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JERRY D. SWIFT Advertising Director Emeritus KELLI DEWITT, CHIP GOOGE, HAILEY THOMAS Senior Account Executives MICHELLE MUSOLF Account Executive BRYCE HAYES Classifieds Coordinator ROBBIE FRENCH Warehouse and Delivery Manager JANICE GRISSOM ELLISON, KAREN MILAM, DON MYNATT, TAMMY NASH, RANDY ROTZ, LEWIS TAYLOR, WILLIAM WIDEMAN Distribution THE MEMPHIS FLYER is published weekly by Contemporary Media, Inc., P.O. Box 1738, Memphis, TN 38101 Phone: (901) 521-9000 Fax: (901) 521-0129 memphisflyer.com CONTEMPORARY MEDIA, INC. ANNA TRAVERSE FOGLE Chief Executive Officer LYNN SPARAGOWSKI Controller/Circulation Manager JEFFREY GOLDBERG Chief Revenue Officer MARGIE NEAL Production Operations Director KRISTIN PAWLOWSKI Digital Services Director MARIAH MCCABE Circulation and Accounting Assistant KALENA MATTHEWS Marketing Coordinator

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JESSE DAVIS Editor SHARA CLARK Managing Editor JACKSON BAKER, BRUCE VANWYNGARDEN Senior Editors TOBY SELLS Associate Editor MAYA SMITH Senior News Reporter CHRIS MCCOY Film and TV Editor ALEX GREENE Music Editor SAMUEL X. CICCI, MICHAEL DONAHUE, JON W. SPARKS Staff Writers ABIGAIL MORICI Copy Editor JULIE RAY Calendar Editor LORNA FIELD, RANDY HASPEL, RICHARD MURFF, FRANK MURTAUGH, MEGHAN STUTHARD Contributing Columnists AIMEE STIEGEMEYER, SHARON BROWN Grizzlies Reporters ANDREA FENISE Fashion Editor KENNETH NEILL Founding Publisher

It all began with Texas’ most recent abortion ban. Senate Bill 8, the one that, essentially, deputized private citizens, empowering them to spy on each other and sue providers and others suspected of having helped women get abortions. The Supreme Court declined to rule on the constitutionality of the law — or to block it. Eventually, U.S. Attorney General Merrick Garland vowed that the Department of Justice was “urgently” searching for a way to challenge the law. But no anti-abortion law is too unconstitutional for Tennessee to try. So, here in the future, I’ve undergone a career change. I used to be a journalist. I was the editor of the Memphis Flyer, and I loved it. But you can only be called “the enemy of the people” so many times before you start to look at other lines of work. Besides, working as a professional amateur bounty hunter is incredibly lucrative. You see, Tennessee didn’t just adopt Texas’ anti-abortion law. No, we saw it as a way to usher in a veritable smorgasbord of unconstitutional laws we reintroduce each legislative session. Just give the public the option to police them. Tennessee finally got a “bathroom bill,” allowing professional amateur bounty hunters like me to report individuals suspected of having used a bathroom that doesn’t match the gender on their birth certificate. Each time, I get a cut of the $10,000 fine. Not really a high-water mark for the state if you care about common decency or not traumatizing students just trying to use the bathroom between classes and active shooter drills (those are a daily occurrence PHOTO: WIKIMEDIA now), but I sleep fine as long as the checks cash. Dog the Bounty Hunter will Speaking of school, this “bounty law” work-around soon face fierce competition. finally gave us the solution to critical race theory, the graduate school-level legal course that’s not taught in K-12-grade classes but which, nonetheless, became a particular bogeyman of the GOP for a time back in good ol’ 2021. That’s right, anything that even remotely resembles CRT being taught in school is punishable with a hefty fine these days. In fact, I successfully sued an elementary school teacher just this week. She made the mistake of calling the “War of Northern Aggression” the “Civil War” in front of impressionable young minds. Can you imagine? What if some poor child got the idea that slavery was bad? Or that anything wrong had ever happened in America? Or that some groups had been discriminated against because of their race or gender — and that it still happens today? That’s preposterous! Now let me tell you some more about how I make a living by policing the private, personal health choices of women. Those horrible hypotheticals are the questions that worry me as I try to fall asleep, lulled by the incessant hacking and coughing of my unvaccinated neighbor. That’s right, Covid’s still a thing in the future. Back in ’21 you’re still dealing with the Delta variant, right? Those were the days! The virus has mutated a few more times, and it’s much more contagious now. The upside is my mask helps conceal my identity while I’m bounty hunting. You probably want to hear more about the bounties. Yes, it seems far-fetched at first, but you have to remember, Tennessee is the state that did away with handgun permit requirements back in 2021. Were we really going to let an opportunity like this pass us by? No, our legislators — the good, righteous, patriotic ones, anyway — started copying from the Texas playbook right away. See someone offer water to a citizen standing in a long line waiting to exercise their democratic right to vote? That’s a lawsuit. Abortion? CRT? Spreading vaccine N E WS & O P I N I O N “misinformation” — like that they’re safe and THE FLY-BY - 4 effective? Lawsuits. I’m rich these days, kids. NY TIMES CROSSWORD - 6 If other countries ever admit Covid is a hoax POLITICS - 8 and open up their borders to the U.S. again, FINANCE - 9 I’m taking my family on such a sweet vacaAT LARGE - 10 tion with all the money I’ve earned. COVER STORY “A PREVENTABLE PANDEMIC” Sure, some detractors will talk about BY TOBY SELLS - 12 “body autonomy” and the “right to WE RECOMMEND - 16 privacy,” and to be fair, they make excelMUSIC - 18 lent points. If I had time to feel guilty, I CALENDAR - 19 imagine I might, but I’ve got too many BOOKS - 23 lawsuits to file to waste time on moralARTS - 24 FOOD - 25 ity. After all, these people won’t report FILM - 27 themselves. C LAS S I F I E D S - 29 Jesse Davis LAST WORD - 31 jesse@memphisflyer.com

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THE

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MEMernet Memphis on the internet. I DA R AI N B OW

POSTED TO INSTAGRAM BY @MEMPHISASF_CK

So many posted the rainbow brought by Hurricane Ida’s near miss. But MemphisAsFuck said it best on Instagram: “Did y’all catch that beautiful ass rainbow yesterday?” MAR S HA, MAR S HA Senator Marsha Blackburn wished us all a “happy #901 day” on Facebook last week. Memphis showed out in the comments. “You’re about as popular here as reheated vinegar-based barbecue at a restaurant owned by John Calipari,” wrote Allan Creasy. “And they’re wishing you a very happy #resignplease,” wrote JP Paul. “KEEP OUR NAME OUT YOUR MOUTH,” wrote Harrison Lampley.

September 9-15, 2021

F I X E D IT

POSTED TO INSTAGRAM BY @UNAPOLOGETICALLYMEMPHIS

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J UST J P K TWE ETS “Just moved into our new place,” tweeted MEMernet mega-star John Paul Keith. “I haven’t been this giddy since Trump got Covid.”

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Questions, Answers + Attitude Edited by Toby Sells

W E E K T H AT W A S By Flyer staff

Mask Mandate, Jail, and MATA Feds probe state’s mask policy, Covid-19 monitors remain, and the driver shortage. A B O RTI O N AC C E S S The abortion ban that went into effect in Texas last week is a part of a national agenda to end abortion access in the country, according to the head of Planned Parenthood of Tennessee and North Mississippi. “People in Tennessee have got to watch what’s happening in Texas really closely because Gov. [Bill] Lee and the General Assembly could very easily replicate S.B. 8 here,” said President and CEO Ashley Coffield. S H O RT STA F F E D Bus riders are waiting longer for buses or waiting for a bus that never arrives due to a Memphis Area Transit Authority (MATA) staffing shortage. MATA’s goal for on-time performance, or how often buses arrive in a seven-minute window of their scheduled time, is 76 Clockwise from top left: Federal investigation of school mask policy; MATA short percent. Since May, it’s been at 63 percent. staffed; Texas abortion ban causes worry; county inmate population in Covid peril. Gary Rosenfeld, MATA’s CEO, said that number is “totally unacceptable.” In seeking termination of the decree, the motion from Sheriff MATA has about 200 fixed-route bus operators and needs Floyd Bonner had claimed that, pursuant to the consent decree, the about 30 more just to have enough manpower to provide relidepartment had offered all inmates access to a vaccine and provided able daily services. adequate educational materials and incentives to take the vaccine. There is also a shortage of mechanics who are needed to Lipman rejected this argument, finding that, contrary to the asregularly inspect the buses every eight to 10 days, Rosenfeld said. sertions of head jailer Kirk Fields, it was not clear that all detainees Without a full complement of mechanics, the inspections back up had indeed been offered a vaccine. and those buses can’t run. She found further that it was even less clear that all inmates had received the educational materials that the Sheriff’s Department MAS K O PT O UT O R D E R B LO C K E D contended had gone out to each detainee, or that the educational On Friday, September 3rd, federal Judge Sheryl Lipman issued a materials had indeed been adequate. temporary restraining order against Tennessee Governor Bill Lee’s Executive Order No. 84, which allows parents to opt their children F E D S P R O B E STATE out of school mask mandates regardless of school district policy. The U.S. Department of Education’s Office for Civil Rights (OCR) Parents of two local children with disabilities filed the lawsuit, is investigating Tennessee along with four other states to determine and in the wake of a hearing on Monday, August 30th, the federal whether statewide prohibitions on universal indoor masking disjudge issued the order temporarily blocking Lee’s order. criminate against students with disabilities. A hearing on the Motion for Preliminary Injunction is set for The investigation will explore if Tennessee’s policy that allows Thursday, September 9th. parents to opt out of school mask mandates prevents students with disabilities, who have higher risk of severe illness, “from safely C OVI D -19 AN D JAI L returning to in-person education.” U.S. District Judge Sheryl Lipman entered an order last week denySuzanne Goldberg, OCR acting assistant secretary, said OCR is ing a motion from the Shelby County Sheriff’s office to terminate a concerned that this policy may be preventing schools from meeting consent decree of last June mandating improved access to Covid-19 their legal obligations not to discriminate based on disability and to prevention for prisoners in the Shelby County Jail. provide equal educational opportunities. Visit the News Blog at memphisflyer.com for fuller versions of these The consent order was the result of litigation on inmates’ behalf stories and more local news. by the American Civil Liberties Union of Tennessee.


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Crossword ACROSS 1 Shoot out, as 14-Across 5 Peach stones 9 Demanding that people do this and do that 14 Volcanic rock 15 Uncork, as a bottle 16 Livid 17 At the lower side of the pH scale 18 Maple or oak 19 Stepping on the baseline when serving in tennis, e.g. 20 Holder of wires along a street 23 Gloom’s partner 24 Actor Efron of “The Greatest Showman” 25 Subway scurrier 28 Like one end of a battery: Abbr.

