-midnight.

The Amazing Rhythmatics Tuesdays, Thursdays-Sundays, 7 p.m.-1 a.m. 126 BEALE 529-0007

Memphis Music Monday Third Monday of every month, 6-9 p.m.

Itta Bena 145 BEALE 578-3031

New Daisy Theatre 330 BEALE 525-8981

The Wailers Sunday, Jan. 14, 7 p.m.

Rum Boogie Cafe

Nat “King” Kerr Fridays, Saturdays, 9-10 p.m.

182 BEALE 528-0150

King Jerry Lawler’s Hall of Fame Bar & Grille 159 BEALE

168 BEALE 576-2220

Chris Gales Solo Acoustic Show Mondays-Saturdays, noon-4 p.m.; Eric Hughes solo/acoustic Thursdays, 5-8 p.m.; Karaoke Mondays-Thursdays, Sundays, 8 p.m.; Live Bands Fridays, Saturdays, 8 p.m.

Young Petty Thieves Thursdays, 8 p.m.-midnight; Eric Hughes Band Mondays, 8 p.m.-midnight; Gracie Curran Tuesdays, 8 p.m.midnight; Plantation Allstars Wednesdays, 8 p.m.-midnight.

Rum Boogie Cafe Blues Hall

Flying Saucer Draught Emporium

182 BEALE 528-0150

130 PEABODY PLACE 523-8536

Memphis Bluesmasters Thursdays, Sundays, 8 p.m.midnight; Vince Johnson and the Plantation Allstars Fridays, Saturdays, 4-8 p.m. and Sundays, 3-7 p.m.; Cowboy Neil Friday, Jan. 12, 8:30 p.m.-12:30 a.m.; Myra Hall Band Saturday, Jan. 13, 8:30 p.m.-12:30 a.m.; Brian Hawkins Blues Party Mondays, 8 p.m.-midnight; Sensation Band Monday, Jan. 15, 8 p.m.-midnight; Chris McDaniel Tuesdays, Wednesdays, 8 p.m.-midnight.

Silky O’Sullivan’s 183 BEALE 522-9596

Dueling Pianos Thursdays, Wednesdays, 9 p.m.-1 a.m., Fridays, Saturdays, 9 p.m.-3 a.m., and Sundays, Tuesdays, 8 p.m.midnight.

Songwriters with Roland and Friends Mondays, 7-10 p.m.

Percussion Explosion Saturday, Jan. 13, 7:30-9:30 p.m.

225 S. MAIN 529-4299

Huey’s Downtown 77 S. SECOND 527-2700

John Paul Keith Trio Sunday, Jan. 14, 8:30 p.m.-midnight.

Paulette’s RIVER INN, 50 HARBOR TOWN SQUARE 260-3300

Live Pianist Thursdays, 5:30-8:30 p.m., Fridays and Saturdays, 5:30-9 p.m., Sundays, 11 a.m.-2 p.m., and Mondays-Wednesdays, 5:30-8 p.m.

DreamFest Weekend 7: The Concert Friday, Jan. 12, 7-11 p.m.

Boscos 2120 MADISON 432-2222

Sunday Brunch with Joyce Cobb Sundays, 11:30 a.m.2:30 p.m.

Canvas 1737 MADISON 443-5232

Karaoke Thursdays, 9:30 p.m.; Kyle Pruzina Live Mondays, 10 p.m.-midnight.

Celtic Crossing Jeremy Stanfill and Joshua Cosby Sundays, 6-9 p.m.; Candy Company Mondays.

Rumba Room

2559 BROAD 730-0719

303 S. MAIN 523-0020

Salsa Night Saturdays, 8:30 p.m.-3 a.m.

855 KENTUCKY

Nancy Apple Thursdays, 8 p.m.; Bobbie & Tasha Wednesdays, 8-11 p.m.

531 S. MAIN 523-9754

1884 Lounge 1555 MADISON 609-1744

DJ Dance Music MondaysSundays, 10 p.m.; 2018 Blind Raccoon & Nola Blue Showcase Wed.-Fri., Jan. 17-19, noon-5 p.m.

Dirty Crow Inn

Earnestine & Hazel’s

Electric Church Sundays, 2-4 p.m.

Muddy Magnolias Saturday, Jan. 13.

140 LT. GEORGE W. LEE 577-1139

MEMPHIS COOK CONVENTION CENTER, 255 N. MAIN TICKETS, 525-1515

Loflin Yard 7 W. CAROLINA

The Halloran Centre

Purple Haze Nightclub Cannon Center for the Performing Arts

South Main

The Silly Goose 100 PEABODY PLACE 435-6915

DJ Cody Fridays, Saturdays, 10 p.m.

Amber Rae Dunn Hosts: Earnestine & Hazel’s Open Mic Wednesdays, 8-11 p.m.

903 S. COOPER 274-5151

The Cove Jazz w/ Ed Finney, Deb Swiney & David Collins Frog Squad Thursday, Jan. 11, 8-11 p.m.; Blackwater Trio Friday, Jan. 12, 9 p.m.; Madison Blue Saturday, Jan. 13, 9 p.m.; David Collins & Frog Squad Sunday, Jan. 14, 6-9 p.m.; Russel Lee Weaver Monday, Jan. 15, 6-9 p.m.; Ben Minden-Birkenmaier Wednesday, Jan. 17, 6-8 p.m.; Karaoke Wednesdays, 9 p.m.

January 11-17, 2018

Queen Ann and the Memphis Blues Masters Fridays, Saturdays, 8 p.m.-midnight.

Blues City Cafe 138 BEALE 526-3637

20

GRIZZLIES VS LAKERS MONDAY, JANUARY 15

HARLEM GLOBETROTTERS SATURDAY, JANUARY 20

WINTER JAM SATURDAY, MARCH 3

JUSTIN TIMBERLAKE WEDNESDAY, MAY 30

Join us to remember and celebrate Martin Luther King Jr. presented by Memphis Area Ford Dealers. Special tip-off at 4:30pm! GRIZZLIES.COM | 901.888.HOOP

Known for their one-of-a-kind family entertainment, the Globetrotters are bringing their 2018 World Tour to FedExForum. Tickets available!

Christian music’s largest tour featuring Skillet, Kari Jobe & Cody Carnes, building 429, KB, Jordan Feliz and Newsong. Suggested donation of $15 at the door.

TheGrammy Award Winner and Memphis native is bringing his Man of the Woods Tour to FedExForum. Tickets on sale Monday, January 22 at 10am!

Get tickets at FedExForum Box Office | Ticketmaster locations | 1.800.745.3000 | ticketmaster.com | fedexforum.com


After Dark: Live Music Schedule January 11 - 17 East Memphis

Poplar/I-240

The Phoenix Blues Jam Tuesdays, 8-11 p.m.

Buckman Arts Center at St. Mary’s School

East Tapas and Drinks

Railgarten

60 N. PERKINS EXT. 537-1483

Eddie Harris Thursdays, Fridays, 6:30-9:30 p.m.; Van Duren Solo Tuesdays, 6-8 p.m.

Arlington/Eads/ Oakland/Lakeland

Neil’s Music Room

Rizzi’s/Paradiso Pub

Growlers

The Phoenix

1911 POPLAR 244-7904

1015 S. COOPER 338-5223

2160 CENTRAL

Chinese Connection Dub Embassy Friday, Jan. 12, 8 p.m.; Mark Edgar Stuart Saturday, Jan. 13; Live Band Karaoke with Public Record Wednesdays, 7 p.m.

Youth Classical Concert Friday, Jan. 12, 7-8:30 p.m.; Still We Rise Act II Sunday, Jan. 14, 2:30 and 7:30 p.m.

Dan McGuinness Pub 4694 SPOTTSWOOD 761-6993

Karaoke Wednesdays, 8 p.m.

Hi-Tone

Huey’s Collierville 2130 W. POPLAR 854-4455

6069 PARK 767-6002

5727 QUINCE 682-2300

Jack Rowell’s Celebrity Jam Thursdays, 8 p.m.; Eddie Smith Fridays, 8 p.m.; Shotgun Billy’s Saturday, Jan. 13, 8 p.m.; Flashback Sunday, Jan. 14, 4-7

6230 GREENLEE 592-0344

Live Music Thursdays, Wednesdays, 7-10 p.m.; Karaoke and Dance Music with DJ Funn Fridays, 9 p.m.

Frayser/Millington Huey’s Millington 8570 HWY 51 N.

Amber McCain Trio Sunday, Jan. 14, 4-7 p.m.

Toni Green’s Palace 4212 HWY 51 N.

Toni Green’s Palace MondaysSundays, 7 p.m.; Live DJ Thursdays, Fridays, 7 p.m.

Germantown Germantown Performing Arts Center

Huey’s Midtown

1801 EXETER 751-7500

The Chaulkies Sunday, Jan. 14, 4-7 p.m.; Royal Blues Band Sunday, Jan. 14, 8:30 p.m.-12:30 a.m.

Russell Hall Friday, Jan. 12, 7 and 8:30 p.m.; Mark O’Connor Saturday, Jan. 13, 8 p.m.; Percussion Explosion Sunday, Jan. 14, 2:30-4:30 p.m.

Lafayette’s Music Room 2119 MADISON 207-5097

The Voodoo Fix Thursday, Jan. 11, 6 p.m.; Low Society Thursday, Jan. 11, 9 p.m.; Fingertrick Friday, Jan. 12, 6:30 p.m.; Almost Famous Friday, Jan. 12, 10 p.m.; School of Rock Memphis Saturday, Jan. 13, 1 and 3 p.m.; Nathan Kalish Saturday, Jan. 13, 6:30 p.m.; Miles Flatt Saturday, Jan. 13, 10 p.m.; Joe Restivo 4 Sunday, Jan. 14, 11 a.m.; Memphis Ukulele Band Sunday, Jan. 14, 4 p.m.; Ladies of Seeing Red Sunday, Jan. 14, 8 p.m.; Memphis Knights Big Band Monday, Jan. 15, 6 p.m.; Kyndle & Adam Tuesday, Jan. 16, 5:30 p.m.; Brandon Taylor & Radio Ghost Tuesday, Jan. 16, 8 p.m.; 3RD Man Wednesday, Jan. 17, 5:30 p.m.; Josh Hoyer & Soul Colossal band Wednesday, Jan. 17, 8 p.m.

Huey’s Southwind 7825 WINCHESTER 624-8911

The King Beez Sunday, Jan. 14, 8:30 p.m.-midnight.

Huey’s Germantown 7677 FARMINGTON 318-3034

Young Petty Thieves Sunday, Jan. 14, 8:30 p.m.-12:30 a.m.

North Mississippi/ Tunica

Acoustic Music Tuesdays.

Senses Nightclub 2866 POPLAR 249-3739

Unique Saturday Saturdays, 10 p.m.-3 a.m.

394 N. WATKINS 443-0502

Minglewood Hall 1555 MADISON 866-609-1744

Lift Each Other Up Expo Saturday, Jan. 13, 5 p.m.

P&H Cafe 1532 MADISON 726-0906

Rock Starkaraoke Fridays; Open Mic Music with Tiffany Harmon Mondays, 9 p.m.midnight.

University of Memphis The Bluff 535 S. HIGHLAND

DJ Ben Murray Thursdays, 10 p.m.; Sister Hazel Saturday, Jan. 13, 7:30 p.m.; Bluegrass Brunch with the River Bluff Clan Sundays, 11 a.m.

