Memphis Flyer 7/14/2022

Page 1

THE BROOKS MUSEUM P17 • D’BO’S DAIQUIRIS, WINGS & SEAFOOD P24 • THOR: LOVE AND THUNDER P27

OUR 1742ND ISSUE • 07.14.22

FREE

SEVENTYFOURIMAGES | DREAMSTIME.COM

ELECTION 2022:

KIND OF BLUE After their countywide sweep of four years ago, Shelby County Democrats still seem to be in charge.

Discover where a career at FedEx can take you.

We’re hiring at the FedEx Express World Hub in Memphis. Starting pay up to $22/hr.

fedexishiring.com


THE BEST ENTERTAINMENT

AUGUST 13

DEON COLE

THE COLEOLOGY TOUR AUGUST 19 MUST BE 21

July 14-20, 2022

FOR TICKETS, VISIT GOLDSTRIKE.COM OR CALL 1.888.747.7711

2

LIVE MUSIC NIGHTLY!

©2022 MGM Resorts International.® All rights reserved. Must be 21. Gambling problem? Call 1.888.777.9696.


JERRY D. SWIFT Advertising Director Emeritus KELLI DEWITT, CHIP GOOGE, HAILEY THOMAS Senior Account Executives MICHELLE MUSOLF Account Executive ROBBIE FRENCH Warehouse and Delivery Manager JANICE GRISSOM ELLISON, KAREN MILAM, DON MYNATT, TAMMY NASH, RANDY ROTZ, LEWIS TAYLOR, WILLIAM WIDEMAN Distribution THE MEMPHIS FLYER is published weekly by Contemporary Media, Inc., P.O. Box 1738, Memphis, TN 38101 Phone: (901) 521-9000 Fax: (901) 521-0129 memphisflyer.com CONTEMPORARY MEDIA, INC. ANNA TRAVERSE FOGLE Chief Executive Officer LYNN SPARAGOWSKI Controller/Circulation Manager JEFFREY GOLDBERG Chief Revenue Officer MARGIE NEAL Chief Operating Officer KRISTIN PAWLOWSKI Digital Services Director MARIAH MCCABE Circulation and Accounting Assistant

National Newspaper Association

Association of Alternative Newsmedia

ANNIVERSARY

SALE Y L U J

7 1 8

QUANTUM

ANTIQUE GALLERY Antique Mall 30,000 SF 100+ VENDORS

♦ Antiques ♦ Furniture ♦ Vintage Items ♦ Collectibles ♦ Decor + Much More! 5696 SUMMER AVE

(901) 385-2544

m e m p h i s f l y e r. c o m

CARRIE BEASLEY Senior Art Director CHRISTOPHER MYERS Advertising Art Director NEIL WILLIAMS Graphic Designer

MALL-WIDE

CONTENTS

JESSE DAVIS Editor SHARA CLARK Managing Editor JACKSON BAKER, BRUCE VANWYNGARDEN Senior Editors TOBY SELLS Associate Editor CHRIS MCCOY Film and TV Editor ALEX GREENE Music Editor SAMUEL X. CICCI, MICHAEL DONAHUE, JON W. SPARKS Staff Writers ABIGAIL MORICI Copy Editor, Calendar Editor LORNA FIELD, RANDY HASPEL, RICHARD MURFF, FRANK MURTAUGH, MEGHAN STUTHARD Contributing Columnists AIMEE STIEGEMEYER, SHARON BROWN Grizzlies Reporters ANDREA FENISE Fashion Editor KENNETH NEILL Founding Publisher

OUR 1742ND ISSUE 07.14.22 If there’s one thing I’ve learned in my time in journalism, it’s to always, always doublecheck the spelling of “public.” If I’m allowed to say I’ve learned two things, I’d have to admit it’s true, you shouldn’t bury the lede. So I’ll skip the preliminaries and announce my official resignation as editor-in-chief of the Memphis Flyer. When I accepted the editor gig, former Flyer editor Bruce VanWyngarden told me, “It’ll eat your life.” Or, as another colleague put it, somewhat more delicately, “There’s an element of being ‘on call’ to this job.” Yeah, that’s true, and for the most part, I’ve loved it. Every job comes with its own kind of stress, and the stress of meeting deadlines, reworking a story, or teasing out the best way to word a complex idea is, for me, nothing less than thrilling. “Thrilling” might be underselling it a bit — it’s a kind of high. I’ve never been much of an athlete, but if a runner’s high is anything like the zap an editor gets from slicing 1,000 words from a story and hearing its author say it reads better now, well, let’s just say I can begin to understand the folks who jog even in these brutal Memphis summers. I’ve been the one to break news of a court ruling and of an escaped wallaby. I’ve worked with Flyer writers to decide how best to tackle big issues — gun violence, reproductive rights, and Memphis beer. There’s only one free print paper in town, and being at the wheel has been a responsibility I have cherished. But for most of my life, I’ve collected responsibilities like baseball cards, and it might be time to admit I’ve become something of a responsibility hoarder. By necessity, I’ve lived as a “duties first” person. In the past few months, my family circumstances have changed unexpectedly, and I want to try my hand at being a “family first” kind of guy. It’s a new kind of challenge, a different sort of responsibility. For most of my childhood, my parents weren’t always around — also usually by necessity. For years, my dad worked at an airline in Memphis, putting in 40-plus hours in three days’ time before turning around to drive the 90 or so miles to our little white house on the county line. He’d sleep for a day, and then we would have a few days together before he had to drive back to Memphis for half a week. My sister and I knew we were loved, but it was still tough at times. Within the next year, my dad will turn 70, my nephew will turn 5, and I’ll get married. I want to be there for these people, really be there, not just when work allows, or be there physically albeit distractedly as I delegate some editorial tasks. I’ve answered work emails and phone calls while I was supposed to be playing dragons with my nephew, and it left me with an all-too-familiar feeling, like seeing myself on the other side of a mirror, 30 years ago. I’ve had Zoom meetings while on a long-deferred vacation with my fiancée, all while a family reunion went on downstairs. It comes with the territory. I know some people could easily juggle the different demands of family and a fast-paced job in a notoriously exacting field, but I think I might just like that aforementioned high of hitting deadlines a little too much. Might as well face it, I’m addicted to responsibility. It might seem clichéd, but in a world where even the people who agree on most things can’t ever seem to get on the same page because of a few minor differences, I like the idea of embracing the people who choose to love me even when we don’t agree on anything. Not only that, but my fiancée and I want to start our own family before too long. So maybe it’s selfishness or naivete, but I think I’d like to focus my energies a little more on my own group of weirdos — not that I don’t love the snarky, creative, somewhat dysfunctional Flyer family I’ve adopted in the last eight years. I do. Deeply. But I also trust them to deliver the news in true Flyer style, even if I have to miss out on the newsroom brainstorming. So I’m choosing to accept a new opportunity I’ve been granted, cherish the time I’ve spent with this wild bunch, and leave knowing the Flyer will keep flying, charting a course unlike any other paper in town. There’s no shortage of senior talent ready to help keep this paper on course while the search for a new editor gets underway. Managing editor Shara Clark, associate editor Toby Sells, and senior editors Jon W. Sparks and Bruce VanWyngarden (remember that guy?) will make sure the NEWS & OPINION same exceptional paper hits stands on THE FLY-BY - 4 time each week. And they’ll have help NY TIMES CROSSWORD - 6 POLITICS - 7 from Inside Memphis Business editor AT LARGE - 8 Samuel X. Cicci. So I feel confident about FINANCE - 9 the Flyer’s future. Oh, and if you or someCOVER STORY one you know would like to apply for the “ELECTION 2022: KIND OF BLUE” editor-in-chief position, send a resume to BY JACKSON BAKER - 10 hr@contemporary-media.com. WE RECOMMEND - 16 MUSIC - 18 In the meantime, I’m excited about CALENDAR - 20 the prospect of being a Flyer reader, and FOOD - 23 of finding new ways to give back to the FOOD FEATURE - 24 Memphis community. ARTS - 25 What else can I say? That’s all, folks. SPECIAL FEATURE - 26 Thanks for reading. FILM - 27 Jesse Davis CLASSIFIEDS - 30 jesse@memphisflyer.com LAST WORD - 31

3


THE

fly-by

MEMernet

{

Questions, Answers + Attitude Edited by Toby Sells

CITY REPORTER By Kailynn Johnson

Memphis on the internet.

Building On Hip-Hop

ON A BOAT

Hip Hop Architecture Camp hopes to inspire the next generation of designers.

POSTED TO FACEBOOK BY BOB BOCCIA

“After one night in Nashville, this is the best way I can describe the difference between the two cities,” wrote Bob Boccia on Facebook recently. TOM LEE SNEAK PEEK

POSTED TO FACEBOOK BY MEMPHIS RIVER PARKS PARTNERSHIP

July 14-20, 2022

Memphis got a peek behind the curtain at some of the play structures (in the form of some cuddly creatures) that will soon be installed at the renovated Tom Lee Park. The Memphis River Parks Partnership (MRPP) shared several images to Facebook, including the one above showing a river-otter slide in construction and the one below showing how it will look with its otter partner.

POSTED TO FACEBOOK BY MEMPHIS RIVER PARKS PARTNERSHIP

4

P OSTE D TO FAC EBOOK BY MEMPHIS R I VE R PA R KS PARTNERSHIP

The MRPP also shared this bird’s-eye-view shot of the Cutbank Bluff section of the park, noting the brown portions of the bluff will soon be green as thousands of seeds have been planted there.

The Downtown Memphis Commission (DMC) and design marketplace Material Bank brought the Hip Hop Architecture Camp to Connect Music on Vance last week. The camp was created in 2016 by Michael Ford, a licensed architect. The week-long camp is designed to “introduce underrepresented youth to architecture, urban planning, creative placemaking, and economic development through the lens of hip-hop culture.” The camp is based on “four Cs,” which are PHOTO: HIP HOP ARCHITECTURE CAMP creativity, collaboration, Inaugural Memphis Hip Hop Architecture Camp hopes to inspire diversity in architecture. communication, and critical thinking. According to the DMC, students will work in unison with architects, urban planners, something that [young people] are comfortable with, designers, community activists, and hip-hop artists throughout something that is accessible to them, there are ideas and the camp to “create unique visions for their communities which principles that apply equally to architecture and hip-hop. include the creation of physical models, digital models, and Whether we’re talking about form, rhythm, structure, the creation of a Hip Hop Architecture track and music video it’s all the same. I think Michael has found a way to take summarizing their designs. ” something that can be boring and esoteric and complicated [and made it] more accessible and interesting.” Only 2.8 percent of architects in the United States are minorities, according to the DMC. While a 2022 report from the National Council of Architectural Registration Boards states that diversity efforts in the architecture field have improved, the DMC says that minority groups continue to be underrepresented. “People of color are woefully underrepresented in the design field, architecture, urban design, and landscape “We know that diversity … just doesn’t happen by architecture,” Roler said. “What I love about Hip Hop accident,” said Brett Roler, the DMC’s senior vice president Architecture Camp is that it gives us the chance to show of planning and development. “So, what we’re trying to do is kids that they can be a part of creating neighborhoods that take intentional steps to invite people, to encourage people you love. You can play a role in building great places and to be proactive in making a Downtown that everyone feels great neighborhoods.” connected to.” The DMC is also helping to sponsor an architecture camp Roler said the Hip Hop Architecture Camp is an hosted by the Memphis chapter of the American Institute opportunity for students to gain exposure to architecture of Architects (AIA), which Roler says is geared more so by using hip-hop music and culture as a catalyst while also to students who have already solidified that they want to showing them the many ways that they can play a role in pursue a career in architecture. “If our broader community their community. is 65 percent African-American, I think we need more “You might say, ‘What’s hip-hop got to do with people of color building Downtown, developing Downtown, architecture?’ and I think that’s a fair question,” Roler opening businesses Downtown, and that’s what we are said. “However, if kids feel like hip-hop and music [are] working on,” Roler said.

There are principles that apply equally to architecture and hip-hop. Whether we’re talking about form, rhythm, structure, it’s all the same.


CORDOVA I N T E R N A T I O N A L

FARMER’S MARKET

NEWS & OPINION

Open everyday from 9 a.m. to 9 p.m. 1150 N. Germantown Parkway, Cordova, TN 38016 901.417.8407 •

m e m p h i s f l y e r. c o m

THE BEST PRICES

5


{

The New York Times Syndication Sales Corporation 620 Eighth Avenue, New York, N.Y. 10018 For Information Call: 1-800-972-3550 For Release Thursday, December 13, 2018

ACROSS

30 Hang tight

1 Put at sea

31 Religiousness

6 “As a result …”

34 A shore thing to happen

11 Birthed

37 Horace Greeley’s advice, as followed by 17-, 25-, 50- and 60-Across?

14 Ira who wrote “The Stepford Wives” 15 South American forest dweller

41 Working harmoniously (with)

16 Hoarfrost 17 Many a hit by Def Leppard

42 Home of Spaceship Earth

19 Grp. that’s well-financed?

44 Baja blast

20 N.F.C. North team, to fans

49 #Me___ 50 Meal served in an edible bowl

21 Bit of crab house attire

53 Follow, as a moral code

22 “You’ve got to be kidding me!”

56 Tag line?

23 Stored away

57 Ending with polypropyl-

25 Like medieval knights 27 Screwy

58 Lacking joie de vivre

28 Response to oversharing

59 Montenegro joined it in 2017

ANSWER TO PREVIOUS PUZZLE B E G A T

U M A M I

S P L I T

T I P S H E S P E E T I L T A L A S Y E N M S W E A P I T C A F R A T I E O

E D R E A L I E D N D O A T B W A I D T H O I D N E

S C A L L E D A N W I I N N G U P U T S O O N

N O W B A M E L N G L E D E I T E D M O D I L P N D M I Y E S G A L A T D I O E T W H A E O L R O Y

60 Famously expensive commercial 64 Mushy mass 65 “Sounds good,” in informal pronunciation 66 Part of the unconscious 67 Military term of address 68 N.F.L. quarterback Drew 69 Long-limbed

1

A L F A

L I O N

L A R S

H O L Y

O G L E

T O S S

T A L I A

S T E A L

Y A R N S

2

3

4

5

6

14

7

8

9

10

18

28 32 37

33

40

26

29

30

34

35

36

38 41

45

39

13

22

25

27

12

19 21

24

31

11

42

46

47

43

48

49

DOWN 50 51 52 53 54 55 1 Nothing but 56 57 58 2 Arm for taking needles, for 59 60 61 62 63 short? 3 Format that 64 65 66 preceded Blu-ray 67 68 69 4 Fatty compound 5 Japanese PUZZLE BY SAM EZERSKY mushroom 24 Take ___ at 51 Live in a studio 38 Site of 6 Air Medal (insult) zero-gravity recipients 52 Marsh plant experiments 25 Benghazi’s land 7 Negative 39 Played the tough 54 It doesn’t get any operation in 26 Feature of a better than this guy computing logic forehead or 40 Beginner, in 55 Actor Troyer fingerprint 8 “Yabba ___ doo!” video game lingo of the “Austin 9 Unadventurous Powers” movies 29 Crystal ___ 43 Item in a claw machine 10 Notable feature 32 Bottle cap type 58 Protrudes of North Dakota 44 One-night and Texas 33 Gossip 61 Spanish : ella :: stands, say English : ___ 11 Kendrick Lamar’s 35 ___ nova 45 2014 boxing genre documentary 62 Texter’s “No 12 Egyptian “king of 36 A school yr. 63-Down!” 46 Person at a desk often begins on the gods” one 48 Swat 63 See 62-Down 13 Boil down 16 Around 70°F, Online subscriptions: Today’s puzzle and more than 7,000 past informally puzzles, nytimes.com/crosswords ($39.95 a year). 18 Took one’s turn Read about and comment on each puzzle: nytimes.com/wordplay. 23 Cut

ON EXHIBIT NOW MEMPHIS MUSEUM

3050 CENTRAL MEMPHIS, TN 38111 901.636.2362 WWW.MOSHMEMPHIS.COM

OF SCIENCE & HISTORY

July 14-20, 2022

FROM THE NEWSEUM/FREEDOM FORUM

+ image courtesy of Pride Archives c.2016

P

R

E

S

E

N

T

® 6

I

N

G

S

P

O

Memphis company focuses on self-care.

