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HARLAN T. BOBO RETURNS P16 • WESTY’S P30 • OCEAN’S S 8 P34 06.14.18 • 1529th Issue

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JUSTIN RUSHING Advertising Director CARRIE O’GUIN Advertising Operations Manager JERRY D. SWIFT Advertising Director Emeritus KELLI DEWITT, CHIP GOOGE Senior Account Executives ROXY MATTHEWS Account Executive DESHAUNE MCGHEE Classified Advertising Manager BRENDA FORD Classified Sales Administrator classifieds@memphisflyer.com LEILA ZETCHI Distribution Manager ROBBIE FRENCH Warehouse and Delivery Manager JANICE GRISSOM ELLISON, ZACH JOHNSON, KAREN MILAM, RANDY ROTZ, LEWIS TAYLOR, WILLIAM WIDEMAN Distribution THE MEMPHIS FLYER is published weekly by Contemporary Media, Inc., 65 Union Avenue, Memphis, TN 38103 Phone: (901) 521-9000 Fax: (901) 521-0129 www.memphisflyer.com CONTEMPORARY MEDIA, INC. KENNETH NEILL Publisher ASHLEY HAEGER Controller JEFFREY GOLDBERG Director of Business Development BRUCE VANWYNGARDEN Editorial Director KEVIN LIPE Digital Director ANNA TRAVERSE Director of Strategic Initiatives LEILA ZETCHI Distribution Manager MOLLY WILLMOTT Special Events Director JOSEPH CAREY IT Director MATTHEW PRESTON Social Media Manager CELESTE DIXON Accounting Assistant BRITT ERVIN Email Marketing Manager KALENA MCKINNEY Receptionist

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now

CONTENTS

BRUCE VANWYNGARDEN Editor SUSAN ELLIS Managing Editor JACKSON BAKER, MICHAEL FINGER Senior Editors TOBY SELLS Associate Editor CHRIS MCCOY Film and TV Editor ALEX GREENE Music Editor CHRIS DAVIS, MICHAEL DONAHUE MAYA SMITH, JOSHUA CANNON Staff Writers JESSE DAVIS Copy Editor JULIE RAY Calendar Editor

OUR 1529TH ISSUE 06.14.18 Some of the “news” I was exposed to before 9 a.m. today: An “urgent alert” post on Nextdoor.com that read, “I love my penis.” A tweet that led me to a video link showing President Trump praising Kim Jong-un as one the “great leaders” of the world, and saying that he “loves his people.” (These would be the people he imprisons and murders, keeps impoverished, and denies basic human rights to, I suppose.) A story in the print-version of The Commercial Appeal about the “grandma” who put her kids in a dog kennel in her car. A link on Facebook to a story about the facilities in Texas where the separated children of (brown) asylum seekers are being kept in cages until they can be sent off to foster homes. America! A CNN video of Dennis Rodman in Singapore wearing a MAGA hat and pitching a crypto-currency called PotCoin. A Commercial Appeal email that sent me to a video of state Representive Reginald Tate talking to a Republican on a “hot mic” and saying his fellow Democrats were “full of shit.” An NPR story about U.S. Attorney General Jeff Sessions’ latest ruling, one that categorically denies asylum to any (brown) woman who claims to be a victim of domestic violence. Drake Hall playing “Miss You” by the Rolling Stones. I also made two moves in Words With Friends on my iPhone. I don’t think I’m particularly atypical. We are bombarded with “news content” from multiple sources these days. It seems unimaginable that just a decade ago, most of us woke up, made coffee, read the paper, and went to work, assuming we were reasonably well-informed. Information now comes at us nonstop, a pupu platter of news, opinion, tragedy, nonsense, pathos, and propaganda. None of us get the same serving. All of us filter our information stream differently, picking and choosing what catches our fancy. Is it any wonder we can’t agree about anything? A survey conducted last week by the the Associated Press-NORC Center for Public Affairs Research and the American Press Institute found, unsurprisingly, that most Americans are unsatisfied with the current state of journalism and the news. Perhaps, surprisingly, three out of four journalists who were surveyed agreed with them. News creators and news consumers both want the news to be better, but for different reasons. Journalists are feeling beleagured and threatened by the continued down-sizing of the newspaper industry, the dumbing down and politicizing of television news, and by the constant attacks on the media from the president, who denigrates any reporting he doesn’t like as “fake news.” The survey found that most journalists believe the public’s level of trust in news media has decreased in the past year. Forty-four percent of news consumers said it had. Interestingly, the survey found that the public wants what most journalists say they want to deliver — stories that are factual and offer context and analysis — but 42 percent of those consumers who were surveyed said journalists too often strayed into non-objective commentary. Here’s where it gets sticky. When newspapers ruled the Earth, readers pretty much knew what was news reporting and what was opinion. Newspapers had (and still have, for the most part) a clearly delineated “op-ed” section, where pundits unleash points of view about various subjects. It was easy to differentiate news reporting from opinion. N E WS & O P I N I O N Now, not so much. Is that clip of DenTHE FLY-BY - 4 nis Rodman news? Entertainment? A realNY TIMES CROSSWORD - 5 ity show gone rogue? Hell if I know. When POLITICS - 7 that video of Trump and Kim gets posted EDITORIAL - 8 to Facebook with a snarky comment from VIEWPOINT - 9 a friend, the video itself is ostensibly news, COVER - “SUMMER but the comment is opinion. The lines are SURVIVAL GUIDE” blurred and getting blurrier. Most of the BY FLYER STAFF - 10 news we get via social media comes with WE RECOMMEND - 14 MUSIC - 16 an opinion attached. Too often, we react to AFTER DARK - 18 the opinion rather than to the news itself. CALENDAR - 20 Where do we go from here? I don’t FEATURE - 28 know. But it’s worrisome that in a time BAR REPORT - 30 when accurate, serious reporting has never SPIRITS - 33 been more important, most Americans FILM - 34 can’t even agree on what it is. C L AS S I F I E D S - 36 Bruce VanWyngarden LAST WORD - 39 brucev@memphisflyer.com

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DAM M IT, GAN N ETT

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Questions, Answers + Attitude Edited by Toby Sells

W E E K T H AT W A S By Flyer staff

Lamar, Stormy, & the ‘Skeleton’ Hotel

June 14-20, 2018

Lamar scores some scrilla, Daniels heads to The Pony, & plans emerge for blighted corner.

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In the photograph above you can see an unidentified woman* holding onto a very special volleyball named Lauren Deaton. For those who don’t already know her, Lauren is a Harding Academy volleyball. Go Lions! She was very recently named “Volleyball of the Year” by The Commercial Appeal, Memphis’ once-proud, now-Gannett-owned daily newspaper. Lauren’s father, Wilson, the sports equipment whose life was famously celebrated in the Tom Hanks movie Cast Away, said nothing of his daughter’s achievement. He just sat there in silence, almost like he was saying, “Why wouldn’t she be Volleyball of the Year?” So, your pesky Fly on the Wall got all defensive and said, “Like, what’s your point, man?” But he just kept his silence while somehow also asking, clear as day, “Are you saying my daughter Lauren’s not good enough to be Volleyball of the Year?” And I said “no” and we went on like that for some time before Wilson finally thanked me for my time and bounced down the sidewalk and into his car where Lauren waited for him. As the pair drove off, I couldn’t help but think I’d get better interviews if the CA would give awards to people instead of stupid balls. Maybe that’s racist, but I just don’t know anymore. *Congratulations to the actual Lauren. We know you’re not gear no matter what the daily paper says.

By Chris Davis. Email him at davis@memphisflyer.com.

AF FO R DAB LE MEMPHIS New stats from the Council on Community and Economic Research (CCER) rank Memphis as one of the cheapest cities for living in the country. Kiplinger used CCER’s most-current information to rank Memphis the 7th most affordable U.S. city in which to live in 2018. P LAN N I N G FO R $15 The Memphis City Council began talks last week on the feasibility of increasing all part-time city employees’ pay to $15 an hour next year. Some 850 part-time city employees make less than $15 per hour, many in vital divisions. Giving them the pay raise would cost about $3.6 million annually. C OTTO N R OW R E-D EVE LO P M E NT Developers will soon float an idea to the Memphis Landmarks Commission to leave the facades of two Cotton Row buildings but remove most of the rest of the structures for a new hotel. Sachs-Haynes Development LLC, of New York City, applied for the project last week that would redevelop 99 and 105 South Front Street. The two buildings are in a “prime location which includes unobstructed river views with close proximity to a trolley stop — both of which are uniquely Memphis waterfront features.” LAMAR F TW Memphis will soon get $71.2 million from the federal government to upgrade Lamar Avenue. The funds will be spent for roadway repairs and capacity upgrades on Lamar from the Mississippi/Tennessee state line to Getwell. In 2016, Memphis applied for $180 million in federal funds to improve Lamar. At the time, state officials said the entire project would cost $300 million. P LAN S FO R TH E “S K E LETO N” H OTE L A Rhode Island company plans to demolish the skeleton of the former Benchmark Hotel at the corner of B.B. King and Union and build a four-star, five-story, $42 million hotel in its place. The property has been vacant since 2011. In 2016, MNR Hospitality tore the building back to the studs, leaving a massive, hulking skeleton in a prime spot Downtown. The Downtown Memphis Commission sued MNR in February

to clean up the site. The proposed five-story hotel would feature a ground-floor bar and restaurant space. B U D G ET PAS S E D The city council approved Memphis Mayor Jim Strickland’s proposed 2019 budget last week after less than an hour of debate. The budget focuses heavily on public safety, youth programs, and infrastructure improvements. There’s no property tax hike in the budget. Instead the rate, $3.19 per $100 of a property’s assessed value, is 8 cents lower than last year (but keeps taxes flat after a recent property-value reappraisal here). STO R MY’S “H O R NY” TO U R H E R E Stormy Daniels, maybe the most famous porn star in the United States, will bring her “Make America Horny Again” tour to The Pony later this month. Daniels, who once allegedly had an affair with President Donald Trump, will perform at the famed, pink strip club on Winchester on Monday, June 18th, and the event will feature meet-and-greets with the star. BAN I N-F LI G HT CALLS U.S. Senator Lamar Alexander urged government officials to finalize rules passed last week that will ban cell phone calls on commercial flights. The issue has been a longtime focus for Alexander. He and Senate Democrat Ed Markey, of Massachusetts, filed the bill a year ago and it was passed Thursday by the Senate Appropriations Committee. Fuller versions of these stories and even more local news can be found on The News Blog at memphisflyer.com.


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Toby Sells


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CITY REPORTER By Maya Smith

Developers and a Midtown icon find a way forward. P&H Cafe owners say developers of an infill project next to their Midtown bar “upheld their word” on a compromise but that they “still have concerns.” A development group called 1544 Madison Partners announced in February they planned to build 230 new apartments spread over four buildings in a gated apartment complex on the vacant lot to the east of the P&H. Bar owners Matthew Edwards and Robert Fortner worried the development would have gated off the one-way alley that runs behind the P&H. Many customers use that alley, Edwards and Fortner said, and gating it off would limit access to their business. As the plan moved through the approval process at Memphis City Hall, Edwards, Fortner, and other neighboring business owners spoke out against the plan to close the alley. Still, the Memphis City Council and the city/county Land Use Control Board approved the development and the coinciding alley closure. But the developers reconsidered the alley closure after Edwards, Fortner, and the owners of surrounding businesses — a self-serve car wash, an event space, and the Cotton Row Recording Studio — continued to oppose it. So, the developers, 1544 Madison Partners, agreed to meet with them to find compromises. City council member Worth Morgan facilitated the meetings. Michael Fahy, president of Prime Development

Midtown’s P&H Cafe.

Group, a member of the development group, said revisions were made to the original plan. Access for customers, emergency personnel, and garbage pick-up were shared concerns of the owners. To alleviate these concerns, the developers agreed to add a private alley off of Court to allow access to the existing alley behind the P & H. Turn-arounds were also added at each end of the one-way alley in the event someone enters the wrong way. There will be gates at each turnaround that will

allow access for emergency services, MLGW, and city of Memphis vehicles. Fahy said “we found a solution” that the business owners seemed to be “very happy” with. “They went from being concerned to the point where we had emails endorsing this revised plan,” Fahy said. “We went from worry to thank you.” Initially, Edwards said the development could be “devastating” to their business, but now he’s “as satisfied as I can be” with the new plan. “They upheld their word,” Edwards said. “We asked for access and they gave it to us, but we still have concerns.” Edwards said the functionality of the one-way alley is one of those concerns: “It’s still going to be a real issue, for sure.” He also anticipates on-street parking availability for the bar’s customers to become limited once the apartments open. Construction of the development is slated to break ground by spring 2019, and Edwards expects another slew of issues to arise then, like the presence of construction trucks, fenced-off work areas, and noisy machinery. Edwards said he might consider changing the cafe’s hours to work around the construction schedule. “We really won’t know anything until the buildings go up,” Edwards said. “It’ll be a trial-and-error process that will hopefully work out.”

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POLITICS By Jackson Baker

Comings and Goings Terrace on Monday, is expecting to get an earful — and maybe a bagful — of support from members of Shelby County’s health-care community at a June 26th fund-raiser scheduled for Germantown Country Club. Among the hosts for the affair are Gary and Glenda Shorb, Meri Armour, Ed Barnett, Richard Glassman and Susan Lawless-Glassman, David and Julie Richardson, Nadeem Shafi, Kip and Martha Frizzell, Charles and Kalyna Hanover, Melody Cunningham, and Michael Rohrer. Weatherspoon, whose campaign treasurer is Ed Roberson, the erstwhile director of Christ Community Health Centers, has made support for Medicaid expansion (“a no-brainer decision”) a key point in his campaign for the District 31 state Senate seat now held by Republican Brian Kelsey (as, for that matter, has Gabby Salinas, the other Democrat running in the forthcoming Democratic primary of August 2nd).

