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05.10.18 / 1524th Issue / FREE

Andrea’s Cooktales P30

Tully P34 Cold Cases P6

MELVIN BLEDSOE

JUSTIN FOX BURKS

Radicalized

The tragic tale of a young Memphian who became an Islamic terrorist. And a father who’s trying to heal the wounds.


May 10-17, 2018

MAIN STREET TROLLEY LINE IS NOW BACK IN SERVICE.

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RIDES ARE FREE UNTIL MAY 14. For more information about the Main Street Trolley schedule, go to matatransit.com or call 901.274.MATA(6282).


JUSTIN RUSHING Advertising Director CARRIE O’GUIN Advertising Operations Manager JERRY D. SWIFT Advertising Director Emeritus KELLI DEWITT, CHIP GOOGE Senior Account Executives ROXY MATTHEWS Account Executive DESHAUNE MCGHEE Classified Advertising Manager BRENDA FORD Classified Sales Administrator classifieds@memphisflyer.com LEILA ZETCHI Distribution Manager ROBBIE FRENCH Warehouse and Delivery Manager JANICE GRISSOM ELLISON, ZACH JOHNSON, KAREN MILAM, RANDY ROTZ, LEWIS TAYLOR, WILLIAM WIDEMAN Distribution THE MEMPHIS FLYER is published weekly by Contemporary Media, Inc., 65 Union Avenue, Memphis, TN 38103 Phone: (901) 521-9000 Fax: (901) 521-0129 www.memphisflyer.com CONTEMPORARY MEDIA, INC. KENNETH NEILL Publisher ASHLEY HAEGER Controller JEFFREY GOLDBERG Director of Business Development BRUCE VANWYNGARDEN Editorial Director KEVIN LIPE Digital Director ANNA TRAVERSE Director of Strategic Initiatives LEILA ZETCHI Distribution Manager MOLLY WILLMOTT Special Events Director JOSEPH CAREY IT Director MATTHEW PRESTON Social Media Manager CELESTE DIXON Accounting Assistant BRITT ERVIN Email Marketing Manager KALENA MCKINNEY Receptionist

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COVER - “RADICALIZED” BY MAYA SMITH - 12 WE RECOMMEND - 16 MUSIC - 18 AFTER DARK - 20 CALENDAR - 22 BOOKS - 29 FOOD - 30 SPIRITS - 33 FILM - 34

C L AS S I F I E D S - 36 LAST WORD - 39

• You want fries with that? The answer is always yes. We are not animals. LBOE, the burger spot near Overton Square on Madison, is also in partnership with the Mid-South Food Bank. It started its Fries for Lives in December 2017. For every order of a fries, a meal is provided through the food bank. You can’t beat that. — Susan Ellis Bruce is on vacation. His column returns next week.

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MIDWIFERY GYNECOLOGY

CONTENTS

BRUCE VANWYNGARDEN Editor SUSAN ELLIS Managing Editor JACKSON BAKER, MICHAEL FINGER Senior Editors TOBY SELLS Associate Editor CHRIS MCCOY Film and TV Editor ALEX GREENE Music Editor CHRIS DAVIS, MICHAEL DONAHUE MAYA SMITH, JOSHUA CANNON Staff Writers JESSE DAVIS Copy Editor JULIE RAY Calendar Editor

OUR 1524TH ISSUE 05.10.18 Y’all, Memphis could use more folks taking care of things and getting it done. I’m thinking of people like Tami Sawyer, the force behind the #TakeEmDown901 movement, and Wendi C. Thomas, who created and saw into fruition the MLK50 journalism project. Enter Edward Bogard, who is opening Bogard, an upscale Southern restaurant in the old Stanley BBQ space (and before that Paulette’s) in Overton Square. When it opens sometime in September, Bogard, under the guidance of seasoned restaurateurs Ed Cabagiao and Ben McLean, will serve a selection of Southern dishes, such as shrimp & grits, fried chicken, and mac-and-cheese. Bogard is a creative type. The food should not only be edible but Instagrammable. “It’s going to be not only tasty,” he says. “You’re not going to want to eat it for a while and just take it all in. The plates and the way the food’s presented will be pretty cool.” But this story begins with shoes. In 2009, Bogard started SoGiv, a shoe design company that gives 100 percent of its proceeds to causes fighting everything from Down syndrome to hunger. It was through SoGiv that Bogard hooked up with former Grizzlies head coach Lionel Hollins and his son-in-law Preston Butt Jr., his new partners in Bogard. In keeping with the mission of SoGiv, Bogard, will also be giving back. Specifically, a percentage of the restaurant’s net sales will go to the Mid-South Food Bank. Bogard expects to hand over $30,000 to the Mid-South Food Bank the first year, which translates to 100,000 Edward meals. A percentage of the net Bogard of drink sales is earmarked for clean water as well. There are an estimated 200,000 people in the area who face food insecurity. People who lack sufficient, nutritious food. Bogard aims to alleviate this through his restaurant. “I wanted to do something like [SoGiv] on a more consistent basis,” Bogard says. “People don’t necessarily buy shoes every day, but people eat every day.” Bogard says he saw his path about 10 years ago, and then the pieces started falling into place. It was when the Stanley BBQ site became available that he knew it was meant to be. The name of the spot has always been a part of the vision. Bogard stands for Buy One Get a Rare Dish. “It’s been a vision replaying in my mind for years,” he says. Bogard says he got his creative side from his father, who used to draw him Superman figures. His mother, a teacher, nurtured his philanthropic side. “She would take all of my clothes very much in season and store them in the lockers in her classroom to give to the struggling families throughout the year,” Bogard recalls. “I remember one morning waking up and looking for my favorite outfit, shoes and everything, I see a kid with that outfit on, and I was all ‘Man, I was looking all over for that outfit.’ “My mom was teaching me at a very early age how to pay it forward and how to give back,” Bogard says. Bogard designed a swoosh for his shoes years ago. It comprises seven continents strung together. N E WS & O P I N I O N For Bogard, the swoosh serves as a THE FLY-BY - 4 roadmap. This restaurant in Overton NY TIMES CROSSWORD - 5 Square is just the beginning. He’d like to POLITICS - 8 see one in every city and then in every EDITORIAL - 10 VIEWPOINT - 11 continent.

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May 10-17, 2018

N EVE R E N D I N G E LVI S You know, it’s been a while since we’ve had a good, headline-grabbing Elvis sighting (at least since that silver-ponytailed groundskeeper at Graceland set the Elvisnet ablaze way back in 2016.) Last week, the foxy groundskeeper’s Elvishood met with a serious challenge when U.K. tabloids ran with stories titled, “King of Rock NOT DEAD?,” and “Elvis Presley, spotted ALIVE singing in a church.” The new reports allege that Elvis is pretending to be 61-year-old Pastor Robert Joyce of Benton, Arkansas. “Most of these folks know I am not Elvis, but to them [the people who hear me sing] it doesn’t matter,” Joyce said.

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S I N C LAI R WATC H According to a new report by the political news website Politico, the Sinclair Broadcast Group has been denying, “any interest in challenging Fox News while awaiting approval of a merger with Tribune Co.,” but is “gearing up to do just that.” If the Tribune merger goes through, Sinclair will own 200 local TV stations including Memphis’ WREG, giving the company considerably more reach than the top cable news stations. Sorry, no punchline. MAR S HA, MAR S HA, MAR S HA U.S. Rep. and Senate hopeful Marsha Blackburn thinks President Donald Trump should win the Nobel Peace Prize. That is all.

By Chris Davis. Email him at davis@memphisflyer.com.

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Questions, Answers + Attitude Edited by Toby Sells

W E E K T H AT W A S By Flyer staff

Spinosa, Tiny Homes, & TVA Council member resigns, a new C-Y project, and a new source of energy.

S P I N OSA O UT Philip Spinosa Jr. resigned his post last week on the Memphis City Council to join the Greater Memphis Chamber staff. He also resigned from FedEx, where he worked in sales management for 25 years. Spinosa now serves as the senior vice president of the Chairman’s Circle, which gathers leaders to solve big problems. He did not make any formal announcement to the media nor to his constituents. Remaining council members will vet and name the next member to fill Spinosa’s seat. M O R E TI NY H O M ES Ed Apple, of Apple Partners LLC, applied to the Landmarks Commission last week to build two new “tiny home” concepts in Cooper-Young, at the corner of Tanglewood and York in a sortof-residential, sort-of-industrial area close to railroad tracks. Apple and his partners at Arkansas-based City Cottages already won approval to build 10 of the small homes in CooperYoung. The homes are pre-fabricated at a facility in Arkansas and assembled on site. Apple and Little Custom Homes have argued, though, that the houses aren’t modular homes or trailers. N EW E N E R GY Tennessee Valley Authority’s (TVA) massive Allen Natural Gas Plant went live last week. The plant replaced the coal-burning Allen Fossil Plant. Both are located on Presidents Island. The Allen Fossil Plant was built by Memphis Light, Gas & Water in 1956 and began generating power in 1959. TVA board members approved a budget of $975 million for the new Allen Natural Gas Plant. However, TVA spokesman Scott Brooks said there’s not yet a final tally of the plant’s actual costs.

LO N E L I N E S S “ E P I D E M I C ” Memphians and Americans are lonely. Health insurance giant Cigna issued those findings in a national survey last week and said loneliness is “at epidemic levels in America.” The loneliness rates in Memphis roughly matched national statistics. Half of the Memphians surveyed said they sometimes or always feel that no one really knows them well. Many said they often feel left out, that their relationships aren’t meaningful, or that they feel isolated. B I K E S HAR E C O M ETH Memphis’ new bike share system announced last week it will officially launch on Wednesday, May 23rd. The system will initially have 600 bikes located at 60 stations across the city from Uptown and Downtown to South Memphis and Orange Mound to Overton Square to Cooper-Young. F LY LI K E AN EAG LE Memphis Zoo staffers and agents with the Tennessee Wildlife Resources Agency (TWRA) released a bald eagle back into the wild last week. A TWRA agent discovered the bird in March, lying on railroad tracks in Lauderdale County. He brought it to the zoo, where a blockage was removed from its throat and it was rehabilitated. The Memphis Zoo said it helps rehabilitate an average of three bald eagles a year. “Partnering with the TWRA on this successful recovery has allowed Memphis Zoo to do what we do best — help animals thrive,” said zoo veterinarian Dr. Felicia Knightly. Fuller versions of these stories and even more local news can be found on The News Blog at memphisflyer.com.


