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OUR 1697TH ISSUE 09.02.21

JERRY D. SWIFT Advertising Director Emeritus KELLI DEWITT, CHIP GOOGE, HAILEY THOMAS Senior Account Executives MICHELLE MUSOLF Account Executive BRYCE HAYES Classifieds Coordinator ROBBIE FRENCH Warehouse and Delivery Manager JANICE GRISSOM ELLISON, KAREN MILAM, DON MYNATT, TAMMY NASH, RANDY ROTZ, LEWIS TAYLOR, WILLIAM WIDEMAN Distribution THE MEMPHIS FLYER is published weekly by Contemporary Media, Inc., P.O. Box 1738, Memphis, TN 38101 Phone: (901) 521-9000 Fax: (901) 521-0129 memphisflyer.com CONTEMPORARY MEDIA, INC. ANNA TRAVERSE FOGLE Chief Executive Officer LYNN SPARAGOWSKI Controller/Circulation Manager JEFFREY GOLDBERG Chief Revenue Officer MARGIE NEAL Production Operations Director KRISTIN PAWLOWSKI Digital Services Director MARIAH MCCABE Circulation and Accounting Assistant KALENA MATTHEWS Marketing Coordinator

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THURSDAY, SEPT. 9 • 8PM

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CONTENTS

JESSE DAVIS Editor SHARA CLARK Managing Editor JACKSON BAKER, BRUCE VANWYNGARDEN Senior Editors TOBY SELLS Associate Editor MAYA SMITH Senior News Reporter CHRIS MCCOY Film and TV Editor ALEX GREENE Music Editor SAMUEL X. CICCI, MICHAEL DONAHUE, JON W. SPARKS Staff Writers ABIGAIL MORICI Copy Editor JULIE RAY Calendar Editor LORNA FIELD, RANDY HASPEL, RICHARD MURFF, FRANK MURTAUGH, MEGHAN STUTHARD Contributing Columnists AIMEE STIEGEMEYER, SHARON BROWN Grizzlies Reporters ANDREA FENISE Fashion Editor KENNETH NEILL Founding Publisher

I cracked a tooth last night. I’m not entirely sure how, not that “how” really matters. However it happened, it means I’ll be calling the dentist’s office today after we ship this issue off to the printer. There was a time, though, when I wouldn’t have been so calm about scheduling an appointment with the dentist, not out of any phobia, but because teeth are expensive. For a time, I didn’t have health insurance. I had never even been to a dentist until the summer after my senior year of high school, when I chipped a tooth. I guess I must grind my teeth. (Okay, I know I grind my teeth. The dentist told me. I also used to have a “Savoy Truffle”-level sweet tooth, which I’ve since gotten in check. It would seem, though, that the damage has been done.) Later, when I was two months into a job that would, at the 90-day mark, come with precious health insurance, I cracked another tooth. So my aunt took me to her dentist, and we hoped the bill wouldn’t be too steep. I sat in the office while the dentist lectured me about investing in my teeth. There was a time, he told me, when no one had insurance. They just paid for necessary procedures like rational adults, no need to involve some third-party company. I suppose he thought I should just cool it on the avocado toast for a month and spend that money on dental care, as if those were equal line items on my budget. This gentleman, well meaning though I’m sure he was, was clearly out of touch. I left, worked with a painfully cracked tooth, and sought treatment from a different dentist when my probationary period at work ended and I had insurance. You think that’s something? I once went to work with a broken foot. Of course, I didn’t know my foot was broken, but I did hear a sharp, sudden crack! when my foot landed wrong on a floor tile. That was when I was in college, just before the beginning of a new semester. I waited until the semester began so I could be sure the university clinic was open. The doctor advised that I get a cast, but a post-surgical boot cost about $15. I bought the boot, and my toes still pop and sting in the cold. My point is, if you don’t have much contact with a system, any system, it’s natural to view it with some skepticism. And in a state that holds the second spot on the list of most hospital closures since 2010 (we’ve had 16), where the U.S. Census estimates that 836,000 Tennesseans don’t have health insurance, is it surprising some people don’t trust doctors? “Oh, sure, but you’ll go to a hospital when you can’t breathe and think you might die,” some self-righteous jerk writes on social media. Well, yeah. This might come as a surprise, but when the other option is a painful death, people will try just about anything. Even guzzling horse dewormer or malaria treatments. And yes, that is mind-numingly stupid, but people make stupid decisions. More so when they’ve been fed a steady diet of alarming disinformation. This May, NPR published an article about the “Disinformation Dozen,” 12 people responsible for more than 65 percent of misinformation about Covid and vaccines, according to the Center for Countering Digital Hate. Not surprisingly, some of these people are “alternative health entrepreneurs” and “even sell supplements and books.” I see. Last week, The Hill published a story about researchers at the intelligence firm Logically who identified QAnon member GhostEzra as Floridian Robert Smart, who used his reach to spread anti-Semitic conspiracy theories. As the story says, “Smart appears to have previously run at least four QAnon Twitter accounts.” Who knows how much bonkers QAnon “information” this guy spread just so he could stir a little hateful antiSemitism into the word soup? We’re in crisis — health, climate, social services, poverty — and states like Tennessee are disproportionately affected. We need to revitalize our healthcare system and expand access to it if we’re going to get out of this pandemic and prevent the next one. The same can be said for climate change and energy infrastructure. It’s hard to win a good faith argument, especially when your goal is to get people to act against their own interests. So why argue in good faith? I understand the barriers of cost or N E WS & O P I N I O N knowledge that make it so easy to mistrust THE FLY-BY - 4 medical experts, but if someone, espeNY TIMES CROSSWORD - 6 cially someone online, is telling you to POLITICS - 8 inject bleach or drink livestock dewormer, AT LARGE - 9 COVER STORY consider that they likely have an ulterior “TIGER TRIALS” motive. Your sweet great-aunt shared that BY FRANK MURTAUGH - 10 article, but it might have been written by WE RECOMMEND - 14 a hateful bigot or someone who needs to MUSIC - 15 sell more books or they’ll be compelled to CALENDAR - 16 return their advance. FOOD - 19 FILM - 20 That’s straight from the horse’s mouth. C LAS S I F I E D S - 22 Jesse Davis LAST WORD - 23 jesse@memphisflyer.com

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THE

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W E E K T H AT W A S By Flyer staff

Masks, Schools, & Refugees

D R U M TH E F T D R AMA

New mask mandate renewed, a plea for virtual learning, and aid for Afghan refugees.

Graham Winchester, drummer in numerous Memphis bands, admitted he was having a rock-and-roll moment. On the last song of a Turnstyles set at Railgarten last weekend, he kicked his drums off the stage. Almost immediately, two guys walked off with pieces of his kit. Winchester took to Facebook with photos and a plea for help. In a happy turn, Winchester reported the drums were found and returned: “I’m not interested in naming names or blasting anyone. That’s just not my style.” M I LK C R ATE C HALLE N G E

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Ken-Tenn Kustomz streamed Whitehaven’s huge milk crate challenge last week on YouTube. This summer’s viral challenge has people climbing milk crates stacked like stairs. They fall, and the hilarity is the internet magic. But its danger brought an official tweet against the challenge from the FDA last week. Dozens gathered at Whitehaven Lane Park last week to watch a handful try the challenge in a stream that lasted more than an hour. G O O D O N E, G O LD C LU B Reddit user Adventure_Thyme13 captured some timely and fleeting humor last week from The Gold Club. “Sorry about OnlyFans,” read its sign. “We’re hiring.”

N EW MAS K MAN DATE Masks could be required through the end of September, unless Shelby County’s Covid-19 situation improves, and employers should require workers to be vaccinated or be regularly tested. That’s all according to a brand-new health directive issued by the Shelby County Health Department last week. The new order renews last week’s mask mandate for most indoor spaces. The mask order could be renewed at the end of next month, health officials said. It could also be loosened in September if the county reaches a vaccination rate of 70 percent.

