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Metal to the Pedal P3 05.17.18 1525TH ISSUE

COURTESY OF MEMPHIS IN MAY

FREE

“I Listen to Memphis” P16 Bar Report: Bayou Bistro P31 Breaking In P34

y t r a P Pigs Cooking up some fun (and ’cue) at Memphis in May World Championship Barbecue Cooking Contest.


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May 17-23, 2018

See Lucky North Club for details. Players must be 21 years of age or older to game and 18 years of age or older to bet at the racetrack. Play responsibly; for help quitting call 800-522-4700.

You’ve been good this week, why not treat yourself? Open Wednesday - Saturday 5pm - 10pm Sunday 4pm - 9pm Make your reservations now!

southlandpark.com West Memphis, AR 2 4510 Flyer 5.17 Roaming Gnome Bourbon ad.indd 1

5/14/18 1:59 PM


DESHAUNE MCGHEE Classified Advertising Manager BRENDA FORD Classified Sales Administrator classifieds@memphisflyer.com LEILA ZETCHI Distribution Manager ROBBIE FRENCH Warehouse and Delivery Manager JANICE GRISSOM ELLISON, ZACH JOHNSON, KAREN MILAM, RANDY ROTZ, LEWIS TAYLOR, WILLIAM WIDEMAN Distribution THE MEMPHIS FLYER is published weekly by Contemporary Media, Inc., 65 Union Avenue, Memphis, TN 38103 Phone: (901) 521-9000 Fax: (901) 521-0129 www.memphisflyer.com CONTEMPORARY MEDIA, INC. KENNETH NEILL Publisher ASHLEY HAEGER Controller JEFFREY GOLDBERG Director of Business Development BRUCE VANWYNGARDEN Editorial Director KEVIN LIPE Digital Director ANNA TRAVERSE Director of Strategic Initiatives LEILA ZETCHI Distribution Manager MOLLY WILLMOTT Special Events Director JOSEPH CAREY IT Director MATTHEW PRESTON Social Media Manager CELESTE DIXON Accounting Assistant BRITT ERVIN Email Marketing Manager KALENA MCKINNEY Receptionist

National Newspaper Association

Association of Alternative Newsmedia

LAST WORD - 39

m e m p h i s f l y e r. c o m

JUSTIN RUSHING Advertising Director CARRIE O’GUIN Advertising Operations Manager JERRY D. SWIFT Advertising Director Emeritus KELLI DEWITT, CHIP GOOGE Senior Account Executives ROXY MATTHEWS Account Executive

SPROCK ‘N ROLL / FACEBOOK

CARRIE BEASLEY Senior Art Director CHRISTOPHER MYERS Advertising Art Director JEREMIAH MATTHEWS BRYAN ROLLINS Graphic Designers

CONTENTS

BRUCE VANWYNGARDEN Editor SUSAN ELLIS Managing Editor JACKSON BAKER, MICHAEL FINGER Senior Editors TOBY SELLS Associate Editor CHRIS MCCOY Film and TV Editor ALEX GREENE Music Editor CHRIS DAVIS, MICHAEL DONAHUE MAYA SMITH, JOSHUA CANNON Staff Writers JESSE DAVIS Copy Editor JULIE RAY Calendar Editor

OUR 1525TH ISSUE 05.17.18 So, I went away for a week of rest and relaxation and I missed the most Memphis thing ever: After being out of commission for four years(!), one of the newly refurbished downtown trolleys smashed into a Sprock n’ Roll pedal-party bike on the Main Street Mall. I was happy to learn no one was hurt — and no drinks were spilled — since the whoo!-party had just disembarked to have a couple pops at a Main Street pub. Oh, and I also missed the news about the city being included as a charter member of the new professional football league, the American Alliance for Football, or AAF. The Memphis franchise even has a coach already, former Chicago Bears great, Mike Singletary. There’s no team name yet, but since Showboats, Pharaohs, Southmen, Mad Dogs, Maniax, and Xplorers have already been used in prior attempts to establish an NFL alternative, I vote we go with something simple: the Memphis AF. And I want in on the “Memphis AF” swag concession business. Also, if I may, I suggest that instead of playing the National Anthem before games and risking losing all the MAGA folks if some players kneel, the AAF should instead play “Freebird” and allow players to do whatever they want — play air guitar, do jumping jacks, check text messages, whatever. We’re the AAF, dammit. But back to the Main Street Mall action … The Flyer offices were moved downtown at the first of the year, and we staffers for the most part have enjoyed the new digs — and the proximity to all the restaurants and other amenities within walking distance. But when we arrived downtown, it was mid-winter. You could walk down the Main Street Mall like a boss. No cars, no trolleys, no horse-drawn carriages, and no pedal-party pubs — or whatever the official name for those things is — just the occasional guy looking for a handout and that semi-decent street musician who sounds like Tracy Chapman. Now, not so much. If you’re walking down the mall to grab a lunch or get some exercise, you’d better keep your eyes and ears open. The new trolleys are quieter — stealthy, even — and judging from how far that trolley pushed the pedalpub after the collision, they are taking no prisoners. Silent but deadly. The Flyer staff tried out one of the Sprock n’ Roll wagons a couple years ago. We pedaled from Overton Square to Cooper-Young, stopping at various joints along the way — and back — for drinks, so I get the “Look at us drinking and pedaling!” appeal. You get lots of honks and you have to yell “Whoooo!™” in response, but on the whole, I prefer stationary drinking. Pedal taverns are a party thing. If you want to see where all this could be going if we aren’t careful, spend a night in Nashville in the trendy Gulch area. The capital city’s party wagon game is several notches above ours. There are flat-bed trucks tricked out with giant speakers blasting country music and filled with dancing bachelorette partiers. There are giant-wheeled pickup trucks that will bump you around downtown while you guzzle Bud Lite, listen to Florida-Georgia Line, and yell “whoo!” at the pedestrians below. And there are multitudes of pedal taverns. They’re everywhere. It’s insane. Frankly, Nashville could use a couple of Memphis’ killer trolleys to calm that shit down. All this to say, yes, we want tourism in Memphis. Tourism is incredibly N E WS & O P I N I O N important to our economy. But we have THE FLY-BY - 4 to draw the line, and I’m not talking NY TIMES CROSSWORD - 5 POLITICS - 7 Florida-Georgia. We don’t want loads of EDITORIAL - 8 drunks being driven around downtown VIEWPOINT - 9 on flatbed trucks. And we need to pass COVER - “PARTY PIGS” a city ordinance outlawing the blasting BY MICHAEL DONAHUE - 10 of bro-country music anywhere in the WE RECOMMEND - 14 38103 before it’s too late. For all their MUSIC - 16 issues, horse-drawn carriages, our few AFTER DARK - 18 pedal taverns, and trolleys are greatly to CALENDAR - 20 be preferred. They’ll just have to learn FOOD FEATURE - 29 to co-exist. Perhaps we should consider BAR REPORT - 31 pedal-trolleys? SPIRITS - 33 FILM - 34 Bruce VanWyngarden brucev@memphisflyer.com C L AS S I F I E D S - 36

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THE

f

fly-by

ly on the wall

May 17-23, 2018

YE O LD E S O UTH You know, nothing in America says “I’m an American politician,” like a sweet temporal mashup of Britain’s feudal and parliamentary systems transmogrified into a campaign fund-raiser. Ten gracious hosts (knights, lords, and ladies all) have invited Memphians to a fund-raiser for Sam Goff, the GOP candidate for County Commission District 7, by spending $50 to become a knight of the realm. A $100 donation gets you into the House of Commons. A $250 donation buys a seat in the House of Lords. Heck, you can be a “loyal subject,” for the low, low price of $25. Invitations described the fundraising event as “a morning of most agreeable merriment,” although there was no promise of dwarves, bear baiting, or actual revels. Alas …

4

N EVE R E N D I N G E LVI S It’s been an amazing-yet-somewhatdisappointing week for poor, posthumous Elvis. On one hand, it seems possible that rumors of the EP brand losing value have been greatly exaggerated. A diamond-studded Omega watch given to Presley by RCA records (estimated to sell for between $54 $108,000) sold at auction for more than $1.8 million, breaking several new records. On the other hand, Page Six described Presley as “a peasant between the sheets,” compared to actor Marlon Brando. Stage and screen star Rita Moreno, 83, told the New York Post that Brando was the “lust of her life.” The King was just a fling. By Chris Davis. Email him at davis@memphisflyer.com.

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Questions, Answers + Attitude Edited by Toby Sells

W E E K T H AT W A S By Flyer staff

Skyscraper, Drones, & Graceland New life for an old building, drones get buzz, and council cautious on Elvis epxansion. SKYSCRAPE R SAVIOR The long-vacant building at 100 North Main may have a new future as the city’s convention center hotel with at least 500 rooms, meeting spaces, restaurants, retail, and more. Memphis Mayor Jim Strickland announced last week that he signed a letter of intent with Loews Hotel Holding Corp. and THM Memphis Acquisitions LLC to develop the building and some of the properties around it. TVA SAYS P LU G AN D PAY Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA) board members approved a new fee last week, despite opposition from environmental groups, small business groups, and even the mayor of Nashville. TVA will charge local utilities, like Memphis Light, Gas & Water (MLGW), a new, fixed fee to access its electricity grid. Local utilities may or may not pass that fee on to their consumers. Environmental groups said the new fee promotes higher energy usage. Small business owners said the move unfairly punishes them. Nashville Mayor David Briley said it could hurt companies there like Google, IKEA, and Phillips, which have goals to run on 100 percent renewable energy. D R O N ES AH EAD (& AB OVE) Expect more drones to buzz in the skies over Memphis as the Memphis-Shelby County Airport Authority was picked last week for a federal pilot program “aimed at shaping the future of drones in America.” Drones here will inspect aircraft for FedEx Corp., ensure public safety around the Liberty Bowl, aid in crop production at Agricenter International, and more. H I STO R I C S P E E DWAY TE R R AC E The Memphis City Council designated Speedway Terrace as a historic overlay district last week. Residents told the council that protection is needed to prevent infill development uncharacteristic of the neighborhood, citing the construction of multiple homes in a lot that’s designed for a single home. Memphis Landmarks Commission now has oversight of addons, demolition, and new structures in the district. LIBERTY BOWL LIFT The council also approved about $2.5 million for improvements to the Liberty Bowl. The money will improve the stadium’s training and locker

rooms to “provide facilities comparable to other collegiate football stadiums” in order to “support the recruitment, growth, and increased visibility” of the team. TUITION HELD STEADY The University of Memphis will not raise tuition for the 2018-19 school year, the school announced last week. It’s the second year in the last five that the university has held its tuition flat. The university said Tuesday it is “likely the only university in Tennessee — public or private — not to increase tuition this year.” CAUTI O N AT G R AC E LAN D Council members expressed concerns last week over Graceland’s expansion plans and request to increase its TIF (tax increment financing) agreement for an arena and exhibition space. Council members worried the arena may violate the the city’s noncompete clause with the Grizzlies for the FedExForum. Many members said they wanted to hold a vote on the matter until a Chancery Court ruling is issued. TR OTTE R JAI LE D FO R U PS K I RTS Former Grizzlies announcer Rick Trotter was ordered to serve 60 days in jail and to register as a non-violent sex offender after he pled guilty last week to taking up-skirt photos of women at his church. While Trotter was a worship leader at The Downtown Church, he was charged for using his church-issued cell phone to take videos under a woman’s skirt as he kneeled behind her. An investigation found more up-skirt videos of victims whose ages ranged from 29 to 63. Fuller version of these stories and even more local news can be found on The News Blog at memphisflyer.com.


For Release Saturday, May 6, 2017

The New York Times Syndication Sales Corporation 620 Eighth Avenue, New York, N.Y. 10018 For Information Call: 1-800-972-3550 For Release Saturday, April 22, 2017

Crossword

Crossword ACROSS 1 One of the Great Lakes 5 Menacing cloud 10 Sony offering 14 Saint’s home, for short 15 Place for a barbecue 16 Rich finish? 17 “Don’t give up” 19 Rather powerful ANSWER TO PREVIOUS PUZZLE engine 20 Brown 21 Some plants 23 Value 25 Spooky quality 28 Smoothie fruit 29 Popular cookie 31 Taking things for granted on April Fools’ Day and others 32 “Time ___ …” 33 Track, in a sense 34 Not wait for Mr. Right, say 35 Huuuuuuuuge 15 From the heart, in Latin

29 One for the record books

16 Heart

31 “Clearly!”

17 He played an escaped convict in “We’re No Angels”

32 “How ludicrous!”

18 Bad representation?

37 Tweak

34 Town in Connecticut’s Gold Coast

41 Rte. that ends in 22-Across

20 Central U.S.’s ___ 42 Lounge piece Plateau 43 Competitor of 22 Keys are found Baker’s Joy in it: Abbr. 23 So-called “Caput 44 River of York Mundi” (“Head of 45 “Death and the the World”) ___” (Bosch painting in the 24 Phrase usually National Gallery abbreviated of Art) 25 Longtime Cunard 46 Confusion flagship, for short 47 “The Cocktail 26 Polymer add-on? Party” inits.

H E L L O

B A M

A S K M E

A T T E N D A N C E S H E E T

H A R D T O S T A R B O A R D

A S S

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A T A L L

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P S G R I A E T O L Y V I J U L C O M E R Y E Y E R S R A P T P A R Y L A O S O N D P G A F E

ANSWER E D K O C H

P E E D E E

I M P E N D

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S A C U L O N A V K E A A R O Z A R A G T M E A

A M A T E U R F O O T B A L L

M I S A P P R O P R I A T E S

E S T E S

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48 With 9-Down, hit sitcom of the 1980s-’90s 49 Prepare for a close-up 50 It could be a blooper 52 Like stars in a review 54 Longtime locals 55 School address 56 Commoner contemner 57 One of a pair a gardener might wear

DOWN 1 Marine 10-legger 2 “Welcome to the Jungle” singer, 1988 3 Marie Curie and Irène JoliotCurie, e.g. 4 Line online 5 More than serious 6 Org. for many residents 7 Go in and out of middle management? 8 Mid-luxury Mercedes-Benz line 9 See 48-Across 10 Be lousy 11 Form of the Italian verb “to be” 12 Set electricians 13 Crow’s-foot, e.g. 14 Aggressive poker play 21 Aquarium denizen with horizontal stripes

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PUZZLE BY ROLAND HUGET

24 1991 Daytona 500 winner Ernie 25 Classroom command

27 Tickling response 28 Coin at an arcade 30 Packing supply 31 Whale facility 33 Cat’s tongue

34 Photoshop color effect 35 Predictably

36 Mozart contemporary Antonio ___

46 “The Outcasts of Poker Flat” author

38 Honest or respectable course

48 Pandorans in “Avatar”

39 It ended after W.W. II

40 Like first drafts, usually 42 Think over

45 Studio equipment

49 Distance unit of about 30 inches

51 European crested ___ 53 ___ Jiabao, 2003-13 premier of China

Count It ! Lock It !

Drop It !

m e m p h i s f l y e r. c o m

28 Succession in a board game

19 Bucket of bolts

No. 0318

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27 The Allegheny and Wabash, to the Ohio: Abbr.

8 Creator of Bluto and Wimpy

No.

NEWS & OPINION

ACROSS

1 Even faster than overnight

Edited by Will Shortz

Edited by Will Shortz


CITY REPORTER By Maya Smith

MPD prioritizes recruitment, retention in 2019 budget. Crime reduction, community outreach, gang intervention efforts, recruitment, and retention are the top priorities in the Memphis Police Department’s (MPD) proposed budget for next year. MPD Director Michael Rallings told Memphis City Council members during budget hearings last week that police recruitment and retention are the most important of his budget’s four priorities. His goal (and Mayor Jim Strickland’s) is to have 2,300 officers by 2021. The department is understaffed, he said, with 1,982 officers responding to about 983,000 calls each year. An officer shortage can be expensive, Rallings said, as more officers are needed to work overtime. For fiscal year 2018, the department is on track to go over its budget for overtime by about $4.5 million. Rallings said the overage is due, in part, to special events like MLK50, the removal of the Confederate statues, and the protests that preceded and followed their removal. Council chairman Berlin Boyd expressed concern over the amount of overtime money spent, asking Rallings, “How much longer do you think we’ll constantly see a need for an increased overtime budget, in that sense of over $20 million?” The director told Boyd and colleagues that the

A recent MPD graduation.

department “is going to continue to do the best we can” to manage overtime, but that right now overtime is the only resource to ensure there are enough officers on the streets. The more officers that are hired, the less money the department will have to budget for overtime, Rallings said. Despite the department’s “many gains” over recent years, Rallings said, “We’re still not satisfied.” In 2019, MPD plans to expand recruiting efforts and hire 100 new officers, which would cost about $4 million. The department is also looking to hire 40 new police service technicians (police recruits who respond to minor calls like traffic accidents) costing close to

$1.3 million. Additionally, $300,000 is slated to be put into the “Best in Blue” recruiting campaign. In order to retain more officers, Rallings said the department will implement recognition and incentive programs, while offering more promotional testing to officers. Rallings said that while promotional tests cost “a lot” upfront, they are cheaper than paying for a lawsuit brought on by an officer who hasn’t been offered a promotion. “This is happening all over the country,” he said. Councilman Worth Morgan asked if the department is on the right track to graduate enough officers each year to reach the goal of 2,300 officers in three years. “Do we need to be more aggressive?” he asked. Rallings said the department should be more aggressive and that the “high-reaching goal” is to recruit 150 officers each year, calling the number “our true goal.” “We’ve had some challenges actually finding qualified applicants,” Rallings said. “It’s not an issue of not having applicants; it’s an issue of having qualified applicants.” The council approved MPD’s budget with no amendments during the first round of budget hearings last week. However, the council has until the end of June to change the budget before final approval.