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Crossword

Edited by Will Shortz

Edited by Will Shortz

No.

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Gone Cold

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Q&A B y To b y S e l l s

A new nonprofit hopes to help solve cold murder cases in the Mid-South.

Memphis Flyer: How bad is the problem? Jim Adcock: Nationally, there are over about 242,000 [unsolved murders]. So, Memphis is a small drop in the bucket. But Memphis, in the last five years, has had some problems, a rise of cold cases. That’s due, primarily in my view with my expertise, to a lack of manpower and lack of funds. They’re not doing anything wrong; they just can’t. MF: So, you’d offer them money? JA: They’d have to request it and justify it. They would have to have a dedicated unit, and they’d have to be sincere in [what] they’re doing. I’m not just going to write a check arbitrarily. It’s almost like grants. Justify what you want. I’ll run it

before my board. If we all agree, then — boom — you get a check. MF: Why is solving cold cases important? JA: First of all, you’ve got families still out there without answers. Are you just going to tell them that they don’t matter? The other part of it is about getting bad actors off the street. We know they’ve committed more crimes or will commit more crimes most likely. We don’t know that 100 percent. But the odds are, they are going to continue. That’s costing [law enforcement agencies] money, too, because [they] have to respond to these crimes. MF: How does a murder case go cold? JA: [Murders go cold] when it reaches a point where there’s no more viable leads that [investigators] see in the file. Then, it sits in a shelf or a bookcase until something pops up. Then, over time, they get a little crusty, a little dust on them. Then, more cases are added [and are prioritized]. Now it becomes, “I’m too busy to get that because I’m onto this now.” It’s a problem we all have. MF: What would solving some cold cases do for Memphis?

MID-SOUTH COLD CASE INIATIATIVE

Jim Adcock wants you to know that he’s not here to point fingers. But he also wants you to know that Memphis has more than 1,500 homicides that are unsolved. Also, he wants you to know that he is here to help. Adcock served for more than 20 years in the U.S. Army Criminal Investigation Command, was a coroner in South Carolina for a time, taught criminal investigation at the University of New Haven, and is wrapping up work on a best practice guide with the National Institute for Justice (NIJ) Cold Case Working Group. He’s in Memphis now and has established the MidSouth Cold Case Initiative. The nonprofit is designed to provide funds like grants to local law enforcement agencies to fuel cold-case work here. — Toby Sells

Mid-South Cold Case Initiative

JA: It should restore complete confidence in law enforcement, save money, see that justice is served, and provide families with answers. It will also cause [people] to come forward more often to talk. The other side of it is, if this all works, I’m going to write about it where Memphis could become “the model” for others to follow. It’s like a business plan test — it either works or it doesn’t. If successful, the initiative can be applied in other jurisdictions. More about the MSCCI at www.ms-coldcaseinitiative.com

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POLITICS By Jackson Baker

Forest or Trees? In reading the May 1st election totals, it depends on what your eyes are letting you see. Quite innocently, but with a fair amount of confidence, I opined over the weekend in an online column at memphisflyer.com that turnout numbers in the just-concluded countywide primaries had, along with other factors, indicated that the much-discussed national “blue wave” favoring Democrats might be paying a visit in Shelby County in August when the county general election and state and federal primaries are held. On the turnout score, there were 44,768 votes in the Democratic primary for Shelby County Mayor, and 30, 208 in the Republican primary. That’s a difference of 14,000 in the marquee race, and — no offense meant to the gallant and underfunded warhorse Sidney Chism — he wasn’t able to put up much of a fight against the well-supported ultimate Democratic nominee, state Senator Lee Harris.

May 10-17, 2018

The much-discussed “blue wave” favoring Democrats might be paying a visit in Shelby County in August when the county general election and state and federal primaries are held.

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Meanwhile, there had seemed to be a legitimate three-way race for much of the way in the hotly contested and well-financed GOP mayoral primary, involving Trustee David Lenoir, the eventual winner; County Commissioner Terry Roland; and Juvenile Court Clerk Joy Touliatos. A non-race versus a battle royal, as it were. Yet 14,000 more voters turned out for the former than for the latter. A fact which suggested — but did not guarantee — a positive turn in Democratic fortunes for the next round, on August 2nd. Yet a dissent to that idea was soon to come from several sources, including my good friends Steven Reid, a highly successful political consultant, and John Ryder, a bona fide GOP luminary, as well as from Ken Taylor, another consultant and a self-professed “kingmaker.” All of them made much of the fact that the increase in primary voting over the turnout in the 2014 county primaries was larger for Republicans than it was for Democrats.

None of them pointed out the obvious: that four years ago there was a hot three-way race between Democratic mayoral contenders Deidre Malone, Steve Mulroy, and Kenneth Whalum (all “name” candidates), whereas, on the Republican side, incumbent Republican County Mayor Mark Luttrell was opposed by Ernest Lunati, a prototypical non-entity best known, if at all, for a prior pornography conviction. No contest on the GOP side, in other words. Nothing to stimulate turnout. Honestly, the GOP primary-turnout figures of 2014 would have no direction to go but up in 2018. But in the general election of 2014, Mayor Luttrell unsurprisingly generated enough votes, including significant Democratic crossovers, to win out over Democratic nominee Malone. On that reversal of fortune from primary to general, do Messrs. Reid, Ryder, and Taylor stake their case — and never mind the other factors I mentioned in my wrapup piece, including the far larger number of Democratic candidates on the August ballot — a possible clue as to relatively greater commitment this year among Democratic Party activists. We’ll see what we’ll see in August, and certainly local Republicans have a shot at closing the voter gap revealed on May 1st. They’ll have a vigorous GOP governor’s race to generate turnout, for one thing. Their candidates are likely to have more money, for another, and it was disproportionately greater financing, for example, that may have allowed the primary victory of promising newcomer Brandon Morrison over incumbent District 13 Republican Commissioner Steve Basar — not necessarily the superior but unspecified “campaigning” attributed to her (and yes, Morrison, largely unknown previously, is a “her”) by pundit Ryder. It is hard to disregard the warning given his troops, at the very beginning of the current political season by Shelby County Republican chairman Lee Mills: “For years, we’ve been lucky. Since 2010, we’ve been lucky in Shelby County. Thanks to the leadership we’ve had in the past, we’ve had good organization, and we’ve had good candidates. The Democrats, on the other hand, have had just the opposite. They haven’t had good candidates, and they haven’t had good organization. But for the first time in a long time they have both of those things, okay? They have a good organization. They have a good leader. And they have decent candidates at the top that’ll drive all the way down to the bottom. So we have got to turn our voters out. There’s no getting around it.”


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The Memphis Wine + Food Series proudly continues our 26year tradition of bringing together award-winning chefs and prominent vintners for a series of fundraising events that directly impact our museum’s ability to bring art education to some of the most underserved in our community. Please join series chairs Emily and Bradley Rice, Sarah and David Thompson, and all of us at the Brooks this spring!

GRAND ARTISANS’ DINNER Friday, May 18 | 6:30 p.m. Memphis Brooks Museum of Art Tickets: $750 (price includes a seat at the Grand Auction)

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E D ITO R IAL

On Saving IRV President Trump’s act of political sabotage by his cavalier scuttling on Tuesday afternoon of the Joint Comprehensive Plan of Action (JCPOA), more familiarly known as “the Iran Nuclear Deal,” is not the only ongoing case of official political vandalism. There is some in our own midst. There is, for example, the fact that important local initiatives passed overwhelmingly by popular referendum within the past decade are in grave peril of being abrogated. A press conference held Tuesday morning at the IBEW Union Hall by a bipartisan citizens’ group calling itself Save IRV Memphis noted for the record that a 2008 city referendum in favor of IRV (Instant Runoff Voting, aka Ranked Choice Voting) had passed by a 71 percent vote in its favor. In a nutshell, what the IRV process would do is eliminate the costly and illattended runoff elections required under the present system in district elections without a first-round majority winner. In the words of a Save IRV Memphis press release, “IRV requires only one trip to the polls, yet still elects officials with broad bases of support. Voters rank the candidates in order of preference. If no candidate wins a majority of the first place votes, the candidate with the fewest votes is eliminated and those ballots are redistributed according to the preferences of the voter.” Recounting subsequent history, the group pointed out that various opponents of the process, both locally and in the state capital of Nashville, had, through artificial obstacles, including overt misinformation campaigns, contrived to delay implementation of the process ever since; and that a new county Election Coordinator Linda Phillips had swept these misconceptions aside and scheduled a trial of the IRV or RCV process for next year’s Memphis city election.

Thereupon, as the Save IRV group indicated, the incumbent members of the current Memphis City Council adopted a policy of blocking the IRV process at all costs, voting unanimously for a new referendum on the subject this November and meanwhile underhandedly instructing city lobbyists to try to get the General Assembly in Nashville to pass legislation voiding the process statewide. Luckily the legislative sabotage effort failed. What caused the council to act so perversely? Former Councilman Myron Lowery, one of the IRV supporters at the IBEW press conference, provided the answer: incumbent protection, pure and simple. The council members acted against IRV for the same reason they have attempted to subvert another prior citizen referendum establishing a limit of two terms for elected city officials. Lowery, the longest-serving African-American council member ever, also debunked a spurious claim that IRV would be counter to the political needs of blacks. “Race has nothing to do with this process,” Lowery said, conclusively disposing of this red herring. We wish godspeed to the campaign launched Tuesday by Lowery and the other participating members of the Save IRV group, including spokesperson Theryn C. Bond; Tami Sawyer and Sam Goff, the Democratic and Republican candidates for the District 7 County Commission seat; and lawyer John Marek. The bipartisan nature of the Save IRV movement is further indicated by the support given it by Democratic 9th District congressman Steve Cohen and GOP state Senate majority leader Mark Norris.