PHOTO: SHELBY COUNTY SCHOOLS/ FACEBOOK (EDITED) PHOTO: MAYA SMITH

CALLI N G FO R J USTI C E PHOTO: DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE Family members of Alvin Motley Jr. are calling for justice and for the footage of his death to be released to the public. Clockwise from top left: Mask mandate renewed, community Motley was allegedly fatally shot by wants justice for Alvin Motley Jr., new business filings, Afghan refugees seek former Horn Lake police officer Gregory resettlement, SCS superintendent Joris Ray Livingston following a verbal altercation over loud music last month, police say. Livingston was charged with second-degree murder and is learning English, and navigating a new culture. currently in jail on a $1.8 million bond. Housing will be a key need for arriving families. World Relief Memphis is currently looking for partners, such as N EW B US I N ES S B O O M apartment complex owners and private families, to provide New business filings in Tennessee continued at a “recordtemporary and permanent housing. Moore said the public can shattering” pace during the second quarter of 2021, according also help by advocating, donating money and household items, to state officials. or volunteering. In those three months, paperwork was completed for 19,983 new business entities here. Secretary of State Tre Hargett said it VI RTUAL LEAR N I N G was the highest number of new business filings ever recorded A Tennessee Department of Education (TDOE) rule stands in in one quarter in the 28 years that such data has been collectthe way of Shelby County Schools (SCS) offering all students ed. First-quarter 2021 broke the previous record. virtual learning options. Shelby County led the way in new business filings, followed The rule passed in April lays four conditions that must be by Davidson (Nashville), Knox (Knoxville), and Hamilton met for districts to implement a Continuous Learning Plan (Chattanooga) counties. (CLP). The first is that the governor has declared a state of emerR ES ETTLI N G R E F U G E ES gency or disaster. Additionally, the emergency or disaster must World Relief Memphis, a nonprofit that serves newly arrived disrupt the traditional operations of the school district. School refugees here, is gearing up to assist Afghan refugees resettling districts must also provide notice to the TDOE justifying the in Memphis. implementation. Finally, the TDOE must approve the district’s As Afghan families flee their country following the Taliban request. SCS superintendent Joris Ray encourages parents to takeover, PJ Moore, executive director of World Relief Memshare concerns about in-person learning with Tennessee lawphis, said he anticipates a number will be coming to Memphis. makers. Visit the News Blog at memphisflyer.com for fuller versions of World Relief is preparing to offer families help integrating into the community by assisting with finding housing and jobs, these stories and more local news.


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Cash Power-Up Report: Electric vehicles could keep more money in Tennessee. When Tennesseans fuel up, much of their money flows out of state. But that hole could be patched with electric cars, according to a new study. In 2019, Tennesseans spent more

than $11.3 billion on fuel — gasoline and diesel — according to data from the Southern Alliance for Clean Energy (SACE). More than $8.2 billion of that money left the state for other states and

countries with oil reserves or petroleum processing plants. As cars become more fuel-efficient and stop hitting the pump as often, Tennessee could see even less money, the report says.

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But what if all those cars and trucks (and all the fuel dollars spent on them) were electric? SACE researchers crunched the numbers and found state drivers would save more than half on fueling their rides, and two-thirds of that money would stay here. In an all-electric Tennessee, drivers would have spent more than $5.7 billion to charge their cars and more than $3.9 billion of that money would remain in Tennessee. Across the Southeast, consumers spend $94 billion on gas and diesel annually, according to the report. The figure would be cut nearly in half to $52 billion if spent on electricity. Of that, about $35 billion would be kept in the region, a $5 billion increase over fuel spending. Add it up, and SACE said electrifying Southeast transportation could be a $47 billion boon to the region each year. The Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA) is now at the center of a push to make an electric future possible. In March, it announced the Eletric Highway Coalition, a group of seven utilities and energy companies helping to build a network of fast-charging stations for electric cars throughout the Southeast. That group doubled in July as seven more organizations joined the coalition. The 14-member group now represents 29 states and the District of Columbia and serves more than 60 million customers. The goal of the coalition is to create an infrastructure network of charging stations. The coalition is hoping to put chargers in areas less than 100 miles apart. The stations are slated to have at least two fast chargers, capable of getting drivers back on the road in 20 to 30 minutes. The stations will have universal vehicle compatibility and convenient payment collections. The network is hoped to ease “range anxiety,” worries that an electric car will get stranded in an area without an available charger. Doing so is hoped to broaden the acceptance of electric vehicles, decreasing the reliance on oil for transportation. “Electric vehicles benefit the environment by reducing carbon, but the economic impact is also substantial,” said Drew Frye, TVA manager of commercial energy solutions.


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POLITICS By Jackson Baker

Going for It Memphis Councilman JB Smiley looks at a long-shot run for governor. Surely it was but a of his initials, and he shares the name coincidence, not with his father, “an Army guy, a Bronze an omen, but on Star winner,” and a former militaryMonday evening, recruitment official from whom, the at which time junior Smiley says, he learned a lot about Memphis Councildedicated effort and about connecting man JB Smiley Jr.’s with people. gubernatorial ambiSmiley has demonstrated his own tions were becompossession of those traits during his ing public, a double rainbow appeared in Council term, where he has been a vocal the western sky. exponent of racial equity and is currently At the very least, each of these co-sponsor of a preliminary cityoverlapping phenomena constituted solid county consolidation effort with white proof that the unexpected can — and Councilman Chase Carlisle. occasionally does — happen. “I can broker deals and move issues,” A first-term city councilman running says Smiley, who lists among those that for governor of Tennessee? Something like he would take statewide the need for that hasn’t happened since — well, since improving education and expanding first-term Memphis city Commissioner Medicaid and broadband services, as Bill Farris, a presumed unknown in state well as easing state control over the government, ran for governor in 1962. prerogatives of local government. Farris didn’t make it, but he ran a So maybe Smiley’s a long shot. So, solid race, finishing third to then-former for that matter, are two other Democrats Governor Frank Clement who’ve filed papers with and Chattanooga Mayor the state regarding a Rudy Olgiati and gubernatorial race. They establishing himself as a are Nashville physician major player in local, state, Jason Martin and and even national politics Memphis activist Carnita for a couple of generations Atwater. to come. They all understand JB Smiley Jr., the difficulty of unseating who hasn’t formally an incumbent, in this case announced yet but Republican Governor Bill PHOTO: COURTESY JB SMILEY JR. has filed preliminary Lee. And they all surely JB Smiley Jr. paperwork with the state grasp something even for a governor’s race, more basic: You can’t win is optimistic, but even he is somewhat if you don’t run. dazzled by the uniqueness of it all. “Is the state ready for a candidate like • Shelby County Democrats elected myself?” he mused out loud Monday Gabby Salinas their new party chair via night. “I’m Black, I’m unmarried, I’m a well-attended Zoom convention on from West Tennessee. …” Of course, Saturday. that description, while arguably atypical of a serious statewide candidate, also • Meanwhile, wheels are beginning to fit Harold Ford Jr., the Memphis grind on the redistricting front. congressman who came within a handful Tennessee House Speaker Cameron of votes of winning a U.S. Senate race in Sexton has named three Shelby Countians 2006. — State Representatives Karen Camper, As it happens, Smiley has had Dwayne Thompson, both Democrats, conversations about running with Harold and Kevin Vaughan, a Republican — to Ford Sr., who was in Congress before his the General Assembly’s 16-member son was and was the best-known political redistricting committee. broker in these parts since the legendary And the Shelby County Commission, E.H. Crump. “I’d like to have his support,” looking to its own imminent Smiley said, stating the obvious. reapportionment, voted Monday to hold Like former Mayor A C Wharton, a series of public meetings on the matter, Smiley’s given name consists entirely starting next Wednesday.


AT L A R G E B y B r u c e Va n W y n g a r d e n

A Hard Rain A visit to Waverly, Tennessee, in the wake of an unthinkable disaster.

PHOTOS: BRUCE VANWYNGARDEN

A freak storm leaves Waverly, Tennessee, in a state of catastrophic despair, with 20 people killed. have to get out. Lots of water is coming,’” says Tricia. “A friend of his came and got me. Water didn’t get into our house, but it came up to the porch. I’m still having nightmares about it. I’m still shaken.” She’s not alone. A lot of people are shaken in Waverly. A week after the horror, they stand watching bulldozers clear the streets, everything they owned, gone or destroyed. On my way out of town, I notice a young woman in shorts and tank-top walking in Trace Creek with a wading stick. She pokes at debris, moves tree limbs, then wades on, looking for something, something that’s likely gone forever. For information on how you can help, call the Red Cross Disaster Health Services in Waverly: 1-800-REDCROSS.