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The crowd at Bredesen headquarters in the Highland Strip Kelsey is a sworn opponent of former President Obama’s Affordable Care Act and its Medicare-expansion component, and was the sponsor of legislation requiring approval by both chambers of the General Assembly’s Republican super-majority before expansion could take place, dooming Insure Tennessee, the state’s variant of the plan. The rejection, according to Weatherspoon, has cost Tennessee $4 billion in federal funding and contributed to the closure of 10 community hospitals. • Headquarters Openings: Two candidates drew large crowds for opening new headquarters last week. Democratic county mayor nominee Lee Harris set up at 2127 Central Avenue on Friday, and a Memphis headquarters was established at in the Highland Strip by the campaign of former Governor Phil Bredesen, now a Democratic candidate for the U.S. Senate.

m e m p h i s f l y e r. c o m

The pending visit to The Orpheum on Friday by former Vice President (and possible 2020 presidential candidate) Joe Biden for his “American Promise” tour highlights what continues to be a busy election season. Republican gubernatorial candidate  Randy Boyd last week underscored the importance of Shelby County in his election campaign by making the county the site of two different stops on his current 95-county bus tour of the state. Boyd kicked off his bus tour in Millington on Monday, and after making several stops elsewhere in West Tennessee, returned to Shelby County on Saturday for a meet-and-greet lunch in the Collierville town square. Among the several Shelby County officials at the affair, either as backers for Boyd or as courtesy visitors, were County Commissioner David Reaves of Bartlett, Mayor Mike Palazzolo of Germantown, Germantown Alderman Mary Ann Gibson, trustee and county mayor candidate David Lenoir, former county Mayor Jim Rout, state Representative Mark White, and, serving as master of ceremonies for the occasion, Shelby County Mayor Mark Luttrell. Boyd, who went on to make a day of it in Shelby County, attending the FedEx St. Jude golf tournament and the Germantown Horse Show, noted that he had taken no salary while serving as director for economic development under Governor Bill Haslam. Boyd promised not to do so as governor, either, unless, as he jested, “some of you who have Invisible Fence stop purchasing new batteries, in which case I may need to renegotiate.” Boyd, one of several independently wealthy candidates for governor, made his fortune as the inventor and vendor of Invisible Fence, which establishes electronic barriers for domestic pets.  David Weatherspoon, who held the latest version of his “listening tour” at Cheffie’s Restaurant on High Point

NEWS & OPINION

JACKSON BAKER

Shelby County remains a beehive of political activity.

come early STAY LATE turn up

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Drop off unused and expired pills at a drop box location near you.

time to time, events in those larger spheres necessarily dominate in our consciousness. Such a moment is upon us now, when the national leader elected in 2016 is busily out and about remaking the guidelines we live by. It has become something of a cliche for pundits to observe that President Trump is effecting drastic changes in an international order that has persisted for the 70-odd years since the end of World War Two, with the United States at the head of that order and the arbiter of its principles. Trump, with his election as president of the United States, inherited with that office the title of “leader of the free world.” In the wake of the president’s purposeful disruption at last week’s meeting of the G-7 nations in Canada, it appears necessary to question the continuing relevance of the term to the office. It is difficult to function as the leader of a concord, when you a) challenge its premises and disturb its coherence, as Trump did when he arrived at the G-7 summit late and with conspicuous casualness; b) while there, comport yourself insultingly and argumentatively vis-a-vis the representatives of the other nations; and c) depart early, leaving unresolved quarrels in your wake, openly launching trade wars against the other G-7 nations, and refusing to sign on to the ritual communique which, whatever its specific language, essentially merely says, “we are together.” The fact is, the United States is no longer “together” with its associates in the post-war international order — not with the aforesaid “free world” component

of it and not with the larger tribunal of the United Nations, where, for the first time ever, the U.S. representative failed to get a single co-sponsor for a major resolution. This one attempted to fix the blame entirely on the Palestinian side for the wholesale deaths in the Gaza strip of demonstrators who were fired upon as they protested the moving of the United States embassy from Tel Aviv to Jerusalem. This tragedy stems essentially from the go-it-alone impulse that spurred Trump, for evident domestic political reasons, to dispense with cautions honored for generations and, with no Mid-East settlement at hand, to tread clumsily and arbitrarily on the diplomatic realm’s most high-voltage third rail. Meanwhile, the president, on his way to North Korea for the “honor” of what could turn out to be no more than a photo op with that nation’s dictator, has issued a call for the re-admission to what would thereby become an enlarged G-8 of Russia, whose authoritarian ruler, Vladimir Putin, he also honors. This, despite Russia’s continued subjugation of the neighbor nation of Ukraine and its documented attempts to sabotage the Democratic process both here and in Western Europe. It’s worse than going it alone. Call it what you will, but it’s obvious Trump is more comfortable buddying up with the world’s bad boys than creating accord with our traditional allies. It’s a high-wire adventure in which we are unavoidably trapped, unless the GOP Congress musters enough courage to do something about it.

C O M M E N TA R Y b y G r e g C r a v e n s June 14-20, 2018

For more information please visit

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CountItLockItDropIt.org


THE BEST

VI EWPO I NT By Courtney Tipper

ENTERTAINMENT

Take Three Steps!

IN TUNICA

Memphis health-care community takes on prescription opioid misuse and abuse.

The Shelby County Health Department joined this effort along with representatives from the University of Tennessee Health Science Center and Memphis Emergency Medical Services. As health-care professionals and public leaders, we have the power to promote a cultural shift in patients’ understanding and handling of opioid pain relievers. To maximize the likelihood of a positive impact, the conversation about how to safely take, store, and dispose of prescription medication is necessary. And it will take the involvement of everyone — patients, family members, caregivers, friends, and community leaders. In order to see a decrease in opioid misuse and abuse in Shelby County, every citizen should educate themselves on what do if prescribed opioids. For more information on this issue and the initiative with AAOA, please visit www.againstopioidabuse.org. If you are interested in an educational session for your organization, please visit www.shelbytnhealth.com and follow the icon marked Opioid. Courtney Tipper is a Public Health Coordinator with the Shelby County Health Department.

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posal practice for opioid medications, we need to get the message out among health-care professionals and throughout the community. Here in Shelby County, we are working with the county government and the health department, as well as the University of Tennessee to respond to the epidemic. At the event last month, I spoke about Shelby County’s opioid response which is focusing on four key strategic areas: data usage and integration, prevention and education, treatment and recovery, as well as first response and law enforcement. Shelby County’s Opioid Response Plan makes it evident that we all have a part to play in reducing the impact of the opioid crisis in our communities. “This plan emphasizes the coordination of efforts aimed at prevention/education, effective deployment of first responders, treatment professionals, and law enforcement,” says David Stern, a physician and the Vice-Chancellor for Health Affairs for Statewide Initiatives at the University of Tennessee Health Science Center.

UPCOMING SHOWS June 24 | Aaron Lewis July 6 | Donny & Marie (SOLD OUT) July 21 | Gabriel Iglesias

NEWS & OPINION

According to the 2016 National Survey on Drug Use and Health, an alarming 40 percent of opioid misusers have admitted to receiving painkillers from a friend or family member at no cost. Another 12 percent admit to purchasing or stealing prescription drugs from someone they know. Dramatically reducing this “pass along” rate is one of the primary missions of the national organization, Allied Against Opioid Abuse (AAOA). Just this past month, AAOA convened a training and discussion aimed toward health-care professionals in the heart of the Memphis Medical District. The purpose of the event was to help area organizations share best practices and promote solutions to cut down on the volume of opioids unwittingly made available in our community. The Shelby County Health Department joined this effort along with representatives from the University of Tennessee Health Science Center and Memphis Emergency Medical Services. Participants engaged with speakers and learned more about how to protect themselves, their patients, and their communities against opioid misuse and abuse. The AAOA praised Shelby County for implementing the Count it! Lock it! Drop it! campaign. This campaign is Shelby County’s safe storage/disposal initiative to help residents avoid becoming victim to opioid misuse and abuse. Action steps for each person with opioid medication are: Count your pills every two weeks to monitor theft and help ensure medications are taken properly; lock your pills in a safe location where others would not think to look; and drop off expired or unused pills at an approved take-back location. Opioid misuse and abuse can lead to opioid addiction. The Count It! Lock it! Drop It! campaign is just one of several campaigns Shelby County is implementing to bring awareness and give patients advice on how to take action to reduce this epidemic affecting our communities. There are other disposal options as well — including placing unused medication in easy-to-use bags or capsules that inactivate opioids and do not pose a hazard for the environment. These materials are available in pharmacies and online. Patients who fill an opioid prescription should consider obtaining one of these simple disposal options so they can be safe stewards of their medications. The discussion we held needs to be one of many that we convene, not just in Shelby County, but in Tennessee and across the United States. In addition to learning proper safe storage and dis-

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5/31/18 10:44 AM


SUMMER SURVIVAL GUIDE EIGHT WAYS TO HELP YOU MAKE IT THROUGH THE NEXT THREE MONTHS. COVER STORY BY FLYER STAFF / ILLUSTRATIONS BY GREG CRAVENS

June 14-20, 2018

HOW TO BEAT MOSQUITOS

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Nothing bums out a backyard beer like mosquitos. Heat and humidity? Dress light and drink cold. You’re a Memphian. It’s part of the package. But biting bugs — literally sucking your blood — it’s enough to inspire your inner indoorsman.   But what works — really works — to get rid of them? The Shelby County Health Department preaches the four “Ds.” Defend with DEET. Dress in long pants and sleeves. Avoid dusk and dawn (when mosquitos are most active). Drain standing water.  That last “D” — draining water — is the number one way experts say you can snuff skeeters. That’s where they lay their eggs. Tyler Zerwekh, administrator of the Environmental Health Services Bureau of the Shelby County Health Department, says all mosquitos need is an eighth of an inch of water. So, even an overturned bottle cap will do.  “When we do our inspections, we’re looking for standing water: flower pots, bird baths, dog bowls,” Zerwekh says. Zerwekh and other experts say you should also cut high grass and any other overgrowth around your house. Swamp angels feed on plant nectar (when not feasting on your life blood) so they’ll swarm to any place with vegetation. They also like overgrown places just to get out of the sun. Get rid of the habitat, get rid of the mosquitos. As for bug spray, Zerwekh recommends anything with DEET. Other products may work, but nothing like DEET. And Zerwekh said the percentage doesn’t really matter.

Any DEET will keep mosquitos at bay, the percentage — much like sunblock SPF — speaks more to re-application times than it does potency. A mosquito won’t know the difference between 15 percent and 30 percent, for example. But you’ll have to re-apply the 15 more often. Since the Zika-virus threat in 2016, the number of companies that will spray your yard for mosquitos has exploded, according to the American Mosquito Control Association. Root out jackleg operators by asking for licenses or certifications, according to Consumer Reports. Ask if they have plans to protect non-target species and ask if they’ll come back to ensure their spray has worked (pros will say yes to and explain all of this). Home stores will also sell you many flavors of DIY yard sprays. Check labels to see which have been approved by the Environmental Protection Agency (because they check for the product’s effectiveness). Zerwekh said he sprays his yard with a Cutter brand spray. Want to go all natural? A good old fan is sometimes enough to keep the wretched creatures at bay. Some things that don’t work: most “natural” repellents, those wristbands and ultrasonic devices, clip-on fans, and most citronella candles, according to Consumer Reports. — Toby Sells

HOW TO THROW AN INEXPENSIVE SUMMER PARTY

How do you throw a summer party for 50 to 100 people and not blow your budget on food and drink? First, start with my sangria. I got the recipe from The New York Times back in the 1970s. You mix five bottles of cheap red wine, five one-liter bottles of club soda, 12 oranges, 12 lemons, five cups of brandy, and enough sugar to sweeten. Lisa Getske, owner of Lisa’s Lunchbox, suggests salmon as the centerpiece dish for a big party. “It can be done in the oven, you can do it on your stove top in a skillet, or you can put it on a grill,” she says. “It’s so easy. It’s just fresh salmon, and I like to put brown sugar on top. For each five-ounce piece of salmon, maybe a quarter cup. Then maybe drizzle about two tablespoons of fresh honey on there. And then I squeeze either lemon or lime. If I’m

doing it in the oven, probably put some aluminum foil over the top of the pan and cook at 350 degrees for 20 to 25 minutes.” One whole salmon will feed 10 people, so adjust accordingly. Alyce Mantia, former owner of Mantia’s International Foods, suggests Italian Porchetta, which she makes with a pork shoulder. “You mix together rosemary and sage,” she says. “I usually put orange peel in mine and some garlic the night before. Just poke holes in it all over and stuff it in there. Then stick it in the fridge.” The day of the party, Mantia says you should let it sit for for an hour or so and then “cook it covered, low and slow” in a 300-degree oven for 40 minutes per pound. You could also do it on the grill if you’ve got one with a cover. One pork shoulder will serve about 20 people. They tend to run about eight pounds. The recipe can be found on Mantia’s blog, mantias.blogspot.com. Mantia recommends roasted potatoes and fresh vegetables such as asparagus as sides. — Michael Donahue

HOW TO PLAY CHEAP GOLF — AND STAY COOL

Memphis’ summer heat can diminish the enthusiasm of even the most dedicated golfer. If the prospect of plunking down $50 to spend four hours in the broiling sun has you re-thinking your Saturday foursome plans, here’s a suggestion: Remember the Alamo! Well, not really. But don’t forget about The Links at Davy Crockett. It’s a city-owned course at the far north end of Hollywood Street in deepest Frayser. It’s densely wooded, meaning you’re mostly playing in the shade. (And if you’ve got an erratic tee shot, you’ll spend even


tennis ball cans. Finally, set the mood by draping a few strings of Christmas lights over your patio. Now, sit back, relax, grab a beer, and admire your hard work. — Maya Smith

HOW TO GET TO A SHADY SPOT FOR $5

roots. Finally, use shade cloths for the first two weeks of growth, cooling the plants during early growth. After that, give them full sun or they’ll get leggy, but keep cooling with those sprinklers. Judging by the lush lettuces sold year-round by Rose Creek, following these steps will make the summer months your salad days. Chris Cosby, a former senior manager at the Memphis Botanic Gardens before pursuing permaculture design and education for Plants Plus People, outlines a broader approach. Work with the seasons, not against them. “Squash vine borers [moths] show up just when the first squash is fruiting. Their life cycle is keyed to a June appearance, and the easiest way to get around that is to not plant until August.” Crop selection can make all the difference as well. “Sweet potatoes are a good hot weather green. The key to sweet potatoes is keeping the vines trimmed, which is easy, because we just eat those greens.” By fall, you’ll have a bounty of the root crop as well. Cosby recommends one last thing: napping. “We need more of a siesta culture here. People should relax a little bit. The summer’s a really good time to observe what's happening in the garden. I mostly grow aromatic herbs this time of year. Change up your summer activities completely so you’re ready to go in the fall. With fall gardening, I’m making more nutrient-rich food in larger quantities that tastes better, with less work.” — Alex Greene

HOW TO HACK YOUR PATIO

HOW TO GROW FOOD IN THE HEAT

Memphis is a gardener’s town, and the summer bounty from homes, farms, and community gardens can bring a cornucopia of tomatoes, okra, and squash. But the MidSouth also presents its own challenges. Once temperatures rise to 95 degrees or more, tomatoes won’t put on fruit. Pests make organic squash nigh-impossible. And for many, summer lettuce is out of the question. Ray Tyler, co-owner of Rose Creek Farms near Selmer, has tackled the problem of summer lettuce for years, and he’s just released a free eBook, The Top Five Secrets for Growing Lettuce Year Round, spelling out his methods in five steps. First, pick your seed varieties wisely. “We favor Batavian hybrids and Salanova over many other varieties,” he writes. “In particular we like Muir and Cherokee for crispheads and the green and red sweet crisp Salanova varieties.” Second, Tyler recommends starting your seeds using the do-it-yourself containers at germchamber.com: Seeds must be cool if you hope to start new plants through the season. Third, “harden off” your plants. “We set the trays outside 4-5 days before planting to get them acclimated to the sun and wind,” writes Tyler, adding that “this allows them to start growing as soon as they get planted.” Lettuce must grow fast to stay sweet. Fourth, water your lettuce daily, using sprinklers for cooling and soaker hoses for the

You’re not doing summer right if you aren’t spending lazy evenings lounging on a patio. Your patio might be a two-star destination now, but with a little bit of work and a few Pintresting DIY hacks, you can see it transform right before your eyes. Skip the premade furniture sets and take a deep dive into the magical world of doing it yourself. Here are some quick tips for transforming your patio into a five-star oasis. I hope you like scavenger hunts, because all DIY projects require some looking in unexpected places for reusable treasures, like tires, for example. They’re not hard to find; just look on the side of most roads. Pick up two, then grab some rubber glue, spray paint, and artificial turf from a hardware store. Paint the tires and cut the turf into a circle to fit the circumference of the tire. Then glue the tires together and the patch of turf on top of them. Bam, you have a multi-purpose piece of furniture that can serve as both an ottoman and a table. Benches can also be made with a minimum amount of materials and labor. All you need are four eight-foot-long four-by-fours and six cinder blocks. You can find both at any home improvement store or a used-lumber yard. Add some paint to the wood and blocks (or leave them as is if you’re into the rustic look). Line the cinder blocks up in two stacks, separated by the length of the wood. Slide the wood through the holes on each side, and voila! you have a bench. For comfort, add a bench cushion and a few outdoor pillows. Now for the fun stuff: greenery, lights, and whatever else your heart desires: Succulents, like cacti, thrive in the summer and can add colorful character to your outdoor space. And instead of housing your plants in pots, try something unconventional, like coffee cups or