16

20 23

No. 1108

15

17

44

47 Sound of a leak

Freedom At the Mat

Edited by Will Shortz

Crossword

CITY REPORTER By Kailynn Johnson

N

S

O

R

S

This project was made possible in part by the Institute of Museum and Library Services. The views, findings, conclusions or recommendations expressed in this exhibition do not necessarily represent those of the Institute of Museum and Library Services.

I

t’s no secret that the pandemic began a shift in conversation on wellness and self-care. It opened up a dialogue on how different populations deal with their mental health and the many ways that we choose to treat and approach it. Wellness and self-care don’t have to be expensive, and they don’t have to consume hours of your time. That sentiment is one of the driving forces behind Memphis native Olivia F. Scott’s company Freedom at the Mat. Freedom at the Mat is a wellness brand that provides weekly YouTube content in the form of affirmations, meditation, yoga flows, and interviews with wellness advocates. “It’s really our mission to make sure we are getting content out to women of all socioeconomic classes throughout the world,” Scott explains. Scott says that the content is specifically and strategically targeted to be under 30 minutes, in order to cater to women who say, “I don’t have time to take care of myself.” “Naturally, you find that women, by our nature, we are nurturers, and we take care of other people, and we don’t take time to prioritize our own selfcare,” Scott continues. Along with accessible self-care, Scott’s company manufactures and retails yoga mats that are available to purchase through her website. Fifteen percent of the profit made from Freedom at the Mat’s paid classes, journals, and yoga mats goes to nonprofits that are dedicated to serving women. One such recipient is Grace House of Memphis. Shortly after graduating from Central High School in 1991, Scott found herself in a number of places from Missouri to Chicago and New York, where she says she was able to create a career for herself. Health

PHOTO: OLIVIA F. SCOTT

The wellness brand focuses on yoga. had always been a part of Scott’s life because of her lineage. Her mother, her sister, and her grandmother all died at the age of 65, and Scott knew that from a young age, she would have to watch her health. While she was always conscious of her health, it was when she started to experience burnout in her mid to late 30s that she decided that she needed to really figure things out. “I was on this hamster wheel in New York, and I had this really amazing career, but I didn’t have any balance. I did [yoga] one time when I was in Chicago, and I was like, this is so boring I’ll never do yoga, it’s so, so boring,” she recalls. After taking a power vinyasa class and becoming a registered yoga teacher, Scott says she realized that yoga was her saving grace. “Women are so busy, and our lives are also busy. You may not have another moment to yourself to actually pray or to set the intention for your day or move your body, so I wanted to make sure that I didn’t leave anything out, that I wasn’t only focusing on the physical or only focusing on the mental.” A car ride through Frayser helped Scott realize that sometimes women don’t always have the resources to find safe coping mechanisms. “I saw the dire poverty in Memphis, and I thought, ‘I wonder, are these people thinking about their wellness?’ The moment I saw that section of North Memphis, I said, ‘I may never be able to reach those women per se … but I want to contribute to an organization that I know is contributing to their health and wellness.’”


POLITICS By Jackson Baker

Early Voting Information Early voting for the August 4th election begins on Friday, July 15th.

County Commission Races District 1: Republican incumbent Amber Mills faces Democrat Donna McDonald-Martin. District 4: Republican incumbent Brandon Morrison vs. Democratic challenger Britney Chauncey. District 5: Democrat Shante Avant and Republican Todd Payne tangle for an open seat. District 7: Henri Brooks, Democrat, vs. Shirelle-Dakota Brown, Independent. District 13: Incumbent Democrat Michael Whaley faces Republican Ed Apple. Early Voting Hours and Locations Early voting for the August 4th election begins on Friday, July 15th, at the following locations. The Shelby County Election Commission location will be open 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. that day. All others will be open from 11 a.m. to 7 p.m. All locations will be open on Saturday, July 16th, from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. and will be closed on Sunday, July 17th. From Monday, July 18th, to Friday, July 23rd, all locations will be open from 11 a.m. to 7 p.m., except for the Election Commission, whose hours will be 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. The same schedule will be kept the week of July 25th through July 29th. On Saturday, July 23rd, all locations will be open from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. On Saturday, July 30th, the final day of early voting,

Abundant Grace Fellowship Church, 1574 E. Shelby Dr., Memphis 38116 Anointed Temple of Praise, 3939 Riverdale Rd., Memphis 38115 Arlington Safe Room, 11842 Otto Ln., Arlington 38002 Baker Community Center, 7942 Church Rd., Millington 38053 Berclair Church of Christ, 4536 Summer Ave., Memphis 38122 Briarwood Church, 1900 N. Germantown Pkwy., Memphis 38106 Christian Life Church Memphis, 9375 Davies Plantation Rd., Bartlett 38133 Collierville Church of Christ, 575 Shelton Dr., Collierville 38017 Compassion Church, 3505 S. Houston Levee Rd., Germantown 38139 Dave Wells Community Center, 915 Chelsea Ave., Memphis 38107 Glenview Community Center, 1141 S. Barksdale St., Memphis 38114 Greater Lewis St. Baptist Church, 152 E. Parkway N., Memphis 38104 Greater Middle Baptist Church, 4892 Knight Arnold Rd., Memphis 38118 Harmony Church, 6740 Elmo Rd., Bartlett 38135 Mississippi Blvd. Church - Family Life Center, 70 N. Bellevue Blvd., Memphis 38104 Mt. Pisgah Missionary Baptist Church, 1234 Pisgah Rd., Cordova 38016 Mt. Zion Baptist Church, 60 S. Parkway E., Memphis 38106 New Bethel Missionary Baptist Church, 7786 Poplar Pike, Germantown 38138 Raleigh United Methodist Church, 3295 Powers Rd., Memphis 38128 Riverside Missionary Baptist Church, 3560 S. Third St., Memphis 38109 Second Baptist Church, 4680 Walnut Grove Rd., Memphis 38117 Shelby County Election Commission, James Meredith Bldg., 157 Poplar Ave., Memphis 38103 Solomon Temple MB Church, 1460 Winchester Rd., Memphis 38116 The Pursuit of God Church (Bellevue Frayser), 3759 N. Watkins, Memphis 38127 TN Shakespeare Company, 7950 Trinity Rd., Cordova 38018 White Station Church of Christ, 1106 Colonial Rd., Memphis 38117

Honest Fair Experienced Compassionate

SAFE HOME. SAFE COMMUNITY.

23 years’ experience as an Assistant District Attorney (since 1999) Currently Chief Prosecutor of the Domestic Violence Special Unit

HELP ELECT GREG Paid for by Greg Gilbert for Judge, Omar Malik, Treasurer

m e m p h i s f l y e r. c o m

Early voting runs from Friday, July 15th, to Saturday, July 30th, excluding Sundays.

all locations will be open from 8 a.m. to 4 p.m.

NEWS & OPINION

The outcome in a majority of the 13 Shelby County Commission seats was established in the May primaries. The occupants of the remaining five seats remain to be determined in the August 4th election. For all practical purposes, what is at stake is how large the Democratic majority on that body will be when it convenes its new term in September. The two GOP incumbents here are expected to win. A Democratic victory in the three other contested races, considered likely, would result in a 9 to 4 Democratic majority.

7


A T L A R G E B y B r u c e Va n W y n g a r d e n

Welcome to Hell Summer’s “new normal” is here.

Sometimes I stare in space Tears all over my face I can’t explain it, don’t understand it I ain’t never felt like this before Now that funny feeling has me amazed Don’t know what to do, my head’s in a haze … Just like a heat wave Burning right here in my heart — Holland-Dozier-Holland

I THURSDAY • JUNE 21 • 6PM - 10PM COVER CHARGE $15

WALRUS

2022 PARTY line up

7.14 7.21 7.28 8.04

DJ Epic Walrus DJ Epic SouthBound

July 14-20, 2022

#PBodyRoof peabodymemphis.com

A Very Tasteful Food Blog Dishing it out at

8

.com.

t’s 8:30 on Saturday morning at Tobey Dog Park. Many of the regulars and their mutts are here. The humans, maybe nine of them, are gathered in the shade of the one appreciable tree. The dogs, maybe 14 of them, make brief forays out into the burnt-grass hellscape to chase a ball or wrestle or dry-hump each other or poop, but soon return to the shade. They are not stupid creatures. Neither are the humans, who don’t even try to wrestle or dry-hump each other or poop. They just stay in the shade and commiserate. It’s the third or fourth week without rain in Memphis. No one here in the shade can remember the last time water fell from the sky. We all agree it’s been at least 10 days since the daily high temperature was less than 98 degrees, with many days reaching triple digits. On Friday, the day before my trek to the dog park, Memphis registered the highest “feels like” temperature in the United States — a balmy 114 degrees. What the hell, y’all? At our house, we have closed every curtain, shutter, and window blind. All the ceiling fans are turning at warp speed. We keep the lights off during the day. We open and shut exterior doors quickly so the satanic heat can’t get in. We’re now living in a dark bat cave just so our air-conditioning can keep up. Sort of. When it’s 114 outside, we consider an interior high of 76 degrees a victory. If it’s any comfort (and no, it’s not) we’re not alone. Heat waves have been happening all over the Northern Hemisphere this summer — in Spain, France, India, the Middle East, parts of Africa, and elsewhere, leading to the usual attendant miseries of drought and crop failure. And also to forest fires like those that have ravaged the Western U.S. this year — where they’re running out of water because it doesn’t snow enough anymore. At least we’ve got water in Memphis. For now. Unless Governor Lee decides to privatize the Memphis Sand Aquifer.

Which I wouldn’t rule out. The world’s legitimate scientists have long moved past debating whether climate change exists or even whether our addiction to greenhouse gases is the cause. In a recent New York Times story, some scientists said that the current trend to longer and more frequent heat waves renders the question obsolete. The climate has changed, and we’re going to have to deal with the consequences. Why argue about the obvious? In the same Times article, climate scientist Andrew Dessler said, “The warming of recent decades has already made it hard for scientists to know what to call a heat wave and what to treat as simply a ‘new normal’ for hot weather. … As time goes on, more and more of the planet will be experiencing those temperatures, until eventually, with enough global warming, every land area in the mid-latitude Northern Hemisphere would be above 100 degrees.”

PHOTO: BRUCE VANWYNGARDEN

It’s too damn hot. If this is the new normal, then summer is the new hell. And it’s not like we don’t have a few other things to worry about these days, including a major political party that can’t kick its addiction to a delusional con man, a country that can’t keep its young men from randomly gunning down dozens of strangers, and a Supreme Court apparently made up of faith healers, gun nuts, and (probably) climate-change deniers. Where to turn? It all feels new and not at all normal. I would say we’re all going to hell in a handbasket, but it appears we may have already arrived. Which begs the question: Can you get out of hell in a handbasket?


FINANCE By Gene Gard

Credit Cards

Make a splash.

Is paying it off enough?

I

Call today or apply online to purchase or refinance your boat, motorcycle, or RV and make no payments for up to 90 days! Subject to credit approval. Other restrictions may apply. Interest will accrue during deferment period. Excludes the refinance of existing Southeast Financial loans.

Equal Housing Opportunity | NMLS# 403243

Ready to turn your current home into your dream home? Apply online for mortgages, home equity loans, and home equity lines of credit. Fixed rate mortgages available. Loan approval, interest rate, and downpayment required based on creditworthiness, amount financed, and ability to repay.

southeastfinancial.org | 901-751-9351

m e m p h i s f l y e r. c o m

Update Renovate Redecorate

NEWS & OPINION

think we can all agree that large make sure your restaurant tab, tax, and revolving credit card balances are intended tip is less than $100. With a bad, but what about no balance? card, it doesn’t really matter if it’s $82 The modern, “responsible” or $120 or $350, especially if you know credit card approach seems to be a win you’ll be able to pay the bill off in full at for all parties. The card issuer gets the the end of the month. swipe fee every time a card is used. These little differences add up. Over The merchant pays the swipe fee, in time, even if a credit card causes you exchange for convenience, time saving, to spend a few percent more than you and access to a broader audience of otherwise would, that extra spending buyers. The will far exceed any card user wins benefit from even by paying the best rewards off the card cards. every month Moving fully to and accruing cash is not practical valuable rewards for many people, or cash back and credit card while paying no rewards can have interest. Where tremendous value is the problem? — if they don’t There’s not lead to additional a problem, unnecessary if you’re spending. Normally completely an abundance content with mindset is a good your level of thing, but in the spending over case of credit card time. However, spending, a little most people scarcity could seem to think lead to broader they spend abundance in PHOTO: NATHAN DUMLAO ON UNSPLASH a little (or a your financial life. lot) too much, Ironically, card regardless of income or assets. Even users with a balance close to their limit those who think their spending is fine probably have more cash-like buying often think their spouse or significant habits than someone who pays their other could tighten up their spending card off every month. a little bit. But how does this relate to Try actually using cash only for a “responsible” credit card use? month, and you might be surprised The bottom line is that countless to see a stark difference in spending studies have shown that using a credit compared to your last card statement. card causes you to spend more, period. Consider purposefully lowering the There is evidence that credit card limit on your day-to-day card to a level holders spend more at department you’ll have to think about before you stores. Credit card users leave bigger swipe. Most importantly, remember tips. A study showed that those required that while credit card rewards can be to return with a credit card were willing meaningful over time, the low singleto pay more than double for playoff digit percent reward can’t make up tickets compared to bidders who were for spending even slightly more than told they had to come back and pay necessary. cash. Another study showed that cards Credit cards can have a role in the create identifiable “purchase cravings” path to your secure financial future, but on MRI scans that cash does not. One keep in mind the obvious risks as well study even showed that simply the as the subconscious ones! Gene Gard is Chief Investment Officer presence of credit card paraphernalia on at Telarray, a Memphis-based wealth a desk caused subjects to spend more management firm that helps families money than the control group. navigate investment, tax, estate, and Why is this? The best way I can retirement decisions. Ask him your explain it is that having a line of credit questions or schedule an objective, untethered to nothing but a sky-high no-pressure portfolio review at irrelevant credit limit means that letstalk@telarrayadvisors.com. Sign up there’s no natural scarcity reaction for the next free online seminar on the when presented with purchases. If you Events tab at telarrayadvisors.com. have $100 in your pocket, you better

9


COVER STORY By Jackson Baker PHOTO: SEVENTYFOURIMAGES | DREAMSTIME.COM

ELECTION 2022: KIND OF BLUE

After their countywide sweep of four years ago, Shelby County Democrats still seem to be in charge.

