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A BAD HEARTBEAT BILL P8 • 1000 LIGHTS P16 • SCARY STORIES TO TELL IN THE DARK P34

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08.15.19 1590th Issue

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DESHAUNE MCGHEE Classified Advertising Manager ROBBIE FRENCH Warehouse and Delivery Manager JANICE GRISSOM ELLISON, KAREN MILAM, DON MYNATT, TAMMY NASH, RANDY ROTZ, LEWIS TAYLOR, WILLIAM WIDEMAN Distribution THE MEMPHIS FLYER is published weekly by Contemporary Media, Inc., 65 Union Avenue, Memphis, TN 38103 Phone: (901) 521-9000 Fax: (901) 521-0129 www.memphisflyer.com CONTEMPORARY MEDIA, INC. ANNA TRAVERSE Chief Executive Officer ASHLEY HAEGER Controller JEFFREY GOLDBERG Chief Revenue Officer BRUCE VANWYNGARDEN Editorial Director KRISTIN PAWLOWSKI Digital Services Director JULIE RAY Distribution Manager MOLLY WILLMOTT Special Events Director JOSEPH CAREY IT Director LYNN SPARAGOWSKI Billing Coordinator BRITT ERVIN Email Marketing Manager KALENA MATTHEWS Receptionist

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9

AUG 16 - AUG 17

CONTENTS

BRUCE VANWYNGARDEN Editor SHARA CLARK Managing Editor JACKSON BAKER, MICHAEL FINGER Senior Editors TOBY SELLS Associate Editor CHRIS MCCOY Film and TV Editor ALEX GREENE Music Editor MICHAEL DONAHUE MAYA SMITH, JON W. SPARKS Staff Writers JESSE DAVIS Copy Editor, Calendar Editor KENNETH NEILL Founding Publisher

OUR 1590TH ISSUE 08.15.19 In the evening, after the day’s heat has broken, I like to sit outside with a glass of wine and look up. The pale sky is filled with life: bats, swallows, hummingbirds, dragonflies, the passing night herons that live a few blocks over, and, usually, a solitary Mississippi kite, circling way up high, his shrill two-note whistle cutting through the pulsing cicada chorus. As darkness falls, you can gaze long and deep into the night sky, at the clouds, the moon, the endless throw of stars. The natural world is always with us, even in the city. If you give it your attention, nature will reward you and give you a respite from our ever-chaotic politics and the nonstop social media melee. It’s easy to take these small pleasures for granted. Sunday, a friend and I drove the backroads up to the Wapanocca National Wildlife Refuge in Arkansas. It’s a vast expanse of water and cypress swamp, with trackless flooded lowlands, miles of mossy sloughs, and a massive shallow lake filled with ancient cypress and blooming lily pads as far as the eye can see. It’s home to gar, catfish, bass, bream, snapping turtles, beavers, muskrats, bobcats, black snakes, probably a gator or two, and who knows what else. Bald eagles, osprey, and red-tailed hawks patrol on high; wood ducks, indigo buntings, cardinals, and countless, nameless little birds flit through the green undercanopy. In the late fall, the lake and the sky above it are covered up with migrating waterfowl, creating sights (and sounds) well worth the 30-minute drive from Memphis. And it’s free. America has a long and checkered history with its natural resources. In the 19th century, hunters almost wiped out the buffalo, exterminated the carrier pigeon, and decimated countless other species. Corporations strip-mined Wapanocca our mountains, denuded our Wildlife Refuge lands of their trees, poisoned our water, polluted our air, and killed countless creatures, big and small, all in pursuit of the almighty dollar. We learned the hard way that, left unchecked, profit-driven entities won’t hesitate to destroy the environment. We started figuring it out, maybe just in time. Thanks to President Teddy Roosevelt, the U.S. created a National Park system to preserve some of our precious wild spaces. Cities and states have followed suit, creating public parks and natural areas for their citizens. With the public’s support, Congress began passing laws protecting our air and water and wildlife. According to a March 2018 Gallup poll, more than 75 percent of Americans think protecting our environment is important; 62 percent think the government should be doing more to protect it. To which, the Trump administration has said, meh, not so much. In its two-and-a-half years of existence, this administration has opened millions of acres of previously protected federal land to mining, oil, and timber operations. It’s weakened off-shore drilling regulations. It’s cut or eliminated many EPA airpollution regulations. We’ve gotten used to this, at some level — Trump’s predilection for appointing agency heads who seem uniquely qualified to destroy the very departments they are charged with running. You may remember — though it’s sometimes difficult to keep up with the revolving doors of Trump’s cabinet — that the president initially appointed the spectacularly sleazy Scott Pruitt to head the EPA. Pruitt was eventually forced out for being too corrupt, even for this administration, which is pretty damn corrupt. Before Pruitt left, he lifted key controls on air pollution, rolled back vehicle fuel efficiency standards, and even reversed the ban of the neurotoxic pesticide chlorpyrifos, against all advice from EPA scientists. Pruitt then purged the EPA’s pesky science advisory panels. Pruitt was followed by a “temporary” EPA director, Andrew N E WS & O P I N I O N Wheeler, who is still running the agency. THE FLY-BY - 4 Now, the president and his team are NY TIMES CROSSWORD - 5 planning to gut the Endangered SpePOLITICS - 7 EDITORIAL - 8 cies Act — you know, the law that saved COVER STORY “THE ABORTION the bald eagle from extinction. Why? BATTLE LINES” Why do you think? So corporations can BY MAYA SMITH - 10 stop worrying about the silly otters and WE RECOMMEND - 14 brown trout and Mississippi kites and MUSIC - 16 get about the business of pillaging our AFTER DARK - 18 BEST OF MEMPHIS BALLOT - 20 environment for profit. CALENDAR - 22 It’s enough to make a man want to go ARTS - 30 outside and gaze long and deep into the BREWS - 33 night sky, at the clouds, the moon, the FILM - 34 endless throw of stars. C L AS S I F I E D S - 3 6 Bruce VanWyngarden LAST WORD - 39 brucev@memphisflyer.com

CONTINUUMMUSICFESTIVAL.COM

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THE

fly-by

MEMernet A round-up of Memphis on the World Wide Web. R U D D R EVEALS University of Memphis president Dr. David Rudd revealed the new community basketball court planned for Orange Mound on Twitter last week. (Rudd is great on Twitter, BTW.)

Posted to Twitter by @UofMemphisPres. TH E D O CTO R I S I N!

August 15-21, 2019

When Memphians see good barbecue, we tell each other. That’s just what Tumblr user memphispbarbecue did last week when he saw Dr. Bar-B-Que’s food bus parked at Evergreen and Jackson.

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Posted to Tumblr by memphisbarbecue. W AT E R B E D R E D U X Want to see Donald Trump’s 1995 Pizza Hut commercial? What about ads for Crystal Pepsi and New Coke? YouTuber Consumer Time Capsule has it all. Last week, it reminded Memphis of the 1985 Master Bedroom Waterbeds 14th-anniversary sale. “A complete waterbed for $99 — $99 I said! Wow!” Posted to YouTube by Consumer Time Capsule.

{

Questions, Answers + Attitude Edited by Toby Sells

W E E K T H AT W A S By Flyer staff

Fugitive, Tennis, & Abortion Watson escaped and captured, a $19M tennis facility plan, & a reprise of the ‘Heartbeat Bill.’ W AT S O N CAPTURED In a series of weekend tweets, state agencies presented a pulse-pounding, up-to-the-moment look at the final capture of escaped fugitive Curtis Watson. The capture came Sunday after Watson was spotted on a home surveillance camera in Henning. Watson was in his sixth year of a 15-year sentence for aggravated assault when he escaped from the West Tennessee State Penitentiary in Henning last week, according to the Tennessee Department of Corrections (TDOC). West Tennessee Correctional Administrator Debra Johnson was found Clockwise from top left: Watson, proposed tennis facility, Mid-South Coliseum, dead in her residence at Gannett merger, Planned Parenthood news conference on abortion ban bill. the penitentiary shortly before noon on Wednesday. Officials discovered Johnson was missing from his farm-work The new facility will remain open to the public and will detail and suspected he played a role in Johnson’s death. be the new home courts for U of M Tiger tennis teams. A manhunt for Watson ensued but was fruitless. As of Saturday, the Tennessee Bureau of Investigation (TBI) said C A I N N E W C O M PA N Y ( A G A I N ) it had received 369 tips on Watson but no credible sightings. The Commercial Appeal will be part of a new newspaper group The TDOC added $4,500 to a reward for information thanks to a $1.38 billion merger plan announced last week. leading to Watson’s arrest, bringing that reward total too The paper’s current owner, Gannett Co., will merge with $57,000 on Saturday afternoon. GateHouse Media, a company from New Media Investment Early Sunday morning, TDOC posted photos and video Group. The new company will be called Gannett and will be from a residential surveillance camera showing Watson centered at Gannett’s headquarters in McLean, Virginia. in camouflage clothes rummaging through an outdoor The new company will own about one-sixth of all refrigerator. At 11:23 a.m., a TBI tweet showed a photo newspapers in the U.S., if the merger goes through. of a haggard-looking Watson in the back seat of a police car. The tweet read “Captured!” On Sunday afternoon, the ROUNDHOUSE CLEAN-UP TBI tweeted another photo of Watson being walked into a Volunteers worked alongside the Coliseum Coalition to detention facility in Tipton County. clean up the Mid-South Coliseum last week in preparation for events planned for the building this fall. “The TENNIS PLAN SERVED Roundhouse is rounding into shape, y’all!” read a post on A new “world-class tennis facility” for Memphis was the Coalition’s Facebook page on Saturday. announced last week. Leaders with the city, the University of Memphis, and H E A R T B E AT B I L L B A C K ? Tennis Memphis said they will renovate the Leftwich Tennis Last week, Tennessee lawmakers announced new hearings on Center near Audubon Park into what officials call a “statelegislation that would ban abortions at six weeks in the state. of-the-art facility.” Last spring, the Tennessee General Assembly came close to The $19 million project will “dramatically improve” passing the so-called “Heartbeat Bill” last year. Sen. Mark Pody the facility with the construction of 32 new courts — 20 (R-Lebanon) brought the bill back before the Senate Judiciary outdoor and 12 indoor. Officials said the majority of Committee on Monday and Tuesday (see Editorial, p. 8). funding for the project was raised privately, while $3 million Visit the News Blog at memphisflyer.com for fuller versions of is coming from the city and $5 million from the university. these stories and more local news.


For Release Monday, June 18, 2018

The New York Times Syndication Sales Corporation 620 Eighth Avenue, New York, N.Y. 10018 For Information Call: 1-800-972-3550 For Release Saturday, June 30, 2018

Crossword

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Patronize offtrack betting, say Blockbuster 2014 animated film Typing center Heat Repeated collaborator with Bowie Grasslands burrower Supposed source of large footprints The “00” of “.00” V-shaped cut In The Beatles had their last one in 1966 2014 Facebook acquisition Not leave at the end of the line

One of the superstates in “1984” Panegyrizes Instagram rival

look 31 5 Lead-in to “di” DOWN 35 or “da” in a Beatles song 36 9 Fowl raised for 38 food 39 14 Commedia dell’___ 15 Gas, oil or coal 42 16 Port St. ___, 43 Fla. 17 End of a 44 drinking hose 45 19 Rand McNally volume 20 Diving gear 46 21 Get going, 47 as an old motorcycle or a 49 new company 51 23 Spheres, in poetry 52 25 Angsty music genre 26 Rapper with the 57 1996 doubleplatinum album 61 “Hard Core” 1 9

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easeWolfish pain 1

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Easy way to

Doesn’t bother About a third of South America Election Day declaration Tries to detect, as a substance in the body Literally, “of nothing” Part of some shortcuts Its capital is Nuku‘alofa “Dagnabbit!” Bottom of the sea? Single numbers Trash holder “How curious …” Final stage Fan favorite

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Republican 45 politico George 2 ___ station 3 Wallops 46 4 Drug marketed as Retrovir 49 5 Use Instagram, e.g. 6 Thumbnail bio, 50 e.g. 7 Threats to 53 Daniel, in the Book of Daniel 56 8 Slow and 57 dignified 9 Aid in keeping food fresh 59 10 Perfectly matched 61 11 Word with skin or ring TO PREVIOUS PUZZLE 12 Outpost in science fiction U C K D E E P F A T 13 Subjects of S O N I N D I A N A babysitter A R E A D U N I T S negotiations S E A L E E R I E 14 Portrayer of E L D E R S S N Warren Buffett T S A R S C H O W in HBO’s “Too Big to Fail” E A V E A R L T H A N K E D 21 War-torn Mideast city R U E H O S T E L S T N T E T C 24 Setting I S S V R O O M E D 26 Smitten E A R F O O T B A L L 29 Lint collector T O R I C A C T I A L A C K M O O N 30 End of a presidential B L U E S A N N E address 1

Edited by Will Shortz

Handyman’s inits. What sirens do Enero begins it Certain red dye Having a high metallic sound Like some magazine perfume ads Ill-tempered Borden milk’s cow 6-3 or 7-6, e.g. Cy Young Award winner Hershiser Faux ___ Tribal leaders Like non-Rx drugs Female friend of François Party vessel with a ladle “There ___ to be a law!” Loud, as a crowd 1

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Margaret Thatcher’s husband Merrymaking Question pundits discuss after a presidential debate Certain voter ID Intimate practice done at a distance Beverage said to help with weight loss

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“Friday I’m in Love” band, 1992 Warmed-over material It’s perfect Hold tight “Never stop improving” sloganeer ___ Hunt, protagonist in the “Mission: Impossible” films

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1999 Brad Pitt movie hinted at by the beginnings of 17-, 21-, 39and 52-Across Planet demoted to “dwarf planet” in 2006 Woman of the Haus Fishes that may shock you Good ___ (repaired perfectly) Appear (to be) Go bananas 13

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Parts of science courses 2 “Spamalot” creator Idle 3 Caesar’s rebuke to Brutus 4 Nike competitor 5 Birds ___ feather 6 Gains muscle, with “up” ANSWER TO PREVIOUS PUZZLE 7 Blue jeans pioneer Strauss A K I T A S C H A S T E V E R O N A H O E D O W N 8 Trump portrayer Baldwin A R O U N D L O W L I F E S 9 Blood fluid L O N G S F O R M O T E L O U C H F R O S T S I Z E 10 Not just playing for fun N A H B E A K E R S E E R C E M E N T S H O E S 11 The N.C.A.A.’s SATURDAY Bruins F A L S E B O T T O M NOV 23 R E T R A C T I O N S 12 Word repeated 8G PM before “pants O T M E N C K E N E A U on fire” A C E S R A K E D A M I N S E A L E L O Y C L O D S 13 Word repeated C A P I T A L N M O O NyourI vote E for while tapping a We’d appreciate microphone A N O M A LBEST Y PERFORMING O R O I ARTS D E VENUE. Magazine of vote. N O T E L L Go to memphisfl D yer.com E F through C O 8/22 N to18 show business

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briefly

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Payment that many wait in line to make

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Online subscriptions: Today’s puzzle and more than 7,000 past puzzles, nytimes.com/crosswords ($39.95 a year). Read about and comment on each puzzle: nytimes.com/wordplay.