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May 17-23, 2018

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POLITICS By Jackson Baker

Anyone who attended the regular committee meetings of the Shelby County Commission last Wednesday, May 9th, and followed that up with a visit to the full commission’s regular public meeting on Monday, May 14th, might be mildly confused about the resolution of a long-running power struggle between the commission and the county mayor’s office. At the Wednesday meeting, Mayor Mark Luttrell, term-limited and experiencing what he called his “long goodbye” to public office, heard himself applauded by commissioners in attendance and extolled by one commissioner after another for his achievements over his eight years in office, in maintaining essential county services while at the same time lowering county debt to a significant degree — by as much as a billion dollars, to a level below $900 million. Given that May 9th was also the day on which Luttrell chose to present a $1.254 billion budget for the coming year that, if executed, would shave the county’s recalculated  tax rate by a penny, to a target rate of $4.05, which is six full cents off the current rate, the hosannas might seem very much in order — especially since the proposed Luttrell budget also contains more money for schools, law enforcement, and employees at large, the latter to be provided with the $15-an-hour minimum wage which was at such extended issue during the 2016 presidential campaign. There was none of the truculence from dissenting commissioners that had become a regular chorus during the past two years, although, as commission budget chairman Eddie Jones and others pointed out, there would be ample opportunity during the next couple of months to make such revisions as might be worth debating. In prior weeks, and again, to some degree, on Monday, notes were sounded that were at variance with the Hakuna Matata of the May 9th meeting. A regular feature of recent commission meetings has been a series of votes on expenditures in proposed county  contracts greater than $50,000 in value. Several weeks back, the commission voted to impose the $50,000 limit as a way of limiting the mayor’s spending power and curbing his general contractual authority, in line with a charter for county

government that, unlike that for the city of Memphis, restricts the chief executive to a “weak mayor” role. That action was one outcome of the power struggle that began with disagreements during budget deliberations in 2015. In that budget year, several commissioners, dealing with what they were told would be a projected surplus, insisted on using it to fund a tax decrease. Luttrell, pleading a concern for unanticipated infrastructure needs as well as the need to reduce the county debt, resisted and ultimately prevailed. What followed was a commission resentment that would increase as members learned that the surplus was far greater than expected — a discovery that led to ever more demands for a greater share of fiscal oversight. Other matters of contention included the commission’s desire to hire former Commissioner Julian Bolton as its own attorney. After much fuss and bother and argumentation, Bolton was allowed on as a “policy advisor,” but the official legal representative for all organs of Shelby County government would remain, under the provisions of the county charter, the mayor’s  appointee as county attorney, currently, Kathryn Pascover. At the moment, Bolton’s status is in limbo, with Luttrell poised to veto an ordinance for his reappointment — something he did once already but will have to repeat because the ordinance he received, due to a clerical error, was not the one ultimately adopted by the commission.       Starting again from scratch, the commission completed work Monday on a correct version of the reappointment ordinance that would extend Bolton’s tenure through September 30th, leaving it to a newly reelected group of commissioners to decide what to do next. Meanwhile, the most spectacular show of commission independence was evinced just before Monday’s meeting, in a ceremony in the Shelby County Building, in which commission Chair Heidi Shafer — joined by Luttrell, Memphis Mayor Jim Strickland, and representatives of local law enforcement and medical interests — announced an ambitious $2.5 million task force plan for combating the county’s current opioid epidemic. (See Editorial, p. 8) The plan is the outgrowth of a commission initiative that Luttrell, though initially claiming authority over the matter, was induced to become a party to, via a series of court tests.

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NEWS & OPINION

A Truce, of Sorts

come early STAY LATE turn up

7


BROADWAY’S BIGGEST SELLING

MAGIC SPECTACULAR “MAGIC’S CIRQUE DU SOLEIL” –THE TIMES OF LONDON

E D ITO R IAL

The Mayor’s Plan Memphis Mayor Jim Strickland, who famously utilized the slogan, “Brilliant at the Basics,” as the hallmark phrase of his administration at its beginning, was deprived by a sequence of bad weather days from delivering a planned “State of the

JUNE 8-10

ORPHEUM

(901) 525-3000 • Orpheum-Memphis.com

City” address to members of the Rotary Club of Memphis back in January. By this week, the weather in these parts had finally come around to being a semblance of spring (just in time for Memphis in May), and the mayor had a chance to cash in his rain check with the Rotarians. Calling it a “State of the City Update,” Strickland’s speech used up-to-the-minute information to outline what he regarded as instances of the aforementioned brilliance. The city’s commitment to a functional program of pre-K education had been realized, said the mayor, and most of the rest of his update consisted of reconfigured statistics. Examples: $19 million worth of street paving; $13 billion in new development, (most of it within city limits); a 5 percent decrease in violent crime and a 38 percent decrease in murders, both numbers owing something to what Strickland said was a reversal (finally) in the decline of the number of MPD officers. Similarly, Strickland said, a response of eight seconds or less to 911 calls has been maintained for four consecutive years. Strickland also promised that every pothole reported to the city would be filled within five days. And so forth. The mayor further stated that the city had managed to bolster — from 12 percent to 21 percent — the amount of business it contracts with enterprises owned by women and/or minorities. The mayor basked in the success of last month’s MLK50 commemoration and looked forward to the city’s bicentennial celebration, planned for next year. (In what can only be regarded as an act of grace,

Strickland heaped praise on Tennessee state government for its cooperation with various city projects, omitting any mention of the state legislature’s tawdry act of canceling a promised $250,000 grant for the bicentennial, as punishment for the city’s actions in ridding itself of Confederate statuaries.) As one result, the city was able to join with county government, in a project announced on Monday, to combat the ongoing opioid-addiction epidemic. The city’s commitment includes a guarantee of “real-time” mapping of overdoses as they happen, coupled with instant response. (The county’s law-enforcement entities, first responders, and other formal units of government are also pledged to the project, which was midwifed into being, Strickland noted, by county commission Chair Heidi Shafer.) Strickland touted his 3.0 comprehensive plan for the city — the first in more than four decades — which included a policy of “growing up, not out.” He declared that his announced policy of ending new sewer connections outside the city was a de facto termination of one of the ways the city had been contributing to its own population loss. The mayor told the Rotarians that what he had intended to do with his remarks was twofold — to “celebrate momentum” and to be “clear-eyed about development.” The main thing, he said, was to have a plan. It would appear that he has one, the aforementioned 3.0, which Memphians will have a chance to pass judgment on in next year’s city election.

May 17-23, 2018

C O M M E N TA R Y b y G r e g C r a v e n s

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IN TUNICA

Real Memphians know that barbecue is not an event in your backyard.

What about barbecue’s contribution as a civic unifier? Wet? Dry? Cole slaw or nah? We all have opinions, and we’ll fight you for them. Serious suits somewhere (and the trend-makers who inform them) thought Memphis barbecue — and our name — were hot enough to market nationwide and to use to fatten the bottom lines of national conglomerates. Memphis is kind of cool. Tell that to state lawmakers who’d rather we all just fell into the Mississippi River. So, money and fame. Shallow, right? But what about barbecue’s contribution as a civic unifier. Wet? Dry? Cole slaw or nah? We all have opinions, and we’ll fight you for them. But barbecue has given us those opinions, the ability to have those conversations, and the even playing field on which to have them. Don’t know anybody at the party? Ask ’em about barbecue. Conversation getting too political? Pivot to barbecue. Looking for some Memphis cred? Look to barbecue.  Seattle’s got coffee. Asheville’s got beer. Nashville’s got, ummm … and we got barbecue.  But wait! “What about Kansas City and Texas?” you ask. Please let me introduce you to someone. He works in the tech industry in San Francisco. Toby Sells is Flyer associate editor.

TYLER HENRY

DARREN KNIGHT’S

MAY 20

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With the 60 or so barbecue joints, smoke shops, road-side pits, lunch counters, food trucks, or restaurants with some-kind-of-barbecue-something-oranother on their menus, you can bet barbecue’s economic impact punches above its weight in Memphis every year. None of this is even to mention barbecue as a major part of the Memphis brand. Who visits and doesn’t eat some sort of barbecue? No one. How do I know? Instagram. Facebook. Twitter. Snapchat. I’d bet someone is probably talking about it on GooglePlus, too, if, y’know, I ever looked there. All right, further proof? To be clear: I’m not qualifying this as a mark of success, but consider the “Memphis BBQ Angus Thick Burger” from Hardee’s. Think about the “Memphis BBQ Chicken Pizza” from Dominos (which they claim is “like summer in a box,” for some reason). Also, you probably missed it (for obvious reasons), but Papa John’s offered “Memphis BBQ Ribs” in the U.K. for a time.

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In Memphis, we see a lot of ourselves in our barbecue. Tough cuts, mellowed low and slow in environs some find harsh and repellant. Slow smoke and heat grinds rock to diamond, from the profane to the divine, with the freedom to move across the spectrum as we choose. If you’re new here, you’re undoubtedly still learning the barbecue ropes and tropes. Words like “wet” and “pulled” take on new meaning, and terms like “pitmaster” enter your lexicon. You learn that “barbecue” is a food — a sacrament — not an event in your backyard. And as you begin to meld with the city, ordering a pulled-pork sandwich becomes almost a civic experience. Native Memphians, and those lucky enough to have lived here awhile, may not order ribs at every meal, but we can damn sure tell you where you should get them — and pulled pork, and barbecue spaghetti (The Bar-B-Q Shop, natch), and barbecue pizza (Colletta’s, natch), and wings (Central BBQ, natch), and barbecue nachos (Rendezvous or AutoZone Park, natch). We take our preferences seriously enough that my final parenthetical there might get me run out of town on a rail. We stand up for barbecue, too. Let some San Francisco tech-bro tell you it’s just meat and meat is kinda gross if you think about it and the whole, like, “regional barbecue style” stuff is pretty hokey. Does your pulse shoot up? Mine did, and I’m just typing. Barbecue is a Memphis icon, part of our brand. Yes, as much as Elvis or the blues. But barbecue is a living art form — practiced, loved, and handed down. And it’s an art that thrives beyond the glass cases of museum galleries. Just take a peek from the bluff at Tom Lee Park on the third weekend of May. So, what does barbecue give Memphis in return? Well, in one month last year, it deposited $37.7 million into the Memphis economy. That’s the final tally from a Memphis in May economic impact report prepared by Younger Associates. More than half of the 63,721 people that hit the park for the Barbecue Fest (formally, the Memphis in May World Championship Barbecue Cooking Contest) last year were from out of town. Almost 67 percent of those stayed a night here. Most stayed for three nights, spending an average of $215 a day. Tally up the sales taxes, hotel/motel taxes, and the rest and barbecue poured more than $1.1 million into the city’s tax coffers.

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5/7/18 8:47 AM


y t r a P Pigs &

SWINA, CADILLAC GRILLZ, AND CHI-TOWN COOKERS

Cooking up some fun (and ’cue) at Memphis in May World Championship Barbecue Cooking Contest.

May 17-23, 2018

M

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eat is key, but meet and greet also is a big deal to Their ranking that year? “I think we got last place. I don’t know if we had teams participating in the Memphis in May World raw meat. I don’t know what we served that year.” Championship Barbecue Cooking Contest. Their tent consisted of “just a boom box” and a bunch of guys COVER STORY BY “drinking beers and taking shots and hanging out.” Some teams have perfected the art of partying the way others perfected the art of effectively applying rubs to their slabs. The next year was different. “We built our own flooring, built a Michael Teams are serious about their ’cue, but the riverfront setting and the bar, built a DJ booth, and got access to a more real-deal smoker. And Donahue opportunity to host family, friends, and business clients also make the each time the party got a little bigger and a little bigger. More full-time event “the perfect venue and excuse for a great party,” says Robert Griffin, members, their friends, and everybody started showing up.” Memphis in May director of marketing. Each year, Swina had a theme. One year they were “Swina Island,” Vestal This year, 225 teams representing 22 states and four foreign countries will says. “We built that 12-foot-tall lifeguard stand and poured sand all over the walkway participate in Barbecue Fest. in front of us. A huge kiddie pool. Filled that up.” Here are three veteran teams known for their swine soirees. Swina also became known for its beer pong table. “People come from other teams, walk by and see it, and challenge people to play. The line got longer and longer,” Vestal PEOPLE’S REPUBLIC OF SWINA recalls. “When you come and play, you have to put your ID down — your physical People’s Republic of Swina didn’t exactly make a flashy entrance when the driver’s license on the table — and that holds your spot. Many times on Sunday we’ve team became part of the Memphis in May World Championship Barbecue found people’s drivers licenses, passports, business cards because they got too drunk.” Cooking Contest. They also play the “cracker game.” Members write their name on a saltine cracker “Ten people in a raggedy tent,” says Will Vestal, one of the founding members. with a felt pen. They throw the crackers on the sidewalk in front of the tent. They “We showed up with a Weber grill, no flooring, and an ice luge.” then sit in lawn chairs and watch people pass by. “Somebody steps on your cracker, That was 10 years ago. Kyle Rogers, who was living Downtown in the Shrine you’re out. But the last one standing has to eat their cracker off the ground. Really, you Building, came up with the idea of forming a team. He got some other guys, don’t want to win.” including Vestal, to go in with him. They figured if they divided up the cost, they So, what about the barbecue? “We party, but at some point, we decided we also could swing it. have to cook some barbecue. The party is important. We’re No. 1 in party. But we Vestal says, “I’m in for a party. I’ve been going to Barbecue Fest for years. I can’t also want to be No. 1 in barbecue,” Vestal says. “The guys that are always winning wait to have our own party. We just want to throw a rager down there.” cook good barbecue, but they don’t throw a good party. Nobody is raging in Big Bob John Rote came up with the team name — “People’s Republic of Swina,” Gibson’s tent. But they cook great barbecue.” which was a play on “People’s Republic of China,” Vestal says. Their chairman was Swina got serious in 2011 — the year the festival moved to Tiger Lane because “Chairman Sow.” But over the years, the name just became “Swina.” the Mississippi River flooded Tom Lee Park. Big Bob Gibson was Swina’s next door They were given a site on the south end of Tom Lee Park. Members brought kegs neighbor. “We were still having a great party, but our cooker got to talking to Big Bob of beer and lawn chairs. “Our head chef, who was supposed to stay up with the grill Gibson, who was giving him pointers on how to do stuff.” smoking the meat, passed out.” Two Swina team members attended the awards ceremony that year “because they

MEMPHIS IN MAY | MIKE KERR

PHOTOGRAPHS COURTESY MEMPHIS IN MAY


didn’t have anything to do. We got 10th place. We got a trophy. They came back to the tent Saturday afternoon, ‘We placed!’ Everybody was going nuts. ‘How did we manage that?’” The next year, Swina partied hard. “Friday night, we’re throwing this huge rager, and it goes 24 hours because everybody’s got 24-hour wristbands, hanging out all night. Next morning, we’re down there cleaning ourselves up, combing our hair, making us look good.” This time, 50 members go to the ceremony and discover Swina came in second place. “We’re going to come in first at some point,” Vestal says. “And, honestly, this is our 10-year anniversary. Everybody is coming back. We’re going to rage, but we’re going to cook some awesome barbecue. We’re going to make this the year. First place in shoulder and first place in party.” CADILLAC GRILLZ A lot of anxious faces can be seen in front of the Cadillac Grillz barbecue booth during the Memphis in May World Championship Barbecue Cooking Contest. People, who are hoping they can get in, are longingly looking up at the tripledecker structure, which is jam-packed with partiers. Music blares. People are laughing and trying to talk over the music. But there are only so many wristbands to give out. “It’s friends and family first,” says Jack Wohrman, one of the founding members. “And outside of that, acquaintances end up coming through.” Cadillac Grillz, which celebrates its 10th anniversary this year, has a few signature things it’s known for: DJ Tree, who keeps the music going (the late Robert Raiford also deejayed for the Cadillac Grillz); bikini-clad bartenders, who keep the drinks flowing; and team members who are big-time Memphis Grizzlies boosters. “Around a Chi-Town Cookers

decade ago, several of us, who had been on another team in the past or various teams, decided to put this one together, and it took off quickly,” Wohrman says. “We had a good party event to kick it off well, and it just continued to snowball from there and turn into a bigger and bigger event.” The name came from the lyrics of a Ludacris song, Wohrman says. “I guess just one of those goofy things somebody threw out.” The team members wore camouflage tank tops and polo shirts. “At the time we kicked it off, it was kind of a little different from what everybody else was doing. We wanted to be our own crew, and it was just what worked for us.” The women bartenders wear camouflage bikinis. “We get them made for them with the Cadillac Grillz logo on them.” Explaining the Grizzlies connection, Wohrman says, “Typically, when the Grizzlies were winning, the playoffs were right around Barbecue Fest time. So, we would always get a TV and set it up and be able to watch the Grizzlies games. If it was a home game, a handful of us would go to the game, but there would be a big contingent watching the game.” Grizzlies fans from other tents would show up to watch the games on TV at the Cadillac Grillz booth. “So, next thing you know, we’ve got 300 people jumping up and down pulling for the Griz in our tent. And it was just a blast.” “It became a great atmosphere for Memphians and people who were in from out of town,” says team member Clark Schifani. “They could feel what it was like to be a part of that Memphis culture.” Grizzlies players visited the tent. “I remember Quincy Poindexter being in there,” Wohrman says. “I guess those would typically be in off years when we weren’t in the playoffs. When playoffs were active, players were resting up.” Original members still are involved, but a younger group of Cadillac Grillz members have become involved with the team. The original members “make sure we follow the template. We do all the busy work to make sure it all goes off without a hitch,” Schifani says. Cadillac Grillz members are serious about the barbecue cooking aspect of the event, Wohrman says. “We have always participated in the competition. And many team members take part in trying to make sure we have a good product. Others were focused more on the party. We came in fourth in the world in ribs in 2011. So, we got to get up on stage and get a trophy.” They’ve cooked ribs in the past, but this year they’re moving to shoulders. Chris Lafoy, who is known in barbecue circles, joined the Cadillac Grillz team and is going to cook this year, Wohrman says. “I think we’re going to come out with a bang on the cooking side this year.” This year, the Cadillac Grillz booth is is moving “a little further South,” he says. “That has to do with shifting over to the shoulder competition.” So, is the Cadillac Grillz triple-decker booth the tallest structure at Barbecue Fest? “It’s up there,” Wohrman says. “I don’t know if it’s the tallest, but if I was a betting man, I would bet nobody’s taller.” continued on page 12