Folk’s Folly Prime Steak House 551 S. MENDENHALL 762-8200

Intimate Piano Lounge featuring Charlotte Hurt Mondays-Thursdays, 5-9:30 p.m.; Larry Cunningham Fridays, Saturdays, 6-10 p.m.

Huey’s Poplar 4872 POPLAR 682-7729

Pamela K. Ward Sunday, Jan. 14, 8:30 p.m.-midnight.

Mortimer’s 590 N. PERKINS 761-9321

Van Duren Solo Thursdays, 6:30-8:30 p.m.

Wang’s East Tapas 6069 PARK 685-9264

Lee Gardner Fridays, 6:30-9 p.m.; Eddie Harrison Tuesdays, 6:30-9 p.m.

p.m.; Debbie Jamison & Friends Tuesdays, 6-10 p.m.; Elmo and the Shades Wednesdays, 8 p.m.midnight.

Owen Brennan’s THE REGALIA, 6150 POPLAR 761-0990

Lannie McMillan Jazz Trio Sundays, 10 a.m.-2 p.m.

Cheffie’s Cafe 483 HIGH POINT TERRACE 202-4157

Songwriter Night hosted by Leigh Ann Wilmot and Dave “The Rave” Saturdays, 5-8 p.m.

High Point Pub 477 HIGH POINT TERRACE 452-9203

Pubapalooza with Stereo Joe Every other Wednesday, 8-11 p.m.

Bartlett Hadley’s Pub 2779 WHITTEN 266-5006

5th Kind Friday, Jan. 12, 9 p.m.; Nuttin’ Fancy Band Saturday, Jan. 13, 9 p.m.; The Backstreet Crawlers Sunday, Jan. 14, 5:30 p.m.; Charlie and Juno All Star Experience Wednesday, Jan. 17, 8 p.m.

Shelby Forest General Store 7729 BENJESTOWN 876-5770

Steak Night with Tony Butler and the Shelby Forest Pioneers Fridays, 6-8 p.m.; Robert Hull Sundays, 12:30-3:30 p.m.

Horseshoe Casino & Hotel AT CASINO CENTER, SOUTH OF MEMPHIS, NEAR TUNICA, MS 1-800-303-SHOE

The Temptations Friday, Jan. 12.

Huey’s Southaven 7090 MALCO, SOUTHAVEN, MS 662-349-7097

Brian Johnson Band Sunday, Jan. 14, 8:30 p.m.-12:30 a.m.

Raleigh Stage Stop 2951 CELA 382-1576

Blues Jam hosted by Brad Webb Thursdays, 7-11 p.m.; Open Mic Night and Steak Night Tuesdays, 6 p.m.-midnight.

m e m p h i s f l y e r. c o m

Dan McGuinness 3964 GOODMAN, SOUTHAVEN, MS 662-890-7611

Midtown Crossing Grill Natalie James and the Professor Saturdays, Sundays, 11 a.m.-3 p.m.; “The Happening” Open Songwriter Showcase Tuesdays, 6:30-9:30 p.m.

Five O’Clock Shadow Sunday, Jan. 14, 8:30 p.m.-12:30 a.m. 8071 TRINITY 756-4480

1927 MADISON 726-4372

Dantones Band Friday, Jan. 12, 9 p.m.-1 a.m.

Huey’s Cordova 1771 N. GERMANTOWN PKWY. 754-3885

The Southern Edition Band Tuesdays.

Easter Island Thursday, Jan. 11, 9 p.m.; Kake and the Zero Point Star, Ben Ricketts, Tiffany Harmon, the Ellie Badge, St. John Band, Blood Like Wine John Hoffman Friday, Jan. 12, 6 p.m.; Emo Night 2.0 Saturday, Jan. 13, 9 p.m.; Risky Whispers, Geist, the Everdeens, John Keegan and the Cut Ties Sunday, Jan. 14, 8 p.m.; The Hazytones, Native Blood, Future Losers Monday, Jan. 15, 8 p.m.; Andrew Ryan, Sky King, Bailey Bigger Tuesday, Jan. 16, 8 p.m.; Oak House, Louise Page, Terry Prince & the Principles Wednesday, Jan. 17, 9 p.m.

11695 HWY. 70, STE. 101

Cordova

T.J. Mulligan’s Cordova

412-414 N. CLEVELAND 278-TONE

The Legacy Bar & Grill

Twin Soul Sunday, Jan. 14, 8-11:30 p.m.

ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT

Monoculture with Monticello & Lucky 7 Brass Band Thursday, Jan. 11, 8 p.m.; Ron Gallo with Caroline Rose Friday, Jan. 12, 9 p.m.; The Ellie Badge with Faux Fiction, Future Losers Sunday, Jan. 14, 8 p.m.; Jake Allen Tuesday, Jan. 16, 8 p.m.; Crockett Hall Tuesdays with the Midtown Rhythm Section Tuesdays, 9 p.m.; Belle Adair Wednesday, Jan. 17, 8 p.m.

Collierville

21


SEE IT IN 3D AT THE PINK PALACE THROUGH FEB 9, 2018

CALENDAR of EVENTS: JANUARY 11 - 17

Send the date, time, place, cost, info, phone number, a brief description, and photos — two weeks in advance — to calendar@memphisflyer.com or P.O. Box 1738, Memphis, TN 38101.

“Stargazer Garden” Flower-Folding

TH EAT E R

The Evergreen Theatre

Stop by and fold a paper flower for collaborative art installation. Mondays-Fridays, 9:30 a.m.-5:30 p.m.

Civil Rights/Civil Wrongs II, presented in honor of Dr. Martin Luther King Jr.’s birthday, and the 50th Anniversary of his demise. Several plays are featured, with comedic overtones to broach the pain of the times and subject. www. womenstheatrefestivalofmemphis. org. $20. Sundays, 3 p.m., and Fridays, Saturdays, 7:30 p.m. Through Jan. 28.

CROSSTOWN CONCOURSE (FORMERLY SEARS CROSSTOWN), N. CLEVELAND AT NORTH PARKWAY, WWW. CROSSTOWNARTS.ORG.

Words and Wine Literary Arts

Featuring authors Angela K. Austin, Jae Henderson, and Laura T. Johnson. Sat., Jan. 13, 5 p.m.

1705 POPLAR (274-7139).

FIREHOUSE COMMUNITY ARTS CENTER, 985 S. BELLEVUE (948-9522), WWW.ANGELAKAYAUSTIN.COM.

Hattiloo Theatre

Sunset Baby, dynamic play about fathers and daughters sears with wit and wisdom the brutal politics of freedom. www.hattiloo.org. Jan. 12-Feb. 11.

O N G O I N G ART

Art Museum at the University of Memphis (AMUM)

37 S. COOPER (502-3486).

TheatreWorks

All Saints in the Old Colony, after emigrating from Ireland to South Boston, Kierman’s family fell apart. Though he sacrificed his own life to raise his three younger brothers, they are not all that grateful. www. theatreworksmemphis.org. $15. Thursdays-Saturdays, 8 p.m., and Sundays, 2 p.m. Through Jan. 28.

“Africa: Art of a Continent,” permanent exhibition of African art from the Martha and Robert Fogelman collection. Ongoing. 142 COMMUNICATION & FINE ARTS BUILDING (678-2224).

ANF Architects

“Flying Colors,” exhibition of works by Sally Hughes Smith. www.anafa.com. Through Jan. 12.

2085 MONROE (274-7139).

1500 UNION (278-6868).

A R TI ST R E C E PT I O N S

Belz Museum of Asian and Judaic Art

Mint Cream Studios

Artist reception for “Mountain Top Dreams,” exhibition of mixed media, paintings, and prints from MLK era and Civil Rights Movement. Mixed media,paintings, and prints. Monday night includes movie, Selma: I’m Not Your Negro. www.mintcreamarket.org. $8. Fri., Jan. 12, 6-9 p.m., Sat., Jan. 13, 4-8 p.m., Sun., Jan. 14, 12-5 p.m., and Mon., Jan. 15, 6-9 p.m. 525 N. MAIN.

3050 Central Ave / Memphis 38111

January 11-17, 2018

P!NK PALACE MUSEUM

901.636.2362

WORLD

CLASS SPEAKERS BUILT IN

COOPER-YOUNG.

SOLD IN

COOPER-YOUNG.

22

2160 YOUNG AVE. | 901.207.6884 HALFORDLOUDSPEAKERS.COM

Ross Gallery

Opening reception for “The Sunny Side,” exhibition of recent ceramic works by Niles Wallace. www.cbu.edu/gallery. Fri., Jan. 12, 5:30-7:30 p.m. Opening reception for “Forge Cast Fabricate,” exhibition of works by Metal Museum artists Lewis Body, Sarah Dorau, Kacy Ganley, Kevin Burge, Lori Gipson, Anastasia Green, Eva Langsdon, Jim Masterson, Jeannie Tomlinson Saltmarsh, and James Vanderpool. www.cbu.edu/gallery. Fri., Jan. 12, 5:30-7:30 p.m. CHRISTIAN BROTHERS UNIVERSITY, PLOUGH LIBRARY, 650 E. PARKWAY S. (321-3000).

DUE TO SPACE LIMITATIONS, ONGOING WEEKLY EVENTS WILL APPEAR IN THE FLYER’S ONLINE CALENDAR ONLY.

“Chinese Symbols in Art,” ancient Chinese pottery and bronze. www. belzmuseum.org. Ongoing.

Artist talk for “Make Spillmanville Great Again” by Bobby Spillman at L Ross Gallery, Saturday, January 13th OT H E R A R T HAPPE N I NGS

Art After Dark

Galleries and gardens will be open late. Featuring light refreshments, entertainment, and a cash bar. Free with admission. Every third Thursday, 6-8 p.m. THE DIXON GALLERY & GARDENS, 4339 PARK (761-5250), WWW.DIXON.ORG.

Artist Talk for “Make Spillmanville Great Again”

Exhibition of paintings and gouache narratives detailing a zany and unpredictable world by Bobby Spillman. Sat., Jan. 13, 11 a.m. L ROSS GALLERY, 5040 SANDERLIN (767-2200), WWW.LROSSGALLERY.COM.

Artists’ Link Meetings

Photographer/painter, Carl Moore, will speak in Jan. Tues., Jan. 16, 6:30 p.m. JASON’S DELI, 3473 POPLAR (324-3181).

“Art/Race/Violence” Panel Discussion

Featuring Shahidah Jones, Antonio De Velasco, and Tom Carlson. Thurs., Jan. 11, 6-8 p.m. CROSSTOWN CONCOURSE (FORMERLY SEARS CROSSTOWN), N. CLEVELAND AT NORTH PARKWAY, WWW.CROSSTOWNARTS.ORG.

Casting Demonstration Saturdays, Sundays, 3 p.m.

119 S. MAIN, IN THE PEMBROKE SQUARE BUILDING (523-ARTS).

Bingham and Broad

“My Kin Is Not Like Yours,” exhibition of works by Debra Edge. Ongoing.

METAL MUSEUM, 374 METAL MUSEUM DR. (774-6380), WWW.METALMUSEUM. ORG.

2563 BROAD (323-3008).

Crosstown Arts Digital Lab

“beginnings,” exhibition of new works by the Artist Group of Memphis. www. buckmanartscenter.com. Through Feb. 26.