I’m sure I’ve read sadder words than the ones displayed on the screen of Explore Bike Share’s vending station in Overton Park, but as the sun beat down and the sweat dripped into my eyes, I sure couldn’t think of anything more upsetting than, “Kiosk unavailable.” This is a brand-new service, how could it possibly be broken already? I’m getting ahead of myself, let me back up. It was 95 degrees on the scorcher of a Sunday afternoon when I decided it was time to rent a bike and go searching for the shadiest spot in town. I have my own bike, but wondered if the added transportation and exercise options Memphis’ new bike share service provides might be a game-changer, particularly for an active family of four with a car rack that only accommodates three bikes. The first thing I’d need to do is find a bike station. There’s an app for that, but with 600 bikes and 60 stations I figured I’d just hop in the car and drive till I didn’t need to drive around anymore. My first stop was the broken Overton Park kiosk. Thankfully, the kiosk isn’t necessary if you have a smart phone with the bike share app, which I strongly advise downloading (bcycle.com/app). Otherwise, a single ride costs $5 and the rental process is pretty intuitive. In no time I was two-wheeling it toward the darkest parts of the old forest — just not very fast. While there are a number of gears, the Explore bike only seemed to have two real speeds: Easy to peddle and slow and harder to peddle and only a little faster. I was already feeling a little fatigued by the time I passed through the park’s eastern gate to the old forest, where the sun disappears, the temperature drops, and oxygen is abundant. Memphis is more forested than the average city, and from the greenline to Shelby Farms, there are plenty of opportunities to get out of the sun and ride. But few of those rides have ever felt as restorative to me as a swing through the old forest. As I hit my first downhill run, and a breeze smacked me full in the face, I started to think, “Hey, this may not ride as comfortably as my bike, but it’s not so bad.” Five miles later, I returned my bike to its station, and by that time I’d both cooled off, and warmed to the ride. I don’t think the service will ever replace my personal bike, but in a city with poor transit options, I could certainly see the $120 year-long pass as a reasonable option for someone with a modest commute. And, should you find yourself in need of some shade fast (or faster than foot travel, anyway), there are worse ways to spend a hot summer afternoon. — Chris Davis

HOW TO HOST A HOG ROAST

In her memoir Blood, Bones & Butter, New York chef Gabrielle Hamilton opens with an anecdote of an annual party for 200 her parents held on the grounds of their home in Pennsylvania. The party was an elaborate lamb roast. An eight-foot pit was dug, the kids sleeping next to it overnight to feed the fire. Her father acted as stage manager; her mother, impossibly chic in a skirt and heels, got shit done. All day long we did our chores, the smell of gamey lamb, apple-wood smoke, and rosemary garlic marinade commingled and became etched into our continued on page 12

COVER STORY m e m p h i s f l y e r. c o m

more time in the shade — looking for your ball.) But here’s the best part: It’s $11 for all the golf you can play. With cart. The official weekday rate is $16 for 18 holes, which is still cheap, but the last few times I’ve been out there, that amazing $11 all-you-can-golf rate was in effect. Now, I’m not going to pretend that Davy Crockett offers a high-end golf experience. You won’t see a lot of guys in expensive, wick-dry, pastel polos and white pants. The cart paths are … rustic; the asphalt buckles over a tree root here and there. The greens can be a little bumpy and dry, depending on which hole you’re playing. And, as I said, if you don’t hit it straight, plan on spending some quality time communing with nature. But, that said, the people in the pro shop are friendly, the beer is cheap, and there’s a diverse community of regulars who make the place a fun golf destination. Best of all is the layout, which for my money is the most interesting track in Memphis, with big elevation changes, old-forest oaks and hickories lining every fairway, and abundant wildlife, including deer, foxes, coyotes, groundhogs, and other critters. Plus, there are no condos, no nearby streets, and no traffic noise. When you’re playing Davy Crockett, you’re in the woods. It’s a beautiful spot, really. And for $11, you don’t feel guilty if you decide to stop after 15 holes — or 23 holes. Or whatever. This ain’t the Memphis Country Club, dude. It’s Davy Crockett. Remember? — Bruce VanWyngarden

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CHILL OUT WITH WATERCOLOR! paint, brushes, and more in the store.

June 14-20, 2018

1636 UNION AVENUE 901.276.6321 artcentermemphis.com

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continued from page 11 brains. I have clung to it for thirty years, that smell. I have a chronic summertime yearning to build large fires outdoors and slowly roast whole animals. I could sit fireside and baste until sundown. Hiss. Hiss. Hiss. The pit, the kids as sentry, the mom in her skirt and heels, the hiss, hiss, hiss all spelled romance to me, a smoky idyll. But, deep in my heart, I know this: It sounds like a lot of trouble. It is, cheerfully admits chef Nick Scott. Scott, a partner in Alchemy, Interim, and the butchery City Block Salumeria, began holding hog roasts for his crews when he worked at Bluefin. Instead of a pit, he uses smoker boxes. One, La Caja China, he bought online, a wooden box lined with galvanized steel, on wheels. The first thing one should do, he says, is brine the pig in a combination of salt, sugar, garlic, apple juice, and bay leaves. Then place it skin side down with a grate placed over it. A barrel with coals, acting as sort of a chimney, is placed on the box. The pig is cooked for four hours, then flayed, turned over, and put back in the box. Scott describes the roast as a great coming together of restaurant types with beer drinking and jockeying to break down the pig. Everyone brings a side dish. Scott recommends roasters get plenty of sleep in the days before the roast, as you’ll be up all night feeding the fire. He notes that just about anything can go in the box — goats, chickens, vegetables. “I love the process of it and getting together and hanging out,” says Scott. Scott’s recent projects have kept him from holding the roast in the past few years, but he plans on bringing it back. Y’all hold him to it. — Susan Ellis

HOW TO STAY COOL WITHOUT LOSING YOUR COOL

As spring runs its course and the thermometer creeps upward, you try to make a game of it: How long can you go without turning on your air conditioner? One year we made it all the way to June, but it seems like it’s getting hotter, faster every year. Soon, it’s time for some AC. You flip the thermostat switch to “cool” and let the techno-magic happen. By mid-afternoon, the house is just a little hotter than it should be. No big deal. The unit is old. It’ll be okay. Within a week, it’s too obvious to ignore. The unit is not keeping up. You got an HVAC guy. Shoot him a text. No response. It’s a busy time of year for HVAC guys, with everyone discovering that their broke-ass compressors aren’t up to snuff. Your neighbor’s got a guy: The Compressor Whisperer. After only a couple of days, he shows up — tall, confident, with a tool belt hanging on his hip at a jaunty, virile angle. He cracks open the AC and digs around. Everything’s going to be fine. The Whisperer emerges shaking his head. Everything is not fine, he says. It’s not quite dead, but your AC is going toward the light. Can’t you do something, anything to save it? No. Then, the dreaded words: “Total replacement.” You rant and scream: WHY HAVE THE GODS OF COOLING FORSAKEN ME? What have I done to deserve this? Deserve’s got nothing to do with it, says the Whisperer. Your system has succumbed to entropy, as one day, we all will. You wake up from fitful, sweaty sleep in a fog. The fact of hotness outweighs everything. Techs, salesmen, and “comfort specialists” roam through your home. Did you invite them? It’s hard to recall. Panic rises as each estimate comes in less affordable than the last. You explore financing options with disembodied voices on the phone. The fact that the owners of the voices are sitting in an air conditioned call center makes you seethe with rage. You visit the city’s museums, take long coffee-shop meetings, wander around big box stores for things you won’t buy. How did people live before air conditioning? George Washington never had it. Lewis and Clark would have scoffed at you. You wouldn’t have lasted a week back then. You find yourself standing in the beer cave in a Midtown convenience store. It’s freezing. You carefully consider your choices, slowly scratching your chin in a “hmmmm” fashion. You don’t even like beer. The cashier is starting to stare at you. She’s going to kick you out if you don’t buy something soon. How do you stay cool while keeping your cool? You don’t. You can’t. — Chris McCoy


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COVER STORY m e m p h i s f l y e r. c o m


steppin’ out

We Recommend: Culture, News + Reviews

Stormy Weather

By Chris Davis

America’s war on terror was dragging on, and the President of the United States was out of options. In a last ditch effort, he did what any rightthinking chief executive would do. He consulted with porn star/administrative assistant Stormy Daniels and made a grave request. “I need you to help me to save the world,” the President said to Daniels. “Can you do that?” he pleaded. “Can you be the hero?” The porn star’s bosom swelled with pride. Her patriotic response was certain, and it came fast. “Yes, sir,” she cooed as only a porn star/administrative assistant can, that she would travel to the Middle East and do whatever it takes to take out the bad guy AKA evil Ron Jeremy in a turban. Is it weird to anybody else that this scene from Operation Desert Stormy doesn’t sound that far fetched today? Daniels (visiting Memphis this week on her Make America Horny Again tour) became the world’s most famous adult entertainer and has been generating a seemingly inexhaustible stream of national headlines since news first broke that she allegedly had an affair with President Donald Trump in 2006 and was paid $130,000 in hush money. The recent notoriety isn’t Daniels’ first brush with politics. It wasn’t POTUS who called Daniels to service, it was a group of Louisiana citizens who wanted the Baton Rouge native to come home from Florida and run for Senate against the incumbent, David Vitter, a “family values” Republican caught up in 2007’s “D.C. madame” scandal. Daniels, a lifelong Democrat, answered the call and changed parties after learning that the RNC had spent funds in a lesbian bondage club in Hollywood. “I cannot help but recognize that over time my libertarian values regarding both money and sex and the legal use of one for the other is now best espoused by the Republican Party,” she was quoted as saying before ultimately dissolving her campaign. Daniels will be in Memphis demonstrating said values Monday, June 18th at The Pony. She’ll be available for meet and greets at 9 p.m. and 11 p.m.

June 14-20, 2018

STORMY DANIELS “MAKE AMERICA HORNY AGAIN” AT THE PONY. JUNE 18TH, 9 P.M. 11 P.M.

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Remembering Anthony Bourdain The Last Word, p. 39

Westy’s — a neighborhood bar with Memphis history Bar Report, p. 30

THURSDAY June 14

FRIDAY June 15

Flight Tour: A Taste of Memphis Various locations, 4 p.m., $315-$400 Sprock n’ Roll (yup, the ones who had a fender bender with the trolley) host this two-hour pub crawl, featuring stops at Old Dominick and Ghost River. World Cup Soccer Kickoff Celtic Crossing, 6:30 a.m. Watch the games at this bar. Includes food specials and vodka cocktails. Dreamgirls: A Special Evening for the CLC Playhouse on the Square, 6-9 p.m., $45-$100 A fund-raising show of Dreamgirls, benefiting the Community Legal Center.

Juneteenth Evening of the Stars University of Memphis Holiday Inn, 6 p.m. A youth talent show presented by Memphis Juneteenth Urban Music Awards. Canoes & Cocktails Shelby Farms, 6 p.m., $45 A guided evening paddle on Hyde Lake followed by cocktails and small bites on the front porch. Benefiting Shelby Farms and the Shelby Farms Greenline.

“The Best of the Best” ANF Architects, 5:30 p.m. A show of the winners of Memphis Camera Club’s 2017 Year End Awards.

Memphis Emo Night Prom Hi-Tone, 8 p.m. Emo kids get their prom. With music by Indeed, We Digress and a photo booth for prom pictures.

“Tinker, A Collaborative Art Show” Cooper-Young Gallery & Gift Shop (889 Cooper), 6-9 p.m. Reception for a show of new work by Sheri Bancroft, Kelly Cox, and Billy Warren.

Brian Setzer Gold Strike Casino, 9 p.m., $24-$74 A concert by this former Stray Cat and respected musician.


Our Own Voice

Pattern Recognition By Chris Davis Our Own Voice has a history of making conceptual work that’s not always easy to describe with any degree of accuracy. The company’s managing director Kimberly Baker says the company’s latest endeavor, Neuro Plastic City, is a “collaborative, experimental, multimedia performance where theater, dance, music, and film all come together to explore and express patterns of the mind, and how those patterns can affect how we move through the world.” Sarah Rushakoff, one of Baker’s collaborators on the project, elaborates, noting that dance pieces blend with scripted and improvisational scenes to address subjects regarding personal behaviors. “We’re hoping the audience will recognize [these behaviors] from their own lives,” Rushakoff says. “Like obsessive loops and tics, rituals, dead-end jobs. All of it came from an intense workshop period with the cast and lots of hard work and brainstorming by the creative team.” Rushakoff has been working with OOV since 2000 on projects ranging from original work to the company’s staging of Antonin Artaud’s infamously unstageable play A Spurt of Blood. “A Spurt of Blood was a different show for us but exemplary in the way we set out to do something seemingly impossible and did the damn thing,” Rushakoff says, attempting to sum up the OOV ethos and explain how it informs Neuro Plastic City, which was only a seed of an idea when the creative said “let’s do a show about patterns.” “Now it’s this wild production with live original music,” Rushakoff says. OUR OWN VOICE PRESENTS “NEURO PLASTIC CITY” AT THEATREWORKS JUNE 15TH-16TH, 22-23 $12 AT THE DOOR. CASH ONLY.

The Music by Michael Brecker Crosstown Arts East Atrium, 7-9 p.m., $15 A salute to saxophonist Michael Brecker with Lannie McMillan, Tony Thomas, Austin Bradley, and Scott Reed. Part of the Crosstown Jazz Series. Arsenic and Old Lace Germantown Community Theatre, 8 p.m., $24 Madcap comedy about women of a certain age who poison men out of pity.

I Read That Movie Benjamin L. Hooks Central Library, 2 p.m. Being screened today is John Grisham bestseller and Memphisset The Firm. Discussion follows after the screening. Cocktails Cards & Cigars Makeda’s Cookies Downtown (488 S. Second), 4 p.m. A spades tournament for Father’s Day. Martin Lawrence FedExForum, 7:30 p.m., $35-$85 A concert by this iconic comedian and television star.

6th Annual Good People Good Beer Propcellar, 8 p.m., $85 A dress-up beer tasting benefiting Operation Broken Silence, which works to educate children in Sudan. Sedated Hi-Tone, 8 p.m. Music by this Ramones tribute band. They’ll be joined by Scary Lizard Ladies.

ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT

SATURDAY June 16

m e m p h i s f l y e r. c o m

Sandra Bullock, (left to right) Sarah Paulson, Rihanna, Cate Blanchett, and Awkwafina star in Ocean’s 8. Film, p. 34

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MUSIC By Alex Greene

Bon Retour Harlan T. Bobo is back in Memphis with a new record.

H June 14-20, 2018

arlan T. Bobo feels like pure Memphis to a lot of music fans. His shows this week feel like a homecoming for many, including Harlan himself, though he’s not from Memphis, and he’s spent the past six years living in Perpignan, France, raising his son as his marriage gradually fell apart. Perhaps Memphis feels like home because this is where his voice was born, that wry perspective on love and self-sabotage that his first three albums convey so well. His new LP on Goner Records, A History of Violence, is somewhat of a departure. What strikes the listener first is the band, now rocking harder, with

a more sinister edge. His singing, while still seemingly perched on one’s ear in a confessional tone, is now addressing a world swirling around him more than the romantic entanglements of his earlier work. I sat down with him recently to try to understand these changes. Memphis Flyer: It’s a pretty bleak bunch of songs. But I also sense an empathy there for down-on-their-luck characters. Which was almost a relief after seeing the cover. Harlan T. Bobo: The cover picture’s of a woman in a band I travel with now and then, from Bordeaux. I thought the picture was so arresting. For me it captured the feel of the record really well. It was one of those old glass plate

We Saw You.

with MICHAEL DONAHUE

16

memphisflyer.com/wesawyou


MUSIC

This album’s less about you. You’re casting your eye out to other characters. I think it’s just that I made enough records about my personal life. And maybe it’s just being a parent, it directs your attention outside yourself. That’s something I didn’t consciously do, but I did notice it after everything was coming together. I was like, “Oh, you’re not so freaking selfabsorbed on this one.” There’s actually social commentary on this one. So that’s progress, I think. It’s hard to imagine replicating the sound of the band you use on the record (including players familiar to most Memphians, Jeff “Bunny” Dutton, Jeffery Bouck, Steve Selvidge, and Brendan Spengler), if you were to tour Europe. Yeah. I don’t know what the difference is between rock-and-roll players in France compared to here, but it’s entirely different. You know, there are French bands that I like, and I’ve tried to play with these guys, but whatever I do has a very American feel to it. Like swing. I’ve noticed how loose some of these songs are. They sort of whip around. Those guys in France play a straight beat and it’s maddening. It loses its power.