COVER STORY m e m p h i s f l y e r. c o m

MEMPHIS IN MAY | ANDREA ZUCKER

Republic of Swina

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CHI-TOWN COOKERS Describing Chi-Town Cookers, David Scully says, “It’s been a party team from the very beginning.” But, he says, “It’s not necessarily all about parties.” His parents and their friends, most of whom went to Christian Brothers University, decided to form a team when the Memphis in May World Championship Barbecue Cooking Contest was just a couple of years old. They sent in an application, but they were rejected. “They believed Memphis in May at the time wanted the competition to be national. Even international. So, the next year they mailed the application to my grandma in Chicago. They named the team the ‘Chi-Town Cookers.’” His grandmother mailed the application from Chicago, so the postmark would be “Chicago.” A lot of the college kids really were from Chicago, Scully says. They got in. His parents and their friends kept the team going for about 20 years, but when their children became juniors and seniors in high school, they stopped doing Chi-Town Cookers. About seven years later, the team was reborn. “By this time, enough of the second generation was 21, and we thought we could reboot it.” They decorated the front of their tent to look like Wrigley Field. They told people, “We’re a party team and not much of a cooking team. We do cook. Try this test run, and if you feel like you need to spit it out, we’ll refer you to the Pronto Pup stand.” As they do now, the team members took the “Ms. Piggy Idol” contest seriously. This is when teams compete against other teams in music performances on stage in Tom Lee Park. “Our parents — the first generation — were world champs of showmanship. We won Ms. Piggy Idol three out of the last four years.” The Chi-Town Cookers tent gets crowded. “We serve dinner. We try to do it around 6:30, 7. As it gets later in the evening, the sun goes down, music gets louder, tables and chairs go to the side.” The barbecue? “Extremely secondary,” Scully says. He recalls the time a judge visited the tent. “We take the shoulder, set it out. Maybe it’s a little dirtier than it should be. We’re a little dirtier than we should be.” The judge begins examining the shoulder. ‘He says, ‘Can you remove the shank bone for me?’” Scully looks at the guy next to him. “What the fuck is a shank bone?” “The first year in shoulder, we finished second to last. The only team that we beat was disqualified because they stole some trophies from one of the other teams.” One year, Chi-Town Cookers ranked in the top 10, Scully says. But usually, he says, “Every year on Saturday, we wait around as if we’re going to be selected in the top 10. When the semi-finals are going to be posted, someone will run down there and find out our score and come back to the tent. When they get back, the party is in full swing — people partying, dancing, doing keg stands. The person jumps on top of the bar and says, ‘I want to congratulate you because you have just cooked the 67th best ribs in the world.’ And we celebrate. We start spraying beers around like in the NBA locker room when they make the playoffs or a conference championship.” Cadillac Grillz


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steppin’ out

We Recommend: Culture, News + Reviews

Dead Ends

Last Word

By Susan Ellis

COURTESY ELMWOOD CEMETERY

Bob Barnett is assistant director of Elmwood Cemetery. In that role, he does a little bit of everything — meeting with families, selling properties, and working on events. One of those events is the Last Word tour, all about epitaphs, on Saturday, May 19th. The tour goes beyond the words carved into stone. Barnett says that where the headstone is placed, how it was placed can communicate a message. He notes the grave of a prostitute that was moved in a spot across from the resting places of some prominent Memphians. The message, he says, is “don’t judge her.” He also mentions the gravestone of a blues singer. Her funny epitaph: “Born who knows? Died who cares?” One epitaph that strikes Barnett as particularly sad is the one of a little girl who died in a fire in 1935. Her epitaph is rendered in stick-on letters. A particular favorite is that of Ma Rainey, which goes, “I’m Ma Rainey #2. Mother of Beale Street. I’m 78 years old. Ain’t never had enough of nothing, and it’s too damn late now.” And, yes, Barnett is mulling over his own last words. “We all become stories in the end” sounds pretty good to him. Last Word is a walking tour. It will take about 90 minutes.

May 17-23, 2018

LAST WORD TOUR AT ELMWOOD CEMETERY, SATURDAY, MAY 19TH, 10:30 A.M. REGISTER FOR THE TOUR AT ELMWOODCEMETERY.ORG OR CALL 774-3212.

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Did no one tell y’all not to play on the phone? The Last Word, p. 39

Lentils — these lovely legumes are too often taken for granted. Food, p. 30

THURSDAY May 17

FRIDAY May 18

Little Women Crosstown Arts, 7-9 p.m. Exhibition on going from black girl to black woman, featuring a performance and photography by Nubia Yasin. Curated by Lawrence Matthews.

Chimes Square Movie Night Overton Square Courtyard, 8-10 p.m. Free weekly screenings. Tonight, it’s the hit comedy Men In Black starring Will Smith and Tommy Lee Jones.

“Memorable Memphians” Memphis Pink Palace Museum, 9 a.m. A show about Memphians who made their mark in history and science.

Memphis in May World Championship Barbecue Cooking Contest Tom Lee Park, $4-$40 So big they call it the Super Bowl of Swine. Tons of pork and tons of fun with the Miss Piggy Idol contest kicking off at 6 p.m. Through Saturday.

Grand Artisans’ Dinner Memphis Brooks Museum of Art, 6:30-7:30 p.m., $750 Chefs hosting this dinner include Andy Ticer and Michael Hudman and Ryan Prewitt from Peche of New Orleans. Part of the Grand Weekend of the Brooks’ Wine + Food Series. Memphis Orchid Society Show and Sale Memphis Botanic Garden, noon-5 p.m. Annual show and sale hosted by the Memphis Orchid Society. Includes a potting station and a kids activity table.

Wish Book: James Benning Crosstown Arts, 1 p.m. (screenings on the hour through 5 p.m.; sign up at crosstownarts.org) Part of the Wish Book film series curated by Brian Pera and Terri Phillips, featuring indie filmmaker James Benning. There will be a reception and Q&A with Benning Saturday, May 19th, 7 p.m. “Connecting Memphis” Ross Gallery, Christian Brothers University, 5:30 p.m. A storytelling and photography project “honor[ing] the image of God in every human being” by Cindy McMillion.


Tyler Henry

So Beyond

By Susan Ellis

Tyler Henry, the celebrity medium, is in the middle of a 15-city tour. It stops at the Horseshoe Casino on Sunday, May 20th. During the show, Henry will go over five points he’s learned while communicating with the dead. “I want to share life lessons from the other side,” he says. The goal, he says, is to offer his client a sense of closure, to help them see what matters, delivered with a healthy dose of compassion. Henry first inched his way into the biz at the age of 10, when he had a premonition about his grandmother dying. At the age of 16, he got professional, taking readings while he was studying to be a nurse. It was during this time that he did his first celebrity reading with Sarah Paulson, star of the American Horror Story series. He’s since worked with RuPaul, Eva Longoria, and Khloe Kardashian, among others. He has his own show, Hollywood Medium with Tyler Henry and recently published a memoir Between Two Worlds. Sometimes, Henry says, a client will bring a momento that opens up communications between that person and the dearly departed. But it’s not necessary. Henry says his sixth sense piques the rest of the senses, so he will work with a voice or a smell. Some of these messages from the beyond translate physically. So, if the client has a heart problem, Henry says he feels chest pain until he relays the message. (Henry had such an encounter with the actor Alan Thicke shortly before the actor died. ) “It’s the one scary part of what I do,” he says.

FUEL THE FREE PRESS

TYLER HENRY — THE HOLLYWOOD MEDIUM AT HORSESHOE CASINO, SUNDAY, MAY 20TH, 8 P.M., $34-$50

Time Warp Drive-In Malco Summer 4 Drive-In, 7 p.m., $10 Tonight’s theme is More Dreams of Gods & Magic! featuring The Princess Bride, The Secret of Nimh, The Last Unicorn, and Krull. Cooper-Young Garden Walk Cooper-Young District, 9 a.m.-5 p.m. Annual garden tour with a focus on native plants. Includes educational exhibits, vendors, and more.

WEDNESDAY May 23 101 Dalmatians CTI 3D Giant Theater, 4 p.m. A screening of the animated film about the cute spotted puppies and the evil lady who wants them for a coat. Royal Wedding Celebration Celtic Crossing, 10:30 a.m.-3 a.m. Celebrate the nuptials of Prince Harry and Meghan Markle with wine and mimosa specials.

Stone Temple Pilots New Daisy Theatre, 7 p.m. Concert in celebration of the New Daisy’s 75th anniversary. A Perfect Circle Landers Center, 7:30 p.m. Super group with Billy Howerdel of Ashes Divide; Maynard James Keenan of Tool and Puscifer, James Iha of Smashing Pumpkins, and Jeff Friedl and Matt McJunkins of Ashes Divide and Puscifer.

Always independent, always free (no paywall - ever), Memphis Flyer is your source for the best in local news and information. Now we want to expand and enhance our work. That’s why we’re asking you to join us as a Frequent Flyer member. You’ll get membership perks while helping us continue to deliver the kind of independent journalism you’ve come to expect.

s u p p o r t . m e m p h i s f lye r. c o m

m e m p h i s f l y e r. c o m

SATURDAY May 19

ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT

They say payback is a mother — Billy Burke (left) and Gabrielle Union star in Breaking In. Film, p. 34

F R E Q U E NT F LYE R S H E LP K E E P TH E F R E E PR E S S F R E E .

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MUSIC By Chris McCoy

Radio to Video   

     



   

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May 17-23, 2018

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Beale Street Caravan expands with “I Listen to Memphis.�

K

evin Cubbins, executive director of Beale Street Caravan, says it was time for the longrunning radio show to change directions. “About three years ago, we redefined our mission. We turned everything on its ear. We were NPR’s blues radio program. I felt we would be better served, and be better aligned with our funder’s mission, if we focused more on the city of Memphis. Cubbins says the thinking was that the change would “keep our messaging simpler and more effective and allow us to expand the genres we aired. Instead of just blues, that meant soul, gospel, hip-hop, and rock-and-roll. A lot of people thought we were nuts to do that, but in a 12-month span we went from 230 stations in the U.S. to 404. I think the message is so much cleaner and easier to get into. ‘I Listen to Memphis’ is just another step. The mission of Beale Street Caravan is sharing the music and culture of Memphis with the world.� The response has been overwhelming. “People absolutely love the music from this town,� Cubbins says. “Sometimes I wish all the local artists could see all the feedback and responses that we get, so it would change our opinions of ourselves. What we have here is so vibrant, so authentic, and so original. There’s just nothing like it anywhere else in the world.� NPR’s audience has grown significantly in recent years, as the organization has embraced the digital world by adding video components to its programming. Cubbins says “I Listen to Memphis� is Beale Street Caravan’s entry into new media. The web series films Memphis music artists playing live in front of their hometown crowds. Christian Walker, who plays with Memphis punk legends Pezz, was tapped to direct. In a gruelingly short schedule, Walker and his crew filmed 10 acts in 10 Mid-South music venues. “Some places have historical significance, some places only have significance to Memphians,� says Cubbins. “Our international audience is going to hear about Wild Bill’s for

the first time.� Midtown punks HEELS played in front of what’s left of the Buccaneer, the underground music club that burned last year. Motel Mirrors filmed at the Galloway House on Cooper, where Johnny Cash played his first gig. “That sanctuary sounds incredible,� Walker says. “That could be Memphis’ Ryman.� Rev. John Wilkins recorded the classic “May the Circle Be Unbroken� with his daughters in his Como, Mississippi, church. “His dad was making blues records here in the 1930s,� Walker says. Marcella Simien’s performance was captured at the P&H Cafe. “We called Spooner Oldham from Fame Studios in Florence. He played on so much amazing stuff, and wrote or co-wrote so much of it. So we did two videos for her: ‘I’m Your Puppet’, which he wrote, and ‘I’d Rather Go Blind.’ Marcella does that song anyway, and Spooner played on the original Etta James version. I think if we do this again, we want to do a lot of more of those mash-ups.�

AVERELL MONDIE

 

Spooner Oldham in Marcella Simien’s shoot at the P&H

Cubbins says adding video to the Beale Street Caravan formula was a steep learning curve for the combined crews. “I met some of the smartest people I have ever met in my life. I didn’t know the depths of talent we have in the Memphis film scene.� “I Listen to Memphis� premieres this week, with Cedric Burnside playing in Royal Studios. The 10 videos will be released weekly throughout the summer. Cubbins says he hopes the series not only reaches music fans around the world, but also helps Memphis discover its own rich music scene. “Get off your couch and go see a band,� he says. “If you don’t do that, you’re missing out on the coolest part of our culture. It’s like living in Florida, and never going to the beach.�


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17


TIGER LAKE SATURDAY, MAY 19TH LEVITT SHELL

LIL ED BLUES IMPERIALS BY PAUL NATKIN

SPACEFACE SATURDAY, MAY 19TH RAILGARTEN

LIL’ ED & THE BLUES IMPERIALS SATURDAY, MAY 19TH RUM BOOGIE CAFE

After Dark: Live Music Schedule May 17 - 23 Sensation Band Tuesdays, Fridays, 7-11 p.m.; Fuzzy and the Kings of Memphis Saturdays, 7-11 p.m.; Chic Jones and the Blues Express Sundays, 7-11 p.m.; North and South Band Wednesdays, 7-11 p.m.

and Saturday, May 19, 9 p.m.-1 a.m.; Little Boy Blues Saturday, May 19, 9 p.m.-1 a.m.; Sensation Band Monday, May 21, 8 p.m.-midnight; Chris McDaniel Tuesdays, Wednesdays, 8 p.m.midnight.

Silky O’Sullivan’s

Handy Bar

King’s Palace Cafe Tap Room

200 BEALE 527-2687

168 BEALE 576-2220

Club 152 152 BEALE 544-7011

Alfred’s 197 BEALE 525-3711

Gary Hardy & Memphis 2 Thursdays-Saturdays, 6-9 p.m.; Karaoke Thursdays, TuesdaysWednesdays, 9 p.m.-1 a.m. and Sundays-Mondays, 10 p.m.-2 a.m.; Mandi Thomas Fridays, Saturdays, 6-9 p.m.; The 901 Heavy Hitters Fridays, Saturdays, 10 p.m.-2 a.m.; Flyin’ Ryan Fridays, Saturdays, 2:30 a.m.; Memphis Jazz Orchestra Sundays, 6-9 p.m.

B.B. King’s Blues Club 143 BEALE 524-KING

The King Beez Thursdays, 5:30 p.m.; B.B. King’s All Stars Thursdays, Fridays, 8 p.m.; Will Tucker Band Fridays, Saturdays, 5 p.m.; Lisa G and Flic’s Pic’s Band Saturdays, Sundays, 12:30 p.m.; Blind Mississippi Morris Sundays, 5 p.m.; Memphis Jones Sundays, Wednesdays 5:30 p.m.; Doc Fangaz and the Remedy Tuesdays, 5:30 p.m.

Blue Note Bar & Grill 341-345 BEALE 577-1089

Queen Ann and the Memphis Blues Masters Fridays, Saturdays, 8 p.m.-midnight.

Blues City Cafe 138 BEALE 526-3637

The Amazing Rhythmatics Tuesdays, Thursdays-Sundays, 7 p.m.-1 a.m.

Hard Rock Cafe 126 BEALE 529-0007

Memphis Music Monday Third Monday of every month, 6-9 p.m. 145 BEALE 578-3031

Nat “King” Kerr Fridays, Saturdays, 9-10 p.m.

King Jerry Lawler’s Hall of Fame Bar & Grille 159 BEALE

Chris Gales Solo Acoustic Show Mondays-Saturdays, noon-4 p.m.; Eric Hughes solo/acoustic Thursdays, 5-8 p.m.; Karaoke Mondays-Thursdays, Sundays, 8 p.m.; Live Bands Fridays, Saturdays, 8 p.m.

182 BEALE 528-0150

Young Petty Thieves Thursdays, 8 p.m.-midnight; Sensation Band Sunday, May 20, 7-11 p.m.; Eric Hughes Band Mondays, 8 p.m.-midnight; Cowboy Neil Band Tuesday, May 22, 8 p.m.midnight; Plantation Allstars Wednesdays, 8 p.m.-midnight.

Rum Boogie Cafe Blues Hall

King’s Palace Cafe 162 BEALE 521-1851

David Bowen Thursdays, 5:309:30 p.m., Fridays, Saturdays, 6:30-10:30 p.m., and Sundays, 5:30-9:30 p.m.

King’s Palace Cafe Patio Sonny Mack Mondays-Fridays, 2-6 p.m.; Cowboy Neil Mondays, Thursdays, 7-11 p.m. and Saturdays, Sundays, 2-6 p.m.;

182 BEALE 528-0150

Memphis Bluesmasters Thursdays, Sundays, 8 p.m.-midnight; Vince Johnson and the Plantation Allstars Fridays, Saturdays, 4-8 p.m. and Sundays, 3-7 p.m.; Pam and Terry Friday, May 18, 5:30-8:30 p.m. and Saturday, May 19, 5:30-8:30 p.m.; Cowboy Neil Friday, May 18, 9 p.m.-1 a.m.; Lil’ Ed and the Blues Imperials Friday, May 18, 9 p.m.-1 a.m.

Amber Rae Dunn Hosts: Earnestine & Hazel’s Open Mic Wednesdays, 8-11 p.m.

Electric Church Sundays, 2-4 p.m.

Flying Saucer Draught Emporium

314 S. MAIN 207-7576

130 PEABODY PLACE 523-8536

The Rusty Pieces Saturday, May 19, 7-10 p.m.; Songwriters with Roland and Friends Mondays, 7-10 p.m.

Huey’s Downtown

Pontotoc Lounge Ragtime Tea Party with DJ Mark Richens Sunday, May 20, 4-8 p.m.