BÉLA FLECK & THE FLECKTONES

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Code breaker Fellow who might be senior class president, for short Rope in a Wild West show Run up, as expenses Peter of “The Maltese Falcon” Uses a rotary phone Bed-andbreakfasts Licorice flavoring Derive by logic Alternatives to Ubers

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Mets’ former ballpark

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Poet whose work inspired “Cats”

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Distribute, as resources

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Carpe ___ (seize the day: Lat.)

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Banned pollutant, in brief

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Cards that may be “wild” in poker

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Lose on purpose Fish tank gunk

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NEWS & OPINION

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Edited by Will Shortz

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“___ Rollin (Tem hit) Addr may on th Pers or th Murd style Hide Cam sang Time Phoe Hawa Recip meas Voca kazo


Bag Ban Blocked {

CITY REPORTER By Maya Smith

Plastic bags can flow freely, thanks to state lawmakers.

August 15-21, 2019

The Memphis City Council voted 6-5 against a plastic bag ban last week, but even if approved, the measure might not have been implemented right away. City officials would not have been able to enforce the ban without state approval, even if the council okayed it, said council attorney Allan Wade. A recently passed state law prohibits local governments from regulating the “use, disposition, or sale of an auxiliary container.” “It may not go anywhere, it may go somewhere, but right now all you can do is advance the ball down the road, get it enacted, and try to get it implemented,” Wade told the council before the vote. “You can’t take a step without taking a step.” Councilman Berlin Boyd, who sponsored the legislation, along with chairman Kemp Conrad, said if the council had voted favorably for the ordinance, it would have “given us the leverage to negotiate on a state level.” “We will not implement anything,” Boyd said before the vote. “We can’t implement anything. We can’t mandate anything because of the state law. The only failures in life are failures of not trying. … This is just an effort for us to try to do something different in the state of Tennessee.”

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Councilman Worth Morgan, who voiced opposition to the ban in a previous council meeting, abstained from the vote last week. He said later that the ban “has merit, but to move forward without a clear legal strategy is a waste of time and resources.” He said the council has “a lot of achievable work to focus on.” Councilwoman Cheyenne Johnson, who voted against the measure, said the ordinance would not have had a direct impact and that it would only be “symbolic of the need for plastic bag reformation. “I began hoping for a gentler, proactive resolution —

Bag ban goes bust?

a resolution that would encourage merchants to accelerate their efforts with providing alternatives to these bags and/or promoting a city-wide plastic bag recycle campaign,” Johnson said. The ban would have prohibited the distribution of single-use plastic checkout bags in retail establishments with 2,000 square feet or more. Each violation of the ordinance would have resulted in a $50 fine. Boyd, who first brought forth the idea of plastic bag regulation in November, said the goal of the ban would be to protect the environment and reduce overall waste, citing plastic-bag-riddled streets, waterways, and trees. Scott Banbury, Tennessee conservation programs coordinator for the Tennessee chapter of the Sierra Club, said the use of single-use plastic bags has “obvious impacts on the environment.” “It’s a problem that really needs to be addressed,” Banbury said. “The whole goal here is to ask people to reuse bags. It doesn’t seem like a huge thing to ask. Just for convenience’s sake, people are willing to cause so much harm to the environment.” Banbury said the state legislation prohibiting a ban on plastic bags is a “matter of local control. Why shouldn’t we be able to address our own problems, and who is Nashville to say we can’t?”

For help, call the Tennessee REDLINE 1-800-889-9789


POLITICS By Jackson Baker

Money Talks The matter of campaign funding could be crucial in several city council races.

Burch, who has run for several previous offices and is a security officer at Memphis International Airport, has raised the only real issue that has surfaced so far, alleging potential or actual conflicts of interest stemming from Fletcher’s association with a TIF project administered by the University of Memphis and involving some possible indirect oversight by a council-funded body. Paul Morris, Fletcher’s treasurer, has responded that the charge is “ridiculous, reckless, false, and defamatory” and that a state law cited by Burch as his authority does not apply to employees of the university. Resource-wise, Warren is a clear

MARC COHN OCT 5 / 7:30p.m.

HOTEL CALIFORNIA

Best known for his iconic hit WALKING IN MEMPHIS. Marc Cohn writes vivid songs evoking: Love – Heartbreak – Hope – Joy – Faith.

SEPT 22 / 4:00p.m. Hotel California takes the stage at BPACC. Savor Eagles songs like LYIN’ EYES – WITCHY WOMAN TAKE IT TO THE LIMIT & more!

GET HAPPY

LOS LOBOS

SALUTE TO THE EAGLES

ANGELA INGERSOLL – SINGS JUDY GARLAND

NOV 9 • 7:30p.m. A powerhouse mix of rock, Tex-Mex, country, R&B, Los Lobos will bring the house down with songs like, LA BAMBA!

SANDI PATTY

ANGELINA BALLERINA

Enjoy one of the most highly acclaimed contemporary Christian singers of our time, for her lovely Christmas-inspired performance.

DEC 14 • 2:30p.m. It’s not about things you receive, but the holiday cheer you share. This heart-warming musical is perfect for everyone’s holiday season!

OCT 18 / 7:30p.m. A star is born as Emmy nominee Angela Ingersoll celebrates Judy Garland, delivering a dazzling virtuoso performance with her tremendous voice!

DEC 11 • 7:30p.m.

A VERY MERRY HOLIDAY MUSICAL

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m e m p h i s f l y e r. c o m

John Marek

leader, with $142,000 on hand as of his second-quarter financial report. Fletcher comes in at $42,000, and Burch and Franklin are not even blips on the screen as of yet. The aforementioned SugarmonCarlisle race for Position 1 is equally lopsided. Carlisle’s second-quarter report shows him with $129,000 on hand, while Sugarmon has $820. She has the asset of name recognition, though. Her late father, Russell Sugarmon, was a distinguished lawyer and civil rights pioneer who later served as a General Sessions Court judge. Developer Carlisle’s father, the late builder Gene Carlisle, is a wellknown name, too, for that matter. District 5 is the site of another bona fide one-on-one. The incumbent, Worth Morgan, a sales executive with a social pedigree and significant business support, has a campaign balance on hand of $117,000, according to his second-quarter report. Though Morgan did not shy away from public campaigning in scheduled forums and the like during his 2015 race, he was assisted mightily by a well-funded advertising campaign, and a recent Facebook post has alerted supporters that his latest yard signs and ads for this year’s campaign are plentiful and ready to go. The assets, financial and otherwise, of Morgan’s opponent, lawyer John Marek, are at this point something of an unknown quantity. Marek has ample political experience as a cadre in numerous Democratic campaigns and managed one of 9th District Congressman Steve Cohen’s re-election campaigns. And he is a cannabis entrepreneur, with a stake in a potentially profitable Colorado farm. Up until now, Marek has been devoting considerable time to the Colorado matter and has done little campaigning. But he arrived Sunday as a visitor to the headquarters opening of candidate Warren with news that he is ready to be a full-time campaigner in his second try for the District 5 seat. Marek has abundant panache but has only just begun to raise money. He has made clear that criminal justice reform is a major concern.

NEWS & OPINION

JACKSON BAKER

To begin with a correction: In the Politics column for Thursday, August 1st, it was stated that Erika Sugarmon was a candidate for the SuperDistrict 9, Position 3 seat. That was an unfortunate typo. Sugarmon and Chase Carlisle are paired in one of the few one-on-one contests on the council ballot. And they are contending for the Super-District 9, Position 1 (one) seat. The actual contest for the SuperDistrict 9, Position 3 seat involves four candidates — Jeff Warren, Cody Fletcher, Charley Burch, and Tyrone Romeo Franklin. Most observers see that race to be one between Warren, a physician and former Memphis School Board member, and Fletcher, a development specialist at the University of Mississippi who is making his first political run.

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E D ITO R IAL

From Bad to Worse One of the standard ways in which the Tennessee legislature can dispose of troublesome legislation — the kind that has an active constituency that needs propitiation but is booby-trapped with unwanted controversy — is to send it to “summer study.” In most cases, that amounts to putting the inconvenient measure into a kind of limbo, from which it normally doesn’t return. Such is not the case, however, with House Bill 77/Senate Bill 1236, the so-called “fetal heartbeat” bill that was introduced in the 2019 legislative session, passed the House, and was seemingly on the verge of passage in the Senate as well when, at the apparent instigation of Senate Speaker Randy McNally, it was deferred from final consideration by the Senate Judiciary Committee and routed to summer study. McNally, it should be noted, is not, in the lexicon of our times, a “pro-choice” legislator, opposed to curbs on legal abortion out of some fealty to the U.S. Supreme Court’s 1973 Roe v. Wade decision or as an advocate that women should have control of their bodies. McNally’s objections to the fetal heartbeat bill hinged on his doubts that the bill could withstand constitutional tests in court while meanwhile running up ruinous legal bills for the state of Tennessee. The bill, versions of which were passed last spring in other states, would prohibit abortion once evidence of a fetal heartbeat could be detected medically. McNally, a professed foe of abortion, lent his authority instead to a “trigger” bill — one that would automatically ban abortions in Tennessee if and when the U.S. Supreme Court should reverse Roe v. Wade, which, at present, guarantees the right of legal abortion nationwide. That bill passed both houses and was signed into law by Governor Bill Lee. Meanwhile, this week, the fetal

heartbeat bill came up for its reckoning before the Senate Judiciary summer study session in Nashville and, as a capacity audience looked on, turned out to be not only live and kicking but metamorphosed into a more direct threat to constitutional precedent than had the original version that was shelved last spring. An amended version of the bill, sponsored by Senator Mark Pody (R-Lebanon), would go the “fetal heartbeat” route one better, proclaiming abortion illegal as soon as a woman knows she is pregnant. In the recast bill, the fact of pregnancy itself, not any determination of fetal functioning, would prohibit abortion. Based apparently on some obscure interpretation of “common law” rights purportedly granted by the 9th Amendment to the U.S. Constitution, the backers of the amended bill are basically calling for an out-and-out ban on abortion. Senator Katrina Robinson (D-Memphis), a Judiciary Committee member, called the amended bill “idiotic” and “completely unconstitutional,” but the Republican committee majority is likely to have its way and to resurrect the already flawed bill in its newly perverse and aggressive form for reconsideration in the legislative session of 2020. McNally has said he is opposed to the new version, and that’s a hopeful sign. But if there’s anything experience has taught us about the Tennessee legislature, it is that good sense and proper caution are not guaranteed among its members. Quite simply, this new version of an already bad bill deserves an early-term abortion.

August 15-21, 2019

C O M M E N TA R Y b y G r e g C r a v e n s

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Thank you, Memphis!


PRESENTED BY:

SAT

AUG 24 • 6-9PM •

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NEWS & OPINION

BENEFITS:

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COVER STORY BY MAYA SMITH PHOTOS BY JUSTIN FOX BURKS

ABORTION BATTLE LINES WITH NEW RESTRICTIVE LEGISLATION ON THE HORIZON, LOCAL PRO-CHOICE AND ANTI-ABORTION ADVOCATES RAMP UP THE FIGHT.