31 Aggressive defensive soccer maneuver 34 Midterm or final 36 That, in Tijuana 37 Eco-conscious Dr. Seuss character 38 Red facial spots 39 Transmits 42 Toward sunrise 43 ___-wip (dessert topping) 45 “Black gold” 46 Nickname for John Wayne, with “the” 47 Series of funny outtakes 51 Smidgen 52 Fashion designer’s monogram 53 Have another birthday 54 Golf ball props 56 Toy in a 2017 craze 62 Cricket’s sound

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35 “Love ___” (Beatles hit) 40 Fizzy, sugarless beverage 41 Takes a night to think over 44 Apple tablet with an attachable keyboard 48 Omelet or quiche ingredient 49 Like clarinets and oboes 50 Hawaiian garland 55 Quick smell

57 Hotel amenity with a cord 58 Adjust, as a piano 59 “Me neither” 60 Grandson of Adam and Eve 61 What talcum powder may prevent 62 Middle: Abbr. 63 The laugh of someone who’s up to no good

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Tennessee’s top attorney believes in the sanctity of school sports and work bathrooms more than “every person should be treated with respect and dignity and should be able to live without fear, no matter who they are or whom they love.” Tennessee Attorney General Herbert Slatery led a 20-state coalition in a lawsuit this past week that hopes to stop an antidiscrimination order from President Joe Biden. The order was issued in January and prevents discrimination based on gender identity or sexual orientation. “Children should be able to learn without worrying about whether they will be denied access to the restroom, the locker room, or school sports,” reads the order. “Adults should be able to earn a living and pursue a vocation knowing that they will not be fired, demoted, or mistreated because of whom they go home to or because how they dress does not conform to sex-based stereotypes.” But Slatery says no. “The guidance purports to resolve highly controversial and localized issues such as whether schools must allow biological males to compete on girls’ sports teams, whether employers and schools may maintain sex-separated showers and locker rooms, and whether individuals may be compelled to use another person’s preferred pronouns,” Slatery said in a statement. However, Slatery claims Biden’s order “threatens women’s sports and student and employee privacy.” To get there legally, Slatery and his coalition (including Kentucky, Louisiana, Mississippi, and more) claim only Congress — not the

PHOTO: NASHVILLE LGBTQ CHAMBER OF COMMERCE

Y’all means all, y’all. president — can change “these sensitive issues” of “enormous importance.” The coalition’s complaint asserts that the claim that the order simply implements the U.S. Supreme Court’s 2020 Bostock decision on anti-discrimination is faulty. “The agencies simply do not have that authority,” Slatery said in a statement. “But that has not stopped them from trying. … All of this, together with the threat of withholding educational funding in the midst of a pandemic, warrants this lawsuit.” Government watchdog group, Accountable.US, said last week that antiLGBTQ rules hurt people, especially kids, and they hurt business. “Unfortunately, it seems that legalizing discrimination is so important to Attorney General Slatery that for him, it outweighs the risks to his constituents and Tennessee’s economy,” said Kyle Herrig, president of Accountable.US. “Students deserve to learn in a safe environment where their identities are respected, not used as props in a conservative culture war. If businesses are serious about opposing discriminatory legislation and valuing the rights of LGBTQ Tennesseans, now is the time for them to speak out.” Earlier this year, leaders with 184 Tennessee businesses — including Amazon, Live Nation, and Lyft — issued a letter urging against anti-LGBTQ legislation in Tennessee.


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POLITICS By Jackson Baker

Labor Day Thoughts It isn’t just the seasons that are changin’.

September 9-15, 2021

There has been no public word yet as to the likely appointee to succeed retiring Federal Appeals Court Judge Bernice Donald, but one name seems to be surfacing more than others in speculation as to who will get the Biden administration’s nod. That would be Andre Mathis, a member of the Butler Snow law firm’s commercial litigation and labor and employment groups. Mathis’ focus, according to his bio, is on “representing businesses and governmental entities with regard to contract disputes, employment litigation, internal investigations, education law, transportation litigation, premises liability, and financial services litigation.” Among other lawyers likely to have been considered was the omnipresent Steve Mulroy, a University of Memphis law professor and former county commissioner.

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• One of the key factors in the overwhelming support given to new Shelby County Democratic Party chair Gabby Salinas at the local party’s recent convention was the direct involvement on her behalf by the Memphis AFL-CIO Labor Council, headed by United Steelworkers President Irvin Calliste, assisted by such youthful AFL-CIO staffers as Jeffrey Lichtenstein and Sweetrica Baker. The labor contingent taking part in the Zoom convention is estimated to have numbered in the hundreds and represented the same stepped-up commitment of resources and energy to Democratic causes as was visible locally in the “Blue Wave” election year of 2018 and the Biden-Harris presidential campaign. • Although sparks may continue to fly involving a recent conflict in county government about how employees receive a bonus payment and how they’ll be taxed on it, the way was finally cleared for the bonus amount — ranging from $1,600 to $5,000, depending on tenure — to be paid on September 15th. At a specially called meeting last week, the commission approved a formula to include the payment on employees’ regular payroll checks as of that date, and to be taxed according to their established

withholding data rather than at a 22 percent formula that federal bookkeeping procedures can apply to add-on payments. The larger rate, originally designated by County Financial Officer Mathilde Crosby, had been vocally protested by numerous employees who disliked having to surrender that much of the bonus, bestowed on them during budget proceedings along with a 1.5 percent pay raise in their regular salaries. Commissioner Edmund Ford Jr., who has been in continuous disagreement with the administration of Mayor Lee Harris over numerous matters, had voiced irate suspicions that, in originally setting the higher tax rate, the administration might either have unspecified ulterior motives or have been unduly negligent. He noted that the city government had accomplished similar bonus payments for employees at their regular withholding rate. Crosby attempted to assure him otherwise regarding his concerns, and, upon looking further into federal tax requirements, concurred that the withholding tax rate would suffice if the bonuses were incorporated into the employees’ regular pay schedule. The “conflict” was more apparent than real, and commissioners gave the withholding formula their unanimous approval at last week’s special meeting. • The commissioners are due to tackle a resolution on Wednesday to invite federal monitors back down to Shelby County to investigate questions of racial inequity and misconduct on the part of Juvenile Court. The monitors, who a decade ago responded to complaints from former Commissioner Henri Brooks and others, found a series of problems to be redressed and mandated improvements. During the Trump administration then-County Mayor Mark Luttrell announced that the reforms had been accomplished and succeeded in getting the monitors withdrawn. Skeptical Democratic commissioners — including Reginald Milton, Tami Sawyer, and Van Turner — are behind the request to return the monitors, a request which apparently also has the support of former chair Eddie Jones. Republican commissioners might well demur, but the Harris administration, with its emphasis on improvements in juvenile justice, is presumably open to the monitors’ return.


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their lease payment as a business expense. The vast majority of business colleagues and clients will neither notice nor care if you drive a 10-year-old Camry or a brandnew Mercedes. I was listening to a podcast recently about marketing to affluent households. The guest talked about how they use ownership and registration data to identify households with expensive vehicles — and then exclude them from the marketing plan! The reason? In a given population (in this case, people living in high-income ZIP codes), the people who actually have money in the bank tend to be the ones who don’t spend it on depreciating assets like sports cars, boats, and recreational vehicles. You might be thinking: “That’s great, but what are we supposed to do without cars in places like Memphis without good public transportation?” I always smile when I hear this because people who say this generally have not earnestly looked into our MATA buses, trolleys, and on-demand services like Ready! and Groove. All that may not be for you, but along with the backup plan of commercial ride-sharing services, these services can be a real alternative to a car. I discovered a while back that an almost perfectly direct bus route connected my house to my workplace, and I still remember fondly the years of paying a couple dollars a day to read the paper rather than fighting traffic. At the end of the day, some people simply like to have new cars, and that’s their choice. But even slight mindset shifts can pay big dividends, like a family deciding to get by with an older car or even fewer total cars. Lots of people spend a lot of time justifying a need to buy new cars. Spend some of that energy toward justifying older, cheaper, and fewer cars in your life — you’ll likely see profound differences in your financial outcome. Have a question or topic you’d like to see covered in this column? Contact the author at ggard@telarrayadvisors.com. Gene Gard is Co-Chief-Investment Officer at Telarray, a Memphis-based wealth management firm that helps families navigate investment, tax, estate, and retirement decisions.

NEWS & OPINION

M

emphis is a car town, no doubt about it. While it’s possible to exist here without one, nobody would say it’s convenient. For many, simply maintaining reliable transportation to get to and from school and work is a challenge that must be supported by an unscrupulous network of used car dealers, predatory lenders, and insurance companies catering to the less affluent and creditworthy market. If you’re caught in that cycle, there’s not much we can offer in a brief article to help you. But for many car owners, rethinking your relationship with cars could make a major difference in your long-term financial picture. Cars are uniquely positioned at the intersection of transportation, identity, and status. It can turn into a cycle: When the car gets paid off (or the lease expires), a new car quickly arrives in the driveway. Car payments seem to be a permanent bill, just like rent or mortgage, taxes, insurance, and utilities. Five-year car loans are now standard and terms stretch to 72, 84, or even 96 months, so it’s no surprise that car payments never seem to go away. But is this cycle really necessary? One justification for a new car is that it’s too expensive to maintain an old car. While this is true toward the end of a vehicle’s life, there’s a lot of time between the end of a 36,000-mile warranty and the 100,000 to 200,000 problem-free miles most cars enjoy today. Short of catastrophic failure, most maintenance issues from reliable brands rarely cost more than $500 to $1,000 to fix. That’s in the range of one to two months of typical car payments, which means you can pay for an awful lot of maintenance before it really makes sense to buy a new car. Another justification for an endless treadmill of new cars is safety. It’s true that cars from previous decades don’t have features like airbags, shoulder belts, and highly engineered crumple zones that have reduced traffic fatalities so dramatically in recent years. However, a lot of money is spent in the name of safety for a few years of improvements that have marginal utility at best. Finally, some people say they have to have a certain level of car for career reasons. This might be true for real estate agents who drive clients around all day. Then again, they also are likely able to deduct

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ALL THE STREETS ARE SILENT Directed by Jeremy Elkin / 2021 / 89 minutes / Rated M SEPTEMBER 30,2021

WOODLANDS DARK AND DAYS BEWITCHED:

A HISTORY OF FOLK HORROR Directed by Kier-La Janisse / 2021 / 193 minutes / Rated R OCTOBER 7, 2021

DEF BY TEMPTATION

Directed by James Bond III / 1990 / 95 minutes / Rated R

OCTOBER 14, 2021

POSSESSION Directed by Andrzej Zulawski / 1981 / 124 minutes / Rated R LIVE SCORE MUSICAL ACCOMPANIMENT with THE POP RITUAL

OCTOBER 28, 2021

THE CABINET OF DR. CALIGARI Directed by Robert Wiene / 1920 / 75 minutes / Rated M NOVEMBER 4, 2021

NO ORDINARY MAN Directed by Aisling Chin-Yee & Chase Joynt / 2020 / 83 minutes / Rated M NOVEMBER 11, 2021

FUNERAL PARADE OF ROSES Directed by Toshio Matsumoto / 1969 / 105 minutes / Rated R NOVEMBER 18, 2021

MILLION DOLLAR MERMAID Directed by Mervyn LeRoy / 1952 / 115 minutes / Rated G The Crosstown Arthouse Film Series showcases a diverse collection of independent, international, historically signifi cant, artistic, experimental, cult, underground and documentary features.

CROSSTOWN THEATER at CROSSTOWN CONCOURSE 1350 Concourse Avenue / Memphis, TN 38104 / crosstownarts.org

Stumped The ideology of ignorance is killing us.

A

nd another one bites the dust. latter two have both written horrible songs It’s become almost a daily about losing their freedom. To be idiots? story in the media: Some Most of Kid Rock’s maskless band caught outspoken anti-vaxxer dies Covid at the annual Sturgis Motorcycle of Covid. Some are repentant in their final Rally last month. (South Dakota’s Covid days, like conservative radio talker Phil infection rate went up 700 percent Valentine of Nashville, who, after coming following the gathering.) down with the disease, changed his tune Locally and statewide, we are seeing and urged his listeners to get vaccinated — the results of a low vaccination rate and before he died on a ventilator. Others have anti-mask sentiment, due mostly to gone to meet their maker still insisting that ignorance and ideology. Parents in this a) Covid was a hoax, b) the vaccines don’t county and this state are intentionally work, or c) they really just had the flu. sending their children to school, Three conservative radio hosts have died unmasked and unvaccinated, convinced in recent weeks: Valentine and two Florida somehow that all these deaths, these talk-show mainstays — Marc Bernier ever-rising case numbers, these children and Dick Farrel. All three disparaged the dying in our hospitals, are somehow a vaccine, masks, and distancing; trashed the Joe Biden/Anthony Fauci plot to take CDC; and told listeners not to fear Covid. away their freedom. Their own children Bernier tweeted: “Now the government (and ours) are being sacrificed on the is acting like Nazis, saying ‘get the shot.’” altar of know-nothing ideology, aided Farrel tweeted: “Why take and abetted by GOP state a vax promoted by people governors, including our who lied 2u all along about own absurdly incompetent masks, where the virus came Bill Lee, who when asked from, and the death toll?” He how he planned to deal with also called Anthony Fauci “a the fact that Tennessee now power-tripping lying freak.” has the highest infection This week, Joe Rogan, rate in the nation, answered aka the “little ball of anger,” that he didn’t plan to the most popular podcaster “change strategy.” in America, announced that “Strategy?” No, Bill. he’d contracted Covid. Rogan, “Strategy” is a plan, a course unsurprisingly, is also an antiof action, a way to take on a vaxxer. He claims that he is problem sickening and killing King Arthur and the the people in your state. taking a horse dewormer to Black Knight treat his case. I hope he is as Sitting on your ass and saying lucky as he is stupid. that “parents know best” is But it’s not just radio hosts who are not a strategy. You are an embarrassment, a dying from denial of science and common wanna-be DeSantis, a mini-Trump with the sense, who are losing the ultimate charisma of a pine-stump. bet, making the deadly choice to pick All this reminds me of nothing so much ideology over science and medicine. It’s as the fight scene from Monty Python and evangelical ministers, politicians, anti-mask the Holy Grail, in which the Black Knight leaders, and other assorted right-wing refuses to allow King Arthur to pass. In spokespeople, now dead because they the ensuing sword fight, the knight’s left bought the bilge being spewed by Valentine arm is hacked off. “’Tis but a scratch,” he and their cohorts, and, even worse, by proclaims, fighting on. When his right arm prominent talk-show blatherers with is severed, he still refuses to surrender. national audiences, like the loathsome and “Look, you stupid bastard,” says Arthur. hypocritical Tucker Carlson (who’s been “You’ve got no arms left!” vaccinated) and Laura Ingraham (also “’Tis but a flesh wound,” says the knight. vaccinated), to name just two. Their lies are Then a leg is sliced off, then the other. quite literally getting people killed. Still he persists, shouting insults and threats, Several country music stars and boomer a noisy torso on the ground. “The Black rock heroes like Eric Clapton and Van Knight never loses!” he shouts. Morrison are also virulent and outspoken Empty words. From a stump. Seems in their anti-vax, anti-mask positions. The familiar.