South Main Sounds 550 S. MAIN 494-6543

Nashville Songwriters Association International Monday, May 21, 7 p.m.

77 S. SECOND 527-2700

Royal Blues Band Sunday, May 20, 8:30 p.m.-midnight.

330 BEALE 525-8981

Rum Boogie Cafe

7 W. CAROLINA

183 BEALE 522-9596

Dueling Pianos Thursdays, Wednesdays, 9 p.m.-1 a.m., Fridays, Saturdays, 9 p.m.-3 a.m., and Sundays, Tuesdays, 8 p.m.midnight.

New Daisy Theatre Barely Alive x Virtual Riot Friday, May 18, 10 p.m.; Stone Temple Pilots Wednesday, May 23, 7 p.m.

Itta Bena

162 BEALE 521-1851

Big Don Valentine’s Three Piece Chicken and a Biscuit Blues Band Thursdays, Tuesdays, 8 p.m.-midnight; Delta Project Friday, May 18, 9 p.m.-1 a.m. and Saturday, May 19, 9 p.m.-1 a.m.

Loflin Yard

531 S. MAIN 523-9754

Belle Tavern 117 BARBORO ALLEY 249-6580

Bourbon and Jazz with Quelude Sundays, 2:30-5:30 p.m.; The Rusty Pieces Sunday, May 20, 6:30-9:30 p.m.

Brass Door Irish Pub 152 MADISON 572-1813

Live Music Fridays; Carma Karaoke with Carla Worth Saturdays, 9-11 p.m.

Paulette’s RIVER INN, 50 HARBOR TOWN SQUARE 260-3300

Live Pianist Thursdays, 5:30-8:30 p.m., Fridays and Saturdays, 5:30-9 p.m., Sundays, 11 a.m.-2 p.m., and Mondays-Wednesdays, 5:30-8 p.m.

The Peabody Hotel

123 S. MAIN AT PEABODY TROLLEY STOP 525-3655

Memphis Deep Saturday, May 19, 8-11 p.m.

The Vault

903 S. COOPER 274-5151

124 GE PATTERSON

South Main

855 KENTUCKY

Nancy Apple Thursdays, 8 p.m.; FreeWorld Friday, May 18, 9 p.m.-midnight; The Po Boys Saturday, May 19, 9 p.m.-midnight; Bobbie Stacks and Friends Wednesdays, 8-11 p.m.

Canvas 1737 MADISON 443-5232

Karaoke Thursdays, 9:30 p.m.; Kyle Pruzina Live Mondays, 10 p.m.-midnight.

Hillbilly Mojo Friday, May 18, 8 p.m.; Timo Arthur Saturday, May 19, 8 p.m.

Dirty Crow Inn

Sunday Brunch with Joyce Cobb Sundays, 11:30 a.m.2:30 p.m.

149 UNION 529-4000

Peabody Rooftop Parties Thursdays, 6-10 p.m.

Center for Southern Folklore

Boscos 2120 MADISON 432-2222

Folk All Y’all Listening Room 11 W. HULING AVE

Folk All Y’all: An Evening with Tina & Her Pony Saturday, May 19, 7:30-9:30 p.m.

Celtic Crossing Jeremy Stanfill and Joshua Cosby Sundays, 6-9 p.m.; Candy Company Mondays.

The Cove 2559 BROAD 730-0719

Jazz with Ed Finney, Deb Swiney, and David Collins Thursday, May 17, 8 p.m.; The Tinglers Friday, May 18, 9 p.m.; Skitch Saturday, May 19, 5-8 p.m.; Bluff City Backsliders Saturday, May 19, 10 p.m.; David Collins & Frog Squad Sunday, May 20, 6-9

May 17-23, 2018

Blind Mississippi Morris Fridays, 5 p.m. and Saturdays, 5:30 p.m.; Brad Birkedahl Band Thursdays, Wednesdays, 8 p.m.; Earl “The Pearl” Banks Saturdays, 12:30 p.m. and Tuesdays, 7 p.m.; Brandon Cunning Band Sundays, 6 p.m., and Mondays, 7 p.m.; FreeWorld Sundays, 9:30 p.m.

Sean “Bad” Apple Thursdays, Sundays, 5 p.m. and Fridays, Saturdays, 4 p.m.; Live Music Thursdays-Sundays, 7-11 p.m.; DJ Ron Fridays, 11 p.m.; DJ DNyce Saturdays, 11 p.m.

Earnestine & Hazel’s

18

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MARTIN LAWRENCE SATURDAY, JUNE 16

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Join us at one of our weekly camps presented by Nike, all of which offer quality instruction, premium giveaways and lots of NBA fun. GRIZZLIES.COM/CAMPS

Join Martin Lawrence along with comedians Deon Cole, Jay Pharoah, Bruce Bruce, Adele Givens and more. Tickets available!

Memphis born rap and hip-hop artist will return to FedExForum with his sixth annual birthday bash. Tickets available!

Witness your Smackdown Superstars broadcast to the world live from FedExForum for the first time in over a year. Tickets available!

Get tickets at FedExForum Box Office | Ticketmaster locations | 1.800.745.3000 | ticketmaster.com | fedexforum.com


After Dark: Live Music Schedule May 17 - 23 p.m.; Richard Wilson Tuesday, May 22, 6-9 p.m.; Karaoke Wednesdays, 9 p.m.

Lindenwood Christian Church

Growlers

An Afternoon of Strings and Things Sunday, May 20, 4 p.m.

Midtown Crossing Grill 394 N. WATKINS 443-0502

Natalie James and the Professor Saturdays, Sundays, 11 a.m.-3 p.m.; “The Happening” Open Songwriter Showcase Tuesdays, 6:30-9:30 p.m.

University of Memphis The Bluff 535 S. HIGHLAND

Memphis LIVE MondaysSundays, 8 p.m.-midnight; DJ Ben Murray Thursdays, 10 p.m.; Bluegrass Brunch with the River Bluff Clan Sundays, 11 a.m.

590 N. PERKINS 761-9321

Van Duren Solo Thursdays, 6:30-8:30 p.m.

Whitehaven/ Airport Rock-n-Roll Cafe

Poplar/I-240

3715-5 ELVIS PRESLEY, AT ELVIS AFTER DARK 398-5692

Mortimer’s

Neil’s Music Room 5727 QUINCE 682-2300

Amber McCain Band Thursday, May 17, 7-11 p.m.; Eddie Smith

Elvis Tribute featuring Michael Cullipher Thursdays-Saturdays, 8 p.m.

Side Car Cafe 2194 WHITTEN 388-0285

Dantones Saturday, May 19, 8 p.m.-midnight; Brian Johnson Band Saturday, May 19, 8 p.m.midnight; Brian Johnson Band Saturday, May 19, 8-11 p.m.

Collierville Huey’s Collierville 2130 W. POPLAR 854-4455

The Chaulkies Sunday, May 20, 8-11:30 p.m.

Cordova

Hi-Tone

Huey’s Cordova

412-414 N. CLEVELAND 278-TONE

1771 N. GERMANTOWN PKWY. 754-3885

Anvil, Shadowside, Sunlord, Skinny Powers Friday, May 18, 8 p.m.; Tin Tenn Saturday, May 19, 9 p.m.; Mrs. Fletcher, Negro Terror, HEELS Saturday, May 19, 9 p.m.; Cap 6, 4 Soul Band, 1 Young Soul Sunday, May 20, 7 p.m.; Kayak Jones, Secret Stuff, Geist Monday, May 21, 8 p.m.; Brightside, All The Rest, Airside Tuesday, May 22, 8 p.m.; The Melvins, All Souls Wednesday, May 23, 9 p.m.

2 Mule Plow Sunday, May 20, 4-7 p.m.; Brandon Taylor and Radio Ghost Sunday, May 20, 8:30 p.m.midnight; John Paul Keith Trio Tuesday, May 22, 6-9 p.m.

Frayser/Millington Old Millington Winery 6748 OLD MILLINGTON 873-4114

Vintage Unplugged Sunday, May 20.

Huey’s Midtown

Toni Green’s Palace

1927 MADISON 726-4372

Amy LaVere Trio Sunday, May 20, 4-7 p.m.; Ghost Town Blues Band Sunday, May 20, 8:30 p.m.midnight.

4212 HWY 51 N

Toni Green’s Palace MondaysSundays, 7 p.m.; Live DJ Thursdays, Fridays, 7 p.m.

Germantown

Indian Pass Raw Bar Memphis

Germantown Performing Arts Center

2059 MADISON 207-7397

Paul Taylor Jazz Quartet Thursday, May 17, 7-10 p.m.; Lucky 7 Brass Band Friday, May 18, 7-10 p.m.; Brandon Taylor Saturday, May 19, 8-11 p.m.

Memphis Symphony’s Double Piano Concerto! Sunday, May 20.

Lafayette’s Music Room

7677 FARMINGTON 318-3034

1801 EXETER 751-7500

Huey’s Germantown Young Petty Thieves Sunday, May 20, 8-11:30 p.m.; Davis Coen and the Change Wednesday, May 23, 6-9 p.m.

2119 MADISON 207-5097

Ricky Montijo Thursday, May 17, 6 p.m.; Von Grey Thursday, May 17, 9 p.m.; The Brevet Thursday, May 17, 10 p.m.; Jason Lee McKinney Friday, May 18, 6:30 p.m.; Almost Famous Friday, May 18, 10 p.m.; School of Rock Memphis Saturday, May 19, 2 p.m.; Amber McCain Saturday, May 19, 6:30 p.m.; Aquanet Saturday, May 19, 10 p.m.; Joe Restivo 4 Sunday, May 20, 11 a.m.; Marcella and Her Lovers Sunday, May 20, 8 p.m.; Memphis Jazz Orchestra Monday, May 21, 6 p.m.; Jimmy Davis Tuesday, May 22, 5:30 p.m.; Char Magnifico and Vintage Tuesday, May 22, 8 p.m.; 3RD Man Wednesday, May 23, 5:30 p.m.; Mighty Souls Brass Band Wednesday, May 23, 8 p.m.

The Legacy Bar & Grill 11695 HWY. 70, STE. 101

Dantones Friday, May 18, 9 p.m.-1 a.m.

Levitt Shell OVERTON PARK 272-2722

Tiger Lake Saturday, May 19.

North Mississippi/ Tunica P&H Cafe 1532 MADISON 726-0906

Rock Starkaraoke Fridays.

Railgarten 2160 CENTRAL

Spaceface with Model Zero Saturday, May 19, 7 p.m.; Live Band Karaoke with Public Record Wednesdays, 7 p.m.

St. Mary’s Episcopal Cathedral 700 POPLAR AVE 9016266763

Texas Boys Choir in Concert Sunday, May 20, 4-5 p.m.

Two Rivers Book Store 2171 YOUNG 630-8088

Sci-Fi Sounds: “A Fantastic, Suspenseful Tale of Computerized Murder and Interplanetary Intrigue” Saturday, May 19, 3-4:30 p.m.

Gold Strike Casino Oasis Hookah Lounge & Cafe 663 S. HIGHLAND 729-6960

DJ ALXANDR Fridays, 10 p.m.2 a.m.; Coldway Saturdays, 10 p.m.-2 a.m.

University of Memphis, Harris Concert Hall INSIDE THE RUDI E. SCHEIDT SCHOOL OF MUSIC 678-5400

Double Piano Concerto! Saturday, May 19, 7:30-9:30 p.m.

East Memphis East of Wangs 6069 PARK 685-9264

Lee Gardner Fridays, 6:30-9 p.m.; Randal Toma, Solo Guitar Tuesdays, 5:30-8 p.m.; Eddie Harrison Wednesdays, 6:30-9 p.m.

Fridays, 8 p.m.; Memphis FunkN-Horns Saturday, May 19, 8 p.m.; Germantown School of Rock Sunday, May 20, 1-5 p.m.; Debbie Jamison & Friends Tuesdays, 6-10 p.m.; Elmo and the Shades Wednesdays, 8 p.m.midnight.

Summer/Berclair Cheffie’s Cafe 483 HIGH POINT TERRACE 202-4157

Songwriter Night hosted by Leigh Ann Wilmot and Dave “The Rave” Saturdays, 5-8 p.m.

High Point Pub 477 HIGH POINT TERRACE 452-9203

Pubapalooza with Stereo Joe Every other Wednesday, 8-11 p.m.

1010 CASINO CENTER IN TUNICA, MS 1-888-245-7829

Bartlett

Tracy Lawrence Saturday, May 19, 8-9:30 p.m.

Bartlett Performing Arts and Conference Center

Horseshoe Casino & Hotel

3663 APPLING 385-6440

Gary Morris Saturday, May 19, 7:30 p.m.

Hadley’s Pub 2779 WHITTEN 266-5006

Twin Soul Friday, May 18, 9 p.m.; The Souled Out Band Saturday, May 19, 9 p.m.; 5th Kind Sunday, May 20, 5:30 p.m.; Animal Crackers Wednesday, May 23, 8 p.m.

Shelby Forest General Store 7729 BENJESTOWN 876-5770

Steak Night with Tony Butler

AT CASINO CENTER, SOUTH OF MEMPHIS, NEAR TUNICA, MS 1-800-303-SHOE

Tyler Henry Sunday, May 20.

Raleigh Stage Stop 2951 CELA 382-1576

The Conspiracy Theory, Who Shot John, Aktion Kat, No Love for Lions Friday, May 18, 8 p.m.; Blues Jam hosted by Brad Webb Thursdays, 7-11 p.m.; Open Mic Night and Steak Night Tuesdays, 6 p.m.-midnight.

m e m p h i s f l y e r. c o m

901Burners with Ciera Skye Friday, May 18, 10 p.m.; Fundraiser for John Boatner for Congress with Mr. Adams, Misti Rae Holten, Will Carpenter & the Cool Breeze Band Saturday, May 19, 2 p.m.; The Tip with Liza Colby & Low Society Sunday, May 20, 8 p.m.; Pony Bradshaw with Crockett Hall Monday, May 21, 8 p.m.; Cannabis Corpse with Incineration & Hate Doctrine Tuesday, May 22, 7 p.m.; Crockett Hall Tuesdays with the Midtown Rhythm Section Tuesdays, 9 p.m.

John Paul Keith Trio Sunday, May 20, 8-11:30 p.m.

2400 UNION 458-8506

and the Shelby Forest Pioneers Fridays, 6-8 p.m.; Rodney Nash & Roger Fakes Saturday, May 19, 12-3 p.m.; Possum Drifters Sunday, May 20, 12:30-3:30 p.m.

ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT

1911 POPLAR 244-7904

Huey’s Poplar 4872 POPLAR 682-7729

19


CALENDAR of EVENTS:

May 17 - 23

T H EAT E R

The Evergreen Theatre

Annapurna, after 20 years apart, Emma tracks Ulysses to a trailer park in the middle of nowhere for a final reckoning. What unfolds is a visceral and profound meditation on love and loss. www.theatreworksmemphis.org. $15. Fridays, Saturdays, 8 p.m., and Sundays, 2 p.m. Through May 27. 1705 POPLAR (274-7139).

Germantown Community Theatre

The Tempest, robbed of position, power, and wealth, Prospero, a magician able to control the very elements and bend nature to his will, reaches across the ocean to isolate his enemies. www. gctcomeplay.org. $12-$24. Fri., Sat., 8 p.m., and Sun., 2:30 p.m. Through May 20. 3037 FOREST HILL-IRENE (453-7447).

New Moon Theatre Company

May 17-23, 2018

Othello, outraged Senator Brabantio disowns his daughter Desdemona when he finds she is secretly married to Othello.

20

Send the date, time, place, cost, info, phone number, a brief description, and photos — two weeks in advance — to calendar@memphisflyer.com or P.O. Box 1738, Memphis, TN 38101. DUE TO SPACE LIMITATIONS, ONGOING WEEKLY EVENTS WILL APPEAR IN THE FLYER’S ONLINE CALENDAR ONLY.

The Moonpie Project Presents: Detour at Crosstown Concourse Theater Stair, Tuesday, May 22nd at noon

Intent on revenge, Iago plants suspicions of unfaithfulness. www.newmoontheatre.org. $20. Fri., Sat., 8-10:30 p.m., and Sun., 2-4:30 p.m. Through May 20. AT THEATREWORKS, 2085 MONROE (484-3467).

5th Annual Number Presents Art of the South: Call for Artists

Playhouse on the Square

Fun Home, based on the bestselling graphic novel. Author Alison Bechdel is introduced to the audience at three different ages, revealing memories of her uniquely dysfunctional family. www.playhouseonthesquare.org. $25-$45. Thursdays-Saturdays, 8 p.m., and Sundays, 2 p.m. Through May 27.

Juried exhibition open to artists 18-plus. Entries must be original works created within the last two years for exhibition July 27 through September 2, 2018. For more information, visit website. $35. Through May 20. WWW.NUMBERINC.ORG.

Casting Demonstration Saturdays, Sundays, 3 p.m.

66 S. COOPER (726-4656).

Universal Parenting Place

PlayBack Memphis, bringing stories to life in a safe space to unlock healing, transformation, and joy. Families welcome. (207-3694), Free. Third Thursday of every month, 4:30-6 p.m. LEMOYNE-OWEN COLLEGE, 990 COLLEGE PARK.

A R T I ST R E C E PT I O N S

Ross Gallery

Opening reception for “Connecting Memphis,” exhibition of selections from photography-and-storytelling project by Cindy McMillion. www. cbu.edu/gallery. Fri., May 18, 5:30-7:30 p.m. CHRISTIAN BROTHERS UNIVERSITY, PLOUGH LIBRARY, 650 E. PARKWAY S. (321-3000).

OT H E R A R T HAPPE N I NGS

Artists’ Link Meeting

Featuring Fred Rawlinson critique session. Third Monday of every month, 6:30 p.m. JASON’S DELI, 3473 POPLAR (324-3181).