Six-station computer lab supports Memphis’ creative community by providing artists and musicians full access to industrystandard art- and music-making technology. Tuesdays-Thursdays, 10 a.m.-9 p.m., and Fridays, Saturdays, 10 a.m.-6 p.m. CROSSTOWN ARTS, 430 N. CLEVELAND (507-8030), WWW.CROSSTOWNARTS.ORG.

A Day of Tasters

90-minute workshops that introduce participants to blacksmithing, welding, casting, and copper work. Sat., Jan. 13, 8:30, 10:30 a.m., 1 & 3 p.m. METAL MUSEUM, 374 METAL MUSEUM DR. (774-6380), WWW.METALMUSEUM. ORG.

Sonnet Contest

Shelby County students are invited to submit their original composition for Rhodes College’s inaugural Sonnet Contest, Winners will receive a prize book and have their poem published. Submit by email, yearwoodl@ rhodes.edu. Through March 2. WWW.RHODES.EDU.

Buckman Arts Center at St. Mary’s School

60 N. PERKINS EXT. (537-1483).

Crosstown Concourse

“Art/Race/Violence: A Collaborative Response,” exhibition of multidisciplinary art in collaboration with visual culture historian Dr. Earnestine Jenkins and artist Richard Lou. www.crosstownarts.org. Through Jan. 14. “Lavender’s Landscape,” exhibition of latex and urethane on panel, triptych large works by Anthony Lee. www.crosstownarts.org. Through Jan. 14. N. CLEVELAND AT NORTH PARKWAY.


C A L E N DA R: JA N UA RY 1 1 - 1 7

THE BEST

ENTERTAINMENT IN TUNICA

97 TILLMAN (767-3800).

The Dixon Gallery & Gardens

Paula Kovarik, exhibition of fiber art. www.dixon.org. Jan. 14-April 1.

Jay Etkin Gallery

“The Paper Show,” exhibition of new work on paper by RoyTamboli, Mary Long, Nathan Yoakum, Pam Cobb, Juan Rojo, Jay Etkin, Stephanie Brody-Lederman, and others. Through Jan. 15.

4339 PARK (761-5250).

942 COOPER (550-0064).

Eclectic Eye

L Ross Gallery

“Relief,” exhibition of papercut maps by Katie Maish. (276-3937). Free. Through Feb. 14. 242 S. COOPER (276-3937).

FireHouse Community Arts Center

Mosal Morszart, exhibition of works by Black Arts Alliance artist. www. memphisblackartsalliance.org. Ongoing. 985 S. BELLEVUE (948-9522).

Fratelli’s

“Local Color,” exhibition of paintings of local landmarks by students under the direction of Fred Rawlinson. www.memphisbotanicgarden. com. Through Feb. 28. 750 CHERRY (766-9900).

Germantown Performing Arts Center “Temporal Narratives,” exhibition of photography by three Memphis-based photographers: Yasmine Omari, Andrea Morales, and Louis Tucker. www.gpacweb. com. Through Jan. 31. 1801 EXETER (751-7500).

Jack Robinson Photography Gallery

Barry Buxbaum and Ray Vunk, exhibition of mixed media on panel. Through Feb. 23. 44 HULING (576-0708).

Java Cabana

“Putting the Pieces Together,” exhibition of new paintings by Erica McCarrens. Through Jan. 24. 2170 YOUNG (272-7210).

“Make Spillmanville Great Again,” exhibition of paintings and gouache narratives detailing a zany and unpredictable world by Bobby Spillman. www.lrossgallery. com. Through Jan. 27. 5040 SANDERLIN (767-2200).

Marshall Arts Gallery

“Love of Art” and “Memphis,” exhibition of work by Nikki Gardner and Debra Edge by appointment only. (647-9242), Ongoing. 639 MARSHALL (679-6837).

Memphis Brooks Museum of Art

“About Face,” exhibition located in the Education Gallery highlighting the different ways artists interpret the connection between emotion and expression. www.brooksmuseum.org. Ongoing. “Drawing Memory: Essence of Memphis,” exhibition of works inspired by nsibidi, a sacred means of communication among male secret societies in southeastern Nigeria by Victor Ekpuk. www. brooksmuseum.org. Ongoing. 1934 POPLAR (544-6209).

Memphis College of Art

“(Dis)placed Bodies,” exhibition of crossdisciplinary and crossinstitutional collaboration by Dr. Susan Nordstrom at University of Memphis, O. Gustavo Plascencia at Memphis College of Art, and graduate students from both institutions. www.mca.edu. Through Jan. 30. Warren Greene, exhibition of paintings with monochrome color palettes on crisply constructed square panels. www. mca.edu. Through Jan. 30.

Metal Museum

“Everyday Objects: The evolution and innovations of Joseph Anderson,” exhibition of works by artist-blacksmith and sculptor highlighting utensils and functional objects. www.metalmuseum. org. Through April 22. “The Tributaries: Zachery Lechtenberg,” exhibition of enameling techniques applied to jewelry and illustration combined creating brightly colored cartoon style imagery. www.metalmuseum.org. Through Jan. 14. 374 METAL MUSEUM DR. (774-6380).

Mint Cream Studios

“Mountain Top Dreams,” exhibition of mixed media, paintings, and prints from MLK era and Civil Rights Movement. Through Jan. 31.

THE TEMPTATIONS JANUARY 12

THE CADILLAC THREE FEBRUARY 2

BLACKBERRY SMOKE FEBRUARY 10

BLUES TRAVELER & JONNY LANG FEBRUARY 17

CREEDENCE CLEARWATER REVISITED FEBRUARY 23

GARY ALLAN MARCH 10

525 N. MAIN.

Ross Gallery

“The Sunny Side,” exhibition of recent porcelain and stoneware by Niles Wallace, professor of ceramics at University of Memphis. www.cbu.edu/gallery. Jan. 12-March 1. “Forge Cast Fabricate,” exhibition of work by Metal Museum artists Lewis Body, Sarah Dorau, Kacy Ganley, Kevin Burge, Lori Gipson, Anastasia Green, Eva Langsdon, Jim Masterson, Jeannie Tomlinson Saltmarsh, and James Vanderpool. www.cbu.edu/gallery. Jan. 12-March 1. CHRISTIAN BROTHERS UNIVERSITY, PLOUGH LIBRARY, 650 E. PARKWAY S. (321-3000).

Slavehaven Underground Railroad Museum “Images of Africa Before & After the Middle Passage,” exhibition of photography by Jeff and Shaakira Edison. Ongoing. 826 N. SECOND (527-3427).

Talbot Heirs

m e m p h i s f l y e r. c o m

“Dimension,” exhibition of paintings on panel and velum by Jared Small. www. davidluskgallery.com. Through Feb. 3.

MLK Jr. 3x3 Tournament at MAM Grizzlies Center, Sat., Jan. 13th

UPCOMING SHOWS March 16 | Rodney Carrington March 22 | Larry Gatlin & The Gatlin Brothers March 23 | Rhythm In The Night: The Irish Dance Spectacular April 13 | Phillip Phillips

ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT

David Lusk Gallery

Tickets available online at Ticketmaster.com or by calling 1-800-745-3000.

Debra Edge Art. Ongoing. 99 S. SECOND (527-9772).

continued on page 24 Must be 21 years or older to gamble or attend events. Know When To Stop Before You Start.® Gambling Problem? Call 1-800-522-4700. ©2017, Caesars License Company, LLC. All rights reserved.

1930 POPLAR (272-5100).

9957_T3_4.575x12.4_4c_Ad_V2.indd 1

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12/14/17 4:21 PM


C A L E N DA R: JA N UA RY 1 1 - 1 7 continued from page 23

Still We Rise Act II

A Musical Tribute celebrating 50 Years of Martin Luther King Day featuring Memphis’ nationally acclaimed artists Morgan Beckford, Jonathan Blanchard, and William Roberson. $35. Sun., Jan. 14, 2:30 & 7:30 p.m.

TOPS Gallery

“Man Finds Meteorites in His Yard (This Is Planet Earth),” exhibition of new works by Josef Bull. www.topsgallery. com. Through Jan. 12. 400 S. FRONT.

BUCKMAN ARTS CENTER AT ST. MARY’S SCHOOL, 60 N. PERKINS EXT. (239-4213).

Tops Gallery: Madison Avenue Park

“Man Finds Meteorites in His Yard (This Is Planet Earth),” exhibition of new works by Josef Bull. Through Jan. 12.

C O M E DY

Landers Center (DeSoto Civic Center)

151 MADISON (340-0134).

Kevin Hart: The Irresponsible Tour, www.landerscenter. com. $50-$112. Sun., Jan. 14, 7-11 p.m.

Village Frame & Art

“20th Century Memphis Photographs,” exhibition of work by Charlie Ivey and Virginia Schoenster, (767-8882), Wednesdays, 10 a.m.-6 p.m.

4560 VENTURE, SOUTHAVEN, MS (662-280-9120).

The Orpheum

540 S. MENDENHALL (767-8882).

OPERA

WKNO Studio

WKNO Preview & Party: The Italian Girl in Algiers

“Street Talk,” exhibition of a juried collection of photographs by 15 different artist members of The Memphis Camera Club. www. wkno.org. Tues., Jan. 16. 7151 CHERRY FARMS (458-2521).

Behind-the-scenes look at our upcoming production. WKNO’s Darel Snodgras will lead a discussion with General Director Ned Canty. Tues., Jan. 16, 6-8 p.m. CLARK OPERA MEMPHIS CENTER, 6745 WOLF RIVER PARKWAY, WWW. OPERAMEMPHIS.ORG.

Brian Regan at The Orpheum, Thursday, January 11th DA N C E

5th Annual Youth Classical Concert

City-wide youth performance featuring Ballet on Wheels Dance Company, the Cordova High School Orchestra, and Prizm. Free with registration. Fri., Jan. 12, 7 p.m.

Brooks Milongas

Members of the Argentine Tango Society give lessons and tango demonstrations in the rotunda. Included with museum admission. Third Wednesday, Thursday of every month, 6:30 p.m. MEMPHIS BROOKS MUSEUM OF ART, 1934 POPLAR (544-6209).

BUCKMAN ARTS CENTER AT ST. MARY’S SCHOOL, 60 N. PERKINS EXT. (537-1483), WWW. BALLETONWHEELS.ORG.

GIORDANO JAZZ DANCE CHICAGO

January 11-17, 2018

January 19, 8 p.m., $28

Now in its landmark 54th season, the iconic Giordano Dance Chicago creates celebratory and highenergy jazz choreography, often expanding the very definition of the art. This legendary company takes audiences through a range of emotions, musical genres and dance styles from a critically acclaimed repertoire. Sponsored in part by Tennessee Arts Commission

Brian Regan, www.orpheummemphis.com. $38-$48. Thurs., Jan. 11, 7:30 p.m. 203 S. MAIN (525-3000).

PO ET RY / S PO K E N WO R D

Epiphany Lutheran Church

Centering Prayer, opportunity for silent contemplation, followed by inspirational poetry and readings. www. epiphanylu.org. Sundays, 5 p.m., and Wednesdays, noon.

B O O KS I G N I N G S

Booksigning by Linda Williams Jackson

Author discusses and signs A Sky Full of Stars for young readers. Sat., Jan. 13, 3 p.m. BARNES & NOBLE, 2774 N. GERMANTOWN (386-2468).

LECT U R E /S P EA K E R

Children of Revolutionaries Speak

Learn what it was like to grow up as the child of a civil-rights icon during a free panel discussion. Rosalind Withers, Cardell Orrin, and Kamillah Turner discuss growing up in a civilly active home. Thurs., Jan. 11, 6 p.m. HATTILOO THEATRE, 37 S. COOPER (502-3486), WWW.HATTILOO.ORG.