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Marshall Charloff performs a heartfelt show honoring Prince: RASPBERRY BERET – 1999 – PURPLE RAIN.

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NEWS & OPINION

BILLY DEAN

OCT. 2 / 7:30P.M.

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COVER STORY BY TOBY SELLS

A PREVENTABLE PANDEMIC COVID BLAZES THROUGH MEMPHIS, BUT EXPERTS CAN (MAYBE) SEE THE END (THE REAL ONE).

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Eighteen-Month Pandemic Check-Up Covid’s second verse is the same as the first in many ways. It’s come with familiar things like mandatory face masks, social distancing, and an unshakable worry about what comes next. But we now know the second verse, the Delta variant, is more infectious, faster, meaner, catching on with a younger audience, and — maybe the most frustrating part — it’s mostly preventable. Experts here say late summer’s recordsetting rise in cases is a “surge of the unvaccinated.” Healthcare leaders say 99 percent of Covid patients they see now are

unvaccinated. That’s a stat, not hyperbole. That figure is, of course, likely heavy on those now broadly called “anti-vaxxers,” right-wingers who put personal freedom before public health. Many, too, are otherwise healthy people in their 20s and 30s whose reluctance to get a vaccine remains a mystery to many health officials. But a huge chunk of Shelby County’s population are unvaccinated not by choice. No vaccine is yet approved for children under 12. Pediatric Covid cases comprised nearly 40 percent of the county’s active cases late last week. The kids are getting sick.

There’s no medicine to protect them. And we’re sending them to school with hundreds just like them. Thanks to the more contagious Delta variant and vaccine hesitancy, the Covid situation in Shelby County last week was as dire as it’s ever been before. Historic high rates of new cases, hospitalizations, test positivity rates — the fundamental data used to measure the Memphis area’s Covid health — make that dire situation an unfortunate reality. Last Thursday, Doug McGowen, the city’s chief operating officer (COO), reported two

September 9-15, 2021

he doctor wished for a miracle drug, pain and regret in a bottle. Inside the room, his colleague was dying of Covid-19. Outside the room, the doctor — Dr. Stephen Threlkeld, a Memphis infectious disease expert — waited with members of the dying person’s family. “We wished we could bottle the pain and regret of that process, to give people just a taste — a drop — of that to realize that this is now a choice that people are making, to get this illness and to die of it. There is no reason for this to continue.”

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COURTESY OF THE DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH POLICY AT VUMC


unvaccinated, according to Dr. Anthony Fauci, director of the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases and the chief medical adviser to President Joe Biden and a medical adviser to former President Donald Trump. From this frightening precipice, though, some experts believe they may even be able to see the end, the real one. How It Happened Memphis didn’t blow it. Covid trend lines look basically the same for Shelby County, Tennessee, the U.S. at large, and the world. In fact, government bodies in Memphis were far more conservative than those in other parts of the state when it came to letting down our Covid guard.

health departments. “Covid-19 is now a managed public health issue in Tennessee and no longer a statewide public health emergency,” Lee said in an April statement. “As Tennesseans continue to get vaccinated, it’s time to lift remaining local restrictions, focus on economic recovery, and get back to business in Tennessee.” We know now that Covid is far from “managed,” but that’s not to malign Lee. No one predicted Delta’s rise. Leaders here were so sure the thing was done, they closed the $51 million Covid overflow hospital in the former Commercial Appeal building on Union without ever seeing a single patient. But it wasn’t only government leaders who were caught off guard.

“We’ve had the tools in our hands. But as we keep resisting vaccination and mitigation strategies, it will prolong the time [the pandemic lasts].” — Dr. Diego Hijano

SVETLANA CHERRUTY | DREAMSTIME.COM

Consider that in late April, even as Covid seemed to start winding down in Shelby County, Memphis Mayor Jim Strickland extended the city’s state of emergency, the same one issued as the pandemic began in March 2020. “Covid-19 continues to present a danger to public health through community transmission, which has resulted in significant loss of lives in Shelby County due to the virus and has strained the hospitals and public health system,” reads the order, which was recently extended. Seven days after Strickland’s new emergency order, Tennessee Governor Bill Lee was ready to call the game and get back to work. His order lifted any mask mandates in 89 counties, those without their own

“I was certainly not expecting the way this has played out,” said Dr. Diego Hijano, an infectious disease expert at St. Jude Children’s Research Hospital. “We knew the virus would move through the vulnerable and we always thought about the unvaccinated. “Obviously, it makes sense that all the kids who were isolated are getting infected and that’s driving a lot of what we’re seeing. But I did not expect things to change so dramatically.” Looking nationally, researchers told The New York Times in mid-July that the coast was clearing. Bill Hanage, an epidemiologist at the Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health, said he thought the “United States has vaccinated itself out of a national

coordinated surge, even though we do expect cases pretty much everywhere.” Kristian Andersen, a virologist at the Scripps Research Institute, said, “I don’t expect that we will get close to the kind of mayhem we saw earlier.” At the end of June, the national sevenday rolling average of new cases was around 12,000, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). On July 27th, it was 60,000. At the same time, Shelby County’s average rose from 46 new cases to 358. The figure’s latest peak was August 24th at 821. It fell slightly to 746 on August 27th, the latest figure available as of press time. In the Hospital Remember “bending the curve”? The phrase seems an Alpha-variant relic these days. But it was a major goal of pandemicmanagement tactics like mask mandates, indoor capacity limitations, and social distancing. Hospitals and healthcare professionals are essential to everyone, and no one wanted them overrun with Covid patients. So, we wanted to “bend” the new-case trend line downward. With little appetite left for Covid restrictions, no one talks much about bending the curve anymore, but hospital capacity remains a red-hot issue. Shelby County Mayor Lee Harris saw the situation firsthand last week on a tour of Baptist Memorial Hospital-Memphis. Every room in the ICU was full and it seemed “every patient was in a very, very serious situation,” Harris said. “I was struck by the idea that not everyone in this community that will be struck by Covid, will be safe because there’s not enough experts around and not enough technology to go around.” The area’s hospitalization record set last week surpassed numbers only seen in the previous week. The number would be astronomical if older residents had not been prioritized in the vaccination effort. While children (age 0-17) now represent the highest number of active cases in the county, many don’t require hospitalization when they get sick. (As of last week, Le Bonheur had 28 Covid patients, seven of them in the ICU.) The age range of hospitalized adults with Covid is now largely between 20 and 40 years old. That’s “not normal,” according to Shelby County Health Department Director Dr. Michelle Taylor. “I am personally ill when I think about the number of young people — or people of any age — but particularly those in their 20s and 40s with little children [being treated in the hospital for Covid],” said Dr. John Craig, a thoracic surgeon with Baptist Medical Group. “It is sad beyond continued on page 14

COVER STORY m e m p h i s f l y e r. c o m

grim milestones. More people were being treated in Shelby County hospitals at one time — 721 — than in any previous time in the 18-month pandemic. Area intensive care units (ICUs) were treating 203 patients, and 518 people were in acute care. Across the county, 163 people were intubated, setting another Covid record here. Through the difficult data, however, rises a sort of delicate optimism. Some numbers started to soften, officials said. But predictions on the figures came laden with plentiful anxious caveats from experts bitten by Delta’s global surprise. New case rates blasted past records Memphians thought terrifying in January. The week after Christmas, nearly 18 percent of Covid tests were coming back positive, significantly more than the previous high of about 15 percent. Consider that for the past three weeks, the figure has hovered at around 21 percent. But it has hovered, and some officials harbor that the spread may have stabilized. Officials at Baptist Memorial HospitalMemphis said Covid cases there crested at 172 this past winter. Weeks ago the hospital had 10 Covid patients, but Delta cases there stair-stepped and hit 152 recently. That number has since stabilized, too. The figure encourages Threlkeld and others at Baptist, who say that, if the number holds, they may have receded from the brink of a dire logistical situation. But optimism is indeed delicate and truly tempered with anxious caveats. “I am flat through underestimating this pandemic,” Threlkeld said at a press event at the hospital last week, “so you will not get me saying it’s going to be fine anymore.” It’s from this high and tenuous peak that we look back at the long slog through the Memphis version of the global Covid-19 pandemic. From here, we can look back on the early days when we couldn’t even test for the virus, when some of us learned to live and work from home. Others, frontline workers, especially grocery store workers, were heroes. Every commercial began with “in these tough times.” We can recall the early optimism in Operation Warp Speed and the race to build a vaccine to stop the spread of the disease. When it arrived, there was a dash to sit in long lines at the Pipkin Building. Some posted photos of vaccine cards to social media, sometimes exposing sensitive information if a finger was in the wrong place. Those vaccines are the difference-maker now as we turn to look ahead, to the future side of this peak. They saved the day, almost. Covid case rates got so low, we pulled our masks off and gently kissed normalcy. But that was fleeting, as we know, ripped away by a virus variant propagated in the

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continued from page 13

September 9-15, 2021

description and to see this go through my community, it’s a terrible thing.” Dr. Jeff Wright, medical director for Baptist Memorial Hospital-Memphis’ critical care program (which includes the ICU), said the average Alpha-variant ICU patient was around 60 or 70. The average age of death in ICU patients is now 30, and these deaths average once a day. “These were not 35-year-olds that had lots of medical problems,” Wright said. “They all had jobs … and families. It was tragic.” These patients die of single-organ failure, lung failure, Wright said. Most times Covid isn’t stressing an existing comorbidity (like cancer or liver disease) in these patients like it did before in older patients. Younger patients also tend to stay in the hospital longer than older patients, he said, sometimes three to four weeks, instead of the two weeks older patients typically stayed, keeping hospital beds full and capacity low. There’s a higher cost. “Nurses are in there eight hours a day on end, FaceTiming with families of dying patients,” Threlkeld said. “You lose a little piece of yourself when that happens, and it’s happened a lot to those folks.”

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How It Ends (Probably) Richard Webby thinks we’re still halfway through the pandemic, or maybe 75 percent of the way. Not only does he have an infectious disease lab at St. Jude with his name on the door (the Webby Lab), he’s also the director of the World Health Organization’s Collaborating Centre for Studies on the Ecology of Influenza in Animals and Birds. “There’s no way of knowing, right?” Webby said. “I think this is as bad as this virus is going to get in terms of speed of replication, how potentially transmissible the virus could get. “I’d like to think that once we do get through this and get more population immunity both through national infection, unfortunately, and through vaccinations, we’ll get back down again, and maybe we’ll stay a little bit lower and get through it.” Webby thinks Covid will likely settle into a winter disease, somewhere between the flu and the cold. Threlkeld agreed, noting four other coronaviruses — which may have started as pandemics hundreds of years ago — circulate as colds these days. “What we hope is that by getting everyone vaccinated, it will drive this disease into becoming something like the current coronaviruses that caused the common cold,” he said. “They infect many people and their kids, and [kids] do well compared to

adults with those types of infections. So, they have some immunity, but it’s not perfect. They’ll get it again later but it won’t be as severe. Then, by the time you get it multiple times as an adult, you just don’t get very sick from it at all.” In the shorter term, Threlkeld said case counts could rise again in the winter as everyone heads indoors, just as the numbers spiked last year. But he said, “[W]e might see this thing really taper off when we look at the springtime.” Hijano said he’s stopped predicting the virus because “sometimes when we think we’ve got it, we really don’t have it all.” The timeline is up to us, he said. “We’ve had the tools in our hands,” Hijano said. “But as we keep resisting vaccination and mitigation strategies, it will prolong the time.” The health department’s latest mask mandate said restrictions may be loosened if case counts fall or if 700,000 of people in the county get vaccinated. As of Friday, 467,296 had been vaccinated, nearly 67 percent to the goal of 700,000. Average daily vaccinations last week were 1,854. If that rate continues, it would take about 125 days (four months) to vaccinate the remaining 232,704 people to get to 700,000. Keep it up and Shelby County would have a major reason to toast New Year’s Eve.