“Beneath the Surface: Life, Death & Gold in Ancient Panama”

Exhibition of finds from Pre-Columbian cemetery of Sitio Conte in central Panama, a mysterious and complex society that thrived there more than 1,000 years ago. Ongoing. MEMPHIS PINK PALACE MUSEUM, 3050 CENTRAL (636-2362), WWW.MEMPHISMUSEUMS.ORG.

METAL MUSEUM, 374 METAL MUSEUM DR. (774-6380), WWW.METALMUSEUM.ORG.

Girls’ Night Out

A fun evening of painting. Snack bar included. BYOB. $12. Third Thursday of every month, 6-9 p.m. Through Dec. 31. PITTER POTTER STUDIO, 845 GERMANTOWN PKWY (443-7718), WWW.PITTERPOTTERSTUDIO.COM.


C A L E N D A R : M AY 1 7 - 2 3

MEMPHIS BROOKS MUSEUM OF ART, 1934 POPLAR (544-6209), WWW. BROOKSMUSEUM.ORG.

“Little Women”

Exhibition and performance by Nubia Yasin. Thurs., May 17, 7-9 p.m. CROSSTOWN CONCOURSE, N. CLEVELAND AT NORTH PARKWAY, WWW.CROSSTOWNARTS.ORG.

The Moonpie Project Presents: Detour

Artist talk at Food for Thought, a weekly lecture series on the Crosstown Concourse Theater Stair. Mural location: Crosstown Arts alley between 430 & 438 N. Cleveland Tues., May 22, noon. CROSSTOWN CONCOURSE, N. CLEVELAND AT NORTH PARKWAY, WWW.CROSSTOWNARTS.ORG.

Open Late

Galleries and gardens will be open late. Free with admission. Every third Thursday, 6-8 p.m. THE DIXON GALLERY & GARDENS, 4339 PARK (761-5250), WWW.DIXON.ORG.

“African-Print Fashion Now!” with Kenya Bradshaw at Memphis Brooks Museum, Wednesday, May 23rd

Tour: “African-Print Fashion Now!” with Kenya Bradshaw

Led by Kenya Bradshaw, cofounder of Gift Wraps, an online shop featuring headwraps made from African-print fabric. Wed., May 23, 6:30 p.m.

permanent exhibition of African art from the Martha and Robert Fogelman collection. Ongoing.

MEMPHIS BROOKS MUSEUM OF ART, 1934 POPLAR (544-6209), WWW.BROOKSMUSEUM.ORG.

142 COMMUNICATION & FINE ARTS BUILDING (678-2224).

Wish Book: James Benning

ANF Architects

Selected works by James Benning in Screening Room, East Atrium, and 430 gallery. Reception on Saturday, 7 p.m. Fri.-Sun., May 18-20.

“Suburban Cigar” and “A Perfect Home,” exhibition of photography by Bruce Meisterman and sculpture by Nikii Richey. www.anfa.com. Through May 17.

CROSSTOWN CONCOURSE, N. CLEVELAND AT NORTH PARKWAY, WWW.CROSSTOWNARTS.ORG.

1500 UNION (278-6868).

Belz Museum of Asian and Judaic Art

ONGOI NG ART

“Chinese Symbols in Art,” ancient Chinese pottery and bronze. www.belzmuseum.org. Ongoing.

20Twelve

“The Visceral World,” exhibition of color photography by William Eggleston, Huger Foote, Adam Bartos, and Stephen Shore. www.20twelve. com. Through June 3.

119 S. MAIN, IN THE PEMBROKE SQUARE BUILDING (523-ARTS).

Bingham and Broad

“My Kin Is Not Like Yours,” exhibition of works by Debra Edge. Ongoing.

2531 BROAD.

Art Museum at the University of Memphis (AMUM)

2563 BROAD (323-3008).

The Cotton Museum

“Monster Marks,” exhibition of work from Memphis collections that make us think about how we define monsters. www. memphis.edu/amum. Through July 28. “Africa: Art of a Continent,”

“Went Out for Cigarettes,” exhibition of images and titles that explore and rediscover the American South with contra-

continued on page 22

Legendary Seafood Fridays, Saturdays and now Sundays $22.99

m e m p h i s f l y e r. c o m

High-energy live auction under the tent on the museum’s plaza. Guests will be treated to a cocktail reception with food by The Kitchen at Shelby Farms and entertainment by Mark Edgar Stuart. $150. Sat., May 19, 5:30-9:30 p.m.

ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT

The Grand Auction

Prices shown are for Total Rewards members. Price does not include tax or gratuity. Must be 21 years or older to gamble or attend events. Know When To Stop Before You Start.® Gambling Problem? Call 1-800-522-4700. ©2017, Caesars License Company, LLC. All rights reserved.

21


C A L E N D A R : M AY 1 7 - 2 3 continued from page 21

Eclectic Eye

dictions and hidden meanings by Ryan Steed, grandson of a cotton farmer and son of a literature teacher. Through May 31.

242 S. COOPER (276-3937).

65 UNION (531-7826).

David Lusk Gallery

“Abstracted Still Life,” exhibition of new paintings by Kit Reuther. www.davidluskgallery.com. Through May 19. “Full Tilt,” exhibition of new paintings and drawings by Pinkney Herbert. www.davidluskgallery.com. May 22-June 23. 97 TILLMAN (767-3800).

The Dixon Gallery & Gardens

“Connecting Memphis” by Cindy McMillion at Ross Gallery, through July 18th

“Surreal Memphis in Infrared Photography,” exhibition of photography by Amy IngramCurtis. www.eclectic-eye.com. Through May 30.

Edge Arts

between regional preferences and cosmopolitanism. Through Aug. 12. “Rotunda Projects: Lisa Hoke,” exhibition of over-the-top installation of recycled and repurposed materials reflecting aspirations for the work and fears of expecting too much. Through June 3. “About Face,” exhibition located in the Education Gallery highlighting the different ways artists interpret the connection between emotion and expression. Ongoing. “Drawing Memory: Essence of Memphis,” exhibition of works inspired by nsibidi, a sacred means of communication among male secret societies in southeastern Nigeria by Victor Ekpuk. www. brooksmuseum.org. Ongoing.

“Memphis Landmarks,” exhibition of works by John Sadowski. Through June 30. 600 MONROE (262-6674).

FireHouse Community Arts Center

Mosal Morszart, exhibition of works by Black Arts Alliance artist. www.memphisblackartsalliance.org. Ongoing. 985 S. BELLEVUE (948-9522).

“Contemplating Character: Portrait Drawings & Oil Sketches from Jacques Louis David to Lucian Freud,” exhibition of portrait drawings and oil sketches extends almost twoand-a-half centuries organized thematically, providing the viewer with provocative visual juxtapositions. www.dixon.org. Through June 24. “’IN LAK’ECH ALA K’IN,’ Tú eres mi otro yo, You are my other self,” exhibition of installation transforming the Mallory/Wurtzburger Galleries into a work of art by Richard Lou. www.dixon.org. Through July 15.

Fratelli’s

4339 PARK (761-5250).

“The Image of Dreams,” exhibition of surreal paintings with patterned borders Annabelle Meacham. www.lrossgallery.

Brad Behnes Art Show, exhibition of original oil paintings, large and miniature, of the moods and moments of Memphis and the Mississippi River. www.memphisbotanicgarden. com. Through May 31. 750 CHERRY (766-9900).

com. Through May 26.

Harrell Performing Arts Theatre

5040 SANDERLIN (767-2200).

“Where We Gather,” exhibition of works by Erika Roberts. www.erikaroberts.studio. Through June 25. 440 POWELL, COLLIERVILLE (853-3228).

L Ross Gallery

appointment only. (647-9242), Ongoing.

Leontyne Price Library at Rust College

“All Night Long,” exhibition of photos and sculpture, Junior Kimbrough’s Juke Joint 19932000, by Bill Steber. www.fancymag.com. Through May 31. 150 RUST (662-252-8000).

Marshall Arts Gallery

“Love of Art” and “Memphis,” exhibition of work by Nikki Gardner and Debra Edge by

639 MARSHALL (679-6837).

Memphis Botanic Garden

“Art of a Scientist,” exhibition of paintings by Dr. K. Gopal Murti. All paintings are for sale with 30 percent of the proceeds going to Memphis Botanic Garden. www.memphisbotanicgarden.com. Through May 31. 750 CHERRY (636-4100).

Memphis Brooks Museum of Art

1934 POPLAR (544-6209).

“Black Resistance: Ernest C. Withers and the Civil Rights Movement,” exhibition focuses on and commemorates the 50th anniversary of the events from March 27 through April 8, 1968. Through Aug. 19. “African-Print Fashion Now! A Story of Taste, Globalization, and Style,” exhibition of dynamic traditions of African dress featuring colorful, boldly patterned printed cloth highlighting the interplay

Metal Museum

“Forge,” exhibition of work by 15 international metal artists whose practice has been identified as having a significant impact in the field of blacksmithing. www.metalmuseum.org. Through Aug. 19. 374 METAL MUSEUM DR. (774-6380).

continued on page 24

give a gift of

HOPE.

May 17-23, 2018

For a limited time youtime can name For a limited an apple the Tree Hope you canonname an of apple in our new distribution center.

on the Tree of Hope in our new You can share an apple with your friends, family or your employee g The more who give, the more we can help. We’re so close to meeting o distribution center. But we can’t do it without you.

give a gift of

HOPE.

You can share an apple with your friends, family or your employee group. The more who give, the more we can help. We’re so close to meeting our goal. But we can’t do it without you.

www.midsouthfoodbank.org/hungertohope

For a limited time you can name an apple on the Tree of Hope in our new distribution center.

22

midsouthfoodbank.org/

You can share an apple with your friends, family or your employee group. hungertohope The more who give, the more we can help. We’re so close to meeting our goal. But we can’t do it without you. www.midsouthfoodbank.org/hungertohope


NOMINATIONS: JUNE 4-28 | BALLOT VOTING: AUG 1-23 memphis flyer.com

m e m p h i s f l y e r. c o m

Top 8 most nominated per category will make up the final ballot!

ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT

Nominate your local favorites

23


C A L E N D A R : M AY 1 7 - 2 3 continued from page 22 Playhouse on the Square

“Art and Illustration,” exhibition of watercolor paintings and architectural illustrations by Terry DeWitt showing how principles of design, composition, and color are important to all art. (7264656), Through June 3. Barcelona Exhibition, www. mca.edu. Through June 3.

“The Chaos and the Cosmos: Inside Memphis Music’s Lost Decade, 1977-1986,” exhibition of photography by Patricia Rainer. www.staxmuseum.com. Through July 31.

Talbot Heirs

99 S. SECOND (527-9772).

Village Frame & Art

Slavehaven Underground Railroad Museum

“Images of Africa Before & After the Middle Passage,” exhibition of photography by Jeff and Shaakira Edison. Ongoing. 826 N. SECOND (527-3427).

St. George’s Episcopal Church

Local Artists, exhibition of work by Libby Anderson, Danny Broadway, Morgan Brookfield, Mandy Buchanan, Sherry and Wayne Carpenter, Donald Golden, Sandra Hill, Zoe Nadel, Rachel Rieves, and Joy Phillips Routt. (624-9067), www.stgchurch.org. Through May 29. 2425 SOUTH GERMANTOWN (754-7282).

BUCKMAN ARTS CENTER AT ST. MARY’S SCHOOL, 60 N. PERKINS EXT. (537-1483), WWW.STMARYSSCHOOL.ORG.

Debra Edge Art. Ongoing.

Ross Gallery

CHRISTIAN BROTHERS UNIVERSITY, PLOUGH LIBRARY, 650 E. PARKWAY S. (321-3000).

libes. $20. Fri., May 18, 6 p.m., and Sat., May 19, 5 p.m.

926 E. MCLEMORE (946-2535).

66 S. COOPER (726-4656).

“Connecting Memphis,” exhibition of selections from photography-and-storytelling project by Cindy McMillion. www.connectingmemphis. com/. May 18-July 18.

Cooper-Young Goes Native Garden Walk, Saturday and Sunday, May 19th and 20th, 9 a.m.-5 p.m.

Stax Museum of American Soul Music

Gallery Artists, exhibition of work by Charlie Ivey, Virginia Schoenster, Lou Ann Dattilo, and Matthew Hasty. Ongoing.

C O M E DY

Local

1, 2, 3 Comedy, local comedians perform in a local basement for local audience at Local. www. localgastropub.com. Free. Wed., May 23, 7:30-10 p.m.

540 S. MENDENHALL (767-8882).

WKNO Studio

Diane Weech, Rick DeStefanis, and Mike Lee, www.wkno.org. Through May 30.

95 S. MAIN (473-9573).

7151 CHERRY FARMS (458-2521).

Memphis Made Brewing Company

Bits on the Table, a weekly comedy workshop by The Comma Comedians. www. memphismadebrewing.com. free. Mondays, 5-7 p.m.

DA N C E

Brooks Milongas

Members of the Argentine Tango Society give lessons and tango demonstrations in the rotunda. Included with museum admission. Third Wednesday, Thursday of every month, 6:30 p.m.

768 S. COOPER (207-5343).

P&H Cafe

You Look Like, a monthly showcase of spite, battle of bitchery, and competition of “Oh, hell no.” Watch the quickest wits from all over the country talk mad shit. (2833814), $8. Third Saturday of every month, 9-11 p.m.

MEMPHIS BROOKS MUSEUM OF ART, 1934 POPLAR (544-6209).

Roudnev Youth Ballet Presents Coppelia

Interpretation of Arthur SaintLéon’s enchanting classic tale of sneakery, magic, and drifting love set to the music of Léo De-

1532 MADISON (726-0906).

Consignment Music

4040 PARK 901-458-2094

STORE HOURS: MON-SAT 10AM-6PM

BUY SELL TRADE. WE DO IT ALL!

MEMPHIS IN MAY SALE

ACOUSTIC GUITARS GALORE! $99.95. STARTING AT

COME SEE JOE OR DYLAN FOR THE BEST DEALS IN TOWN. EVAN LEAKE HAS YOU COVERED FOR ALL INSTRUMENT REPAIRS.

May 17-23, 2018

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For All Your Emergency Accessory Needs! Strings, Straps, Picks, Batteries & Much Much More! Professional Guitar Teachers Available 7 Days a Week for the Best Rates in Town!

Bidding is

FUN!!

COME SEE US AT

“The Big One” May 19-20 & The Italian Festival May 31-June 2

We carry CBD oils, CBD honey sticks, CBD Teas & even CBD for Pets. simplyhempshop.com

Todd’s Auction Service Personal Property Liquidation

3449 Summer Ave. Memphis TN 38122

Auctions: Every Thurs. & Sat. 6pm Preview opens at 2pm

Antiques, Collectibles & Home Furnishings! Auctioneer: Col. Lamar Todd

ING CELEBR AT

24

Simply Hemp Shop

MEMPAHYIS IN M !

TAL# 5911 TAF# 5415

901-324-4382 Visit our site for full auction info

www.aquatreasures.com

MEMORIAL DAY SALE! MAY 19-28TH.

Everything in the store 10% off. 21,000 sq. feet. 100+ Booths.

Monday-Saturday 10a.-6p. • Sunday 1-6p. 5855 Summer Avenue (Corner of Summer & Sycamore View) Exit 12 off I40 | 901-213-9343


C A L E N D A R : M AY 1 7 - 2 3 P O E T RY/S PO K E N WO R D

Epiphany Lutheran Church

Centering Prayer, opportunity for silent contemplation, followed by inspirational poetry and readings. www.epiphanylu.org. Sundays, 5 p.m., and Wednesdays, noon.

Yellow Fever Rock & Roll Ghost Tour

See what used to be, Memphis-style, with Mike McCarthy. Call to schedule a personal tour. Ongoing. (486-6325), WWW.FACEBOOK.COM/YELLOWROCKGHOST/.

Spring Native Plant Sale

How-To Festival

STRAWBERRY PLAINS AUDUBON CENTER, 285 PLAINS (662-252-1155), WWW.STRAWBERRYPLAINS.AUDUBON.ORG.

GERMANTOWN COMMUNITY LIBRARY, 1925 EXETER (7577323), WWW.HOWTOFESTIVAL.COM/.

Experts are available to answer your plant, garden, and wildlife questions; bring your own carts or boxes to ease transport. Fri.-Sat., May 18-19, 9 a.m.-4 p.m.

7887 POPLAR (861-6227).

E X P OS / S A L E S

Two Rivers Book Store

Memphis Orchid Society Annual Show and Sale

F E ST IVA LS

MEMPHIS BOTANIC GARDEN, 750 CHERRY (636-4100), WWW.MEMPHISORCHIDS.ORG.

International foods, fashions, entertainment to be sampled benefiting The Arc Mid-South, a 501c3 nonprofit agency that serves people with intellectual and developmental disabilities. $25. Sat., May 19, 2-4 p.m.

Sci-Fi Sounds: “A Fantastic, Suspenseful Tale of Computerized Murder and Interplanetary Intrigue,” reading of vintage science fiction novel The Transvection Machine by Edward D. Hoch, with accompanying sci-fi/experimental electronic sounds from Robert Traxler. Free. Sat., May 19, 3-4:30 p.m. 2171 YOUNG (630-8088).

L ECT U R E /S P EAK E R

Conservation Residential & Commercial

Fri., May 18, 12-5 p.m., Sat., May 19, 9 a.m.5 p.m., and Sun., May 20, 11 a.m.-4 p.m.

Soul Market

Enjoy vendors with unique products, great food, music, and more. Saturdays, 12-4 p.m. THE DEN, 656 MARSHALL (773-738-9019).

The Arc Mid-South’s International Tea

Celebrate creativity and craftsmanship as artists, crafters, and DIY experts gather to share a diverse array of talents. Enjoy ongoing demonstrations and Q&A opportunities. Free. Sat., May 19, 1-4 p.m.

Memphis in May

Join the fun at MIM Music Festival and World Championship Barbecue Contest. Honored country, Czech Republic. Visit website for more information and ticketed events. Through May 31. TOM LEE PARK, OFF RIVERSIDE DR., WWW.MEMPHISINMAY.ORG/.