Interior Design 101: Book Cases & Organization

Professional interior designer of 28 years, Andrea Stratton, talks about how to better bring style and organization to your home. Refreshments provided. Free. Sat., Jan. 13, 1-2 p.m. THE URBAN EARTH, 80 FLICKER (323-0031), WWW. URBANEARTHMEMPHIS.COM.

7887 POPLAR (861-6227).

DR. WESLEY E. JONES OUR MISSION

Tri-State Gastroenterology, P.C.’s mission is to provide quality, cost-effective medical services that meet patients’ individual yet diverse needs. We are committed to maintaining excellence when providing medical services and promoting an educational program that encourages preventive maintenance.

Treatment of Stomach & Digestive System

Ulcers, Gastroesophageal Reflux, Gastritis, Esophagitis, Irritable Bowel Syndrome, constipation, Diarrhea, Crohn’s Disease, Hemorrhoids, Hiatal Hernia, Lactose Intolerance, Helicobacter Pylori, Diverticulosis, Colon Polyp, Anemia, Abdominal Pain, Trouble Swallowing, Blood in Stool, Pancreatitis, Ulcerative Colitis, Abnormal weight loss.

Other service provided: Colon Cancer Screening

Tickets

24

BuckmanArtsCenter.com (901) 537-1483 60 Perkins Extended Memphis, TN 38117

We are currently accepting new patients, and most insurance is welcome. Call today to make an appointment.

TRI-STATE

GASTROENTEROLOGY,

is located at Methodist Hospital South, Physician Office Building, 1264 Wesley Drive, Suite 303, Memphis, TN 38116. Office phone number is 901.398.9574. Fax number is 901.398.9581. Office hours are Monday-Friday from 8 a.m. to 5 p.m.

P.C.


C A L E N DA R: JA N UA RY 1 1 - 1 7

FIRST CONGREGATIONAL CHURCH, 1000 S. COOPER (278-6786), WWW. MIDSOUTHPEACE.ORG.

TO U R S

Bite-Sized Tours

Order lunch from Park & Cherry, and then Dixon staff members and docents will lead a quick tour of their favorite works of art or plants in the garden. Your lunch will be waiting for you after tour. Thurs., 11:45 a.m. THE DIXON GALLERY & GARDENS, 4339 PARK (761-5250), WWW.DIXON.ORG.

Calvary Episcopal Church Tours

Docent-led tours discuss stained glass windows, architecture, and symbols in Christian art. In addition, private tours are available by appointment for a suggested donation of $10 per person. Free. Saturdays, Sundays, 11 a.m.-1 p.m. CALVARY EPISCOPAL CHURCH, 102 N. SECOND (525-6602), WWW. CALVARYMEMPHIS.ORG.

City Tasting Tours

Savor tastings at five eateries, interact with chefs and managers, and sample local flavors while strolling down Main Street and enjoying new art installations and historic landmarks. WednesdaysSaturdays, 1:30 p.m. WWW.CITYTASTINGTOURS.COM.

Cutting Garden Tours

Garden docents will focus on the cutting garden each week on Saturday morning. Meet in the Catmur Foyer to see the large urn design and start tour. Saturdays, 10 a.m.-noon. THE DIXON GALLERY & GARDENS, 4339 PARK (761-5250), WWW. DIXON.ORG.

Graceland Excursions Trips: Musical Landmarks of the Mississippi Delta

Take a detour down the backroads and explore the deep roots of Blues culture and history, while reliving a musical revolution powered by raw emotion. $119. Saturdays, 8:30 a.m.-6:30 p.m. GUEST HOUSE AT GRACELAND, 3600 ELVIS PRESLEY (332-3322), WWW.GRACELAND.COM.

Graceland Excursions Trips: Tupelo, Mississippi–Birthplace of Elvis Presley

Experience the rural setting of Elvis’ upbringing and see where it all began in the tworoom house where he was born, the church he attended in his youth, and artifacts from his modest beginnings. $99. Fridays, 8:30 a.m.-3:30 p.m. GUEST HOUSE AT GRACELAND, 3600 ELVIS PRESLEY (332-3322), WWW.GRACELAND.COM.

Walking tour of the region’s only urban old-growth forest. Second Saturday of every month, 10 a.m. OVERTON PARK, OFF POPLAR (276-1387).

Yellow Fever Rock & Roll Ghost Tour

See what used to be, Memphis style, with Mike McCarthy. Call to schedule a personal tour. Ongoing. (486-6325), WWW.FACEBOOK.COM/ YELLOWROCKGHOST/.

E X P OS / S A LES

Memphis Boat Expo

Premier boat show/expo for the Mid-South. For more information, visit website. $15. Fri., Jan. 12, 12-6 p.m., Sat., Jan. 13, 10 a.m.-6 p.m., and Sun., Jan. 14, 12-5 p.m. MEMPHIS COOK CONVENTION CENTER, 255 N. MAIN (576-1200), WWW.MEMPHISBOATEXPO.COM.

Soul Market

Enjoy vendors with unique products, great food, music, and more. Saturdays, 12-4 p.m. THE DEN, 656 MARSHALL (773-738-9019).

Wedding University Free Bridal Show First 100 brides will receive a swag bag and a signature cocktail drink from the Hilton. All brides can participate in “trash the dress,” judge the best floral/ reception room, cake tasting, and more. Free. Sun., Jan. 14, 12-4 p.m.

MEMPHIS HILTON, 939 RIDGE LAKE (684-6664), WWW.WEHELPBRIDES.COM.

Who’s Hiring: Memphis Career Fair

Free and open to the public. Attendees should bring copies of their resume and dress in business professional attire. Free. Tues., Jan. 16, 10 a.m.-3 p.m. THE ESPLANADE, 901 CORDOVA STATION (729-9469), WHOSHIRINGAMERICA.COM.

Young Living Essential Oils: Live Your Passion Rally

Education rally, oils for families/pets, to enhance health and wellness. All chemical-free products. Free. Sat., Jan. 13, 1-3 p.m. SINGLETON COMMUNITY CENTER, 7266 THIRD, BARTLETT (618-306-0646).

F E ST IVA LS

Cherry Street Fair

Experience LIVE MUSIC at downtown’s newest entertainment destination.

Enjoy the sites and sounds of the Arkansas Delta at this family-friendly event featuring Southern Avenue band, classic car and motorcycle show, food, shopping, and crazy kids’ contests. Free. Second Saturday of every month, 5-8 p.m. DOWNTOWN HELENA, AR, CHERRY STREET (870-3383300), WWW.FACEBOOK.COM/ CHERRYSTREETFAIR.

S PO R TS / F IT N E S S

2018 MLK Jr. Weekend 3v3 Tournament

Open to any group within the age range. There will be a boys division and a girls division for ages 10-13. Each team is allowed a four-player roster. Special appearances by NBA and WNBA legends. $20 per team. Sat., Jan. 13. MAM GRIZZLIES CENTER, 2107 BALL (240-1268), WWW.MAMSPORTS.ORG.

Body & Soul Yoga

Senior yoga with membership, $15 per year. Fridays, 10-11 a.m. HOUSTON LEVEE COMMUNITY CENTER, 1801 HOUSTON LEVEE (384-3885), WWW.HLCCMEMPHIS.ORG.

Cornhole Tournaments at Ghost River Brewing Co.

Weekly tournament with a 70 percent payout. Format and number of teams paid based upon number of entries. All teams guaranteed two games. $25 team. Thursdays, 6-9 p.m.

AN EVENING WITH NATURALLY 7 February 3 With their rich a cappella harmonies and a stage presence that can be felt in every seat of the house, these musicians use their voices in unison to recreate different musical instruments from drums to brass to guitars.

(901) 525-3000 • Orpheum-Memphis.com

Sponsored in part by:

GHOST RIVER BREWING, 827 S. MAIN (278-0087).

Family Fun Hike

Educational recreation for adults and children of all ages. Second Sunday of every month, 2-4 p.m. SHELBY FARMS, VISITOR’S CENTER, 6903 GREAT VIEW DRIVE NORTH (767-7275), WWW.SHELBYFARMSPARK.ORG.

Get Right 4 the Night Get fit and have fun with Kellye Crawford. $10. Tuesdays, 6:45 p.m.

FIREHOUSE COMMUNITY ARTS CENTER, 985 S. BELLEVUE (948-9522), WWW. MEMPHISBLACKARTSALLIANCE. ORG.

Sam Watson Amateur Boxing Invitational

$10-$20. Sat., Jan. 13, 7 p.m. AGRICENTER INTERNATIONAL, 7777 WALNUT GROVE (757-7777), WWW.AGRICENTER.ORG.

Zumba

Child-friendly class. Call for more information. Free. Third Tuesday of every month, 5-6 p.m. Through Dec. 18. UNIVERSAL PARENTING PLACE, LEMOYNE-OWEN COLLEGE, 990 COLLEGE PARK (207-3694), WWW.KNOWLEDGEQUEST.ORG.

m e m p h i s f l y e r. c o m

Join the Mid-South Peace and Justice Center celebrate 36 years of people-powered change. Keynote address from organizer, journalist, scholar, and former Green Party Vice Presidential candidate. Sat., Jan. 13, 5:30-9 p.m.

Old Forest Hike

ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT

Living the Legacy of Nonviolence 36 with Rosa Clemente

continued on page 26

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C A L E N DA R: JA N UA RY 1 1 - 1 7 continued from page 25 M E ETI N G S

100 Women Who Care

First of three meetings in 2018 to be held in the Community Room of the Church Health Center in Crosstown Concourse. Wine and desserts by Muddy’s Bake Shop and MemPops will be served. Tues., Jan. 16. CROSSTOWN CONCOURSE (FORMERLY SEARS CROSSTOWN), N. CLEVELAND AT NORTH PARKWAY, WWW.100WOMENWHOCAREMEMPHIS.ORG.

Fantastical Writers of the Mid-South

For writers who specialize in science-fiction/fantasy/ etc. Second Thursday of every month, 7 p.m.

In Good Company

Connect with fellow creatives. Find your next freelance gig, catch up with old colleagues, or just grab a drink and play some games. Free with RSVP. Thurs., Jan. 11, 5:30-7:30 p.m. REC ROOM, 3000 BROAD (209-1137), WWW.PICATIC.COM.

Kosten Foundation Monthly Pancreatic Cancer Support Group Open to pancreatic cancer patients, families, caregivers, friends, and anyone interested in learning about pancreatic cancer. Share stories, ask questions, and support one another. Free. Second Saturday of every month, 10 a.m.-noon. CORDOVA BRANCH LIBRARY, 8457 TRINITY (832-4782), KOSTENFOUNDATION.COM/SUPPORT-GROUP.

LGBTQ Seniors Out for Coffee

Join the Senior Services Committee at OUTMemphis for our LGBTQ Seniors Out for Coffee monthly event. Free. Second Sunday of every month, 11 a.m.-3 p.m. OUTMEMPHIS: THE LGBTQ CENTER OF THE MID-SOUTH, 892 S. COOPER (278-6422), OUTMEMPHIS.ORG.

Nashville Songwriter’s Assn. Intnl. (NSAI) Memphis Chapter Meeting

Lessons and discussion on songwriting. Share songs in progress and provide feedback. Bring a song to share and eight-10 copies of your lyrics. Every third Tuesday, 6:30-8:30 p.m. OFF THE SQUARE CATERING, 19 S. FLORENCE (361-0584), WWW.FACEBOOK.COM/NSAIMEMPHISCHAPTER.