T

July 14-20, 2022

he blue wave of 2018 was not unique to Shelby County; it crested virtually everywhere in the nation, but in that year’s Shelby County election, it became a tsunami, flooding out what had been an extended period of Republican dominance that began with the establishment of partisan elections in 1992. The fact that the GOP chose not even to compete this year for the position of sheriff was a concession to the party’s obviously reduced strength in a majority-Black, Democraticleaning local population. Statewide, Shelby County’s preeminence in Democratic affairs has historically been shared with Davidson County, site of the state capital of Nashville. As Memphis Congressman Steve Cohen pointed out at a recent Democratic rally, however, the party’s position in the capital has been somewhat undermined by the governing GOP’s ruthless gerrymandering in the 2022 session of the General Assembly. District lines were redrawn so as to reduce Nashville’s Democratic 10 representation in the legislature and to virtually eliminate its ability to elect a

Democratic congressman. As was noted by Cohen, who is likely to end up being the sole surviving Democratic member of the U.S. House of Representatives from Tennessee, this development enlarges the status of the Memphis area as an anchor of the state’s fast-disappearing two-party system. State and Federal It is no coincidence that the three candidates for the Democratic nomination for governor hail from the state’s two major metropolises. Jason Martin, who began running more than a year ago after charging incumbent GOP Governor Bill Lee with negligence during the Covid-19 epidemic, is from Nashville, while Carnita Atwater, a public health administrator, and JB Smiley, a city councilman, are both Memphians. The three Democrats agree on most issues, especially in their condemnation of Lee’s controversial school-voucher program, which targets only Memphis and Nashville. Lee is unopposed in his own primary and — in spite of, or because of, his unrelentingly arch-conservative position

on all issues save that of criminal justice reform — netted a favorability rating of 56 percent in the latest Vanderbilt University poll. In little more than a decade’s time, the political complexion of Tennessee at large has gone from traditionally Democratic to defiantly Republican, and Lee will be heavily favored against whichever Democrat wins their primary. Shelby County is served by two congressional districts — the 8th, which consists of a broad swath of rural West Tennessee, along with a strategic salient in affluent East Memphis, and the 9th, which, post-gerrymandering, extends from most of Memphis through Millington to a portion of Tipton County. Republican 8th District incumbent David Kustoff of Germantown should win easily in the GOP primary against challengers Danny Ray Bridger Jr. of Milan, Gary Dean Clouse of Somerville, and Bob Hendry of Collierville. Tim McDonald of Jackson and Lynette Williams of Collierville vie in the Democratic primary for the right to oppose Kustoff in November. The aforementioned Cohen, a national

as well as a local figure, who normally has only pro forma opposition, envisions a somewhat stouter test than usual. To be sure, his primary opponent, M. LaTroy Alexandria-Williams, is but a perennial candidate, as — on the Republican side — are Charlotte Bergmann and the madcap pretender Leo AwGoWhat. But a third Republican, the odds-on favorite to win his primary, is Brown Dudley, a Memphis entrepreneur who has GOP establishment support and enough cash on hand to give Cohen at least a theoretical run for his money in November. On the Democratic side, there are five contested races — one of the state Senate and four for the state House. In Senate District 33, former State Rep. London Lamar, recently appointed to the seat by the County Commission, is heavily favored over two primary opponents — Marion LaTroy Alexandria-Williams Jr. and Rhonnie Brewer. Republican Frederick D. Tappan will be her Republican opponent in November. In House District 84, longtime Democratic incumbent Joe Towns Jr. has a primary opponent, Brandon Price,


but should win another term. Likewise, Democratic incumbent Jesse Chism is heavily favored over primary opponent Phyllis Parks in District 85. In House District 86, Barbara Cooper, still going strong in her 90s, has the most formidable opponent in quite a while in Will Richardson, who basically talks up his presumably fresher legs. Democrat Torrey Harris, a first-termer in a reconfigured district, is favored over challenger Barbara Farmer-Tolbert in District 91. Meanwhile, Democrats Toniko Harris and Houston Wolf vie for the right to oppose District 97 GOP incumbent John Gillespie in November. On the Republican side, the only contested legislative race is the House District 99 primary between incumbent Tom Leatherwood and challenger Lee Mills. This is a grudge match of sorts, the third contest for the seat, in one way or another, between Leatherwood and Mills, who was notified early this year by state Elections Coordinator Mark Goins that, according to census maps, his house was in the outlying portion of a subdivision split between Shelby and Fayette counties. Chancellor Jim Kyle ruled that Mills and his wife, County Commissioner Amber Mills, could stay on the ballot in Shelby County because they paid their property taxes there. County General Election Shelby County Mayor: Strictly speaking, the major countywide seat up for grabs is that for Shelby County mayor. But the race between Democratic incumbent Lee Harris and Republican challenger Worth Morgan has somehow managed to stay on the back burner, public attention-wise. This is despite the fact that both candidates have had access to, and employed, ample budgets. (During any election season, a drive down Walnut Grove will tell you who the big spenders are, and Morgan’s yard signs are much in evidence there this year.) City Councilman Morgan has inveighed against what he says has been Harris’ failure or negligence on matters of public safety, public accessibility, and public affairs in general. “We Deserve Bet-

ter,” he says, citing, among other things, the initial snafus in the county’s distribution of Covid vaccines, but his advertising has focused on a dubious claim that the mayor has somehow “defunded the police.” Upon examination, the charge — dependent on a highly creative reading of county budget numbers — founders, and Sheriff Floyd Bonner, whose department would seem to be the county equivalent of “the police,” has made no such contention. With regard to truth in advertising, the public deserves better. For his part, Harris has emphasized a series of governmental initiatives he has pursued, in areas ranging from criminal justice, most notably his Second Chance program for youthful offenders, to gun safety to storm damage to mental health and more, including even the creation of a citizen pipeline on reactions to the war in Ukraine. On the strength of relative party strengths alone, Harris would seem to have the advantage. There are those who see Morgan’s race as a matter of introducing himself to the public for such future-tense purposes as may occur. District Attorney General: Unmistakably, this is the contest which is regarded as the marquee race on the ballot and the one on which both major parties have dug in their heels. Unlike the four-year terms mandated for other countywide offices discussed in this section, the term of a DA runs for a full eight years. Though incumbent DA Amy Weirich carries the Republican Party label (and its residual hopes for the party’s relevance in county government), she is not especially partisan in demeanor and, in fact, has been critical of pro-gun legislation by the General Assembly’s GOP super-majority. But she is definitely to the right on matters of criminal justice, on the “Law and Order” side of the equation, or, as she puts it, on the side of the victims of crime. Her Democratic opponent, University of Memphis law professor and former County Commissioner Steve Mulroy, is an exponent of various criminal-justice reforms

and contends that Weirich’s positions are rigid and overly harsh, counterproductively so. Between the two positions, and inclusive of them, is a whole universe of useful options to be considered, but the contest has so far smacked more of the legal courtroom’s adversary process than it has of Socratic dialogue. Mulroy cites various chastisements conferred on Weirich by judicial tribunals as indication of an overzealous prosecutorial zeal. He pronounces her the “worst” DA in Tennessee both in that regard and by virtue of a steady upsurge in violent crime locally during her tenure. She alleges a general laxity in Mulroy’s concern for

DA Amy Weirich victims — notably in a highly contentious TV commercial that misleadingly suggests he is a “Defund the Police” advocate motivated by a desire to turn criminals loose. The two have real differences. Mulroy is for bail reform and post-conviction reviews; Weirich is for “truth-in-sentencing.” On the matter of enforcing the state’s new anti-abortion law, which prescribes criminal penalties, both are circumspect, though Mulroy states directly that prosecuting offenders of the statute would be a “low priority” for him and Weirich insists that the issue is at this point hypothetical. In the event, it is doubtful that either would be prone to pursue such a prosecution. (The

law allows for the intervention of a special prosecutor appointed by the state.) Mulroy has made an issue of what he says is serious racial disparity in the current DA’s office, especially in the prosecutorial ranks, while Weirich maintains she is actively recruiting to improve the balance. None of the other countywide races have quite the impact or ideological import of the two discussed above, though the principals in them and their respective parties take the potential outcome quite seriously. Assessor: Melvin Burgess, the Democratic incumbent, has been aggressive both in executing his duties and in pursuing his campaign — enough so to be heavily favored over Republican nominee Steve Cross, who is a veteran of several county offices, including prior service in the Assessor’s Office. County Trustee: Incumbent Democrat Regina Morrison Newman has accumulated 10 years of service in a partial appointed term and a full elected one. She also has served as president of the West Tennessee Trustees Association, collected some $20 million in back taxes, and initiated several customer-friendly new services as the county’s de facto tax collector. Her Republican opponent is Steve Basar, a former county commissioner who claims endorsements from all of Shelby County’s suburban mayors. Both candidates have worked hard at fundraising; Newman has the advantage of incumbency and whatever blue edge remains. Sheriff: As indicated, incumbent Sheriff Floyd Bonner, a Democrat, has no Republican opponent but is opposed by two Independent candidates, Keisha Scott and Donald Taylor, both sheriff ’s deputies. Bonner should win big. Circuit Court Clerk: Democrat Jamita Swearengen, who has served recently as City Council chair, is opposed by Republican nominee Soheila Kail, a veteran of county service. Criminal Court Clerk: Incumbent continued on page 12

COVER STORY m e m p h i s f l y e r. c o m

Mayor Lee Harris; City Councilman Worth Morgan; Steve Mulroy

11


continued from page 11

PAID FOR BY THE COMMITTEE TO RE-ELECT JUDGE BETTY THOMAS MOORE, ALVIN MOORE TREASURER

Democrat Heidi Kuhn has campaigned hard and can boast more than her share of awards during her term of service; she is opposed by Republican Paul Houston, a veteran of service with the Shelby County Correctional Center. Probate Court Clerk: Democrat Eddie Jones, coming off eight years on the County Commission, during which he served as chair for a year, is opposed by Republican Dewayne Jackson. County Clerk: Democrat Wanda Halbert handily won her party’s primary in May and can probably turn the trick

T H I S W E E K at

CROS STOWN ARTS TUESDAY JOEL FRAHM WITH THE TED LUDWIG TRIO MUSIC | THE GREEN ROOM | 7:30pm

THURSDAY THE CROSSTOWN ARTHOUSE FILM SERIES presents

LADY SINGS THE BLUES

FILM | CROSSTOWN THEATER | 7:30pm

FRIDAY THE SMARTEST MAN IN THE WORLD July 14-20, 2022

MUSIC | CROSSTOWN THEATER | 7:30pm CROSSTOWN ARTS and WYXR present

CRAIG BREWER’S SECRET SCREENING

FILM | CROSSTOWN THEATER | 7:30pm

SATURDAY FOLK ALL Y’ALL presents

DANIEL CHAMPAGNE

MUSIC | THE GREEN ROOM | 7:30pm

SUNDAY LANA J.

MUSIC | THE GREEN ROOM | 7:30pm

12

For more info visit CROSSTOWNARTS.ORG or call 901.507.8030

PHOTO: JACKSON BAKER

Bonner supporters Dwayne Thompson (D) and John Gillespie (R) again, despite a delay in getting out new state automobile plates. She is opposed by Republican Jeff Jacobs and Independent Harold Smith. Register of Deeds: Democrat Willie Brooks, term-limited on the Shelby County Commission, leaves that body as its chair and is favored over Republican Bryan Edmiston and Independent George “Dempsey” Summers, a frequent candidate. Juvenile Court Judge: Strictly speaking, this position sorts out with the judicial races indicated below. Like them, it carries an eight-year term and is elected on a nonpartisan basis. There are four candidates — William “Ray” Glasgow, Dan Michael,

PHOTO: JACKSON BAKER

Tarik Sugarmon handing out lollipops. Dee Shawn Peoples, and Tarik B. Sugarmon — but almost all the attention has been focused on Michael and Sugarmon, who dueled for the judgeship eight years ago, with current incumbent Michael coming out ahead. Two dormant matters have figured in the contest. Sugarmon wants to revive a proposal to create a second juvenile judgeship, while Michael, who opposes the idea, notes that he presides over 12 magistrate referees and says that any such expansion should be multifold. At issue, too, is whether the U.S. Department of Justice should revive a suspended process and return to monitor Juvenile Court for alleged racial inequities. Sugarmon says yes; Michael was one of the county officials who, on a claim of sufficient improvements, successfully petitioned for a halt in the monitoring process. Judicial Races Inflating the ballot to more than usual proportions in this election is the presence on it of all of the county’s elective judgeships, each of them carrying an eight-year term. The sitting judges and candidates vying for these positions on the bench are enjoined from political rhetoric per se. They may not proclaim their positions on issues likely to come before them, and, aside from affirming their own presumably superior credentials, they are not to attack or otherwise indict their opponents on the ballot. Given the existence of such strictures and the sheer number of judicial positions to be chosen, it would be folly to expect the majority of lay voters to be properly prepared to make fully informed judgments on those who would judge them. Those members of the electorate best able to do so are members of the legal profession who encounter these candidates on a continued on page 14


DO YOU KNOW YOUR CANDIDATES FOR JUDGE? Each election year, the Memphis Bar Association conducts a poll of all licensed and practicing attorneys in Shelby County to determine the best qualified candidates for judicial office. Local attorneys have first-hand experience in Memphis/Shelby County courtrooms and know candidates’ qualifications best. The poll asked attorneys to choose the candidate they were familiar with in each race whom they felt was best qualified to serve. Here are the results.

2022 SHELBY COUNTY ELECTION BALLOT

3Carlos Bibbs BEST QUALIFIED q q Carol Chumney q Kenneth Margolis Circuit Court Judge, Division VI

3Stuart Breakstone q BEST QUALIFIED

Criminal Court Judge, Division III

3Michael R. McCusker q BEST QUALIFIED

q James Jones

Criminal Court Judge, Division V

3Christopher J. Lareau q BEST QUALIFIED

q Cedrick Wooten

q Carlyn Addison

Circuit Court Judge, Division VII

Criminal Court Judge, Division VI

3Mary Wagner BEST QUALIFIED q q Paul Robinson, Jr. Circuit Court Judge, Division VIII

3Robert “Bob” Weiss q BEST QUALIFIED

q Damita Dandridge q Larry Parrish Chancellor, Part I

3Gadson W. Perry BEST QUALIFIED q q Melanie Taylor Jefferson Chancellor, Part III

3JoeDae “Joe”Jenkins BEST QUALIFIED q q Richard Parks Probate Court Judge, Division II

3David L. Pool BEST QUALIFIED q q Reginald Henderson q Ross Sampson Criminal Court Judge, Division VII

3

q Varonica R. Cooper

Gen. Sessions Civil Court Judge, Div. 6

3Lonnie Thompson q BEST QUALIFIED

q Kim Gilmore Sims

Gen. Sessions Criminal Court Judge, Division 7

3Bill Anderson BEST QUALIFIED q q Handel R. Durham, Jr Gen. Sessions Criminal Court Judge, Division 8

3Lee V. Coffee BEST QUALIFIED q3Lee Wilson BEST QUALIFIED q q Kenya Brooks

Criminal Court Judge, Division VIII

3Chris Craft BEST QUALIFIED q q Sanjeev Memula

Criminal Court Judge, Division IX

3Mark Ward BEST QUALIFIED q q A. Melissa Boyd

Gen. Sessions Civil Court Judge, Div. 1

3Lynn Cobb BEST QUALIFIED q

3Karen Webster BEST QUALIFIED q Lawrence A. Pivnick q q Victoria Gillard q Joe Townsend Criminal Court Judge, Division I

Gen. Sessions Civil Court Judge, Div. 5 Gen. Sessions Criminal Court Judge, q Betty T. Moore BEST QUALIFIED Division 13

Gen. Sessions Civil Court Judge, Div. 3

q John H. Parker II q Perry S. Hayes

Gen. Sessions Criminal Court Judge, Div. 9

3Gerald Skahan BEST QUALIFIED q q Sheila Bruce-Renfroe

Environmental Court Judge, Division 14

3Patrick M. Dandridge q BEST QUALIFIED

q Danny W. Kail q Addie M. Burks

Gen. Sessions Criminal Court Judge, Division 15

3Loyce Lambert-Ryan q BEST QUALIFIED

q Christian Johnson

Juvenile Court Judge

3Dan H. Michael BEST QUALIFIED q q Tarik B. Sugarmon q William “Ray” Glasgow q Dee Shawn Peoples

City of Memphis, Municipal Court Gen. Sessions Civil Court Judge, Div. 10 Judge, Division 1

3Douglas “Greg” Gilbert q BEST QUALIFIED

q Erim Sarinoglu q Kevin Reed q Rhonda Wilson Harris q Patience “Missy” Branham q Cathy Anderson

3Paula Skahan BEST QUALIFIED q3Danielle M. Sims BEST QUALIFIED Gen. Sessions Criminal Court Judge, q q Michael Floyd q Lincoln Hodges Division 11 q William M. Larsha, Jr Criminal Court Judge, Division II 3Karen L. Massey BEST QUALIFIED q q Lisa N. Stanley 3 q Terita M. Hewlett q Joe Ozment BEST QUALIFIED Gen. Sessions Civil Court Judge, Div. 4 q Jimmy Thomas q Jennifer Fitzgerald q Gregory Carman 3Deborah M.Henderson q Gen. Sessions Criminal Court Judge, q Samuel D. Winnig BEST QUALIFIED Division 12 q Amy G. Mayne q Eran E. Julian 3Silvio R. Lucchesi BEST QUALIFIED q q Mischelle Alexander-Best Paid for by Memphis Initiative PAC, Bill H. Watkins, Jr., Treasurer

3Louis Montesi BEST QUALIFIED q q Terrance Tatum

3Kenya Hooks BEST QUALIFIED q q Carolyn S. Watkins YOUR 2022 GUIDE TO THE BEST QUALIFIED JUDICIAL CANDIDATES IN SHELBY COUNTY!