May 10-17, 2018

C O M M E N TA R Y b y G r e g C r a v e n s

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VIEWPOINT By Ernest Dumas

The Low-Tax Fallacy A neighboring state provides an object lesson in the wrongheadedness of a misguided myth. public and private support to our education system.” It recommended that 90 percent of general revenues above $127 million each year be earmarked for public schools, colleges, and technical schools. The state was dedicating a little more than 50 percent of general revenues for education. Now, it is far less. Yes, they invoked a founding father, the Virginian Thomas Jefferson: “Preach, my dear Sir, a crusade against ignorance; establish and improve the law for educating the common people. Let our countrymen know that . . . the tax that will be paid for this purpose is not more than the thousandth part of what will be paid … if we leave the people in ignorance.” The report scoffed at the popular excuse that spending a lot of money on education was futile, partly because it would take many years to bear fruit.

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One man who took the report to heart was Winthrop Rockefeller, who as head of the new state Industrial Development Commission, had been responsible for such development as the state had experienced the past decade — a bunch of cut-and-sew and other factories that paid minimum wage. He ran for governor four times to implement the study’s solutions: a raft of tax increases to upgrade education and health care, the latter by taking advantage of the new federal Medicaid law. He had given his own money to build a new school in the nearby town of Morrilton and a medical clinic in the hamlet of Perryville. The heavily Democratic (132 to 3) legislature defeated all his taxes, in a regular session and again at a special session. His income tax bill would have raised the top rate from 5 to 12 percent for rich men like him. He left office in 1971 in bitter defeat, remorseful that he had failed to deliver his goal of transforming his adopted state into an educated and prosperous populace. Now, nearly every politician’s dream is to cast votes to cut taxes, the more the better. It is an end unto itself.   Ernest Dumas is a longtime political writer and columnist, whose work is featured in the Arkansas Times. This essay is adapted from his most recent column there.

m e m p h i s f l y e r. c o m

Industry often located in states with higher taxes, they said, because low taxes “may indicate a low level of the community’s services that are necessary for industry to be profitable.”

NEWS & OPINION

The most egregious fallacy of our time is the idea — one repeated endlessly in this and any other election year — that the key to economic development — the creation of business and the movement of people — is lower taxes. Despite numerous experiments with the idea, in Washington and a number of states, including Arkansas, it almost never works out that way and often makes things worse, as we have seen recently in Louisiana, Kansas, West Virginia, and Oklahoma. The other day, I pulled my dusty copy of Accelerating Economic Growth in Arkansas off the shelf. It had been 50 years since I studied the 186-page tome, written in 1964 by the Arkansas Economic Expansion Study Commission, a blue-ribbon group of 11 conservative businessmen and a country lawyer who were commissioned by the legislature and the governor to find out why Arkansas lagged far behind other states in economic growth and what to do about it. The commission was staffed by the University of Arkansas College of Business (this was before Walmart bought it) and economists at the Industrial Research and Extension Center. Here is what they concluded about taxes: The level of state and local taxes are never a significant factor in neither where a company locates nor where people choose to live. They cited economic research plus common sense. Arkansas had always been at the bottom or near it in state and local taxes but had suffered net outmigration for most of the century and benefited little from the movement of industry to the Sun Belt. Industry often located in states with higher taxes, they said, because low taxes “may indicate a low level of the community’s services [including well-educated people] that are necessary for industry to be profitable and successful.” They suggested much greater use of personal and corporate income taxes at the state level and wider authority for cities, counties, and schools to raise property taxes and levy new forms of taxes. The state lagged far behind in education, public health, and transportation, and the state had to invest heavily in those services if it were to ever to prosper. Most of the book was devoted to raising the educational achievement of people. A few of its recommendations were adopted in the next two decades, including a system of community colleges and technical schools. “We cannot advance economically without the leadership of education,” the study concluded. “We, therefore, call for the highest priority in the commitment of

come early STAY LATE turn up

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Cover Story by Maya Smith / Photographs by Justin Fox Burks

Radicalized

May 10-17, 2018

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ine years ago, 24-year-old Abdulhakim Mujahid Muhammad shot two people at a military recruiting center in Little Rock. Acting as a lonewolf terrorist and pledging allegiance to al-Qaeda’s cause, Muhammad killed Private William Long and wounded Private Quinton Ezeagwula. He is now serving a life sentence at the Varner Unit supermax prison in Lincoln, Arkansas. Muhammad was born Carlos Bledsoe in Memphis, and his father, Melvin Bledsoe, wants his son’s entire story to be told. Melvin Bledsoe says his son grew up like “any other kid.” He was born and raised in Memphis, like his father, who founded and still owns Blues City Tours. Bledsoe says Carlos was raised in a middleclass family that gave him love and “all the best things.” His family was one that “ate dinner and breakfast together at the table,” he recalls, with a smile. Bledsoe remembers his son being a “happy-go-lucky fellow,” a kid who always wore a “big smile.” He grew into a “typical” teenager who loved to dance. “He thought he knew more than his parents,” Bledsoe says. “He was a normal teenager like that. But he loved life and pure fun. He was always making people laugh. And he loved his dog.” He was a young black man who had opportunities to go to college and get a higher education — something Bledsoe says he didn’t get a chance to do. His son’s dream was to study business in hopes of “giving me an early retirement,” he says.“No one would have thought that sending him to college would make that dream turn into a nightmare, but it did.”

When Carlos Bledsoe graduated from Craigmont High School, he went off to Tennessee State University in Nashville, where his father says he started to “drift off a little bit.” But, after a run-in with the law on a weekend trip with friends, Bledsoe says his son wanted to change his lifestyle and looked to get on the right track. “[The incident] scared him.” Though he grew up in a Baptist church, Carlos wanted to start exploring other religions that would “guide him in the right direction,” his father says. “So he went searching.” The young Bledsoe visited churches of different denominations, and a Jewish synagogue, but none of those felt like a good fit for him. Then, one day on campus, he crossed paths with an imam passing out flyers inviting students to visit a local mosque. Though he didn’t know it at the time, this was the beginning of his son’s radicalization, Bledsoe says. After his son started attending services at the mosque, the imam realized Carlos was vulnerable and impressionable, and, Bledsoe says, he took advantage of that. “[Carlos] didn’t know what was about to happen,” Bledsoe says. “He had no idea that once he got to this particular mosque he would be introduced and led to the plan they had for him.” The plan they had for his recently converted Muslim son led him to Yemen, which at the time was known for its notorious radical Islamic population. Bledsoe says his son traveled there under the impression that he would be teaching English to locals, while learning Arabic. That was not the case. Instead, his father says, he went there to be “brainwashed” by radical Islamists.

Carlos Bledsoe After being lied to about the true intentions of his trip, he was “fed poison and nonsense,” Bledsoe says. While in Yemen, his son was exposed

While in Yemen, his son was exposed to anti-American propaganda that his father says changed his thoughts, behavior, and identity. He was encouraged to hate his country.

to anti-American propaganda that his father says changed his thoughts, behavior, and identity. He was encouraged to hate his country and seek revenge for the crimes America had committed against Muslims. “He was totally brainwashed,” Bledsoe says. “He had ideas for his life, but they had other ideas for him.” Bledsoe had no idea that, less than two years later, those ideas would lead his son to open fire on two soldiers outside of a

COURTESY OF THE BLEDSOE FAMILY

The tragic tale of a young Memphian who became an Islamic terrorist. And a father who’s trying to heal the wounds.


Melvin Bledsoe (right) is one of the founding members of Parents For Peace, a nonprofit formed to help families combat the lure of extremism.

COVER STORY m e m p h i s f l y e r. c o m

Little Rock Army/Navy recruiting center. At the time, Carlos Bledsoe told the police his actions were fueled by frustrations with the way Muslims were being treated in the wars in Iraq and Afghanistan. A few months before the shooting, when his son came home from Yemen, Bledsoe says he was different. He changed the way he talked and dressed, and he changed his name. He no longer wanted to be called Carlos, and asked to be called Abdulhakim Mujahid Muhammad. In hopes of helping his son return to a normal life, Bledsoe expanded his tour bus business to Little Rock, in order to give his son a job. But, like the rest of his family, Bledsoe was totally unaware of his son’s stewing anger — and his plan to launch a jihadi attack. On a weekend in early June 2009, young Bledsoe loaded his black Ford SUV with a rifle and two handguns, setting out to his intended targets: a rabbi’s home in Nashville and a military recruiting center in Kentucky. When those attacks didn’t pan out, the 24-yearold headed back home to Little Rock on June 1st. While just a few miles from his apartment, he happened to come across two soldiers smoking cigarettes outside of a recruiting center. Bledsoe opened fire on the pair, wounding 19-year-old Quinton Ezeagwula, and killing 23-year-old William Long. Muhammad was charged with one count of capital murder and 16 counts of engaging in a terrorist act, which were charges stemming from shots he fired at an occupied building. Muhammad told authorities in Little Rock that he was “mad at the U.S. military because of what they had done to Muslims in the past.”

Parents for Peace

Melvin Bledsoe is still healing from the events of that day nine years ago. “This is something I have to live with until I die,” he says. “So I decided, because of the will of God, that I would do something that would help other people.” Bledsoe says he does that by talking continued on page 14

Melvin Bledsoe

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about it. At first, he says his family didn’t support his speaking freely about the incident in public, but he says the more he talked about it, the more he felt healed, so he kept talking. “I’ve been very outspoken,” Bledsoe says. “I stand up and I speak up as often as I can.” He says because he spoke, someone listened, and that led to his founding of Parents For Peace, along with his daughter, Monica Holley. The organization was conceived during a trip Bledsoe took to Los Angeles four years ago, where he attended a series of focus groups about radical Islamic practices on American college campuses, especially those targeting young black males. Though Bledsoe was one of several people who told stories of loved ones falling into the trap of radical Islam, his son’s story was chosen for a deeper discussion. Through those discussions, Bledsoe met others who had experienced similar situations and who also wanted to “make a difference.” They decided to create the foundation for Parents For Peace, a nonprofit formed to help families concerned about loved ones becoming involved in extremism. Today, most of the organization’s operations are based in Boston, including a 24-hour hotline. Callers are put in contact with social services or professionals best suited for their situation. Sometimes law enforcement is asked to intervene, although, Bledsoe says, “We try not to involve the police, but we will work with law enforcement. Sometimes we have to, if we can save someone.” The organization is designed to thwart attraction to any type of extremist ideology or groups, including terrorist organizations, white supremacists, the Ku Klux Klan, and street gangs. “Gangs have extremists too,” Bledsoe says. “They’re people in there trying to change the thoughts and behaviors of young people. And they certainly need help, too. “Maybe we don’t pay attention to it and we don’t recognize it, but there are still people in this country who wish to do harm to America,” Bledsoe says. What happened to his son can happen to any young person who is “looking for something and doesn’t quite know what they’re looking for.” Bledsoe says it’s important to help people look for and recognize the signs of radicalization before it’s too late. The main motivation for doing what he does, Bledsoe says, is to help other families avoid having to endure the kind of pain his family has had. “We’ve made a difference, and we’re making a difference,” he says. “That’s the story that needs to be told at the end of his story.”