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trashed but now-tranquil stream. “Is this your property?” he asks. “No, I’m from a Memphis newspaper, up here to do a story.” “Good,” he says. “All this just disappeared from the news in one day, and it’s just unbelievable what happened here. Go ahead, just be careful.” I approach a man and woman sitting on the porch of a white frame house that looks largely unaffected by the storm. Across the street, a house sits cockeyed on its foundation with a pickup truck standing nearly vertical in the yard. Tricia and Chris Wilcher, mother and son, have stories to tell. Tricia was home and saw the water rising, which isn’t uncommon in Waverly. Creeks rise. “We’ve lived through lots of flooding here, but nothing like this one,” she says. “People were out looking at the water. At first it looked like a monster crawling around on the ground between the houses, then BOOM, it was like a tsunami — and everything just got swept away.” How does a tsunami happen in the middle of Tennessee? The current thinking is that a massive amount of water pooled behind a railroad track bed that suddenly gave way. Chris Wilcher says he witnessed it. “I was on my way home from work in Nashville and I stopped in Gorman because the roads were getting flooded. You could see the water building like a huge lake behind the railroad tracks up there. Then it started pouring over the tracks, then the bed gave way, and all that water just rushed out at once. It looked like a dam had broken, or like the levees with Katrina.” “Chris saw that and texted me and said, ‘Mom, you

NEWS & OPINION

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he I-40 exit for Highway 13 is pretty typical, as these things go. There’s a McDonald’s, three gas stations, a couple of chain restaurants, four motels. Numerous signs tout Loretta Lynn’s Ranch and Resort, just up the road. A little north of Loretta’s place, 15 miles from the exit, sits the town of Waverly, Tennessee, home to 4,000 people and the site of a horrific disaster on the weekend of August 20th. A freak storm hit the mountains to the east of Waverly that night, dumping 17 inches of rain in six hours near the hill town of McEwen, all-time record for the state. The only outlets for the water were five streams: Trace Creek, Blue Creek, Hurricane Creek, Tumbling Creek, and the Piney River. Waverly has the misfortune to be split by Trace Creek, normally a small clear stream, maybe 30 feet wide, three feet deep in its pools. But on this night, the placid little waterway became a deadly funnel for the torrential rain coming out of the highlands. Dozens of houses along the creek in Waverly, mostly modest frame structures, including some public housing — what locals call the “projects” — were inundated by the wave. Twenty people were killed. Twin seven-month-old babies were ripped from their father’s arms; two teenage sisters were separated in the deluge. One survived; the body of the 15-year-old, last seen clinging to a piece of debris being washed downstream, was later found. Houses, cars, furniture, appliances, and the contents of more than 100 homes were flushed away. As you enter Waverly, nothing seems amiss in the business district, which is on higher ground a couple blocks from the creek. But the two streets nearest the stream are a nightmarish wasteland: Houses sit in the middle of streets; cars are stacked against trees like ladders; washing machines, boats, fencing, furniture, books, televisions, and other human detritus are strewn everywhere. At a gas station, a house sits near the pumps, as if looking for fuel. An enormous dead wild boar floats belly-up in a backwater pool. I wander the area, taking pictures, trying not to bother the National Guard and other salvage and cleanup operations. A Tennessee park ranger pulls up as I survey the

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COV E R STORY BY FRANK M U RTAUG H

Tiger Trials Coach Ryan Silverfield and the Memphis Tigers aim to build upon a year of challenges.

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September 2-8, 2021

o college football coach has begun his career in quite the way Ryan Silverfield has at the University of Memphis. His very first experience in command on the Tiger sideline occurred on December 28, 2019, in what happens to be the biggest game in the program’s history. Having been promoted from an assistant’s position to succeed Mike Norvell (who left for Florida State after Memphis won the American Athletic Conference championship game), Silverfield — then 39 years old — led the 15th-ranked Tigers against Penn State in the Cotton Bowl, one of the four most prestigious postseason games in the land. Memphis came up short (53-39) in an exciting game, but Silverfield had his platform for the next era of the program’s growth. Not quite three months later, Silverfield’s program essentially shut down as the coronavirus pandemic took hold of organized sports all over the globe. The young head coach would learn the ropes under conditions unlike any of his predecessors — or any of his competition — had experienced before. “Who would ever have thought my first three months on the job would be the easiest,” wonders Silverfield. “It became a totally different deal [during the pandemic] than when I took the job. It was a new era for Memphis football, and I felt like we had some momentum going in. Our kids left for spring break, and we ended up having about a three-month spring break. Anytime you’re trying to get a staff together, to learn from each other and build relationships, it’s never easy. Doing it via Zoom, not being able to be around [the players] … so much of college football is about relationships. You’re dealing with 125 17- to 22-year-olds. We 10 need to be there for them in everything we do. Our administration handled it

the right way, and our kids persevered. It was a trying season, in more ways than one. The opt-outs [players choosing not to play under the pandemic restrictions], not knowing your schedule, getting tested [for Covid-19]. I’m proud of those who persevered and came out on top. Credit to all those around me. You want to forget, but I’ll always remember a season that was unique to me and everyone else.” Even with the stifling restrictions, Silverfield’s first season was a success. The Tigers went 8-3 and won the program’s first bowl game since 2014 (a victory over Florida Atlantic University in the Montgomery Bowl). But Memphis missed out on the AAC championship game for the first time in four seasons, so there’s ground to gain (or regain) in 2021. Entering his second season, Silverfield has a closer-to-normal football atmosphere around him. (As camp opened in August, players who had not been vaccinated against the coronavirus were required to be tested for Covid-19. Near the end of the month, Silverfield said more than 80 percent of the Tiger roster has been vaccinated, with the goal being 100 percent.) And part of “normal” for college football coaches every summer is the task of addressing significant departures. Former quarterback Brady White leaves the most significant void, having won the most games (28) and passed for the most yardage

PHOTO: LARRY KUZNIEWSKI

Coach Ryan Silverfield


JUST WATCH!

PHOTO: U OF M ATHLETICS

(Top to Bottom) Senior Calvin Austin III led the Tigers in 2020 with 63 receptions for 1,063 yards; Quindell Johnson intercepted three passes in 2020 and led the AAC with 60 solo tackles; Sean Dykes holds the Tiger career record for receptions (80) and yards (1,169) by a tight end.

There’s some irony to the watch lists, as you won’t find a Tiger among candidates for the Davey O’Brien Award, given annually to the country’s top quarterback. Having suited up Paxton Lynch (201315), Riley Ferguson (2016-17), and White (2018-20) over the last eight years, Memphis has found not just stability behind center, but profound, recordbreaking success. Silverfield opened camp in August by declaring any one of four quarterbacks capable of continuing this unprecedented stretch: Keilon Brown (a dual-threat redshirt freshman from Zachary, Louisiana), Grant Gunnell (a junior transfer from the University of Arizona), Seth Henigan (a freshman from Denton, Texas), and Peter Parrish (a sophomore transfer from LSU). Despite nursing an injury through much of training camp, Gunnell fits the picture — and brings the most experience — for Saturday’s opener at the Liberty Bowl. [Editor’s note: Silverfield had not named the starter at

press time.] Based on his size (6’6”, 228 lbs.), Gunnell fits the prototype for a drop-back gunslinger, the kind Memphis has gotten used to over the last decade. As for credentials, Gunnell shattered state records as a high school player in Houston, passing for 16,108 yards and 195 touchdowns over four years. In his two seasons at Arizona, Gunnell played in 12 games, completed 66 percent of his passes and connected for 15 touchdowns (with only three interceptions). “First and foremost, it’s intelligence and accuracy,” says Silverfield, in emphasizing the qualities he wants to see from his quarterback on a weekly basis. “He needs to display leadership and arm strength and be athletic enough to get you out of trouble. Can he handle the offense? Is he a quick thinker, able to process information?”