Until then, Dr. Aditya Gaur, director of St. Jude’s clinical research on infectious diseases, knows what works and knows how you feel. “I know you are tired of hearing the same thing over and over about wearing your mask, staying home, and not socializing,” he said. “A part of that is that the people who have been doing it intensely are the ones who continue to do it intensely, although they are tired of it. But the people who never had the appetite for it still don’t have an appetite for it.” McGowen, the city’s COO, is likely tired of talking about Covid, too, directing much of the area’s response to the pandemic and giving regular updates on the situation. Last week, he asked for help. “We’re asking that everybody, that you just do the right thing,” he said. “We understand this has been a rough 18 months for everyone in our nation. But it is not the job of the city government or county government or the health department to navigate this alone. Nor is it the responsibility of the hospitals to navigate this alone and be just the net receiver of those who are very sick. “It is individual by individual, person by person, who complies with common sense and doing the right thing that will get us through this pandemic.”


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steppin’ out (& stayin’ in)

We Recommend: Culture, News + Reviews

Rural Art Tour

PHOTO: DEBORAH FAGAN CARPENTER

“Rural Route” art and sale show

By Julie Ray

City life is chaotic. The world is a crazy mess fraught with viruses and tension. Maybe it’s time to take a soothing trip somewhere close to home. Three well-known local artists are opening their home studios to the public this weekend in Lakeland and Eads during the “Rural Route: Autumn Aesthetic” art show and sale. Just 30 minutes from Downtown Memphis, Deborah Fagan Carpenter and Jimmy Crosthwait invite art lovers to wander their Lakeland home and studio. “The whole house is filled with art — even the bathroom,” says Carpenter. “I will have small and large paintings for sale, and Jimmy will have sculpture pieces for sale, including a large selection of his zen wind chimes that make the sound of — in his words — ‘one hand clapping.’” Crosthwait’s work is designed for movement while Carpenter’s work is quiet and soothing, a perfect complement to each other. Meander onto the patio in the garden and be treated to homemade refreshments. Just a short trip down the road in Eads, potter Agnes Stark will also have her home studio open to the public. Each piece of pottery is unique, fired in a gas kiln. Along with decorative and useful stoneware and ceramic clay pieces for sale, guests are invited to walk Stark’s property where there is also a log cabin amid open spaces. Whether you are seeking a unique piece of art, a quiet respite, or both, you are invited to travel an artful autumn rural route this weekend.

September 9-15, 2021

Stephen Graham Jones writes horror with heart in My Heart Is a Chainsaw. Books, p. 23

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BRIAN MANNING

STEPHEN GRAHAM JONES

“RURAL ROUTE: AUTUMN AESTHETIC,” FAGAN-CARPENTER STUDIO, 4881 CANADA, AND AGNES STARK POTTERY, 12675 DONELSON, FRIDAY-SATURDAY, SEPT. 10-11, 11 A.M.-5 P.M., AND SUNDAY, SEPT. 12, NOON-5 P.M., FREE

Fashion illustrator Kris Keys heals through watercolors and storytelling. Arts, p. 24

VARIOUS DAYS & TIMES September 9th - 15th Southern Heritage Classic Cultural Celebration Various events and locations, southernheritageclassic.com, ThursdaySaturday, Sept. 9-11, free-$23+ Enjoy events leading up to the game on Saturday, when Jackson State University squares off with Tennessee State University. Opening Reception for “Nature Amplified” Eclectic Eye, 242 S. Cooper, Friday, Sept. 10, 6-8 p.m., free Exhibition of impressionist-inspired paintings by Stacey Johnson.

Lil’ Buck: Real Swan TONE Gallery, 2234 Lamar, Friday, Sept. 10, 7 p.m., free with RSVP A special screening in conjunction with the exhibition “Chocolate Cities” that explores and examines Blackness and intersections with the first Black neighborhood, Orange Mound.

Alexander Vindman in Conversation with Arnold Schwarzenegger Novel, 387 Perkins Ext., Friday, Sept. 10, 7 p.m., free with registration The author discusses Here, Right Matters: An American Story moderated by CNN’s Bianna Golodryga via Crowdcast.

Trippin’ Comedy Show Cannon Center for the Performing Arts, 255 N. Main, Friday, Sept. 10, 7 p.m., $55 Features DC Young Fly, Emmanuel Hudson, Chico Bean, Darren Brand, and Justin Whitehead.

Mad Tea Party Black Lodge, 405 N. Cleveland, Friday, Sept. 10, 8 p.m., $10 Celebrate your unbirthday, featuring drag performers, tunes from DJs, door prizes, and costume prizes.

Super Chevy Show Memphis International Raceway, 5500 Victory, Millington, TN, Friday-Sunday, Sept. 10-12, 8 a.m.-5 p.m., $20 - $65 The largest car show in the Mid-South, featuring drag racing, car and truck shows, a swap meet, and more. International Goat Days Festival Millington Gym, 4885 Bill Knight, Millington, TN, Saturday, Sept. 11, 7 a.m.-6 p.m., $5 Features pancake breakfast, live music, craft vendors, car show, antique tractor show, hot air balloon rides, and barbecue contest.


Live music at

PHOTO: COURTESY ABO MARKETING

Reach up and stretch at Memphis Rox Yoga Festival.

Yoga Rox

By Julie Ray

Making your Saturday healthful at an outdoor event this weekend might be just what you need. If you want to get your yoga on, Memphis Rox Yoga Festival is for you. Join a variety of local studios from Memphis, Nashville, and North Mississippi for a festival celebrating all things yoga. The festival will offer lectures, workshops, film screenings, and yoga classes for all levels — even kids. Browse the Memphis Botanic Garden while enjoying live music, food trucks, kids’ activities, lectures, and 20 different yoga classes throughout the venue for the entire day. A portion of the proceeds from the festival will benefit Memphis Rox, a nonprofit climbing gym located in Soulsville, South Memphis, that functions on a pay-what-you-can model. The community benefits from the climbing facility that offers programs to foster relationships across cultural, racial, and socio-economic backgrounds. Rock climbing is a metaphor for overcoming life’s obstacles. The higher the community climbs physically, the higher the community climbs metaphorically. In addition to rock climbing, Memphis Rox also offers other community amenities such as yoga, a community closet, and the Juice Almighty juice bar cafe lunch program. Co-founder of Memphis Rox Yoga Festival and Memphis Rox board member Susannah Herring says, “When we created the festival, we wanted to partner with a nonprofit organization that supported both yoga and Memphis, and Memphis Rox was the perfect fit. Often rock climbing and yoga go hand-in-hand.” MEMPHIS ROX YOGA FESTIVAL, MEMPHIS BOTANIC GARDEN, 750 CHERRY, SATURDAY, SEPT. 11, 9 A.M.-4 P.M., $35 - $55

th -2021 September1515, September 8:00pm

SHOW STARTS @ 8PM Hayes Carll $15 advance

$20 at the door

September 16th - 8:00pm Lettuce

9/8 - 6:30pm

Duwayne Burnside Blues Hour

9/9 - 8pm Lucky 7

9/10 - 8pm 9/11 - 8pm

Memphis All-Stars

9/12 - 8pm

Mighty Souls brass Band Orange Mound Love and Wellness Fair Orange Mound Tower, 2205 Lamar, Saturday, Sept. 11, 11 a.m.-3 p.m., free Informative talks, health screenings, games, food, vendors, and music, plus $1,500 in gift card giveaways. May the Schwartz Be with You: A Sci-Fi Comedy Time Warp Malco Summer 4 Drive-In, 5310 Summer, Saturday, Sept. 11, 7:30 p.m., $25 per car Space-bound satire and alien invasion antics featuring Spaceballs, Galaxy Quest, Mars Attacks!, and Critters.

Labyrinth 35th Anniversary Malco Paradiso, 584 S. Mendenhall, Sunday, Sept. 12, 3 p.m., and Wednesday, Sept. 15, 7 p.m., $15 Frustrated with babysitting, Sarah, a teenager with an active imagination, summons the Goblin King to take her baby stepbrother away. Central Gardens Virtual Home Tour Detour Download map at centralgardens.org, starts Sunday, Sept. 12 and continues through Sept. 30, free Self-guided tour featuring a blend of old and new, plus Troop 34 Scout Lodge.

King Henry VI: The Wars of the Roses Wiseacre Brewery, 2783 Broad, Tuesday, Sept.14, 7 p.m., and Overton Square, Wednesday, Sept.15, 7 p.m., visit tnshakespeare.org for more performances through Sept. 26, free The Duke of Somerset plucks a red rose. The Duke of York plucks a white. English nobles declare their loyalty. Civil dissent blooms. Steve Hofstetter Lafayette’s Music Room, 2119 Madison, Sunday, Sept. 12, 7 p.m., $25 Popular YouTube comic brings the laughs to Memphis.

9/15 - 6:30pm

Duwayne Burnside Blues Hour

9/15 - 8pm Hayes Carll

9/16 - 8pm Lettuce

railgarten.com 2 1 6 6 C e n t r a l Av e . Memphis TN 38104

ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT

Simu Liu (above) stars as the titular hero in Marvel’s Shang-Chi and the Legend of the Ten Rings. Film, p. 27

m e m p h i s f l y e r. c o m

John Williams and the A440 Band

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MUSIC By Alex Greene

Music for the Masses The Memphis Symphony Orchestra is woven into the life of the city.

B THURSDAY, SEPT. 9 • 8PM

SUNDAY

SEPTEMBER 12

7 PM

September 9-15, 2021

Thursday September 23rd 8pm

with

Special Guest Shannon McNally

Sunday, September 26 • 8 pm

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randon Knisley, vice president of patron engagement at the Memphis Symphony Orchestra (MSO), has to be a great juggler. He’s intimately involved in the mission of the MSO as it marches on into the 21st century, and, it turns out, that requires keeping a lot of diverse ideas in the air at once. Music history, music appreciation, economics, and a bit of sociology are all part of the equation in today’s MSO, which has evolved by leaps and bounds since adopting that name in 1960. Speaking with Knisley recently revealed just how ambitious, diverse, and locally grounded the MSO is, not to mention what musical treasures we can expect from their 2021-22 season. Memphis Flyer: The MSO has really expanded its mission since you came aboard in late 2019, in spite of the pandemic. How would you describe that mission now? Brandon Knisley: Right from the beginning, [MSO CEO] Peter Abell and I lined up on what we wished for the musicians and what we thought an orchestra is for a city. He and I both believe that it’s not just concerts you put on. An orchestra is what happens when you make it possible for artists to be a part of your community. How do we make the music education program better? How do we partner with the library system and their literacy program? To do these things, you have to make it possible for artists to live here. Our hope is that we can, over time, build some civic infrastructure. Instead of raising money to build a building, we want to raise money to ensure that we can pay musicians to live here. And endowment funding is how we’re really trying to do that. So the days when musicians had to take a pay cut just so MSO could survive have gone? A lot of work has been done, so we’ve raised a large portion of an endowment for the orchestra, and that’s closed that structural gap. The orchestra’s always going to be here. Our hope now is to really, significantly grow that endowment so that, long term, we can create a competitive wage for our musicians, attract great talent,

that including diverse voices should not be something special. It should just be what we do. Pretty much every program on our new season features composers who are either women or people of color. Or we have an artist who is a person of color. It’s just something we do, a part of our everyday work.