The Search for Identity 14

To an adolescent looking for identity, radical or deviant groups can be very seductive, says Kelly James, a sociology

and criminology professor at Christian Brothers University. She says young people join these groups with the promise of “concrete payoffs.” There are a handful of theories, James says, that explain why people are drawn to deviant subcultures, extremist ideology, and hate groups. A common thread among the theories is a discontentment with one’s own life and a need to somehow express that frustration, which often can result in targeted acts of hate or violence. James adds that when these deviant groups have charismatic leaders that package their agenda well, young people are more likely to take interest. A key piece of adolescent psychology is a desire to belong and to feel significant, she says, and peers play a huge role in that. “I think young people are searching for identity and community,” James says. “If you feel powerless as a young man, and here’s a very masculine and powerful personna you see that you can immediately take on, then you will. It’s like an avatar. “You manifest a look and attitude and it gives you entrance into this premade community,” James says. “These things are attractive for young people, especially when they’re vulnerable.” Once a part of these communities, James says research shows that it’s easier for someone to make risky decisions or commit violent acts than they would if acting alone. The cause of the group becomes more important than individual human life. “So you justify hurting people because of a cause,” she says. “Some of it is chemical at some point. Your body is at a heightened excitation level. Life becomes less valuable, especially when you’re in a specific group that can target another specific group.” James says this can even be the case within certain religious circles. Subgroups within a religion have been known to use some pieces of their faith while ignoring other parts to justify their own causes, she says. “The books of religion are one thing and the people that interpret them are another thing.”

“Islam Means Peace”

Though he hasn’t come in contact with any radical Muslims since he moved from Lebanon to Memphis in the 1990s, Nabil Bayakly says he understands how extremists’ ideology is contrived from Islam, which he knows as a peaceful religion. Bayakly is the vice president of Muslims in Memphis, a nonprofit formed here in 2003 to be a “cultural bridge builder.” It aims to educate the public about the Islamic faith, while shedding a positive light on the religion and the people who practice it. According to Bayakly, Islam literally means peace. “That’s the core concept,” he says. “It means peace within yourself, peace with your


neighborhoods, and peace with your community. The root word of Islam is peace.” But, Bayakly says, when people take certain elements of the Islamic faith out of context, they can “justify doing horrendous things.” Some people use isolated verses of the Quran “to do whatever they want.” The violence and hatred of radical ideology stems from the handful of verses in the Quran that focus on warfare and battlefronts, Bayakly says. And when people try to apply these “ubiquitously, in everyday life, it doesn’t work.” Bayakly says the extremist ideology in the Muslim faith is not unlike that which can be derived from any other religion. It happens when people use their religion to claim superiority over others and believe they have a unique closeness to God, he says. For example, Bayakly says, members of the Ku Klux Klan have used the Bible and Christianity to justify their mistreatment of certain groups. It’s the same with Islam, he says. Bayakly says it’s especially important now in America to “show that our religion is not one of vengeance and war. … That’s not the message of Islam at all. There’s a matrix of hate toward us now,” he says. “Once you’re aware of the matrix, you have to go in and shatter all of the falsehoods.”

Bayakly says knowledge is the most effective tool in combating people’s mistrust of his religion. That’s why he tries to educate people as much as possible about his faith. Bayakly says he would tell the Muslim who would commit violence in the name of the religion and the non-Muslim who is prejudiced toward it, the same thing: Read the Quran in its entirety and understand the real message — peace.

Life After Death

That’s what Carlos Bledsoe is beginning to understand today, as he serves his life sentence at the Varner Unit. “He’s trying to deprogram himself,” Melvin Bledsoe says about his son. “And that’s very hard to do in a state prison. The people he met before had twisted the religion to do evil things.” Bledsoe says his son is learning what it really means to be Muslim. “Those people lied to him, and they used him.” and his son is starting to realize that. “And I will tell the world on the tallest mountain that what happened to my son was a tragedy,” Bledsoe says. “A crime was committed against my son before he committed a crime.”

Bledsoe says his son is remorseful. Seeking forgiveness, he sent an apology letter from prison to the victim’s family a couple of years ago. In the letter, he explained what happened to him and all that preceded his decision on that June morning in 2009. He told the family he was “confused, misled, and lied to.” It’s steps like that that make Bledsoe believe his son is “starting to come around.” More

recently, he’s started to help out with Parents For Peace — something his father calls a “miracle.” “Trying to turn a tragedy into something positive is never easy,” Bledsoe says. “To see the sadness and anger of people receiving my story and what happened to my son really moves me. It motivates me; it makes me want to do more to help. And it heals me and my family.”

“I will tell the world on the tallest mountain that what happened to my son was a tragedy,” Bledsoe says. “A crime was committed against my son before he committed a crime.”

36 City Year AmeriCorps members are serving as mentors and tutors in five Memphis schools, working alongside teachers in the classroom to help every student reach his or her potential.

Learn more at cityyear.org/memphis

cymemphis1 @cityyearmemphis @cityyearmemphis

COVER STORY m e m p h i s f l y e r. c o m

THE SKY’S THE LIMIT. THE CLASSROOM IS THE BEGINNING.

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steppin’ out

We Recommend: Culture, News + Reviews

Funny Book

Fun Home

By Chris Davis

To borrow a line of inquiry from the postmodern author John Barth, “For whom is the Fun Home fun?” Not for its unhappy residents, certainly. Not for lovers. Except for those few, golden, giggly moments when everything’s perfect. There are moments of humor in Alison Bechdel’s groundbreaking graphic memoir Fun Home, an intimate, wise account of growing up gay in a troubled family. They are fleeting, however, and laced with pathos. Her biographical accounts tested the limits of comic book storytelling, just as the musical incarnation of her novel, currently on stage at Playhouse on the Square, dispenses with every trace of Broadway razzle dazzle, trading instead on fuzzy memory and fresh emotion. Although it’s told from Bechdel’s viewpoint, Fun Home revolves around her dad Bruce, an English teacher, a funeral home director, and a deeply repressed gay man whose struggles have left him twisted, full of rage, and, between outbursts, as generous and loving as he knows how to be. “Speaking as someone who lost a parent recently, I think this show is full of searching to define that parent’s influence on you,” says regional stage veteran Stephen Huff, who returned to Memphis from his new home in Tampa, Florida, to play Bruce. “What the script and score does so brilliantly is show this fragmented self that’s searching for some kind of wholeness in those initial relationships with her parents,” he says. “At the end of the show, you finally have the three of the Allisons together singing in unison and harmony. It’s this self-integration that’s so gorgeous and fulfilling. “I couldn’t pass this up,” Huff says answering the opening question. “I saw the [Tony-winning] Broadway production. When Playhouse mentioned that they wanted me for it, I was all-in.” “FUN HOME” AT PLAYHOUSE ON THE SQUARE THROUGH MAY 27TH. $25-$40 PLAYHOUSEONTHESQUARE.ORG

May 10-17, 2018

Andrea LeTard’s Cooktales — Southern food meant to be shared Food News, p. 30

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THURSDAY May 10

FRIDAY May 11

Edwin McCain Bartlett Performing Arts and Conference Center, 7:30 p.m. Concert by romantic balladeer Edwin McCain, known for the songs “I’ll Be” and “I Could Not Ask for More.”

The Ultimate Recess Railgarten, 7-11 p.m. A silent disco dance party in honor of teachers, presented by Teach901.

Faith and the Addicted Brain University Ballroom, University of Memphis, 9 a.m. A panel discussion on faith and addiction, part of a conference on addiction, particularly opioids.

Disney Junior Dance Party on Tour The Orpheum, 6 p.m., $29.50-$159.50 An interactive dance concert with favorite Disney characters.

Time to get a CLUE — and invite all the students on the bus to success. The Last Word, p. 39 SATURDAY May 12 Disrespect Your Surroundings Growlers, 7 p.m. A tribute to A Day to Remember. Crystals & Castles Gala Peabody Hotel, 6:30 p.m., $250 A gala in recognition of Memphis in May’s honored country, the Czech Republic. With music by Booker T. Washington.

Sound Observations Crosstown Arts, 7:30 p.m. A collaboration between abstract turntablist/sound artist/DJ Maria Chavez and guitarist/pianist Christina Carter. Mother’s Day at the Concourse Crosstown Concourse, 11 a.m.-6 p.m. A day filled with shopping, live music, eating, and family activities. There will be an artist’s market featuring the work of Brian Blankenship, Angi Cooper, Cheryl Pesce, Misti Rae, and others.


SUNDAY May 13 Dragon Races Mud Island Riverpark, 8 a.m.-2 p.m. Teams of participants race in cool boats fashioned to look like dragons. Benefitting St. Jude.

Taste of the Czech Republic Chez Philippe, 6-10 p.m., $75 A four-course dinner saluting the Czech Republic, this year’s honored Memphis in May country.

MoneyBagg Yo New Daisy, 8 p.m. Concert by this Memphis rapper. Part of the New Daisy’s 75th anniversary celebration.

2001: A Space Odyssey Benjamin L. Hooks Central Library, 2 p.m. A screening and a book club discussion of this sci-fi classic.