BARNES & NOBLE, 2774 N. GERMANTOWN (386-2468).

FIGHTS AT FITZ

JANUARY 27 | 7:30PM YOUR PULSE WON’T BE THE ONLY THING POUNDING

Olive Branch Genealogy Club

Third Wednesday of every month, 12-2 p.m. B.J. CHAIN LIBRARY, 6619 HWY 305 (662-895-4365).

T.O. Fuller State Park Monthly Meeting Call for more information. Third Wednesday of every month, noon. T.O. FULLER STATE PARK, 1500 MITCHELL (543-7581).

KIDS

Boys Hip-Hop Classes

For boys ages 5-10. $135 per semester session. Wed., 6 p.m. Through March 21. BALLET ON WHEELS DANCE SCHOOL & COMPANY, 2085 MONROE, WWW.BALLETONWHEELS.ORG.

Children’s Art Class: Exploring the Landscape with Emma Kate Rose

Children ages 7-11 learn formal art techniques, color relationships, and art history through projects that explore the landscape and hone drawing skills through painting and collage. $150. Tuesdays, 4-5:30 p.m. Through Feb. 21. FLICKER STREET STUDIO, 74 FLICKER (767-2999), WWW. FLICKERSTREETSTUDIO.COM.

Tennessee Shakespeare Company Education Programs

Featuring an opportunity for students to participate in playshops, performances, and learn about TSC. For more information, visit website. Through June 30. WWW.TNSHAKESPEARE.ORG.

Hotel Package $189

• Deluxe Room • 2 Reserved Seats Call 1-662-363-LUCK(5825) and mention code: CPFAF

Tickets Start at $30

Purchase tickets at Fitz, ticketmaster.com or call Ticketmaster at 800-745-3000.

Booksigning by Linda Williams Jackson for A Sky Full of Stars at Barnes & Noble, Saturday, January 13th S P EC IA L EVE NTS

January 11-17, 2018

2018 Blind Raccoon & Nola Blue Showcase

Donation at door includes three-day wristband and Blind Raccoon Collection: Volume Four CD. Net proceeds benefit the Blues Foundation’s HART Fund. $10 donation. Wed.-Fri., Jan. 17-19, noon-5 p.m. PURPLE HAZE NIGHTCLUB, 140 LT. GEORGE W. LEE (577-1139), WWW.BLINDRACCOON.COM.

2018 MLK Days of Service

Join Volunteer Memphis, service partners, and sponsors for the kick-off press conference, Thursday, 4 p.m., to learn how you can make a better community. For more information, visit website. Free with RSVP. Thurs., Jan. 11, 4 p.m., and Jan. 12-14. BENJAMIN L. HOOKS CENTRAL LIBRARY, 3030 POPLAR (415-2700), WWW.VOLUNTEERMEMPHIS.ORG.

FitzgeraldsTunica.com • 1-662-363-LUCK (5825) •

26

Must be 21 and a Key Rewards member. See Cashier•Players Club for rules. While supplies last. Tax and resort fee not included in listed price. Advance hotel reservations required and subject to availability. $50 credit or debit card is required upon hotel check-in. Arrivals after 6pm must be guaranteed with a credit card. Management reserves the right to cancel, change and modify the event or promotion. Gaming restricted patrons prohibited. Gambling Problem? Call 1-800-522-4700.

34th International Blues Challenge

Worldwide search for those blues bands and solo/duo blues acts ready to perform on the international stage. Judged by blues professionals from across the world. $100. Tues.-Sat., Jan. 16-20.


C A L E N DA R: JA N UA RY 1 1 - 1 7 BEALE STREET, DOWNTOWN MEMPHIS (529-0999), WWW.BLUES.ORG.

Association for Women Attorneys (AWA) 38th Annual Banquet

Featuring cocktail reception, live entertainment from David Pool and Jimmy Smith of the Risky Whiskey Boys, wine pull, seated dinner, and program honoring Claudia Haltom, CEO of A Step Ahead Foundation, and induction of 2018 officers and chairs. $30$70. Tues., Jan. 16, 7 p.m. 409 S. MAIN, SOUTH MAIN ARTS DISTRICT, WWW.AWAMEMPHIS.ORG.

Cerrito Trivia

Different themes each week. Free. Thursdays, 8-9 p.m. MEMPHIS MADE BREWING COMPANY, 768 S. COOPER (2075343), WWW.CERRITOTRIVIA.COM.

Dr. Martin Luther King Black and Gold Scholarship Gala 2018 Formal event benefiting Alpha Memphis Education Foundation, Inc. (AMEF) scholarship fund. $65-$75. Sat., Jan. 13, 7-11 p.m.

THE ESPLANADE, 901 CORDOVA STATION (753-3333), WWW. ALPHAMEF.ORG.

Fire & Ice Memphis Magazine/ Memphis Flyer Polar Bear Team

children’s activities, health and community resources, and museum experience. Free-$5. Mon., Jan. 15, 8 a.m.-6 p.m.

7 a.m.-5 p.m. Through Jan. 29.

Jan. 16, 6:30-9:30 p.m.

THE YARD, 1735 THOMAS (833-9273), WWW. MEMPHISBOTANICGARDEN.COM.

LOCAL GASTROPUB, 2126 MADISON (725-1845), WWW. DBBREWINGCOMPANY.COM.

WWW.SPECIALOLYMPICSMEM.ORG.

NATIONAL CIVIL RIGHTS MUSEUM, 450 MULBERRY (521-9699), WWW. CIVILRIGHTSMUSEUM.ORG.

Vision Board Party

Mobile Farmers Market

Friday Night Dance Party

Themed outdoor dance parties featuring illuminated dance floor, food vendors on site, and beer and wine available with a valid ID. Free. Fridays, 6-9 p.m.

“LeMoyne-Owen College: A Beacon of Hope”

MEMPHIS PARK (FOURTH BLUFF), FRONT AND MADISON, WWW. THEFOURTHBLUFF.COM.

Exhibition of a central institution in Memphis since its founding in 1871 as the LeMoyne Normal and Commercial School. Ongoing.

Grant for Student Pet Owners

MEMPHIS PINK PALACE MUSEUM, 3050 CENTRAL (636-2362), WWW. MEMPHISMUSEUMS.ORG.

Maddie’s Fund has given a substantial grant to help offset surgery costs for student pet owners. For more information or to make a surgery appointment, call or visit website. #ThankstoMaddie $20. Ongoing. SPAY MEMPHIS, 854 GOODMAN (3243202), WWW.SPAYMEMPHIS.ORG.

Guided Meditations

Includes a sitting meditation and a walking meditation designed to increase balance and stability. Visit link to download guided meditations to your mobile device. Ongoing. THE DIXON GALLERY & GARDENS, 4339 PARK (761-5250), WWW. DIXON.ORG/TOUR-THE-GARDENS.

King Day 2018

Celebrating the life and legacy of Dr. King featuring entertainment,

Senior Karaoke and Dance Tuesdays, 6-10 p.m.

UNDER THE WATER TOWER, 1280 BROOKHAVEN CIRCLE.

Sherlock Holmes Day

Celebrate the birthday of the Great Detective with a day of puzzles, dramatic readings, memorabilia, and trivia contests. Sat., Jan. 13, 2-5 p.m.

Start off the new year with a vision board. Be in attendance for the KandiSparklez Vision Board Party. Price includes all supplies and refreshments. Free to BYOB. $25. Sat., Jan. 13, 4-6 p.m. DEERFIELD BUILDING, 3340 POPLAR, SUITE 330 TO 333 (352-6800), WWW. THEKANDISPARKLEZ.COM.

Volunteer Day: T.O. Fuller State Park

Call for more information. Second Saturday of every month.

SHELBY FARMS, 500 N. PINE LAKE (767-PARK), WWW. SHELBYFARMSPARK.ORG.

Music at St. Mary’s

Hear Wednesday Morning Musicians at Eucharist in Sisters’ Chapel followed by a community breakfast. The program will feature a wide variety of musical styles with instruments and vocals. Wednesdays, 8 a.m.

T.O. FULLER STATE PARK, 1500 MITCHELL (543-7581).

ST. MARY’S CATHEDRAL, 700 POPLAR (527-3361), WWW. STMARYSMEMPHIS.ORG.

Woodruff Fontaine Ghost Hunt

On the Edge: Cars & Coffee

$129. Fri., Jan. 12, 8:30 p.m. WOODRUFF-FONTAINE HOUSE, 680 ADAMS (526-1469), WWW. MEMPHISMUSEUMS.ORG.

BENJAMIN L. HOOKS CENTRAL LIBRARY, 3030 POPLAR (415-2700), WWW.MEMPHISLIBRARY.ORG.

FOOD & DR I N K E V E N TS

Tree Recycling at The Yard

Devils Backbone Brewing Co. Dinner and Launch Party

Recycle Christmas trees and support the Garden. Bring your tree to be recycled into reusable materials. $5 for every tree will be donated to Memphis Botanic Garden, if mentioned. Saturdays, 7 a.m.2 p.m., and Mondays-Fridays,

Second Saturday of every month, 9 a.m.-noon.

Celebrate with a five-course dinner featuring all things pork paired perfectly with new DB craft beers. Learn more about Virginia’s own awardwinning lager brewery with the brewmaster. $50. Tues.,

Join Mid-South regional automotive enthusiasts as they display their favorite cars in the parking lot across from High Cotton. Enjoy a hot cup of coffee, some donuts, and a sign-up sheet. Second Saturday of every month, 8 a.m.-noon. HIGH COTTON BREWING CO., 598 MONROE (896-9977), WWW.FACEBOOK.COM/ ONTHEEDGECARSANDCOFFEE/.

The Science of Beer

Eat, drink, and learn about beer. $35-$65. Fri., Jan. 12, 6:30 p.m.

MEMPHIS PINK PALACE MUSEUM, 3050 CENTRAL (636-2362), WWW. MEMPHISMUSEUMS.ORG.

F I LM

Piano Man Pictures Roadshow

Featuring four short films, a wild journey for the senses. Dark, horrific tale; dramatic story; twisted fantasy; and comedic conspiracy theory from four directors. $10-$18. Sat., Jan. 13, 7 p.m. CROSSTOWN ARTS, 430 N. CLEVELAND (272-7744), WWW. PIANOMANPICTURES.COM.

Rocky Horror Picture Show

Absent Friends present the cult classic with a live shadowcast and costume contest. $10. Second Friday of every month, 11:30 p.m. THE EVERGREEN THEATRE, 1705 POPLAR (274-7139).

A Wider Angle Film Series: After the Storm

From award-winning filmmaker Hirokazu Kore-eda. A struggling writer working as a third-rate detective uses a powerful typhoon that strands him overnight with his ex-wife and son as an opportunity to reconnect with his estranged family. Japanese with English subtitles. Free. Tues., Jan. 16, 7 p.m. BENJAMIN L. HOOKS CENTRAL LIBRARY, 3030 POPLAR (415-2726), WWW.MEMPHISLIBRARY.ORG.

JANUARY 12-FEBRUARY 11

ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT

m e m p h i s f l y e r. c o m

Join the Memphis magazine/ Memphis Flyer team help raise funds for Special Olympics.

Click the ticket link to show your support for Special Olympics and your favorite media folks. Through Feb. 3.