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August 15-21, 2019

f abortion had not been an option for former addict Ashley Howell when she unexpectedly got pregnant two years ago, she might have relapsed. She wasn’t in a good place and was not ready to have a child. Her dad had recently passed away due to complications with alcoholism, she was in her last semester of college at the University of Memphis, and she was three years sober from alcohol, heroin, and meth. Tennessee lawmakers are now pushing legislation that would have hindered Howell’s chances of getting a safe and legal abortion. The Senate Judiciary Committee wrapped up hearings on that legislation, Tuesday, as the Flyer went to press. Legislators are seeking to ban abortion at the point a woman knows she is pregnant — essentially to completely ban abortions in the state. The proposed legislation is an amended version of the so-called “heartbeat bill,” which nearly passed in the spring but stalled in the Senate. The Tennessee General Assembly did, however, pass an abortion trigger ban bill, which means if Roe v. Wade is 10 overturned, abortion would be banned in the state.

Ashley Howell (above) speaks about her experiences with pregnancy, abortion, and advocacy. At the time of her first pregnancy, it felt like a “me-or-the-baby question,” she says.

Me or the Baby? If the heartbeat bill, also known as the six-week ban, had been in place two years ago, it would have been impossible for 30-year-old Howell to terminate her pregnancy when she did — at 12 weeks. When Howell found out she was pregnant, despite being on birth control, she had been dating her now-husband for three months. Howell was sure that “he was the one” and that she wanted to marry him and have a family with him. But not then; she wasn’t ready. “I wasn’t in a place to have a child then. I found out I was [pregnant] and freaked out.” During her three months of pregnancy, Howell says she thought about using drugs every day. The urge had not been that relentless in her three years of sobriety until then. She and her then-boyfriend did eventually want to have a planned pregnancy. Because of Howell’s mental health and struggles with addiction, she wanted to get pregnant under medical supervision. As she considered abortion, Howell felt like it was a “me-or-the-baby question,” and she chose herself — and to focus on her own health first. “Evidently it was the right thing because I have no regrets,” she says. “Now I’m able to help other women

who go through the same thing. That’s the beauty in it all.” Howell says she often meets with women she’s met through recovery programs who are in similar positions as she was to offer advice and support. But she wasn’t always comfortable talking about her abortion. “I talk about my alcoholism all the time, and I’m very open with it,” Howell says. “But for some reason, I was ashamed of this.” Then she heard about Patients to Advocates, a year-long program that brings together women who’ve had abortions. Meeting once a month for a year, the women learn about women’s rights, social justice, and how to become advocates for abortion rights to legislators. Through the program, Howell learned she “still had a lot of judgment toward myself.” Ultimately, she says, the program was vital to her healing. Looking back, Howell says she’s convinced that if she would have had the baby two years ago, she would have relapsed. “If I use, I die. My addiction was very, very dark. I can’t imagine being in a place where I didn’t have the choice to choose abortion.” Howell says a place where the government would force a woman to do something she can’t or doesn’t want to “doesn’t feel like a free

country. The right to choose what I do with my body just feels fundamental. It’s not a wild thing. In other countries it’s not up for debate. So why is it in the South?” Preparing for the Fight Katy Leopard, assistant director of CHOICES: Memphis Center for Reproductive Health, says it’s a hard time to be a woman and have a daughter in the South. It’s also a hard time to be an abortion provider, she says. “Being an abortion provider, every time the legislators are in session, my anxiety goes up,” Leopard says. “Everyone on the anti-choice side is emboldened and empowered. [President Donald] Trump’s rhetoric and the makeup of the Supreme Court make them feel powerful, so they are definitely willing to do a lot more than they were.” Leopard says she never thought she would have to consider the possibility of Roe v. Wade being overturned, but that now she’s “very worried about it. We all should be.” But Leopard says CHOICES is preparing for whatever challenges lie ahead. CHOICES, which was founded in 1974 as the first abortion provider in the city after the Roe v. Wade decision, is now one of nine nonprofits left in the country that


perform abortions. The framework for CHOICES that’s been used since its formation, Leopard says, is “if you give people information — scientifically based, factual information, that they will make the choices that are best for them, and all you have to do is support them.” Over the last 10 to 15 years, Leopard says the organization began looking at other reproductive health-care needs not being met in the community. In addition to providing abortion care, the center now offers pre-natal care, fertility and birthing services, and wellness care to the transgender community and those living with HIV. “There are issues around birth that people deserve choices for, too, and we should be able to do that,” Leopard says. “Today we do everything from fertility to birth and everything in between. If it has to do with your sexual, reproductive organs, we do it.” In an effort to provide this more holistic approach, Leopard says CHOICES is opening a new, larger clinic in 2020. This means the services provided at the two current clinics on Bellevue and on Poplar will be offered under one roof. This will make CHOICES one of three centers in the country to provide abortions and birth in the same location and the first nonprofit in the country to do so. “For us, it didn’t make sense to only

be an abortion provider,” Leopard says. “It’s an unsafe thing to be, and it was a strategy of the anti-choice movement to carve abortion out and make it this weird thing that’s done in a house somewhere. It re-stigmatizes and supports the stereotype that abortion is some kind of odd, bad procedure. But it’s a part of women’s reproductive health care, and it belongs with all these other things that are about reproductive health.” The new space will also allow CHOICES to see more patients, Leopard says. “We can’t see all the patients who would like to come see us in a timely manner because capacity is maxed out.” The new model makes sense for patients, but it also makes sense legally, Leopard says. If legislation passes that places greater restrictions on or bans abortions here, the new all-encompassing model will allow CHOICES to remain open and perform its other services while it challenges the ban in court. “If you want to be around to fight the fight, then you prepare,” she says. And CHOICES is preparing by building a comprehensive center. “We can’t do abortions? Fine. We’ll do all the other things while we take you to court.” CHOICES is already challenging one law that puts a barrier between women and abortions — the 48-hour waiting period. The law requires women to have a physician visit 48 hours before she can

receive an abortion. The law’s supporters say it’s meant to reduce coerced abortions and to allow time for women to carefully consider the information presented by the physician. Leopard calls it a “crazy barrier.” Ashley Coffield, CEO of Planned Parenthood Tennessee and North Mississippi (PPTNM), agrees, saying that Tennessee is one of the worst states in the country in terms of barriers. She cites the 48-hour rule as a major contributor to this, calling it one of the “most onerous restrictions we have,” and noting that it places an extra burden on patients, particularly on low-income women. “You have to take additional time off work, maybe another day of childcare; you have to travel to the health center twice,” Coffield says. “It’s just a lot, and it’s medically unnecessary.” Along with CHOICES, Planned Parenthood of the Greater Memphis Region and of East and Middle Tennessee, as well as the Knoxville Center for Reproductive Health and Adams & Boyle, P.C. are plaintiffs in the lawsuit against Tennessee Attorney General Herbert Slatery and other state officials. The lawsuit, which argues that the waiting period “imposes significant burdens and offers no health benefits to abortion patients,” is set to go to court next month. “Last Support System” Two girls wearing yellow traffic vests

stand on the sidewalk in front of Planned Parenthood’s main office on Poplar. They offer purple goodie bags to those approaching the clinic’s entrance. Inside the bags are a box of Mike and Ike candy, a bottle of nail polish, a journal, and a brochure with “Women’s Care Network” written on the front. On the back of the brochure is a list titled “helpful resources,” including Christ Community Health Clinic, Birthright Memphis, and the Abortion Pill Reversal Hotline. “We’re just here to support women,” one of the girls says, smiling and waving at those coming and going from the building. The girls are just two of 25 volunteers with the Memphis Coalition for Life who participate in sidewalk advocacy aimed to steer women away from abortion. The coalition was formed in 2018 with the mission of ending abortion in Memphis “peacefully and prayerfully.” Jessica Wade, founder and executive director of the organization, says the group aims to do that by connecting pregnant women with the resources they need to help them carry their pregnancies to term. “We don’t picket, protest, or yell at women,” Wade says. “We’re just there to be that last support system and listening ear for them as they are about to make that decision. If they choose to take us up on that support, then we walk with them. If continued on page 12

COVER STORY m e m p h i s f l y e r. c o m

Kent Pruett (beside-left) and Eliza Sims (b-right) protest; Ashley Coffield (above) is CEO of Planned Parenthood Tennessee and North Mississippi.

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they choose not to, then we’re there. We’re still kind to them.” Wade says she started the coalition because many women don’t realize the number of resources that are available to help with unplanned pregnancies. “They feel like that’s the only option, so we’re just there to offer them another option. If we really respect a woman’s right to choose, we’d want her to have all her options. I’m willing to sacrifice my nights and weekends so these women have the support that they need.” Some of the support resources the coalition connects women with are prenatal care, parenting classes, adoption services, and post-abortion counseling. “Most of the women that we talk to who are considering abortion aren’t doing it because they hate babies and love abortion,” Wade says. “They’re doing it because they can’t pay their rent or their doctor bills and have a baby at the same time. But they don’t have to choose between a career and having a baby or going to school and having a baby. They can do both.” Wade admits that the group’s mission of ending abortion in Memphis is a “lofty goal,” but she believes it’s possible. “If women felt like they had support … I don’t think nearly as many women would choose abortion if they knew there was help for them. I think even pro-choice advocates would say that if women had really strong support systems, they don’t necessarily need an abortion.” If abortion does become illegal in Tennessee, Wade says it’s important that women are offered resources to support their pregnancies. “We’re not just telling her ‘Don’t have an abortion’ and leaving her in a crisis,” Wade says. “We want to empower women to choose life. I believe abortion is wrong and immoral, but I know that an unplanned pregnancy is scary and women need help. Abortion needs to end, but women need to be supported.” State of Emergency Coffield of PPTNM says Tennessee could be dangerously close to passing total-ban legislation next session that would make it nearly impossible for women to get abortions here. Abortion is currently legal in Tennessee up to the point of viability, which the Constitution cites at 24 weeks. Coffield says the new legislation being heavily pushed by Senator Mark Pody (R-Lebanon) is a total abortion ban. It aims to redefine viability to the moment of conception, she says, and this type of legislation interferes with women’s personal and private decisions. “We have a Supreme Court that puts Roe v. Wade at risk, and we have a state that is doing everything it can to eliminate the right and challenge women,” she says. “Politicians in Tennessee are out of touch with what people in Tennessee actually want them to be focusing on.” Coffield says a total abortion ban is

unconstitutional. “It’s an extreme and draconian measure. It’s being introduced by a group of privileged radicals that want nothing more than to hurt the health and well-being of women in Tennessee.” She also says the ban is “dangerous,” and it “threatens the lives of pregnant women.” When abortion is not an option, she says women and babies suffer. “Physicians know that protecting women and children’s health requires giving them the option to terminate a pregnancy,” Coffield says. “Pregnancy is a medical diagnosis, and they should have all their options to decide if they want to continue with that or not.” States with more abortion restrictions, tend to have poorer health outcomes for women and children, as well as a higher rate of infant and maternal mortality, Coffield notes. A total ban would predominantly affect women who already experience disadvantages in health care, she says. These include young women, women of color, women with disabilities, undocumented women, as well as women living in low-income and rural areas. “A total ban would put their lives in jeopardy,” she says. “And the state’s health and racial disparities are exacerbated by policies like this — ones that make it difficult or impossible to access a full range of reproductive services.” Women of means can afford time off work and travel to other states to get an abortion, Coffield says. They also typically have better health care, which means they will know they are pregnant earlier and in time to legally terminate their pregnancy. “If passed in Tennessee, the six-week abortion ban will be challenged in court,” Coffield said. “Just like every other state that’s passed similar laws, we would be setting Tennessee up for an expensive lawsuit that wastes hundreds of thousands of dollars in taxpayer money.” Coffield says in other states that have passed six-week bans, including Kentucky, Mississippi, Iowa, North Dakota, and Ohio, the court has “easily blocked these bans,” on the basis that it is unconstitutional for states to prohibit a woman from choosing abortion before viability. Still, she says “this is a state of emergency. In the 40-plus years since Roe v. Wade, there’s never been a more precarious time for women’s health. Abortion rights give women control over their bodies and their lives and without that, we’ll never be free or equal.” Two Years After … Two years after Ashley Howell decided to have an abortion, she’s expecting again and intends to carry her baby to term this time. She says she’s fully equipped, stable, and further along in her sobriety. She and her husband are ready now. “It’s something I want, and it’s something I planned for,” Howell says. “I have a different perspective entirely. It’s such a lie that women who have abortions hate children.”


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8/7/19 2:19 PM


steppin’ out

We Recommend: Culture, News + Reviews By Julia Baker

Elvis Presley’s former residence, Graceland, has always been a popular destination for fans of the King. “Even before his death, Elvis fans would always flock to Memphis hoping for a chance to see him leaving the Graceland mansion or to see him driving around on Elvis Presley Boulevard,” says Christian Ross, Graceland’s PR specialist. “The year after he passed in August of 1977, his fans continued to line up outside of his mansion, but this time, it was to honor his memory.” Fans gathered around the mansion, holding candles and leaving floral arrangements, cards, and other tokens of appreciation, to pay their respects to the dearly departed. Since this initial (and unofficial) ceremony more than 40 years ago, fans have continued to rally annually to celebrate his life. The Candlelight Vigil, which is now an official commemoration and which has become a time-honored tradition, attracts thousands of fans from all over the world who exhibit a strong sense of comradery. “It’s heartwarming to see all of the relationships and friendships that have been built because of a shared love for Elvis and his music,” Ross says. “It’s also been an opportunity for families to bond and create new memories for children who might not have otherwise been exposed to Elvis. It keeps his memory and his legacy alive for these new generations.” Anyone interested in joining the commemoration is encouraged to arrive early to allow for road blockages and traffic. Anyone who is not able to make it may access a live stream of the vigil by visiting graceland.com. CANDLELIGHT VIGIL, GRACELAND MANSION, 3764 ELVIS PRESLEY BLVD., THURSDAY, AUGUST 15TH, 8:30 P.M., FREE.