Mother’s Day Pop-Up The Art Factory, noon-5 p.m. An artists’ market with gifts for mom, including pottery, sculpture, paintings, prints, and more.

Sunset Boulevard Paradiso, 2 p.m. It’s the pictures that got small. Screening of this classic 1950s film about a washed up starlet.

.com. m e m p h i s f l y e r. c o m

Charlize Theron (above) provides a counterpoint to the male-gaze style of filmmaking in Tully. Film, p. 34

ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT

DIRTY MOVIES SCREENS “FOOD FIGHT” AT MOVE THE AIR AUDIO(1583 MADISON) FRIDAY, MAY 11TH, BYOB, FREE WITH SUGGESTED DONATION. @MEMPHISDIRTYMOVIES

Dishing it out at

William Loden and his Dirty Movies co-creator Scotty Theunissen were motivated by one thing: “We really like Mystery Science Theater 3000. “But I prefer a live format,” says Loden, who hosts the show at Move the Air Audio and is planning to expand into Black Lodge when the must-see movie emporium reopens on Cleveland. Following the example of MST3000 and other interruption-style shows, Dirty Movies brings together a clutch of local and touring comics to talk back to terrible movies. “Our emcee Charlie McMullen hosted a show similar to this in Colorado and so he has a truck full of really bad movies,” Loden says, explaining how the animated feature Food Fight was selected for screening. “He described a movie starring Charlie Sheen and Hilary Duff as the main characters where they ran out of money a third of the way through production. And I trust his judgment.” Running out of money isn’t the only thing that went wrong with Food Fight, an action/adventure/inter-species romance set inside a grocery store and starring a number of actual and fictitious supermarket brand mascots like Captain Crunch and Chester the Cheetos cheetah. With its jarringly bad script, weird mix of motion capture and other unfinished animation styles, bizarre sexual overtones, and an all-star cast that also included Eva Longoria, Christopher Lloyd, Wayne Brady, and Harvey Fierstein, this famously plagued movie about well-known grocery store products defending their turf against the invasive Brand X, is a behind-the-scenes-tell-all-documentary waiting to happen. “We’ve got Kayla Esmond and Josh Ogle, two wonderful comics, coming from Little Rock and local favorite Judy Driscoll,” Loden says. “It’s good cheap entertainment that’s not kid-friendly on a Friday night.”

By Susan Ellis

By Chris Davis

A Very Tasteful Food Blog

Fight Club

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MUSIC By Alex Greene

All Girl

Punk pioneers The Klitz return for Grrl Fest.

May 10-17, 2018

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t’s a rare opportunity to share coffee with all of the Klitz at once, as I found myself doing on a recent Memphis morning. All in all, singer and guitarist Lesa Aldridge (aka Elizabeth Hoehn) is proud of the seminal group’s newly released LP, Rocking the Memphis Underground 1978-1980, a compilation of some of their most important archived recordings. But she may have a few regrets. “Back then, with Dickinson and Alex and that circle, the brilliance was in being what you sounded like … rather than trying to polish or change. And so it was ‘Oh no, you can’t fix that! Oh no, that’s the brilliance!’ Damn.” The Klitz, one of the first all-girl bands from the punk era, were really a genre unto themselves. Perhaps that’s what led such finely tuned ears as Jim Dickinson, Alex Chilton, and others to champion their cause. As drummer Marcia Clifton Faulhaber notes, “We were more punk in our social settings than really in our sound. Especially when you listen to the songs we’re doing now. Even though a lot of them are on the album, they don’t translate in hindsight as punk. The name is punk …” Then Amy Gassner Starks interjects, “that’s why I wanted to call us the Kiltz.” There is collective intake of breath at this stunning admission. And then a big laugh. There is a good-natured camaraderie among the women who now reunite occasionally under their old moniker. Though there was a long hiatus after they all moved to other projects in the ’80s, interest in the group only seemed to grow over the years. One critical moment came with the invitation to join Philadelphia’s Pink Slip Daddy on some east coast shows in 2016. Yet only more recently have all four Klitz actively rehearsed and played shows as a unit. Lately, they’ve been rehearsing like mad, as they prepare for this Saturday’s

EBET ROBERTS

Gail Elise Clifton, Marcia Clifton Faulhaber, Lesa Aldridge (Elizabeth Hoehn), Amy Gassner Starks

Grrl Fest 2 at the Hi-Tone. In a night designed to celebrate all-woman or womandominated bands, the Klitz will hold court at the top of the bill. When they started out, tackling the male dominance of the music industry was no small matter. As singer and keyboardist Gail Elise Clifton recalls, “It was a boy’s club. Of course, they got more shows. This town has always been a boy’s club. It’s too powerful being all girls. Guys can’t take it.” Even in 1970s Memphis, don’t imagine the Klitz were entirely unpopular. Faulhaber recalls going down well with large crowds at the Overton Park Shell, the Orpheum, and the Well, precursor to the Antenna Club. And they hung out with and opened for the Cramps. Surely, at the time, it must have felt that they were on the verge of something bigger. It was not to be, at least then. Faulhaber tells one tale that sets the scene for their dissolution. “Remember Mr. Bill? The creator of that, Michael O’Donoghue, was a writer for Saturday Night Live. We opened for his movie, which was Mr. Mike’s Mondo Video, on September 23, 1979 at the Times Square Tango Palace. But because we were nervous, and I think we had had too much to drink … we weren’t really tight.” The band lost its momentum not long after that. Yet, having played in bands before the Klitz, the four continued to create in different ensembles or as solo performers. Even after nearly 40 years, it has not been a far stretch for any of them to throw their hat in the ring. Beyond Grrl Fest 2, they’ll be doing interviews for a new documentary on the group, and are planning an official record release show for sometime in June or July. From there, the possibilities are endless. As Aldridge sums it up, “We’re getting in a groove.” GRRL FEST 2 takes over the Hi-Tone, Saturday, May 12th. $15.


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m e m p h i s f l y e r. c o m

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ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT

49

19


MONEYBAGG YO FRIDAY, MAY 11TH NEW DAISY THEATRE

KRIS KRISTOFFERSON SATURDAY, MAY 12TH HORSESHOE CASINO’S BLUESVILLE

JIMMY EAT WORLD SUNDAY, MAY 13TH NEW DAISY THEATRE

After Dark: Live Music Schedule May 10 - 16 Club 152 152 BEALE 544-7011

Alfred’s 197 BEALE 525-3711

Gary Hardy & Memphis 2 Thursdays-Saturdays, 6-9 p.m.; Karaoke Thursdays, TuesdaysWednesdays, 9 p.m.-1 a.m. and Sundays-Mondays, 10 p.m.-2 a.m.; Mandi Thomas Fridays, Saturdays, 6-9 p.m.; The 901 Heavy Hitters Fridays, Saturdays, 10 p.m.-2 a.m.; Flyin’ Ryan Fridays, Saturdays, 2:30 a.m.; Memphis Jazz Orchestra Sundays, 6-9 p.m.

B.B. King’s Blues Club 143 BEALE 524-KING

The King Beez Thursdays, 5:30 p.m.; B.B. King’s All Stars Thursdays, Fridays, 8 p.m.; Will Tucker Band Fridays, Saturdays, 5 p.m.; Lisa G and Flic’s Pic’s Band Saturdays, Sundays, 12:30 p.m.; Blind Mississippi Morris Sundays, 5 p.m.; Memphis Jones Sundays, Wednesdays 5:30 p.m.; Doc Fangaz and the Remedy Tuesdays, 5:30 p.m.

Blue Note Bar & Grill 341-345 BEALE 577-1089

Queen Ann and the Memphis Blues Masters Fridays, Saturdays, 8 p.m.-midnight.

Blues City Cafe 138 BEALE 526-3637

May 10-17, 2018

Blind Mississippi Morris Fridays, 5 p.m. and Saturdays, 5:30 p.m.; Brad Birkedahl Band Thursdays, Wednesdays, 8 p.m.; Earl “The Pearl” Banks Saturdays, 12:30 p.m. and Tuesdays, 7 p.m.; Brandon Cunning Band Sundays, 6 p.m., and Mondays, 7 p.m.; FreeWorld Sundays, 9:30 p.m.

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Sean “Bad” Apple Thursdays, Sundays, 5 p.m. and Fridays, Saturdays, 4 p.m.; Live Music Thursdays-Sundays, 7-11 p.m.; DJ Ron Fridays, 11 p.m.; DJ DNyce Saturdays, 11 p.m.

Handy Bar 200 BEALE 527-2687

The Amazing Rhythmatics Tuesdays, Thursdays-Sundays, 7 p.m.-1 a.m.

Itta Bena

Daniel Tuesdays, Wednesdays, 8 p.m.-midnight.

Flying Saucer Draught Emporium

King’s Palace Cafe Tap Room

Silky O’Sullivan’s

130 PEABODY PLACE 523-8536

168 BEALE 576-2220

Big Don Valentine’s Three Piece Chicken and a Biscuit Blues Band Thursdays, Tuesdays, 8 p.m.-midnight; Cowboy Neil Band Friday, May 11, 9 p.m.-1 a.m.; Fuzzy Saturday, May 12, 9 p.m.-1 a.m.

183 BEALE 522-9596

Dueling Pianos Thursdays, Wednesdays, 9 p.m.-1 a.m., Fridays, Saturdays, 9 p.m.-3 a.m., and Sundays, Tuesdays, 8 p.m.midnight.

New Daisy Theatre

Belle Tavern

330 BEALE 525-8981

145 BEALE 578-3031

Nat “King” Kerr Fridays, Saturdays, 9-10 p.m.

King Jerry Lawler’s Hall of Fame Bar & Grille 159 BEALE

Chris Gales Solo Acoustic Show Mondays-Saturdays, noon-4 p.m.; Eric Hughes solo/acoustic Thursdays, 5-8 p.m.; Karaoke Mondays-Thursdays, Sundays, 8 p.m.; Live Bands Fridays, Saturdays, 8 p.m.

King’s Palace Cafe 162 BEALE 521-1851

David Bowen Thursdays, 5:309:30 p.m., Fridays, Saturdays, 6:30-10:30 p.m., and Sundays, 5:30-9:30 p.m.