COVER STORY m e m p h i s f l y e r. c o m

Circuit Court Judge, Division II

13


$300,000 Gone Wild G iveaway

FRIDAYS & SATURDAYS | 7PM-11PM Win up to $1,000 Free SlotPlay®! 10 points equal one (1) entry. Start earning entries weekly. Up to 10X entries on Sunday and 20X entries on Mondays at 1st Jackpot and Wednesdays at Hollywood. Swipe at any promotional kiosk on Sundays to activate your multiplier.

Show N' Win Show the mychoice App when your name is called as a winner and receive a prize based on tier.

ADVANTAGE

= $25 Free SlotPlay

PREFERRED

= $75 Free SlotPlay

ELITE

continued from page 12 daily, familiar basis. Accordingly, here, as a guide to voters at large, are the results of the Memphis Bar Association Judicial Qualification Poll for 2022. Only contested and retention races were polled, and 1,199 active Shelby County attorneys participated in the survey and expressed their preferences. Here they are, with “No Opinion” being an alternative choice in each race. Circuit Court, Division II: Carlos Bibbs, 484; No Opinion, 308; Carol Chumney, 234; Kenneth Margolis, 173. Circuit Court, Division VI: Stuart Breakstone, 605; Cedric Wooten, 310; No Opinion, 284. Circuit Court, Division VII: Mary Wagner, 898; No opinion, 172; Paul

= $150 Free SlotPlay = $250 Free SlotPlay

GRAND PRIZE DRAWING

July 14-20, 2022

September 2

14

September 3

PHOTO: JACKSON BAKER ©2022 Penn National Gaming, Inc. All rights reserved. Offer not valid for self-exclusion program enrollees in jurisdictions which Penn National Gaming, Inc. operates or who have been otherwise excluded from the participating property. Must be 21 or older. Gambling Problem? Call 1-888-777-9696.

1stJackpot.com HollywoodCasinoTunica.com

Danny and Soheila Kail, husband-wife candidate team Robinson Jr., 129. Circuit Court, Division VIII: Robert Weiss, 779; Damita Dandridge, 190; No Opinion, 171; Larry Parrish, 59. Chancellor, Part I: Gadson William Perry, 798; No Opinion, 215; Melanie Taylor Jefferson, 186. Chancellor, Part III: JoeDae “Joe” Jenkins, 867; No Opinion, 259; Richard Parks, 73. Probate Court Judge, Division II: Karen Webster, 465; No Opinion, 368; Joe

PHOTO: JACKSON BAKER

Demonstrators in front of Mulroy’s and Lee Harris’ headquarters. Townsend, 366. Criminal Court Judge, Division I: Paula Skahan, 868; No Opinion, 265, Michael Floyd, 66. Criminal Court Judge, Division II: No Opinion, 417; Joe Ozment, 284; Jennifer Fitzgerald, 190; Gregory Carman,137; Samuel D. Winnig, 105; Amy G. Mayne, 66. Criminal Court Judge, Division III: No Opinion, 465; Michael R. McCusker, 461; James Jones, 273. Criminal Court Judge, Division V: Christopher J. Lareau, 513; No Opinion, 422; Carlyn Addison, 264. Criminal Court Judge, Division VI: No Opinion, 375; David L. Pool, 366; Reginald Henderson, 270; Ross Sampson, 188. Criminal Court Judge, Division VII: Lee V. Coffee, 741; No Opinion, 327; Kenya Brooks, 131. Criminal Court Judge, Division VIII: Chris Craft, 841; No Opinion, 193; Sanjeev Memula, 165. Criminal Court Judge, Division IX: Mark Ward, 888, No Opinion, 217; A. Melissa Boyd, 94. General Sessions Civil Court Judge Division 1: Lynn Cobb, 688; No Opinion, 238; Lawrence A. Pivnick, 183; Victoria Gillard, 90. General Sessions Civil Court Judge, Division 3: Danielle Mitchell Sims, 373; No Opinion, 354; Lincoln Hodges, 232; William “Bill” Larsha Jr., 138; Lisa N. Stanley, 102. General Sessions Civil Court Judge, Division 4: Deborah Means Henderson, 783; No Opinion, 316; Eran E. Julian, 100. General Sessions Civil Court Judge, Division 5: Betty Thomas Moore, 736; No Opinion, 300; Varonica R. Cooper, 163. General Sessions Civil Court Judge, Division 6: Lonnie Thompson, 750; No Opinion, 309; Kim Gilmore Sims, 140. General Sessions Criminal Court Judge, Division 7: Bill Anderson, 453; No Opinion, 334; Handel R. Durham Jr., 302.


RE-ELECT

Election Day August 4 Paid for by the Committee to Re-Elect Judge Bob Weiss Danny Woodlief, Treasurer

Track your volunteer hours on your profile so you can easily verify your child’s hours for school. Go to www.volunteerodyssey.com to get started today. Questions? Email Ariana at ariana@volunteerodyssey.com

COVER STORY m e m p h i s f l y e r. c o m

Volunteer with your entire family—no matter your child’s age!

15


steppin’ out

We Recommend: Culture, News + Reviews

The Great Catsby

PHOTO: HUMANE SOCIETY

Kumera is available for adoption.

By Abigail Morici

Everybody wants to be a cat, sings The Aristocats, but no one wants to be a cat lady. But having a cat is where it’s at. At least in Heather Prouty’s eyes, it’s the cat’s meow. “Kittens love people,” says Prouty, the cat adoption center supervisor at the Humane Society of Memphis & Shelby County, where the kittens are ready to socialize and get adopted. As such, this weekend, the kitties are hosting a special yoga session, and everyone is invited. Fortunately, you won’t be learning yoga from the cats; as one of the most flexible species, the felines would have far too high expectations for us mere humans. Instead, Cedahlia Stand, who adopted her kitten Ella Rose in June, will teach a “gentle” yoga class, and the cats will move around the room as they please, getting their much desired enrichment outside of their cages. Plus, Prouty says, “The kittens love to play. They’re wild right now.” (So you know it’s going to be a good time, even if you can’t quite stay balanced in a tree pose.) “Right now is peak kitten season at the Humane Society,” Prouty says. “In the spring, it starts to warm up and animals start to breed, and with kitties they can procreate at 4 months and if you don’t get animals spayed and neutered, we get an abundance of kittens. … Right now [our kittens] are about 3 months old. And of course, we have every age, shape, and type of cat as well.” If you happen to fall in love with one, you can adopt them for $50, and if you want two, the nonprofit will waive the fee for the second for the month of July. “I always joke if you have to have a litter pan anyway, one cat is no harder work than two,” Prouty says. “Plus, the kittens are so funny to watch when they’re together.” KITTEN YOGA, HUMANE SOCIETY OF MEMPHIS & SHELBY COUNTY, SATURDAY, JULY 16, 9 A.M., $10.

Brother-and-sister duo celebrate their newly franchised D’Bo’s location. Food Feature, p. 24

Monika Grzymala brings the act of drawing into three-dimensional space. Arts, p. 25

July 14-20, 2022

VARIOUS DAYS & TIMES July 14th - 20th

16

A Closer Walk with Patsy Cline Playhouse on the Square, performances through July 17, $20$42 A theatrical tribute to the legendary country and pop icon, Patsy Cline, as seen through the eyes and heart of a local radio disc jockey in Patsy’s hometown of Winchester, Virginia. A Closer Walk with Patsy Cline features a score of Patsy’s greatest hits like, “Crazy,” “Walkin’ After Midnight,” and “I Fall to Pieces.” The show also features backup vocals crooned by The Jordanaires. Performances run FridaySaturday at 8 p.m., with a Sunday matinee at 2 p.m.

Darius Rucker Memphis Botanic Garden, Friday, July 15, 5 p.m., $60-$300 Live at the Garden has been providing Memphis with music since 2001. And this Friday, you can enjoy a concert from country music star Darius Rucker. With 2,500 people seated at white linen-cloth tables, and 4,500 people partying on the lawn, where else can you sip a cold beverage, relax, and listen to some of the hottest touring artists in the world? Whether you bring in your own food and drinks, pre-order from a Live at the Garden caterers, or purchase on-site, Live at the Garden has everything you need for a great Memphis night!

Cocktails & Chemistry with the Blue Suede Sisters Museum of Science and History, Friday, July 15, 6-8:50 p.m. and 8-10:50 p.m., $25 A one-of-a-kind, 21+ night of shenanigans that combines cocktails, drag nuns, and science experiments, where guests can buy drinks from the cash bar and mingle with the Sisters before going downstairs to perform exciting science experiments under the instruction of Sister Kat Ion and the Blue Suede Sisters. In the laboratory, guests will need to work in pairs, so bring a lab partner or one will be assigned for you!

From the Beyond: Ghosts, Spiritualism, and Cemeteries Elmwood Cemetery, Friday, July 15, 5:30-6:30 p.m., $20 Anyone who works at a cemetery (technically, a cemetarian) knows that the number one question posed to them by the public will always be: Have you ever seen a ghost? After years of avowed silence and cynicism on the subject, Elmwood Cemetery is ready to talk about it. Executive director Kim Bearden will share the fascinating history of spiritualism in the United States, and how it ties into the abolitionist, temperance, and suffrage movements. She will explore the meaning of spiritualism,


PHOTO: COURTESY KENNETH WAYNE ALEXANDER

Tower of Babel, 2021.

NFT, WTF?

Live music at

By Abigail Morici

When Beeple sold an NFT for $69 million in March 2021, I can bet $69 million that you hadn’t heard of NFTs before then. Okay, maybe that’s just me. But digital art has been around since the 1960s as artists experimented with early computer art. Today, though, after a pandemic-induced shift toward virtual environments, digital art seems more mainstream than ever. “Whether or not you think this is valid art,” says Patricia Daigle, “the way we use digital, it’s just part of who we are. I think you’ll just increasingly see [digital] art in general.” Daigle, who has curated the Brooks’ latest exhibition “Another Dimension: Digital Art in Memphis,” points out that digital art is not just “a tiny GIF or something you can view on the screen, that the digital can be thought of as a tool or space.” In this exhibit, artists like Kenneth Wayne Alexander II, Karl Erickson, and Anthony Sims, do turn to animation and NFTs as their preferred medium, but Coe Lapossy and Sarai Payne demonstrate the use of digital in sculpture featuring video and collage using online images and Photoshop. “I find it really interesting how artists of all backgrounds are using these digital tools,” Daigle says. “I think it’s really interesting and exciting we’re living in this moment where [a new art movement is] being developed. … The market and sort of the attitudes are always shifting. What you’re looking at isn’t staying static.” To speak on our constantly changing, hyper-digitized world, the Brooks is hosting two panels this weekend, the first of which will touch on how and why artists engage with digital forms, the second of which will delve into NFTs. “We’re almost at a point where we feel overwhelmed by technology,” Daigle says, but she hopes that by engaging with the exhibition we can find pleasure in the digital and perhaps reflect on our connection to technology, “whether it’s positive or negative or neither.”

july 14th Mighty souls brass bands

“ANOTHER DIMENSION: DIGITAL ART IN MEMPHIS,” MEMPHIS BROOKS MUSEUM OF ART, ON DISPLAY THROUGH SEPTEMBER 11. ARTISTS’ TALK: ART IN THE DIGITAL AGE, FRIDAY, JULY 15, 6 P.M. | NFTS: BEYOND BOOM OR BUST, SATURDAY, JULY 16, 2 P.M.

july 15th Thumpdaddy

Ida B. Wells Celebration - Unveiling & Groundbreaking of Phase II Ida B. Wells Status & Plaza, Saturday, July 16, 12-1:30 p.m. Join the Memphis Memorial Committee for the annual Ida B. Wells Celebration, where the committee will unveil plans for the revitalization of the plaza and break ground for construction. Birthday cake will be served, and guests can enjoy live music

“Thomas Campbell: Corollary” Closing Reception Metal Museum, Saturday, July 16, 3-5 p.m. Fifth-generation steelworker and sculptor Thomas Campbell’s boundary-bending exhibition closes this weekend. The artist will be in town to discuss his work at the closing reception. The exhibition marks a departure in concept for the studio artist as he shapes both the form and function of his work while blending tradition with innovation. The evolution is Campbell’s way of embracing his family’s roots in the steel fabrication industry, which date back nearly 150 years.

MicroCinema: Best of Children’s Film Festival Seattle Showcase Crosstown Theater, Wednesday, July 20, 6:30 p.m. This program, which includes award-winning and audience favorite short films from the Children’s Film Festival in Seattle, intends for youth audiences to gain global awareness through the medium of film. From an exploration of what we see in the clouds, a walk where sidewalk chalk comes to life, and continuing the skill and celebration of Labrador Inuit drumming, these films wonderfully cover a broad range of ages and experiences. Recommended for kids ages 8 and up.

july 21st Jombi

july 28th Sean Martin

july 29th Mark Edgar Stuart

railgarten.com 2 1 6 6 C e n t r a l Av e . Memphis TN 38104

ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT

or the religious belief that the dead communicate with and advise the living. Ghost photography, séance, and more will be illuminated during this 45-minute, indoor presentation. Beverages and snacks will be provided.

Joselyn and The Sweet Compression

m e m p h i s f l y e r. c o m

july 16th

No matter how clichéd it sounds, it really does take a village to raise a kid. Last Word, p. 31

17


MUSIC By Alex Greene

DreamFest 11 Local music lovers bring out the city’s best newcomers.

I

July 14-20, 2022

18

’m just a super fan,” says Cat Evans, and she has indeed attended hundreds, if not thousands, of local live performances over the past decade. But unlike many of us, she’s a fan who was determined to give her favorite artists more exposure — to both a wider audience and to one another. “I noticed that the music scene is so segregated,” she reflects. “I would see poets and acoustic singers Downtown; then I’d see backpack rappers off the highway, near the University of Memphis. Then I’d see trap rappers off of Summer Avenue. And I would bring up the names of my favorites to the other circles, so if I met a trap rapper and then went down to the poetry scene, I’d say, ‘Have you ever met such and such?’ I realized they were all in their own individual silos.” That realization planted the seed of DreamFest, a music festival that’s now beginning its second decade. Next week, anyone attending DreamFest Weekend 11 at the Overton Park Shell will take part in Evans’ vision of mixing up the divided scenes of the city into one big melting pot. “It’s intentionally diverse,” Evans says. “So this year we have everything from a string quartet to a gospel rapper.” While the Shell often brings in heavyweights for their Orion Free Concert Series and Shell Yeah! events, don’t expect any household names on the roster for DreamFest — that would be missing the point. “We don’t really consider anyone to be a headliner,” Evans continues. “We make sure that the lineup for DreamFest has folks that you may have not seen before and who have probably not met each other before. And we try to give everybody the same spotlight.” Shahidah Jones, Evans’ partner in staging DreamFest, agrees. “We don’t bring big names to draw a crowd,” she says. “Memphis has a prolific music scene. You’ll see a variety of artists that you won’t see in other places. And even if you have seen the performer before, this is a new way to see them. We give the performer complete artistic freedom. They’re using this time to do their own music in a new way.” Indeed, DreamFest may be the first time some of the artists have had a chance to perform with a live, world-class band backing them. “It’s a three-day weekend, and each night has a house band and a DJ, and then the performers,” Evans says. “As far as the house band is concerned,

we normally reach out to someone who we consider the musical director, and then they put together the band.” This year’s musical director for all three days is Antonio Motley. “The house band then learns the artists’ music, so the artists can perform their originals with the band.” This can be especially invaluable to rappers. Evans points out that “some of the rappers are used to just performing with their [pre-recorded] tracks. So we provide a band.” Jones concurs, adding that simply showcasing these rap acts in a large venue is a big step for many of them. “One reason we push hip-hop is because, in Memphis, there are not a lot of venues for it,” says Jones. “You may see performers of color doing covers, but you will not see many independent music folks and definitely not much hip-hop that falls outside of street trap rap. And even street trap rappers are relegated to only certain venues. Some people think if you have

PHOTO: (ABOVE) FRANK CHIN; (BELOW) BRANDON KINDER

DreamFest 11 celebrates all music. these folks in your lineup, you’re inviting crime or violence. Each year, we have proven that that’s not the case. If you treat folks with honesty, give them a safe space, and provide an environment that’s open and welcoming, folks return the favor.” DreamFest Weekend 11 is sponsored by Official Black Lives Matter Memphis Chapter, Memphis Artists For Change, SisterReach, and Memphis United for Fairness and Justice, and takes place at the Overton Park Shell, with each day organized around a theme: “DreamFest: The Concert” takes place Friday, July 22nd; “Girl Power” is on Saturday, July 23rd; and “Loungin’ in the Park” is on Sunday, July 24th. Live music begins at 5 p.m. each day. Free. Visit dreamfestweekend.com for details.