August 15-21, 2019

Sip on sight — Hutton & Smith Brewing Company’s German-style beer Brews, p. 33

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THURSDAY August 15

FRIDAY August 16

Full Moon Kayaking River Garden at Mississippi River Park, 7:30-9:30 p.m. Are you ready to howl at the moon? Free kayaks (provided by The Fourth Bluff ) available on a first-come, first-served basis for this event celebrating the Grain Moon. DJ Ben Murray spins the tunes as attendees float the Wolf River Harbor. Alternatively, bring your own boat or watch from the bank.

Elvis Week Hound Dog Tours: Elvis Presley’s Memphis Backbeat Tours, 197 Beale, 1 p.m., $15-$30 This sightseeing tour takes you to Humes High School, the Overton Park Shell, Sun Studio, the Memphian Theater, Chisca Hotel, the Audubon Drive house, and more. Add an optional guided tour inside the Presley apartment at Lauderdale Courts, where a teenage Elvis lived.

Jelly’s Last Jam Hattiloo Theatre, 7:30 p.m., $30-$35 George C. Wolfe’s Tony and Drama Desk Award-winning play tells the story of jazz pioneer Jelly Roll Morton. Runs through September 1st.

Bobby Rush Album Release Party Blues Hall of Fame Museum, 421 S. Main, 5:30 p.m. Party (free to attend) celebrating the release of Sitting on Top of the Blues, featuring light hors d’oeuvres, meet and greet, and performance.

Frida Kahlo and Mexican modernism at the Frist Art Museum in Nashville Arts, p. 30

The Science of Wine Pink Palace, 3050 Central, 6-9:30 p.m., $65 Botrytis. Brettanomyces. Tannins. I dunno, I just looked up a glossary of wine terms. Taste wines, talk to wine experts, sample wine and food pairings, and more. Cheers! 1969 50th Anniversary Concert Elvis Returns to Vegas Graceland, 7-11 p.m., $50-$120 Anniversary celebration featuring Elvis live in concert on the big screen and performances by Elvis’ TCB Band — James Burton, Ronnie Tutt, and Glen Hardin — along with original members of The Imperials, Terry Blackwood, Armond Morales, and Jim Murray.

Elvis Week at Overton Square Overton Square, 7-10 p.m. Starting at 7 p.m., “Elvis” will be in Chimes Square singing and taking pictures with fans. At 8 p.m., enjoy free popcorn and a showing of the 1958 film King Creole. Sandlot Night featuring “Squints” AutoZone Park, 7:05-10:05 p.m., starting at $17, $60-$65 includes club level seating, meet and greet, T-shirt, and Home Plate buffet Celebrate The Sandlot with the film’s own Squints (Chauncey Leopardi). Meet and greet will be held from 7 to 8:30 p.m., with the movie playing on the stadium’s videoboard after the game.

ELVIS PRESLEY ENTERPRISES

Always on My Mind

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Strings and things

Across the Continuum Jenny Davis, project coordinator for Crosstown Arts and originator of Continuum Music Festival, hopes to bring together artists who come from different creative worlds. “The mission of Continuum is essentially as the name of the festival suggests,” says Davis. “We’re trying to present music that’s kind of across the continuum of musical genres — artists and groups ranging in genres like classical, jazz, and opera.” One of the performing acts, Blueshift Ensemble, for which Davis is director and a flutist, has a unique collaboration in store. The classical chamber group will perform scores written by ICEBERG New Music, a group of composers from New York who are dedicated to widening the possibilities of music. “This year, we’re also bringing in Cities Aviv, a local rapper who is going to be singing and taking the role of MC during our compositions,” Davis says. Other performances within Crosstown Concourse’s numerous venues, like the Green Room and Crosstown Theater, include “As One,” a chamber opera created by Laura Kaminsky, Mark Campbell, and Kimberly Reed (presented by Opera Memphis); Project Logic with MonoNeon, Vernon Reid, and Daru Jones; and Duet for Theremin and Lap Steel. Ultimately, Davis says, “I hope there’s something for everyone — something that they might be familiar with or want to come and check out. And while they’re there, they might hear these other groups they’re not familiar with.” To see the full lineup and get tickets, visit crosstownarts.org. CONTINUUM MUSIC FESTIVAL, CROSSTOWN CONCOURSE, 1350 CONCOURSE AVE., FRIDAY, AUGUST 16TH, AND SATURDAY, AUGUST 17TH, $30 PER DAY OR $55 FOR A WEEKEND PASS.

SATURDAY August 17 Alice Marie Johnson with After Life: My Journey from Incarceration to Freedom Novel, 387 Perkins Ext., 1 p.m. Author discusses her memoir, a story about spending more than 20 years in prison before having her life sentence for non-violent drug trafficking commuted. The Goonies Pink Palace CTI Giant Theater, 4 p.m., $8-$10 Heeey, you guyyys! Truffle shuffle your way to the Pink Palace and relive your favorite treasure hunt in search of One-Eyed Willy’s bountiful booty. Playing Saturdays and Sundays in August.

SUNDAY August 18 Dog Show Loflin Yard, 7 W. Carolina, 4-7 p.m. All-ages event for humans and pups alike features ugly dog contest, dog talent show, costume contest, puppy olympics, dog karaoke, photo booth, and a showcase of adoptable dogs. Awww!

Breakaway Bardog 5K & Monroe Avenue Festival Bardog Tavern, 73 Monroe, 9 a.m.-7 p.m., $20-$100 Event features finisher medals for all participants, Grandma’s Meatball Eating Contest, and a craft beer tent. Proceeds benefit St. Jude.

Soul Train Dance Off Midtown Crossing Grill, 394 N. Watkins, 9-11:30 p.m., $5 Time to dust off your bell bottoms and boogie shoes and break out your best dance moves. Shimmy your way into the dance contest as DJ Wheeler spins the tunes. Proceeds benefit the Mid-South Peace and Justice Center.

The Marvelous Women of Elmwood Cemetery Elmwood Cemetery, 824 S. Dudley, 3-4:15 p.m., $20 A civil rights activist, a beauty queen, suffragists, an explorer: The women buried at Elmwood lived incredibly diverse lives. This indoor, seated presentation by executive director Kim Bearden explores those lives. Wine and snacks included.

m e m p h i s f l y e r. c o m

Are you afraid of the dark? Michael Garza (left) and Zoe Margarett Coletti star in Scary Stories to Tell in the Dark. Film, p. 34

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here’s only one band in Memphis, and everyone is in it. The truth in that old pearl was underlined by last Saturday’s tribute to Dr. John’s Gris-Gris, a party that ended at Cooper-Young’s Bar DKDC — after the musicians took the revels to the street. The performers included members of Marcella & Her Lovers, the Sheiks, and, yes, Memphis’ new alternative gothrock band, 1000 Lights. The historically amorphous lineups of Memphis bands is of note because 1000 Lights is something of a Bluff City supergroup itself. The band will release its debut album, 3NC EP, on Forbidden Place Records this Friday, August 16th, at B-Side. The lineup includes Jesse James Davis (Yesse Yavis, Model Zero) on vocals, Joey Killingsworth (Jocephus & the George Jonestown Massacre, Super Witch) on guitar, Flyer film editor Chris McCoy (Super Witch, Pisshorse) on bass, and drum10:14 AM mer Russ Thompson (The Margins, Static Bombs, Pisshorse). “I just love Russ. There’s a lot of good drummers in town, and I think he’s the best rock drummer in town,” says McCoy of his longtime bandmate. The two go way back. Back in their days in Pisshorse, they used to share bills with the Oblivians and the Grifters. “We were one of the first bands to play Black Lodge,” McCoy adds. Pisshorse played a “secret set” of Black Sabbath covers at Black Lodge’s Halloween “Hell on Earth” party, which got the band invited back. They decided to cover The Stooges’ Fun House. Unfortunately, they never got to play that night. “The cops came when people started setting off smoke bombs,” McCoy says. “So we never got to play. And I was always bitter about that.” So when a recently broken-up Super Witch was invited to play Black Lodge’s Halloween celebration, McCoy saw his opportunity to play Fun House. Of course, McCoy and Thompson would make up the rhythm section, because “there’s something about a rhythm section that’s been together for a really long time,” McCoy says. “You get a telepathic relationship.” To handle guitar duties, McCoy and Thompson tapped Killingsworth from Super Witch. All that remained? “We needed someone who could be Iggy,” he says.

The then-trio wanted arguably one of the best front-persons in Memphis. “I met Jesse James Davis at that Bowie [tribute] show,” McCoy explains, further adding to the mosaic of musical influences that helped inform 1000 Lights. Memphis songwriter Graham Winchester put on a David Bowie tribute concert in 2016 to benefit St. Jude Children’s Research Hospital, and McCoy and Davis both performed. “Everybody was good that night, but Jesse just blew me away.” Who better to be the band’s Iggy than someone who had already played Bowie? They planned to play the Halloween show and, if everyone felt good about it, pursue the band as a full-time project. “We walked off stage at that Black Lodge show,” McCoy says, “and Jesse turned to me and said, ‘Let’s do it!’”

1000 Lights: (l to r) McCoy, Thompson, Davis, and Killingsworth

“The name 1000 Lights comes from a line in ‘Down on the Street,’ the Stooges song,” McCoy says. So the band set about crafting its sound, influenced by their roots but branching out to cultivate music based on their varied tastes. Killingsworth “wanted to do something really gothy,” McCoy says. “He’s really into Bauhaus and he loves Nick Cave & the Bad Seeds.” There is a darkness and a sense of drama to 3NC EP, recorded at Move the Air Audio, but there are also shades of punk, post-punk, and early alternative music. The first two tracks, “Shark Tooth” and “Exile Your Life,” open the album with a grit-your-teeth, Stooges-like momentum, but as the record plays, the band lets the songs spool out a little longer. “Isolation Line” has an opening rhythm that recalls Joy Division’s “The Sound of Music.” The multifaceted structure of the songs speaks to the collaborative nature of the project — and the songwriting chops on display. Memphis’ newest supergroup, 1000 Lights, burns brightly. 1000 Lights record release with Alyssa Moore and Glorious Abhor is Friday, August 16th, at B-Side, 9 p.m.


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After Dark: Live Music Schedule August 15 - 21 Alfred’s 197 BEALE 525-3711

Gary Hardy & Memphis 2 Thursdays-Saturdays, 6-9 p.m.; Karaoke Thursdays, TuesdaysWednesdays, 9 p.m.-1 a.m. and Sundays-Mondays, 10 p.m.-2 a.m.; Mandi Thomas Fridays, Saturdays, 6-9 p.m.; The 901 Heavy Hitters Fridays, Saturdays, 10 p.m.-2 a.m.; Flyin’ Ryan Fridays, Saturdays, 2:30 a.m.; Memphis Jazz Orchestra Sundays, 6-9 p.m.

B.B. King’s Blues Club 143 BEALE 524-KING

The King Beez Thursdays, 5 p.m.; B.B. King’s All Stars Tuesdays, Thursdays, 8 p.m. and Fridays, Saturdays, 9 p.m.; Lisa G

and Flic’s Pic’s Band Saturdays, Sundays, 12:30 p.m.

Wednesdays, 7 p.m.

Blue Note Bar & Grill

200 BEALE 527-2687

341-345 BEALE 577-1089

Queen Ann and the Memphis Blues Masters Fridays, Saturdays, 8 p.m.-midnight.

Blues City Cafe 138 BEALE 526-3637

Handy Bar The Amazing Rhythmatics Tuesdays, Thursdays-Sundays, 7 p.m.-1 a.m.

Hard Rock Cafe 126 BEALE 529-0007

Sean Apple Thursdays, 4-7:30 p.m.; Ghost Town Blues Band Thursday, Aug. 15, 8 p.m.midnight; Robert Washington Friday, Aug. 16, 5-9 p.m.; Blind Mississippi Morris Fridays, Saturdays, 5-9 p.m.; John Paul Keith Aug. 16-17, 9:30 p.m.-1:30 a.m.; Earl “The Pearl” Banks Tuesdays, 7 p.m. and Saturdays, 12:30-4:30 p.m.; Brandon Cunning Band Sundays, 5-9 p.m.; FreeWorld Sundays, 9:30 p.m.1:30 a.m.; Brad Birkedahl Band

Memphis Music Monday Third Monday of every month, 6-9 p.m.

Itta Bena 145 BEALE 578-3031

Nat “King” Kerr Fridays, Saturdays, 9-10 p.m.

King Jerry Lawler’s Hall of Fame Bar & Grille 159 BEALE

Lunch on Beale with Chris Gales Wednesdays-Sundays, 12-4 p.m.; Eric Hughes solo/ acoustic Thursdays, 5-8 p.m.;

Karaoke Mondays-Thursdays, Sundays, 8 p.m.; Live Bands Fridays, Saturdays, 8 p.m.