PHOTOS: COURTESY MSO; ZIGGY MACK/LOUISE TUCKER

Scott Moore, principal trumpet; MSO music director Robert Moody and keep the really great musicians who come here and want to stay. How has the mission evolved beyond the performers themselves? Ten years ago, the orchestra started an initiative called the Circle of Friends. And at its core was the belief that art and music should be used as instruments for intentional inclusion. It really started as a women’s philanthropic initiative, and we brought together a really incredible group of women. About 200 women have been a part of this group over the past 10 years, and they really became a strong force in our board recruitments. This approach applies to the orchestra and the programming itself. Our music director, Robert Moody, has decided

What does the current season look like? We are presenting a season that looks a lot more normal, including five fairly traditional concerts at the Cannon Center. Then we’ll have a chamber music series at the Germantown United Methodist Church, but we’re also going to do that series at Crosstown Theater, which will have an educational component for the high school that’s there. Then we also have our Orchestra Unplugged series at the Halloran Centre, where Robert Moody speaks about a single piece of music or an idea about music or a particular composer and does a deep dive into it. Then, as it’s performed, you hear the music with new ears. We’ll continue to do live radio broadcasts on WKNO, and we’re also considering more YouTube livestreams. While the pandemic has been an awful period for so many reasons, it’s been interesting from a creativity standpoint. The new season launches with MSO at the Botanic Garden, Saturday, September 25th, 7 p.m. Free. Visit memphissymphony.org for details.


Send the date, time, place, cost, info, phone number, a brief description, and photos — two weeks in advance — to calendar@memphisflyer.com or P.O. Box 1738, Memphis, TN 38101. DUE TO SPACE LIMITATIONS, ONGOING WEEKLY EVENTS WILL APPEAR IN THE FLYER’S ONLINE CALENDAR ONLY.

CALENDAR of EVENTS:

September 9 - 15

archives. Ongoing.

ART AN D S P EC IA L E X H I B ITS

STAX MUSEUM OF AMERICAN SOUL MUSIC

“Africa on My Mind”

“Strata”

Exhibition featuring new and recent artwork by Ethiopian artist Dereje Demissie and Nigerian artist Johnson Uwadinma. Ongoing.

Exhibition of work by Coriana Close and Sarah Elizabeth Cornejo. Through Sept. 13. 2021 PROJECTS

“The Louisiana Project”

UREVBU CONTEMPORARY

Exhibition of works by William Eggleston. Through Oct. 24.

“After the Storm”

Exhibition of new work featuring paintings and pottery by Meghean Warner and Amy Hertz. Through Oct. 11.

MEMPHIS BROOKS MUSEUM OF ART

“The Southern Gothic Oracle”

BUCKMAN ARTS CENTER AT ST. MARY’S SCHOOL

Exhibition of paintings by Stacey Williams-Ng. Through Oct. 2.

“Borders”

JAY ETKIN GALLERY

Exhibition of metal sculptures by Steinunn Thorarinsdottir. Through Oct. 31.

Tributaries: Tiff Massey I “Everyday Arsenal”

Exhibition of works inspired by African standards of economic vitality. Through Sept. 25.

THE DIXON GALLERY & GARDENS

“Contemporary & Ethnographic Works of Art”

“Divine Legacies in Black Jewelry” Exhibition of jewelry to contextualize the history of modern Black American jewelry production during the 20th and 21st centuries. Through Sept. 12. METAL MUSEUM

“Escape to Water and Sky”

Exhibition of paintings by Ann Brown Thomason on display in the Grand Hall. Through Sept. 30. MEMPHIS BOTANIC GARDEN

“Genealogy”

Exhibition of watercolor paintings and films inspired by the patterns of blood, memory, and history. Free. Through Nov. 7.

“Hindsight 2020”

Exhibition offering a reflection of the events of 2020 through the lens of artists of color, LGBTQ+ artists, and others. Through Sept. 30. ART MUSEUM AT THE UNIVERSITY OF MEMPHIS (AMUM)

“Images of Africa Before & After the Middle Passage” Exhibition of photography by Jeff and Shaakira Edison. Ongoing.

SLAVE HAVEN UNDERGROUND RAILROAD MUSEUM

“Indefinitely Wild”

Exhibition of work by Angi Cooper and Janet Weed Beaver. Through Sept. 30. WKNO.ORG

Brooks curator Heather Nickels revisits the exhibit, “Persevere and Resist: The Strong Black Women of Elizabeth Catlett.” “Inside the Walt Disney Archives”

Exhibition celebrating the legacy of The Walt Disney Company archives. Through Jan. 2. GRACELAND EXHIBITION CENTER

“Light Is A Place”

Exhibition of 20 photographs by Huger Foote. Through Oct. 9. DAVID LUSK GALLERY

“Meet the Dixons”

Exhibition highlighting Margaret and Hugo Dixon’s personal lives, collections, and legacy. Through Sept. 26. THE DIXON GALLERY & GARDENS

BYKRISKEYS.COM

“Micro-Aesthetic”

Exhibition of microscopic images presented by Dr. Amir Hadadzadeh. Through Sept. 30.

Mensah, which explores notions of Blackness coupled with the convergence of place and space. Through Sept. 18.

ART MUSEUM AT THE UNIVERSITY OF MEMPHIS (AMUM)

TONE

“Mona Hatoum: Misbah”

Exhibition of confectious sculptures by Greely Myatt. Through Sept. 26.

Art installation where the viewer stands in a darkened room, lit only by a rotating lantern dangling from the ceiling. Through Jan. 9. MEMPHIS BROOKS MUSEUM OF ART

New Art by Dr. Tom Gettelfinger

Artwork exhibition in the Crosstown Concourse West Atrium and the Church Health Welcome Center. Through Sept. 30. CROSSTOWN CONCOURSE

“On the Road: Chocolate Cities” Exhibition featuring multiple artists curated by Larry Ossei-

“Piece of Cake”

THE DIXON GALLERY & GARDENS

“Sketching Europe: A Tour through the Eyes of Memphian Samuel H. Crone”

Exhibition of sketches and watercolor paintings by Samuel Hester Crone in the permanent collection. Through Sept. 30. ART MUSEUM AT THE UNIVERSITY OF MEMPHIS (AMUM)

“Solid Gold Soul: The Best of the Rest from the Stax Museum” Exhibition of items from the

Work by Niles Wallace and Alisa Free Through Sept. 11. L ROSS GALLERY

“Wayne Thiebaud 100: Paintings, Prints, and Drawings”

Exhibition of works by artist. Through Oct. 3. THE DIXON GALLERY & GARDENS

“Yin & Yang: Duality of Structure and Expression”

Watercolors by Mary Anne McCraw and Howard Carman. Through Oct. 30. FRATELLI’S

A R T HA P P E N I N G S

Agnes Stark Pottery and Sale

Show and sale, pottery by Agnes Stark. Friday, Sept. 10, 11 a.m. AGNES STARK POTTERY

continued on page 20

49th sponsored by

The Marston Group, Mobile Mini, Marge Palazzolo & Friends of the Pink Palace

CRAFTS FAIR

m e m p h i s f l y e r. c o m

JAY ETKIN GALLERY

“Uncommon Vessels”

ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT

Exhibition of contemporary and ancient works by multiple artists. Ongoing.

METAL MUSEUM

19


CALENDAR: SEPTEMBER 9 - 15

SHELBY COUNTY AND GRIFFIN & STRONG, P.C. INVITE YOU TO A

Virtual Public Meeting Shelby County has commissioned Griffin and Strong, P.C. (GSPC)

“Exploring the African American Experience Through Art”

to conduct a comprehensive

Heather Nickels will take a look at the Brooks’ recent exhibit, “Persevere and Resist: The Strong Black Women of Elizabeth Catlett.” Thursday, Sept. 9, 6 p.m.

Disparity Study to evaluate procurement policies and

FACEBOOK.COM/BENLHOOKSINSTITUTE

practices and recommend

Opening reception for “Nature Amplified”

improvements, if needed.

Exhibition of impressionistinspired paintings by Stacey Johnson. Friday, Sept. 10, 6-8 p.m.

GSPC will be conducting

ECLECTIC EYE

Plein Air Season at the Garden

a hearing on Wednesday,

Guest artists will be on-site painting and sharing Plein Air techniques. Sunday, Sept. 12, 3-5 p.m.

September 15, 2021 and on Thursday, September 16, 2021. The purpose of the public September 9-15, 2021

MEMPHIS BOTANIC GARDEN

Senior Studio: Mosaics for the Garden

Design and create your own piece with Creative Aging and teaching artist Kristi Duckworth. Thursday, Sept. 9, 1:30 p.m.

meetings are to listen to the

20

continued from page 19

THE DIXON GALLERY & GARDENS

community's experiences or

Studio Art

Show and sale of sculpture and paintings by Jimmy Crosthwait and Deborah Fagan Carpenter. Friday, Sept. 10, 11 a.m.

attempts to do business with Shelby County.

FAGAN-CARPENTER STUDIO

Virtual Tours at Two

Join a Dixon docent or curatorial staff member on a virtual tour of the current exhibition. Free, $5. Tuesday, Sept. 14, 2-3 p.m.

Registration is not required but is highly encouraged.

DIXON.ORG

September 15 | 12-1:30 EST

TO REGISTER bit.ly/ShelbyPH1

September 16 | 5-6:30 EST

bit.ly/ShelbyPH2

WE Boutique: Wearable Fabric Art Featuring wearable art by Dinah Makowsky, Lisa Mergen, and Dorothy Northern. Through Sept. 23.

WOMAN’S EXCHANGE OF MEMPHIS

International Goat Days Festival has so much to float your goat, from goat yoga to The World’s Greatest Goat Parade. B O O K EVE NTS

Alexander Vindman in conversation with Arnold Schwarzenegger Author discusses Here, Right Matters: An American Story, moderated by CNN’s Bianna Golodryga. Friday, Sept. 10, 7 p.m. NOVEL.COM

Book Signing by Rekeshia S. Hudson

Author discusses and signs A Widow’s Journey from Grief to Grace. Thursday, Sept. 9, 10 a.m. WOMAN’S EXCHANGE OF MEMPHIS

C O M E DY

Jazz and Jokes

Music and comedy showcase. Showcase winner will receive a cash prize, studio time, and open for Howard Hewett and Cherrelle. Thursday, Sept. 9, 7 p.m. CHUCKLES COMEDY CLUB

Steve Hofstetter

One of YouTube’s most popular comics with over 150 million views and half a billion more on Facebook. $25. Sunday, Sept. 12, 7 p.m. LAFAYETTE’S MUSIC ROOM

TK Kirkland and Chris Thomas

Second performance FridaySunday, 10 p.m. $45. Friday, Sept. 10, 7 p.m. CHUCKLES COMEDY CLUB

Trippin’ Comedy Show

Features some of the funniest up-and-coming names in comedy, including DC Young Fly, Emmanuel Hudson, Chico Bean, Darren Brand, and Justin Whitehead. $55. Friday, Sept. 10, 7 p.m. CANNON CENTER FOR THE PERFORMING ARTS

C O M M U N I TY

God’s Work, Our Hands

Help beautify the church grounds. Sunday, Sept. 12, 1 p.m. EPIPHANY LUTHERAN CHURCH

Keepers of the Dream Award Applications

Honors students in grades 6-12. Award winners will be highlighted during the Freedom Award Student Forum. Apply online. Due by Sept. 10. FREEDOMAWARD.CIVILRIGHTSMUSEUM. ORG

South Memphis Senior Walking Club Calling all seniors for #SeniorEdition walking club. Tuesday, Sept. 14, 8-9 a.m.