HATTILOO THEATRE / 37 SOUTH COOPER / 901.525.0009 / HATTILOO.ORG

27


JOIN US AT 376 N. CLEVELAND FOR OUR

T H E AT E R B y C h r i s D a v i s

GRAND OPENING The Exorcism AT OUR NEW MIDTOWN LOCATION SMOKING ACCESSORIES, GIFTS, VAPE MODS & ACCESSORIES

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CLOUD9 NOW SMOKESHOP has all your smoking WITH accessories LOCATIONS & gifts! TO

Mon-Sat: 10a-10p Sun: 12-6

SERVE YOU

January 11-17, 2018

Midtown: 376 N. Cleveland St. 901.585.0941 Bartlett: 2125 Sycamore View Rd. 901.249.6741 Collierville: 396 New Bayhalia Rd. 901.316.5619

28

A family confronts its demons in All Saints.

H

istorians have speculated that All Saints Day — a solemn observation honoring saints of the Catholic church who’ve died and attained heaven — was developed as a means of de-paganizing an ancient rite. The Roman feast of Lemuralia was originally a springtime event, wherein offerings of food were made by individual households to exorcise restless, tormenting spirits of dead family members. Julianne Homokay’s pitch-black comedy All Saints in the Old Colony may be a piece of contemporary theater, but it harkens back to this ancient rite. And even though it’s a classic slice of kitchen-sinkstyle social realism and not a supernatural horror story, this is very much a play about curses, demons, death, desire, and unshakable disappointment. It’s a fantastic POTS@TheWorks world premiere that finds laughter in some extremely dark places as it introduces audiences to a broken Irish family from Boston’s rapidly gentrifying Southie neighborhood. It’s a bleak but loving exploration of tradition and the meaning of family that is, by turns, hard to watch and impossible to look away from. With subtle, effective direction by Jeff Posson, and a top-drawer cast, All Saints is an exciting, emotionally charged way to say hello to a new year of theater in Memphis. All Saints in the Old Colony feels like Homokay’s New England-flavored answer to Katori Hall’s housing project drama Hurt Village. The Old Colony, Boston’s second oldest housing project, has changed quite a bit in recent years, but was once a  dense cluster of brick towers populated by poor Irish families. As with Hurt Village, All Saints is set against a backdrop of gentrification and change. It tells the story of Kier, an Irish-born immigrant and disabled dock worker who, in the absence of parents, raised his siblings as best he could, making hard decisions that still haunt his malnourished, whiskey-soaked brain. More specifically, it tells the story of an attempted family intervention where the whole family comes together — including sister Fiona who was given up for adoption at an early age — to help Kier into a healthier lifestyle. But, in the words of playwright Sam Shepard, whose work is also reflected in All Saints, there’s no hope for the hopeless. Opportunities for temporary escape abound, but for these siblings normalcy will always be relative, and there’s no hope that these four siblings

— five, counting an offstage brother too unforgiving to appear — will ever find peace, let alone happiness. In an early moment, Greg Boller’s Kier opens the refrigerator and waves off the stink of rotten food as he dives in looking for a pack of baloney to make offerings to his household Saints. Even if we didn’t see all the garbage piled up in corners, Boller’s relationship with the smells in his environment tell us exactly where we are. His is a strong, physicallycommitted performance at the heart of an incredible ensemble. As Ronan, Keir’s brother who never left Southie, John Maness offers a master class in honest, unflashy character acting. Marques Brown is similarly compelling as brother Rickey who left Catholicism to become an Episcopal priest and fully embrace both his West Coast lifestyle and his wife Tiffani. Or is it Tiffanii?

CARLA MCDONALD

FRIDAY, JANUARY 12th. 12

All Saints in the Old Colony: real people, real problems

Ronan’s known his long lost sister Fiona for some time, even though they didn’t know they were related. Like a character from some Hawthorne short story, Fiona, in spite of her separation from the family, lived a parallel life. She became a bartender. Ronan frequents bars. Stuff happens. Their introduction is uncomfortably hilarious and a real twist to Fiona’s story, which may ultimately be the saddest of them all. In an ensemble full of great performances, Erin Shelton’s Fiona is, perhaps, the most deeply satisfying. All Saints is a boisterous play about a family that drinks, squabbles, fistfights, tells old stories, sings old songs, and doesn’t clean up very much. It’s about real people, real problems, and real places. And it’s haunted by unwholesome spirits who refuse to stay dead. POTS@ TheWorks has brought Memphis some solid world premieres. All Saints in the Old Colony is the best yet. All Saints in the Old Colony is at TheatreWorks through January 28th. Playhouseonthesquare.org


NOTICE OF PUBLIC MEETING SHELBY COUNTY NATIONAL DISASTER RESILIENCE GRANT MID -SOUTH RESILIENCE PLAN PUBLIC INPUT WORKSHOPS

1548 Poplar Avenue, Memphis, TN 38104 • 6:00 p.m. – 7:30 p.m.

Thursday February 1, 2018

Southaven, MS – Southaven Public Library

8554 Northwest Drive, Southaven, MS 38671 • 6:00 p.m. – 7:30 p.m.

Wednesday January 31, 2018

Millington, TN - Baker Community Center

7942 Church Street, Millington, TN 38053 • 6:00 p.m. – 7:30 p.m.

The purposes of the Resilience Plan are to identify unmet recovery needs in the Mid-South Region following three storms in 2011, identify potential future resilience activities which will make the Mid-South Region less susceptible to and more secure from future disasters, and to develop and prepare resilience strategies to storms, flooding, snow and ice, and other climate- and weather-related events which can be addressed as potential funding becomes available. The geographic extent of the plan includes all of Shelby and DeSoto Counties, as well as parts of Fayette and Marshall Counties. All interested residents, parties, and stakeholders are invited to join the master planning team at any one of the three workshops listed above and share their opinions on the best strategies for handling and recovering from future weather-related incidents. All three events will share the same agenda. If you plan to attend the public hearing and have special needs, please contact the following individual by 4:30 p.m. Tuesday January 23, 2018 and we will work to accommodate you: Jared Darby, NDR Planning Manager, Office of Resilience, 125 N. Main, Room 443, Memphis, TN 38103, (901) 636-7166, jared. darby@memphistn.gov Citizen input and public participation is strongly encouraged from all sectors of the Shelby County community. Shelby County does not discriminate on the basis of race, color, national origin, sex, religion, age or disability in employment or the provision of services. Equal opportunity/equal access provider. Development of the Mid-South Regional Resilience Plan is part of ongoing implementation of the Mid-South Regional Greenprint which can be viewed at midsouthgreenprint.org and is funded by a National Disaster Resilience Grant awarded by the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development. Learn more at about the National Disaster Resilience Grant at ResilientShelby.com. Para mas información en Español, por favor llame al 901-222-2088. TTY at 901-222-2301. Mark H. Luttrell, Jr. Mayor Jim Vazquez, Administrator Shelby County Office of Resilience

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Shelby Government’s Office of Resilience and Shelby County’s partners in the National Disaster Resilience Grant will host three workshops to begin to gather public input on the creation of the Mid-South Regional Resilience Plan. The first Public Meetings will be held on January 30, 2018 through February 1, 2018 at the following locations and times:

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FOOD By Michael Donahue

Melting Pot

Chef Travis Tungseth’s long road to becoming a chef.

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ravis Tungseth sports a “war band” — a thin white tattoo — across his face. “Every single fight that I’ve fought in my life I’ve earned getting this war band,” said Tungseth, 31, executive chef at The Skybox Grill & Bar in Collierville. “It’s a white line that goes from my ears all the way over the cusp of my nose. Just the whole tattoo itself signifies a war band — that I’m always ready for more. I’m able to grapple any task at hand.” Cooking related? “Always. And life itself. Come on. Life is crazy, man.” Tungseth, born in Puyallup, Washington, wasn’t a picky eater as a kid. “When Mom and Dad put food on the table, it was take it or leave it. I definitely took it because there were alway repercussions — ‘Go straight to your room, and go straight to bed’ — if you didn’t eat.”

But Tungseth was fascinated with food and the kitchen. At six, he made lunch for himself for the first time: a peanut butter sandwich with chocolate chips and marshmallows. “I started breaking the rules. That’s not good sustenance for lunch, necessarily. It was that rebel mentality of ‘Okay, I finally get to do what I want.’”

“What makes a strong kitchen is, no matter what happens, you make sure your guys get through. And you do it in a professional manner.” Tungseth, who considered himself a rebel in high school (“I was half prep, half skateboarder”), dropped out of school in his senior year. “There was nothing there that just intrigued me to want to move on. I got a job at a

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M E LT I N G P O T bar and grill as a dishwasher.” He loved it. “It was the high voltage, crazy, glamour of that rock star lifestyle. Being back in the dish pit, I got to hear everything that was going on. I got to hear about all the drama. I got to see the cooks, who I admired because they looked badass. They smoked cigarettes. They ran out to their cars and snuck a little marijuana. A little smoke. “I saw these rebels. I saw chefs getting mad and slinging pans left and right. Granted, the place was just opened. It was in that honeymoon phase, so it was pure chaos. The adrenaline that these guys [had]. They loved it. They got through it, and they laughed about it. It was aggressive. It really intrigued me.” Tungseth, who eventually got his degree from an alternative school, went to work at a “turn-and-burn restaurant. Get them in. Get them out. Send them home with a piece of pie. By the end of my duration at that place, I was running the line by myself.”

that.’ Growing up I learned how to throw knives. He was like, ‘All right. That will do.’ “David completely nurtured me into being a proper chef. He’s absolutely my mentor. I have nothing but love for Dave. I wouldn’t be here as the chef I am without that man.” Cooking was the perfect fit. “I became a part of something I could identify with. The type of people that I’m working with. It’s so tightly knit because you have to go into battle with these boys. You’re in the trenches taking

grenades. You build that love and that bond. What makes a strong kitchen is, no matter what happens, you make sure your guys get through. And you do it in a professional manner.” When The Tennessean closed, Tungseth worked at other restaurants, including Fino Villa and Chiwawa. He also worked for the late Ronnie Grisanti. “Ronnie, to me, is like the godfather of old school cooking. His was just the quintessential rock star chef mentality: ‘Whatever I say goes. And I’m going to do what I want.’ That

rebel. I loved him, man.” Tungseth moved to Skybox three years ago. “It’s just that classic American soul food that you want.” He enjoys coming up with new specials and prides himself on his skill at a wide variety of cooking styles. “I can even cook Asian food. My fiance is Asian, and she’s taught me to make Pho Thai and cook tofu correctly.” How would Tungseth describe his own style? “I would be the Ellis Island of cooking. I’m a collaboration of this melting pot of America.”

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ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT

When he was 18, Tungseth moved to Collierville, where his mother’s side of the family lived. His grandmother told the owner of The Tennessean, a now-defunct restaurant housed in Collierville’s vintage train cars, that her grandson needed a job. The owner told Tungseth to talk to David Krog, the restaurant’s executive chef. He called Krog, who said, “I’m at the Pizza Cafe. I’ll be here for 15 minutes. If you want an interview, you’d better make it.” “I hopped on my bicycle and pedaled in my pajamas to the Pizza Cafe.” Krog asked him if he had any knife skills. “I was like, ‘Well, I can throw a knife from here and stick it into the wall right there. I’m pretty good at

m e m p h i s f l y e r. c o m

Chef Travis Tungseth

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Join us Wednesday, January 24th, 4:30-7pm at Old Dominick Distillery, where we'll be celebrating this year's crop of young folks doing great things — the annual Memphis Flyer Twenty Under Thirty! Twenty Under Thirty recognizes 20 young Memphians who are shaping the future of the city with their ideas and actions. The annual Twenty Under Thirty issue of The Memphis Flyer hits the streets Wednesday morning 1/24/18, and we'll be celebrating Wednesday evening with all of our Twenty Under Thirty honorees.