King’s Palace Cafe Patio 162 BEALE 521-1851

p.m.; North and South Band Wednesdays, 7-11 p.m.

Sonny Mack Mondays-Fridays, 2-6 p.m.; Cowboy Neil Mondays, Thursdays, 7-11 p.m. and Saturdays, Sundays, 2-6 p.m.; Sensation Band Tuesdays, Fridays, 7-11 p.m.; Fuzzy and The Kings of Memphis Saturdays, 7-11 p.m.; Chic Jones and the Blues Express Sundays, 7-11

MoneyBagg Yo Friday, May 11, 7 p.m.; Jimmy Eat World Sunday, May 13, 7 p.m.; The Fifty Shades Male Revue Monday, May 14, 7 p.m.

Rum Boogie Cafe 182 BEALE 528-0150

Young Petty Thieves Thursdays, 8 p.m.-midnight; Pam and Terry Friday, May 11, 5:30-8:30 p.m.; Vizztone’s Blues Party on Beale Friday, May 11, 9 p.m.-1 a.m.; Sensation Band Sunday, May 13, 7-11 p.m.; Eric Hughes Band Mondays, 8 p.m.-midnight; Cowboy Neil Band Tuesday, May 15, 8 p.m.-midnight; Plantation Allstars Wednesdays, 8 p.m.-midnight.

Rum Boogie Cafe Blues Hall 182 BEALE 528-0150

Memphis Bluesmasters Thursdays, Sundays, 8 p.m.-midnight; Vince Johnson and the Plantation Allstars Fridays, Saturdays, 4-8 p.m. and Sundays, 3-7 p.m.; Myra Hall Band Friday, May 11, 9 p.m.-1 a.m.; Delta Project Saturday, May 12, 9 p.m.-1 a.m.; Sensation Band Monday, May 14, 8 p.m.-midnight; Chris Mc-

Songwriters with Roland and Friends Mondays, 7-10 p.m.

Huey’s Downtown 77 S. SECOND 527-2700

Brian Johnson Band Sunday, May 13, 8:30 p.m.-midnight.

Boscos 2120 MADISON 432-2222

Brass Door Irish Pub

The Peabody Hotel 149 UNION 529-4000

Live Music Fridays; Carma Karaoke with Carla Worth Saturdays, 9-11 p.m.

Peabody Rooftop Parties Thursdays, 6-10 p.m.

Center for Southern Folklore

124 GE PATTERSON

123 S. MAIN AT PEABODY TROLLEY STOP 525-3655

An Evening with Zeke Johnson Saturday, May 12, 8-11 p.m.

The Vault The Po Boys Friday, May 11, 8 p.m.; Chris Hill Saturday, May 12, 8:30 p.m.

South Main

Dirty Crow Inn

Loflin Yard

855 KENTUCKY

7 W. CAROLINA

Nancy Apple Thursdays, 8 p.m.; Bobbie Stacks and friends Wednesdays, 8-11 p.m.

Electric Church Sundays, 2-4 p.m.

Earnestine & Hazel’s

314 S. MAIN 207-7576

531 S. MAIN 523-9754

Amber Rae Dunn Hosts: Earnestine & Hazel’s Open Mic Wednesdays, 8-11 p.m.

Karaoke Thursdays, 9 p.m.-midnight; Dantones Friday, May 11, 10 p.m.-1 a.m.

Paulette’s

Bourbon and Jazz with Quelude Sundays, 2:30-5:30 p.m. 152 MADISON 572-1813

Blue Monkey 2012 MADISON 272-BLUE

RIVER INN, 50 HARBOR TOWN SQUARE 260-3300

Live Pianist Thursdays, 5:30-8:30 p.m., Fridays and Saturdays, 5:30-9 p.m., Sundays, 11 a.m.-2 p.m., and Mondays-Wednesdays, 5:30-8 p.m.

117 BARBORO ALLEY 249-6580

Friday, May 11, 7-9 p.m.

Pontotoc Lounge Ragtime Tea Party with DJ Mark Richens Sunday, May 13, 4-8 p.m.

South Main Sounds 550 S. MAIN 494-6543

Earle Whittington, Danny Umfress, Jeremy Stanfill, Will Stults

Sunday Brunch with Joyce Cobb Sundays, 11:30 a.m.-2:30 p.m.

Canvas 1737 MADISON 443-5232

Karaoke Thursdays, 9:30 p.m.; Kyle Pruzina Live Mondays, 10 p.m.-midnight.

Celtic Crossing 903 S. COOPER 274-5151

Jeremy Stanfill and Joshua Cosby Sundays, 6-9 p.m.; Candy Company Mondays.

The Cove 2559 BROAD 730-0719

Jazz with Ed Finney, Deb Swiney, and David Collins Thursday, May 10, 8 p.m.; 432 South Friday, May 11, 9 p.m.; Skitch Saturday, May 12, 5-8 p.m.; Drunken Horns Greg’s Birthday Saturday, May 12, 9 p.m.; David Collins & Frog Squad Sunday, May 13, 6-9 p.m.; Richard Wilson Tuesday, May 15, 6-9 p.m.; Karaoke Wednesdays, 9 p.m.

Crosstown Concourse N. CLEVELAND AT NORTH PARKWAY

Sound Observations: Maria Chavez & Christina Carter

GRIZZ’S PICK N’ PAY DRAFT L O T

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E R Y

IF THE GRIZZ WIN. YOU WIN.

WWE SMACKDOWN LIVE! TUESDAY, JUNE 12

MARTIN LAWRENCE SATURDAY, JUNE 16

YO GOTTI & FRIENDS THURSDAY, JUNE 28

Place a $44 deposit on 2018/19 Season Tickets prior to the NBA Draft Lottery on May 15 and pay the Grizzlies pick per game for all 44 home contests. GRIZZLIES.COM

Witness your Smackdown Superstars broadcast to the world live from FedExForum for the first time in over a year. Tickets available!

Join Martin Lawrence along with comedians Deon Cole, Jay Pharoah, Bruce Bruce, Adele Givens and more. Tickets available!

Memphis born rap and hip-hop artist will return to FedExForum with his sixth annual birthday bash. Tickets available!

Get tickets at FedExForum Box Office | Ticketmaster locations | 1.800.745.3000 | ticketmaster.com | fedexforum.com


After Dark: Live Music Schedule May 10 - 16

1911 POPLAR 244-7904

Clownvis Presley with Native Blood Thursday, May 10, 8:30 p.m.; Disrespect Your Surroundings: A Tribute to A Day To Remember Friday, May 11, 7 p.m.; Ron Gallo Saturday, May 12, 9 p.m.; Parker Millsap with Jillette Johnson Monday, May 14, 7 p.m.; Story Party Memphis I: True Dating Stories Tuesday, May 15, 7 p.m.; Crockett Hall Tuesdays with the Midtown Rhythm Section Tuesdays, 9 p.m.

Huey’s Poplar 4872 POPLAR 682-7729

Soul Shockers Sunday, May 13, 8-11:30 p.m.

Murphy’s 1589 MADISON 726-4193

Behavior with Hash Redactor Saturday, May 12; Witch Jail Monday, May 14.

Overton Park Golf Shack 2080 POPLAR

Park Friends Spring Music Series Wednesday, May 16, 6-8 p.m.

University of Memphis The Bluff 535 S. HIGHLAND

Memphis LIVE MondaysSundays, 8 p.m.-midnight; DJ Ben Murray Thursdays, 10 p.m.; Bluegrass Brunch with the River Bluff Clan Sundays, 11 a.m.

Mortimer’s

Summer/Berclair Cheffie’s Cafe 483 HIGH POINT TERRACE 202-4157

590 N. PERKINS 761-9321

Songwriter Night hosted by Leigh Ann Wilmot and Dave “The Rave” Saturdays, 5-8 p.m.

Pimento’s Kitchen Market

6439 SUMMER 356-2324

Van Duren Solo Thursdays, 6:30-8:30 p.m.

6450 POPLAR 755-8103

Maria’s Restaurant Karaoke Fridays, 5-8 p.m.

Bartlett Bartlett Performing Arts and Conference Center 3663 APPLING 385-6440

Edwin McCain Thursday, May 10, 7:30 p.m.

Hadley’s Pub

Ben Callicott Wednesday, May 16, 5:30-8 p.m.

2779 WHITTEN 266-5006

Cruisin’ Heavy Friday, May 11, 9 p.m.; The Back Street Crawlers Saturday, May 12, 9 p.m.; Furious George Sunday, May 13, 5:30 p.m.; A.M. Whiskey Wednesday, May 16, 8 p.m.

Hi-Tone 412-414 N. CLEVELAND 278-TONE

Rosedale Indeed, We Digress Thursday, May 10, 8 p.m.; Seckond Chaynce Thursday, May 10, 9 p.m.; Jet Black Alley Cat, Rally Owls, Quiet, Please!, Tiger Lake Friday, May 11, 8 p.m.; 40 Watt Moon Friday, May 11, 9 p.m.; GRRL FEST 2 Saturday, May 12, 7 p.m.; Blueprint Showcase Vol. 2 Sunday, May 13, 7 p.m.; Hoods, Set Your Anchor, Reserving Dirtnaps, Autolith, Walking on Landmines Tuesday, May 15, 7 p.m.; Psychostick Tuesday, May 15, 8 p.m.; Rich Aucoin, Louise Page, Bearport Wednesday, May 16, 9 p.m.

Tony Maynard and Cecil Yancey Sunday, May 13.

Huey’s Midtown

Toni Green’s Palace

Collierville Huey’s Collierville 2130 W. POPLAR 854-4455

Brandon Taylor and Radio Ghost Sunday, May 13, 8-11:30 p.m.

Frayser/Millington Old Millington Winery 6748 OLD MILLINGTON 873-4114

1927 MADISON 726-4372

4212 HWY 51 N

Henry Swain Club Sunday, May 13, 4-7 p.m.; Marcella and Her Lovers Sunday, May 13, 8:30 p.m.-midnight.

Toni Green’s Palace MondaysSundays, 7 p.m.; Live DJ Thursdays, Fridays, 7 p.m.