The city embraces Memphis Tiger football. The love for the players grows, year in and year out. It's what makes this place unique. Silverfield chuckles when asked if the Tiger offense will remain a run-first attack. “I’m an offensive-line guy,” he says. “We’ll base it on personnel. Brady White was a great drop-back passer, so there were times when we had to lean on the pass. We’ve also had NFL-caliber running backs recently, so it made sense to run first. A lot of it is what the defense gives us.” In Austin and Dykes, the Memphis quarterback — whoever he might be — will have a pair of veteran game-breakers to target. A former walk-on from Harding Academy of Memphis, Austin caught 63 passes for 1,063 yards and 11 touchdowns in 2020, filling the void left by Damonte Coxie, who opted out early in the season. Dykes hauled in 47 passes for 581 yards and seven touchdowns and already owns the Tiger career records for catches (80) and receiving yards (1,169) by a tight end. The top returning ball-carrier is Rodrigues “Dreke” Clark (561 yards last year), but Marquavius Weaver (from Bartlett High School), Kylan Watkins (Whitehaven), Cameron continued on page 12

COVER STORY m e m p h i s f l y e r. c o m

(10,690) and touchdowns (90) among all signal-callers in Tiger history. Also gone are placekicker Riley Patterson (second in career scoring for the U of M with 432 points) and a trio of impact-making transfers: offensive lineman Obinna Eze (to TCU), wide receiver Tahj Washington (to USC), and defensive back T.J. Carter (to TCU). But there is returning star power for Memphis. If you enjoy “watch lists” — those preseason projections of which players will contend for which postseason awards — you’ll need a deep breath before reciting the Tigers’ candidates: Calvin Austin III (Biletnikoff Award for outstanding receiver and Maxwell Award for most outstanding player), Sean Dykes (John Mackey Award for best tight end), Quindell Johnson (Jim Thorpe Award for best defensive back and Chuck Bednarik Award for outstanding defensive player), and Dylan Parham (Outland Trophy for best interior lineman). These kinds of preseason nods tend to go to programs that have enjoyed seven straight winning seasons, a pair of AAC titles, and three Top-25 finishes (in 2014, ’17, and ’19). The Tigers enter the 2021 campaign on a 15-game home winning streak (fifth in the nation), the kind of utter dominance expected of blue bloods in Tuscaloosa, Alabama, or Columbus, Ohio. Since 2014, the Tigers are 41-5 at the Liberty Bowl. (For perspective, Memphis has won more home games over the last seven seasons than the program did the previous 14.) So yes, expectations are high. Again.

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continued from page 11 Fleming, and Brandon Thomas give the running back position every bit as much depth — or question marks — as quarterback. “We started seven different running backs last year,” notes Silverfield. “Probably not where you want to be, but our bell cow [Kenneth Gainwell] opted out five days before the first game. We’ve got to figure out who that guy is [this season].”

HIGH EXPECTATIONS FOR TIGER TALENT

September 2-8, 2021

The Tigers have become one of the topscoring programs in the country, with averages (points per game) the last five seasons of 38.8, 45.5, 42.9, 40.4, and 31.0. Conversely, the Memphis defense has allowed its share of points, with averages (since 2016) of 28.8, 32.5, 31.9, 26.4, and 27.9 last season under first-year defensive coordinator Mike MacIntyre. A pair of ugly losses at Cincinnati (49-10) and Tulane (35-21) exposed the Tiger defense in ways that even a prolific offense couldn’t hide. This year’s defense will be led by a pair of preseason all-conference selections, first-team lineman Morris

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Joseph (seven quarterback sacks in 2020) and second-team safety Quindell Johnson. As a sophomore last season, Johnson led the AAC with 60 solo tackles, pulled down three interceptions, forced two fumbles, and recovered another. “Quindell is an extremely smart football player,” says MacIntyre. “He can cap the defense and see what’s going on with the offenses [we face]. Not only does he have the ability to make plays on interceptions, but running the alley, making checks, and just his great football savvy.” As high as the expectations have become for the Tigers here in the MidSouth, the program has drifted back into a middle tier when measured nationally. Only one AAC team (Cincinnati) cracked the AP’s preseason Top 25, Memphis not so much as receiving a vote. As for their conference standing, the Tigers are projected to finish fifth in the AAC by media pollsters, behind the Bearcats, UCF, SMU, and Houston. Silverfield takes the stance of a coach with many more years behind him when it comes to such prognosticating, or circling games on the Tiger schedule. No one has won (or lost) a game yet, so paper standings in August mean zilch. And yes, he’s circled a game on

the Memphis schedule: the opener this Saturday against Nicholls State. (September 18th might be highlighted on a few Memphis refrigerators. Mississippi State visits the Liberty Bowl for the first time since 2011. The Tigers haven’t beaten the Bulldogs since 1993 and not since 1988 on their home turf.) “This is a winning program now,” stresses Silverfield. “The city embraces Memphis Tiger football. The love for the players grows, year in and year out. It’s what makes this place unique. Our players appreciate the support they get from the city. We know what a home-

field advantage we have.” Silverfield learned much about himself over his rookie year — that unique rookie year — as a head coach. “As a first-year coach, you want to control everything,” he says. “Nothing kicked me in the teeth like the pandemic telling me, ‘Hey, you have very little control over everything.’ I control what I can. But every day there is going to be something, and I have to deal with it the right way, to have patience but act swiftly. I’m still gonna coach hard and hold people accountable. But when issues arise, I better be level-headed in order to figure things out.”

2021• September TIGER FOOTBALL SCHEDULE 4 (6 p.m.) — Nicholls State • September 11 (6 p.m.) — at Arkansas State • September 18 (3 p.m.) — Mississippi State • September 25 — UTSA • October 2 (11 a.m.) — at Temple • October 9 — at Tulsa • October 14 (Thursday, 6:30 p.m.) — Navy • October 22 (Friday, 6 p.m.) — at UCF • November 6 — SMU • November 13 — East Carolina • November 19 (Friday, 8 p.m.) — at Houston • November 26 (Friday) or Nov. 27 — Tulane

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RISE WITH THE FEVER. Yellow Fever, the plague that almost killed Memphis, returns to tell its stories in person. Meet history at Elmwood, October 8-9. Go to ElmwoodCemetery.org for tickets and details, or call 901.774.3212.

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COVER STORY m e m p h i s f l y e r. c o m

SUMMER

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first annual

steppin’ out (& stayin’ in)

We Recommend: Culture, News + Reviews

Zine Scene September 1–5, 2021

9/1 - 8pm

9/2 - 8pm

MonoNeon

Lucero

9/3 - 9pm

9/4 - 9pm

Lord T & Eloise

dead soldiers

plus

Detective Bureau The PRVLG CYC Obruni Dance Band Lucky 7 brass band Max Kaplan & the Magics The Sensational Barnes Brothers

VISIT railgarten.com

FOR FULL LINEUP

September 2-8, 2021

9/8 - 6:30pm

Duwayne Burnside Blues Hour

9/9 - 8pm Lucky 7

9/10 - 8pm

John Williams and the A440 Band

9/11 - 8pm

Memphis All-Stars

railgarten.com

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2 1 6 6 C e n t r a l Av e . Memphis TN 38104

By Julie Ray This year’s Zine Fest has a new component — the Memphis Listening Lab/WYXR inaugural Record Swap. According to Zine Fest curator Erica Qualy, this is such a perfect pairing because the birth of zines as we know them today was started as a response to the punk music culture in the 1970s, when copiers were made available commercially. People started creating fanzines and raising awareness in a way they hadn’t been able to before. Qualy remembers hopping on the zine scene more than PHOTO: COURTESY CROSSTOWN CONCOURSE a few years later. “My friend and I first found out about zines in high school while browsing at the local library. We came across the book Zine Scene: The Do It Yourself Guide to Zines by Francesca Lia Block. We were entranced.” She says they immediately went home and started brainstorming. They pulled an all-nighter until their first zine was born. Nearly 20 years later, Qualy is curating Zine Fest 6. “Funny how seemingly small instances in your life can be the building blocks for a future,” says Qualy, inviting the public to join the revolution. “You don’t need to wait for anyone else to publish your stack of poems, your short stories about alien invasions, your comic about the dog and cat duo that saved the world. You can do it yourself. Make a zine today.” Zine Fest 6 will be held in the upstairs Central Atrium of Crosstown Concourse, with DIY zine-making stations and vendor booth spaces. The record swap will take place on the bottom floor of the Central Atrium. The Memphis Listening Lab, outside vendors, and the radio station inside Crosstown Concourse, WYXR 91.7 FM, will be selling music and merchandise. RECORD SWAP & ZINE FEST 6, CROSSTOWN CONCOURSE, 1350 CONCOURSE, SATURDAY, SEPT. 4, 10 A.M.-5 P.M., AND SUNDAY, SEPT. 5, 10 A.M.-3 P.M., FREE.