CORNER OF MISSISSIPPI AND GAITHER

Thistle & Bee Ambassador Program

Become a steward for the Thistle & Bee mission. Email Oriana for more info, oholmes@thistleandbee.org. Free. Ongoing. THISTLEANDBEE.ORG

E X PO/SA LES

Crosstown Concourse Job Fair

Connects employers with potential candidates in positions for management, security, custodial, food service, and more. Saturday, Sept. 11, 10 a.m.-1 p.m. CROSSTOWN CONCOURSE

Memphis Modern Market at MoSH

Features work by regional artists. Friday, 5-8 p.m., Saturday, 10:30 a.m.-5 p.m., and Sunday, noon-5 p.m. Through Oct. 10. MEMPHIS PINK PALACE MUSEUM

Orange Mound Love and Wellness Fair Features health screenings, talks, games, food, vendors, and music. Saturday, Sept. 11, 11 a.m.-3 p.m. ORANGE MOUND TOWER

RK Gun Show

Browse and shop available items. Through Oct. 24. LANDERS CENTER


CALENDAR: SEPTEMBER 9 - 15 FAM I LY

KangaZoo Outback Experience

Meet the red kangaroo. Free. Through Oct. 31. MEMPHIS ZOO

Talk and Walk: Reptiles

Learn all about reptiles then enjoy a guided hike. $10. Saturday, Sept. 11, 9 a.m. LICHTERMAN NATURE CENTER

Walt Disney Archives Tour & Tea Party

A charming tea party, followed by a tour of the “Inside the Walt Disney Archives.” Saturday, Sept. 11, 11 a.m.-noon. GRACELAND

by Juzo Itami that tells the story of two truck drivers who embark on a search for the perfect ramen restaurant. $5. Thursday, Sept. 9, 7:30 p.m. CROSSTOWN CONCOURSE

Hispanic Film Festival

Celebrate Hispanic Heritage Month by viewing five Hispanic films on select dates throughout the month virtually and in person. Throuh Oct. 5.

May the Schwartz Be with You: A Sci-Fi Comedy Time Warp Featuring Spaceballs, Galaxy Quest, Mars Attacks!, and Critters. Saturday, Sept. 11, 7:30 p.m.

Forever Golden: A Celebration of The Golden Girls

UNIVERSITY OF MEMPHIS, UNIVERSITY CENTER THEATER

MALCO SUMMER 4 DRIVE-IN

Labyrinth: 35th Anniversary

Time Is Up

MALCO PARADISO CINEMA GRILL & IMAX

MALCO PARADISO CINEMA GRILL & IMAX

Free Burma Rangers

Lil’ Buck: Real Swan

MALCO PARADISO CINEMA GRILL & IMAX

MALCO PARADISO CINEMA GRILL & IMAX

TONE

continued on page 22

A special screening of some of the most memorable episodes from the series. Also screening at Collierville Towne Cinema. $15. Tuesday, Sept. 14, 7 p.m.

Explores the 20-year journey of missionaries Dave and Karen Eubank. Also screening in Collierville. $15. Monday, Sept. 13, 7 p.m.

A teenager summons the Goblins to take her baby stepbrother away. $15. Sunday, Sept. 12, 3 p.m.; Wednesday, Sept. 15, 7 p.m.

Follows two students with different capabilities who help each other to reclaim their lives. Also screening at Collierville Towne Cinema. $15. Thursday, Sept. 9, 7 p.m.

In conjunction with the exhibition “Chocolate Cities” that explores and examines Blackness and Orange Mound. Friday, Sept. 10, 7 p.m.

F ES T IVAL

Delta Fair & Music Festival

Features carnival rides, fair food, livestock shows, cooking contests, and more. $10. Through Sept. 12. AGRICENTER INTERNATIONAL

International Goat Days Festival

Features pancake breakfast, vendors, car show, antique tractor show, hot air balloon rides, and barbecue contest. $5. Saturday, Sept. 11, 7 a.m.-6 p.m. MILLINGTON GYM

Join our team. Get a $2,000 sign-on bonus.

*

Job fairs every Thursday at Southland.

m e m p h i s f l y e r. c o m

Evolutions of Words, by Angi Cooper and Janet Weed Beaver, is just one of the works in WKNO’s “Idefinitely Wild.” Memphis Rox Yoga Festival

Features a variety of local and regional studios and vendors, lectures, workshops, film screenings, yoga classes, food trucks, kids activities, and more. $35/ general advance tickets, $45/general admission, $55/ door admission. Saturday, Sept. 11, 9 a.m.-4 p.m.

Southern Heritage Classic Cultural Celebration

Want to earn your $2,000 sign-on bonus? Come work at

Enjoy tailgating, golf, and more, leading up to the game where Jackson State University squares off with Tennessee State University. Through Sept. 11.

Southland. You’ll get a great starting salary and be part of the

SOUTHERNHERITAGECLASSIC.COM

available, stop by the Southland Job Fair on Thursdays, from

Super Chevy Show

The largest car show in the Mid-South region and a thrilling Pro Show featuring Larry Dixon’s Top Fuel Experience, fire-breathing Jet Funny Cars, and Open Outlaw racing. $20, $65. Friday, Sept. 10, 8 a.m.

ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT

MEMPHIS BOTANIC GARDEN

friendliest staff in the industry. To see what opportunities are 11 AM to 3 PM, on the second floor in the Kennel Club. Or visit dn.careers/southland to apply for positions online.

MEMPHIS INTERNATIONAL RACEWAY

FI LM

Arthouse Film Series: Tampopo

See HR for complete details. *Any Cage Cashier, Main Banker, Drop/Count Team Member, Dishwasher, Cook, Bartender, Cocktail/Beverage Server, Dealer, Slot Technician, Restaurant Server and Restaurant Host/Cashier. Must be 21 years or older. Play responsibly; for help quitting call (800) 522-4700.

21

A 1985 Japanese satirical “ramen Western” comedy 13754 print ad for Flyer JR pg 7.2"x8.37.indd 1

9/2/21 3:16 PM


CALENDAR: SEPTEMBER 9 - 15 continued from page 21

LECTU R E

FO O D AN D D R I N K

Dahlia Walk and Talk

Cordova International Farmers Market

Large selection of produce and meat. Tuesday, Sept. 14, 9 a.m. INTERNATIONAL FARMERS MARKET

Food Truck Friday

Features food trucks and lunch in the gardens. Zio Matto Gelato will also be on-site for a sweet treat to cool off in the gardens. Friday, Sept. 10, 11:30 a.m. THE DIXON GALLERY & GARDENS

Wine Tasting Event: Wines of Washington State

Enjoy and learn about the wines of Washington state in a fun, casual, and interactive setting. $15. Friday, Sept. 10, 3-4 p.m. THE WILSON CAFE AND TAVERN

H EALT H A N D F I TN ES S

Yoga

Join Peggy Reisser in the Garden, weather permitting. Free. Saturday, Sept. 11, 10:30 a.m. THE DIXON GALLERY & GARDENS

Yoga in the River Garden

Join Candace of Yoga Kickback along the mighty Mississippi for class. Bring mat, towel, and water to the River Garden, 51 Riverside. Tuesday, Sept. 14, 5:30 p.m.

who now desperately need our support. $20. Monday, Sept. 13, 7:30 a.m.-4 p.m.

Join Kim Rucker, an expert dahlia-grower, as she discusses dahlia cultivation. Saturday, Sept. 11, 10:30 a.m.

WINDYKE COUNTRY CLUB

Memphis 901 FC vs. The Miami FC

Memphis 901 FC vs. The Miami FC Saturday, Sept. 11, 11 a.m.

THE DIXON GALLERY & GARDENS

“Looking Toward Fall”

AUTOZONE PARK

Join Julie Spear, member of MGC, Garden Club of America, and floral design judge via Zoom. Wednesday, Sept. 15, 1 p.m.

Memphis Redbirds vs. Louisville Bats

P E R F O R M I N G A R TS

The Mesmerist

See magic as it was performed during the Golden Age of Magic. $50. Friday, Sept. 10, 7-9 p.m. WOODRUFF-FONTAINE HOUSE MUSEUM

S P EC I A L EV E N TS

Dog Days of Summer

Bring your dog for extended garden hours and free admission. Thursday, Sept. 9, 5 p.m. MEMPHIS BOTANIC GARDEN

Mad Tea Party

Goth drag and variety show. $10. Friday, Sept. 10, 8 p.m.

The museum celebrates with extended hours through Labor Day, free admission on 9/25, opportunities to share your memories, and a special fall exhibition. Through Sept. 25. NATIONAL CIVIL RIGHTS MUSEUM

Stargazing

Get a closer look at the night skies with Memphis Astronomical Society (MAS). Telescopes provided. Saturday, Sept. 11. SHELBY FARMS PARK

BLACK LODGE

Summer Music Picnic Series

Grab some food from your favorite restaurant on The Square,

MISSISSIPPI RIVER PARK

TO U R S

Central Gardens Virtual Home Tour Detour

AUTOZONE PARK

National Civil Rights Museum’s 30th Anniversary Celebration

Memphis Rox Yoga Festival invites anyone interested in mindfulness and wellness to join classes, lectures, and events. then bring a chair and join a free concert in Chimes Square. Tipsy Tumbler will be on-site selling adult beverages. Friday, Sept. 10, 7 p.m. OVERTON SQUARE

S PO R TS

Alpha Omega Golf Classic This event benefits service to U.S. military veterans who fought for our freedoms, defended our Constitution, and

The Duke of Somerset plucks a red rose, and the Duke of York plucks a white. As fellow English nobles declare their loyalty, civil dissent blooms into a war of ungodly proportions. Tuesday, Sept. 14-Sept. 26. TENNESSEE SHAKESPEARE COMPANY

Promotional games including nacho Tuesday, throwback Thursday, fireworks, and more. Monday, Sept. 13-Sept. 19.

DIXON.ORG

Shout-Out Shakespeare Series, King Henry VI: The Wars of the Roses

Self-guided tour features a blend of old and new, plus Troop 34 Scout Lodge. Saturday, Sept. 11-Sept. 30.

T H EAT E R

Days of Rage

Young revolutionaries search to make change rather than wait for it. Thursday-Saturday, 8 p.m., and Sunday, 2 p.m. $42. Through Sept. 19. PLAYHOUSE ON THE SQUARE

Hello, Dolly!

In the 1890s, the bold, enchanting widow Dolly Levi is a socialiteturned-matchmaker. Fridays and Saturdays, 7:30 p.m. and Sundays, 2 p.m. $35. Through Sept. 19. THEATRE MEMPHIS

Motherhood: The Musical Performances on Friday and Saturday, 8 p.m., and Sunday at 2:30 p.m. $25. Through Sept. 12.

CENTRALGARDENS.ORG

Memphis True Crime Tour

Your guide will take you to some of the cities most notorious locations for chilling stories of Memphis’ dark history. $25. Friday, Sept. 10, 9:30 p.m. THE BROOM CLOSET

Tales from Elmwood: A Cemetery Walking Tour

Get to know the residents of Elmwood Cemetery on this 90-minute walking tour of the cemetery grounds. $20. Saturday, Sept. 11, 10 a.m. ELMWOOD CEMETERY

GERMANTOWN COMMUNITY THEATRE

presents

REO SPEEDWAGON

September 9-15, 2021

august 27

TICKETS ON SALE NOW liveatthegarden.com

22

september 17

SHERYL CROW

october 21

EARTH, WIND & FIRE SOLD OUT


BOOKS By Jesse Davis

Piece of My Heart Stephen Graham Jones’ My Heart Is a Chainsaw is bloody, brilliant. Years ago, some friends made a full-length horror movie. A slasher. They bought a van, drove it up to Connecticut, where they filmed for a few weeks. They did pretty much everything themselves, so they could pay for the things they couldn’t do themselves. They hired a pro cinematographer and a handful of real actors — Troma’s Lloyd Kaufman, Peter Tork from The Monkees. It was no backyard B-movie red corn syrup amateur-hour horror flick. My friends were members of the congregation of the Church of Horror, and they made a pilgrimage to Connecticut to make a tribute. I know people who live and breathe — whose blood pumps — for slashers. In a world that seems, at times, arbitrary and chaotic, they can rely on the unspoken rules of slashers. Those folks exist in the real world, not just in the celluloid frames of Scream (Wes Craven, 1996), or the pages of books like Stephen Graham Jones’ My Heart Is a Chainsaw (Saga Press). The heroine of My Heart Is a Chainsaw, 17-year-old Jennifer Daniels, aka Jade, of Proofrock, Idaho, is one such slasher savant. “I write because I can’t draw. I write because I can’t cut to the basket slick enough to go pro,” writes Jones on his website, demontheory.net. “I write because, for a few

pages at a time, I can make the world make sense.” For Jade, slashers are a way of making the world make sense. There are rules to slasher films, after all, a precedent that must be followed. They’re a coping mechanism helping her get through life as a high school outcast with a hard home life, but, as with any coping mechanism, they also help her keep the world at arm’s length. Jade is poor, and her parents are divorced. She does some janitorial work, which helps her pay for food and bargain bin VHS tapes of ’80s horror flicks, but which hardly endears her to her classmates. Jade’s father is Native American, and her mother is white, leaving her with a feeling of not fully belonging to either community. It doesn’t help that her mother has treated Jade like a stranger since the divorce. So Jade is left to fend for herself, as she lives with her neglectful, alcoholic father. That might not seem to be enough to doom a teenager, no matter how much they quote Halloween, to status as a pariah, not in the 21st century anyway. But as anyone who has lived in

WED, SEPT. 15 • 7:30 PM

a truly small town can attest, Jade is doomed at least thrice-over. A scholar of slasher movies, Jade sees herself as a Cassandra when strange disappearances begin to plague Proofrock and no one believes her hypothesis. She has cracked the code, and stands ready to usher Letha, who Jade sees as the story’s Final Girl, to triumph over the masked killer, whoever it is. As the pages turn, My Heart Is a Chainsaw reveals other horrors — neglect and abuse, gentrification, racism, and loneliness. The book culminates in Proofrock’s annual Fourth of July celebration, when the townies row or motor their boats out on the lake to drink and watch a screening of Jaws. The big celebration waiting at the end of the book works like a ticking clock — the reader just knows that something horrible is going to happen to spoil the party. After all, it’s a slasher. There are rules. Jones’ other most recent publications, The Only Good Indians and Night of the Mannequins, won a pair of Shirley Jackson Awards, so it’s no surprise that his newest is already receiving early buzz. The author’s prose is lyrical, and his tone sometimes shades into reverence and remorse — reverence for the genre whose influence can be found in so much of his work, and remorse for the high school outcast those genre rules say he must put through the wringer.