January 11-17, 2018

Mix and mingle with these smart folks while you enjoy special cocktails from Old Dominick Distillery, tasty appetizers from local favorite Jack Pirtle's Chicken, jam out to some great Memphis tunes, have a chance to win some awesome giveaways and door prizes, and more! Tickets are $10 in advance and include 1 complimentary drink ticket. Parking is available on the street, but we encourage you to use Uber or Lyft. 21+ only, please.

For more info head on over to the Memphis Flyer’s Facebook page — and check out Events! Or reach out to Molly — molly@memphisflyer.com, 901.832.2085

Sponsored by:

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S P I R ITS By Richard Murff

Blackstone

of maintaining that tricky and elusive equilibrium of quality versus capacity. Whether or not a beer is craft shouldn’t depend on some minority ownership, but how the brewer deals with expanded markets. Getting philosophical about it, Taylor asks: “The question is, when you open up a new market, can you serve that market and continue to serve the original [market]?” In a hyper-competitive market, very rarely do craft breweries fail or fly on the quality of their beer alone. Breweries, craft or not, are businesses, and businesses require focus on the product and the market and all the other things customers never see. The real trick, in any business, is to refocus when things change. And they always do. It is fitting that Blackstone was relaunched into Memphis on Repeal Day, December 5th. In Tennessee craft beer circles, Blackstone is about as historical as you get. One of the first craft breweries

in Nashville, the Blackstone Restaurant on West End Avenue predates the craft beer boom altogether. When the place first opened, customers walked out when they learned that they couldn’t get a Bud Light. Things have changed, and Nashville now has more than 20 craft breweries and counting. And no one seems to get their nose out of joint if they can’t find a Busch or a Milwaukee’s Best at a brew pub. Blackstone had been churning out its award-winning beer at a rate of 1,200 barrels a year. The restaurant was a Nashville fixture. Then things changed — again. Co-founder Stephanie Weans lost her battle with cancer a few years ago. Taylor, a CPA by trade, was more comfortable behind the curtain. Stephanie had the personality; she was good at being out front. “Everything I know about running a restaurant I learned from her,” Taylor says. “And one thing I learned was that I wasn’t a restaurateur.” In light of the painful loss of a productive partnership, as well as capacity constraints and a changing marketplace, it was time to refocus on what was in that glass in front of us: the beer. The Brewery contracted to refocus on what it was brewing, opening a new 15,000-square-foot facility with a 60,000-barrel capacity and a taproom. After shutting down the restaurant for a remodel, the decision was made to close its doors for good after 23 years. The new capacity has changed things yet again. Now available in bars such as the Flying Saucer and Young Avenue Deli, as well as in local grocery stores, Blackstone is back, serving the entire state with an eye to opening up markets in Kentucky and north Alabama. Yet through the changes, their beer has remained remarkably consistent. The Hopjack IPA is a great go-to ale. The wonderfully designed Dark Matter Black IPA is a clever twist on the style — still full of hops but with the darkness of roasted malt. You can get their award-winning Nut Brown all over town, along with that St. Charles Porter — dark, but not too heavy, with traces of mocha and cocoa. And that is how you make a change and still fill the glass with a beer you’re known for.

ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT

K

ent Taylor, coowner of Nashville’s Blackstone Brewery, pointed to the glass in front of us: “We are all about what is in there,” he said. What I was looking at was an inviting pint of Blackstone Brewery’s St. Charles Porter — the most award-winning Brown Porter at the Great American Beer Festival, racking up eight medals. It is also a polished version of the homebrew Taylor used to whip up in his kitchen. I’d dropped into the Flying Saucer in Cordova to pester Kent and the Blackstone crew about beer, markets — and to ask him, “Where exactly have you been for the last few years?” Actually, Blackstone has been out of west Tennessee for about three years. It wasn’t a lack of demand for Blackstone’s beers, such as the St. Charles Porter or their Hopjack IPA — a dry hopped and hazy ale — it was more a matter

m e m p h i s f l y e r. c o m

The storied Nashville brewer is back on form.

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FILM REVIEW By Chris McCoy

Rules of the Game Somehow, I didn’t hate Jumanji: Welcome to the Jungle.

I

magine my surprise when I discovered that Jumanji: Welcome to the Jungle is an adequately constructed, reasonably functional piece of entertainment. Maybe that doesn’t sound like much — being merely adequate seems like a ridiculously low bar to clear for a major studio production that cost $100 million. Imagine saying that about any other industry’s product. “My car doesn’t explode and kill me when I start it” is hardly an endorsement. You don’t have to say “This food processor won’t inject deadly blowfish toxin into your infant’s pureed carrots.” That’s pretty much expected, right? But this is the state of big-budget Hollywood filmmaking as we open 2018 — I am shocked when a film that cost enough to pay the salary of 2,080 Tennessee middle school teachers doesn’t make me pray for the sweet release of death. Make no mistake — this is exactly the extruded, film-type product that is the big studios’ reason for being these days. It’s a remake of the 1995 Robin Williams film Jumanji, directed by Joe Johnson, the special effects wizard whose most recent credit is the first Captain America movie. In that not-very-well-remembered non-classic, kids (including a 13-year-old Kirsten Dunst) find a magical, explorer-themed board game that causes

things to appear in real life with a roll of the dice, including Williams, who had been trapped in the game’s jungle setting since 1969. But as Welcome to the Jungle’s Alex (Mason Guccione) says in the film’s brief intro, “Who plays board games any more?” So the board game magically upgrades itself to a console cart, and when Young Alex picks up his controller, he is sucked inside to an uncertain fate. That was in 1996. Cut to present day, where four high schoolers are trying to make it through their day. Nerdy Spencer (Alex Wolff) is splitting his time between playing video games and writing papers for his hunky football player friend Fridge (Ser’Darius Blain). When their cheating is discovered, they get detention together. Selfie-obsessed Bethany (Madison Iseman) gets detention for making a Facetime call during a quiz, while bookish Martha (Morgan Turner) gets thrown in the teen clink for disrespecting her gym teacher. Our Breakfast Club heroes are assigned to help clean out the school basement, where they find the 20-year-old Jumanji console gathering dust. Once they plug it in and choose their characters, they are sucked inside the game. It’s like Tron, but with less neon. Inside the game, they inhabit the bodies of the char-

(from l to r) Jack Black, Dwayne “The Rock” Johnson, Kevin Hart, and Karen Gillian star in Jumanji: Welcome to the Jungle. acters they chose. Spencer is now Dwayne “The Rock” Johnson, aka Dr. Smolder Bravestone; Fridge is now Kevin Hart, or Professor “Mouse” Finbar, Bravestone’s sidekick; Martha is Karen Gillian, aka Ruby Roundhouse, the Laura Croft figure in midriff revealing short shorts; and, worst (or best) of all, comely Bethany is now Jack Black, aka Professor Shelly Oberon, the cartographer. Once they’re on the virtual ground, they learn the ropes of the video game world (everybody gets three lives, hippos are deadly, cake makes Finbar explode) and set out on the quest to complete the game and gain their freedom. Along the way, they hook up with Alex, now played by pop star Nick Jonas. Director Jake Kasdan (son of Raiders of the Lost Ark scribe Lawrence Kasdan) should be credited for excel-

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FILM REVIEW By Chris McCoy lent casting. The main quartet has great chemistry and consistent comic chops. Hart particularly is pitch perfect as a vain football star who can’t get used to not being physically dominant. If all The Rock does for the rest of his career is comedy, it will be best for everyone. Gillian, who propped up the Doctor Who franchise for three seasons as companion Amy Pond, tackles the job of Token Leia with wry fun while sporting an amazing mane of red hair. And all you need to know about Jack Black’s role as a teenage girl trapped inside a pudgy middle aged man’s body is that there’s a scene where she/he has to figure out how to pee with a penis. Up against these four powerhouses, Jonas is clearly the weak link, barely able to hit his marks and squeak out his lines. Everyone takes the material exactly as

I Tonya R The Disaster Artist R Wonder Wheel PG13 Lady Bird

Molly’s Game R

seriously as it deserves to be taken, which is to say not seriously at all. The plot is barely existent, but the fact that it’s a video game allows the folks inside it to crack constant meta jokes. Kasdan knows this is all about his stars’ charisma, and keeps them bouncing off each other in pleasing ricochets. Jumanji: Welcome to the Jungle will fade from memory as soon as you leave the theater, but at least you won’t feel ripped off. And yes, Guns N’ Roses got paid. Jumanji: Welcome to the Jungle Now playing Multiple locations

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NOW HIRING SALES REP/ACCOUNT REP Contemporary Media Inc., locally owned and operated publisher of Memphis magazine, The Memphis Flyer, Memphis Parent, and Inside Memphis Business is looking for a full-time salesperson to join our team. Must have proven sales experience, excellent communication skills (both written and oral) and be a self-starter. Candidate must be highly organized and able to thrive in a high volume, fast-paced and teamoriented environment. Knowledge of the local market a plus. Preferred Qualifications: · Print, digital, event sponsorship, and mobile selling experience · High-level cold calling · Negotiation skills · High competency in MS Office or Google Drive products · Ability to communicate effectively to a large group Compensation package commensurate with experience, plus paid company benefits

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MERTON MANOR APARTMENTS

2bedroom/1 bath $595 3bedroom/2 bath $750 Laundry facility on-site. Gated community. Call 272-8658 or cell 281-4446 Kismet Property

NOW HIRING At ROCKWOOL, we’re welcoming employees with various backgrounds and abilities who share our values and are eager to face new challenges as part of our growing manufacturing team, located at our plant in Byhalia, MS. WE’RE HOSTING A JOB FAIR Saturday, January 13th 9am through 2pm ROCKWOOL Factory 4594 Cayce Road Byhalia, MS 38611 We’re currently recruiting for the following positions:  Production Operators  Industrial Maintenance Mechanics  Forklift Operators  Industrial Maintenance Electricians  Quality Technicians  Heavy Machinery Operators

Weoffer: offer: We Pay in in Permanent, Permanent,Full-Time Full-TimePositions Positions -– Competitive Competitive Pay – Medical, Dental and Vision Insurance - Medical, Dental and Vision Insurance Paid Vacation Vacation Time Time and and13 13Holiday Holidays Annually -– 2 2 Weeks Weeks Paid Annually 401k Plan Plan and andFringe FringeBenefits Benefits -– Generous 401k -– Career Career Advancement: Advancement: We We Promote Promotefrom fromWithin! Within! Learn more about our company and available careers at www.rockwool.com


REAL ESTATE • SERVICES Midtown APTS

983 JUNE ROAD #6 Great E. Memphis 2 BR, 1.5 BTH, 2nd flr. rental in gated Poplar East Apartments 1Min from Starbucks & I-240. Pool & Clubroom incld. $895/mo. Call 508-0639

OVERTON SQUARE Walk to all events, Great 2BR/1BA on Diana St. New full size W/D, CH/A, walk in closet. Beautiful! $850-$975/mo. +dep. Also Midtown 1BR staring at $625. Kevin @ 901-482-4262 _____________________

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CENTRAL GARDENS 2BR/1BA, hdwd floors, ceiling fans, french doors, all appls incl. W/D, 9ft ceil, crown molding, off str pking. $750/mo. Also Large 1BR, $720/mo. 833-6483 or 569-0847.