VARIOUS DAYS & TIMES September 2nd - 8th Opening Reception for “The Southern Gothic Oracle” Jay Etkin Gallery, 942 Cooper, Friday, Sept. 3, 6-8 p.m., free Exhibition of acrylic paintings by Stacey Williams-Ng that are part of a series created to illustrate an oracular card deck of the artist’s creation. Beale Street Cigar Festival Handy Park, Beale Street, FridaySunday, Sept. 3-5, $50 Relax, eat, drink, smoke, and play. Features DJ Spinderella, H-Town, Grammy-winning artist Norman Brown, and others.

Delta Fair & Music Festival Agricenter International, 7777 Walnut Grove, starts Friday, Sept. 3, and continues through Sept. 12, $10 Features carnival rides, fair food, live music, attractions, vendors, livestock shows, cooking contests, and more. River City Jazz & Music Festival Cannon Center for the Performing Arts, 255 N. Main, Sunday, Sept. 5, 6:30 p.m., $60 Enjoy jazz music from featured artists Damien Escobar, Karyn White, Con Funk Shun, Kenny Lattimore, and Julian Vaughn.

Labor Day Donut Ride West Cancer Center, 7945 Wolf River, Monday, Sept. 6, 6:30 a.m., free for Memphis Hightailers Bicycle Club members, $40 nonmembers (includes one-year individual membership) Early risers get the donuts during a 26- or 40-mile bike ride for Labor Day benefiting West Cancer Center. “Genealogy” Online from bykriskeys.com, opens Tuesday, Sept. 7, 11:22 a.m., and continues through Nov. 7, free with registration Exhibition of watercolor paintings and films inspired by the patterns of blood, memory, and history.


Already Made shows off Elder Jack Ward’s original, time-tested take on gospel. Elder Jack Ward, age 83, may be the greatest gospel singer you’ve never heard of. True, Bruce Watson’s Bible & Tire Recording Co., founded on the older aesthetic of “sacred soul” rather than modern jazz/funk/fusion gospel, has given new life to a few singing careers in the field, and many of them were not well-known at the time. Yet some, like Elizabeth King, were quickly embraced by media outlets like NPR, vice.com, and American Songwriter. Ward’s name hasn’t received as much attention but may soon follow suit, now that his album of songs, freshly recorded with the Sacred Soul Sound Section at Delta-Sonic Sound, has been released. One thing distinguishing his album, Already Made, from other Bible & Tire releases is Ward’s songwriting. While many gospel singers focus on breathing new life into classic church music, Ward composed every song on the album. As he tells it, it has always been thus. “I’ve been writing basically since I started singing, when I was 8 or 9 years old,” he says. “I grew up listening to the Grand Ole Opry and such … Ernest Tubb, a lot of guys, I used to pattern after them. I never did try to record them. But when I was in the cotton field I used to sing, ‘I’m walking the floor over you. I can’t keep awake and it’s true.’ [laughs] Yes. It was just a gift that was in me, and I can just about sing any type of song.

But I had stuff of my own. What you’ve been listening to [on the new album], that is my way of singing, ‘This is what I like. This is me. No one else.’” That talent for composition served Ward well when he first journeyed to Memphis from his hometown of Itta Bena, Mississippi, at age 18, determined to make a life in music. He fell in with a group called the Christian Harmonizers, and their 1964 single on the Stax subsidiary Chalice stayed on the charts for an impressive stretch of time. “‘Don’t Need No Doctor’ was a hit for about two years, off and on,” says Ward. “Isaac Hayes was playing piano on both of those sides. The flip side was ‘Jesus Will Send Down His Blessings.’ Those are the two songs I wrote. And I can tell you about the fast one, ‘Jesus Will Send Down His Blessings.’ I was walking when I was in my 20s. I heard someone saying ‘Help me!’ from down in a deep ditch. I couldn’t see it so good. It was almost dark, and I was headed back home from going to see a girl. And he said, ‘Help me out!’ The guy was drunk, and I pulled him out and he appreciated that. And I went from there on that particular song.” From there, Ward and a new group, the Gospel Four,

recorded his originals with Pastor Juan D. Shipp’s D-Vine Spirituals label, which Bible & Tire has gone on to acquire and reissue in recent years, and whose roster from the ’70s has continued to supply Watson’s new imprint with much talent, including Elizabeth King. As Watson notes, “Elder Ward has a notebook” full of compositions. “We had a tough time narrowing the list down to 10 songs. Ward has an otherworldly gift.” In true Bible & Tire style, the songs are arranged and recorded using the same house band featured on other releases by the label, including Will Sexton and Matt RossSpang on guitars, George Sluppick on drums, and Mark Edgar Stuart on bass. Lucero’s Rick Steff adds keyboards (full disclosure: so do I), but the really captivating sounds come from Ward’s own family. “I’ve got two sons in Ohio, and they’ve been up there for a spell. But I’ve got my three daughters and my son here, they do the background,” says Ward. “I started them off when they were about 7 or 8.” Now, they are deeply involved in his ministry and often sing with him. “The First Temple Holiness Church, 701 Pearce Street. Smokey City. My wife is the evangelist, and our daughter is in the ministry. Sometimes my wife sings with us, and most of my children and grandchildren. I’ve got some great-grandchildren coming, too. So I’m still in it. I love to sing, love to preach, love to teach. That’s me!”

m e m p h i s f l y e r. c o m

Sacred Soul

PHOTO: MATT WHITE

Elder Jack Ward

ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT

MUSIC By Alex Greene

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CALENDAR of EVENTS:

September 2 - 8

ART AN D S P EC I A L E X H I B ITS

Artists’ Link Summer Show Work by members of Artists’ Link. Through Sept. 2. MEMPHIS BOTANIC GARDEN

“Divine Legacies in Black Jewelry” Exhibition of jewelry to contextualize modern Black American 20th- and 21st- century jewelry production. Through Sept. 12. METAL MUSEUM

“Escape to Water and Sky” Paintings by Ann Brown Thomason. Through Sept. 30. MEMPHIS BOTANIC GARDEN

“Genealogy”

Watercolor paintings and films inspired by the patterns of blood, memory, and history. Free. Monday, Sept. 6-Nov. 7. BYKRISKEYS.COM

“Hindsight 2020”

Reflection of the events of 2020 by artists of color, LGBTQ+ artists, and others. Through Sept. 30. ART MUSEUM AT THE UNIVERSITY OF MEMPHIS (AMUM)

Send the date, time, place, cost, info, phone number, a brief description, and photos — two weeks in advance — to calendar@memphisflyer.com or P.O. Box 1738, Memphis, TN 38101. DUE TO SPACE LIMITATIONS, ONGOING WEEKLY EVENTS WILL APPEAR IN THE FLYER’S ONLINE CALENDAR ONLY.

“Light Is A Place”

“Strata”

DAVID LUSK GALLERY

2021 PROJECTS

“Meet the Dixons”

“Uncommon Vessels”

Exhibition of 20 photographs by Huger Foote. Tuesday, Sept. 7-Oct. 9.

Work by Coriana Close and Sarah Elizabeth Cornejo. Through Sept. 13.

Work by Niles Wallace and Alisa Free. Through Sept. 11.

Margaret and Hugo Dixon’s personal lives, collections, and legacy. Through Sept. 26.

L ROSS GALLERY

THE DIXON GALLERY & GARDENS

A R T HA P P E N I N G S

“Micro-Aesthetic”

Microscopic images presented by Dr. Amir Hadadzadeh. Through Sept. 30.

Hannah’s Hope Fund Raiser and Art Exhibit

Exhibits by Picasso, Woodhams, Lyle, Becky Ross McRae; designer handbags and scarves; and a chance ticket for a family portrait on canvas. Refreshments provided. Saturday, Sept. 4, 2-4 p.m.

ART MUSEUM AT THE UNIVERSITY OF MEMPHIS (AMUM)

New Art by Dr. Tom Gettelfinger

Exhibition in the Crosstown Concourse West Atrium and the Church Health Welcome Center. Through Sept. 30.

MID-SOUTH ARTIST GALLERY

Memphis Listening Lab/ WYXR Record Swap & Crosstown Arts Zine Fest 6

CROSSTOWN CONCOURSE

“On the Road: Chocolate Cities”

Featuring multiple artists exploring notions of Blackness coupled with the convergence of place and space. Through Sept. 18. TONE

Theatre Memphis kicks off its 100th season with Hello, Dolly!, a musical centering around the brassy and charming widow Dolly Levi, a socialite-turned-matchmaker in the 1890s.