KEEPING IT FRESH SINCE 1998 NOW WELCOMING THESE MEMPHIS FAVORITES

SATURDAY AUGUST 20

LADY A radiansamp.com

INFO@CORDELIASMARKET.COM

@CORDELIASMARKET

m e m p h i s f l y e r. c o m

(901) 526-4772

ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT

737 HARBOR BEND RD, MEMPHIS, TN 38103

19


CALENDAR of EVENTS:

July 14 - 20

ART AN D S P EC I A L E X H I B ITS

“Action!: Art in Motion”

An educational, interactive exhibition that encourages visitors to think about how twodimensional art can capture dynamic moments of motion. Through Sept. 25. MEMPHIS BROOKS MUSEUM OF ART

“Alice’s Adventures at the Garden”

Meet larger-than-life Alice in Wonderland-themed sculptures constructed entirely of mosaiculture. Through Oct. 31. MEMPHIS BOTANIC GARDEN

“Anna Bearman and Dimitri Stevens”

See new works by Anna Bearman and Dimitri Stevens, two dynamic, young artists who are rapidly making an impression on the Memphis art community. The art may be seen by appointment. Through July 15. JAMES LEE HOUSE

“Another Dimension: Digital Art in Memphis” Exhibition exploring the rise of mainstream interest in digital art. Featuring work by Anthony Sims, Sarai Payne, Karl Erickson, and Coe Lapossy. Through Sept. 11.

MEMPHIS BROOKS MUSEUM OF ART

“Art of the African Diaspora”

Exhibition of historic and contemporary art questions and complicates the often-used term, “diaspora.” Through Aug. 29. MEMPHIS BROOKS MUSEUM OF ART

“Charcoal Portraits by Anita Biriya”

Exhibition of charcoal portrait drawings by artist Anita Biriya from Herat, Afghanistan. Through July 18. BUCKMAN ARTS CENTER AT ST. MARY’S SCHOOL

“Down the Rabbit Hole” Exhibition of various local artists’ interpretations of the White Rabbit. Through Dec. 31. MEMPHIS BOTANIC GARDEN

July 14-20, 2022

“Elvis: Dressed to Rock”

Exhibition exploring Elvis’ on-stage style from 1969 to 1977. Featuring more than 100 pieces of stage wear, including jumpsuits, capes, belts, jewelry, original designer sketches, and more. Ongoing. GRACELAND

“Faig Ahmed: Secret Garden”

Exhibition of work by Faig Ahmed, who is known for transforming the visual language of traditional Eastern carpets into contemporary, sculptural works of art. Through Aug. 9. MEMPHIS BROOKS MUSEUM OF ART

“Flowerful: Fashioning the Armored Feminine”

20

Exhibition of Ramona Sonin’s couture gowns and drawings of fantastical women,

Send the date, time, place, cost, info, phone number, a brief description, and photos — two weeks in advance — to calendar@memphisflyer.com. DUE TO SPACE LIMITATIONS, ONGOING WEEKLY EVENTS WILL APPEAR IN THE FLYER’S ONLINE CALENDAR ONLY. FOR COMPREHENSIVE EVENTS LISTING, VISIT EVENTS.MEMPHISFLYER.COM/CAL. world of digital art and NFTs. Saturday, July 16, 2 p.m.

who, like her gowns, walk the line between toughness and softness, contemporary and timeless, and edge and grace. Sunday, July 17-Oct. 23.

MEMPHIS BROOKS MUSEUM OF ART

Paint and Sip: Gilded House Plants

THE DIXON GALLERY & GARDENS

Grab your friends for a paint and sip night where you will paint your favorite house plant! $40. Saturday, July 16, 6-8 p.m.

“From Artisans to Artists: AfricanAmerican Metal Workers in Memphis”

ARROW CREATIVE

Exhibition that traces the role of Black metal workers from Central and West Africa to modern-day Memphis, bringing to the fore an often overlooked yet vital part of the city’s artistic history. Through Sept. 11.

Paper & Clay Seconds Sale 2022

Shop hundreds of perfectly imperfect pieces, up to 75 percent off. Saturday, July 16, 8-11:30 a.m. PAPER & CLAY

METAL MUSEUM

Resident Artist Talks

“Handcrafted for the Hungry”

Learn about the work of the artists currently in the residency program. Free. Tuesday, July 19, 6-8 p.m.

Presenting handcrafted empty bowls, plates, and cups for sale by local ceramic artists to benefit the Mid-South Food Bank. Through Sept. 30.

THE GREEN ROOM AT CROSSTOWN ARTS

“Thomas Campbell: Corollary” Closing Reception

WOMAN’S EXCHANGE ART GALLERY

“Isaac Hayes: Black Moses Gives Back”

Closing reception for exhibition of work by fifth-generation steelworker Thomas Campbell. Saturday, July 16, 3-5 p.m.

An engaging exhibition that showcases Hayes’ unique dashikis collection and his humanitarian work in Ghana. Through July 31.

METAL MUSEUM

MUSEUM OF SCIENCE & HISTORY

C LAS S / WO R KS H O P

“Love in the Club: Photographs by Michael Abramson”

Garden Chat: Senses Like a Cat

Tap into your senses with Adam Gann as he teaches you how to be like the sneaky and always aware cat. Thursday, July 14, 5-8 p.m.

Exhibition of images of Chicago’s South Side underground life. Through Sept. 4. STAX MUSEUM OF AMERICAN SOUL MUSIC

“Many Mansions”

An exhibition of Nancy Cheairs’ single work comprised of 50 canvases. Through July 16. TOPS GALLERY: MADISON AVENUE PARK

“Memphis Proud: The Resilience of a Southern LGBTQ+ Community” Explore the history and culture of Memphis’ LGBTQ+ community. Through Sept. 26. MUSEUM OF SCIENCE & HISTORY

“Michael Ngo Exhibition”

L.A.-based fashion and pop culture designer Michael Ngo is known for creating one-ofa-kind pieces that celebrate freedom, sexuality, and strength. Through Sept. 30. ART MUSEUM AT THE UNIVERSITY OF MEMPHIS (AMUM)

“Nothing Ever Goes Unseen”

Shaped by his family history, John Roberts’ paintings and drawings express the extraordinary within everyday environments in this exhibit. Through July 31. DAVID LUSK GALLERY

“Rapid Response Exhibition: POVERTY TODAY!”

Exhibition that highlights the current Poor People’s Campaign Movement and dire issues impacted by the pandemic. Through Dec. 31. NATIONAL CIVIL RIGHTS MUSEUM

The virtual exhibition “Re-Emergence” features Rick Cannon’s Emerging Remnants, remnants of two butterflies from long ago. On view through July 31st at wkno.org. “Re-Emergence”

Virtual exhibition of decorative, functional, and wearable art by the Tennessee Craft Southwest Chapter. Through July 31. GALLERY 1091

“Rise Up: Stonewall and the LGBTQ Rights Movement”

Exhibition of artifacts and images that shed light on important milestones of gay rights history. Through Sept. 26. MUSEUM OF SCIENCE & HISTORY

“Solidarity Now! 1968 Poor People’s Campaign”

Exhibition that explores the little-known history of the multicultural movement to address poverty and social justice in the nation. Through July 31. NATIONAL CIVIL RIGHTS MUSEUM

“Spoiled”

Group exhibition exploring pleasure — the ways we seek it, the ways we bar ourselves from experiencing it, and the ways we contextualize it. Viewer discretion is advised. Through July 16. TONE

“The Art of Science”

Over 30 local artists will present a piece of art inspired by the work of area researchers

MEMPHIS BOTANIC GARDEN

Ice Cream Class

Make your own ice cream and take it to go in a signature Kaye’s pint container. $50. Saturday, July 16, 7 p.m.

and clinicians, which will also be on display alongside the works of art. Through Sept. 4.

her technique. Thursday, July 14, 5:30 p.m. PLAYHOUSE ON THE SQUARE

KAYE’S PINTS & SCOOPS

CROSSTOWN ARTS AT THE CONCOURSE

Artists’ Talk: Art in the Digital Age

Marble Dirty Pour

“The Natural World” Art Exhibition by Libby Anderson Exhibition of work by Libby Anderson. Through July 30. MEMPHIS BOTANIC GARDEN

“Thomas Campbell: Corollary”

Exhibition of work by fifthgeneration steelworker Thomas Campbell, who shapes both the form and function of his work while blending tradition with innovation. Through July 17. METAL MUSEUM

“Wearable Art Exhibition”

Wearable art exists as an avenue for pure artistic expression within the world of fashion design. Through Sept. 30. ART MUSEUM AT THE UNIVERSITY OF MEMPHIS (AMUM)

ART HAPPE N I NGS

Artist’s Reception

See unique saw-dust-fired pieces in traditional forms and shapes and hear the potter Patricia Prins Schwarz explain

What does it mean to be an artist in our hyper-digitized world? Join exhibition artists Karl Erickson, Coe Lapossy, and Sarai Payne as they discuss how and why they engage with the digital. Friday, July 15, 6:30 p.m. MEMPHIS BROOKS MUSEUM OF ART

Free Panel Discussion: Five Guys Named Moe

Songwriters share how they funnel their emotions into their music. Followed by a pay-whatyou-can performance of Five Guys Named Moe. Thursday, July 14, 6-7:15 p.m. HATTILOO THEATRE

Munch and Learn

The lecture series features presentations by local artists, scholars, and Dixon staff sharing their knowledge on a variety of topics. Wednesday, July 20, noon-1 p.m. THE DIXON GALLERY & GARDENS

NFTs: Beyond Boom or Bust

Join exhibition artists Kenneth Wayne Alexander II, Anthony Sims, and Tam Gryn as they discuss their journeys into the

Learn all of the dirty pour marble painting basics and make beautiful one-of-a-kind abstract paintings. $50. Friday, July 15, 6-8 p.m. ARROW CREATIVE

C O M E DY

Joe Torry

Joe Torry’s off-the-cuff brand of comedy has made him a living legend. Unlike most comedians, he doesn’t prerehearse his scripts; he uses the audience to unleash his raw and unfiltered comedic style. $60. Friday, July 15, 7:30 p.m., 10 p.m.; Saturday, July 16, 7:30 p.m., 10 p.m. CHUCKLES COMEDY HOUSE

Open Mic Comedy

Hosted by John Miller. Tuesday, July 19, 8 p.m. HI TONE

Revenge of the Nerds 2

The nerds are back and are funnier than ever. Hosted by Eclectic Enigma and featuring Little Rock’s own Nick Moore and headliner Reggie Junior. $20. Saturday, July 16, 8 p.m. THE COMEDY JUNT


C A L E N D A R : J U LY 1 4 - 2 0 URBAN EARTH GARDENS, NURSERY & MARKET

Meal Distribution with the Cordova YMCA

C O M M U N I TY

Volunteer with the YMCA of Memphis and the Mid-South to distribute food to neighbors in need. Saturday, July 16, 9 a.m.-noon.

Community Garden with Carpenter Art Garden

Trail Opening

LOCAL (DOWNTOWN)

If you would enjoy being in an urban garden, consider volunteering some time at the Carpenter Art Garden. Tuesday, July 19, 3-5 p.m. CARPENTER ART GARDEN

Dance Party

Enjoy dancing to R&B, country, and pop music. Attendees to the dance must be 18 years of age or older and have a disability. Friday, July 15, 3-5:30 p.m.

YMCA OF MEMPHIS & THE MID-SOUTH

Get out and enjoy the new trail and the beauty of T.O. Fuller State Park with food and drink. Saturday, July 16, 10 a.m. T.O. FULLER STATE PARK

Yappy Hour in Edge Triangle

Visit with neighbors in the dog park before walking over to High Cotton for a drink on MMDC. Tuesday, July 19, 5:30 p.m. EDGE TRIANGLE

curated selection of books, which focus on historical events and civil or human rights issues. Wednesday, July 20.

Look at Me, with food, drinks, and vendors. $10. Saturday, July 16, 8-11 p.m.

NATIONAL CIVIL RIGHTS MUSEUM

Lupus Fundraiser Movie Night

¡VIVA EL TEATRO! Bilingual Theatre Workshops

Join Cazateatro to explore fun bilingual theater activities for the whole family. Saturday, July 16, 11:30 a.m.-12:30 p.m. THE DIXON GALLERY & GARDENS

Crosstown Brewing is teaming up with HappiDog Rescue to celebrate its summer seasonal beer, Dog Days Pink Lemonade Shandy, and find homes for some lucky dogs! Dogs will be on-site from 2 to 5 p.m. Saturday, July 16, 2-7 p.m.

F E ST IVA L

CathARTic - Black Yoga and Mental Wellness Festival

CathARTic is more than merely a festival. It is a healing space created with intention and attention to the unique wellness needs of the Black community. Saturday, July 16, 10 a.m.-3 p.m. ORANGE MOUND COMMUNITY CENTER

CROSSTOWN BREWING CO.

Dog Days of Summer

Bring your well-behaved dog on a leash to the new tire trail near the Interpretive Center, and take a hike with a ranger. Choose from sessions at 8 a.m., 9 a.m., 5 p.m., or 6 p.m. Saturday, July 16-July 17. T.O. FULLER STATE PARK

Ida B. Wells Celebration: Unveiling & Groundbreaking of Phase II

Please join the Memphis Memorial Committee for the annual Ida B. Wells Celebration, where the committee will unveil plans for the revitalization of the plaza and break ground for construction. Saturday, July 16, noon-1:30 p.m. IDA B. WELLS STATUE & PLAZA

Indoor Plant Prop & Swap

Bring your cuttings, propagations, and other plant babies to trade with the plant com-

FA M I LY

FI LM

Explore Memphis

Bladerunner 40th Anniversary Screening

Join MPL for Explore Memphis 2022 where an “Ocean of Possibilities” awaits. All ages are invited to register for MPL’s reading challenge. Be on the lookout for more Explore Memphis. Through July 31. BENJAMIN L. HOOKS CENTRAL LIBRARY

H2Oh! Splash Park at CMOM

This garden-themed exhibit provides over 7,700 square feet of cool fun with 40+ sprayers including jet streams, mists, geysers, and water tunnels. Through Sept. 4. CHILDREN’S MUSEUM OF MEMPHIS

Mudpie Mondays

Children can dig in and craft their own mud-pie using natural materials. Monday, July 18, 10 a.m.-noon. MEMPHIS BOTANIC GARDEN

Puppet Show

Join the Silver Lining Puppet Players as they perform their shadow puppet show, The Three Little Fishies and the Big Bad Shark. A craft activity will follow. Thursday, July 14, 1:30-2:15 p.m. BENJAMIN L. HOOKS CENTRAL LIBRARY

Small but Mighty Storytime Series

For young activists and families. Virtual read-alouds of a

A movie night fundraiser to support the Memphis Lupus Support group, showing Sister Act. There will be a small concession stand to purchase snacks. $3. Friday, July 15, 6-8 p.m. DEMOIR BOOKS AND THINGS

RAYMOND SKINNER CENTER

Dog Days/HappiDog Rescue Adoption Day

136 CUMBERLAND

One of the most important pieces of sci-fi cinema, Bladerunner is still as influential today as when it was released 40 years ago. Free. Thursday, July 14, 7:30-9:30 p.m.