King’s Palace Cafe 162 BEALE 521-1851

David Bowen Thursdays, 5:309:30 p.m., Fridays, Saturdays, 6:30-10:30 p.m., and Sundays, 5:30-9:30 p.m.; Eric Hughes Band Saturday, Aug. 17.

King’s Palace Cafe Patio 162 BEALE 521-1851

Sonny Mack Mondays-Fridays, 2-6 p.m.; Cowboy Neil Mondays, Tuesdays, Thursdays, 7 p.m.midnight and Saturdays, Sundays, 2-6 p.m.; Fuzzy Wednesdays, Fridays, 7 p.m.-midnight; Baunie and Soul Sundays, 7 p.m.-midnight.

Big Don Valentine’s Three Piece Chicken and a Biscuit Blues Band Thursdays, Tuesdays, 8 p.m.-midnight; Ronnie Friday, Aug. 16, 9 p.m.-1 a.m.

night; Ryan Snyder Aug. 16-17, 9 p.m.-1 a.m.; Vince Johnson and the Plantation Allstars Wednesdays, 8 p.m.-midnight and Saturdays, 4:30-8:30 p.m.; Cowboy Neil Band Sundays, 8 p.m.-midnight; Delta Project Tuesdays, 8 p.m.-midnight.

Rum Boogie Cafe

Silky O’Sullivan’s

King’s Palace Cafe Tap Room 168 BEALE 576-2220

182 BEALE 528-0150

Eric Hughes Band Wednesdays, Thursdays, 7-11 p.m.; Pam and Terry Fridays, Saturdays, 5:308:30 p.m.; FreeWorld; Memphis Blues Masters Sundays, 7-11 p.m.; Vince Johnson and the Plantation Allstars Mondays, Tuesdays, 7-11 p.m.

Rum Boogie Cafe Blues Hall 182 BEALE 528-0150

Memphis Blues Masters Mondays, Thursdays, 8 p.m.-mid-

183 BEALE 522-9596

Dueling Pianos Thursdays, Wednesdays, 9 p.m.-1 a.m., Fridays, Saturdays, 9 p.m.-3 a.m., and Sundays, Tuesdays, 8 p.m.midnight.

Dirty Crow Inn 855 KENTUCKY

Mallory Everett Friday, Aug. 16, 9 p.m.; Chris Johnson Saturday,

TCB with Too Tall Todd! Let him sell your house.

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Four-time Grammy nominated comedian brings the Secrets and Pies Tour to FedExForum. Tickets available!

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After Dark: Live Music Schedule August 15 - 21 Aug. 17, 4-7 p.m.; Blackwater Trio Saturday, Aug. 17, 8-11 p.m.; The Accessories Sundays.

Hu Hotel 79 MADISON 333-1200

Ladies’ Love Day Parties: SheDJs Takeover Saturday, Aug. 17, 3-8 p.m.

p.m.; Karaoke Wednesdays, 8 p.m.

Crosstown Arts at The Concourse 1350 CONCOURSE, SUITE 280 507-8030

Continuum Music Festival Aug. 16-17.

Huey’s Downtown 77 S. SECOND 527-2700

John Paul Keith Sunday, Aug. 18, 8:30 p.m.-midnight.

The Peabody

Mountain Wednesday, Aug. 21, 8 p.m.

Hi Tone 412-414 N. CLEVELAND 278-TONE

Saints & Sinners, Fugitive Droids, Walking On Landmines Thursday, Aug. 15, 9 p.m.; Fister, Sea of Bones, Ritual Vessel Friday, Aug. 16, 8 p.m.; SOURCE, Lightstory, Knoll Saturday, Aug. 17, 8 p.m.; Pro Wrestling Trainwreck Saturday, Aug. 17, 10 p.m.; Day Kisser, Andrew Goldring,

18, 8:30 p.m.; A Very Special Evening with Jason Ringenberg Sunday, Aug. 18, 8:30 p.m.; Madison Line Mondays Mondays, 6 p.m.; Royal Blues Band Tuesday, Aug. 20, 7 p.m.; Breeze Cayolle & New Orleans Wednesdays, 5:30 p.m.; Lucky 7 Brass Band Wednesday, Aug. 21, 8 p.m.

Midtown Crossing Grill 394 N. WATKINS 443-0502

Natalie James and the Professor Saturdays, Sundays, 11 a.m.-3 p.m.; Open Songwriter Showcase Tuesdays, 6:30-9:30 p.m.

East Memphis Buckman Arts Center at St. Mary’s School 60 N. PERKINS EXT. 537-1483

Memphis Made: Center Stage Presents Star & Micey Friday, Aug. 16, 8 p.m.

149 UNION 529-4000

Rooftop Party with Burning Las Vegas Thursday, Aug. 15, 6-10 p.m.

South Memphis Stax Museum of American Soul Music 926 E. MCLEMORE 946-2535

BiSoultennial Top Ten Memphis Soul Songs Announcement Party Thursday, Aug. 15, 7-9 p.m.

Whitehaven/ Airport Graceland 3717 ELVIS PRESLEY 332-3322

Elvis Week 2019.

South Main

Graceland Soundstage 3717 ELVIS PRESLEY

Blues Hall of Fame Museum

Brian Setzer’s Rockabilly Riot Wednesday, Aug. 21, 7 p.m.

421 S. MAIN 527-2583

Bobby Rush Album Release Party Friday, Aug. 16, 5:30 p.m.

Spindini

Bartlett

383 S. MAIN 578-2767

Candace Mache Jazz Trio Aug. 16-17, 7-10 p.m.

Hadley’s Pub 2779 WHITTEN 266-5006

Blacktop Mojo, Lullwater Wednesday, Aug. 21, 7 p.m.

Rockstar Karaoke with Charlie Belt Thursdays, 8 p.m.; Twin Soul Friday, Aug. 16, 9 p.m.; Jay Jones and the Unwanted Saturday, Aug. 17, 9 p.m.; He Said She Said Sunday, Aug. 18, 5:30 p.m.; Furious George Wednesday, Aug. 21, 8 p.m.

1555 MADISON 347-6813

Collierville

1884 Lounge 1555 MADISON 609-1744

B-Side

The Conspiracy Theory, Harry Koniditsiotis Thursday, Aug. 15, 9-11 p.m.; 1000 Lights Album Release with Alyssa Moore, Glorious Abhor Friday, Aug. 16, 9 p.m.-midnight; Ashton Riker & Friends Saturday, Aug. 17, 8 p.m.; Devil Train Mondays; David Cousar Tuesdays, 9 p.m.; Outer Ring Wednesdays, 8:30 p.m.

Jamie Baker & the VIPs Sunday, Aug. 18, 8-11:30 p.m.

Cordova Huey’s Cordova

Obruni Dance Band Friday, Aug. 16, 10:30 p.m.; Subteens Saturday, Aug. 17, 10:30 p.m.; Mary Gagz and Her Gaggle of Drags Mondays, 8:30-11 p.m.

Help save lives at YOUR city animal shelter!

2 Mule Plow Sunday, Aug. 18, 4-7 p.m.; Chris and Sarah Sunday, Aug. 18, 8:30 p.m.-midnight.

NEW VOLUNTEER ORIENTATION

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Canvas

1737 MADISON 443-5232

Karaoke Thursdays, 9:30 p.m.; Kyle Pruzina Live Mondays, 10 p.m.-midnight.

Celtic Crossing 903 S. COOPER 274-5151

Jeremy Stanfill and Joshua Cosby Sundays, 6-9 p.m.; Candy Company Mondays.

The Cove 2559 BROAD 730-0719

Ed Finney & Neptune’s Army with Deb Swiney Thursdays, 8 p.m.; Wayde Peck Fridays, 6 p.m.; To Go Friday, Aug. 16, 9 p.m.; The Skitch Saturday, Aug. 17, 5 p.m.; Relentless Breeze Saturday, Aug. 17, 9 p.m.; Jazz Jam with Frog Squad Sundays, 6 p.m.; Freeman Shane Weems and Ron Shuman Monday, Aug. 19, 6:30-8:30 p.m.; Richard Wilson Tuesdays, 6-8 p.m.; Ben MindenBirkenmaier Wednesdays, 6

Huey’s Southwind 7825 WINCHESTER 624-8911

Folk All Y’all Listening Room at Studio688 688 S. COX ST 9016266763

Folk All Y’all: An Evening with Kalyn Fay Saturday, Aug. 17, 7:30 p.m.

Growlers 1911 POPLAR 244-7904

Last Broadcast, The Feet Sleeves, Kimmy Jones, Noah Ploderer Thursday, Aug. 15, 8 p.m.; Bun B Friday, Aug. 16, 8 p.m.; B2H Presents Saturday, Aug. 17, 8 p.m.; Down & Good Sunday, Aug. 18, 4 p.m.; Sacred: Southern Charm Tour Sunday, Aug. 18, 8 p.m.; Tiny Towns Monday, Aug. 19, 8 p.m.; Heel Turn, Pressed, Crossed, Allegation Tuesday, Aug. 20, 8 p.m.; Crockett Hall Tuesdays with the Midtown Rhythm Section Tuesdays, 9 p.m.; Dead Reckoning, Semantic Shift, The Red

June Pastel, Everdeens Tuesday, Aug. 20, 8:30 p.m.; Austin Meade, Keith Paluso Wednesday, Aug. 21, 10 p.m.

Huey’s Midtown 1927 MADISON 726-4372

Murphy’s 1589 MADISON 726-4193

Hillbilly Mojo Sunday, Aug. 18, 8:30 p.m.-midnight.

P&H Cafe

Poplar/I-240

Rockstar Karaoke Fridays; Open Mic Music Mondays, 9 p.m.midnight.

Lafayette’s Music Room

Railgarten

2119 MADISON 207-5097

4872 POPLAR 682-7729

Dale Watson and his Lone Star Elvis Tribute Friday, Aug. 16, 9 p.m.

The Chaulkies Sunday, Aug. 18, 4-7 p.m.; The Lauren Mitchell Band Sunday, Aug. 18, 8:30 p.m.midnight.

David Kurtz Thursday, Aug. 15, 6 p.m.; Bluff City Bandits Thursday, Aug. 15, 9 p.m.; Almost Famous Friday, Aug. 16, 6:30 p.m.; Shelby Lee Lowe Friday, Aug. 16, 6:30 p.m.; The Three Amigos Saturday, Aug. 17, 2 p.m.; Amber McCain Band Saturday, Aug. 17, 6:30 p.m.; The Dantones Saturday, Aug. 17, 10 p.m.; Joe Restivo 4 Sundays, 11 a.m.; Jason Ringenberg Sunday, Aug.

Huey’s Poplar

1532 MADISON 726-0906

2160 CENTRAL

Mighty Souls Brass Band Thursday, Aug. 15, 6 p.m.; Ghost Town Blues Band Friday, Aug. 16, 8 p.m.; Lucky 7 Brass Band Saturday, Aug. 17, 8 p.m.; Super Low Sunday, Aug. 18, 7 p.m.

Young Avenue Deli 2119 YOUNG 278-0034

Devil Train Friday, Aug. 16, 9 p.m.

Neil’s Music Room 5727 QUINCE 682-2300

5 O’Clock Shadow Thursday, Aug. 15, 7-11 p.m.; Eddie Smith Fridays, 8 p.m.; Mike Watkins Saturday, Aug. 17, 8 p.m.; Benefit for Amber Maharrey Sunday, Aug. 18, 3-10 p.m.; Debbie Jamison & Friends Tuesdays, 6-10 p.m.; Elmo and the Shades Wednesdays, 8 p.m.-midnight.

The Tony Holliday Band Sunday, Aug. 18, 8:30 p.m.-midnight.

Huey’s Germantown 7677 FARMINGTON 318-3034

Young Petty Thieves Sunday, Aug. 18, 8-11:30 p.m.

North Mississippi/ Tunica BankPlus Amphitheater at Snowden Grove 6285 SNOWDEN, SOUTHAVEN, MS (662) 892-2660

Thomas Rhett Friday, Aug. 16, 7 p.m.

Horseshoe Casino Tunica 1021 CASINO CENTER, TUNICA, MS 800-357-5600

Elvis, Elvis, Elvis: a Tribute to the King Friday, Aug. 16, 8:30 p.m.

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let the games bEgIN Arts & Entertainment

Best Museum Best Gallery Best College Gallery Best Local Singer Best Local Band Best Local Comedian Best Live Theater Best Performing Arts Venue Best Movie Theater Best Casino Best Family Entertainment Best Festival Best Park Best Dog Park

Food & Drink

August 15-21, 2019

IT IS AN HONOR TO BE NOMINATED IN SO MANY CATEGORIES.