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m e m p h i s f l y e r. c o m

I can see how those questions have taken on a new urgency, raising your son and thinking about how aggression flows through generations. Yeah, there’s a lot about raising children and passing this thing on. And it can be a sort of battle, between how much a kid’s gonna take from an aggressive side of the family, that’s addictive and exciting, and how much he’s gonna take from a parent talking to him, and the boring things.

Harlan T. Bobo

ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT

photographs, and the glass had broken. Nobody did that, the cracks were already there. I actually asked my ex-wife’s permission to use it. I said, “People are gonna think this is you.” People will automatically assume that it’s about her, but it’s not. Sure, a lot of the aggression and the frustration that was happening during the breakup is in there. But I only sing about her specifically twice. The fact is, the record has very little to do with my marriage. A couple songs are about that, but the rest of it is addressing something that’s disturbed me since childhood, and it’s that aggression wins, you know? It wins out on top of consideration for people, diplomacy, because all those things are very boring compared to the visceral excitation of aggression and violence. Even as a little kid, I just could not figure out why it is. And the place I live in now, it’s not violent like anything in America, but it’s very aggressive. And the way people raise their children and treat each other is really disturbing to me.

With these Memphis guys, we only had two rehearsals before recording that record. But we’ve all played together in various other bands. It’s sort of my dream band. I actually tried recording this album in France. I had a band, we played together for a couple years. And they were fine replicating the older stuff. That’s kinda why I met them. But I knew what I wanted, and I was not getting anywhere close with them. So I just eventually had to ditch it. They’re sending me emails now that they see the record’s out. [laughs] Harlan T. Bobo and the Psychotic Lovers play Friday, June 15th, at Bar DKDC, and Sunday, June 17th, at the Levitt Shell.

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17 4798 BOM Flyer 6.975x9.25.indd 1

6/1/18 3:24 PM


LA CHAT FRIDAY, JUNE 15TH NEW DAISY THEATRE

BREEZE CAYOLLE WEDNESDAY, JUNE 13TH LAFAYETTE’S MUSIC ROOM

IGUANAS THURSDAY, JUNE 14TH LEVITT SHELL

After Dark: Live Music Schedule June 14 - 20 don Cunning Band Sundays, 6 p.m., and Mondays, 7 p.m.; FreeWorld Sundays, 9:30 p.m.

Alfred’s 197 BEALE 525-3711

Gary Hardy & Memphis 2 Thursdays-Saturdays, 6-9 p.m.; Karaoke Thursdays, TuesdaysWednesdays, 9 p.m.-1 a.m. and Sundays-Mondays, 10 p.m.-2 a.m.; Mandi Thomas Fridays, Saturdays, 6-9 p.m.; The 901 Heavy Hitters Fridays, Saturdays, 10 p.m.-2 a.m.; Flyin’ Ryan Fridays, Saturdays, 2:30 a.m.; Memphis Jazz Orchestra Sundays, 6-9 p.m.

B.B. King’s Blues Club 143 BEALE 524-KING

The King Beez Thursdays, 5:30 p.m.; B.B. King’s All Stars Thursdays, Fridays, 8 p.m.; Will Tucker Band Fridays, Saturdays, 5 p.m.; Lisa G and Flic’s Pic’s Band Saturdays, Sundays, 12:30 p.m.; Blind Mississippi Morris Sundays, 5 p.m.; Memphis Jones Sundays, Wednesdays 5:30 p.m.; Doc Fangaz and the Remedy Tuesdays, 5:30 p.m.

Blue Note Bar & Grill 341-345 BEALE 577-1089

Queen Ann and the Memphis Blues Masters Fridays, Saturdays, 8 p.m.-midnight.

Blues City Cafe 138 BEALE 526-3637

152 BEALE 544-7011

Sean “Bad” Apple Thursdays, Sundays, 5 p.m. and Fridays, Saturdays, 4 p.m.; Live Music Thursdays-Sundays, 7-11 p.m.; DJ Ron Fridays, 11 p.m.; DJ DNyce Saturdays, 11 p.m.

Handy Bar 200 BEALE 527-2687

The Amazing Rhythmatics Tuesdays, Thursdays-Sundays, 7 p.m.-1 a.m.

Sonny Mack Mondays-Fridays, 2-6 p.m.; Cowboy Neil Mondays, Thursdays, 7-11 p.m. and Saturdays, Sundays, 2-6 p.m.; Sensation Band Tuesdays, Fridays, 7-11 p.m.; Myra Hall Band Friday, June 15, 7 p.m.; Delta Project Saturday, June 16, 7 p.m.midnight; Chic Jones and the Blues Express Sundays, 7-11 p.m.; Fuzzy Tuesdays, Wednesdays, 7 p.m.-midnight; North and South Band Wednesdays, 7-11 p.m.

King’s Palace Cafe Tap Room 168 BEALE 576-2220

Hard Rock Cafe 126 BEALE 529-0007

Memphis Music Monday Third Monday of every month, 6-9 p.m.

Itta Bena 145 BEALE 578-3031

Nat “King” Kerr Fridays, Saturdays, 9-10 p.m.

Big Don Valentine’s Three Piece Chicken and a Biscuit Blues Band Thursdays, Tuesdays, 8 p.m.-midnight; Juke Joint Allstars Friday, June 15, 9 p.m.-1 a.m.; Myra Hall Band Saturday, June 16, 8 p.m.-midnight.

Rum Boogie Cafe Blues Hall 182 BEALE 528-0150

Memphis Bluesmasters Thursdays, Sundays, 8 p.m.-midnight; Vince Johnson and the Plantation Allstars Fridays, Saturdays, 4-8 p.m. and Sundays, 3-7 p.m.; Cowboy Neil Friday, June 15, 9 p.m.-1 a.m.; Fuzzy Saturday, June 16, 9 p.m.-1 a.m.; Brian Hawkins Blues Party Mondays, 8 p.m.-midnight; Sensation Band Mondays, 8 p.m.-midnight; Chris McDaniel Tuesdays, Wednesdays, 8 p.m.-midnight.

Silky O’Sullivan’s 183 BEALE 522-9596

Dueling Pianos Thursdays, Wednesdays, 9 p.m.-1 a.m., Fridays, Saturdays, 9 p.m.-3 a.m., and Sundays, Tuesdays, 8 p.m.midnight.

330 BEALE 525-8981

159 BEALE

Chris Gales Solo Acoustic Show Mondays-Saturdays, noon-4 p.m.; Eric Hughes solo/acoustic Thursdays, 5-8 p.m.; Karaoke Mondays-Thursdays, Sundays, 8 p.m.; Live Bands Fridays, Saturdays, 8 p.m.

King’s Palace Cafe David Bowen Thursdays, 5:309:30 p.m., Fridays, Saturdays, 6:30-10:30 p.m., and Sundays, 5:30-9:30 p.m.

La Chat Friday, June 15; An Evening with Marc Antoine and Kevin Whalum Saturday, June 16, 8 p.m.; TECH N9NE Sunday, June 17, 7 p.m.

Rum Boogie Cafe 182 BEALE 528-0150

Eric Hughes Band Mondays, Thursdays, 8 p.m.-midnight; Young Petty Thieves Thursdays, 8 p.m.-midnight; Pam and Terry Fridays, Saturdays, 5:30-8:30 p.m.; The Blues Beatles Friday, June 15, 9 p.m.-1 a.m.; Sensation Band Saturday, June 16, 9 p.m.-1 a.m. and Sunday, June 17, 7-11 p.m.; Cowboy Neil Band Tuesday, June 19, 8 p.m.-midnight; Plantation Allstars Wednesdays, 8 p.m.-midnight.

June 16, 1 and 6 p.m.

Dirty Crow Inn 855 KENTUCKY

Nancy Apple Thursdays, 8 p.m.; Eric Hughes Friday, June 15, 9 p.m.; Christine DeMeo Saturday, June 16, 9 p.m.; Bobbie Stacks and friends Wednesdays, 8-11 p.m.

Earnestine & Hazel’s

Flying Saucer Draught Emporium 130 PEABODY PLACE 523-8536

Songwriters with Roland and Friends Mondays, 7-10 p.m.

John Paul Keith Trio Sunday, June 17, 8:30 p.m.-midnight.

Belle Tavern Bourbon and Jazz with Quelude Sundays, 2:30-5:30 p.m.

Brass Door Irish Pub 152 MADISON 572-1813

Live Music Fridays; Carma Karaoke with Carla Worth Saturdays, 9-11 p.m.

Cannon Center for the Performing Arts MEMPHIS COOK CONVENTION CENTER, 255 N. MAIN TICKETS, 525-1515

Memphis Quartet Show Thursday, June 14, 1 and 6 p.m., Friday, June 15, 6 p.m. and Saturday,

Loflin Yard 7 W. CAROLINA

Electric Church Sundays, 2-4 p.m.

South Main Sounds 550 S. MAIN 494-6543

Joe Leathers and Friends Friday, June 15, 7 p.m.

531 S. MAIN 523-9754

Huey’s Downtown

117 BARBORO ALLEY 249-6580

South Main

Amber Rae Dunn Hosts: Earnestine & Hazel’s Open Mic Wednesdays, 8-11 p.m.

77 S. SECOND 527-2700

New Daisy Theatre

King Jerry Lawler’s Hall of Fame Bar & Grille

162 BEALE 521-1851

162 BEALE 521-1851

Paulette’s RIVER INN, 50 HARBOR TOWN SQUARE 260-3300

Live Pianist Thursdays, 5:30-8:30 p.m., Fridays and Saturdays, 5:30-9 p.m., Sundays, 11 a.m.-2 p.m., and Mondays-Wednesdays, 5:30-8 p.m.

The Peabody Hotel 149 UNION 529-4000

Peabody Rooftop Parties Thursdays, 6-10 p.m.

The Vault 124 GE PATTERSON

Heath and Bobbie Thursdays, 7 p.m.; Christine DeMeo Friday, June 15, 8 p.m.

BarDKDC 964 S. COOPER 272-0830

Harlan T. Bobo Album Release Friday, June 15; Mighty Souls Brass Band Saturday, June 16; Spank! Sunday, June 17; Devil Train Monday, June 18; Dave Cousar Tuesday, June 19; Baby Men Wednesday, June 20, 7:30 p.m.

Boscos 2120 MADISON 432-2222

Sunday Brunch with Joyce Cobb Sundays, 11:30 a.m.-2:30 p.m.

Canvas 1737 MADISON 443-5232

Karaoke Thursdays, 9:30 p.m.; Kyle Pruzina Live Mondays, 10 p.m.-midnight.

Celtic Crossing 903 S. COOPER 274-5151

Jeremy Stanfill and Joshua Cosby Sundays, 6-9 p.m.; Candy Company Mondays.

The Cove 2559 BROAD 730-0719

Jazz with Ed Finney, Deb Swiney, and David Collins Thursday,

June 14-20, 2018

Highjivers Thursday, June 14, 8 p.m., Friday, June 15, 9:30 p.m. and Saturday, June 16, 9:30 p.m.; Blind Mississippi Morris Fridays, 5 p.m. and Saturdays, 5:30 p.m.; Brad Birkedahl Band Thursdays, Wednesdays, 8 p.m.; Earl “The Pearl” Banks Saturdays, 12:30 p.m. and Tuesdays, 7 p.m.; Bran-

Club 152

King’s Palace Cafe Patio

18

2018 NBA DRAFT PARTY THURSDAY JUNE 21

NICK CANNON SATURDAY, SEPTEMBER 22

NICKI MINAJ & FUTURE TUESDAY, OCTOBER 23

PANIC! AT THE DISCO WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 6

Doors open at 5:30pm with draft coverage tipping off at 6:00pm on the Grizzlies’ scoreboard. Free to the public! RSVP online at grizzlies.com/2018-draft-party

Wild’ N Out Live brings lightning-fast improv & head-to-head battles to FedExForum. Tickets on sale Friday, June 15 at 10am!

Grammy Award nominated hip-hop icons are hitting the road together on their NickiHndrxx tour. Tickets on sale Friday, June 15 at Noon!

Bringing the Pray for the Wicked Tour with special guest Two Feet. Tickets on sale Friday, June 22 at Noon!

Get tickets at FedExForum Box Office | Ticketmaster locations | 1.800.745.3000 | ticketmaster.com | fedexforum.com


After Dark: Live Music Schedule June 14 - 20

Earthless with Here Lies Man Friday, June 15, 9 p.m.; Crockett Hall Tuesdays with the Midtown Rhythm Section Tuesdays, 9 p.m.; The Host Country and Dogwood Tales Wednesday, June 20, 8 p.m.

Midtown Crossing Grill

Band with Tony Chapman, Charles Cason, and Miss Joyce Henderson Fridays, Saturdays, 11 p.m.-3 a.m.; Memphis Blues Society Juke Jam Sundays, 4 p.m.

394 N. WATKINS 443-0502

Natalie James and the Professor Saturdays, Sundays, 11 a.m.-3 p.m.; “The Happening” Open Songwriter Showcase Tuesdays, 6:30-9:30 p.m.

Minglewood Hall 1555 MADISON 866-609-1744

Ledisi, Tweet, Melanie Fiona Thursday, June 14, 7 p.m.

Huey’s Poplar 4872 POPLAR 682-7729

Royal Blues Band Sunday, June 17, 8-11:30 p.m.

Memphis Botanic Garden

June 17, 5-9 p.m.; The Gentleman Combatants Monday, June 18, 8 p.m.-midnight; Debbie Jamison & Friends Tuesdays, 6-10 p.m.; Elmo and the Shades Wednesdays, 8 p.m.-midnight.

750 CHERRY 636-4100

University of Memphis The Bluff 535 S. HIGHLAND

Memphis LIVE Mondays-Sun-

5530 SHADY GROVE 683-7329

PRIZM Music Camp &

South Memphis FireHouse Community Arts Center 985 S. BELLEVUE 948-9522

8071 TRINITY 756-4480

The Southern Edition Band Tuesdays.

Frayser/Millington Old Millington Winery 6748 OLD MILLINGTON 873-4114

Java Trio Sunday, June 17.

Germantown Germantown Performing Arts Center 1801 EXETER 751-7500

First Responders Benefit Concert featuring the Farrell Webber Band Saturday, June 16, 7 p.m.

Huey’s Midtown

Huey’s Germantown

1927 MADISON 726-4372

The Chaulkies Sunday, June 17, 4-7 p.m.; Young Petty Thieves Sunday, June 17, 8:30 p.m.midnight.

7677 FARMINGTON 318-3034

The Dantones Sunday, June 17, 8-11:30 p.m.; John Paul Keith Trio Wednesday, June 20, 6-9 p.m.

Indian Pass Raw Bar Memphis

North Mississippi/ Tunica

2059 MADISON 207-7397

Paul Taylor Jazz Quartet Thursdays, 7-10 p.m.; Marcella and Her Lovers Friday, June 15, 7-10 p.m.; Joe Johnson Saturday, June 16, 4-6:30 p.m.; Jeremy Stanfill & Co. Saturday, June 16, 7-10 p.m.; Jeremy Stanfill and Josh Cosby Sunday, June 17, 12-3 p.m.

Gold Strike Casino 1010 CASINO CENTER IN TUNICA, MS 1-888-245-7829

Brian Setzer Friday, June 15, 9-10:30 p.m.