Join DIY zine-making stations and WYXR Listening Lab. Buy zines, records, and merchandise. Saturday, Sept. 4, 10 a.m. CROSSTOWN CONCOURSE

FAB FRIDAYS Laser light shows in the Planetarium, Friday nights in September Memphis Museum of Science & History

September 2-8, 2021

WWW.MEMPHISMUSEUMS.ORG

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Elton John 7PM Queen 8:30PM & Bowie 10PM


CALENDAR: SEPTEMBER 2 - 8

JAY ETKIN GALLERY

WE Boutique: Wearable Fabric Art

Wearable art by Dinah Makowsky, Lisa Mergen, and Dorothy Northern. Wednesday, Sept. 8-Sept. 23. WOMAN’S EXCHANGE OF MEMPHIS

FI LM

H E A LT H A N D F IT N E S S

Battle of the Food Trucks and Music Fest

Arthouse Film Series: Sisters With Transistors

South Memphis Senior Walking Club

Vendors, music, games, bouncers, gaming truck for kids and teens. $5. Saturday, Sept. 4, 10 a.m. SOUTHLAND MALL

Beale Street Cigar Festival

CROSSTOWN CONCOURSE

HANDY PARK

Also screening at Collierville Towne Cinema. $15. Sunday, Sept. 5, 3 p.m.; Wednesday, Sept. 8, 7 p.m.

Relax, eat, drink, smoke, and play. $50. Friday, Sept. 3-Sept. 5.

Delta Fair & Music Festival

Carnival rides, fair food, music, vendors, livestock shows, and more. $10. Friday, Sept. 3-Sept. 12.

C O M E DY

Monique

Friday, Sept. 3, 7 p.m. Second performance on Friday and Saturday, 9:30 p.m. Sunday performance at 7:30 p.m. $40.

AGRICENTER INTERNATIONAL

CHUCKLES COMEDY CLUB

136 CUMBERLAND

C O M M U N I TY

Keepers of the Dream Award Applications

Grades 6-12. Winners will be highlighted during the Freedom Award Student Forum. Apply online. Due by Sept. 10. FREEDOMAWARD.CIVILRIGHTSMUSEUM.ORG

FAM I LY

Talk and Walk: Reptiles

Learn all about reptiles and enjoy a guided hike. $10. Saturday, Sept. 4, 9 a.m.

Documentary about the untold story of electronic music’s female pioneers. $5. Thursday, Sept. 2, 7:30 p.m.

Odd Fest

Featuring your favorite Memphis artists. $5. Saturday, Sept. 4, 7 p.m.

River City Jazz & Music Festival

Features Damien Escobar, Karyn White, Con Funk Shun, Kenny Lattimore, and Julian Vaughn. $60. Sunday, Sept. 5, 6:30 p.m. CANNON CENTER FOR THE PERFORMING ARTS

Southern Heritage Classic Cultural Celebration

Backdraft: 30th Anniversary

The Alpinist

Also screening at Collierville Towne Cinema. $15. Tuesday, Sept. 7, 7 p.m. MALCO PARADISO CINEMA GRILL & IMAX

FOOD AN D DR I N K

Fall Food Truck Garden Party

Music by Tracking Giants and food from 9 Dough 1, Lynnie’s Links and Drinks, New Wing Order, and more. Plus cash bar and magic by The Amazing Grayson. $10. Wednesday, Sept. 8, 5-8 p.m.

Tailgating, golf, and more leading up to when Jackson State University squares off with Tennessee State University. Wednesday, Sept. 8-Sept. 11. SOUTHERNHERITAGECLASSIC.COM

COURT SQUARE

CORNER OF MISSISSIPPI AND GAITHER

Food Truck Thursday

Features Fresh Gulf Shrimp, N!hsay, El Mero Taco, and more. Thursday, Sept. 2, 10 a.m.-1 p.m.

Join the shops on Broad for themed events, specials, and pop-ups. Friday, Sept. 3, 5-8 p.m. BROAD AVENUE ARTS DISTRICT

Memphis Greek Picnic

Memphis Astronomical Society

Features DJ IB John Doe and DJ Zetta. A portion of the proceeds benefits the Ambition Foundation’s School Adoption Program in conjunction with the SCS Family and Community Engagement Department. Friday, Sept. 3-Sept. 5.

MEMPHISASTRO.ORG

MARTIN LUTHER KING RIVERSIDE PARK

P E R F O R M I N G A R TS

Tekken & DBFZ Tournament AOD16ver.1

L E CT U R E

MALCO PARADISO CINEMA GRILL & IMAX

MEMPHIS BOTANIC GARDEN

Earn a free Fitbit after a month of walking. Tuesday, Sept. 7, 8-9 a.m.

First Fridays on Broad

Join MAS for a monthly meeting via Zoom featuring speakers on astronomy. Friday, Sept. 3, noon.

Labor Gay Music and Variety Show

If you’re gay and have the day off, come party. Featuring live music, circus performances, lip syncs, contortions, kings, queens, inbetweens, rainbows, and stunning fun hunties. $10. Sunday, Sept. 5, 2:30 p.m. BLACK LODGE

S P E C IA L E V E N TS

Dog Days of Summer

Bring your dog for extended garden hours and free admission. Thursday, Sept. 2, 5 p.m. MEMPHIS BOTANIC GARDEN

LICHTERMAN NATURE CENTER

Fighting Game Tournament series for Memphis and surrounding areas. Saturday, Sept. 4, 10 a.m. BLACK LODGE

information leading to arrests or warrants in felony crimes. Thursday, Sept. 2. WINDKYE COUNTRY CLUB

Labor Day Donut Ride

Ride 26 or 40 miles benefiting West Cancer Center. $40. Monday, Sept. 6, 6:30 a.m. WEST CANCER CENTER

Memphis 901 FC vs. Birmingham Legion FC

Memphis 901 FC vs. Birmingham Legion FC. Saturday, Sept. 4, 11 a.m. AUTOZONE PARK

T H EAT E R

Days of Rage

Young revolutionaries search to make change rather than wait for it. Thursday-Saturday, 8 p.m., and Sunday, 2 p.m. $42. Through Sept. 19. PLAYHOUSE ON THE SQUARE

S PO R TS

Battle at Black Lodge II: Kontar v. Mack

The 901 Wrestling and the 1819 championships are on the line. $5. Friday, Sept. 3, 8 p.m. BLACK LODGE

CrimeStoppers Golf Tournament

This fundraiser will provide future funding for cash awards to citizens who provide helpful

Hello, Dolly!

Dolly Levi is a socialite-turnedmatchmaker. Fridays and Saturdays, 7:30 p.m., and Sundays, 2 p.m. $35.Through Sept. 19. THEATRE MEMPHIS

Now I Am Alone

Performance written by Shakespeare, conceived and performed by Geoffrey Owens. Through Sept. 4. HATTILOO THEATRE

SIT DOWN A GAMBLER

RISE A LEGEND Must be 21 years or older to gamble or attend events. Know When To Stop Before You Start.® Gambling Problem? Call 1-800-522-4700. ©2021, Caesars License Company, LLC. All rights reserved.

m e m p h i s f l y e r. c o m

Paintings by Stacey WilliamsNg. Friday, Sept. 3, 6-8 p.m.

F ES TI VA L

ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT

Opening Reception for “The Southern Gothic Oracle”

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WED, SEPT. 15 • 7 PM

THUR, SEPT. 16 • 7 PM

TRIBUTE

CONCERT

ANNIVERSARY PARTY

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PUBLIC NOTICE SHELBY COUNTY DEPARTMENT OF HOUSING FY 2021 CONSOLIDATED ANNUAL PERFORMANCE REPORT Shelby County Department of Housing (SCDH) is preparing its Consolidated Annual Performance Report (CAPER) for the program year that began July 1, 2020 and ended June 30, 2021. The CAPER is required by the U.S. Department of Housing & Urban Development (HUD) to describe CDBG and HOME activities undertaken by SCDH to address housing and community development needs, especially in low- and moderate-income areas of Shelby County, outside the City of Memphis. SCDH utilized approximately $1,321,150 in Community Development Block Grant funds and $238,337 in HOME funds for the following activities: low-to-moderate income housing rehabilitation and minor home repair; infrastructure/community development improvements to benefit low-to-moderate income communities within the Urban County; public service activities to benefit Urban County seniors; administrative expenses; and program delivery costs. The CAPER will be available for public review and comment from Friday, September 10, 2021 through Monday, September 27, 2021 on the Department of Housing website https://www.develop901.com/housing/planningReporting. The proposed CAPER will also be distributed via email to the City of Memphis main library listserv. To solicit comments on the CAPER, Shelby County Department of Housing will host a virtual public hearing on Thursday, September 23, 2021 at 5:30pm via GoToMeeting. To join the virtual public hearing from a computer, tablet, or smartphone, follow this link: https://global.gotomeeting.com/join/401933293. Or, dial into the meeting using a phone with the following details: +1 (571) 317-3112 Access Code: 401-933-293.