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BE SURE TO VOTE FOR US: BEST BAR BEST BAR FOOD BEST DOG FRIENDLY RESTAURANT BEST HANGOVER FOOD (RESTAURANT) BEST LATE NIGHT DINING BEST PATIO BEST PEOPLE WATCHING BEST SERVER IN T.J EVANS BEST BARTENDER IN AMBER CAREY & NIKKI MOSELEY BEST AFTER HOURS NIGHT SPOT BEST HAPPY HOUR BEST SPORTS BAR

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Best Burger Best Hot Wings Best Fried Chicken Best Restaurant for Dessert Best Dessert Shop Best Frozen Treat Shop Best Smoothies/Juices Best Italian Best Middle Eastern Best Ethiopian Best Mexican Best Cajun/Creole Best Chinese Best Thai Best Vietnamese Best Indian

Best Home Cooking/ Soul Food Best Latin American/ Caribbean Best Vegetarian Best Seafood Best Pizza Best Sandwiches Best Hangover Food (Restaurant) Best Fine Dining Best Service Best Server Best Kid-Friendly Restaurant Best Late-Night Dining Best Place for PeopleWatching Best Patio Best Food Truck Best Bakery Best Donut Shop Best Local Coffeehouse Best Coffee Roaster Best Local Brewery Best Hibachi Best Sushi Best Dog-Friendly Restaurant/Bar Best Bar Food Best Taco Best Bloody Mary Best Farm-to-Table Best New Restaurant Best Restaurant

Goods & Services Best Grocery Store

Best Specialt Best Butcher Best Liquor S Best Shoppin Best Gift Sho Best Farmers Best Booksto Best Local B Credit Unio Best Local St Women's Cl Best Local St Men’s Cloth Best Place to Vintage/Use Best Local St Women’s Sh Best Local St Men’s Shoes Best Lingerie Best Home F Best Pet Stor Best Vet Best Pet Boa Care Best Local Fi Store Best Tattoo S Best Tattoo A Best Antique Best Tobacco Best Alterna Shop Best Vape Sh Best Florist Best Garden Best Local A Goods Store

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Best Beer Garden Best Place to See Stand-up Best Nightclub Best Date Bar Best Place to Shoot Pool Best New Bar Best Bar

Wellness

Best Hair Salon Best Hair Stylist Best Day Spa Best Place to Get a Facial Best Nail Salon Best Place to Get Waxed Best Health/Fitness Club Best Yoga Studio Best Crossfit Studio Best Barre Studio Best Tanning Salon Best Barber Shop

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Best Bicycle Shop Best Record Store Best Music Equipment Store Best New Car Dealership Best Used Car Dealership Best Auto Repair Best Place to Buy a Motorcycle Best Event Rental Venue Best Realtor Best Hotel Best Sex Shop Best Creative Agency Best Day Care (Children) Best Law Firm Best Local College Best Local Public School Best Local Private School Best Home Remodeling Service

ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT

ty Food Shop r Store ng Center op s Market ore Bank or on tore for lothing tore for hing o Get ed Clothing tore for hoes tore for s e Shop Furnishings re

21

he Best of Memphis issue on September 26th

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Back to School Sale at

Alison’s Alcove

Antique Mall & Consignment Shop Est 1984 Re-Born 2019

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“Where the past will make you happy today!” 901.317.9137 4792 Navy Road, Millington, TN

CALENDAR of EVENTS: AUG. 15 - 21 T H E AT E R

Hattiloo Theatre

Jelly’s Last Jam, he wore a diamond in his tooth, denied he was black, and claimed to have single-handedly invented the genre we know as jazz. Jelly Roll Morton, jazz pioneer reinvented himself so as to conquer the vast American expanse. Born a Creole of color in turn-of-the-century New Orleans, he came of age playing piano in the bawdy houses of Storyville. Through Sept. 1. 37 S. COOPER (502-3486).

Playhouse on the Square

Kinky Boots, in this musical with music and lyrics by Cyndi Lauper and a book by Harvey Fierstein, Charlie has inherited a shoe factory from his father. It sounds like a great deal, except the factory is failing and on the way to being shut down. Enter Lola, a cabaret performer and drag queen, who sees what Charlie can’t — and it’s all in the heel. playhouseonthesquare.org. Through Sept. 1. 66 S. COOPER (726-4656).

Theatre Memphis

Mamma Mia!, set on a Greek island and to the music of the international pop group ABBA,

GYNECOLOGY ABORTION CONTRACEPTION MIDWIFERY

“uneXpected/ juXtapositions” by Carl Moore at Jay Etkin Gallery, Friday, Aug. 16th

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Send the date, time, place, cost, info, phone number, a brief description, and photos — two weeks in advance — to calendar@ memphisflyer.com or P.O. Box 1738, Memphis, TN 38101. DUE TO SPACE LIMITATIONS, ONGOING WEEKLY EVENTS WILL APPEAR IN THE FLYER’S ONLINE CALENDAR ONLY.

a young girl plans her wedding while trying to discover who of three men may be her father … all to the distress and ultimate joy of her mother. theatrememphis.org. Aug. 16-Sept. 8.

Jay Etkin Gallery

630 PERKINS EXT. (682-8323).

942 COOPER (550-0064).

TheatreWorks

Making Folk Happy, two sisters leave Mississippi for the big city life in Memphis. Given the ultimatum to find a job or find husbands in one year, the girls live with a family friend, but soon find out that big city life may not be all that “happy.” $22. Sundays, 3 p.m., and Fridays, Saturdays, 7:30 p.m. Through Aug. 25. 2085 MONROE (274-7139).

Universal Parenting Place

Opening Reception for “uneXpected/juXtapositions,” exhibition of new works by Kiara Sally and Carl Moore. Fri., Aug. 16, 6-9 p.m.

Playhouse on the Square

Opening Reception for “Melange,” exhibition of mixed-media work by Rebecca Chappell. (413-4756), Fri., Aug. 16, 5-6:30 p.m. 66 S. COOPER (726-4656).

OT H E R A R T HAP P E N I N G S

Memphis Magazine Fiction Contest

PlayBack Memphis, bringing stories to life in a safe space to unlock healing, transformation, and joy. Families welcome. (207-3694), Free. Third Thursday of every month, 4:30-6 p.m.

Winning authors will be honored with a $200 gift certificate to Novel. For more information, contest rules, and submission, visit website. Through Aug. 31.

LEMOYNE-OWEN COLLEGE, 990 COLLEGE PARK.

Perfect Summer PopUp Market

A R T I ST R EC E PT I O N S

Buckman Arts Center at St. Mary’s School

Opening Reception for “Ray of Light,” exhibition of new works by Sydney Gruber. Fri., Aug. 16, 5-7 p.m.

WWW.MEMPHISMAGAZINE.COM.

Sale of original artworks by members of the Memphis Arts Collective. Organized by the artists. Sat., Aug. 17, 10 a.m.-5 p.m. 430 GALLERY, 430 N. CLEVELAND (507-8030).

60 N. PERKINS EXT. (537-1483).

continued on page 24


THANKS FOR THE CONTINUED LOVE, MEMPHIS! H BEST PLACE FOR PEOPLE WATCHING H BEST KID-FRIENDLY RESTAURANT H BEST DOG-FRIENDLY RESTAURANT

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CALENDAR: AUGUST 15 - 21 continued from page 22

Blues Hall of Fame Museum

“The Blues According to Arhoolie,” exhibition honoring Arhoolie Records, an independent record label famed for publishing and promoting obscure folk and blues artists. www.blues. org. Through Sept. 1.

O N G O I N G ART

Art Museum at the University of Memphis (AMUM)

“Africa: Art of a Continent,” permanent exhibition of African art from the Martha and Robert Fogelman collection. Ongoing.

Art Village Gallery

“Out of Africa: Inhabitants of the Earth,” exhibition of work by Nigerian artist Uchay Joel Chima. www.artvillagegallery. com. Ongoing.

ArtsMemphis

Belz Museum of Asian and Judaic Art

“Chinese Symbols in Art,” ancient Chinese pottery and bronze. www.belzmuseum.org. Ongoing. 119 S. MAIN, IN THE PEMBROKE SQUARE BUILDING (523-ARTS).

“Ray of Light,” exhibition of new works by Sydney Gruber. Mondays-Fridays, 10 a.m.-4 p.m. Through Sept. 9.

RHODES COLLEGE, 2000 N. PARKWAY (843-3000).

Crosstown Concourse

“R&D,” a collection of artwork from the fall 2018 University of Memphis sculpture students. Ongoing. 1350 CONCOURSE AVE.

David Lusk Gallery

“Daily Art,” exhibition and sale of new works by 31 contributing artists. All August long, 31 days, 31 artists. Through Aug. 31. 97 TILLMAN (767-3800).

Marshall Arts Gallery

509 S. MAIN (647-9242).

FireHouse Community Arts Center

Mosal Morszart, exhibition of works by Black Arts Alliance artist. www.memphisblackartsalliance.org. Ongoing.

Clough-Hanson Gallery

“Unfolding: The Next Chapter in Memphis,” exhibition of visual art by local Memphis artists, curated by Kenneth Wayne Alexander. (578-2787), www. artsmemphis.org. Free. Ongoing, 5:30-7:30 p.m. 575 S. MENDENHALL (578-2787).

Buckman Arts Center at St. Mary’s School

Senior Thesis Exhibition, exhibition of work by Rhodes studio art majors Olivia Rowe, Charlotte Sechrist, Qian Xu, Sara Lynn Abbott, and Melissa Kiker. www.rhodes.edu/events. Ongoing.

242 S. COOPER (276-3937).

Folk Artists, exhibition of work by Debra Edge, John Sadowski, Nancy White, Bill Brookshire, and other folk artists. Ongoing.

60 N. PERKINS EXT. (537-1483).

410 S. MAIN (521-0782).

lights at the Grand Ole Opry. (767-2200), lrossgallery.com. Tuesdays-Saturdays, 10 a.m.-5 p.m. Through Aug. 31.

Edge Gallery

421 S. MAIN (527-2583).

142 COMMUNICATION & FINE ARTS BUILDING (678-2224).

liams, whose art embraces the chaotic process of ceramic while creating abstract parts that reference the building blocks of life. Through Sept. 18.

985 S. BELLEVUE (948-9522).

Graceland

“Melange” by Rebecca Chappell at Playhouse on the Square, Friday, August 16th, 5 p.m. The Dixon Gallery & Gardens

“Place Shapes,” exhibition of recent work by Elizabeth Alley. dixon.org. Through Oct. 6. “Central to Their Lives: Southern Women Artists in the Johnson Collection,” exhibition spanning the decades between the late 1890s and early 1960s, which examines the particularly complex challenges female art-

ists confronted in a traditionally conservative region during a period in which women’s social, cultural, and political roles were being redefined and reinterpreted. dixon.org. Through Oct. 13. “Kate Freeman Clark,” exhibition that brings together nearly 40 paintings by Southern-born Impressionist. Clark’s work was defined by her intimate portraits of family and friends, bucolic landscapes, and compelling still life paintings. dixon. org. Through Oct. 13. 4339 PARK (761-5250).

Eclectic Eye

“Nature of the Line,” exhibition of new work by Andrew Wil-

“Hillbilly Rock,” exhibition featuring items from The Marty Stuart Collection. www.graceland.com. Ongoing. 3717 ELVIS PRESLEY (332-3322).

Jay Etkin Gallery

“uneXpected/juXtapositions,” exhibition of new works by Kiara Sally and Carl Moore. Tuesdays-Saturdays. Through Aug. 31. David Hall, exhibition of watercolor works on paper. www. jayetkingallery.com. Ongoing. 942 COOPER (550-0064).

L Ross Gallery

“Kick Out the Lights,” exhibition celebrating Memphis music, past and present. The title refers to the night Johnny Cash broke all the stage

5040 SANDERLIN (767-2200).

“Love of Art” and “Memphis,” exhibition of work by Nikki Gardner and Debra Edge by appointment only. Ongoing. 639 MARSHALL (679-6837).

Memphis Botanic Garden

“Chasing the Light,” exhibition of new work by Diana Shearon. Through Aug. 31. “Summer in the City,” the Artist Group of Memphis returns this summer with many new and vibrant works by local artists in Memphis. Through Aug. 30. Twilight Thursdays, extended hours staying open til sunset. Each week will have a different highlight from plants to pets. www.memphisbotanicgarden. com. Thursdays. “Bicentennial Blues Bed,” new, year-long planting celebrating the Bluff City’s bicentennial, located just outside of the Four Seasons Garden. www. memphisbotanicgarden.com. Ongoing. 750 CHERRY (636-4100).

Memphis Brooks Museum of Art

“Arts of Global Africa,” exhibition of historic and contemporary works in a range of

continued on page 26

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ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT

m e m p h i s f l y e r. c o m


CALENDAR: AUGUST 15 - 21 continued from page 24

exhibition of works by more than 90 local artists, supporting the Woman’s Exchange mission, “Helping others help themselves.” (327-5681), Saturdays, 10 a.m.-2 p.m., and MondaysFridays, 10 a.m.-4 p.m. Through Aug. 23.

1934 POPLAR (544-6209).

Memphis College of Art

88 RACINE (327-5681).

1930 POPLAR (272-5100).

DAN C E

Metal Museum

Argentine Tango Society

“Horn Island 35,” Aug. 19-Oct. 4.

“40 Under 40: The Next Generation of American Metal Artists,” to continue the celebration of the museum’s 40th anniversary, this exhibition explores the next generation of influential American metal artists. (774-6380), www.metalmuseum.org/40-under-40. Tuesdays-Sundays, 10 a.m.-5 p.m. Through Sept. 15. 374 METAL MUSEUM DR. (7746380).

Overton Park Gallery

Dorothy Northern and Jennifer Sargent, exhibition of works. Ongoing. 1581 OVERTON PARK (229-2967).

Playhouse on the Square “Melange,” exhibition of mixed-media work by Rebecca Chappell. (413-4756), Through Sept. 9. “Art Show,” exhibition of new work by Sue Layman. (4097870), Through Sept. 8, 10 a.m.-5 p.m. 66 S. COOPER (726-4656).