Huey’s Southaven 7090 MALCO, SOUTHAVEN, MS 662-349-7097

Lafayette’s Music Room 2119 MADISON 207-5097

The Iguanas Thursday, June 14, 7:30-9 p.m.; La Misa Negra Friday, June 15, 7:30-9 p.m.; The

Huey’s Cordova 1771 N. GERMANTOWN PKWY. 318-3030

T.J. Mulligan’s Cordova

Un, Bädr Vogu, Epoch of Unlight, Onus Thursday, June 14, 8 p.m.; Cut Throat FreakShow Thursday, June 14, 9 p.m.; Smith 7 Presents: The World Pants Tour Friday, June 15, 7 p.m.; Memphis Emo Night Prom Friday, June 15, 8 p.m.; Sedated (Worlds Greatest Ramones Tribute) with Scary Lizard Ladies Saturday, June 16, 8 p.m.; Wham Bam Glitter Glam Burlesque Saturday, June 16, 8 p.m.; Yob, Bell Witch, Powers That Be Sunday, June 17, 8 p.m.; Of Feather and Bone, Tomb Mold, Autolith, Hellthrasher Monday, June 18, 7 p.m.; Lume, The Animals Comfort, Pressed, Wine Witch Wednesday, June 20, 8 p.m.

Levitt Shell

Cordova

2 Mule Plow Sunday, June 17, 4-7 p.m.; Jamie Baker and the VIPs Sunday, June 17, 8:30 p.m.-midnight; The Rusty Pieces Tuesday, June 19, 6-9 p.m.

Hi-Tone

OVERTON PARK 272-2722

Huey’s Collierville Vintage Sunday, June 17, 8-11:30 p.m.

412-414 N. CLEVELAND 278-TONE

Swingtime Explosion Big Band Thursday, June 14, 6 p.m.; Cash Unchained Thursday, June 14, 9 p.m.; C2 & the Brother’s Reed Friday, June 15, 6:30 p.m.; Almost Famous Friday, June 15, 10 p.m.; Shelby Lee Lowe Saturday, June 16, 6:30 p.m.; The Fast Mothers & Fingertrick Saturday, June 16, 10 p.m.; Joe Restivo 4 Sundays, 11 a.m.; Keith Blanchard Sunday, June 17, 4 p.m.; Scott Albert Johnson Sunday, June 17, 8 p.m.; Orange Joe Monday, June 18, 6 p.m.; Susan Marshall Tuesday, June 19, 5:30 p.m.; McKenna Bray CD Release Party Tuesday, June 19, 8 p.m.; 3RD Man Wednesday, June 20, 5:30 p.m.; Mighty Souls Brass Band Wednesday, June 20, 8 p.m.

Collierville 2130 W. POPLAR 854-4455

Midland with Trent Harmon: Wolf at the Garden Wednesday, June 20, 7:30 p.m.

Shady Grove Presbyterian Church

Sunday, June 17, 5:30 p.m.; Red Letter Day Wednesday, June 20, 8 p.m.

P&H Cafe 1532 MADISON 726-0906

Rock Star Karaoke Fridays.

Railgarten 2160 CENTRAL

Dale Watson Saturday, June 16, 7 p.m.; Live Band Karaoke with Public Record Wednesdays, 7 p.m.

Rockhouse Live Midtown 2586 POPLAR

Rock’N’Roll Variety Blast with Aktion Kat! Saturday, June 16, 9 p.m.-2 a.m.

Senses Nightclub

2866 POPLAR 249-3739

Unique Saturday Saturdays, 10 p.m.-3 a.m.

Wild Bill’s 1580 VOLLINTINE 207-3975

Juke Joint All Stars Fridays, Saturdays, 8 p.m.; The Wild Bill’s

days, 8 p.m.-midnight; DJ Ben Murray Thursdays, 10 p.m.; DJ Ben Murray Saturday, June 16; Bluegrass Brunch with the River Bluff Clan Sundays, 11 a.m.

Oasis Hookah Lounge & Cafe 663 S. HIGHLAND 729-6960

Live Music with DJ ALXANDR Fridays, 10 p.m.-2 a.m.; Live Music with Coldway Saturdays, 10 p.m.-2 a.m.

East Memphis East of Wangs 6069 PARK 763-0676

Lee Gardner Fridays, 6:30-9 p.m.; Randal Toma, Solo Guitar Tuesdays, 5:30-8 p.m.; Eddie Harrison Wednesdays, 6:30-9 p.m.

International Chamber Music Festival; Dance to the Music: 2018 PRIZM Festival Concert Thursday, June 14, 7-9 p.m.; Cultural Voyage: 2018 PRIZM Festival Concert Friday, June 15, 7-9 p.m.; The Show Must Go On: 2018 PRIZM Festival Concert Saturday, June 16, 1-3 p.m.; Center Stage: 2018 PRIZM Festival Concert Saturday, June 16, 7-9 p.m.; On a Different Note: 2018 PRIZM Festival Concert Monday, June 18, 7-9 p.m.

Voices Open Mic Variety Show Third Friday of every month, 7 p.m.

Whitehaven/ Airport Rock-n-Roll Cafe 3855 ELVIS PRESLEY 398-6528

Elvis Tribute featuring Michael Cullipher Thursdays-Saturdays, 8 p.m.

Neil’s Music Room The Reba Russell Trio Thursday, June 14, 7-11 p.m.; Dantones Friday, June 15, 7-11 p.m.; Eddie Smith Fridays, 8 p.m.; Eddie Smith Saturday, June 16, 8 p.m.midnight; Land Divided Sunday,

Raleigh Stage Stop 2951 CELA 382-1576

Blues Jam hosted by Brad Webb Thursdays, 7-11 p.m.; Open Mic Night and Steak Night Tuesdays, 6 p.m.-midnight.

West Memphis/ Eastern Arkansas Southland Park

Poplar/I-240 5727 QUINCE 682-2300

Ghost Town Blues Band Sunday, June 17, 8 p.m.-midnight.

1550 N. INGRAM, WEST MEMPHIS, AR 800-467-6182

Bartlett Hadley’s Pub

Live Music Fridays, Saturdays, 10 p.m.; Live Band Karaoke Wednesdays, 7 p.m.

m e m p h i s f l y e r. c o m

Growlers 1911 POPLAR 244-7904

McCrary Sisters Saturday, June 16, 7:30-9 p.m.; Harlan T. Bobo Sunday, June 17, 7:30-9 p.m.

ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT

June 14, 8 p.m.; Faith Ruch Friday, June 15, 9 p.m.; Wayde Peck Saturday, June 16, 6-8 p.m.; Bluff City Backsliders Saturday, June 16, 10 p.m.; David Collins & Frog Squad Sunday, June 17, 6-9 p.m.; Ben Minden-Birkenmaier Wednesday, June 20, 6-8 p.m.; Karaoke Wednesdays, 9 p.m.

2779 WHITTEN 266-5006

Animal Cracker Friday, June 15, 9 p.m.; A.M. Whiskey Saturday, June 16, 9 p.m.; Full Circle

19


CALENDAR of EVENTS:

June 14 - 20

Artist reception for “Tinker, a Collaborative Art Show” at CooperYoung Gallery + Gift Shop, Friday, June 15th, 6 p.m.

T H EAT E R

Cannon Center for the Performing Arts

King and the 13 Hundreds, drama, history, comedy. Mayor Jim Strickland and the Memphis Office of Youth Services presenting. Admission is a jar of peanut butter or three canned goods. www.thecannoncenter.com. Sun., June 17, 6-8 p.m.

business and discovers which relationships are most important in life. www.theatrememphis.org. $30. Sundays, 2 p.m., Fridays, Saturdays, 8 p.m., and Thursdays, 7:30 p.m. Through July 1.

MEMPHIS COOK CONVENTION CENTER, 255 N. MAIN (TICKETS, 525-1515).

630 PERKINS EXT. (682-8323).

Circuit Playhouse

Death of a Streetcar Named Virginia Woolf: A Parody, when a mysterious invitation brings Blanche DuBois back to New Orleans, she finds herself once again face-to-face with the smoldering Stanley Kowalski. www. playhouseonthesquare.org. $25-$40. Fridays, Saturdays, 8 p.m., and Sundays, 2 p.m. Through June 24. 51 S. COOPER (725-0776).

Landers Center

Godspell, timeless tale of friendship, loyalty, and love based on the Gospel According to St. Matthew. www.dftonline.org. $15-$30. Sun., 2 p.m., Fri., Sat., 7 p.m., and Sat., June 16, 2 p.m.

TheatreWorks

Through June 17. 4560 VENTURE, SOUTHAVEN, MS (662-280-9120).

Germantown Community Theatre

Arsenic and Old Lace, a madcap cast of characters, including the Brewster sisters who feel that poisoning solitary, friendless old men is a charitable act. www.gctcomeplay. org. $24. Sundays, 2:30 p.m., and Fridays, Saturdays, 8 p.m. Through July 1. 3037 FOREST HILL-IRENE (453-7447).

420 S. GERMANTOWN PKWY STE 104

CORDOVA, TN 38018

901-435-6157

10% OFF* PURCHASE June 14-20, 2018

*COUPONS CANNOT BE STACKED, LIMIT 1 PER PERSON*

20

Send the date, time, place, cost, info, phone number, a brief description, and photos — two weeks in advance — to calendar@memphisflyer.com or P.O. Box 1738, Memphis, TN 38101. DUE TO SPACE LIMITATIONS, ONGOING WEEKLY EVENTS WILL APPEAR IN THE FLYER’S ONLINE CALENDAR ONLY.

Hattiloo Theatre

Raisin, musical adaptation of Lorraine Hansberry’s revolutionary A Raisin in the Sun. Set in segregated 1950s Chicago, the story depicts a black family’s struggle in the face of change. www.hattiloo. org. $30-$35. Thursdays, Fridays, 7:30 p.m., Saturdays, 2 & 7:30 p.m., and Sundays, 3 p.m. Through July 1. 37 S. COOPER (502-3486).

Playhouse on the Square Dreamgirls, follows the journey of a young female singing

group from a revolutionary time in American music history. The trio learns that show business and stardom isn’t always as glamorous as it seems. www.playhouseonthesquare. org. $25-$40. Sundays, 2 p.m., and Thursdays-Saturdays, 8 p.m. Through July 15.

Neuro Plastic City, original multidisciplinary performance piece exploring elastic patterns of humans in natural and unnatural habitats, from neurons firing in our brains to major societal trends. (274-1000), $12. Fridays, Saturdays, 8-9:30 p.m. Through June 23. 2085 MONROE (274-7139).

66 S. COOPER (726-4656).

A R T I ST R EC E PT I O N S

Theatre Memphis

ANF Architects

42nd Street, star-struck Peggy Sawyer arrives in New York City from Allenstown, PA, hoping to become a Broadway star. She learns about show

BEST PRICES BEST SERVICE BEST SELECTION

BEST REWARDS PROGRAM

OPEN 7 DAYS A WEEK

Opening reception for “The Best of the Best,” exhibition showcasing the winners of the Memphis Camera Club’s 2017 Year End Awards. www.anfa.com. Fri.,

June 15, 5:30-7:30 p.m. 1500 UNION (278-6868).

Cooper-Young Gallery + Gift Shop

Artist reception for “Tinker, a Collaborative Art Show,” exhibition of new work by Sheri Bancroft, Kelly Cox, and Billy Warren. (729-6305), www.cooperyoung.gallery. Fri., June 15, 6-9 p.m. 889 SOUTH COOPER (729-6305).

OT H E R A R T HAP P E N I N G S

Accepting Applications: Crosstown Arts Residency Program

Visit website for more information and registration. $10 application fee. Through July 15. CROSSTOWN CONCOURSE, N. CLEVELAND AT NORTH PARKWAY, WWW.CROSSTOWNARTS.ORG.

Artists’ Link Meeting

Featuring Fred Rawlinson critique session. Third Monday of every month, 6:30 p.m. JASON’S DELI, 3473 POPLAR (324-3181).

continued on page 22

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ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT

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EVERY TUESDAY AT 6 PM THROUGH SEPTEMBER

21


CALENDAR: JUNE 14 - 20 continued from page 20 Blue Star Museums Program

Free admission to Pink Palace Family of Museums for the nation’s active-duty military personnel and their families from Memorial Day weekend through Labor Day. Through Sept. 3. MEMPHIS PINK PALACE MUSEUM, 3050 CENTRAL (636-2362), WWW.MEMPHISMUSEUMS.ORG.

Creative Aging Senior Arts Series

Featuring native Memphian, jazz and blues Creative Aging artist Deborah Swiney and highlights from Theatre Memphis’ 42nd Street. Followed by reception. $5. Wed., June 20, 1:30-3 p.m. THEATRE MEMPHIS, 630 PERKINS EXT. (682-8323), WWW.CREATIVEAGINGMIDSOUTH.ORG.

Dreamgirls: A Special Evening for the CLC

Featuring food and beverages, incredible show, and many ways to give to the Community Legal Center. $45-$100. Thurs., June 14, 6-9 p.m. PLAYHOUSE ON THE SQUARE, 66 S. COOPER (834-7222), WWW.CLCMEMPHIS.ORG.

Eighth Annual Woman’s Exchange Art Gallery Open House

Public invited to view and purchase local art shown in the recently renovated gallery benefiting the artist and our mission “Helping others to help themselves.”

June 14-20, 2018

(Endless summer Adventures)

Opening reception for “Best of the Best,” from the Memphis Camera Club, at ANF Architects, Friday, June 15th at 5:30 p.m.

Through Aug. 24, 2-4 p.m. WOMAN’S EXCHANGE TEA ROOM, 88 RACINE (541-331-0077).

Memphis Literary Arts Festival

Celebrate storytelling and the intersections of the city’s unique arts, culture, and historical legacies. Sat., June 16, 9 a.m.-5 p.m.

Graceland

“Hillbilly Rock,” exhibition featuring items from The Marty Stuart Collection. www.graceland.com. Ongoing.

PREMIERE PALACE, 629 MONROE (725-5625).

3717 ELVIS PRESLEY (332-3322).

Harrell Performing Arts Theatre

ONGOI NG ART

Art Museum at the University of Memphis (AMUM)

“Monster Marks,” exhibition of work from Memphis collections that make us think about how we define monsters. www.memphis. edu/amum. Through July 28. “Africa: Art of a Continent,” permanent exhibition of African art from the Martha and Robert Fogelman collection. Ongoing. 142 COMMUNICATION & FINE ARTS BUILDING (678-2224).

ANF Architects

“The Best of the Best,” exhibition showcasing the winners of the Memphis Camera Club’s 2017 Year End Awards. www. anfa.com. June 15-Aug. 2. 1500 UNION (278-6868).

Belz Museum of Asian and Judaic Art

“Chinese Symbols in Art,” ancient Chinese pottery and bronze. www.belzmuseum.org. Ongoing.

“Where We Gather,” exhibition of works by Erika Roberts. www.erikaroberts.studio. Through June 25. 440 POWELL, COLLIERVILLE (853-3228). 119 S. MAIN, IN THE PEMBROKE SQUARE BUILDING (523-ARTS).

Bingham and Broad

“My Kin Is Not Like Yours,” exhibition of works by Debra Edge. Ongoing. 2563 BROAD (323-3008).

Crosstown Concourse

“Distilled: The Narrative Transformed,” exhibition of a 30-year survey of works by Pinkney Herbert. www.crosstownarts. org. Through July 4. N. CLEVELAND AT NORTH PARKWAY.

David Lusk Gallery

“Arcadia,” exhibition of new paintings and drawings by Pinkney Herbert. www. davidluskgallery.com. Through June 23. 97 TILLMAN (767-3800).

The Dixon Gallery & Gardens

“Contemplating Character: Portrait Drawings & Oil Sketches from Jacques Louis David to Lucian Freud,” exhibition of portrait drawings and oil sketches extends almost twoand-a-half centuries organized thematically, providing the viewer with provocative visual juxtapositions. www.dixon.org. Through June 24. “’IN LAK’ECH ALA K’IN,’ Tú eres mi otro yo, You are my other self,” exhibition of installation transforming the Mallory/Wurtzburger Galleries into a work of art by Richard Lou. www.dixon.org. Through July 15.