THUR, SEPT. 16 • 7 PM

TRIBUTE D'KIEREN R HARRELL TONY COLEMAN CARL STUART WALTER KING REGGIE RICHARDS PHOTO CREDIT: STEVE ROBERTS

ANNIVERSARY PARTY ROBERT RANDOLPH AND ERIC GALES WITH

THE BB KING'S ALLSTAR BAND

FOR TICKETS AND INFORMATION, VISIT BBKINGS.COM/MEMPHIS OR CALL 901.524.5464 143 BEALE ST., MEMPHIS, TN 38103

@BBKINGSMEMPHIS

m e m p h i s f l y e r. c o m

FT. ORIGINAL MEMBERS OF BB KING'S BAND

ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT

CONCERT

23


ARTS By Abigail Morici

The Art of Healing Fashion illustrator Kris Keys finds inspiration in tracing the roots of her blood disorder.

September 9-15, 2021

A

mid the gray, rainy city of London, fashion student and Memphis native Kris Keys found herself in an indescribable pain. A gallbladder attack, the doctors told her, triggered by hereditary elliptocytosis — a rare blood disorder that Keys was diagnosed with as a baby. Searching for a way to heal, Keys turned to research. She contacted St. Jude Children’s Research Hospital, where she was treated as a child, and got a hold of slides of her blood cells and the blood tests doctors performed on Keys’ older relatives. Soon, those organic, elliptical blood cells that Keys observed spread across her illustrations as she replicated the deep reds and purples with watercolors. It was cathartic to see her disorder on paper and later on fabric in her 2019 womenswear collection, “Hematology.” “Using my pain as an artist was my way to heal,” she says. “One thing that shifted my mindset of having an illness was pushing it into an art space.” After returning to Memphis and releasing “Hematology,” Keys says, she started hearing from people around the world who shared the blood disorder, and she knew she hadn’t finished her research. The disorder is genetic, affects one in every 3,000 to 5,000 people in the U.S., and mostly affects people of African-American and Mediterranean descent. “I wondered, how can this be resolved?” Keys says. “How can we avoid continuing this pattern?” She wanted to find the genesis of her disorder, so she started tracing her lineage and listening to her older relatives’ stories. “I still haven’t found the origins of the disorder,” she says, but the stories she did find have offered her insights into her identity. “There’re so many reasons why we act the way we act. A lot times it comes from our ancestry. There’re these streams of things that lead back to slavery. I never realized how much slavery affected DNA. I started seeing patterns in my relationships, my friendships that I really couldn’t get a grasp on until I started to sit down and think about where these patterns are coming from. Like, oh, this is coming from my grandfather or my great-grandfather.

PHOTOS: BRIAN MANNING

Kris Keys uses watercolors to heal and understand her pain, passed down by the generations before her.

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“Sometimes,” Keys continues, “the patterns help us to be stronger, but sometimes they work against our purpose.” Her most recent collection, “Genealogy,” explores this connection between ancestral patterns and the opportunity for healing. Unlike the mysterious and dark violets and reds of her first collection, this collection features flowers in dusty yellows and earthy tones, light colors that reflect the enlightenment Keys has found in uncovering her family’s stories. “Flowers have these healing properties,” Keys says of the floral motif. “I thought, what natural resources do I have around me, and what did my ancestors have?” During her travels, Keys noticed wildflowers, daffodils, and elderberry and magnolia flowers growing around her relatives’ homes, and the inspiration took root and blossomed with the help of her choice medium of watercolors. “Watercolors are one of the only mediums of painting that you have to completely surrender,” says Keys. “You can’t control where it goes. You put the paint down, and it kinda flows where it wants to even if you have an idea of where you want it to go. I relate that to life. You can have an idea of what you want your life to be, but you have to surrender to your story and make beauty out of what you have.” She adds, “To really live a life that’s magical and purposeful and that’s gonna make an impact, we have to learn where we’ve been and how we got there.” Keys unveiled “Genealogy” with a virtual exhibition on September 7th. The exhibition, still accessible on her website, features watercolor paintings, accompanied by videos that explain the story behind each piece. Within a year or so, these paintings will be turned into a patterned fabric for womenswear that emphasizes comfort and style for the traveling woman. To register for the exhibition and for more information, visit bykriskeys.com or @bykriskeys on Instagram.

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Here comes Zio Matto Gelato! Matteo Servente and Ryan Watt are peddling their gelato. Literally. The Zio Matto Gelato owners recently bought a bicycle with an attached cart/cooler to help them sell their five-ounce gelato containers, which are already in area restaurants and markets. “We had this idea of ‘How do we bring it to people as much as possible,’” says Servente. “The cart is such a visually iconic image in people’s minds.” And, he says, “We could really use it to bring gelato to people for weddings, corporate events, whatever people might be interested in. It’s a great way to bring the gelato experience to your backyard or wherever you want it.” Servente, who is from Torino, Italy, founded the business. “The name comes from my niece. When she was very little she couldn’t pronounce my name right. ‘Matteo’ was ‘Matto,’ which is ‘crazy,’ and ‘Zio’ is ‘uncle’ in Italian.” Servente, a filmmaker and former Crosstown Arts resident artist, says Zio Matto is his main focus. “For many years I had been toying with the possibility of bringing some of these Italian treats to Memphis that I’m used to from growing up. Gelato became the obvious choice.”

Matteo Servente on the Zio Matto Gelato bike He learned “the secret” to making gelato in Italy, and it seemed like the right treat to bring to “a place where the options of real, authentic gelato are not too many.” Enter Watt, former Indie Memphis executive director. “Ryan and I have worked before in film and have known each other for years. We always had a good friendship and working relationship,” Servente says. Before Indie Memphis, Watt owned a technology company at Emerge Memphis. “The challenge and excitement of growing something new is really what I get excited about,” he says. “Gelato is not ice cream,” Servente explains. “It’s a part of the same family, but it’s a less fat version of ice cream. The texture is much silkier in ours and a little bit denser as opposed to the cold, almost icy, texture of ice cream.

m e m p h i s f l y e r. c o m

Gelato Man

So, it kind of packs more flavor. “As far as the ingredients go, there’s nothing really revolutionary in the way we make it. It’s more like the process of making it that makes us stand out. We don’t use the gelato machines that mass produce gelato. We just use kitchen mixers and our hands to make it and mix all the ingredients together. ‘Less is more’ is really what applies perfectly to the food-making process in Italy.” Tamboli’s Pasta & Pizza was the first restaurant to carry their gelato. “When the pandemic hit and they had to sort of readjust a little bit of their model, our prepackaged containers were perfect.” They’re now up to 15 locations, including High Point Grocery, Cordelia’s Market, Lucchesi’s Ravioli & Pasta Company, Ciao Bella Italian Grill, and David Grisanti’s Italian Restaurant. It’s available on Saturdays at the Downtown and Cooper-Young farmers markets. Zio Matto’s six flavors include stracciatella. “A very popular flavor for gelato. The way we do it is Italian sweet cream with chocolate chips in it.” The new bicycle/cart is ready to roll. “It’s not the easiest thing to ride,” Watt admits. “It’s nice to roll up and maybe park and serve gelato.” But, he says, “Right now, we’re a pretty small team. Our plan is to use [the bicycle] for bookings. You may see it out and about so we can get the world out. Maybe it will become a league of bikes, and we’ll have to hire riders, people that can run the carts for us.” And, like any “Good Humor Man” vehicle, Zio Matto’s bicycle comes with the proper accessory: “It does have a little bell,” Servente says.

ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT

FOOD By Michael Donahue

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FRIDAY 9.24.21 6-9PM | THE METAL MUSEUM, DOWNTOWN MEMPHIS Join us at this 100% outdoor event for creative pork-inspired dishes and a vast array of distilled spirits to tempt your tastebuds!

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FILM By Chris McCoy

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i! It’s me, the Flyer film editor (Tony Leung), aka The Deadliest Man again, with a Radical New Alive, is a semi-immortal leader of an Theory (TM). international crime syndicate called For the last 13 years, the the Ten Rings, last seen in the MCU Marvel movie Borg (to mix a pop culture battling Iron Man. They’ve got to go to metaphor) has been assimilating all other Macau to preemptively rescue Xialing genres. Do you want a spy movie? A space from whatever the Ten Rings wants the opera? Well, Disney has sucked up all the pendants for. available resources and slapped a thin Once in Macau, they discover Xialing layer of Marvel branding on it. Spy movie? has been much more industrious than her Captain America: The Winter Soldier. older brother. She’s built a small empire Space opera? Guardians of the Galaxy. out of a quasi-legal street-fighting league Now, it’s kung fu movies’ — or, more that rakes in the cash by streaming death accurately wuxia, the Chinese blanket term matches on the dark web. After Shang-Chi for stories that blend martial arts, fantasy, survives a main-event dustup with sis (Katy and East Asian history — turn. With all of makes bank by betting against her bestie), the first-gen Avengers like Robert Downey Jr. they are attacked by the Ten Rings, which and Chris Evans out of contract (and Scarlett precipitates another instant classic set piece Johansson suing the studio), Marvel needs on a bamboo scaffolding. a new breed of stars. Since Iron Man was on One thing that distinguishes this the superhero B-list as late as 2007, Marvel film from most MCU fare is its frequent considers this a solved problem. To tap into a flashbacks. The Ten Rings group was fresh supply of those sweet, sweet yuans, the named after a set of magic bracelets that first order of New Avengers business must grants Wenwu both practical immortality introduce Shang-Chi, a character modeled and extreme kick-assery. But the old after Bruce Lee, to the masses. warlord decided to settle down after Shaun (Simu Liu) is a carefree young getting his butt whooped by Ying Li, who guy in San Francisco, spending his days was the guardian of the magic village working as a valet at a fancy hotel and Ta Lo. Now, Wenwu has been receiving nights carousing at the karaoke bars with psychic messages from Ying Li’s spirit, his bestie, Katy (Awkwafina). But one day, begging him to rescue her from captivity on the bus to work, Shaun is attacked by in Ta Lo, and he has retrieved his a bunch of karate-chopping thugs, led wayward children to help. Once Shang(top, l-r) Meng’er Zhang, Simu Liu, and Awkwafina star in Shang-Chi and the Chi and Xialing reach Ta Lo, they discover by a guy named Razor Fist who has, you Legend of the Ten Rings; (bottom) Liu’s Shang-Chi must confront his past — the truth is quite different from what their guessed it, a giant razor where his hand and the Ten Rings syndicate — to find his place in the MCU. should be. father told them. The big fight on the bus that ensues, Shang-Chi is directed by Destin Daniel in which Shaun reveals his mad kung Cretton, whose debut Short Term 12 is fu skills, is one of the best fight scenes the MCU has Fala Chen) gave him. His estranged sister Xialing one of the best independent films of the 2010s. The produced. The attackers were after a jade pendant (Meng’er Zhang) has a matching pendant. So Shaun continued on page 28 Shaun’s dead mother Ying Li (played in flashback by tells Katy his real name is Shang-Chi, his father Wenwu