Germantown

Indian Pass Raw Bar Memphis

Huey’s Southwind

2059 MADISON 207-7397

7825 WINCHESTER 624-8911

Paul Taylor Jazz Quartet Thursday, May 10, 7-10 p.m.; Marcella and her Lovers Friday, May 11, 7-10 p.m.; Eric Lewis and Paul Taylor Saturday, May 12, 8-11 p.m.

The King Beez Sunday, May 13, 8:30 p.m.-midnight.

Lafayette’s Music Room

Horseshoe Casino & Hotel

North Mississippi/ Tunica

2119 MADISON 207-5097

Rice Drewry Collective Thursday, May 10, 6 p.m.; Eric Hughes Thursday, May 10, 9 p.m.; Memphis Funk-N-Soul Friday, May 11, 6:30 p.m.; Almost Elton John Friday, May 11, 10 p.m.; School of Rock Germantown Saturday, May 12, 1 p.m.; Jess Lamb & The Summit Saturday, May 12, 6:30 p.m.; Seeing Red Saturday, May 12, 10 p.m.; Joe Restivo 4 Sunday, May 13, 11 a.m.; Memphis Ukulele Band Sunday, May 13, 4 p.m.; Travis Linville Sunday, May 13, 8 p.m.; Memphis Knights Big Band Monday, May 14, 6 p.m.; Swingtime Explosion Big Band Tuesday, May 15, 5:30 p.m.; The Grand Ole Uproar Tuesday, May 15, 8 p.m.; Breeze Cayolle & New Orleans Wednesday, May 16, 5:30 p.m.; Devils Backbone Five-Course Craft Brew Pairing Wednesday, May 16, 6:30 p.m.; Royal Blues Band Wednesday, May 16, 8 p.m.

Midtown Crossing Grill 394 N. WATKINS 443-0502

Natalie James and the Professor Saturdays, Sundays, 11 a.m.-3 p.m.; “The Happening” Open

AT CASINO CENTER, SOUTH OF MEMPHIS, NEAR TUNICA, MS 1-800-303-SHOE

Kris Kristofferson Saturday, May 12.

P&H Cafe 1532 MADISON 726-0906

Rock Starkaraoke Fridays; The Minor, Second Drone, Room Nonconnah/Homefield Saturday, May 12; Open Mic Music with Tiffany Harmon Mondays, 9 p.m.-midnight.

Railgarten 2160 CENTRAL

Eric Hughes Band Friday, May 11, 8 p.m.; Travis Linville Saturday, May 12, 7 p.m.; Christy Hays Saturday, May 12, 8 p.m.; Live Band Karaoke with Public Record Wednesdays, 7 p.m.

Wild Bill’s 1580 VOLLINTINE 207-3975

The Wild Bill’s Band with Tony Chapman, Charles Cason, and Miss Joyce Henderson Fridays, Saturdays, 11 p.m.-3 a.m.

East Memphis The Dixon Gallery & Gardens 4339 PARK 761-5250

Symphony in the Gardens Sunday, May 13, 5-8 p.m.

East of Wangs 6069 PARK 685-9264

Lee Gardner Fridays, 6:30-9 p.m.; Randal Toma, Solo Guitar Tuesdays, 5:30-8 p.m.; Eddie Harrison Wednesdays, 6:30-9 p.m.

Folk’s Folly Prime Steak House 551 S. MENDENHALL 762-8200

Intimate Piano Lounge featuring Charlotte Hurt MondaysThursdays, 5-9:30 p.m.; Larry Cunningham Fridays, Saturdays, 6-10 p.m.

Poplar/I-240 Neil’s Music Room 5727 QUINCE 682-2300

Fall of Rome, Lifetap, The Stereotypes Thursday, May 10, 8-midnight; Eddie Smith Fridays, 8 p.m.; Rob Caudill’s tribute to Rod Stewart Saturday, May 12, 8 p.m.; Memphis All Stars Sunday, May 13, 5-9 p.m.; Debbie Jamison & Friends Tuesdays, 6-10 p.m.; Elmo and the Shades Wednesdays, 8 p.m.midnight.

The Hut 475 WEST VALLEY

Whitehaven/ Airport Guest House at Graceland 3600 ELVIS PRESLEY 332-3322

Eric Darius Jazz Concert Friday, May 11, 8-10 p.m.

Rock-n-Roll Cafe 3715-5 ELVIS PRESLEY, AT ELVIS AFTER DARK 398-5692

Elvis Tribute featuring Michael Cullipher Thursdays-Saturdays, 8 p.m.

Kimbrough Cotton-Patch Blues Festival 2018 Friday, May 11, 4-6 and 7 p.m.-2 a.m., Saturday, May 12, 10 a.m.-4 p.m. and 8 p.m.-2 a.m. and Sunday, May 13, 10 a.m.-2 p.m., 2-3 and 3:30 p.m.-midnight.

Raleigh Stage Stop 2951 CELA 382-1576

Blues Jam hosted by Brad Webb Thursdays, 7-11 p.m.; Open Mic Night and Steak Night Tuesdays, 6 p.m.-midnight.

m e m p h i s f l y e r. c o m

Growlers

Songwriter Showcase Tuesdays, 6:30-9:30 p.m.

ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT

Friday, May 11, 7:30 p.m.; The Music of Grant Green Saturday, May 12, 6:30 p.m.

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CALENDAR of EVENTS:

Send the date, time, place, cost, info, phone number, a brief description, and photos — two weeks in advance — to calendar@memphisflyer.com or P.O. Box 1738, Memphis, TN 38101.

MAY 10 - 16 TH EAT E R

Circuit Playhouse

Stupid F**king Bird, discover how disappointing love, art, and growing up can be in this irreverent, contemporary, and very funny remix of Chekhov’s The Seagull. www.playhouseonthesquare.org. $25-$40. Thurs.Sat., 8 p.m., and Sun., 2:30 p.m. Through May 13. 51 S. COOPER (725-0776).

The Evergreen Theatre

We Saw You. with

MICHAEL DONAHUE

memphisflyer.com/blogs/WeSawYou

Annapurna, after 20 years apart, Emma tracks Ulysses to a trailer park in the middle of nowhere for a final reckoning. What unfolds is a visceral and profound meditation on love and loss. www. theatreworksmemphis.org. $15. Sundays, 2 p.m., and Fridays, Saturdays, 8 p.m. Through May 27. 1705 POPLAR (274-7139).

Germantown Community Theatre

The Tempest, robbed of position, power, and wealth, Prospero, a magician able to control the very elements and bend nature to his will, reaches across the ocean to isolate his enemies. www. gctcomeplay.org. $12-$24. Fridays, Saturdays, 8 p.m., and Sundays, 2:30 p.m. Through May 20. 3037 FOREST HILL-IRENE (453-7447).

Ghost River Brewing

Squaring Up, a multimedia theatrical experience to raise awareness about human sex trafficking in the Memphis area. Touching stories of three women, based on real-life accounts of HST survivors. $10 suggested donation. Thurs., May 10, 7-8 p.m. 827 S. MAIN (278-0087).

Hattiloo Theatre

Jitney, the owner of an unlicensed cab station descends into an emotional spiral when his son, Booster, comes home from jail. Characters who come in and out of their lives pose questions about an uncertain future. www.hattiloo.org. $22-$30. Sun., 3 p.m., Sat., 2 & 7:30 p.m., and Thurs., Fri., 7:30 p.m. Through May 13.

Theatre Memphis

August: Osage County, the large Weston family unexpectedly reunites after Dad disappears, and their Oklahoman family homestead explodes in a maelstrom of repressed truths and unsettling secrets. www. theatrememphis.org. $25. Fri., Sat., 8 p.m., Sun., 2 p.m., and Thurs., 7:30 p.m. Through May 13. 630 PERKINS EXT. (682-8323).

37 S. COOPER (502-3486).

The Salvation Army Kroc Center

Lion King Jr., www.stagedoormemphis.org. PWYC. Sun., 2:30 p.m., and Thurs.-Sat., 7 p.m. Through May 13. 800 E. PARKWAY S. (729-8007).

New Moon Theatre Company

Othello, outraged Senator Brabantio disowns his daughter Desdemona when he finds she is secretly married to Othello. Intent on revenge, Iago plants suspicions of unfaithfulness. www.newmoontheatre.org. $20. Fridays, Saturdays, 8-10:30 p.m., and Sundays, 2-4:30 p.m. Through May 20. AT THEATREWORKS, 2085 MONROE (484-3467).

Playhouse on the Square

Fun Home, based on the bestselling graphic novel. Author Alison Bechdel is introduced to the audience at three different ages, revealing memories of her uniquely dysfunctional family. www.playhouseonthesquare.org. $25-$45. Thursdays-Saturdays, 8 p.m., and Sundays, 2 p.m. Through May 27. 66 S. COOPER (726-4656).

A R T I ST R EC E PT I O N S

Crosstown Concourse

Closing reception for “Goodnight My Love,” exhibition of photographs from the Ernest Withers collection. Books of photography from the exhibition will be sold at the closing reception. www.crosstownarts.org. Thurs., May 10, 5-7 p.m. N. CLEVELAND AT NORTH PARKWAY.

Leontyne Price Library at Rust College

Artist reception for “All Night Long,” exhibition of photos and sculpture, Junior Kimbrough’s Juke Joint 19932000, by Bill Steber. www.fancymag. com. Fri., May 11, 4-6 p.m. 150 RUST (662-252-8000).

Memphis Botanic Garden

Artist reception for “Art of a Scientist,” exhibition of paintings by Dr. K. Gopal Murti. All paintings are for sale with 30 percent of the proceeds going to Memphis Botanic Garden. www.memphisbotanicgarden.com. Sun., May 13, 3-5 p.m. 750 CHERRY (636-4100).

Playhouse on the Square

Opening reception for Barcelona Exhibition, www.mca.edu. Fri., May 11, 5-7 p.m. 66 S. COOPER (726-4656).