THE SALVATION ARMY KROC CENTER, 800 E. PARKWAY S. (327-2473), WWW.THEARCMIDSOUTH.ORG.

continued on page 27

Spring series discussing the environment. Thurs., May 17, 5:45-7 p.m. BENJAMIN L. HOOKS CENTRAL LIBRARY, 3030 POPLAR (415-2700).

Suds & Stories: The Plagues of Early Memphis

Kim Bearden gives a presentation on the causes of death for the settlers of Memphis featuring beer, light snacks, and a look at what it was that killed us in the good old days. Advance registration required. 18-plus. $15. Sun., May 20, 2 p.m. ELMWOOD CEMETERY, 824 S. DUDLEY (774-3212), WWW.ELMWOODCEMETERY.ORG.

TO U R S

“Cooper Young Goes Native” Garden Walk

Tour 75 diverse, urban, quirky gardens in a walkable, bikeable, vibrant neighborhood. Featuring keynote speakers Dr. Doug Tallamy and Chris Cosby, pollinators, chickens, bees, and more. $25. Sat.-Sun., May 19-20, 9 a.m.-5 p.m. COOPER-YOUNG DISTRICT, CORNER OF COOPER AND YOUNG (299-5887), COOPERYOUNGGARDENCLUB.ORG/.

2018 Memphis Area Master Gardeners Tour

Features five gardens within an eight-mile radius. For more information including directions, visit website. Thursdays. Through May 24. WWW.MEMPHISAREAMASTERGARDENERS.ORG.

City Tasting Tours

Savor tastings at five eateries, interact with chefs and managers, and sample local flavors while strolling down Main Street and enjoying new art installations and historic landmarks. Wednesdays-Saturdays, 1:30 p.m. WWW.CITYTASTINGTOURS.COM.

THE DIXON GALLERY & GARDENS, 4339 PARK (761-5250), WWW.DIXON.ORG.

Graceland Excursions Trips: Musical Landmarks of the Mississippi Delta

Take a detour down the backroads and explore the deep roots of blues culture and history, while reliving a musical revolution powered by raw emotion. $119. Saturdays, 8:30 a.m.-6:30 p.m. GUEST HOUSE AT GRACELAND, 3600 ELVIS PRESLEY (3323322), WWW.GRACELAND.COM.

Graceland Excursions Trips: Tupelo, Mississippi – Birthplace of Elvis Presley

Experience the rural setting of Elvis’ upbringing and see where it all began in the two-room house where he was born, the church he attended in his youth and artifacts from his modest beginnings. $99. Fridays, 8:30 a.m.-3:30 p.m. GUEST HOUSE AT GRACELAND, 3600 ELVIS PRESLEY (3323322), WWW.GRACELAND.COM.

The Last Word

Visit several compelling sites with Bob Barnett where epitaphs have left visitors scratching their heads and wondering “what’s the story behind that?” 18-plus. $20. Sat., May 19, 10:30 a.m. ELMWOOD CEMETERY, 824 S. DUDLEY (774-3212), WWW.ELMWOODCEMETERY.ORG.

ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT

Garden docents will focus on the cutting garden each week on Saturday morning. Meet in the Catmur Foyer to see the large urn design and start tour. Saturdays, 10 a.m.-noon.

m e m p h i s f l y e r. c o m

Cutting Garden Tours

25


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26

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An Equal Opportunity Employer


C A L E N D A R : M AY 1 7 - 2 3 continued from page 25 Memphis in May: World Championship Barbecue Cooking Contest

$4-$40. Wed.-Sat., April 16-19. TOM LEE PARK, OFF RIVERSIDE DR., WWW.MEMPHISINMAY.ORG.

Natchez Festival of Music: “Sound Waves!”

Diverse series of events that celebrate the merging of historic eras, three different centennial seasons, and musical offerings spanning three continents. Opening gala featuring Mac McAnally. For more information, visit website. $10-$315. Thursdays-Saturdays. Through May 26. NATCHEZ PERFORMING ARTS CENTER, 64 HOMOCHITTO (601-304-9488), WWW.NATCHEZFESTIVALOFMUSIC.COM.

20, 3:30-5:30 p.m. NESHOBA UNITARIAN UNIVERSALIST CHURCH, 7350 RALEIGH-LAGRANGE (266-2626).

Thurs., May 17, 9 a.m.-noon, and Fri., May 18, 9 a.m.-noon.

FERREN FAMILY COUNSELING, 895 S. COOPER (498-9126), WWW.FERRENFAMILYCOUNSELING.COM.

MEMPHIS PINK PALACE MUSEUM, 3050 CENTRAL (6362362), WWW.MEMPHISMUSEUMS.ORG.

Tennessee Shakespeare Company Education Programs

Registration for S.P.A.R.K.

KIDS

Junior Fishing Rodeo

There will be door prizes as well as awards for the first catfish, the largest catfish, and the most catfish caught for ages 5-13. Sat., May 19, 7-10 a.m. AGRICENTER INTERNATIONAL, 7777 WALNUT GROVE (757-7777), WWW.AGRICENTER.COM.

“Memorable Memphians”

Learn more about historic figures that called Memphis home. Hear how Memphians made their mark on history and science while viewing artifacts and materials that will bring these historic Memphians to life. Free on Discovery Days.

Ruby Bridges Reading Festival

Summer Performing Arts Readiness Kamp for kids 6-18. Includes morning workout, breakfast, lunch, and snacks. For more information, registration, and scholarship opportunities, visit website. $20 per day. Through June 3.

Featuring an opportunity for students to participate in playshops, performances, and learn about TSC. For more information, visit website. Through June 30. WWW.TNSHAKESPEARE.ORG.

FIREHOUSE COMMUNITY ARTS CENTER, 985 S. BELLEVUE (948-9522), WWW.MBAAFIREHOUSE.ORG.

S P EC IA L EVE NTS

Teen Girls’ Therapeutic Art Group

2018 American Humane Hero Dog Awards®

Designed for teens ages 14-17 to give your teen the tools to develop healthy relationships, selfconfidence, and coping strategies for dealing with the challenges her world can bring. 210.00. Thursdays, 6-7 p.m. Through May 31.

Hudson, an 11-year-old Great Pyrenees from Memphis, will be competing against 265 other

continued on page 28

A chance for children to receive free books, enjoy storytelling, and entertainment. Educators with valid school ID can also get free books for their classroom. Sat., May 19, 10 a.m.-3 p.m. NATIONAL CIVIL RIGHTS MUSEUM PLAZA, BETWEEN MAIN AND CIVIL RIGHTS MUSEUM, CIVILRIGHTSMUSEUM.ORG.

New and Inactive Members PLAY $100 OF RISK FREE GAMING AT TUNICA’S LUCKIEST CASINO.

S P O R TS / F IT N ES S

36th Annual Memphis in May Olympic Triathlon and Sprint Triathlon

Sport Expo kick-off on Friday, 3-7 p.m. Amateur challenge with a $5,000 prize purse will be paid to the top 15 male and female athletes who

HERE’S HOW IT WORKS: 1. Play your favorite slots on the day you sign up for or reactivate your card. 2. Any losses you incur between $20-$100 will be reimbursed in Promo Cash. 3. Your reimbursement will be mailed to you and is redeemable on a future visit.

Coppelia at Buckman Arts Center, Friday and Saturday, May 18th and 19th participate in both triathlon events. For more information, visit website. Fri.-Sun., May 18-20. EDMUND ORGILL PARK, MILLINGTON, TN, WWW.PR-EVENTMANAGEMENT.NET.

Memphis Heroes in Recovery 6K

South Memphis Glide Ride

The Big Jump Teen Ambassadors take scenic routes through South Memphis and consider how to improve bicycle facilities and connectivity within the area. Free. Thursdays, 6-7 p.m. Through May 31. SOUTH MEMPHIS FARMERS MARKET, CORNER OF MISSISSIPPI BOULEVARD AND SOUTH PARKWAY EAST (726-6409), WWW.REVOLUTIONSMEMPHIS.COM.

M E E TI N G S

FIGHTS AT FITZ SATURDAY, JUNE 9 7:30PM Hotel Package $189 • Deluxe Room • 2 Reserved Seats

Call 1-662-363-LUCK (5825) and mention code: CPFAF

Tickets Start at $30

Purchase tickets at Fitz or call Ticketmaster at 800-745-3000 or ticketmaster.com

The Dixon Book Club

Learn about gardens, the arts, Memphis, and France through reading fiction and non-fiction. To request a copy of a book to borrow, email lschmidt@dixon.org Free with admission. Third Thursday of every month, 6-7:30 p.m. THE DIXON GALLERY & GARDENS, 4339 PARK (761-5250), WWW.DIXON.ORG.

New Beginnings: The All Souls Collective

Discuss religion and faith from an AfricanAmerican, Afro-Caribbean or just plain African, perspective. Share dialogue, beliefs, ideas, religious perspectives, and experiences in a spirit of openness without fear of reprisal. free. Sun., May

FitzgeraldsTunica.com • 1-662-363-LUCK (5825) • Must be 21 and a Key Rewards member. See Cashier•Players Club for rules. While supplies last. Tax and resort fee not included in listed price. Advance hotel reservations required and subject to availability. $50 credit or debit card is required upon hotel check-in. Arrivals after 6pm must be guaranteed with a credit card. Management reserves the right to cancel, change and modify the event or promotion. Gaming restricted patrons prohibited. Gambling Problem? Call 1-800-522-4700.

m e m p h i s f l y e r. c o m

OVERTON PARK, EAST PARKWAY PAVILION, WWW.HEROESINRECOVERY.COM.

ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT

Join us on a mission to break the stigma that keeps individuals with addiction and mental health issues from seeking help. $25-$40. Sat., May 19, 8-11 a.m.

27


C A L E N D A R : M AY 1 7 - 2 3 continued from page 27 courageous canines for the nation’s highest honor recognizing Mankind’s best friend. Vote online. Through July 11. WWW.HERODOGAWARDS.ORG.

25th Annual Memphis “Beat the Odds” Award Program

Recognizes outstanding accomplishments of a youth and an adult who has made a positive impact on youth and young adults. For more information, visit website. $35. Thurs., May 17, 6 p.m. LINDENWOOD CHRISTIAN CHURCH, 2400 UNION (458-8506), WWW. MEMPHISBEATTHEODDS.ORG.

30 Thursdays at the Garden

On Thursday nights throughout Daylight Savings Time extended hours until sunset open to members at no cost and to guests paying daily fee for free and sometimes with an added cost. Thursdays. Through Oct. 31. MEMPHIS BOTANIC GARDEN, 750 CHERRY (636-4100), WWW.MEMPHISBOTANICGARDEN.COM.

30 Thursdays: Walk after Work Explore our 96 acres as you wish. Thurs., May 17, 6 p.m. MEMPHIS BOTANIC GARDEN, 750 CHERRY (636-4100), MEMPHISBOTANICGARDEN.COM.

Brave New World Campaign KickOff Party

Celebrate the festive new home for TSC with music, food, drinks, and a brave new world of Shakespeare. Complimentary hors d’oeuvres and open bars. Dress is casual. Free with registration. Sat., May 19, 5-6:30 p.m. TENNESSEE SHAKESPEARE COMPANY, 7950 TRINITY (759-0604), WWW.TNSHAKESPEARE.ORG.

Cazateatro Presents: Latin Night Fiesta

An evening celebrating Latin culture featuring Latin cuisine from local Latin restaurants, cocktails, performances from Salsa Memphis, Mariachi Los Cantadores, and Tropical Fusion Latin Band $45. Fri., May 18, 6:30 p.m. HATTILOO THEATRE, 37 S. COOPER (662-469-6095), WWW.CAZATEATRO. ORG.

“LeMoyne-Owen College: A Beacon of Hope” Exhibition of a central institution in Memphis since its founding in 1871 as the LeMoyne Normal and Commercial School. Ongoing. MEMPHIS PINK PALACE MUSEUM, 3050 CENTRAL (636-2362), WWW. MEMPHISMUSEUMS.ORG.

MIFA at 50: Celebrating God’s Tapestry

Featuring keynote speaker Reverend Ollie V. Rencher, recognition of outstanding donors

and volunteers, brief reception with refreshments, and music by Earl Randle. $35. Tues., May 22, 5:30-7:30 p.m. CHURCH OF THE HOLY COMMUNION, 4645 WALNUT GROVE (767-6987), WWW.MIFA.ORG.

Nominations for IMB Innovation Awards

Accepting nominations for October Awards issue. Include biographical or business info, why the person, business, or organization should be recognized as an innovative leader and your contact information. Email nomination to, Through July 15. INSIDEMEMPHISBUSINESS.COM.

One Memphis: A Monthly Interfaith Musical Celebration To promote and foster unity, love, acceptance, and understanding with the goal of creating a city in harmony. Sun., May 20, 4-6 p.m. W.C. HANDY PARK, BEALE AT THIRD, WWW.BEALESTREET.COM/ONEMEMPHIS.

Peabody Rooftop Parties

Live music and beautiful views of the sun setting over the Mississippi River. Ladies get in free before 7 p.m. Visit website for scheduled entertainment. 21+ $10-$15. Thursdays, 6-10 p.m. Through Aug. 16. THE PEABODY HOTEL, 149 UNION (529-4000), WWW.PEABODYMEMPHIS. COM.

Symphony in The Rose Garden

VR Gaming Date Night

Concert by Germantown Symphony. Followed by dinner for added ticket purchase. $30-$60. Sun., May 20, 5 p.m.

$20. Fridays, 6-10 p.m.

HISTORIC HOME OF BOB AND MARY JEAN SMITH, 156 WEST POPLAR, WWW.HARRELLTHEATRE.ORG.

FO O D & D R I N K EVE NTS

Toward Justice: A CityWide Upstanders’ Project

Bourbon and Jazz with Quelude

Memphis-based leaders come together to present this project featuring keynote speaker Bob Zellner who was active in the civil rights movement, art exhibitions and a film screening. Free. Tuesdays, Thursdays, 8 a.m.-8 p.m. Through May 31.

MEMPHIS JEWISH COMMUNITY CENTER, 6560 POPLAR (761-0810), WWW. JCCMEMPHIS.ORG.

“The Trail of Tears: Andrew Jackson and the Cherokee Nation”

Lecture and pop-up exhibit. Amanda Lee Savage of University of Memphis, will speak. Part of a series of lectures and pop-up exhibits commemorating Andrew Jackson’s 250th birthday. Thurs., May 17, 5:307:30 p.m. MEMPHIS PINK PALACE MUSEUM, 3050 CENTRAL (636-2362), WWW. MEMPHISMUSEUMS.ORG.

U-Pick Strawberries

Through May 17, 8 a.m.-6 p.m. AGRICENTER INTERNATIONAL, 7777 WALNUT GROVE (757-7777), WWW. AGRICENTER.ORG/STRAWBERRIES.

True Story:

BLUFF CITY VIRTUAL REALITY, 1026 N GERMANTOWN PKWY (585-5964).

Soothe Sunday away with mellow jazz played along with hip hop and trap beats. $3 Four Roses Bourbon drinks all day. 21+ Free. Sundays, 2:30-5:30 p.m. Through June 24. BELLE TAVERN, 117 BARBORO ALLEY (249-6580).

Flight Tour: A Taste of Memphis

Up to 16 people per bike enjoy a flight of local spirits and brew during this two-hour pub-crawl with Sprock n’ Roll’s bike bar to Old Dominick Distillery and Ghost River Brewing Tap Room. BYOB, but no glass. $315 - $400. Thursdays, 4-7 p.m., Fridays, Saturdays, 12-8 p.m., and Sundays, 12-5 p.m. Through Dec. 31. DOWNTOWN MEMPHIS, VARIOUS LOCATIONS (500-7101), WWW.SPROCKNROLLMEMPHIS.COM.

The Grand Artisans’ Dinner + Grand Auction

Host chefs Andy Ticer and Michael Hudman are featuring chefs Ryan Prewitt from Peche, Breanne Kostyk from Josephine Estelle, and others along

Royal Wedding Celebration at Celtic Crossing

Say cheers to the newlyweds with $5 off our seasonal wine bottles and $23 mimosa carafes all day. Sat., May 19, 10:30-3 a.m. CELTIC CROSSING, 903 S. COOPER (274-5151).