MicroCinema: Best of Children’s Film Festival Seattle Showcase

This program, which includes award-winning and audience favorite short films from the most recent Children’s Film Festival, aims for youth audiences to gain global awareness through the medium of film. Wednesday, July 20, 6:30 p.m. CROSSTOWN THEATER

Overton Square Summer Movie Nights: Father of the Bride

Plan ahead and order your favorite meal from an OS eatery of choice, grab a blanket or chair, and meet in Chimes Square for a classic motion flick. Free popcorn provided. Thursday, July 14, 8:30 p.m.

BLACK LODGE

OVERTON SQUARE

Craig Brewer’s Secret Screening

Summer Movie Series: La Bamba

You are invited to enjoy one of Craig’s favorite films, with an introduction to the film from Craig himself! With very special guests including Memphis hip-hop legend Al Kapone! $5. Friday, July 15, 7:30 p.m.

The bar will be open and there will be food trucks, games, and shady trees — you bring your chairs and blankets! Picnics welcome. Friday, July 15, 6-8 p.m.

THE GREEN ROOM AT CROSSTOWN ARTS

GERMANTOWN PERFORMING ARTS CENTER

Dinner & A Movie: Spirited Away

TCM: Cabaret 50th Anniversary

Enjoy a vegetarian meal with a screening of Spirited Away. Friday, July 15, 7-9:30 p.m. BLACK LODGE

Lady Sings the Blues

Diana Ross stars as legendary singer Billie Holiday. Nominated for an Academy Award, Diana carries the movie with intense acting chops. $5. Thursday, July 14, 7:30 p.m. THE GREEN ROOM AT CROSSTOWN ARTS

Look at Me!

A huge movie event showcasing the XXXtentacion biopic

Berlin, 1931, As Nazism rises in Germany, flamboyant American Sally Bowles (Liza Minnelli) sings in a nightclub and falls in love with a British language teacher, whom she shares with a German baron. Sunday, July 17, 3 p.m.; Wednesday, July 20, 7 p.m. MALCO PARADISO CINEMA GRILL & IMAX

The Deer King-Fan Event (dubbed)

In the aftermath of a brutal war, former soldier Van toils in anime controlled by the ruling empire. Thursday,

July 14, 7 p.m.

July 19, 6-9 p.m.

MALCO PARADISO CINEMA GRILL & IMAX

PLAYHOUSE ON THE SQUARE

Transformers 15th Anniversary

From director Michael Bay and executive producer Steven Spielberg comes the thrilling blockbuster battle between the heroic Autobots and the evil Decepticons. Thursday, July 14, 7 p.m. MALCO PARADISO CINEMA GRILL & IMAX

H EA LT H A N D F IT N ES S

Group Meditation

Join intuitive guide, teacher, and author Michele Sammons for a free guided meditation session in the formal gardens. All levels are welcome. Wednesday, July 20, 8:30-9:15 a.m. OVERTON PARK

FOOD AN D DR I N K

Canoes + Cocktails

Experience an unrivaled sunset with a guided evening paddle on Hyde Lake, followed by cocktails and snacks. Friday, July 15, 7:15-9:45 p.m. SHELBY FARMS PARK

Chelsea Avenue Farmers Market

Living Life Deliberately: Mindfulness Meditation in Daily Life This class focuses on how you can practice meditation in ways that foster your ability to live deliberately, paying attention to what matters. Friday, July 15, noon-12:30 p.m. CHURCH HEALTH

The Chelsea Avenue Farmers Market is an open-air community farmers market at the intersection of Chelsea Avenue and Springdale Street in the Hollywood-Hyde Park neighborhood. Saturday, July 16, 9 a.m.-noon.

Lunchtime Meditations with Karla Ingram

CHELSEA AVENUE FARMERS MARKET

THE DIXON GALLERY & GARDENS

Cooper-Young Community Farmers Market

A variety of fresh seasonal produce and special artisan fares, featuring work by local artists. Saturday, July 16, 8 a.m.-6 p.m. FIRST CONGREGATIONAL CHURCH

Food Truck Fridays

Enjoy food trucks every Friday at Health Sciences Park. Friday, July 15, 11:30 a.m.-1 p.m. HEALTH SCIENCES PARK

Lightfoot Farm Market

Local farmers market full of fresh farm raised meat, produce, fresh eggs, baked goods, artisan cheeses, jams and jellies, canned goods, spices and rubs, honey, bottled barbecue sauces, and more. Saturday, July 16, 9 a.m.-2 p.m. LIGHTFOOT FARM

The Great Wine Performances

This fun and funky fundraiser brings 10 exciting shows to life and pairs them with 10 different wines to create an evening guests won’t soon forget! $75/ general, $100/VIP. Tuesday,

Make time for yourself each week and explore a variety of meditation practices designed to help you find balance and reduce stress. Free. Friday, July 15, noon-12:30 p.m.

Open Water Swims + Clinics

Open water swims and swim clinic sessions are open to a wide range of skill levels. Sunday, July 17, 6:30-10:30 a.m. SHELBY FARMS PARK

Sunset Yoga Downtown

All ages and experience levels are welcome for the free yoga class with instructor Bridget Sisney. Sunday, July 17, 5:30-6:30 p.m. FOURTH BLUFF PARK

Tai Chi

Relieve stress and increase flexibility by participating in Tai Chi classes led by a certified instructor. Wednesday, July 20, 3-4 p.m. SHELBY FARMS PARK

Taijiquan

Led by Milan Vigil, this Chinese martial art promotes relaxation, improves balance, and provides no-impact aerobic benefits. Ages 16 and older. Free. Saturday, July 16, 10:30-11:30 a.m. THE DIXON GALLERY & GARDENS

continued on page 22

m e m p h i s f l y e r. c o m

Get your laughs on with the Comma Comedians! A fantastic lineup of local and touring comedians. Thursday, July 14, 8-9:30 p.m.

munity and spread some green! Saturday, July 16, 10 a.m.-2 p.m.

ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT

Secret Show Comedy at Local on Main presented by Comma Comedians

21


C A L E N D A R : J U LY 1 4 - 2 0

PAY IT FORWARD & GET PAID Seeking Blood & Cell Donors Support important medical research focused on fighting

PHOTO: BILL SIMMERS

life-threatening diseases.

Playhouse on the Square’s A Closer Walk with Patsy Cline closes July 17th.

Make a big difference for patients seeking new hope.

continued from page 21

Qualified donors are

Twilight Yoga and Pilates

You will feel the entire body burn in this fun, low-impact workout. Join the Shell each Monday for a rotating yoga and Pilates workout. Free. Monday, July 18, 5:30-6:30 p.m.

compensated for their time — from $50 to several hundred dollars depending on the study.

OVERTON PARK SHELL

Weekly Hike for Mental Health Awareness

901-252-3434

researchchampions.com

CARRY NARCAN (Narcan provided at no cost)

July 14-20, 2022

Free Individual and Agency trainings are available Qualifying Agencies are: • Health Organizations • Treatment Centers • Churches • Schools • Local Businesses • Non Profits • Restaurants/Bars/Clubs • Hotels etc...

22

A group of middle-aged women working together in a used automobile luxury car dealership struggle with an overbearing and abusive female boss. $30. Friday, July 15-July 17.

Five Guys Named Moe

T.O. FULLER STATE PARK

Magical Miss Mothie and Brenda Newport take the reins for this month to bring the newest in Mid-South LGBTQ+ entertainers. Sunday, July 17, 6 p.m.

Strengthen your yoga practice and enjoy the health benefits of light exercise with a certified yoga instructor. If weather permits, yoga will take place in the gardens. Thursday, July 14, 6-6:45 p.m. THE DIXON GALLERY & GARDENS

L E CT U R E

From the Beyond: Ghosts, Spiritualism, and Cemeteries

After years of avowed silence and cynicism on the subject, Elmwood Cemetery is ready to talk about its ghosts in this 45-minute presentation. $20. Friday, July 15, 5:30-6:30 p.m. ELMWOOD CEMETERY

Prescribed Fire

This project is funded under a Grant Contract with the State of Tennessee Department of Mental Health and Substance Abuse Services.

Cougars

Open Stage with Moth! Moth! Moth! and Brenda Newport

CHRISTIAN BROTHERS UNIVERSITY

If you need help, support, or referral to treatment, please call Lincoln Coffman (901) 495-5103

A variety show featuring Papa Chubb and his sparkly friends, followed by a dance party with Memphis House Mafia. $20-$100. Saturday, July 16, 8 p.m.

PLAYHOUSE ON THE SQUARE

THE EVERGREEN THEATRE

Join for a talk about urban planning in Memphis. Panelists will discuss the progress to date and the challenges of implementing street taming and other complete streets improvements. $15. Thursday, July 14, 4-5:30 p.m.

memphisprevention.org

Channel Chubb!: A Variety Show of Cosmic Proportions

BLACK LODGE

Memphis 3.0 Today

To schedule training, please call: David Fuller (901) 484-2852

HI TONE

Patsy Cline, as seen through the eyes and heart of a local radio disc jockey in Patsy’s hometown of Winchester, Virginia. Through July 17.

Rangers will get you in great mental shape to face the day! Wednesday, July 20, 8:309:30 a.m.

Yoga with Laura Gray McCann

PREVENT OPIOID OVERDOSE

friendly, passionate, and collaborative fashion. $9.01. Monday, July 18, 8 p.m.

Learn about prescribed burns and wildfires from T.O. Fuller State Park Rangers every Saturday in July. Choose from three sessions: 10 a.m., 2 p.m., and 4 p.m. Saturday, July 16; Wednesday, July 20. T.O. FULLER STATE PARK

DRU’S PLACE

HATTILOO THEATRE

Shanktown S P EC IA L EVE NTS

Cocktails & Chemistry with the Blue Suede Sisters

MoSH & the Blue Suede Sisters invite you to a one-ofa-kind night of shenanigans that combines cocktails, drag nuns, and science experiments. $25. Friday, July 15, 6-9 p.m., 8-11 p.m. MUSEUM OF SCIENCE & HISTORY

MidSouth Derby And Ales: Wood Block Racing For Grown Ups! Pinewood derby-style racing for adults … with beer! Wednesday, July 20, 6 p.m. SOUL & SPIRITS BREWERY

Twilight Thursdays

MBG will be open late for dog-friendly hours with food trucks and curious cocktails, plus special guests, vendors, performances, and more. Thursday, July 14, 5-8 p.m. MEMPHIS BOTANIC GARDEN

S PO R TS

There’s a patriarch whose power is waning fast, a questionable friend, an estranged son, and a clinging daughter. Like an ancient Greek tragedy with modern-day laughs, Shanktown is an emotional processing arena that holds the potential to everything from hate to hope. Through July 24. PLAYHOUSE ON THE SQUARE

The Spongebob Musical

The stakes are higher than ever as SpongeBob and all of Bikini Bottom face the total annihilation of their undersea world. Can the power of optimism really save the world? $12-$17. Friday, July 15, 7 p.m.; Saturday, July 16, 2 p.m., 7 p.m.; Sunday, July 17, 2 p.m. HERNANDO PERFORMING ARTS CENTER

Wakey, Wakey

The New York Times calls Wakey, Wakey a “glowingly dark, profoundly moving” work. It’s a funny, sad, tragic, comic examination of the many ways a life can run its course. $20. Through July 17.

901 FC vs. Louisville City

GERMANTOWN COMMUNITY THEATRE

Saturday, July 16, 7:30 p.m.

TO U R S

AUTOZONE PARK

Backstage Experience Tour

P E R F O R M I N G A R TS

T H EAT E R

901 Poetry Open Mic

A Closer Walk with Patsy Cline

Showcasing Memphis’ poetry, spoken word, and performing arts community in a loving,

Nomax is broke, his lovely Lorraine left him, and he’s listening to the radio at 5 in the morning. Out of the radio, five guys named Moe appear and encourage Lomax to turn his life around. Friday, July 15-Aug. 7.

A theatrical tribute to the legendary country and pop icon,

The Shell is opening up the Green Rooms for a guided tour that will take you from its 1936 beginnings to the present. $15. Monday, July 18, 2-3 p.m. OVERTON PARK SHELL


FOOD By Michael Donahue

Cheese Wizard Arbo’s Cheese Dip takes off.

Sa n d w i ch e s AT S O UTH P OI NT K I TCHEN

Josh McLane is a native Memphian who’s been in bands and the comedy scene for years. He’s cooked in some of Memphis’ most famous spots like The P&H, Fino’s and The HiTone, where he learned “The Sandwich Arts.” His unique sandwich menu may be a little different, but he guarantees they’ll always hit the spot. “Half of these were created for my vegetarian wife, and the rest just to make me happy. And guess what — they work.”

S E E T H E F U L L M E N U AT S O U T H P O I N TG R O C E RY.CO M

1 3 6 WE BST E R AVE . O P E N DA I LY 8 A M - 9 P M

9 01 - 672 - 8 2 2 5 S O U T H P O I N TG R O C E RY.CO M

@SouthPointGrocery

m e m p h i s f l y e r. c o m

get to the

ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT

A

ndrew Arbogast debuted People were saying, “Do you have a his Arbo’s Cheese Dip on white or a ‘queso blanco’?” May 15, 2021, at High “And I said, ‘I don’t. I guess I’ve got Point Grocery. to figure that out.’” “I remember bringing over 12 cases, Then, he says, “Over time people which is 144 total tubs,” says Arbogast, were saying, ‘Dude. The original recipe 37. “And it sold out that weekend.” is great, but you can even kick it up a A year later, Arbo’s Cheese Dip is in little more if you want to.’” 300 stores in the Mid-South. And that’s Arbogast realized he needed to have not just grocery stores. Area locations more flavor options. “It took me all include Oxbeau, which sells clothing and of seven months to come up with two other items; Millstone Market & Nursnew formulas. And it was just constant ery; and Doc’s Wine, Spirits & More. failures,” he says. “I’m talking too runny It’s also sold at Grind City Brewing or too much seasoning or not the right Co. “They sold more cheese dip than most of my customers.” As of July 7th, Arbogast says he’s sold 29,024 tubs. His slogan is “Cheese fix mafia.” On August 15th, the dip will be available in major Texas cities. And in late summer/early fall, Arbogast will introduce two new flavors — Queso Blanco PHOTO: MICHAEL DONAHUE and Spicy Original. Andrew Arbogast gave a sneak peek Arbogast currently of his upcoming new dips at Oxbeau. is giving samples of the new dips at pop-ups. seasoning.” The new dips had to have Last year, Arbogast quit his job at the “perfect consistency and quality.” International Paper to devote his time His original dip is made with his fato the business. ther’s recipe. “The original recipe never He had been trying to figure out how changed,” Arbogast says. to get into KeHE, a major wholesale food So, he began experimenting. distributor. “They’re national. They supFor the spicy dip, Arbogast told port very large grocery or retail chains. himself, “Okay. I know I have to take Just to name a few: Publix, Schnucks, this original recipe and crank up the Whole Foods, Fresh Market, Sprouts. heat, but I don’t want to change the Once you get into KeHE, doors open.” flavor a ton. I just want it to be spicier. Arbogast got a call from the comI don’t want to add chipotle or any pany this spring. “They said, ‘Hey, this other jalapeños or other distinct flavor is so-and-so from KeHE. We’re reachthat could change the flavor of it.” He ing out on behalf of H-E-B and Central found “a type of pepper that has a very Market in Texas.” mild flavor but ends up giving the dip a H-E-B Grocery Co. is a “large local smoky finish. And all the while kicking Texas retail chain. Central Market is up the heat.” owned by H-E-B.” They had heard As for the white dip, Arbogast says, about Arbo’s Cheese Dip and wanted “Initially, I tried to use the same seasonto try it, Arbogast says. “I told them, ing blend as the original and substitute ‘You’ll have the samples tomorrow.’” the tomatoes with jalapeños.” His first He was “floored” after he got the attempt “tasted great.” But, he says, “The phone call. “If anybody knows queso problem is when you added the original and/or cheese dip, it’s going to be Texas. spice it changed the white to gray.” So, I shipped samples the next day. The dip wasn’t “visually appealing,” They got them. I get a call the following Arbogast says. “So, we added garlic day and they want two pallets of it in powder, onion powder, and those sorts July. And I was like, ‘Oh, my gosh.’” of whitenings.” As for his new dips, the idea to add The jalapeños give it a “totally differmore flavors began when Arbogast ent flavor. But it’s incredible. And it still started selling the original cheese dip. has a kick.”