All level dancers; everyone is welcome. $10. Wednesdays, 6-7:30 p.m.

BERT FERGUSON COMMUNITY CENTER, 8085 TRINITY (341-9282).

Brooks Milongas

Dance Conservatory Open House at the Buckman, Saturday, August 17th, 10 a.m. Slave Haven Underground Railroad Museum

“Images of Africa Before & After the Middle Passage,” exhibition of photography by Jeff and Shaakira Edison. (5273427), slavehavenmemphis. com. Ongoing. 826 N. SECOND STREET (527-3427).

Stock&Belle

“A Love Letter to My Porch,” exhibition of new work by Grace Porter. Through Aug. 26. 387 S. MAIN (734-2911).

Sue Layman Designs

Sue Layman Designs Ongoing Art, exhibition of oil-on-canvas paintings featuring brilliant colors and daring geometric shapes. (409-7870), suelaymandesigns.com. Ongoing. 125 G.E. PATTERSON (409-7870).

Talbot Heirs

Debra Edge Art, ongoing. 99 S. SECOND (527-9772).

Village Frame & Art

“20th Century Memphis Photographs,” exhibition of work by Charlie Ivey and Virginia Schoenster, Wednesdays, 10 a.m.-6 p.m. 540 S. MENDENHALL (767-8882).

WKNO Studio

“Memphis Germantown Art League Showcase,” exhibition of new works by the MGAL. wkno.org. Mondays-Fridays, 9 a.m.-4 p.m. Through Aug. 28. 7151 CHERRY FARMS (458-2521).

Woman’s Exchange Art Gallery

Woman’s Exchange of Memphis Gallery Show, ninth annual

Members of the Argentine Tango Society give lessons and tango demonstrations in the rotunda. Included with museum admission. Third Wednesday, Thursday of every month, 6:30 p.m. MEMPHIS BROOKS MUSEUM OF ART, 1934 POPLAR (544-6209).

Free Belly Dance Open House

Join Karsilama Tribal Belly Dance for an open house with door prizes, food, mini introductory belly dance choreography class, performances, and more. Free. Tues., Aug. 20, 6:15-8 p.m. CORDOVA COMMUNITY CENTER, 1017 SANGA, KARSILAMADANCE.COM.

continued on page 28

August 15-21, 2019

different media presenting an expansive vision of Africa’s artistry. www.brooksmuseum. org. Through June 21, 2021. “Bouguereau & America,” exhibition of work by the French academic painter WilliamAdolphe Bouguereau. His modern and highly polished interpretations of classical subjects as well as his intimate and idealized portrayals of peasant life, were avidly sought by American collectors. brooksmuseum.org. Through Sept. 22. “Native Son,” exhibition of sculpture and sound installation by multimedia artist Terry Adkins. www.brooksmuseum. org. Through Sept. 3. Rotunda Projects: Federico Uribe, exhibition of magical creatures and playful installations from everyday objects. www.brooksmuseum.org. Through Oct. 11. “Small Passion,” exhibition of work by Albrecht Dürer, who has long been recognized as one of the most influential artists of the European Renaissance and one of the finest printmakers in the history of art. Through Oct. 27. “About Face,” exhibition located in the Education Gallery highlighting the different ways artists interpret the connection between emotion and expression. www.brooksmuseum.org. Ongoing. “Drawing Memory: Essence of

Memphis,” exhibition of works inspired by nsibidi, a sacred means of communication among male secret societies in southeastern Nigeria by Victor Ekpuk. www.brooksmuseum. org. Ongoing.

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CALENDAR: AUGUST 15 - 21 continued from page 26 Velvetina’s Blue Moon Revue

A dazzling dinner show featuring live, local music and the best in glamorous, classic burlesque. $30. Every other ThursdaySaturday, 7-9 p.m. Through Aug. 31. MOLLIE FONTAINE LOUNGE, 679 ADAMS (917-705-0945), BLUEMOONREVUEMEMPHIS.COM.

C O M E DY

The Bluff

Memphis Next Top Comic, funny-man Mason King is the new top comic in town, and he’ll have to defend his title against five comedic competitors in the battle of laughs. Wed., Aug. 21, 6-9:30 p.m. 535 S. HIGHLAND (454-7771).

FedExForum

Jim Gaffigan, four-time Grammy-nominated comedian, actor, writer, and producer dishes out the funny on his new Secrets and Pies tour. $32-$110. Sat., Aug. 17, 8 p.m. 191 BEALE STREET.

B O O KS I G N I N G S

Booksigning by Alice Marie Johnson

Author discusses and signs her new book After Life: My Journey from Incarceration to Freedom. Sat., Aug. 17, 1 p.m. NOVEL, 387 PERKINS EXT. (922-5526).

Booksigning by Bill Morris

Author discusses and signs his book Bill Morris: A Legendary Life at this brown-bag lunch booksigning. Tues., Aug. 20, noon. CHURCH HEALTH, 1350 CONCOURSE AVE.

Booksigning by Martin Clark

Author discusses and signs his new thriller The Substitution Order. Mon., Aug. 19, 6:30 p.m. NOVEL, 387 PERKINS EXT. (9225526).

LECTU R E / S P EA K E R

ACT Workshop presented by Memphis ACT Tutors

This one-day workshop will introduce students to unique academic methods designed specifically for improving ACT scores. $50. Sat., Aug. 17, 10:30 a.m.-4:30 p.m. LUCIUS E. & ELSIE C. BURCH JR. LIBRARY, 501 POPLAR VIEW, COLLIERVILLE (457-2601), COLLIERVILLELIBRARY.LIBCAL.COM.

Sierra Club Meeting

Discussion about recycling with audience participation about what locals would like to see in the community. Free and open to the public. Thurs., Aug. 15, 6:30-8 p.m. BENJAMIN L. HOOKS CENTRAL LIBRARY, 3030 POPLAR (415-2700).

TO U R S

The Marvelous Women of Elmwood Cemetery

The very first person to be buried at Elmwood was a woman. A Civil Rights activist, a beauty queen, suffragists, an explorer, and so many more: the women who are buried at Elmwood Cemetery lived incredibly diverse lives. $20. Sun., Aug. 18, 3 p.m. ELMWOOD CEMETERY, 824 S. DUDLEY (774-3212).

S PO R TS / F IT N E S S

Memphis Redbirds vs. Iowa Hawkeyes

Thurs., Aug. 15, 7:05 p.m., and Sat., Aug. 17, 6:35 p.m. Sun., Aug. 18, 2:05 p.m. AUTOZONE PARK, THIRD AND UNION (721-6000).

Memphis Redbirds vs. Round Rock Express Aug. 19-21, 6:35 p.m.

AUTOZONE PARK, THIRD AND UNION (721-6000).

Sandlot Night: Memphis Redbirds vs. Iowa Hawkeyes

Chauncey Leopardi (aka “Squints”) is scheduled to do a meet-and-greet with fans after he throws out a ceremonial first pitch, and he is also slated to lead the crowd in “Take Me Out to the Ballgame” at the 7th inning stretch. After the game, fans are invited to remain in

their seats for a showing of The Sandlot on the videoboard. $17$75. Fri., Aug. 16, 6 p.m.

CHILDREN’S MUSEUM OF MEMPHIS, 2525 CENTRAL (458-2678), CMOM.COM.

AUTOZONE PARK, THIRD AND UNION (721-6000), MEMPHISREDBIRDS.COM.

The Wiggles Party Time Tour

KIDS

CANNON CENTER FOR THE PERFORMING ARTS, MEMPHIS COOK CONVENTION CENTER, 255 N. MAIN (TICKETS, 525-1515).

Buckman Dance Conservatory Open House

Opportunity for the community to learn about St. Mary’s new dance school, with an exploration of the Magic Carpet Ride series, a jazz class, and previews. Sat., Aug. 17, 10 a.m.-2 p.m. BUCKMAN ARTS CENTER AT ST. MARY’S SCHOOL, 60 N. PERKINS EXT. (537-1483).

Magic Carpet Explores the Nutcracker with the Sugar Plum Fairy

Boys and girls age 2 and up will be transported through the wonder of their imaginations to Russia and Tchaikovsky’s magical Land of Sweets as part of the Nutcracker. $5 for children, free for adults. Sat., Aug. 17, 10 a.m. BUCKMAN ARTS CENTER AT ST. MARY’S SCHOOL, 60 N. PERKINS EXT. (537-1483), BUCKMANARTSCENTER.COM.

PAW Patrol: Adventure Play

Free-flowing exhibit with activities encouraging teamwork, self confidence, and playing the roles of the rescuing heroes. Included with museum admission. Aug. 17-Feb. 2, 9 a.m.-5 p.m.

Kids’ song-and-dance show. Sat., Aug. 17, 6:30 p.m.

F U N D -R AI S E R S

Soul Train Dance Off

Funky, soulful dance and costume contest. DJ Wheeler will be spinning the beats. $5. Sat., Aug. 17, 9-11:30 p.m.

F I LM

Crosstown Arthouse Presents: Be Natural: The Untold Story of Alice Guy-Blaché

This documentary tells the story of the first female filmmaker, Alice Guy-Blaché. $5. Thurs., Aug. 15, 7:30 p.m. CROSSTOWN THEATER, 1350 CONCOURSE AVENUE.

The Goonies

When adventurous kids discover an old pirate map in the attic, they follow it into an underground cavern in search of lost treasure. Saturdays, Sundays, 4 p.m. Through Aug. 31.

MIDTOWN CROSSING GRILL, 394 N. WATKINS (443-0502).

CTI 3D GIANT THEATER, IN THE MEMPHIS PINK PALACE MUSEUM, 3050 CENTRAL (636-2362).

S P EC IA L EVE NTS

I Read That Movie at the Library: The Remains of the Day

Candlelight Vigil

Traditional ceremony where fans pay tribute to the King by carrying a candle in quiet remembrance. Thurs., Aug. 15, 8:30 p.m. GRACELAND, 3717 ELVIS PRESLEY (332-3322).

Meet Candidates

Chickasaw Group of the Sierra Club is hosting a meet and greet for the public to meet candidates for Memphis mayor and Memphis City Council in the October election. Fri., Aug. 16, 6-8 p.m. THE SALVATION ARMY KROC CENTER, 800 E. PARKWAY S. (729-8007).

Monthly page-to-screen book club screening, featuring the adaptation of Kazuo Ishiguro’s Booker Prize-winning 1989 novel. Free. Sat., Aug. 17, 2 p.m. BENJAMIN L. HOOKS CENTRAL LIBRARY, 3030 POPLAR (415-2726).

A Wider Angle Film Series: Antonio Lopez 1970: Sex Fashion & Disco

Documentary about Antonio Lopez, the dominant fashion illustrator of his time. Free. Tues., Aug. 20, 6:30 p.m. BENJAMIN L. HOOKS CENTRAL LIBRARY, 3030 POPLAR (415-2726).

We Saw You.

with MICHAEL DONAHUE

August 15-21, 2019

memphisflyer.com/blogs/WeSawYou

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September 15, 2019

5pm - 8pm

Whiskey Tasting. BBQ Dinner. Silent Auction. Two tastings at 5:30 pm & 7:00 pm Tickets will be time specific for tasting. Dinner available the whole time.

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Silent auction of fine crafts from Donations by Pink Palace Crafts Fair artists. Purchase Tickets on Eventbrite.com *All proceeds after expenses go to Lichterman Nature Center to support its programs.


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F

rida Kahlo and Diego Rivera are so well-known in postcards and posters that it’s difficult to understand their work in its own right. As Walter Benjamin wrote in 1935, “What withers in the age of the technological reproducibility of the work of art is the latter’s aura … By replicating the work many times over, it substitutes a mass existence for a unique existence.” Because of Kahlo and Rivera’s pop culture status, the quote is especially relevant to the exhibit currently at Nashville’s Frist Art Museum until September 2nd, “Frida Kahlo, Diego Rivera, and Mexican Modernism from the Jacques and Natasha Gelman Collection.” Not only have we seen many of the works countless times, the exhibit’s focus on the artists as a couple threatens to overwhelm the art itself with their very celebrity. And yet, because much of Kahlo’s work reflects her life’s traumas, such as her chronic ill health after a bus accident at age 18, her art can transcend mere celebrity if only we delve more deeply into the details. And that’s precisely what this intensely biographical exhibit does so well. The aura of each work lives in details, too, and that’s the first revelation. Overfamiliar paintings take on a new life when one can savor each brush stroke, each nuance of shading that makes the artwork spring to life again. Beyond such epiphanies, the sheer volume of biographical detail forces us to see beyond the storybook tale of the artists’ lives. The Gelman collection also includes other leading artists of the time, such as Guatemalan Carlos Mérida, whose Festival of the Birds fuses geometric abstraction with the then-widespread fascination with Mexicanidad folk identity. This interplay is also apparent when comparing Rivera’s most widely known Mexicanidad work, such as Call Lilly Vendor, with his forays into Cubism when living in Paris from 1907 to 1920. Seeing the intriguing geometry of his The Last Hour (1915) elucidates the abstracted graphic elements of his later, more famous nativist works. It also sets the context for the celebrity Rivera enjoyed by the time he met Kahlo, 20 years his junior. That celebrity, and his financial security, convinced her parents to give the union their blessing. (Examples of Kahlo’s German father’s stark architectural photography offer a clue to his sympathy for her artistic aspirations). Eventually, many infidelities colored their entire marriage, though after renewing their

vows in 1940, their relationship settled into a state of mutual non-monogamy. This turbulent romance is expressed in many of Kahlo’s most revered works, such as Diego on My Mind. But an even clearer window into their relationship is the home movie footage perpetually looping on a large screen. In it, as the pair makes a good show of being happy spouses, the tense body language between them is palpable. Seeing the two strolling through the courtyard has an aura all it’s own, and that’s true of other exhibit highlights that were not created by either artist in the strict sense. Several of Kahlo’s distinctive dresses, so emblematic of her love of Mexican folk culture, are showcased. And there are portraits of both Rivera and Kahlo by others. The photographs of Kahlo by her erstwhile lover, Nickolas Muray, are groundbreaking not only for their use of color in 1939, but for their stylized por-

COURTESY FRIST ART MUSEUM

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Frida at Frist The devil’s in the details in current exhibit.

sketch books

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ARTS By Alex Greene

Diego on My Mind (Self-Portrait as Tehuana), 1943.

traiture. And images like songwriter Patti Smith’s 2012 photographs of the painter’s crutches and corset reflect Kahlo’s ongoing cultural relevance. Though there are many insights into Rivera’s work as well, this is a show dominated by Kahlo’s artistic trajectory. And, from her rare lithographs depicting her miscarriage, infused with her fascination with medical illustrations, to her politicized charcoal sketch of the Statue of Liberty, there are many surprises that add the shock of the undiscovered to our knowledge of Kahlo and offer fresh perspectives on the troubled relationship that framed her life. “Frida Kahlo, Diego Rivera, and Mexican Modernism” is on view at Nashville’s Frist Art Museum through September 2nd.