“Escape to the Sea,” exhibition of acrylic and watercolor paintings by Carolyn Moss. www.eclectic-eye.com. Through July 25. 242 S. COOPER (276-3937).

Edge Arts

“Olly Olly Oken Free,” exhibition features playful paintings by Memphis artists Pam McDonnell and Stephanie King and tactile works by Sloane Bibb. www.lrossgallery.com. Through June 30. 5040 SANDERLIN (767-2200).

“Memphis Landmarks,” exhibition of works by John Sadowski. Through June 30. 600 MONROE (262-6674).

FireHouse Community Arts Center

Mosal Morszart, exhibition of works by Black Arts Alliance artist. www.memphisblackartsalliance.org. Ongoing. 985 S. BELLEVUE (948-9522).

Marshall Arts Gallery

“Love of Art” and “Memphis,” exhibition of work by Nikki Gardner and Debra Edge by appointment only. Ongoing. 639 MARSHALL (679-6837).

Memphis Botanic Garden “Seeing Green,” exhibition by the Bartlett Art Association bringing together the BAA

continued on page 25

4339 PARK (761-5250).

SEE IT AT THE PINK PALACE

Now Showing! Paddle through the exhibit Now through September 3, 2018

22

L Ross Gallery

Eclectic Eye

This exhibition was produced by the Florida Museum of Natural History with support from the AEC Trust, Lastinger Family Foundation, State of Florida and VisitGainesville.

Enjoy an out-of-this-world experience at the Planetarium! Now Showing!


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Storytime for young activists & families For ages 2-5 years old

SOULSVILLE RECORD SWAP Stax Museum of American Soul Music

Saturday, June 16

$10 for Early Bird Collectors 10—11a.m. Free admission 11a.m.—4p.m. Dealers from around the country / Food Trucks

FREE & open to the public! Registration is NOT required. Program is recommended for children ages 2-5, but all are welcome. Parents must stay with their child during the program. For more info, contact Dory Lerner, Museum Educator at dlerner@civilrightsmuseum.org

It is easier to build strong children than to repair broken men. – Frederick Douglass

Pre-Party at Memphis Made Friday, June 15

926 E. McLemore Avenue, Memphis, TN 38106 901.261.6338 /~ StaxMuseum.com

450 Mulberry Street • Memphis, TN 38103 • civilrightsmuseum.org

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ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT

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Wednesdays, JUNE 13, 20, 27 and JULY 11, 18, 25; and saturdays, JUNE 30 & JULY 7 10:30-11am • Museum Legacy Building Lobby

23

6/12/18 2:16 PM


June 24, 2018 – 7am Memorial Park 25 Mile Ride &

1 Mile Kids Fun Ride through scenic areas of Memphis beginning and ending at Memorial Park.

Post Ride Breakfast by Crepe Maker & Say Cheese! plus Entertainment

June 14-20, 2018

Register at

midsouthtransplantRFL.racesonline.com

901-328-4438 • www.midsouthtransplant.org www.memorialparkfuneralandcemetery.com

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CALENDAR: JUNE 14 - 20 continued from page 22 members’ collected interpretations and visions of the many meanings of nature’s favorite color. www. memphisbotanicgarden.com. Through June 29. 750 CHERRY (636-4100).

WKNO Studio

“Tennessee Craft-Southwest Fine Craft Showcase,” exhibition of fine craft in an array of media and styles by members of Tennessee Craft-Southwest. www.wkno.org. Through June 29. 7151 CHERRY FARMS (458-2521).

Memphis Brooks Museum of Art

“Black Resistance: Ernest C. Withers and the Civil Rights Movement,” exhibition focuses on and commemorates the 50th anniversary of the events from March 27 through April 8, 1968. www. brooksmuseum.org. Through Aug. 19. “African-Print Fashion Now! A Story of Taste, Globalization, and Style,” exhibition of dynamic traditions of African dress featuring colorful, boldly patterned printed cloth highlighting the interplay between regional preferences and cosmopolitanism. Through Aug. 12. “About Face,” exhibition located in the Education Gallery highlighting the different ways artists interpret the connection between emotion and expression. www.brooksmuseum.org. Ongoing. “Drawing Memory: Essence of Memphis,” exhibition of works inspired by nsibidi, a sacred means of communication among male secret societies in southeastern Nigeria by Victor Ekpuk. Ongoing.

C O M E DY

TO U R S

Cannon Center for the Performing Arts Heather Land, www.thecannoncenter.com. $29$99. Tues., June 19, 7 p.m. MEMPHIS COOK CONVENTION CENTER, 255 N. MAIN (TICKETS, 525-1515).

FedExForum

DA N C E

Sock It to Me Burlesques: Legends

Tributes to iconic legends through burlesque, belly dance, hip-hop dance, ballet, singing, Vaudeville, and sideshow. $10-$90. Sat., June 16, 8-11:30 p.m. ROCKHOUSE LIVE, 5709 RALEIGH-LAGRANGE (386-7222), WWW.ROCKHOUSELIVE.COM.

Savor tastings at five eateries, interact with chefs and managers, and sample local flavors while strolling down Main Street and enjoying new art installations and historic landmarks. Wednesdays-Saturdays, 1:30 p.m. WWW.CITYTASTINGTOURS.COM.

Martin Lawrence, www.forummemphis.com. $35-$85. Sat., June 16, 7:30 p.m.

Jimmy Ogle’s Elmwood

191 BEALE STREET.

Rockhouse Live Midtown

City Tasting Tours

Hidden Talents, Memphis’ finest performers. Hosted by Judaea Driscoll and Kake Napier. $5. Sun., June 17, 7-10 p.m.

Historian Jimmy Ogle will show you his favorite sites at Elmwood Cemetery. $20. Sat., June 16, 10:30 a.m.-noon & 1-2:30 p.m. ELMWOOD CEMETERY, 824 S. DUDLEY (774-3212), WWW.ELMWOODCEMETERY.ORG/EVENTS/.

2586 POPLAR.

continued on page 26

THE BIGGEST & THE BEST

1934 POPLAR (544-6209).

Memphis College of Art

FREE FIRE WORKS SHOW AT DUSK ON FIT Z FRONT L AWN

“We Rise: The Final Biennial,” exhibition by Memphis College of Art’s Alumni Association. All alumni and community invited to celebrate the MCA art and artists that will continue to progress forward. www.mca.edu. Through July 15. 1930 POPLAR (272-5100).

Metal Museum

“Forge,” work by 15 international metal artists whose practice has been identified as having a significant impact in the field of blacksmithing. Through Sept. 16. “Tributaries: Venetia Dale-Next After the First in Order, Place and Time,” installations that refocus attention on overlooked support objects secondary to the items they hold up, contain, or aid. Appreciated as individual creations when removed from context and made in pewter. www. metalmuseum.org. Through Sept. 9.

TUESDAY, JULY 3

Watch a spectacular fireworks show light up the night sky! Bring your friends, family, lawn chairs and blankets as you enjoy the music and food starting at 5pm. Enjoy the biggest FREE fireworks show in the mid-south.

L I V E M U S I C • B B Q • B E E R G A R D E N • PA R T Y FAVO R S • F R E E , C O N V E N I E N T PA R K I N G

374 METAL MUSEUM DR. (774-6380).

Playhouse on the Square

“DreamESCAPES,” exhibition of multi-media series of imagined, constructed landscapes of famous cities, iconic places, and sometimes rural, non-descriptive corners of the world by O. Gustavo Plascencia. www.mca.edu. Through July 29. 66 S. COOPER (726-4656).

Ross Gallery

“Connecting Memphis,” exhibition of selections from photography-and-storytelling project by Cindy McMillion. www.connectingmemphis. com. Through July 18. CHRISTIAN BROTHERS UNIVERSITY, PLOUGH LIBRARY, 650 E. PARKWAY S. (321-3000).

“Images of Africa Before & After the Middle Passage,” exhibition of photography by Jeff and Shaakira Edison. Ongoing. 826 N. SECOND (527-3427).

Stax Museum of American Soul Music “The Chaos and the Cosmos: Inside Memphis Music’s Lost Decade, 1977-1986,” exhibition of photography by Patricia Rainer. www.staxmuseum.com. Through July 31. 926 E. MCLEMORE (946-2535).

Tops Gallery: Madison Avenue Park

“Lion Tamers,” exhibition of paintings by Paul Edwards. www.topsgallery.com. Through July 15. 151 MADISON (340-0134).

Trezevant Manor

Anne Hughes Sayle, exhibition of oil on canvas realistic landscapes and figures work and fabric art pieces. www.trezevantmanor.org. Through Aug. 10. 177 N. HIGHLAND (325-4000).

Village Frame & Art

“20th Century Memphis Photographs,” work by Charlie Ivey and Virginia Schoenster, Wednesdays, 10 a.m.-6 p.m. Gallery Artists, work by Charlie Ivey, Virginia Schoenster, Lou Ann Dattilo, and Matthew Hasty. Ongoing. 540 S. MENDENHALL (767-8882).

FitzgeraldsTunica.com • 1-662-363-LUCK (5825) • Must be 21 and a Key Rewards member. See Cashier•Players Club for rules. While supplies last. Tax and resort fee not included in listed price. Advance hotel reservations required and subject to availability. $50 credit or debit card is required upon hotel check-in. Arrivals after 6pm must be guaranteed with a credit card. Management reserves the right to cancel, change and modify the event or promotion. Gaming restricted patrons prohibited. Gambling Problem? Call 1-800-522-4700.

ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT

m e m p h i s f l y e r. c o m

Slavehaven Underground Railroad Museum

25


CALENDAR: JUNE 14 - 20 continued from page 25 E X POS/SALES

KREWE Trunk Show

Featuring on-site brand rep, Voodoo Café food truck, caricaturist Kevin Reute, Urban Hardware pop-up shop, and live music from Mighty Souls Brass Band. Sat., June 16, 10 a.m.-4 p.m. ECLECTIC EYE, 242 S. COOPER (2763937), WWW.ECLECTIC-EYE.COM.

F EST IVALS

Lifeblood Annual Donor Fest Celebration

Food, awards, activities for all ages, blood drive, and giant human blood drop picture. Sat., June 16, 8 a.m.-noon. MEMPHIS UNIVERSITY SCHOOL, 6191 PARK (260-1300), LIFEBLOOD.ORG.

CYNTHIA PLACE HOME OF THE MILITARY RETIREES OF THE TRISTATE AREA, 280 CYNTHIA PLACE (527-0238), TROOPSANDBOOTS5K. EVENTBRITE.COM.

Veterans 5K Walk/Run

Featuring history, music, food vendors, entertainment, games, car show, play rides, bouncers for the children, and more. Fri.Sun., June 15-17. ROBERT R. CHURCH PARK, CORNER OF FOURTH AND BEALE, WWW.MEMPHISJUNETEENTH.COM.

S PO RTS / F IT N E S S

Troops and Boots 5K Run 2018

The race will start and finish at the MRTSA Clubhouse. All proceeds to be used for scholarships for high school seniors.

Wine Down for BizTown

Benefiting Operation Stand Down Mid-South, Inc. Sat., June 16, 6:30 a.m.

ROBERT R. CHURCH PARK, CORNER OF FOURTH AND BEALE, WWW.MEMPHISJUNETEENTH.COM.

Featuring blind wine tasting, silent auction, food, music, prizes, and giveaways. 21+ to participate. $30. Fri., June 15, 5:30-9:30 p.m.

KIDS

JUNIOR ACHIEVEMENT, 307 MADISON (366-7800), WWW.JAMEMPHIS.ORG.

Graceland Performing Arts Camp

F I LM

Immersive theater arts and music experience for kids and teens, ages 6 to 15, and their families. June 18-22. GRACELAND, 3717 ELVIS PRESLEY (332-3322), WWW.GRACELAND.COM.

The Lego Movie

Memphis Juneteenth Urban Music Festival

Dreamgirls at Playhouse on the Square, through July 15th

$20-$30. Sat., June 16, 8-11 a.m.

Saturdays, 4 p.m. Through June 30.

CTI 3D GIANT THEATER, IN THE MEMPHIS PINK PALACE MUSEUM, 3050 CENTRAL (636-2362), WWW. MEMPHISMUSEUMS.ORG.

S P EC I A L EVE N TS

2018 Fort Pillow Massacre Historic Marker Ceremony In honor of the African-American soldiers and civilians that died on April 12, 1864 Tues., June 19, 10 a.m.

MEMPHIS NATIONAL CEMETERY, 3568 TOWNES (386-8311).

Outflix 2018 Summer Movie Series LGBT Legend Awards

Red carpet awards event. $10$50. Sun., June 17, 7 p.m. THE HAVEN MEMPHIS, 206 G.E. PATTERSON (453-2664).

Peabody Rooftop Parties

Live music and beautiful views of the sun setting over the Mississippi River. Ladies get in free before 7 p.m. Visit website for scheduled entertainment. 21+ $10-$15. Thursdays, 6-10 p.m. Through Aug. 16. THE PEABODY HOTEL, 149 UNION (529-4000), PEABODYMEMPHIS.COM.

Robert Jamison Meet and Greet

benefiting St. Jude Children Hospital in the name of deceased patient (Raytheon Perry). RSVP by email, rljamisonphd@gmail.com. $25. Sat., June 16, 3-5 p.m. PETTIGREW’S, 3443 AUSTIN PEAY HWY (207-5543).

H O L I DAY E V E N TS

“Cocktail Cards & Cigars”

The Father’s Day Edition, Spades Tournaments featuring $600 cash prize for the winning team. 45. Sat., June 16, 4-11 p.m. MAKEDA’S COOKIES DOWNTOWN, 488 S. SECOND (300-6685), WWW. STEMMEDGLASS.COM.

Enjoy food, drinks, autograph books, DVDs, and other swag

$10. Wednesdays, 7 p.m. Through June 30.

FO O D & D R I N K EVE NTS

6th Annual Good People Good Beer A dress up beer tasting gala benefiting Memphis-based nonprofit Operation Broken Silence and their childhood education work in war-torn Sudan. Free-$85. Sat., June 16, 8-11 p.m.

PROPCELLAR VINTAGE RENTAL, 2585 SUMMER, WWW.OPERATIONBROKENSILENCE.ORG.

Canoes + Cocktails

$40 members, $45 nonmembers. Thurs., June 14.

MALCO STUDIO ON THE SQUARE, 2105 COURT (725-7151), WWW. OUTFLIXFESTIVAL.ORG.

I Read That Movie @ the Library: The Firm

Page-to-screen book club meeting. Discussion follows the movie. Free. Sat., June 16, 2 p.m. BENJAMIN L. HOOKS CENTRAL LIBRARY, 3030 POPLAR (415-2700).

Time Warp DriveIn: Season 5

Sat., June 16, 8 p.m.

MALCO SUMMER 4 DRIVE-IN, 5310 SUMMER (901-681-2020), WWW.MALCO.COM.

SHELBY FARMS, 500 N. PINE LAKE (767-PARK), WWW.SHELBYFARMSPARK.ORG.

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F E AT U R E B y J e s s e D a v i s

Voices Then and Now

There’s more to the Memphis Medical District than Medicine. Let’s celebrate the vibrant community around us. Schedule and details coming soon.