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E RINE OU

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FILM By Chris McCoy continued from page 27 screenplay, which he co-wrote, is both more complex and clearer than most MCU fare. Simu Liu is fine as a bland everyman hero, but it’s Awkwafina as the normie sidekick comic relief who repeatedly steals the show. Turns out, wuxia is the perfect fit for the superhero formula. Which brings me to my Radical New Theory: What if the MCU films have always secretly been wuxia at heart? Think about it: An elite class of super-warriors defend civilization and the innocent with

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martial arts. No matter how out-there superhero storylines are, problems are always solved by people in tights punching each other. So Shang-Chi does not represent Marvel co-opting EastWest crossovers like Crouching Tiger, Hidden Dragon as much as it is the form reaching back to its roots. Regardless, Shang-Chi definitely ranks among the more entertaining installments as the MCU grinds endlessly on. Shang-Chi and the Legend of the Ten Rings Now playing Multiple locations

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NOTICE OF PROPOSED CLASS ACTION SETTLEMENT

Shelby County Jail Suit Class Action Settlement If you were arrested and detained at the Shelby County, Tennessee Jail at some point between November 1, 2016 and March 21, 2021 for longer than you should have been, you may be eligible to receive a cash payment from a Class Action Settlement. SUMMARY DESCRIPTION OF THE LAWSUIT There is a proposed Class Action Settlement of the lawsuit pending in the U.S. District Court for the Western District of Tennessee entitled Turnage, et al. v. Oldham, et al., case no: 2:16-cv-2907. This lawsuit involves persons who were allegedly over detained at the Shelby County, Tennessee Jail as a result of the November 2016 implementation of a computer system. The Action alleged that Defendants violated state and federal laws by detaining persons arrested between November 1, 2016 and March 21, 2021 for a period of time longer than the law provides. Defendants deny any and all wrongdoing of any kind whatsoever and deny any liability to Plaintiffs and to the Settlement Class. The Court has not decided who is right. Both sides have agreed to settle the dispute. The Settlement provides an opportunity for payments and other benefits to Settlement Class Members. WHO IS INCLUDED IN THE SETTLEMENT? The Settlement Class includes: All persons who, between November 1, 2016 and March 21, 2021 were arrested and then detained in the Shelby County Jail after legal authority for the detention ceased. More information is available at the Settlement Website, www.shelbycountyjailclasssettlement.com, or by calling (901) 425-4828. WHAT DOES THE SETTLEMENT PROVIDE? The Settlement provides a Gross Settlement Amount of $4,900,000.00 to pay (1) Claims of eligible Settlement Class Members; (2) the costs of administration; (3) Attorneys’ Fees and Expenses; and (4) any Incentive Awards made by the Court to Plaintiffs. Settlement Class Members who timely submit valid Claim Forms are entitled to receive a cash payment from the Settlement. The actual amount recovered by each Settlement Class Member is based on the amount of time the Class Member was allegedly over detained and will not be determined until after the Claim Period has ended and all claims have been calculated. WHAT ARE MY RIGHTS?

1.

Participate in the Settlement by Submitting a Claim. If you wish to participate in the Settlement and be eligible to receive a cash benefit under the Settlement, you MUST fill out and submit a Claim Form by December 30, 2021. You can obtain a Claim Form by (1) Visiting the Settlement Website www. shelbycountyjailclasssettlement.com, where you can request a Claim Form to submit by mail; (2) Mailing a written request for a Claim Form to: Shelby County Jail Suit Class Action, Settlement Administrator, P.O Box 341316 Bartlett, TN 38184; (3) Emailing a request for a Claim Form to: info@cmmsettlementsolutions.com; or (4) Calling (901) 425-4828 and requesting a Claim Form. If you do not timely submit a valid Claim Form and do not opt out from the Settlement, you will be bound by the Settlement but will not receive any cash benefit of the Settlement.

2.

You Can Object to the Settlement. If you do not agree with the Settlement or any part of it, you may submit a written objection to the Court. The deadline for submitting an objection is October 11, 2021. You may not object if you opt out of the Class. Details about how to object are available at www.shelbycountyjailclasssettlement.com.

3.

You Can “Opt Out” of the Settlement. If you do not want to be legally bound by the Settlement, you must elect to opt out and exclude yourself by submitting a written notice of opt out to the Administrator by September 10, 2021. If you opt out, you cannot get money from this Settlement. Details about opt-out or exclusion are available at www.shelbycountyjailclasssettlement.com, which explains how to exclude yourself from this settlement.

4.

If You Do Nothing: If you fail to timely submit a complete Claim Form or notice of opt out, you will be bound by the Court’s decisions and precluded from pursuing any claims or matters covered by the Settlement in any pending or future lawsuits or other proceedings.

LEGAL NOTICE

901-575-9400 classifieds@memphisflyer.com ADOPTION IN THE CHANCERY COURT OF DYER COUNTY, TENNESSEE ADOPTION OF JAYDEN KYLE ALLEN D.O.B. 11/04/2010, A Minor, MARY NICOLE ALLEN, Step-Mother, Petitioner, KRISTOPHER ARTHUR ALLEN, Legal Father, CO-Petitioners, VS. BRITTAN (CALKINS) HOGELAND, Respondent. ORDER FOR SERVICE VIA PUBLICATION COMES ON for hearing the Motion for Alternative Service pursuant to Rule 4.08 of the Tennessee Rules of Civil Procedure and T.C.A. 21-1-203 filed by Plaintiffs Mary Nicole Allen and Kristopher Arthur Allen from the pleadings, affidavit of counsel, and other things presented, the Court finds as follows: 1. Plaintiffs filed their Petition for Termination of Parental rights and Adoption citing abandonment by the Defendant of the minor child for (5) years or more. 2. Plaintiff was awarded full custody of minor child on April 14, 2016 in Lauderdale county, Tennessee, Docket number J8-1222. 3. Historically, that the defendant Brittan (Calkins) Hogeland has had her Parental rights terminated on another biological child in Chancery Court of Tipton County Docket number 36144, on June 7, 2021. 4. Personal service of process on the defendant in a court of chancery is

dispensed with ... [w]hen the defendant is a non resident of the state. Tenn. Code Ann. 21-1-203(a)(1) (West 2018). Further “[p]ersonal service of process on the defendant in a court of chancery is dispensed with ... [w]hen the residence of the defendant is unknown and cannot be ascertained upon diligent inquiry.” Tenn. Code Ann. 21-1-203(a)(5) (West 2018). 5. Personal service will be attempted upon this Defendant, but as such personal service is dispensed with

under Tenn.Code Ann. 21-1-203(a), an Order for Alternative Service shall be entered, allowing Plaintiff to serve Defendant Brittan (Calkins) Hogeland simultaneously service by publication in newspapers in Memphis, Tennessee. IT IS SO ORDERED. H. Steven Walker, Chancellor Approved as to Form and Content: Lauren Raynor, BPR No. 032330 Attorney for Plaintiff, HMRS Attorneys, PLLC, 131 W. Liberty Ave.

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OTHER IMPORTANT INFORMATION INCLUDING RELEASE OF CLAIMS

The Court has appointed Class Counsel as follows: WATSON BURNS, LLC 253 Adams Ave Memphis, TN 38103 Phone: (901) 529-7996 Brice Timmons Donati Law, PLLC 1545 Union Ave. Memphis, TN 38104 Phone: (901) 209-5500

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Class Counsel will be compensated from the proceeds of the Settlement and you will not otherwise be charged for their services in representing the Class. The Court will hold a hearing on November 10, 2021 at 1:30 to consider whether to give final approval to the Settlement, including a request for Attorneys’ Fees and Expenses up to $2,400,000.00 and Incentive Awards for the named Plaintiffs totaling up to $140,000.00 from the Gross Settlement Amount. You or your own lawyer may appear and speak at the hearing at your own expense. FOR MORE INFORMATION: Visit www.shelbycountyjailclasssettlement.com or Call (901) 425-4828 PLEASE DO NOT CALL OR WRITE THE COURT OR THE CLERK’S OFFICE

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If the proposed Settlement is given final approval by the Court, Class Members who have not excluded themselves from the settlement will release any and all claims they may have against Defendants related to the claims asserted in the lawsuit regarding alleged over detention at the Shelby County Jail. Please see the Settlement at www.shelbycountyjailclasssettlement.com for more information.

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EMPLOYMENT FINANCIAL PLANNING SPECIALIST needed at Vishria Bird Financial Group LLC in Memphis, TN. Must have bachelor’s (or 3 yrs’ academic coursework) in Accounting, Finance, or related & 5 yrs’ exp in finance, including 2 yrs’ exp with the following: Indian tax rules & financial markets; Filing India tax returns; Analysis of corporate debt securities & similar products to determine investment risk; Analysis of financial documents & reports; Analysis of financial markets; Analysis of Indian financial regulations & laws; Must have Certified Financial Planner Designation or be enrolled in a certification program. Fax resumes to 901-683-5838. EOE.

SOUL AND SPIRITS BREWERY is now hiring all positions! Please visit www.soulandspiritsbrew.com to send resume.

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SERVICES Ever seen a UFO? Want to find out more? The Memphis UFO Discussion Group has been meeting monthly for 40 years. You’re invited on September 8th at 7:00 p.m. to join us at Perkins Restaurant, Eastgate.

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THE LAST WORD By Clay Bright

Nobody Trashes Tennessee Roadside litter is bad for the environment — and the Tennessee economy.

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Litter does more than just trash scenic views — it can end up in waterways as pollution.

THE LAST WORD

Tennessee is known for its natural beauty, with 4,022 of the state’s 96,167 miles of public roads classified as scenic. These roads play an essential role in connecting communities and families as well as driving the economy. Litter along our public roads has implications beyond being an eyesore. It’s an enormous burden to the state with impacts on public health and safety, the environment, and the economy. Public education and cleaning up this litter along public roads cost the Tennessee Department of Transportation (TDOT) $19 million annually. Since 1983, a special tax levied on soft drinks and malt beverages has funded these efforts — funds that could potentially be used for road maintenance and infrastructure improvements. Nobody Trashes Tennessee (NTT), the state of Tennessee’s litter prevention campaign managed by TDOT, is a comprehensive, statewide communications campaign that tells the story of litter on Tennessee’s roadways and its impact on public health and safety, the ecosystem, and the economy. By juxtaposing the beauty of Tennessee with the ugliness of litter, NTT leverages the intense feelings of state pride to activate Tennesseans across the state to become a part of the solution. The campaign provides resources and opportunities for residents to take both personal and volunteer actions to help prevent and reduce litter. To determine the scope of the litter problem along our roadways, TDOT conducted research in 2006 and 2016. This statewide research included the “Visible Litter Study,” a pioneering field study of litter along TDOT rights-of-way (nFront Consulting, October 2016). The findings revealed that while the state of littering in Tennessee has improved significantly since 2006 — dropping by 43 percent — there are still 100 million pieces of litter on the state’s roadways at any given time, and 18 percent of this litter ends up in streams and waterways as pollution. The study also showed that 28 percent of litter is deliberate. Beverage containers, lids, and straws were revealed as the biggest problem with intentional litter. The remaining 72 percent is considered unintentional litter and includes vehicle debris and trash flying out of uncovered vehicles. Research conducted in May 2021 that helped guide the next phase of the NTT campaign includes a quantitative survey to determine baseline awareness of the litter problem (Decision Analyst, May 2021) and focus groups to help understand attitudes toward litter and to test litter prevention messaging (Epiphany, May 2021). The campaign also includes expanded statewide public education initiatives and additional resources and support for all 95 county partners — who in 2020 alone and despite Covid restrictions — removed 21 million pounds of litter from roadways and cleaned up 4,023 illegal roadside dump sites. As the Volunteer State, our unique character is built on our history of stewardship and service. Learn more about how to join the movement to prevent and reduce littering at NobodyTrashesTennessee.com. Clay Bright is Commissioner of Transportation, Tennessee Department of Transportation.

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Profile for Contemporary Media

Memphis Flyer 9/9/2021  

A Preventable Pandemic - Covid Blazes Through Memphis, But Experts Can (Maybe) See the End (The Real One). Memphis Symphony Orchestra Zio...

Memphis Flyer 9/9/2021  

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