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Altbier is German for “old beer,” which employs a top-fermentation method similar to English ales, but then is matured at a lower temperature for a cleaner finish. With the advent of “lagering,” most German brewers switched to the bottomfermenting method like the one used in Pilsners. Hence, it’s considered an old-style beer — which, in Germany, is pretty old. It’s a style popular in Westphalia (Peace of Westphalia, 1648, ended the 30 Years’ War; that’s probably why the name is familiar) and almost nowhere else (who really cares about the 30 Years’ War?). Of course, this makes it perfect fodder for traditional-minded craft breweries like Hutton & Smith. Based in Chattanooga, H&S is named for a) James Hutton, whose Theory of the Earth explained in 18th-century glory the enormous spans of time over which geological changes occur, and b) William Smith, who produced the first

geological map of the Earth. Evidently, the good people at H&S decided these intellectual exercises required a fair bit of mental lubrication and named a brewery after them. Which is no stranger than my scheme to quaff the growler of ancient Teutonic brew for breakfast, maintain enough focus to write this column, get it off to my long-suffering editor, Mr. V, then meet my father for lunch. There were difficulties with the day’s plan. First, that said column would get lost in the increasingly regular dump of lunatic fringe hate mail bombarding Mr. V of late. And second, that after a lifetime of disappointing experience with his fifth child, Dad would likely note that I had had a bellyful of beer before noon on a weekday. “Big beers” refer to high-gravity or high-alcohol beers, and, at 5 percent ABV, H&S On-Sight Alt beer doesn’t qualify. Still, it has a weapons-grade beer taste and feel. This is what beer tasted like when you were 10 and snuck a snort while your dad was berating the lawnmower. Or at least it’s what you thought it tasted like, except this time it’s pretty damn good. You don’t have to put on a cool face for your older brothers and pretend to like it. This beer is like thinking back to some childhood fear and realizing that Dad was, in fact, a pretty mellow monster with interesting thoughts on the Rolling Stones: “Man, it’s the imperfection in Gimme Shelter that makes it perfect! Can’t you see that?” That big, malty bloom followed by a clean finish becomes a real pleasure. Yet for all that big German beer flavor, it is remarkably light and crisp. There is a little more to it than a Pilsner and not so much going on as a hoppy IPA, and there is certainly none of that “Is this really a beer?” business you get when brewers get too trendy. I’m not sure I’d drink it with a salad, but it’s hard to think of a sandwich or burger this altbier wouldn’t complement. At that aforementioned 5 percent ABV, it takes the edge off but not much else. I might suggest it as a method of coping for some of the people writing all that hate mail. That, and maybe pay a little more attention to your grammar.

ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT

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popped into Buster’s to find an interesting growler from their Pegas system. The nice fella behind the counter told me that, through some voodoo or another, the system would keep a growler fresh and zippy for weeks. I told him that I’d need to take his word for it because while I’m usually on top of things, deadline-wise, I didn’t have a couple of weeks. I’d waited dangerously close to filing, and I had a previous engagement that night, so drinking it then was ill-advised. Which is why I woke up Friday morning, sat down at my desk, and pounded 32 ounces of Hutton & Smith Altbier — at 7:15 a.m.

33


FILM REVIEW By Chris McCoy

Scary Stories to Tell in the Dark A plucky little horror film that delivers what it promises.

S

August 15-21, 2019

cary Stories to Tell in the Dark is bookended by two versions of “Season of the Witch.” Over the opening credits is Donovan’s psychedelic classic from 1966, the dark side of Sunshine Superman. The second is a confident, if breathy version by Lana Del Rey, who becomes the latest artist to attempt to capture the song’s serenely spooky vibes. What can an artist bring to something like “Season of the Witch”? The song’s Wikipedia entry lists 26 different versions, done by everyone from Vanilla Fudge to Hole. Maybe the reason the song appeals to so many artists is because it has strong bones. Its soft-loud, verse-chorus structure would be appropriated by the Pixes in the 1980s and inspire a legion of imitators, including Nirvana. The lyrics are as vaguely threatening as they are nonsensical. Versions like Del Rey’s continue to sound fresh because the artists have sussed out the secret: Just do it like Donovan did it, and you’ll be okay. Good bones are what keep Scary Stories to Tell in the Dark upright. It’s an adaptation of a series of short story anthologies released in the 1980s by folklorist and fantastically prolific author Alvin Schwartz. The stories, which

are aimed at young readers, are short and often gruesome resettings of campfire tales and dimly remembered legends. Schwartz’s books, greatly enhanced by Stephen Gammell’s haunting illustrations, have consistently appeared on the American Library Association’s Most Banned list for the last 30 years. Horror maestro and 2017 Best Picture winner Guillermo del Toro executive produced this long-gestating adaptation. Instead of doing a Creepshow-esque anthology, del Toro crafted a framework story and tapped Trollhunter helmer André Øvredal to direct. It opens on Halloween of 1968, which the narrator describes as “The last autumn of our childhood.” The narrator is revealed to be a teenager named Stella (Zoe Margaret Colletti), who is fastening fake warts to her face and applying black lipstick to dress as a witch for the annual shenanigans in the small town of Mill Valley, Pennsylvania. She meets up with her friends Auggie (Gabriel Rush) and Chuck (Austin Zajur), and they set out to exact a little flaming bag of poo-themed revenge on bat-wielding bully Tommy (Austin Abrams). But when their plans go pear-shaped, they flee into a drive-in theater, where they are saved by Ramón (Michael Garza) as Night

Guillermo del Toro and André Øvredal bring Stephen Gammell’s illustrations to the big screen. of the Living Dead spools in the background. The group finds their way to the town’s only bona fide haunted house. Naturally, it’s a crumbling late-Victorian affair where the rich descendants of the Bellows, the town’s founding family, degenerated into gothic madness. Their youngest daughter Sara (Kathleen Pollard) was an albino whom they kept locked away in shame. The family is long since gone, but Sara has lived on in legend for the scary stories she would tell to any 19th-century kid brave enough to sneak up to the manse.

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FILM REVIEW By Chris McCoy If the above seems like a lot of trouble to go to in order to set up a framing device for a bunch of short creepy tales, well, it is. Øvredal and del Toro work very hard to get us invested in this group of small town outsiders living on the eve of Nixon’s election. It helps that Colletti brings some big Hermione energy as the ostracized smart girl who is obsessed with writing horror. Their prank wars soon turn seriously spooky when aspiring writer Stella steals Sara’s book of scary stories scribbled in the blood of children, and Tommy has a runin with a sinister scarecrow. Horror aficionados will recognize many of the tropes at play here, which lean much more heavily on Cronenbergian body horror than the retro setting would suggest. Especially upsetting is the poster-worthy pimple from hell suffered by Chuck’s sister Nancy (Natalie Gan-

zhorn) on the night of the high school’s big harvest festival. But what Scary Stories lacks in originality, it makes up for in execution and heart. Øvredal makes a virtue of his limitations, shooting in a muted autumnal palette and even getting a scare out of the color grading at one point. The eager actors and mid-budget, analog feel to the effects turn out to be the film’s greatest assets. There are a lot of parallels to the Stephen King horror juggernaut It, and when the nerdy Auggie dresses as a clown for Halloween, it is surely meant as a jab at the competition. Admittedly, not everything here works, but I greatly prefer Scary Stories’ playful pluck to the reverent sterility of It. Scary Stories to Tell in the Dark Now playing Multiple locations

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TH E LAST WO R D by Aylen Mercado

The Pink Seesaw On July 30th, images of a bright pink seesaw installed at the U.S.-Mexico border flooded my social media and news feeds. On the Mexico side of the wall, children lined up for a turn on the seesaw. On the U.S. side, a handful of people, mostly adults, got on the seats at the other end. Though temporarily installed (for about half an hour), the seesaw will exist forever in digital memory through the photos and videos that documented it. Messages of love and unity accompanied them, and people celebrated the seesaw for allowing U.S. and Mexican kids to play together. As the co-architect Ronald Rael described, the “Teetertotter Wall” was meant to foster “joy, excitement, and togetherness.” But when I first came across these photos and videos, I didn’t see what most people saw or wanted to see. Despite many reports suggesting kids on both sides playing together, coverage of the seesaw on the U.S. side showed mostly grown adults. Images that were widely circulated of actual children on the seesaw were of children on the southern side of the border. On the surface, images of smiling and laughing brown kids evoke positive messages. If that’s the level where we choose to stop, then we can agree that some of the goals that Rael and his partner, architect Virginia San Fratello, set out for this art installation — to bring joy and show that people on both sides can build positive relationships — have been accomplished. But art is not that simple. Border narratives are not simple. The border, the wall, and the realities of immigration, colonialism, and militarization bound to it are multilayered. When Rael and San Fratello said, “The wall became a literal fulcrum of U.S.-Mexico relations” and that the Teetertotter Wall reflects “how the actions on one side of the border have direct consequences on the other,” they presented a limited way to understand immigration. While it may not have been their intent, the consequence of this framing is that we neglect to consider the significant number of Central American asylum seekers who present themselves at the U.S. southern border. It also doesn’t recognize the role of the U.S. and Mexico in the oppression of Central Americans, especially black and indigenous Central Americans. All that is lost in the coverage of the bright pink seesaws. In their statement “Borderwall as (Settler Colonial) Architecture, or Why We Prefer Bulldozers to Seesaws” Dubravka Sekulić, Elise Misao Hunchuck, and Léopold Lambert write, “The immediate public acceptance and celebration of this project flattened it into a palatable image of hope, concealing if not erasing real and pressing concerns.” They emphasize that “this is less about the installation itself than its publicization” because the coverage of the seesaw suggests that this art intervention can make the wall a part of a playful landscape. In that brief but well-documented and later publicized moment, all we see is the smiling and laughing faces of brown children. It doesn’t challenge us. And because we are not challenged to think of the border and what it represents and supports in a different way, we consume images of brown smiles and then those images, like anything “viral,” enter and leave our social media feeds. This leads to another point that unsettled me. These images of children that are meant to make you feel — something. Images of children, especially black and brown children, are often used for this purpose. Smiling faces to make you feel one way, faces full of tears to feel another. A recent example is the series of raids that happened in Mississippi where images of grieving families and children were spread across the internet. The 2018 worksite ICE raid in Bean Station, Tennessee, that took 97 people was about 440 miles away from Memphis, and while there have been raids in Memphis before, this one had been the largest in a decade at the time. For perspective, Canton, Mississippi, one of the six cities that experienced worksite raids, is less than half the distance from Memphis that Bean Station is. Around 680 people were taken from worksites last week. For some cities, it was the first day of school for children. Their faces of grief and trauma were shared and retweeted over and over. Some may say that this was done to raise awareness, but a recurring problem is that images of black and brown people experiencing violence at the hand of the state are not made for awareness; they are exploited for white consumption. The images of the smiling brown kids on the pink seesaw similarly serve to aid a comfort that obscures a call to challenge and act. Journalists and photographers need to think about their role in documenting these events. Are you amplifying the voices and stories of people with dignity and respect? Bringing awareness does not require photographing children without their or their parents’ and caretakers’ consent. What these children and communities need is resources and support, now more than ever. Aylen Mercado is a brown, queer, Latinx chingona and Memphian exploring race and ethnicity in the changing U.S. South.

m e m p h i s f l y e r. c o m

Border narratives are complex. Coverage of them should be, too.

THE LAST WORD

CNN VIDEO

Exploring the balance of race and power and media coverage.

39


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Memphis Flyer 08.15.19  

Memphis Flyer 08.15.19