Shared Housing FURNISHED ROOMS Bellevue/McLemore, Latham/ Parkway, Jackson/Watkins, Stage Rd/ Covington Pike, Airways/Park. W/D, Cable TV/Phone. 901-485-0897 _____________________ HOUSE SHARING Bartlett Area. 1 private bedrooms and full bath, big back yard, quiet area, $350/mo + utils. Call 901-314-9734 _____________________ MIDTOWN ROOMS FOR RENT Central Heat/Air, utls included, furnished. 901.650.4400 _____________________

MIDTOWN ROOM XL room for rent near medical district. Very safe, private entrance. Fully furnished. Wifi. $120/wk + dep. Utilities included. 901-725-0895. NICE ROOMS FOR RENT S. Pkwy & Wilson. Utilities and Cable included. Fridge in your room. Cooking and free laundry privileges. Some locations w/sec. sys. Starting at $435/mo. + dep. 901.922.9089 _____________________ SOUTH MEMPHIS 1 furnished room for mature ladies in Christian home. Nice area on bus line, near expressway. Non smoker. $400/mo, includes utilities, cooking/ laundry privileges. Must be employed or retired. 901-405-5755 or 901-518-2198.

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THE LAST WORD by Maya Smith

Power Outage Last Saturday, white nationalist Billy Roper, his two bodyguards (dressed in camo), and about 10 other protesters showed up at Health Sciences Park to rally against the city’s recent removal of the statue of a Ku Klux Klan founding father and Confederate general, Nathan Bedford Forrest, from the park. Roper, who in person lacks the intimidating presence of his online extremist blog, the Roper Report, stood in front of militantlooking protesters flashing Confederate flags and holding a 10-footlong banner that read “‘DIVERSITY’ = WHITE GENOCIDE.” Claiming that removing the statue was a step in erasing his people’s heritage, history, and culture, Roper said this is the beginning of erasing whites entirely. As ridiculous as it sounds, if you would have asked Roper and the other protesters, they would have told you with a straight face that the government’s mission is to wipe all white people from the country and essentially make the caucasian race extinct. “If they want to separate people from their identity and their heritage and their history, then that is a way of making them unaware of their identity and heritage so they can easily be genocided,” Roper said. Whites are being targeted, bred out, and erased, he continued, because whenever an area is diversified, it’s always a majority white area. “No one says Kenya or Nigeria need more diversity or that South Central L.A. and Harlem need more diversity,” he shouted through a bullhorn. “They always say that white areas, and only white areas, need more diversity.” And this leads to fewer white people by percentage, which he describes as an act of genocide. “According to the United Nations’ definition of the term, genocide doesn’t have to be the violent murder of millions of people,” Roper continued. “It means their cultural displacement and their demographic replacement.” The UN defines genocide as “any of the following acts committed with intent to destroy, in whole or in part, a national, ethnical, racial, or religious group, as such: killing members of the group; causing serious bodily or mental harm to members of the group; deliberately inflicting on the group conditions of life calculated to bring about its physical destruction in whole or in part; imposing measures intended to prevent births within the group; [and] forcibly transferring children of the group to another group.” That doesn’t sound like anything that’s ever happened to whites in this country, but Roper maintains the belief that the demographic replacement of this country’s founders is genocide. Which of the country’s “founders” is he referring to, I wonder. Because people of color inhabited this country long before the ones who ran them off of their land and took it from them arrived. That’s a discussion for another day, though. But, we do know that the origins of mixed-race babies in this country come from within the system of slavery: A white slave-owner mates with a black slave, and the rest is history. So, if you call the gradual decrease of whites in this country genocide, then it’s self-inflicted genocide, at best. Removing the statues, Roper admitted, is not just about the Confederacy, history, heritage, or culture. He added that it’s also not about the Civil War that happened between 1861 and 1865. Iinstead, he claimed it’s about “the civil war that is coming to America once again, as we continue to polarize and divide on the way toward balkanization.” Roper said people of color and whites, “different species of a subspecies,” should not have to — and aren’t meant to — coexist. It’s just not right, he said. He claims his main concern with the so-called white genocide is the white race’s decline (or as he puts it, being “bred-out and turned feces-colored”), but I’d venture to say Roper and others with similar thought processes are simply afraid of progress. They’re afraid to live alongside people who don’t look like them. Why? I’ll never know. If you ask me, statues of two historically racist and divisive figures coming down in Memphis was a wake-up call for Roper and his posse. They’re realizing the country is no longer the way it was during the post-Civil War era or at the time the Forrest statue was erected, during the days of Jim Crow — and that it won’t ever be that way again. The thought of diversity and different races existing together throws people like Roper into a panic. Perhaps, it’s because they’re afraid of losing a power that they forcibly took — and that was never rightfully theirs to begin with. Maya Smith is a Flyer staff writer.

m e m p h i s f l y e r. c o m

White nationalist protestors in Memphis.

THE LAST WORD

MAYA SMITH

White nationalists came to Memphis and left empty rhetoric behind.

39


MINGLEWOOD HALL

1/13: Lift Up Each Other Expo w/ Stan Bell 1/20: V3Fights 2/9: Lyfe Jennings 3/3: Wild N’ Memphis 3/15: SuicideGirls Blackheart Burlesque 3/16: Jeezy 4/14: Lucero Family Block Party 20th Anniversary w/ Turnpike Troubadours, Deer Tick, John Moreland & More! 4/18: Nightwish

Live LIVE! in 2018 THIS WEEK:

Fri Jan 12 ‑ Daisyland w/ Bad Boy Bill & Richard Vission Back to Vinyl Tour 2 JUST ANNOUNCED:

1884 LOUNGE

Fri April 13 ‑ RED & Lacey Sturm UPCOMING SHOWS:

1/12: Dreamfest 2/2: R.LUM.R 2/16: Brent Cobb 2/24: Drivin N’ Cryin

Sun Jan 14 ‑ The Wailers w/ Chinese Connection Dub Embassy Fri Jan 19 ‑ Greensky Bluegrass Sat Jan 20 ‑ The Eric Gales Band Tue Jan 23 ‑ Daisyland XL w/ Datsik, Space Jesus, Riot Ten, Wooli Thu Feb 1 ‑ August Burns Tue Feb 6 ‑ Y&T Tue Feb 13 ‑ Daisyland w/ Excision: The Paradox 2018 Wed Feb 14 ‑ Big Gigantic Tue Feb 20 ‑ AJR Thu Mar 1 ‑ George Clinton & Parliament Funkadelic Fri Mar 2 ‑ The SteelDrivers Sat Mar 3 ‑ Beth Hart Sat Mar 17 ‑ Rumours ‑ A Fleetwood Mac Tribute Thu Mar 29 ‑ Ty Dolla $ign Wed April 4 ‑ Big Krit Thu April 5 ‑ Dweezil Zappa Sun April 29 ‑ Parkway Drive Mon May 7 ‑ Todrick Hall Sun May 13 ‑ Jimmy Eat World

MORE EVENTS AT MINGLEWOODHALL.COM

TUT‑UNCOMMON ANTIQUES 421 N. Watkins St. 278‑8965 1500 sq. ft. of Vintage & Antique Jewelry. Retro Furniture and Accessories. Original Paintings, Sculpture, Pottery, Art & Antiques. We are the only store in the Mid‑South that replaces stones in costume jewelry.

GROWLERS 1911 Poplar | 901growlers.com 1/12‑ Ron Gallo 1/24‑ Red Fang 2/4‑ Declan McKenna 2/5‑ Marco Benevento 3/2‑ Kofi Baker’s Cream Experience

NEW DAISY THEATRE | 330 Beale St Memphis 901.525.8981 • Advance Tickets available at NewDaisy.com and Box Office

MURPHY’S Pool Table • Darts • WI-FI • Digital Jukebox Visit our website for live music listings or check the AfterDark section of this Memphis Flyer KITCHEN OPEN LATE, OPEN FOR LUNCH! 1589 Madison • 726‑4193 www.murphysmemphis.com

STONEWALL COUNSELING

David Joslin, LCSW, LAPSW. 26+ years exp new to Memphis now accepting clients Case Management, general counseling, LGBTQIA issues, male survivors of child/sexual abuse. Credit cards accepted. 50 min session for $75.00 901-422-2171 www.stonewallcounseling.com

YOUNGAVENUEDELI.COM 2119 Young Ave • 278‑0034

1/10: $3 Pint Night! 1/11: Memphis Trivia League! 1/13: Goldie & Friends Drag Show Event 1/20: UFC 220 Miocic vs. Ngannou 1/27: FREE MUSIC SATURDAY’S w/ Chris Johnson 2/10: UFC 221 Whittaker vs. RockholdKitchen

IF YOU’RE A GOOD READER and can volunteer to do so please call 901-832-4530

Open Late! Now Delivering All Day! 278-0034 (limited delivery area)

BOOK REPAIR

Have an old book or bible that needs repair? Call Art, 2nd Editions Bookstore at 901.483.0478

JESSE & THE TWO SHOTS OF TEQUILA BAND Five Piece Band available for weddings, corporate events, parties etc... in Memphis and Nashville. Song list on website. More information including song lists and booking information at www.rick.business or call 407.608.8015. Calendar will fill up fast so act now. Special discounts for veterans.

MEMPHIS MADE BREWING Taproom hours:

Mon 4 ‑ 7 p.m., Thurs & Fri 4 ‑ 10 p.m., Sat 1 ‑ 10 p.m., Sun 1 ‑ 7 p.m.

768 S. Cooper • 901.207.5343 FREE BREWERY TOURS 4 P.M. SATURDAY & SUNDAY

GONER RECORDS New/ Used LPs, 45s & CDs. We Buy Records! 2152 Young Ave 901‑722‑0095

Friday, 1/12 ‑ Chinese Connection Dub Embassy, 8p Saturday, 1/13, Mark Edgar Stuart Friday, 1/19 ‑ Live Band Karaoke w/Public Record, 8p Saturday, 1/20 ‑ Folk Soul Revival, 8p Saturday, 1/27 ‑ Walrus, 8p

Coco & Lola’s

MidTown Lingerie

Create some fire with a little bit of Lace! www.cocoandlolas.com

Finest lace ‑ Coolest place 710 S. Cox|901‑425‑5912|Mon‑Sat 11:30‑7:00

FABULOUS CARPET CARE Steam Clean 3 Rooms For $99. “It’s Thorough, Dries Quickly & Stays Clean Longer ‑ Or It’s Free.” Call 901.282.5306

CHIP N’ DALE’S ANTIQUES 3457 Summer Avenue • Memphis, TN 38122 EVERYTHING ON SALE! Open Tues‑Sat | 901‑452‑5620 “Celebrating 30 years in Business”

I Buy Old Windup Phonographs & Records

PRESSURE WASHING

QRS, Superior, Supertone, Champion, OKeh,

Patios, Siding, Decks, Sidewalks, Driveways, Fences ans More!

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others. Also large quantities of older 45’s. Paul. 901‑435‑6668

Memphis Flyer 1.11.18  
Memphis Flyer 1.11.18  

This week: Meet the people behind Memphis 3.0, the roadmap behind Memphis' third century. Also: Our review of Jumanji, All Saints in the Old...