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F O O D B y A r i L e Va u x

Lentil Love of them. Unless you are cool with a bowl of green-brown, bland gruel that may also be too crunchy, it’s worth mastering a few basic concepts and learning the potential scope of lentil cookery. Sometimes I want more lentil power and less mush, and that’s when I make a pot of rasam, a soup that’s based on the cloudy water leftover from cooking lentils. The lentils themselves are a byproduct. It’s analogous to the making of a bone or vegetable stock. Eventually, the carcass gives up so much of its goodness that it’s essentially spent, devoid of flavor and nutrients, all of which fled to the broth. Deep down, everyone feels a nourishing vibe from lentils. But sometimes, the soothing lentil flavor for which you thirst in your bones can be elusive to conjure into the kitchen. I find the flavor and feeling of rasam, a South Indian drink, or soup, depending on how it’s served, is what I want from lentils. No less fulfilling than a bowl of chicken soup, rasam is made with lentil broth, flavored with ground spices and two sources of sour, and balanced with fat, and a fragrant garnish. I learned about rasam from a yogi named Norman, who lived in India for decade, earning a Masters of Indology from the University of Mysore. Rasam soup, Norman explained, is something of a power drink for Brahmans, which are the elitists of the caste system. The caste system is messed up, but that doesn’t change the fact that Brahman food can be dazzling. They drink rasam multiple times a day, he said. In addition to the lentil water and spices, what makes rasam so electrifying is the combination of sour flavors from both tomato or tamarind. When Norman

taught me the ways, we happened to be standing under a tamarind tree, and made a paste of fresh tamarind pods mashed in water. For those without fresh tamarind, Knorr brand tamarind soup powder is a great substitute. Mix a tablespoon of that powder into a cup of water for each batch of rasam. The tomatoes can be fresh, cut into cubes, or from a can — if so, include the water. I use my frozen roasted tomato sauce. If you don’t have tomatoes and tamarind, you can substitute for one of them with fresh lemon or lime juice. It won’t be the same, but it will be good. As for the spices, Norman claims not to use exact proportions, but I can tell you the ingredients and get you close enough to follow your own taste. In a heavy pan with no oil, toast a tablespoon each of cumin and coriander seed, two tablespoons mustard seeds (yellow and/or brown), a teaspoon of black peppercorns, and five fenugreek seeds (careful, they are bitter!). Keep the pan moving, toasting until the mustard seeds start to pop. Crush the spices in a mortar and pestle or spice grinder, along with powdered red chile pepper. That is your rasam powder. To prepare the lentil water, soak a cup of lentils in a pot of water for 10 minutes. Stir, discard floaters with the water, and add two or three quarts of cold water. Simmer for 30 minutes. Split, aka decorticated lentils, have their skins removed and cook faster, producing a creamier broth. Whole lentils, like black

belugas, which look like shiny drops of caviar, produce a thinner, darker broth that’s no less rich. When the lentil water, spices, and sour flavors have been assembled, heat a pan with oil or butter on medium heat, and add half an onion, flat side down, along with the tomato, tamarind water, and three or so tablespoons rasam powder. Bring to a simmer and add the lentil water. Simmer. Adjust salt. Maybe add some garlic powder (and fresh curry leaves if you have them). That’s about it. At least, that’s all it needs to be. But this point is also a gateway of sorts. Rasam can be a base in which to cook veggies, like cauliflower or potatoes, until tender. You can also add some of the cooked lentils back to the rasam to make it thicker, or make rasam with more than one type of lentil. Just don’t be afraid to add fat. It needs to be there to balance the acid and spices. Butter or ghee are traditionally used. Coconut milk is amazing. Bacon, inexplicably, not so much. I serve it simply, in a bowl with chopped cilantro and a dollop of mayo. As for the lentils themselves, that dense mushy byproduct from the preparation of lentil water, I sneak it into things. Scrambled eggs handle it well — especially the yellow lentils. Of course, you can make dal. But I’ve been enjoying a hummus-like dip, made in the food processor with olive oil, fresh garlic, tahini, salt, and lemon. For extra flavor, I look no further than my fresh rasam powder.

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am SO PUMPED TO EAT LENTILS! Said basically no-one, ever. At least in my bubble of America. But the more I look into this sentiment, or lack thereof, the less sense it makes. As I write these words, I am full of lentils. Not bloated but satisfied, with a tangy, savory lingering aftertaste. Pound for pound, lentils represent about the most human nutrition one could wring from the earth. They pack more protein than any plant that isn’t soy and are easier to digest. A serving of lentils contributes huge amounts of folate, iron, and other minerals, twice the anti-oxidants of blueberries, and about half your daily fiber needs. Even a thin-soiled, poorly watered field can produce a crop of lentils, which is why entire societies have been built of their thick mortar. The tough determination of a lentil plant is appealing, and being legumes, each successive crop can improve the health of the soil. India, which grows more than 50 varieties of lentil and consumes half of the world’s supply, is one of the few places I’ve visited where vegetarian options are more appealing than meat-based, thanks in part to the lentil action. In North America, most lentils are grown in the upper Columbia River basin, but they are migrating east, over the continental divide and onto the Northern Plains, where grain farmers are planting rotations of lentils to build soil. Being so good for the soil, the lentils themselves are almost a bonus, a byproduct of a healthy cropland system. And something similar can be said about lentils in the kitchen: a lentil-based meal need not contain many

m e m p h i s f l y e r. c o m

Nothing but respect for this super legume.

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DeltaARTS Presents

Sundays with the Arts

Hues of Hughes

A celebration of the poetry of Langston Hughes and the Harlem Renaissance, choreographed and presented by Emma Crystal and Company

Sunday, May 20th 3:00 pm

DeltaARTS Glenn P. Schoettle Arts Education Center 301 S. Rhodes, West Memphis Made possible by a grant from the H.W. Durham Foundation

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JOIN US FOR DANCING, DRINKS AND THE BEST DOWNTOWN VIEW IN TOWN. PEABODY ROOFTOP PARTY NEXT THURSDAY, MAY 24 6-10PM 30


BAR REPORT By Meghan Stuthard

JUSTIN FOX BURKS

A

h, Overton Square! The revitalization of the Midtown entertainment district has led to so many shiny new restaurants with their adorable branding and goofy mottos. While tiny food items and hilariously named drinks can be cool sometimes, that newness leaves some of us craving a real bar, the kind where the bartender rolls his eyes and people don’t ask for chasers. Fortunately, Overton Square is still home to one such bar, attached but separate from the Bayou Bar & Grill. Formerly named Le Chardonnay, it went through a couple additional name changes before the owners settled on the Bayou Bistro. Those of us who frequent it, however, still refer to it affectionately as Le Chard. Le Chardonnay has existed alongside the Bayou for the entirety of the Bayou’s existence, tucked away in the corner to be enjoyed by those in the service industry well before Overton Square started looking like a carnival ride. It’s a secret hideout from the glitz and specialty burgers; it’s a simple place to enjoy beers for under $3 and avoid guacamole completely. The thing that’s most appealing about Le Chard is that it’s a bar for those who just had “one of those days.” It’s dimly lit, its ceilings are low, the music doesn’t suck, and it’s only open at night. You can squirrel yourself away in a corner with a whiskey neat and rest assured that the only person who will bother you is the one guy whose day was worse than yours. On top of that, your bartender will likely commiserate with you. Scott, who mans the bar three nights a week, also fronts a Smiths cover band, Louder Than Bombs. If you can’t talk to a guy that spends a couple nights a week emulating Morrissey about your problems, then I don’t know who you can talk to. Tyler and Megan round out the crew that holds down the bar. For a good time, watch them deal with an unruly patron. Live vicariously through them as they say everything to some drunk asshole that you’ve ever wanted to say but didn’t want to get punched or fired for saying. Though dimly lit and slightly smoky (they permit smoking after 9 p.m., when they become 21-plus), it does have the modern amenities that holes-in-the-wall need in 2018, like several large TVs. Le Chard is a perfect place to watch a game because the bar is decently sized with televisions at both ends. Also, it doesn’t typically get busy in there until after 9 p.m., so you’re guaranteed a seat when games

begin around 7. The bar is home to many diehard Griz fans who gather to watch games during the season (though to be fair, after this season, probably every bar in the city was home to diehard Griz fans). The bar shares a menu with the Bayou, so you can order your po’boys and enjoy them in relative silence without having to deal with Bayou crowds. You can even enjoy said po’boy from the comfort of a couch next to the fireplace, another fine amenity unique to Le Chard. Heading into summer months, it’s important to know the location of all shady patios, and Le Chard has one of Memphis’ best. It’s to the side of the building under a canopy of wisteria. Like the inside, it’s dim in there due to being completely shaded by the vines. It’s not often crowded because no one knows about it. Wow your friends by taking them to a secret spot where you can nurse your hangover on a breezy patio, free of judgment.

Bayou Bistro, aka Le Chard

Le Chard has a full bar available, plus all the draft beers that are offered by the Bayou’s bar. When I say “full bar,” remember that I’m talking about a bar where you go when you’ve had “one of those days.” So don’t walk in there ordering a frosé just because the patio is cute. Order a whiskey and loudly complain about your neighbors, as God and Le Chardonnay intended. Le Chard remains unique in Overton Square because the joints are shutting down in favor of the new places. Support your local joints and go tie one on with the crew that still remembers when Overton Square was a ghost town. I’ll buy you your first shot.

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In Capote’s short story “The Bargain,” written in 1950, lost, and finally published in 2004, a character reminiscing about her ex-husband recalls how “we used to go down to the brook and pick mint and make mint juleps, huge ones in fruit jars.” Elsewhere, Capote wrote that “there is nothing better than a mint julep to bring relief from the pressures and pains of summertime.” Mint juleps aren’t just for horse races. The drinks are as de rigueur as the Stella “shouting contest” at New Orleans’ annual Tennessee Williams Festival, held annually in late March. And at Rowan Oak, Faulkner’s Oxford, Mississippi, home, visitors can glimpse his battered metal julep cup, which is displayed in a glass case alongside an empty bottle of Four Roses bourbon. Yet the best — and most frequently cited — literature on the mint julep belongs to a Kentucky colonel-turned-newsman named Joshua Soule Smith, who penned an ode to the cocktail in 1890. In it, he described the bourbon and mint as “lovers” and declared reverently of the julep that “even the nectar of the Gods is tame beside it.”

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With global climate change bringing sultry temperatures and stifling humidity levels to Memphis earlier every year, I’m tempted to escape into a mint julep fog by the end of May and not emerge again until mid-October. Served in a regular highball glass, the cocktail is coolly refreshing. Better yet, pour it into a traditional metal julep cup — I like the charm of used sterling silver cups found on ebay or at an antiques store, although you can easily purchase brand-new cups at WilliamsSonoma, Pottery Barn, or Crate and Barrel. Stick in the freezer for a bit after mixing your drink, so that the cup frosts and the bourbon blend turns into an icy slush. Give it at least 20 minutes — make dinner or take the dog for a walk in the interim.

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few weeks ago, I spent a Saturday afternoon perched on a stool at the long wooden bar at Café 1912. Friends and I watched the parade of thoroughbred horses lining up to run the 2018 Kentucky Derby, sipping on mint juleps that ace bartender Tyler Morgan prepared for us. Morgan plucked mint from a fresh, aromatic bouquet perched on the bar in honor of the occasion. He also made certain to use Woodford Reserve, the small-batch Kentucky bourbon brand that, these days, sponsors the $2 million-purse horse race won this year by a chestnut colt named Justify. When I threw back my drink, the rich, syrupy flavor instantly reminded me of the very first time I tasted a mint julep. It must’ve been 25 years ago — sometime in the early-to-mid 1990s. The year might be hazy, but I remember exactly where I was when I tried it. Well, maybe not exactly — I was in a shotgun house that belonged to friends-of-friends in the Bywater neighborhood of New Orleans. We’d spent the evening at the Hi-Ho Lounge, then, when the bar closed, headed there instead of returning to my friends’ place in Gentilly. Someone had suggested juleps, and it seemed like a perfectly Southern thing to do. We had bourbon and sugar. Some of us wandered up the street to clip mint from a neighbor’s herb garden. Another of us mournfully noted the scant handful of ice cubes languishing in the freezer, and headed to the corner store for a fresh bag of ice. Our hostess stood at the stove, making simple syrup which had to chill before we could mix our drinks. I was tired, and the wait seemed interminable. I think the sun was coming up by the time we were finally able to toast each other with cups filled with macerated mint, simple syrup, bourbon, and crushed ice. It was worth the wait — and the cocktail’s loose affiliation with the sport of kings brought me luck the next afternoon, when, at the fairgrounds, I won nearly $100 on a $2 trifecta. Mint juleps have been around since the mid-18th century, when they were prescribed as a remedy for stomach ailments, although the drink’s origins harken all the way back to the Middle East, where thirsty Arabs would order a julab, or rose-water drink. The lions of the Southern literary canon — William Faulkner, Tennessee Williams, and Truman Capote — all wrote of their fondness for mint juleps.

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FILM REVIEW By Ben Siler

Mom Alone Gabrielle Union stars in the home invasion thriller Breaking In.

V

iolence is thrilling in a fictional setting. When heroes visit violence upon malcontents, the audience living vicariously through them gets feelings of triumph. This is all cover, so that we can assert murderousness in a safe space where it won’t hurt anyone and go home having let loose our bloodlust. A particularly good cover is protecting the family unit. Breaking In, a home-invasion thriller produced by and starring Gabrielle Union, is paint-by-the-numbers. Exactly what you expect to happen, happens, but there is charm in its efficiency. Shaun (Union) travels with two

kids to the countryside to close up her murdered father’s estate in order to sell it. A quartet of thieves is already there, intent upon getting past his state-of-the-art surveillance system, and Union must use all her strength to defeat them and save her children. No time is wasted on her father’s murder, Shininglike shots of her car on long roads, a brief setup of the generic siblings’ relationship, or images of Shaun looking at her father’s coffee cups and broken picture frames set to sad piano music. In order to establish its use for later, her son (Seth Carr) is shown flying a drone through the house. Then people start getting grabbed and dragged into shadows, and we’re off. The villains are familiar: They consist of a beleaguered pro who has seen it all (Billy Burke), the eager-to-murder wild card (Richard Cabral), an inexperienced youth having second thoughts (Levi Meaden), and a fourth (Mark Furze) whose most distinguishing feature is looking like Gordon Freeman from Half-Life, with thickrimmed glasses and a crowbar. They are introduced bickering and proceed to follow the procedurally unsound steps by which homicidal thieves regularly underestimate working moms. Burke is best, with majestic

Gabrielle Union (above) and Billy Burke (below, left) star in James McTeigue’s Breaking In. swooped-back hair and a weak beard. He alternates between the weariness of a guy who has seen this all before and Bond-suave pronouncements like “I imagine in this moment you’re wondering whether you and your kids will make it out alive,” and “You’re a woman alone at the mercy of strangers. Your greatest weakness is trapped inside the house.” (He means her kids.) As the odds increase in Shaun’s favor, several of his lines are repeated back to him. The conversational throughline among his compatriots is calling Shaun “bitch.” The audience at my screening was wry. The robbers were a little too hapless for them: They laughed at odd looks on their faces and unintentional moments of awkwardness. Sometimes even the appearance of Meaden’s character, with his dyed yellow hair and unthreatening demeanor, would bring the house down. One such moment was when he began to dry off safecracking electronics Shaun had submerged in a sink full of water, presumably because it was a stupid, hopeless

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FILM REVIEW By Ben Siler in art that we can find catharsis through violence. Besides the fun of seeing this with an audience perfectly keyed into the familial triumph it was selling, I surmised from Union’s producer credit that it was a personal story she wanted to tell. I watch a lot of amateur true crime stories on Youtube, which I find fascinating. There’s no quicker way to remind oneself of the vastness of our world: the unknown and unexplained dead branch out in every direction, in endless patterns. It’s good to find meaning in crime instead of mystery — and to see a person purposefully tell the story of making one’s way back from trauma. Breaking In Now playing Multiple locations

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task. (The audience even laughed at the final image of the film, probably because of the extreme lateness of police arrival.) Union is good as a sexual assault survivor, which brings an emotional, personal undercurrent to scenes of her being attacked and thrown about by the different men. Her hard-won eventual dominance over them was also cheered. The script gave her triumphant lines like, “You broke into the wrong fucking house” and “I’m just a mom,” and my fellow viewers got it. On leaving, they noted happily she was a “mean momma,” and the intruders’ mistake was getting near a “lion and her cubs.” As Union wrote about her own history in regards to the controversy around The Birth of A Nation in 2016, assault in real life produces post-traumatic stress disorder, from which she suffers. It’s only

35


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Hospitality/ Restaurant CAMY’S IS NOW HIRING ALL POSITIONS: Asst. Managers, Drivers, Cooks. Apply in person 2886 Walnut Grove Rd. Anytime. No Phone Calls. _____________________

RAFFERTY’S We are looking for service minded individuals, that don’t mind working hard. We work hard, but make $. Apply in the store. 505 N Gtown Pkwy SALSA COCINA MEXICANA Mexican Restaurant in East Memphis is looking for Servers & Hostess We are looking for Servers and Hostess with prior experience. Must have flexible schedule and be able to work 4-5 shifts lunch and or dinner weekly. Experience is preferred but will train the right person with the right attitude towards learning and growing from

within the restaurant. Hourly pay is negotiable upon hiring for Hostess. Discounted employees meals, fast upbeat environment. We have 26yrs of business in the same location serving East Memphis guests and will need servers of which we do promote from within long term and for the upcoming season. Apply in person at 6150 Poplar Ave, Memphis, TN 38119 _____________________ YOUNG AVE DELI is looking for experienced cooks. Part time and full time opportunity available. Must be able to work in the evenings. Must be able to work on Sunday. Pay will be based on experience. Come by the Deli to fill out an application. 2119 Young Avenue 38104

EVELYN & OLIVE Jamaican and Southern Cuisine is now hiring for Wait Staff & Kitchen Help. Apply in person, Mon-Fri between 2-4pm. 630 Madison Ave Memphis, TN 38103. _____________________ PORCH & PARLOR IN MIDTOWN Southern Social and Flight are excited to open our newest restaurant, Porch & Parlor in Midtown. Now hiring all positions including Executive Chef, servers, bartenders, and greeters. Please submit all resumes to porchandparlorjobs@gmail.com _____________________

Volunteer Opportunities

CENTRAL GARDENS 2BR/1BA, hdwd floors, ceiling fans, french doors, all appls incl. W/D, 9ft ceil, crown molding, off str pking. $750/mo. Also Large 1BR, $720/ mo. 833-6483 or 569-0847.