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June 14-20, 2018

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(l to r) Zandria Robinson, Jamey Hatley, and Molly Rose Quinn

Hatley, a native Memphian whose work has appeared in the Oxford American, Callalloo, and the acclaimed Memphis Noir collection, knows the value of a space for writers to connect. She remembers waiting in a line at the now twice-rebranded Davis-Kidd bookstore to meet Crystal Wilkinson, an author with whom Hatley developed a friendship. Wilkinson will be in conversation with Hatley at MLAF, closing a circle that began when Hatley was a “baby writer … in the back of the line waiting to try to figure out something to say to the famous writer.” Wilkinson will be just some of the talent on display at the MLAF. The festival is remarkable in its inclusion of different forms of storytelling. The lineup for the one-day festival includes Courtney Alexander, who made a tarot deck that engages with ideas about body image and archetypes, and Daniel Jose Older, a musician and author of a series of young-adult ghost noir books. There will also be journalists, muralists, musicians, and novelists. “We thought really hard about what kind of overlap and what kind of interdisciplinary spirit this lineup would have,” Quinn says. “In part because we believe that mixing those things together allows for the kind of accessibility Jamey is talking about.” It’s fitting in Memphis, a city where some of the most illustrative storytellers haven’t even been literate, that accessibility is among the primary goals of the festival. Hatley explains that, with this goal in mind, they’re striving to marry the entertaining and the enriching, the highbrow and the whimsical. “We want to say that literature is the ‘then’ and the ‘now,’ and we want to make a bridge across to those communities,” Hatley says. “Voices need to be heard, and whatever route they can take, we want people to know all the ways. We want people’s voices to get out in a way that feels empowering for them.” Memphis Literary Arts Festival is Saturday, June 16th, 9 a.m.-5 p.m. Marshall Avenue between South Orleans and Monroe Extd.

DBW PHOTOGRAPHY

I

f the prevailing stereotype of the writer/reader is of a solitary individual, slaving away with bleary eyes, then the Center for Southern Literary Arts (CSLA) aims to challenge the traditional narrative. Because stories are inherently a means of communication and of reinforcing our connections — with each other, with the past, and with our cultures. To illustrate the communal aspect and intersectional nature of storytelling, in its many forms and genres, the CSLA is unveiling the inaugural Memphis Literary Arts Festival (MLAF) this Saturday, June 16th, in the Edge district. “We founded the organization a little less than a year ago,” says Jamey Hatley, co-founder and creative director of the CSLA. In its not-quite-a-year in existence, along with planning the debut of the MLAF, the center has already brought some impressively mighty literary talent to Memphis. Last February, the nonprofit brought Tayari Jones, author of An American Marriage, to the Orpheum for a reading and conversation with Hatley, who is a writer in her own right. “That event was the launch of our Main Stage series,” says Molly Quinn, co-founder and executive director of CSLA and a veteran of similar nonprofit literature festivals in New York and L.A. “We did two of those this year, and next year you’ll see somewhere between four and six.” When Hatley and Quinn founded the CSLA (with co-founder/writer Zandria Robinson), Memphis did not seem quite as hospitable a place for practitioners of the literary arts. “When I was a young writer, I didn’t travel. My parents didn’t have a lot of money, and I traveled and experienced the world through books. We were at a point in Memphis where we weren’t sure if our big independent [bookstore] was going to stick around, the [Mid-South Book Festival] had stopped,” Hatley elaborates. “So I came back to Memphis into a situation that was more in peril than how I left it. As a working artist, that was very scary to me.” So, mindful of the importance of a space given over to the mingling of voices and ideas, Hatley, Quinn, and Robinson pulled together to create the CSLA. MLAF is about connections, about creating new ones, and about celebrating existing connections that may go overlooked. “A lot of people might think that they have to go to New York to find mentors and people to inspire them, but we want people to know that that inspiration is right here in Memphis,” Hatley says.

The Memphis Literary Arts Festival brings new voices to the conversation.


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BAR REPORT By Meghan Stuthard

All Memphis

Jake Schorr (inset) and Haley, two of the welcoming faces at Westy’s.

Consider a visit to Westy’s.

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ere’s what you need to know about Jake Schorr: He’s Memphis-born and Memphis-raised, having never lived elsewhere outside of the six years he spent in the Navy. He is an ambassador of Memphis, one of its biggest cheerleaders and a true fountain of knowledge of the city he loves. His family is as ingrained in Memphis as the Mississippi River, having founded the Tennessee Brewery on its shores back in the 1880s. Like the Mississippi, the Schorr family winds its way through Memphis, having impressed itself upon the city with business ventures, bars, and most importantly, beer. Westy’s, old as it is, is still Mr. Jake’s most recent bar venture and his longest-running. Situated down on North Main, Westy’s has been in operation since 1983, serving as the go-to bar for locals, visitors, and both versions of the Pyramid. Two friends and I met at Westy’s on a Sunday afternoon to, you know, drink beer. At this point, I didn’t know anything about the Schorr family, their legacy, or Goldcrest, outside of the fact that it had once been brewed at the Tennessee Brewery. The original Goldcrest 51 has been served for a while at Westy’s, but I went for the Goldcrest Bock, the recipe for which was thought to be lost, but happened to be recovered just a few years ago. Here’s how chill Westy’s and its patrons are: We had a loud discussion about bands we saw on tour in the ’90s, and no one nearby appeared to judge us, even though names like Marilyn Manson and Veruca Salt were thrown around with wild abandon. Even after this discussion and several beers, the

bartender, Haley, was still politely addressing us as “ma’am” and “sir,” though I can nearly guarantee none of the three of us were worthy of it. Haley introduced us to Schorr, or Mr. Jake, as his staff calls him. He immediately remarked that he gets people from all over the world at his bar and each one knows more about Memphis than actual Memphians do. He told us the fantastic story of his life: how he started in the stereo business after returning from the Navy, how he once spoke on the phone with Elvis, and how he befriended Alex Chilton.

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ALL MEMPHIS He had stories about Ardent and the old Lafayette’s and nearly every musician who has passed through, and you’d think after all of this, he’d be done. But here’s another thing about Mr. Jake: He doesn’t sit idly by. His most ambitious venture yet is still in the works. The beloved Rainbow Room, located behind Westy’s, has been shuttered since it closed in 1983. His purchase of the former synagogue finally complete, he is renovating and reopening it as a music venue. Westy’s is hardly a secret, especially for those who live in the Downtown area, but the law school and medical school populations that cram into other, more publicized Downtown bars might not know about it. It’s open until 3 a.m. each night and offers delivery until 2 a.m. It’s got a bizarrely shaped bar (which is one of my favorite things about it), booths, and tables; it’s large enough to accommodate groups both at lunch and late into the night. There’s a large patio out back and, some nights, live music. Most impressively, the menu has over 150 items by my count. Why so many? “I guess I just don’t know any better,” Mr. Jake confesses. Hell, the man wants to add even more. His favorite dishes are the patty melt and the jambalaya. Eventually it wasn’t long before our discussion turned to Anthony Bourdain. All three of us are writers ourselves (well, the two of them are writers; I’m more of a barfly with access to a laptop) and one of us being a kitchen wizard, it was hard not to recall Bourdain and his many culinary, literary, and cultural triumphs, especially while sitting at a beautiful old, dark bar. Before long, we had befriended an English couple who had traveled all this way for — who else? — Elvis. It was fitting of Bourdain, to be in this crazy little dive, laughing and drinking with pals from far away, sharing stories about Memphis with two new fans. I urge everyone to do the same, wherever you may drink or dine, but consider a visit to Westy’s. Introduce yourself to Mr. Jake, and prepare to learn something new about this city you love. Westy’s, 346 N Main, 543-8646, westysmemphis.com

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S P I R ITS By Andria Lisle

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Refreshing summer cocktails to beat the heat.

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dinner on the grill. Start with a base of lemonade in a large pitcher, then add a bottle of Chardonnay, two-thirds cup of light rum, fresh berries, a sliced orange, and a sliced Granny Smith apple. Refrigerate the concoction for as long as you can stand it — I recommend an hour, minimum — and serve. A gin shandy is simple to make — and it reminds me of a family vacation to London when I was a teenager. I discovered pre-canned shandy in vending machines around town and pretended I was getting a buzz while making the tourist rounds of Big Ben and Buckingham Palace. This shandy is better than canned and almost as simple as popping a tab. Just mix one cup of lemonade with three-fourths cup gin and a 12-ounce bottle of ginger beer. If you want something even simpler, skip the ginger beer and just enjoy a lemonade with gin. Or try vodka, served in a tall Collins glass over ice. Another fun twist on an old favorite is a lemonade margarita. This one is best served on the rocks. Salt your rims per usual, then, in a cocktail shaker, combine 2 one-quarter cups lemonade with three-quarters cup tequila. Garnish your glasses with lemon rounds. Enjoy! Or, step it up a notch with the Kentucky Lemonade Cocktail. Rim highball glasses with coarse sugar instead of salt. Muddle mint leaves in a shaker, then add lemonade and bourbon (I’ll let you decide how much). Shake and strain. Pour, leaving enough room to top off each glass with ginger ale and a lemon slice garnish. I’ve found my new favorite recipe online. Called Cajun Lemonade, a riff on the illustrious Pimm’s Cup cocktail, it was concocted by Duffan McDonnell, a twice-nominated Mixologist of the Year at New Orleans’ Tales of the Cocktail and author of the cocktail history Drinking the Devil’s Acre. Combine two ounces of lemonade with one-and-a-half ounces of white rum or vodka, one ounce of Pimm’s No. 1, and two dashes of hot sauce (the recipe calls for Tabasco, but I substituted my favorite, Louisiana Hot Sauce). Shake with ice, then strain into an ice-filled Collins glass. Top with a splash of 7Up and garnish with a lemon wheel. Spicy, tangy, savory, and herbaceous, this drink refreshes like no other.

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t feels like summer has hit a little earlier — and a lot harder — this year. I’m trying to up my water intake and cut down on my wine drinking, because it seems like both whites and reds can be dehydrating. The human race might be able to survive on water alone, but not this Memphian — and that’s why I’m drinking lemonade. Acid, it seems, can be a thirst quencher. One of the first signs of dehydration is a dry mouth — and the tartness of lemon sparks immediate salivation. Lemonade is also packed with Vitamin C and antioxidants, which makes it a better choice for a summer mixer than, say, a can of cola. I occasionally make lemonade from scratch — but until recently, I was most likely to pick up a bottle of Simply Lemonade at the grocery store. Yes, it’s chock full of sugar, but with just four ingredients, and cane sugar instead of high fructose corn syrup, I could do worse. Then I discovered a gamechanger via the website TheKitchn — a “juicing hack” that utilizes a stand mixer to yield the most juice from fresh lemons. You simply quarter your lemons and then pulverize them at low-speed using the paddle attachment. Strain the juice into a measuring cup, and you’re ready to go. Use eight to 10 lemons to yield one cup of lemon juice, then whisk in up to one cup of sugar until dissolved. (I like my lemonade tart, so I generally use 2/3 cup sugar). Add six cups of water, and chill. And now it’s time for the cocktails: I’m a sucker for the Limoncello cocktail recipe I found on the Simply brand’s homepage. Mix one cup of lemonade, ¾ cup club soda, ½ cup Limoncello liqueur, and a shot of vodka. Muddle some mint in a glass, add ice, and pour over the cocktail ingredients. I realize that I slightly disparaged white wine above, but paired with lemonade in a sangria, I can tolerate it on these 95 degree days. Pre-make this cocktail by the pitcher, and pair it with

33


FILM REVIEW By Chris McCoy

Thieves Like Us A stellar cast is the best thing about female-driven heist remake Ocean’s 8.

W

hat is the appeal of the heist movie? Is it about watching a supremely clever person concoct an elaborate plan, and then reveling in the OCD perfection when all the pieces click into place? Is it about the powerless getting one over on the powerful? Or is it all about the charisma of the criminal mastermind, a way for the audience to harmlessly indulge their need for a leader? The history of heist pictures goes all the way back to the beginnings of American cinema, and they’ve always been popular. The Great Train Robbery held the record for highest grossing movie from 1903 until Birth of a Nation in 1915. It was also the subject of the first remake in history, when Edwin S. Porter’s original film was redone by Sigmund Lubin and released under the same title in the same year. The only heist movie that’s been remade almost as often as The Great Train Robbery is Ocean’s 11. The original is a curious artifact: a massive vanity project put on by the Rat Pack as their Las Vegas decadence reached fever pitch. It’s not a great movie. Frank Sinatra is visibly distracted, while Martin is visibly drunk. It’s a bunch of celebrities cynically cashing in on their

fame, best enjoyed by fans who are content just to look at their heroes. That’s one of the reasons Steven Soderbergh’s 2001 Ocean’s 11 remake was so surprising: It was actually a pretty good movie. Just as the original cemented the Rat Pack as the pre-eminent stars of the early 1960s, so too did Soderbergh’s Ocean’s 11 define the first batch of 21st-century superstars: George Clooney, Matt Damon, Brad Pitt, Don Cheadle, Bernie Mac, and Andy Garcia. Julia Roberts was the lone feminine presence to redeem the sausage fest. Soderbergh took the barely-there plot of trying to rob a bunch of casinos at once and honed it to a razor edge. His editing was tight and cinematography outstanding. The 2001 Ocean’s 11 wasn’t just an object of fan admiration — although it unmistakably was on some level — but unambiguously good filmmaking. It’s trashy fun, but incredibly well executed. A female driven remake was inevitable in the #MeToo era. The ragtag band of thieves camaraderie translates perfectly into the girl power moment, and high-powered talent agencies would love to see their clients put into the roles that women all over the

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Anne Hathaway and Helena Bonham Carter star in writer/director Gary Ross’ Ocean’s 8. world would imprint on. In the Sinatra/Clooney slot is Sandra Bullock as Debbie Ocean, the younger sister of Danny Ocean, who, we find out in the opening shots of the film, is dead. Probably. The film gets off to a good start with Bullock faking sincerity in her parole hearing. She’s got the smooth prattle and irresistible charisma of the Ocean family down pat. Less than a day after being released from her five-year stint in the pen, she’s shoplifted a whole new wardrobe and fraudulently ensconced herself in a luxury hotel. Then, there’s the requisite gathering of the team: Lou (Cate Blanchett), a crooked New York nightclub owner; Amita (Mindy Kaling), a jeweler; Constance (Awkwafina) the pickpocket; a hacker known as Nine Ball (Rihanna); and Tammy (Sarah Paulson), a

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big time fence hiding out as a suburban mother of two. The plan, which Debbie came up with while in solitary confinement, is to steal a necklace called The Toussaint, valued at $150 million. To steal it, it has to be lured out into the open at the Met Gala, an annual, super ritzy fashion world party thrown by the Metropolitan Museum of Art. To do that, the gang targets Rose Weil (Helena Bonham Carter), a fashion designer drowning in debt, to convince superstar actress Daphne Kluger (Anne Hathaway) to use her clout to convince Cartier to let the necklace out of the vault so she can wear it for the party. During the scenes inside the simulated Met Gala, Ocean’s 8 functions extremely well as lifestyle porn with a more propulsive plot than Fifty Shades

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LEGAL NOTICE • EMPLOYMENT • REAL ESTATE Legal Notice

Housing for Rent

AUTO AUCTION White’s Wrecker will auction the following cars on 6/6/18 at 9am. ‘07 Nissan 1N4BA41EX7C822309 ‘00 Toyota 4T1BF28B3YU046253 ‘00 Vw 3VWCA21CXYM493559 ‘07 Nissan 5N1BV28U27N140427 ‘09 Chevy 2G1WA5EK1A1177475 ‘01 Pontiac 2G2FV22G812123373 ‘10 Chevy 1G1ZA5E0XAF214480 ‘07 GMC 1GKFK63807J277877 ‘89 Chevy 1GCDC14K7LE237957 ‘03 Dodge 1D7HA18N74J107042

Employment COPELAND SERVICES, L.L.C. Hiring Armed State Licensed Officers/Unarmed Officers. Three Shifts Available. Same Day Interview. 1661 International Place 901-258-5872 or 901-818-3187 Interview in Professional Attire. _____________________ RETAIL WINE SALES wine store looking for experienced PT/FT wine/liquor sales associate. Great personality & wine knowledge is required. Email resume to winesnob1102@gmail.com _____________________ RETAIL WINE SALES Downtown-Midtown Wine/liquor store looking PT sales associate. Great personality is required. Wine and spirits knowledge is a plus. Email resume to winesnob1102@gmail.com _____________________ WE’RE GROWING Lee Harris for County Mayor: Hiring Phonebankers - $15 per hour. Email: info@ leeharrisformayor.com or to apply visit: http://bit.ly/pb4newera *Approved by Lee Harris for County Mayor, Rajiv Singh, Esq., Treasurer

Hospitality/ Restaurant

YOUNG AVE DELI is looking for experienced cooks. Part time and full time opportunity available. Must be able to work in the evenings. Must be able to work on Sunday. Pay will be based on experience. Come by the Deli to fill out an application. 2119 Young Avenue 38104

1215 TULLY For rent: North Memphis - Close to Downtown. 3BR/1BA. W/D connection, CH/A, $680/mo + optional $32.00 alarm fee. Call 901-239-4419. Ready to rent to good tenant.