September 2-8, 2021

Written comments or suggestions regarding the CAPER will be accepted through 4:30p.m. on September 28, 2021. Written comments should be sent to Dana Sjostrom (dana.sjostrom@shelbycountytn.gov) at Shelby County Department of Housing, 1075 Mullins Station Road, Memphis, TN 38134. SCDH will respond to all written comments within 15 working days of receipt. For questions concerning the public hearing or the CAPER, please contact the Department of Housing at 901-222-7600. Those with special needs that plan to attend the public hearing are encouraged to contact SCDH at (901) 222-7600 by 4:30 p.m on Wednesday, September 22, 2021 and we will work to accommodate you. Para mas información en Español, por favor llame Dana Sjostrom al 901-222-7601. The Shelby County Department of Housing does not discriminate on the basis of race, color, national origin, sex, religion, age or disability in employment or provision of services. Equal opportunity/equal access provider. Lee Harris Shelby County Mayor Attest: Scott Walkup, Administrator Department of Housing

18


FOOD By Michael Donahue

NOTICE OF PROPOSED CLASS ACTION SETTLEMENT

Shelby County Jail Suit Class Action Settlement

G

rowing up, Ranequa Bean didn’t eat her vegetables. But she did eat her sweets. So it’s no surprise she is now the owner of 350 Baked, which features her homemade cakes, cookies, brownies, and cobblers. Her goods are available online and in four locations, including High Point Grocery and Cordelia’s Market. But getting back to those childhood eating habits. “I was definitely a picky eater,” says Bean. “Any type of vegetable you put in front of me, I wouldn’t eat. Only meat and cheese. I didn’t like ketchup, mustard, mayonnaise. I didn’t start eating a lot of things until I went to culinary school.” Her mother was a good cook, but Bean’s “love for cooking” came from her aunt, Shapell Gates, who was a “Southern cooker.”

PHOTO: RAVYN TOWNS

Ranequa Bean Bean’s first baking effort was a cake she made for her stepfather when she was in high school. “It was embarrassing. It was so bad … awful. “The lines ‘Happy Birthday’ started at the top left of the cake and ended at the bottom right of the cake. I had some little flowers on it. He was so happy. He said, ‘This is the best cake ever.’” The cake might have looked bad, but Bean says, “The taste was definitely there.” A dog lover, Bean originally wanted to be a veterinarian. “I did animal science for two years. But it was in an animal physiology class where we had to artificially inseminate cows when I said, ‘No, mom. I can’t do this.’ I’d smell like cow poop all day.” She had a revelation: “I like dogs. I don’t like cows.” It was “love at first sight” when Bean discovered the culinary arts program at The Art Institute of Tennessee-Nashville. She

earned her associate’s degree in baking and pastry, but her bachelor’s degree in culinary management made the biggest impression. “They taught me how to open a business.” She also learned to love vegetables after she tried grilled asparagus for the first time in culinary school. “It was something about the taste from the grill … the oil and salt. The grilled flavor brings the vegetables alive.” Bean worked at several businesses, including the Radisson Hotel Nashville Airport, where she was sous-chef. Her first food-related job in Memphis was sous-chef at Baptist Memorial Hospital. In her spare time, she sold pre-ordered slices of her caramel, strawberry lemonade, banana pudding, and other cakes at Sprouts Farmers Market and Whole Foods Market. Bean chose the name 350 Baked because 350 degrees is the temperature of the ovens her desserts are baked in. Last February, Bean quit her job as culinary director at Remington College Memphis Campus. “350 Baked was getting a lot of recognition. I was getting more money from it than Remington.” Also, she says, “I had reached my breaking point of working for anybody other than myself.” More people were seeing photos of her cakes on Facebook and Instagram. “My goal in 350 Baked is to be a household brand.” She also had another goal. “My goal was to be in three locations by the end of this year. I did it in three weeks. And I told my husband, ‘God is so real.’” Bean now offers a regular list of cakes, cookies, and cobblers, as well as rotating specials. Her cakes and other baked goods are available on her website, 350baked. online, or via her Facebook and Instagram. She also sets up at the Downtown Memphis Farmers Market. “Moistness” is what makes her cakes different from other people’s, Bean says. She credits culinary school for teaching her how to get the right texture and flavor profiles. She also has “secret ingredients,” which set her cakes apart. Her slogan is: “Without us, it’s just cake.” Bean doesn’t want a brick-and-mortar location. “My business plan is to get a big ice cream truck, but with cakes.” She wants her truck to make “the sound like the ice cream truck makes,” but be more unique. So, when people hear it, they’ll say, “There’s 350 Baked.”

SUMMARY DESCRIPTION OF THE LAWSUIT There is a proposed Class Action Settlement of the lawsuit pending in the U.S. District Court for the Western District of Tennessee entitled Turnage, et al. v. Oldham, et al., case no: 2:16-cv-2907. This lawsuit involves persons who were allegedly over detained at the Shelby County, Tennessee Jail as a result of the November 2016 implementation of a computer system. The Action alleged that Defendants violated state and federal laws by detaining persons arrested between November 1, 2016 and March 21, 2021 for a period of time longer than the law provides. Defendants deny any and all wrongdoing of any kind whatsoever and deny any liability to Plaintiffs and to the Settlement Class. The Court has not decided who is right. Both sides have agreed to settle the dispute. The Settlement provides an opportunity for payments and other benefits to Settlement Class Members. WHO IS INCLUDED IN THE SETTLEMENT? The Settlement Class includes: All persons who, between November 1, 2016 and March 21, 2021 were arrested and then detained in the Shelby County Jail after legal authority for the detention ceased. More information is available at the Settlement Website, www.shelbycountyjailclasssettlement.com, or by calling (901) 425-4828. WHAT DOES THE SETTLEMENT PROVIDE? The Settlement provides a Gross Settlement Amount of $4,900,000.00 to pay (1) Claims of eligible Settlement Class Members; (2) the costs of administration; (3) Attorneys’ Fees and Expenses; and (4) any Incentive Awards made by the Court to Plaintiffs. Settlement Class Members who timely submit valid Claim Forms are entitled to receive a cash payment from the Settlement. The actual amount recovered by each Settlement Class Member is based on the amount of time the Class Member was allegedly over detained and will not be determined until after the Claim Period has ended and all claims have been calculated. WHAT ARE MY RIGHTS?

1.

Participate in the Settlement by Submitting a Claim. If you wish to participate in the Settlement and be eligible to receive a cash benefit under the Settlement, you MUST fill out and submit a Claim Form by December 30, 2021. You can obtain a Claim Form by (1) Visiting the Settlement Website www. shelbycountyjailclasssettlement.com, where you can request a Claim Form to submit by mail; (2) Mailing a written request for a Claim Form to: Shelby County Jail Suit Class Action, Settlement Administrator, P.O Box 341316 Bartlett, TN 38184; (3) Emailing a request for a Claim Form to: info@cmmsettlementsolutions.com; or (4) Calling (901) 425-4828 and requesting a Claim Form. If you do not timely submit a valid Claim Form and do not opt out from the Settlement, you will be bound by the Settlement but will not receive any cash benefit of the Settlement.

2.

You Can Object to the Settlement. If you do not agree with the Settlement or any part of it, you may submit a written objection to the Court. The deadline for submitting an objection is October 11, 2021. You may not object if you opt out of the Class. Details about how to object are available at www.shelbycountyjailclasssettlement.com.

3.