IF YOU’RE A GOOD READER and can volunteer to do so please call 901-832-4530

Midtown Apt CENTRAL GARDEN TOWNHOUSE 209 S. IDLEWILD Very private. Avail. Aug.10th. 1400 sq ft. 2 br h/w Floors. Large closets. 11/2 Baths. L/D combo. Den with adjoining patio. W/D Furnished. Fans. Covered Parking. Yard service furnished. 25x35 private Side yard. $1,150 per month. 901-682-6008 _____________________

EVERGREEN HIST. DIST. XL Studio $395, remodeled, hardwood floors, screened porch, pets ok. Great neighbors. Only 1 apt available. $25 cc fee. 452-3945

Shared Housing 309 N. MONTGOMERY Room for rent with reduced rate for housekeeping assistance. Call Walter 288-7512. _____________________

RES TAU R A N T SU PPLY

FREEZER ASSOCIATES, STOCKERS, & CASHIERS

RAFFERTY’S HIRING - Servers & Dayshift Greeters Are you a hardworking & service mindedindividual that loves to smile & earn $$ Join us @ #65 4542 Poplar AveApply Now www.raffertys.com _____________________

POSITIONS AVAILABLE

If you have a strong work ethic and a good attitude, we would like to hear from you. Apply in person or send email to jobs@litsupply.com

Request for Proposal and Contract

Nonprofit School Food Service Vended Meal Services Freedom Preparatory Academy Freedom Preparatory Academy (FPA) will receive sealed bids for School Lunches, and Breakfast that meet USDA and State requirements for reimbursement. Bidders are invited to submit bids on the enclosed forms based on the specifications supplied by the District. The bid covers the furnishing of pre-portioned breakfast and lunch, inclusive of milk for the 2018-2019 school year. A pre-bid conference will not be held. All questions regarding the bid solicitation contract can email to Teresa Thornton at tthornton@freedomprep.org. Bids must be received in the FPA office at 964 Fields Rd. Memphis TN 38109 no later than 3:00 p.m. on May 25, 2018 at 3:00 pm.. Bids received after the time specified will be rejected, and returned to the bidder unopened. The opening of bids will be conducted in a closed meeting.

APARTMENT FOR RENT • MIDTOWN•

129 Stonewall # 1

LIT ON UNION 309 Union Avenue, Memphis, TN 38103 LIT JR. ON SUMMER 2965 Summer Avenue, Memphis, TN 38112 LIT JR. ON WINCHESTER 1665 Winchester Road, Memphis, TN 38116 LIT JR. ON AUSTIN PEAY 3292 Austin Peay Highway Memphis, TN 38128

Laurie Stark • 28 Years of Experience

• Life Member of the Multi Million Dollar Club • From Downtown to Germantown • Call me for your Real Estate Needs

2 Bedroom 1.5 Bath Apartments

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183 Beale St

$775 Rent

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$775 Deposit

Call 901-430-4117 for appointment rentmsh.com Enterprise Realtors Inc | 901-867-1000

www.hobsonrealtors.com

(901)761-1622 • Cell (901)486-1464


REAL ESTATE • SERVICES

Contact 901.820.4367 Contact 901.820.4367 For More Information Contact 901.820.4367 For More Information renshawpropertymanagement.com For More Information renshawpropertymanagement.com renshawpropertymanagement.com

FURNISHED ROOMS Bellevue/McLemore, Stage Rd/ Covington Pike, Airways/Park. W/D, Cable TV/Phone. 901-485-0897 _____________________ MIDTOWN ROOM for rent near Medical District. Fridge, utilities, wifi, $100/week + dep. No Drugs. 901-725-0895. _____________________ NICE ROOMS FOR RENT S. Pkwy & Wilson. Utilities and Cable included. Fridge in your room. Cooking and free laundry privileges. Some locations w/sec. sys. Starting at $435/mo. + dep. 901.922.9089

General Housing For Rent 1215 TULLY For rent: North Memphis - Close to Downtown. 3BR/1BA. W/D connection, CH/A, $680/mo + optional $32.00 alarm fee. Call 901-239-4419. Ready to rent to good tenant.

Services DENIED CREDIT?? Work to Repair Your Credit Report With The Trusted Leader in Credit Repair. Call Lexington Law for a FREE credit report summary & credit repair consultation. 855-620-9426. John C. Heath, Attorney at Law, PLLC, dba Lexington Law Firm. (AAN CAN)

VW • AUDI MINI•PORSCHE

German Car Experts Mini • Porsche Factory Trained Experience Independent Prices

4907 Old Summer Rd.

(Corner of Summer & Mendenhall)

REQUEST FOR PROPOSAL AND CONTRACT Nonprofit School Food Service Vended Meal ServicesFreedom Preparatory AcademyFreedom Preparatory Academy (FPA) will receive sealed bids for School Lunches, and Breakfast that meet USDA and State requirements for reimbursement. Bidders are invited to submit bids on the enclosed forms based on the specifications supplied by the District. The bid covers the furnishing of pre-portioned breakfast and

Massage TOM PITMAN, LMT Massage The Way You Like It. Swedish/Deep Tissue - Relaxation, Hot Stones. Credit Cards. Call 761-7977. tompitmanmassage.com, tom@tompitmanmassage.com _____________________ WILLIAM BREWER Massage Therapist (Health & Wellness offer) 377-6864

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Also Servicing

1103 S. COOPER

1 CEMETERY PLOT For Sale in Memorial Park Cemetery, Memphis. Call Barbara @ 662-996-7117

lunch, inclusive of milk for the 2018-2019 school year.A prebid conference will not be held. All questions regarding the bid solicitation contract can email to Teresa Thornton attthornton@ freedomprep.org. Bids must be received in the FPA office at 964 Fields Rd. Memphis TN 38109 no later than 3:00 p.m. on May 25, 2018 at 3:00 pm.. Bids received after the time specified will be rejected, and returned to the bidder unopened. The opening of bids will be conducted in a closed meeting.

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Call 901-272-7252 or 901-272-8658

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Kismet Property

Kismet Property

3707 Macon Rd. • 272-9028 lecorealty.com Visit us online, call, or office for free list.

Houses & Duplexes for Rent ALL AREAS Visit us @ www.lecorealty.com come in, or call Leco Realty, Inc. @ 3707 Macon Rd. 272-9028

MERTON MANOR APARTMENTS

2bedroom/1 bath $595 3bedroom/2 bath $750 Laundry facility on-site. Gated community. Call 272-8658 or cell 281-4446 Kismet Property

TAXES *2018 Tax Change Benefits* Personal/Business + Legal Work By a CPA-Attorney Practicing in Midtown & Memphis Since 1989

(901) 272-9471 1726 Madison Ave

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CLASSIFIEDS memphisflyer.com

127 MADISON 127 AVE.MADISON #701 127 MADISON AVE. #701 Memphis, TN AVE. #701 Memphis, TN 38103 Memphis, TN 38103 2BD/2BA - 1400 38103 2BD/2BA - 1400 sq. ft. 2BD/2BA - 1400 sq. ft. $1895/mo. sq. ft. $1895/mo. Includes all $1895/mo. Includes all appliances Includes all appliances appliances 245 MADISON 245 AVE.MADISON #503 245 MADISON AVE. #503 Memphis, TN AVE. #503 Memphis, TN 38103 Memphis, TN 38103 Available: 6/1/2018 38103 Available: 1BD/1BA -6/1/2018 /912 sq. Available: 6/1/2018 1BD/1BA /912 sq. ft. 1BD/1BA /912 sq. ft. $1150/mo. ft. $1150/mo. Includes all $1150/mo. Includes all appliances Includes all appliances appliances 245 MADISON 245 AVE.MADISON #604 245 MADISON AVE. #604 Memphis, TN AVE. #604 Memphis, TN 38103 Memphis, TN 38103 1BD/1BA - 1150 38103 1BD/1BA - 1150 sq. ft. 1BD/1BA - 1150 sq. ft. $1175/mo. Includes sq. ft. $1175/mo. Includes all appliances $1175/mo. Includes all appliances $0 app fee & ½ all appliances $0 app mo fee with & ½18 off 3rd $0 app mo fee with &½ off 3rd mo lease & split18 off 3rd mo with mo lease & split18 deposit mo lease & split deposit deposit 66 MONROE AVE. 66 MONROE AVE. #1007 66 MONROE AVE. #1007 Memphis, TN #1007 Memphis, TN 38103 Memphis, TN 38103 1BD/1.5BA - 1017 38103 1BD/1.5BA - 1017 sq. ft. 1BD/1.5BA - 1017 sq. ft. $1595/mo. Includes sq. ft. $1595/mo. Includes all appliances $1595/mo. Includes all appliances Workout facility, all appliances Workout facility, Indoor Pool & Workout facility, Indoor Pool & Sauna Indoor Pool & Sauna Sauna 655 RIVERSIDE 655 RIVERSIDE DR. #304B 655 RIVERSIDE DR. #304B Memphis, TN DR. #304B Memphis, TN 38103 Memphis, TN 38103 1BD/1BA - 1054 38103 1BD/1BA - 1054 sq. ft. 1BD/1BA - 1054 sq. ft. $1400/mo. sq. ft. $1400/mo. $1400/mo.

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THE LAST WORD by Jen Clarke

Chill Out, Ladies

m e m p h i s f l y e r. c o m

I’ve never been a victim of racism. I recognize it. I speak out against it when I witness it. But I don’t know how it feels. There’s no Virtual Reality Blackness Simulator, no curriculum of deep conversations and Ta-Nehisi Coates articles and Kendrick Lamar records that can duplicate the African-American experience. I can listen and empathize, but I don’t really know what it’s like to be Latino or Native American or Asian, either. I can, however, speak to my own experiences as a 30-something white woman, which qualifies me to ask my fellow white ladies: Did no one tell y’all not to play on the phone? Because you’re tying up the line and wasting everyone’s time. Please leave your homes, make some new friends, and find another hobby besides busy-bodying. And for everybody’s sake, stop calling the police every time you see a person who doesn’t look like you out living life. Innocent people are getting hurt. Just in the past few weeks, police have responded to complaints of black people waiting in Philly and golfing elsewhere in Pennsylvania, checking out of an Airbnb in L.A., shopping at Nordstrom Rack in Missouri, and grilling out at a park in Oakland. Two Native American teens were hassled on a college tour. These incidents are just the ones we’ve heard about. No laws were broken. No, it’s not new, but the list of asinine reasons non-white people have to justify themselves to the police in 2018 keeps reaching new levels of shamefulness. Some people need their telephone privileges revoked, starting with the Yale student who called the cops on a black grad student who dozed off in a common area in her own dorm. The alleged criminal catnapper was awakened by officers who had been told she appeared “out of place” in the building. I don’t know how they do things in the Ivy League, but I was a pro napper in college — in my car, in the UC, in the newspaper office, in the library and probably some other buildings that have been torn down. Either someone “smart” enough to get into Yale couldn’t deduce that a sleeping woman surrounded by books and papers is catching a few quick Zs between paragraphs, or … Things must be going pretty well in Philadelphia if police have the time and manpower to enforce Starbucks’ loitering policy. That policy doesn’t prevent patrons from buying the smallest cup of drip and availing themselves of free wifi all day long, but two black guys grabbing a table before ordering is a reason to get law enforcement involved within minutes? I stopped at the location at Poplar and White Station for an afternoon latté not long ago and saw a woman camped out at a table, eating a meal she’d obviously brought from home. I’m not talking about a purse granola bar, either. She busted out the Tupperware and aluminum foil, right in the middle of the coffee shop. I would have called CrimeStoppers if I’d known it was that serious. Then again, I’m no angel — I’ve used the Starbucks restroom without buying anything in multiple cities. Once, I sat down and charged my phone for about 10 minutes while I pretended to wait for somebody. Does that mean I’m a fugitive? No, it means a billion-dollar corporation missed out on about $20. They’ll live. Of course there’s always an excuse. Airbnb lady called because the people checking out didn’t smile or wave at her. Rude, maybe? But not illegal! College tour lady called because the teens showed up late and didn’t answer her questions — in other words, acted like teens. It takes a special kind of entitlement to call the police because a total stranger doesn’t think they owe you their time. Profiling isn’t only dangerous, it’s a waste of law enforcement resources and taxpayers’ money. If I called the police whenever I felt annoyed or uncomfortable, every 6’3” guy who has stood in front of me at a rock show, every driver who doesn’t stop at crosswalks, and every person who checks out with more than 15 items in the express lane at Superlo would be doing hard time. But I don’t do that — because I’m not a monster, and the police aren’t a concierge service. Segregating public spaces is not the police’s job. Helping white people get over their racial grievances? Also not the police’s job, but maybe they should try. Start by saying, “Hey, thanks for calling, but have you considered that this is a you problem, not a them problem? Anyway, call back if you see a crime. That’s more in our wheelhouse.” Jen Clarke is an unapologetic Memphian. Follow @jensized on Twitter.

THE LAST WORD

RONNIE WU | DREAMSTIME.COM

Dialing the police while white has reached epidemic proportions.

39


MINGLEWOOD HALL

JUST ANNOUNCED: JJ Grey & Mofro [9/21] 5/20: SCM Awards 6/14: Ledisi w/ Melanie Fiona & Tweet 6/16: V3Fights MMA 6/28: Trixie Mattel 9/20: SuicideGirls 11/1: Gary Clark Jr

Celebrating 75 Years JUST ANNOUNCED:

Wed May 30 – Man of the Woods Afterparty w/ DJ Freestyle Steve Sat June 2 – Daisyland presents: Borgore Thu June 7 – YFN Lucci Sat June 16 – Downtown Live! w/ Marc Antoine and Kevin Whalum

1884 LOUNGE

6/5: Shaun Martin (Snarky Puppy) 6/6: DOOBIE 6/29: The Steel Woods 7/6: Jason Eady

MORE EVENTS AT MINGLEWOODHALL.COM

UPCOMING:

Fri May 18 - Daisyland presents: Barely Alive and Virtual Riot Wed May 23 - Stone Temple Pilots Fri May 25 - Butcher Babies w/ Cane Hill Sat May 26 - Sevendust Tue June 5 - Big Boi Sun June 17 - Tech N9ne Fri June 22 – Daisyland presents: Blunts and Blondes Sat June 23 – Lyfe Jennings Mon July 2 – Bush Fri Aug 3 - Tory Lanez

Coco & Lola’s

MidTown Lingerie Latest Styles arriving Daily! www.cocoandlolas.com

Finest lace - Coolest place 710 S. Cox|901-425-5912|Mon-Sat 11:30-7:00

NEW DAISY THEATRE | 330 Beale St Memphis 901.525.8981 • Advance Tickets available at NewDaisy.com and Box Office

TUT-UNCOMMON ANTIQUES 421 N. Watkins St. 278-8965 All Rings in stock are 50% OFF throughout May.

1500 sq. ft. of Vintage & Antique Jewelry. Retro Furniture and Accessories. Original Paintings, Sculpture, Pottery, Art & Antiques. We are the only store in the Mid-South that replaces stones in costume jewelry.

YOUNGAVENUEDELI.COM 2119 Young Ave • 278-0034 5/16: $3 Pint Night! 5/17: Memphis Trivia League! 5/19-5/20: Cooper Young Garden Walk 5/25: Drag Show With Goldie Dee

GROWLERS 1911 Poplar | 901growlers.com

Kitchen Open Late! Now Delivering All Day! 278-0034 (limited delivery area)

5/18- The Burners w/ Ciera Skye 5/20- The Tip w/ Liza Colby & Low Society 5/21- Pony Bradshaw 5/22- Cannabis Corpse 5/25- Lionize 5/26- Dead Country Gentleman 5/29- Dance Gavin Dance

MEMPHIS IN MAY POSTERS Rare. Signed. Limited Ed. prints for sale. Italy, Israel, Egypt & others. 901-270-8550.

$CASH 4 JUNK CARS$

ETHEL’S EARTH

Non-Operating Cars, No Title Needed.

Leggings, bikinis, shorts, dresses, shirts, and more. www.ethelsearth.com

901-691-2687

*MATTRESS LIQUIDATION SALE*

ROSIE’S HAULING SERVICE

Queen Sets starting at - $150 First Come First Served Call or Text Mike (901) 426-6616

• Spring Clean Up • Delivery & Pick Up Service • Light Debris & Junk Removal

Call 901.512.7686

BEST CHOICE CARPET CLEANING

MEMPHIS MADE BREWING Tap Room Hours:

SIMPLY HEMP SHOP

3 rooms $49 or up to 600 sqft. 5 rooms $89 or up to a 1000 sqft. Sofa cleaning $49. Call Michael (901) 270-4871 BestCoiceCarpetCleaning@facebook.com

Mon, Thurs & Fri 4-10 p.m., Sat 1-10 p.m., Sun 1-7 p.m.

Come See Us at “The Big One” May 19-20 and the Italian Festival May 31-June 2 We carry CBD oils, CBD honey sticks, CBD Teas & even CBD for Pets. simplyhempshop.com

768 S. Cooper • 901.207.5343 Free brewery tours Saturday & Sunday at 4 p.m

GONER RECORDS

BOOK REPAIR

Have an old book or bible that needs repair? Call Art, 2nd Editions Bookstore at 901.483.0478.

New/ Used LPs, 45s & CDs.

We Buy Records!

2152 Young Ave 901-722-0095 Thur May 17: The Little Things, 6p, Steve Selvidge, 8p Fri May 18: Faux Killas and Yesse Yavis, 8p Sat May 19: Spaceface w/Model Zero, 7p Sun May 20: Roosters & Railcars Brunch Series w/Star & Micey, 12p Fri May 25: The Nightowls, 9p Fri June 1: John Paul Keith, 7:30p Sat June 2: Liz Brasher, 7p Sat June 16: Dale Watson, 7p railgarten.com • 2166 Central Ave • 231-5043

Antiques & Collectibles Antiques & Collectibles 21,000 sq ft. 100 + booths 5855 Summer Ave. (corner of Summer and Sycamore View) exit 12 off I-40 | 901.213.9343 Mon-Sat 10a-6p | Sun 1p-6p

I Buy 45RPM Records & Old Windup Phonographs

CHIP N’ DALE’S ANTIQUES 3457 Summer Avenue • Memphis, TN 38122 EVERYTHING ON SALE! Open Tues-Sat | 901-452-5620 “Celebrating 30 years in Business”

whatevershops.com

And Old 78 RPM’s on labels: Paramount, Okeh, Gennett, Vocalion, Champion, Supertone, Superior, QRS, Black Patti, Perfect, Romeo, Conqueror, Victor, Columbia, Edison, Sun, Meteor, Flip Many others. Call Paul: 901-435-6668

Memphis Flyer 5.17.18  

This week: Michael Donahue serves up true tales of the Memphis in May World Championship Barbecue Cooking Contest! Also: more money for more...

Memphis Flyer 5.17.18  

This week: Michael Donahue serves up true tales of the Memphis in May World Championship Barbecue Cooking Contest! Also: more money for more...