23


F O O D F E AT U R E B y K a i l y n n J o h n s o n

Memphis to Your Mouth Brother-and-sister duo celebrate “Black millennial entrepreneurship” with newly franchised D’Bo’s location.

O

July 14-20, 2022

n August 2, 1990, David and Leticia Boyd’s mission to bring the “Buffalo wing” to Memphis came into fruition as the first D’Bo’s Daiquiris, Wings & Seafood opened as a food truck. Almost 32 years and thousands of customers later, D’Bo’s has grown into multiple locations around Memphis, with franchise locations in Michigan and others on the horizon. It’s the next step in the growth and expansion of D’Bo’s, says Julian Boyd. Boyd is the son of David and Leticia and is proudly carrying the torch that his parents laid of being responsible for making Memphis the “Hot Wing Capital of the World.” “It’s been a fantastic ride, and we are so grateful for everything that has taken place,” Boyd says. “We’re known for the blues, we’re known for the barbecue. However, because of D’Bo’s, Memphis is known for its wings. There were no wing places in Memphis like this 32 years ago, but to be able to set the standard at the way it’s set to now, it’s a great thing to be able to see. We’re bringing that Memphis to your mouth. That’s the way that we’re looking to do this thing. Memphis to your mouth, and Memphis to your market.” It’s no secret that hot wings are a staple of Memphis culinary culture. That fact is something that many Memphians are proud to boast about, especially when visiting new cities. However, it seems that no other city can produce a hot wing the way the Bluff City does. “We opened one in Detroit in February. That one up there is doing fantastic,” Boyd says. “It’s such an exciting opportunity because we’re breaking into new markets. It’s all about

GET ONE 2 PC DARK DINNER

FREE

the strong foundation that was set by David and Leticia Boyd.” Boyd recalls memories from his formative years when he and his late brother David Boyd II would be at the first brick-and-mortar location on Kirby Parkway and Knight Arnold, standing on crates and operating the cash register. “That was fun for us back in the day. So now it’s so much fun to be invested in the business in this way and focusing on the growth and development through franchising and finding franchise partners,” he says. “If we’re going to do this franchising thing the right way, we have to be hands-on and supportive to ensure the success of every single location because at the end of the day, that’s our family name up on that building.” There are currently two locations that sport the Boyd moniker in Memphis, with one of the original locations being newly franchised. D’Bo’s on Riverdale is now owned and operated by a sister-and-brother duo, Ashlei and Ross Williams. The Williams siblings were born and raised in Memphis, and are eager to bring their entrepreneurial spirit and family legacy of hospitality to the D’Bo’s franchise. “About two years ago in the pandemic, my sister and I knew we were both at an area where we wanted to pivot and explore new opportunities,” Ross says. Ashlei explains that one of the positives of the pandemic was that many of her creative services were booming, and she wanted to be smart with her revenue. This created the perfect opportunity for Ross to “circle back and pitch himself again,” which was around the time that D’Bo’s started franchising. “The company is positioned now to

PHOTO: COURTESY ASHLEI WILLIAMS

New owners Ashlei and Ross Williams pose at D’Bo’s Riverdale’s reopening. grow … and for Ashlei and I as young entrepreneurs, not only did I want to invest in a brand that was exciting and that we liked, but also one that is positioned for growth,” Ross explains. “It’s also about being Black millennial entrepreneurs. It’s important for us to tell the story of legacy. Tell the story of what legacy can look like. I think we’re personally interested in expanding the footprint of Black

businesses in general, and franchising is a great way to do that and bring more Black owners in,” Ashlei adds. Ashlei also says it’s been a joy to work with Julian as another Black millennial. “You can pass something down and the next generation can take it over and improve it and make it better. We’re just excited to be on the journey here for this legacy location and what it means to Memphis.”

DO GOOD. BETTER.

W/ PURCHASE OF ONE 2PC DARK DINNER & 2 MED DRINKS. WITH THIS COUPON. EXPIRES 8/31/22.

24

Drive Thru 2520 Mt. Moriah 4349 Elvis Presley 2484 Jackson Ave. 1370 Poplar Ave. 890 Thomas

NO PHOTOCOPIES ACCEPTED!

901.726.5725 momentumnonprofit.org

We help Mid-South nonprofits succeed.


A R T S B y E i l e e n To w n s e n d

Adhesive Art Berlin-based artist Monika Grzymala creates sculptural drawings at the Brooks’ Rotunda Projects.

The Berlin-based artist Monika Grzymala — whose site-specific installation is on display in the Brooks Museum Rotunda through the end of 2022 — trained as a stone sculptor but always maintained a daily practice of drawing. One day, while she was drawing in her sketchbook, she felt the need to expand her drawing past the limits of the page and decided to use tape to extend the drawing across other surfaces in her studio. When she finished, she found she’d made something new: a sculptural drawing. She’d arrived at an artistic question that has preoccupied her ever since, the question of how to extend the act of drawing into three-dimensional space. Today, her sculptural drawings have been shown throughout the world, but this summer is the first time her work has been shown in the American South. To craft her artwork at the Brooks, she used four different varieties of tape that she has specially manufactured in Germany. The tape varies in width and adhesiveness, allowing the artist to

PUBLIC MEDIA RELEASE 2022-2023 CHILD AND ADULT CARE FOOD PROGRAM The Land Academy announces participation in the Child and Adult Care Food Program. Meals will be provided at no separate charge to eligible children/adults without regard to race, color, national origin, sex, disability, age, or reprisal or retaliation for prior civil rights activity in any program or activity conducted or funded by USDA served at the following site(s):

Name of Site(s): The Land Academy Address of Site(s): 3430 Overton Crossing FREE - 130%

REDUCED - 185%

MONTHLY

TWICE PER MONTH

EVERY TWO WEEKS

WEEKLY

ANNUAL

MONTHLY

TWICE PER MONTH

EVERY TWO WEEKS

17,667

1,473

737

680

340

25,142

2,096

1,048

967

484

23,803

1,984

992

916

458

33,874

2,823

1,412

1,303

652

HOUSEHOLD SIZE

ANNUAL

1 2

WEEKLY

3

29,939

2,495

1,248

1,152

576

42,606

3,551

1,776

1,639

820

4

36,075

3,007

1,504

1,388

694

51,338

4,279

2,140

1,975

988

5

42,211

3,518

1,759

1,624

812

60,070

5,006

2,503

2,311

1,156

6

48,347

4,029

2,015

1,860

930

68,802

5,734

2,867

2,647

1,324

7

54,483

4,541

2,271

2,096

1,048

77,534

6,462

3,231

2,983

1,492

8

60,619

5,052

2,526

2,332

1,166

86,266

7,189

3,595

3,318

1,659

6,136

512

256

236

118

8,732

728

364

336

168

For each additional family member, add

USDA Income Eligibility Guidelines Effective July 1, 2022 through June 30, 2023 In accordance with Federal civil rights law and U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) civil rights regulations and policies, the USDA, its Agencies, offices, and employees, and institutions participating in or administering USDA programs are prohibited from discriminating based on race, color, national origin, sex, disability, age, or reprisal or retaliation for prior civil rights activity in any program or activity conducted or funded by USDA. Persons with disabilities who require alternative means of communication for program information (e.g. Braille, large print, audiotape, American Sign Language, etc.), should contact the Agency (State or local) where they applied for benefits. Individuals who are deaf, hard of hearing or have speech disabilities may contact USDA through the Federal Relay Service at (800) 877-8339. Additionally, program information may be made available in languages other than English. To file a program complaint of discrimination, complete the USDA Program Discrimination Complaint Form, (AD-3027) found online at: http://www.ascr.usda.gov/complaint_filing_cust. html, and at any USDA office, or write a letter addressed to USDA and provide in the letter all of the information requested in the form. To request a copy of the complaint form, call (866) 6329992. Submit your completed form or letter to USDA by: (1) mail: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Office of the Assistant Secretary for Civil Rights, 1400 Independence Avenue, SW, Washington, D.C. 20250-9410; (2) fax: (202) 690 7442; or (3) email: program.intake@usda.gov. This institution is an equal opportunity provider.

m e m p h i s f l y e r. c o m

PHOTO: LUCY GARRETT

Monika Grzymala’s Raumzeichnung (Messe Sepe), 2022

achieve a variety of lines as well as shapes. According to Brooks Museum curator Rosamund Garrett, who first encountered Grzymala’s work while a young student in England, Grzymala “thinks like an engineer” and is always paying attention to the weight and balance of her installations. Her work in the museum stretches the length of the Rotunda, attached to column and ceiling. The artist used miles of the tape, arranging it in long lines and clustered loops or layering it to craft structured supports. The black-and-white color of the piece recalls simple line drawings. A thin and nearly invisible fishing net provides a ceiling for the installation, but otherwise the work is completely made of tape, a tangle of expanding and contracting lines that appear differently depending on vantage point. In looking at a traditional, twodimensional drawing, a viewer experiences immersion by letting their eye follow the shape of the line. Grzymala’s work offers a version of that same experience, but rather than following a line visually, viewers can experience her work physically. She considers each installation to be a performance and the installation to be a temporary artifact of that performance. Likewise, viewing her work, you remain aware of time and space — not its illusion, but its frustrating reality. Standing beneath Grzymala’s artwork, it feels monumental, while viewing it from the museum’s second floor immerses the viewer in a complicated network of shapes. Things appear for a moment and then disappear depending on how you move through the piece. Shadows come and go as the light and hour changes. Perhaps the installation is immemorable because it changes so much depending on how and when you experience it. Or perhaps it is more memorable because any aspect of the work becomes almost immediately reduced to memory. Even the tape, over the course of the year, will sag, changing the feeling of the installation with time. The primal gesture that began the drawing will continue until, still mysterious, it disappears from view. The site-specific exhibition Rotunda Projects: Monika Grzymala is on view at the Brooks Museum through January 9, 2023.

ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT

D

rawing is the foundation of art and, seemingly, fundamental to human consciousness — drawings are the oldest recorded form of human expression and the precursor to written language. In traditional art schools, students practice drawing for a year before picking up a paintbrush. Many artists who work broadly in other mediums continue drawing as a core of their practice. They do so because there is something primal about the act of drawing, about the translation of thought into gesture and gesture into line. The artist Cy Twombly wrote that, in drawing, “Each line is inhabited by its own history, it does not explain, it is the event of its own materialization.”

25


F E AT U R E B y A b i g a i l M o r i c i

Buggin’: The Dubia Dude Kevin Wong started his business of selling Dubia roaches to petowners from his bedroom.

M

July 14-20, 2022

Memphis Parent wants to highlight the region’s top student-athletes. Know a rising sports star?

NOMINATE your favorite athlete at memphisparent.com/playbook *Student-athlete nominees must be in middle or high school.

26

ost people would squirm at the idea of living in the same house as a bunch of roaches, but Kevin Wong has turned cohabitating with vermin into a profitable business — the Dubia Dude, which sells and ships Dubia roaches across the country. Dubia roaches, Wong explains, are high in protein, making them a great meal for reptiles, spiders, fish, and even chickens. In 2019, while working as an assistant manager at T-Mobile, Wong bought two baby bearded dragons, which he aptly named Spyro and Godzilla, and at first, he used crickets to feed them. “Crickets are really annoying to deal with,” he says. “They would jump out and can actually harm the bearded dragons.” But during a vet visit for a deformity in Godzilla’s tail, the vet suggested he try Dubia roaches, a much more nutritious (and less finicky) option for the growing dragons. “Nobody around here sold them, so eventually I ordered some online,” Wong says. “And my bearded dragons — the two of them — ate through them super quick, and they’re kinda expensive, too, so after that, I started breeding them. Once I had a successful colony and my dragons were at a pretty good age where they didn’t need as much, I reached out to people on Facebook and they were like, ‘Well, I’ll buy some.’” As one would expect, breeding roaches proved an interesting task. Initially, Wong kept them in his “small, not even walk-in” closet. “I would hear them at night,” he says. “It was creepy, and now I don’t sleep in the same room as them.” Instead, he says, the roaches have taken over the upstairs bedroom and closet in the house he shares with three roommates. “I think right now I’m close to 100,000 [roaches], or between 100,000 to 200,000.” Though initially focused on curating a local brand, once Wong started his website and promoted his business on social media, the Dubia Dude began shipping nationally, and he quit his T-Mobile job. “I actually got my first [online] order while out of town, so

basically my mom ended up packaging up the order and shipping it out, which was really nice of her. She’s helped me a lot.” In fact, Wong’s mom’s influence has spread into his business practices, as she encouraged him and his siblings to be environmentally conscious and to always recycle. Out of this mindset came the idea to reuse plastic bottles to ship the roaches. “So they’re not loose in the box,” Wong explains. “I based it off of ease of use for the customer so you can take the [mesh] top off the bottle and shake them out.” So far, the Dubia Dude has reused over 7,000 bottles sourced from family and friends.

PHOTO: KEVIN WONG

Kevin Wong with Spyro and Godzilla But Dubia Dude’s green footprint doesn’t end there. “I’m trying to do the whole cycle,” Wong says, so all dead roaches end up in a compost, sometimes his mom’s, sometimes his assistant’s. “We create a lot of fertilizer. I’m trying to create a liquid fertilizer for people to use,” he says. “I know that the roaches [who are fed only organic food] are super high in nutrients. As fertilizer, they’re really good to use.” As Wong continues to grow his business and delve into other areas of interest, such as real estate, scuba diving, and rock-climbing, he hopes to emulate his father’s work ethic and his mother’s humility, and maybe even acquire a few other reptilian pets for his collection, which has since grown to include two scorpions and a colony of hissing cockroaches.


FILM By Chris McCoy

Mandatory Fun Thor: Love and Thunder collapses under the weight of its contradictions.

an admittedly stunt casting, but Bale is a phenomenally talented actor who played one of the greatest villains in cinematic history in American Psycho. Gorr is the first person we see in Love and Thunder, wandering through the desert of his home planet on a pilgrimage to the shrine of his god Rapu (Jonny Brugh) in an effort to save his daughter Love (India Rose Hemsworth, who is actually Chris Hemsworth’s daughter) from the blight that has consumed their world. But Love dies anyway, and when Gorr meets the real Rapu, the god makes it clear that he doesn’t care about the sufferings of the little people who worship him. So Gorr grabs the nearest weapon, which happens to be the godkilling Necrosword and vows to wage a campaign of deicide, beginning with Rapu. Meanwhile, Thor is hanging out with the Guardians of the Galaxy, saving planets and — having sculpted his Avengers: Endgame dad bod

Tune into the Memphis Flyer Radio podcast!