You Can “Opt Out” of the Settlement. If you do not want to be legally bound by the Settlement, you must elect to opt out and exclude yourself by submitting a written notice of opt out to the Administrator by September 10, 2021. If you opt out, you cannot get money from this Settlement. Details about opt-out or exclusion are available at www.shelbycountyjailclasssettlement.com, which explains how to exclude yourself from this settlement.

4.

If You Do Nothing: If you fail to timely submit a complete Claim Form or notice of opt out, you will be bound by the Court’s decisions and precluded from pursuing any claims or matters covered by the Settlement in any pending or future lawsuits or other proceedings.

OTHER IMPORTANT INFORMATION INCLUDING RELEASE OF CLAIMS If the proposed Settlement is given final approval by the Court, Class Members who have not excluded themselves from the settlement will release any and all claims they may have against Defendants related to the claims asserted in the lawsuit regarding alleged over detention at the Shelby County Jail. Please see the Settlement at www.shelbycountyjailclasssettlement.com for more information. The Court has appointed Class Counsel as follows: WATSON BURNS, LLC 253 Adams Ave Memphis, TN 38103 Phone: (901) 529-7996 Brice Timmons Donati Law, PLLC 1545 Union Ave. Memphis, TN 38104 Phone: (901) 209-5500

BLACK McLAREN JONES RYLAND & GRIFFEE PC 530 Oak Court Drive, Suite 360 Memphis, TN 38117 Phone: (901) 762-0535

Class Counsel will be compensated from the proceeds of the Settlement and you will not otherwise be charged for their services in representing the Class. The Court will hold a hearing on November 10, 2021 at 1:30 to consider whether to give final approval to the Settlement, including a request for Attorneys’ Fees and Expenses up to $2,400,000.00 and Incentive Awards for the named Plaintiffs totaling up to $140,000.00 from the Gross Settlement Amount. You or your own lawyer may appear and speak at the hearing at your own expense. FOR MORE INFORMATION: Visit www.shelbycountyjailclasssettlement.com or Call (901) 425-4828 PLEASE DO NOT CALL OR WRITE THE COURT OR THE CLERK’S OFFICE

m e m p h i s f l y e r. c o m

Ranequa Bean showcases her sweet skills at 350 Baked.

If you were arrested and detained at the Shelby County, Tennessee Jail at some point between November 1, 2016 and March 21, 2021 for longer than you should have been, you may be eligible to receive a cash payment from a Class Action Settlement.

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Fully Baked

19


FILM By Chris McCoy

The Candyman Can The new sequel to the classic slasher is a stylish, sophisticated scare.

September 2-8, 2021

L

ike the most famous resident of Cabrini-Green, J. J. “Dyn-omite” Evans, Anthony McCoy (Yahya Abdul-Mateen II) is a painter. But the Downtown Chicago neighborhood he inhabits is quite different from Good Times. In the 1970s, Cabrini-Green was notorious for violence, a symbol of inescapable, generational Black poverty — the go-to example of everything that was wrong with the concept of “public housing.” In 1992, Cabrini-Green was the setting for Candyman. Director Bernard Rose, who had made his name creating classic music videos for Frankie Goes to Hollywood, switched the setting of the Clive Barker story “The Forbidden” from Liverpool to Chicago in order to explore themes of race and class in America, while delivering the chills and gore horror audiences demand. Memorably played by Tony Todd, the Candyman is a hook-handed spectral killer who appears when you say his name five times while looking in a mirror. But Candyman is as much a victim as he is a boogeyman. Like Freddy Krueger, he was killed by an angry mob, and comes back to haunt the people in the neighborhood. (The mob rubbed their victim with honeycombs, and he was stung almost to death before being lit on fire. As someone with a stinging insect phobia, I found that especially traumatizing.) But Candyman’s backstory as a Reconstruction-era painter who was lynched because he was romantically involved with a white girl gives the film a layer of meaning rare in the horror genre of the time. It also makes it a perfect property to revisit among our

current moment of thoughtful horror. Written and produced by Jordan Peele, and directed by Nia DaCosta, this Candyman is a direct sequel to the 1992 film. Now, instead of a crumbling public housing project, Anthony lives in a swanky high-rise with his art dealer girlfriend Brianna (Teyonah Parris). She believes in him, but he’s having a hard time breaking into the art world — until he uncovers the legend of the Candyman. Soon, inspiration becomes obsession. His first installation based on the Candyman mythos, where he hangs a mirror in Brianna’s gallery and dares people to defy the urban myth, ends predictably badly. But that only stokes Anthony’s smoldering psychosis. As the gruesome murders pile up, the press and the art world’s interest in the artist’s work grows. His deep dive into the bloody history of Cabrini-Green uncovers his own connection to the original Candyman. What’s great about Candyman is DaCosta’s direction. Depicting a spectral villain who appears only in mirrors gives her plenty of opportunity for creative shots and staging. When Anthony, visiting the University of Chicago to find the files of the first film’s protagonist Helen Lyle, steps into the mirrored interior of an elevator, you clench the armrest, just knowing some crazy stuff is about to go down. DaCosta has a pair of dynamite leads. Abdul-Mateen is, as always, magnetic on screen. Like the best actors from the glory days of ’80s horror, he shares the audience’s disbelief at the weirdness taking over his life. Parris carves out her own character as neither stupid victim or savvy final girl, but an educated woman

Teyonah Parris (above) portrays art dealer Brianna; Yahya Abdul-Mateen II (below) as artist Anthony McCoy uncovers his own connection to Candyman.

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THE LAST WORD By Joseph Thomas

Take My Children, Bill Lee, and Use Them for Your Glory Consider a modest proposal in response to Executive Order 84. Covid cases are back at November 2020 levels, children under 12 years old are not yet eligible for vaccines, students are returning to schools, and you, Governor Bill Lee, have decided that now is a good time to allow parents to opt their kids out of school mask mandates. On the surface, the timing seems poor. With elementary schools packed wall to wall with unvaccinated bodies and the Delta variant far more prevalent in children than the original virus, parents across Tennessee are in a panic, but I want you to know that I get it. I see what you are doing, and I am willing to help any way I can. Honestly, it’s high time you show the nation that you are on the same level as revered governors like Greg Abbott and Ron DeSantis, not to mention the lofty, seemingly unattainable former president, Donald J. Trump — all three beacons of selfless leadership who constantly seek what is best for all people. It will not be easy, but I believe in you, and, for this reason, I freely offer you my children to use for the solidifying of your political legacy and furthering your future aspirations. We need strong, conservative leadership in this country to show the sanctity of human life and protect unborn children, and if that means harming or even sacrificing some already-born children then I am happy to do what it takes to be a part of the movement. Presently, I have a 6-year-old, a PHOTO: TN.GOV 10-year-old, and a Governor Bill Lee 12-year-old to give. Of course, the 6- and 10-year-olds are both too young to be vaccinated, so if sick children are what you need, then that should be no problem. You do have some catching up to do if you want to catch Abbott and DeSantis, so please take my two unvaccinated children and stuff them in an underfunded Tennessee school building with all the rest of the students who will not learn that slavery was bad because you so courageously outlawed its teaching, and show the world what you’re made of! Now, I apologize in advance for my 12-year-old. He has been vaccinated. If I had known you would need him so desperately to catch Covid, I would not have allowed that to happen, but I’m afraid it’s too late. I have faith that you can find some way to use him nonetheless. Maybe turn him over to a gang of illegal immigrants. The nation will not stand for those people coming into our country and taking one of our own children! There is potential there. And while he has been vaccinated, you could still try to infect him because, if it were to work, then you can pin it on the gang of immigrants and their bringing Covid across our open borders. Of course, you do what you think is best. I am here to serve. I know it’s not much. In fact, my only regret in this life is that I have but three children to give you and not a hundred or more. I am like the widow in the book of Mark who gave her last two coins. Some people can give more, yes, but I am giving you all I have. These three children are my two coins, and I am willing, even eager, to part with them if it furthers your political agenda, thrusts your boldness into the national spotlight, and helps you regain any support you lost from your role in removing the Nathan Bedford Forrest bust from the capitol building. Godspeed, Governor Lee, and good luck. Joseph Thomas is a humor writer living in Memphis, Tennessee, with his wife (Natalie), their three kids, and one dog.

THE LAST WORD

m e m p h i s f l y e r. c o m

It’s high time you show the nation that you are on the same level as Greg Abbott, Ron DeSantis, and Donald J. Trump — all beacons of selfless leadership who constantly seek what is best for all people.

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