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RETAIL WINE SALES Downtown-Midtown Wine/Liquor store looking for PT sales associate for afternoon/evening shift. Great personality is required. Wine and spirits knowledge is a plus. Email resume to winesnob1102@gmail.com

ASSE International Student Exchange Programs (non-profit) ID#953034133 Non-Profit Organization Seeking Local Families for Hosting High School Exchange Students ASSE International Student Exchange Programs (ASSE), in cooperation with community high schools around the USA, is looking for local families to host boys and girls between the ages of 15 to 18 from a variety of countries: Norway, Denmark, Spain, Italy, Japan, to name a few. ASSE students come with an enthusiasm to practice their English and experience American culture — food, sports, shopping and more. They also love to share their own culture and language with their host families. Host families welcome these students into their family, not as a guest, but as a family member, giving both the students and families a rich cultural experience. In addition, ASSE students have pocket money for personal expenses and full health, accident and liability insurance. ASSE students are academically selected into the program, and host families can choose their student from a wide variety of backgrounds, countries and personal interests. To become a host family or to find out how to become involved with ASSE in your community, please call us at the ASSE Southern Regional Office at 1-800-473-0696 or go to www.host.asse.com to choose your student and begin your host family application. There are many students to choose from, so begin the process of welcoming your new son or daughter into your family today! ASSE International (formerly American Scandinavian Student Exchange) is a non-profit, tax-exempt, public benefit organization. ASSE is officially designated as an exchange visitor program by the United States Department of State, was founded by the Swedish National Department of Education.

YOUNG AVE DELI is looking for kitchen staff.

June 14-20, 2018

EVELYN & OLIVE Jamaican and Southern Cuisine is now hiring for Wait Staff & Kitchen Help. Apply in person, Mon-Fri between 2-4pm. 630 Madison Ave Memphis, TN 38103. _____________________ PORCH & PARLOR IN MIDTOWN Southern Social and Flight are excited to open our newest restaurant, Porch & Parlor in Midtown. Now hiring all positions including Executive Chef, servers, bartenders, and greeters. Please submit all resumes to porchandparlorjobs@gmail.com _____________________

In need of a day time prep cook and multiple late night closers (3AM) • Must be willing to work on Sunday.

NOW HIRING

• Part time and full time opportunities are available. • Pay will be based on experience.

Come by the Deli to fill out an application.

At ROCKWOOL, we welcome employees with various backgrounds and abilities who share our values and are eager to face new challenges as part of our growing manufacturing team, located in Byhalia, MS—just south of Collierville. Concern for People, Planet and Prosperity go hand-in-hand at ROCKWOOL, the world’s leader in stonewool insulation. Would you be proud to work for a global company that is making a positive impact on global challenges like climate change and energy efficiency? Join us in releasing the natural power of stone to help improve modern living conditions for millions of people worldwide.

2119 Young Ave. 38104

Marilyn

We’re hiring for the following positions:

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Qualified candidates may email a resume to HRInbox@rockwool.com with preferred positon in the subject line or stop in to fill out an application on-site.

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We offer: - Competitive Pay in Permanent, Full-Time Positions - Medical, Dental and Vision Insurance The Marilyn on Monroe - Paid Vacation Time and Holiday We offer amenities like: We’re delivering all the perks of apartment living, with the extra added features that​ m renting - Generous​ ake 401k Plan and Fringe Benefits and accessible. We offer amenities like:  Free Utilities • Free WiFi • Fully Remodeled Inside & Outeasier The Marilyn on Monroe - Company Provided Uniforms - Free Utilities  Onsite Laundry • All New Appliances • Courtyard with We’re delivering ​ ake renting  - Free WiFi  all the perks of apartment living, with the extra added features that​ m - Career Advancement: We Promote from Within! easier and accessible. We offer amenities like:  We’re delivering all the perks of apartment living, with the extra added features that make renting easier and accessible.

Outdoor BBQ • Gated Parking

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We’re delivering all the perks of apartment living, with the extra added features that​ m ​ ake renting easier and accessible. We offer amenities like:  -

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REAL ESTATE • SERVICES

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Houses & Duplexes for Rent ALL AREAS Visit us @ www.lecorealty.com come in, or call Leco Realty, Inc. @ 3707 Macon Rd. 272-9028

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127 MADISON 127 AVE.MADISON #701 127 AVE.MADISON #701 Memphis, TN AVE. #701 Memphis, TN 38103 Memphis, TN 38103 2BD/2BA - 1400 38103 2BD/2BA - 1400 sq. ft. 2BD/2BA - 1400 sq. ft. $1895/mo. sq. ft. $1895/mo. Includes all $1895/mo. Includes all appliances Includes all appliances appliances 245 MADISON 245 AVE.MADISON #503 245 MADISON AVE. #503 Memphis, TN AVE. #503 Memphis, TN 38103 Memphis, TN 38103 Available: 6/1/2018 38103 Available: -6/1/2018 1BD/1BA /912 sq. Available: 6/1/2018 1BD/1BA /912 sq. ft. 1BD/1BA - /912 sq. ft. $1150/mo. ft. $1150/mo. Includes all $1150/mo. Includes all appliances Includes all appliances appliances 245 MADISON 245 AVE.MADISON #604 245 AVE.MADISON #604 Memphis, TN AVE. #604 Memphis, TN 38103 Memphis, 38103 -TN 1BD/1BA 1150 38103 1BD/1BA 1150 sq. ft. 1BD/1BA - 1150 sq. ft. $1175/mo. Includes sq. ft. $1175/mo. Includes all appliances $1175/mo. Includes all appliances $0 app fee & ½ all appliances $0 3rd app mo fee with & ½18 off $0 app mo fee with &½ off 3rd mo lease & split18 off 3rd mo with mo lease & split18 deposit mo lease & split deposit deposit 66 MONROE AVE. 66 MONROE AVE. #1007 66 MONROE AVE. #1007 Memphis, TN #1007 Memphis, TN 38103 Memphis, TN 38103 1BD/1.5BA - 1017 38103 1BD/1.5BA - 1017 sq. ft. 1BD/1.5BA - 1017 sq. ft. $1595/mo. Includes sq. ft. $1595/mo. Includes all appliances $1595/mo. Includes all appliances Workout facility, all appliances Workout facility, Indoor Pool & Workout facility, Indoor Pool & Sauna Indoor Sauna Pool & Sauna 655 RIVERSIDE 655 RIVERSIDE DR. #304B 655 RIVERSIDE DR. #304B Memphis, TN DR. #304B Memphis, TN 38103 Memphis, TN 38103 1BD/1BA - 1054 38103 1BD/1BA - 1054 sq. ft. 1BD/1BA - 1054 sq. ft. $1400/mo. sq. ft. $1400/mo. $1400/mo.

*2018 Tax Change Benefits* Personal/Business + Legal Work By a CPA-Attorney Practicing in Midtown & Memphis Since 1989

Midtown Apt

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THE LAST WORD by Jen Clarke

Confidential Bonds

m e m p h i s f l y e r. c o m

You can always tell when a person has worked in a restaurant. There’s an empathy that can only be cultivated by those who’ve stood between a hungry mouth and a $28 pork chop, a special understanding of the way a bunch of motley misfits can be a family. Service industry work develops the “soft skills” recruiters talk about on LinkedIn — discipline, promptness, the ability to absorb criticism, and most important, how to read people like a book. The work is thankless and fun and messy, and the world would be a kinder place if more people tried it. With all due respect to my former professors, I’ve long believed I gained more knowledge in kitchens, bars, and dining rooms than any college could even hold. Working in a restaurant, you see the full spectrum of behavior and emotions. The best is in the kitchen, where people from different backgrounds who speak different languages work together. It’s in the enduring friendships made between trips from kitchen to table — full hands both ways, of course — and fortified at the bar once the money’s been counted and the floors have been swept. It’s at the restaurant across the street, where the chef is happy to spare some rosemary because the truck didn’t show, and the bartender has a shot waiting for you when you wander over on your smoke break. It’s at family meal, a service industry tradition other fields really ought to copycat. It’s in a good review and the look in a guest’s eyes when they take that first amazing bite. The worst is at the table, when you can barely sputter a “Good evening!” before being interrupted by a brash “DIET COKE!” It’s on the line, when you’ve screwed up so badly and you want to yell back, but you know you deserve every curse word being flung your way. It’s at a corner banquette at the end of the night, when you discover you didn’t earn enough tips to cover your car note because Table 18 wrote “Here’s a tip: you should smile more” on their credit card slip. It’s a call from your manager, waking you up before the second shift of your double, asking if you can come in early. The absolute worst is on Yelp, where everybody “really wanted to like this place” but not enough to tell anyone they had asked for sweet potato fries, not regular ones. I haven’t tied on an apron in years, but restaurant people will always be part of my tribe. The industry attracts a certain kind of individual, whom I consider to be my people. I’m talking about chefs, bartenders, servers who choose standing for 14 hours, enthusiastically describing tonight’s fresh catch, or artfully arranging herbs on a plate as a lifestyle. I get them. That’s why Anthony Bourdain was so beloved: He got them, too, and sought to elevate them to the status they deserve. We need food to live. Food is integral to every single culture. Nourishment is an expression of love. Bourdain arrived at the onset of the “foodie” craze with a different perspective and a mission to tell stories beyond what’s on the plate. Knowing those stories made everything taste better. He was a bard. He was an avatar of so many wise and brilliant restaurant people who, at least in my experience, are the best people. And the best people never seem to stick around as long as you want or need them to. I’ve attended a lot of funerals for restaurant friends who left the world too soon and for unfair reasons. So the grief felt familiar when I saw the news alert on my phone last Friday morning. With all celebrity suicides come pleas to get help if you feel suicidal thoughts. If those pleas save one life, I’m happy to hear it. While it’s true that no one is immune, anyone who has suffered can tell you it’s not that simple. It’s hard to tell someone’s in pain when the chemicals that inspire genius in the arts — whether they’re the culinary, literary, or performing kind — are the same ones that take creators to dark places. The adrenaline of a Saturday night dinner rush mutes the voices just as an addict’s intoxicant of choice. Bringing happiness to others briefly fills the hole where one’s own joy belongs. Instead, I’ll offer some different advice, straight from the pages of Kitchen Confidential: Never use a garlic press. And if you ever get an opportunity to talk shop with a chef, bartender, or another service industry lifer, sit down and listen. They’ve seen some stuff. Jen Clarke is an unapologetic Memphian. Follow @jensized on Twitter.

Anthony Bourdain

THE LAST WORD

STARSTOCK | DREAMSTIME.COM

Anthony Bourdain’s death hits hard with those who’ve worked in the food service trade.

39


MINGLEWOOD HALL

JUST ANNOUNCED: HOUNDMOUTH [10/12]

6/14: Ledisi w/ Melanie Fiona & Tweet 6/16: V3Fights MMA 6/28: Trixie Mattel 7/6: PC Band Jodeci Tribute 8/17: Memphis Burlesque 9/20: SuicideGirls Blackheart Burlesque 9/21: JJ Grey & Mofro w/ New Orleans Suspects 10/23: Social Distortion w/ Will Hoge 11/1: Gary Clark Jr

Celebrating 75 Years UPCOMING:

Fri June 15 – Trina and La Chat Sat June 16 – Marc Antoine and Kevin Whalum Sun June 17 – Tech N9ne Fri June 22 – Daisyland presents: Blunts and Blondes Sat June 23 – Lyfe Jennings Sat June 30 –Zoogma w/ Agori Tribe Mon July 2 – Bush Fri Aug 3 – Tory Lanez Sat Aug 4 –Daisyland presents Yheti Tue Dec 11 – Ministry

1884 LOUNGE

6/29: The Steel Woods w/ Ross Cooper 7/6: Jason Eady w/ Mark Edgar Stuart 7/13: Allman Brothers Tribute 9/21: Adam Wakefield

MORE EVENTS AT MINGLEWOODHALL.COM

NEW DAISY THEATRE 330 E Beale St Memphis 901.525.8981 • Advance Tickets at newdaisy.com and Box Office

TUT-UNCOMMON ANTIQUES 421 N. Watkins St. 278-8965 All Watches in stock is 50% OFF throughout June. 1500 sq. ft. of Vintage & Antique Jewelry. Retro Furniture and Accessories. Original Paintings, Sculpture, Pottery, Art & Antiques. We are the only store in the Mid-South that replaces stones in costume jewelryy.

YOUNGAVENUEDELI.COM 2119 Young Ave • 278-0034

6/13: $3 Pint Night! 6/14: Memphis Trivia League! 6/28: Devil’s Backbone Give Away Event for “Hoopla” Music Festival 7/7: UFC 226 Stipe Miocic vs. Daniel Cormier Kitchen Open Late! Now Delivering All Day! 278-0034 (limited delivery area)

MEMPHIS IN MAY POSTERS

SIMPLY HEMP SHOP

Rare. Signed. Limited Ed. prints for sale. Italy, Israel, Egypt & others. 901-270-8550.

Come See Us at the The “Big One” at Tiger Lane (Old Fairgrounds) Fri - Sat We carry CBD oils, CBD honey sticks, CBD Teas & even CBD for Pets. Our products are available at Foozi Eats in Clark Tower. Call 901-443-7157

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MEMPHIS MADE BREWING Tap Room Hours: Mon, Thurs & Fri 4-10 p.m., Sat 1-10 p.m., Sun 1-7 p.m.

768 S. Cooper • 901.207.5343 Free brewery tours Saturday & Sunday at 4 p.m

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GONER RECORDS

BOOK REPAIR

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Have an old book or bible that needs repair? Call Art, 2nd Editions Bookstore at 901.483.0478.

We Buy Records!

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Thu June 14: The Ammunition & Fleece, 7p Fri June 15: Jack O. w/Dirty Streets, 8p Sat June 16: Dale Watson, 8p Sun June 17: Dadstock! 78, 2p, 40 Watt Moon, 3p, Short In the Sleeve, 4p, Walrus, 5p, Showboats, 6p Thu June 21: Wood and Wire, 7p Fri June 22: Jeff Plankenhorn, 8p Sat June 23: Impala, 8p Sun June 24: Roosters & Railcars Brunch Series, Tonya Dyson’s Sunday School, 12p railgarten.com • 2166 Central Ave • 231-5043

Antiques & Collectibles Antiques & Collectibles 21,000 sq ft. 100 + booths 5855 Summer Ave. (corner of Summer and Sycamore View) exit 12 off I-40 | 901.213.9343 Mon-Sat 10a-6p | Sun 1p-6p

I Buy 45RPM Records & Old Windup Phonographs

CHIP N’ DALE’S ANTIQUES 3457 Summer Avenue • Memphis, TN 38122 EVERYTHING ON SALE! Open Tues-Sat | 901-452-5620 “Celebrating 30 years in Business”

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And Old 78 RPM’s on labels: Paramount, Okeh, Gennett, Vocalion, Champion, Supertone, Superior, QRS, Black Patti, Perfect, Romeo, Conqueror, Victor, Columbia, Edison, Sun, Meteor, Flip Many others. Call Paul: 901-435-6668

Memphis Flyer 6.14.18  

This issue: Our Summer Survival Guide! Simple, illustrated how-to's (in, uhh, a very Swedish style) that will get you through another Memphi...

Memphis Flyer 6.14.18  

This issue: Our Summer Survival Guide! Simple, illustrated how-to's (in, uhh, a very Swedish style) that will get you through another Memphi...