Christian Bale as Gorr the God Butcher; Natalie Portman and Chris Hemsworth both as Thor into a chiseled god bod — looking good doing it. Thor’s intro sequence epitomizes why I prefer the comicbooky approach to comic book movies. I can get detectives chasing serial killers and corrupt cops anywhere, but only Waititi can give me a space Viking fighting an army of owl-bears on hover bikes. Thor gets wind of Gorr’s anti-god crusade and returns to Earth to check on New Asgard, where the refugees from his destroyed home planet are now running a tourist trap. Sure enough, Gorr and his shadow monsters have come calling. But the Asgardians are putting up a fight, led by Valkyrie (Tessa Thompson) and the Mighty Thor (Natalie Portman). continued on page 28

A weekly podcast from the pages and people of the Memphis Flyer. Available wherever you stream your podcasts!

m e m p h i s f l y e r. c o m

or a glowering neofascist like Robert Pattinson?” has outsized impact on the culture. The two philosophies collide violently in Thor: Love and Thunder. Chris Hemsworth has now appeared in nine films as Thor, but he didn’t find his footing until 2017’s Thor: Ragnarok, when director Taika Waititi empowered him to go for laughs. Since then, the himbo from Asgard has been a breath of fresh air when things get a little too self-serious in the MCU. The gritty side is represented by Christian Bale as Gorr the God Butcher. As Nolan’s gravelly voiced Batman, he wrenched the gravitas out of a rich boy who dresses like a bat to play cops and robbers. Making the DC hero into a Marvel antagonist is

ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT

T

here are two schools of thought on how to make a movie about comic book superheroes. The first is to try to make it realistic and grounded in the real world. That’s what Christopher Nolan’s Dark Knight trilogy did for Batman and the Joker. Those films are grim and violent, long on visceral thrills, short on humor. The second school of thought is to make comic book superhero movies more comic book-y. Outlandish plots, self-aware asides, and jaunty humor are the order of the day. The best example of this school of thought is the wacky Batman TV series from 1966, but Richard Donner’s earnest Superman is a less extreme version. Students of the gritty school accuse the other side of not taking the source material seriously, while the comic book-y school believes that the gritties fundamentally misunderstand the source material. Since films about superpowered people wearing tights punching each other in space are ubiquitous to the point of being mandatory, the question “Is Batman a good-natured altruist like Adam West

27


LEGAL NOTICE TO OFFERORS Solicitation No. PB 23-R-00647 The Memphis Housing Authority (MHA) seeks proposals from rental property owners and/ or developers who wish to attach federal rental subsidies to properties eligible for the project-based voucher (PBV) rental assistance program for new construction, substantial rehabilitation or the existing program. The authority may consider allocating up to 20% or the Voucher Allocation, or 30% as allowed under recent federal regulatory changes in Housing Opportunity Through Modernization Act (HOTMA) of the existing Voucher Program (consisting of 7,818 units) to the Project Based Voucher Program. Currently up to 750 vouchers are available for award through the program. Proposals attached to specified properties will be accepted.

FILM By Chris McCoy continued from page 27 Hold up — there’s another Thor? And he’s a she? And she’s Thor’s ex-girlfriend, Dr. Jane Foster, who, for budgetary reasons, was unceremoniously written out of the story after Thor: The Dark World? Yes, yes, and yes. Since the breakup, Jane’s had her ups and downs, first becoming a famous physicist and then contracting terminal cancer. She heeded a psychic call to New Asgard, where the reassembled pieces of Thor’s broken hammer Mjölnir prolonged her life and granted her the powers of the thunder god. Facing an ex who also has his old job is just the beginning of Thor’s problems. Love and Thunder is a deeply divided movie. On the one hand, you’ve got

July 14-20, 2022

28

Thor: Love and Thunder Now playing Multiple locations

CHECK MALCO.COM OR THE MALCO APP FOR THE CURRENT SCHEDULE

The MHA contemplates award of a contract based on housing providers response to this solicitation. Offers in response to this solicitation will be evaluated using MHA’s technical proposal evaluation process. Offers must be submitted in accordance with the instructions provided in the RFP no later than 3:00 pm, August 8, 2022. Failure to furnish a complete offer at the time and date due shall result in elimination from award consideration. The issue date for this RFP is July 8, 2022. Responses will not be accepted beyond the 30-day deadline of August 8, 2022. Formal communication such as requests for clarification and/or information concerning this solicitation shall be submitted in writing to the Purchasing Manager. All requests should be received in writing in the Contracting Office no later than Monday, August 1, 2022 by 3:00 pm. Email: dwalker@memphisha.org or fax 901-544-1299. You may download a copy of the solicitation from the MHA website at memphisha.org; click on tab “RFP/ RFQ”.

HOME OF THE TIME WARP DRIVE-IN SERIES

The MHA reserves the right to reject any or all offers. No offer shall be withdrawn for a period of Ninety (90) days subsequent to the opening of proposals without the consent of the MHA. Thank you for your interest in this solicitation. We look forward to receiving your proposal. Memphis Housing Authority David Walker Contracting Officer

a hero dying of cancer and a villain whose motivation is literally the Greek philosopher Epicurus’ Problem of Evil. On the other hand, you’ve got Hemsworth mugging for the camera and the director himself (as Thor’s sidekick Korg) narrating as a “once upon a time” story. Bale tries valiantly to fit in, but he’s got one gear: intense. Portman is a professional who understands the assignment and is able to at least fake fun. Ultimately, the film collapses under the weight of its contradictions. Love and Thunder can’t decide if it wants to laugh at itself or soar into Valhalla, and ends up doing neither well.

SHOP & SHIP

Gift Cards & Gourmet Popcorn from www.malco.com or in the Malco app


JULY 29 J ULY 2 9 JU 29 JULY SHELBY FARMS

FedEx Event Center at Shelby Farms Park

TICKETS AVAILABLE AT:

COOL DOWN AT SUMMER'S HOTTEST PARTY!

ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT

m e m p h i s f l y e r. c o m

SUMMERCOCKTAILFEST.COM

29


EMPLOYMENT • REAL ESTATE • SERVICES

901-575-9400 classifieds@memphisflyer.com EMPLOYMENT ACCOUNTANT CBRE, Inc. has an oppty in Memphis, TN for an Asst Real Estate Controller. Email resume w/Ref# MEMJLA to GM-Recruitment@CBRE.com. Must be legally auth to work in the US w/o spnsrshp. EOE ENTERPRISE DATA DEVELOPER (Memphis, TN): The Enterprise Data Developer, as a member of the Enterprise Data Integration team team within Enterprise Technology, is responsible for data development activities, modeling, and implementing data solutions in both operational and analytical data sources including the Enterprise Data Warehouse. Requires a Bachelor’s degree in Computer Science, Information Management, Computer Engineering or related field and 5 years of experience in job offered or related position. Apply via website: https://www.firsthorizon. com/Careers. Reference Job #: FB3314 IT CONSULTANT SR. (Memphis, TN): The IT Consultant Sr. is responsible for the overall quality and performance levels of First Horizons Business Banking Online system. The role evaluates, recommends, and implements software solutions to ensure that the platform performs according to specified requirements and conforms to quality guidelines. Requires a Bachelor’s degree in Computer Science or related field and 8 years of experience in job offered or related position. Apply via website: https:// www.firsthorizon.com/Careers. Reference Job #: FB3314

RPA OFFSHORE DEVELOPER AND PRODUCTION SUPPORT MANAGER (Memphis, TN): Responsible for implementation of projects and delivery of support services for RPA solutions in a hybrid (onshoreoffshore environment). Help ensure the appropriate support and delivery processes are in place to enable delivery of high-quality service to endusers that meet business needs while complying with the relevant security and risk criteria. Requires a Bachelor’s degree in Engineering, Computer Science, Technology or related field and Master of Business Administration and 5 years of experience in job offered or related position. Apply via website: https://www.firsthorizon. com/Careers. Reference Job #: FB7193

ENGINEERING DIGITAL INNOVATION MANAGER needed at Buckman Laboratories International, Inc. in Memphis,TN. Must have bach in Comp Sci, Electrical Engr, Comp Engr, or related & 10 yrs’ project leadership exp, including: Java, Springboot, Struts, Java Swings; Software testing; Service oriented architecture framework; Software delivery using Waterfall methodology; SDLC (Software Development Life Cycle); Code repository including GitHub, Rational Clear Case tool, SVN. Must also have at least 4 years’ exp with following: Cloud experience: AWS & Microsoft Azure; DevOps experience using Jenkins; Database experience: SQL, NoSQL, Mongo DB; Platform development for IoT applications. Email CVs to recruiting@buckman. com. EOE - M/F/D/V.

Laurie Stark

SR. SYSTEMS ENGINEER needed at AutoZone in Memphis, TN. Must have Bachelor’s in Comp Sci, MIS or related & 5 yrs of exp in the retail sector, including: Utilizing UNIX/Linux, Maven, GIT, Ansible, Ant, VMware, Puppet, Vagrant, JBoss, WebLogic; Shell, Python, Ruby and Groovy Scripting languages; ITIL processes, Agile methodologies, JIRA; Jenkins, Docker, Kubernetes, Azure Devops Google cloud technologies; MySQL, Oracle DB, MongoDB and Cassandra DB; Utilize Dynatrace, SiteScope and Grafana for monitoring and troubleshooting. Remote work is an option. Email resumes to taresume@autozone.com. EOE

• 29 Years of Experience • Life Member of the Multi Million Dollar Club • From Downtown to Germantown • Call me for your Real Estate Needs

SHARED HOUSING FURNISHED ROOMS Airways/Lamar, Bellevue/McLemore, Jackson/Watkins. W/D, Cable TV/ Phone. Call 901-485-0897.

BUY, SELL, TRADE WANTED: OLD WINDUP Victrolas & old 45 & 78 records. Call Paul 901-734-6111.

AUTO

www.hobsonrealtors.com

(901)761-1622 • Cell (901)486-1464 AUDI-VW-PORSCHE

AUTO ACTION These abandoned vehicles will be sold on 7-15-22 at Principle Toyota, 7370 Winchester Rd., Memphis, Tn. 38125 at 10:00am. 2006 TOYOTA PRIUS VIN#JTDKB22U267071800, 2012 SCION TC VIN#JTKJF5C78C3039472, 2001 TOYOTA SIENNA VIN#4T3ZF13C21U361535

Specializing in

5331 Summer Ave.

www.WolfsburgAuto.com

Factory Trained Experience Independent Prices

(901) 761-3443

Call today for an appointment!

AUDI-VW-PORSCHE

Be a part of something big. We’re hiring at the FedEx Express World Hub in Memphis.

July 14-20, 2022

Starting pay up to $22/hr.

30

fedexishiring.com

Memphis, TN 38122


THE LAST WORD By Coco June

Okay, So It Really Does Take a Village

I think it’s more accurate to say that the love for your child is different from any other love.

THE LAST WORD

Panic. I was not prepared for the slow onset of horror when I realized that there was a nearly three-week gap between when my 4-year-old’s summer camp ended and his school year began. I imagine that seasoned parents are shaking their heads at this rookie mistake, but as I was until very recently a stay-at-home parent, I was caught off guard by this error in my planning. In my defense, it seems illogical to have such a large window built in between camp and school, but that’s just my humble opinion. Thankfully, my ex-husband and I moved back to Memphis, my hometown, last year not only to bring our child up in a more diverse environment, but also because I have family and close friends here. PHOTO: © ANASTASIIA BORIAGINA | DREAMSTIME.COM Since the day my son was born, almost five years Clichés about parenthood ring with a bit of truth. ago now, the old adage “it takes a village to raise a child” has been reinforced in my mind at almost every turn. If I can’t find an available summer camp in the next two weeks (a scenario which seems highly likely), then I will be able to turn to the community I have built around myself for help. Only a few months ago, I was able to provide this exact kind of assistance to a friend who seized an opportunity to return to the workforce. I grew up surrounded by a horde of younger cousins. I’ve always loved children, and taking care of them came naturally to me, even when I was still a child myself. When I was pregnant, it always irked me how so many people would make comments about how I “wouldn’t truly know love” until my baby was born. The sage nods and knowing glances that usually followed these kinds of remarks did nothing to soften the inherent condescension. Then: My baby was born and I learned that all those people were kind of right. I think it’s more accurate to say that the love for your child is different from any other love. It’s more consuming. Less rational. It’s a shame there’s not a specific word for it in the English language. Even with this all-consuming maternal love, there’s another thing I would never have really understood until I experienced it firsthand. Being a stay-at-home-parent is hard. Not only is it hard, there are quite a lot of people who seem to look down on parents — and especially, in my experience, moms — who stay at home. It doesn’t matter that childcare is so expensive that often staying at home might actually be a smarter financial move. It doesn’t matter that an au pair or nanny is a paid position and even career. Personally, I’ve gotten the impression that by choosing to be a SAHM, I’m somehow letting down the feminist cause. I think this is ridiculous, but the subtext has been present too many times for me to ignore. With that in mind, transitioning back to working full-time was still pretty seamless for me. Because two of my child’s four years at home with me were in quarantine, we are both reaping the rewards of the simple socialization that comes with work and school. There have been hiccups (like when my son tested positive for Covid on the exact same day that I learned the vaccines for children under 5 years old were finally approved), but on the whole, I think we’ve done okay. This is in large part due to our collective “village.” Having family and friends encompassed into the structure of our daily routine is something that seems healthy and even essential to me. Maybe it’s a postpandemic mindset, but my perspective is that my son will benefit from having different people influencing his childhood. It wouldn’t have occurred to me, for example, to show him the somewhat controversial clip of Phoebe Bridgers smashing her guitar on SNL, but he certainly agreed with his uncle that it was cool. It’s funny how juxtapositions can occur within our lives. Becoming a single parent (half the time) only reinforced my stance that my child needs a more diverse framework of people in his life. Becoming a stay-at-home mom brought the realization that it’s not wrong or bad parenting to need some time to yourself. Separating from my ex-husband only made me more grateful for his and his family’s roles in our son’s “village.” Coco June is a Memphian, mother, and the Flyer’s theater columnist.

m e m p h i s f l y e r. c o m

Navigating the school year, the pandemic, and full-time employment as a parent can feel like a full-time job.

31


New/Used LPs, 45s & CDs.

2152 Young Ave - 901-722-0095 goner-records.com Voted Flyer’s Best of Memphis Since 2004 We Open at Noon.

We Buy Records!

BOOK YOUR HOLIDAY PARTY WITH US! Coco & Lola’s Midtown Lingerie Spice Up Date Night!

ALL SIZES SMALL – 3X!! New Styles at

CocoandLolas.com IG/FB/TW @CocoandLolas Memphis’ Top Lingerie Shop

710 S. Cox | Mon-Sat 11:30-7:00

I’M NONI! Now taking holiday catering orders for Thanksgiving and Christmas. ANTIQUES & COLLECTIBLES

7 W CAROLINA AVE ♦ VISIT LOFLINYARD.COM/EVENTS FOR MORE INFO.

21,000 sq ft. 100 + booths • 5855 Summer Ave. (corner of Summer and Sycamore View ) exit 12 off I-40 | 901.213.9343 Mon-Sat 10a-6p | Sun 1p-6p

SEND YOUR SEND YOUR SEND YOUR BUSINESS BUSINESS BUSINESS SKY HIGH SKY HIGH SKY HIGH WITH WITH WITH

SUBSCRIBE NOW

an d n ever m iss an issu e

CLASSIFIEDS CLASSIFIEDS CLASSIFIEDS We got you covered WeWegot coveredforfor for gotyou you covered Legal Notices, Help Wanted, LegalNotices, Notices, Help Legal HelpWanted, Wanted, Real Estate, etc. Real Estate, etc. Real Estate, etc.or or Contact 575-9400 ContactUsUsatat(901) (901) 575-9400

I used to be called Mommy, now my pups have homes and I’m waiting for mine. I’m beautiful and a good girl, good in the car, and I love all people and attention. Won’t you please consider me as your forever companion?

Contact Us at (901) 575-9400 or classifieds@memphisflyer.com classifieds@memphisflyer.com classifieds@memphisflyer.com

TO ADOPT, VISIT: https://dogs2ndchance.org/ adoption-application-form

CELEBRATE the 901s

People & Places Food & Drink Arts & EnterHomes & History and so much more! tainment

ONE YEAR for only $12 with code SUMMER22

TO ORDER, CALL 901.521.9000 OR VISIT MEMPHISMAGA ZINE .COM/SUBSCRIPTIONS

GO GLOBAL!

xm7digitalsales.com Advertise

Online* Mobile Phone * Distribution

call us @ (877)-879-9XM7