May 10-17, 2018

“Forge” at the Metal Museum, from May 13th through August 19th

22

DUE TO SPACE LIMITATIONS, ONGOING WEEKLY EVENTS WILL APPEAR IN THE FLYER’S ONLINE CALENDAR ONLY. OT H E R A R T HAP P E N I N G S

August Wilson Century Cycle Award Celebration

Ekundayo Bandele will accept the August Wilson American Century Cycle Award on behalf of the theater and the creative teams before performance of Jitney. August Wilson House is the organization committed to preserving and promoting Wilson’s childhood home on Bedford Avenue. Thurs., May 10, 7 p.m. HATTILOO THEATRE, 37 S. COOPER (502-3486), WWW.HATTILOO.ORG.

“Beneath the Surface: Life, Death & Gold in Ancient Panama”

Exhibition of finds from PreColumbian cemetery of Sitio Conte in central Panama, a mysterious and complex society that thrived there more than 1,000 years ago. Ongoing. MEMPHIS PINK PALACE MUSEUM, 3050 CENTRAL (636-2362), WWW.MEMPHISMUSEUMS.ORG.

5th Annual Number Presents Art of the South: Call for Artists

Juried exhibition open to artists 18-plus. Entries must be original works created within the last 2 years for exhibition July 27–September 2, 2018. For more information, visit website. $35. Through May 20. WWW.NUMBERINC.ORG.

Memphis Black Artists Summit 2018

Day-and-a-half-long summit puts local artists in the same room with notable artists in the fields of music, film, stage, literature, and fine art. $50. Fri., May 11, 5:30-11:30 p.m., and Sat., May 12, 8 a.m.-8 p.m. HATTILOO THEATRE, 37 S. COOPER (502-3486), WWW.HATTILOO.ORG.


C A L E N DA R: M AY 1 0 - 1 6 Seniors OUT and About at the Dixon Meet in the lobby for a free guided tour. This event is free for all LGBTQ senior participants. RSVP on facebook or email, seniors@ outmemphis.org. Free with registration. Tues., May 15, 9:30 a.m.-1:30 p.m.

THE DIXON GALLERY & GARDENS, 4339 PARK (761-5250), WWW.OUTMEMPHIS.ORG.

O N G O I N G ART

20Twelve

“The Visceral World,” exhibition of color photography by William Eggleston, Huger Foote, Adam Bartos, and Stephen Shore. www.20twelve. com. Through July 25. 2531 BROAD.

Art Museum at the University of Memphis (AMUM)

“Monster Marks,” exhibition of work from Memphis collections that make us think about how we define monsters. www.memphis.edu/amum. Through July 28. “Africa: Art of a Continent,” permanent exhibition of African art from the Martha and Robert Fogelman collection. Ongoing. 142 COMMUNICATION & FINE ARTS BUILDING (678-2224).

ANF Architects

“Suburban Cigar” and “A Perfect Home,” exhibition

We Are Not Cats at Crosstown Arts, Wednesday, May 16th at 7 p.m.

Leontyne Price Library at Rust College

“All Night Long,” exhibition of photos and sculpture, Junior Kimbrough’s Juke Joint 19932000, by Bill Steber. www. fancymag.com. May 11-31.

of photography by Bruce Meisterman and sculpture by Nikii Richey. www.anfa.com. Through May 17.

150 RUST (662-252-8000).

Marshall Arts Gallery

1500 UNION (278-6868).

“Love of Art” and “Memphis,” exhibition of work by Nikki Gardner and Debra Edge by appointment only. (647-9242), Ongoing.

Belz Museum of Asian and Judaic Art

“Chinese Symbols in Art,” ancient Chinese pottery and bronze. www.belzmuseum. org. Ongoing.

639 MARSHALL (679-6837).

Memphis Botanic Garden

119 S. MAIN, IN THE PEMBROKE SQUARE BUILDING (523-ARTS).

The Cotton Museum

“Went Out for Cigarettes,” exhibition of images and titles that explore and rediscover the American South with contradictions and hidden meanings by Ryan Steed, grandson of a cotton farmer and son of a literature teacher. Through May 31. 65 UNION (531-7826).

Crosstown Concourse

“Goodnight My Love,” exhibition of photographs from the Ernest Withers collection, including works from Withers’ archive of more than one million negatives that have never been seen by the public. www.crosstownarts.org. Through May 13. N. CLEVELAND AT NORTH PARKWAY.

David Lusk Gallery

“Abstracted Still Life,” exhibition of new paintings by Kit

Reuther. www.davidluskgallery.com. Through May 19. 97 TILLMAN (767-3800).

The Dixon Gallery & Gardens

“’IN LAK’ECH ALA K’IN,’ Tú eres mi otro yo, You are my other self,” exhibition of installation transforming the Mallory/ Wurtzburger Galleries into a work of art by Richard Lou. Through July 15. “Contemplating Character: Portrait Drawings & Oil Sketches from Jacques Louis David to Lucian Freud,” exhibition of portrait drawings and oil sketches includes almost two-and-ahalf centuries, providing the viewer with provocative visual juxtapositions. www.dixon.org. Through June 24. 4339 PARK (761-5250).

Eclectic Eye

Harrell Performing Arts Theatre

“Surreal Memphis in Infrared Photography,” exhibition of photography by Amy IngramCurtis. www.eclectic-eye.com. Through May 30.

“Where We Gather,” works by Erika Roberts. www.erikaroberts.studio. Through June 25. 440 POWELL, COLLIERVILLE (853-3228).

242 S. COOPER (276-3937).

FireHouse Community Arts Center

750 CHERRY (636-4100).

Jay Etkin Gallery

“Snippets,” exhibition of work in group show featuring Marc Rouillard, Nathan Yoakum, Mickey Bond, David Malkin, and others. www.jayetkingallery.com. Through May 12.

Mosal Morszart, exhibition of works by Black Arts Alliance artist. www.memphisblackartsalliance.org. Ongoing. 985 S. BELLEVUE (948-9522).

942 COOPER (550-0064).

Fratelli’s

L Ross Gallery

Brad Behnes Art Show, exhibition of original oil paintings of the moods and moments of Memphis and the Mississippi River. www.memphisbotanicgarden.com. Through May 31.

“The Image of Dreams,” surreal paintings with patterned borders Annabelle Meacham. www.lrossgallery.com. Through May 26. 5040 SANDERLIN (767-2200).

750 CHERRY (766-9900).

“Art of a Scientist,” exhibition of paintings by Dr. K. Gopal Murti. All paintings are for sale with 30 percent of the proceeds going to Memphis Botanic Garden. www. memphisbotanicgarden.com. Through May 31.

Memphis Brooks Museum of Art

“Black Resistance: Ernest C. Withers and the Civil Rights Movement,” exhibition focuses on and commemorates the 50th anniversary of the events from March 27 through April 8, 1968. Through Aug. 19. “African-Print Fashion Now! A Story of Taste, Globalization, and Style,” exhibition of dynamic traditions of African dress featuring colorful, boldly patterned

continued on page 24 Supported in part by a generous grant from

305 South Front Street, 38103

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ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT

Thursday May 10

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C A L E N DA R: M AY 1 0 - 1 6 continued from page 23 printed cloth highlighting the interplay between regional preferences and cosmopolitanism. Through Aug. 12. “Rotunda Projects: Lisa Hoke,” exhibition of over-the-top installation of recycled and repurposed materials reflecting aspirations for the work and fears of expecting too much. Through June 3. “About Face,” exhibition located in the Education Gallery highlighting the different ways artists interpret the connection between emotion and expression. Ongoing. “Drawing Memory: Essence of Memphis,” exhibition of works inspired by nsibidi, a sacred means of communication among male secret societies in southeastern Nigeria by Victor Ekpuk. www.brooksmuseum. org. Ongoing. 1934 POPLAR (544-6209).

Metal Museum

“Forge,” exhibition of work by 15 international metal artists whose practice has been identified as having a significant impact in the field of blacksmithing. www.metalmuseum. org. May 13-Aug. 19. 374 METAL MUSEUM DR. (774-6380).

Playhouse on the Square

May 10-17, 2018

“Art and Illustration,” exhibition of watercolor paintings and architectural illustrations by Terry DeWitt showing how principles

24

Mother’s Day Pop-Up at The Art Factory, Saturday, May 12th, from noon to 5 p.m.

and tango demonstrations in the rotunda. Included with museum admission. Third Wednesday, Thursday of every month, 6:30 p.m. MEMPHIS BROOKS MUSEUM OF ART, 1934 POPLAR (544-6209).

of design, composition, and color are important to all art. (726-4656), Through June 3. Barcelona Exhibition, www. mca.edu. Through June 3.

C O M E DY

Move the Air Audio

66 S. COOPER (726-4656).

Slavehaven Underground Railroad Museum

“Images of Africa Before & After the Middle Passage,” photography by Jeff and Shaakira Edison. Ongoing.

Kimbrough Cotton-Patch Blues Festival 2018

Booksigning by Andrea LeTard

Author, local chef, and recipe blogger discusses and signs Andrea’s Cooktales: A Keepsake Cookbook featuring four appetizers from the book paired with wines from Joe’s Wines. Thurs., May 10, 6-9 p.m. NOVEL, 387 PERKINS EXT. (9225526), WWW.NOVELMEMPHIS.COM.

Talbot Heirs

Debra Edge Art. Ongoing. 99 S. SECOND (527-9772).

“The Chaos and the Cosmos: Inside Memphis Music’s Lost Decade, 1977-1986,” exhibition of photography by Patricia Rainer. www.staxmuseum. com. Through July 31.

TOPS Gallery

926 E. MCLEMORE (946-2535).

400 S. FRONT.

“The Daily Avalanche,” exhibition of new drawings and prints by John Shorb. www. topsgallery.com. Through May 13.

WKNO Studio

Diane Weech, Rick DeStefanis, and Mike Lee, www.wkno.org. Through May 30. 7151 CHERRY FARMS (458-2521).

DA N C E

Brooks Milongas

Members of the Argentine Tango Society give lessons

USA BASEBALL STADIUM, 4351 BABE HOWARD BLVD. IN MILLINGTON (876-4015).

1583 MADISON.

B O O KS I G N I N G S

Stax Museum of American Soul Music

Featuring special appearances, Native American craft vendors, performances, concessions, and more. Sat.-Sun., May 12-13, 9 a.m.-5 p.m.

Festival Cinco de Mayo

St. George’s Episcopal Church

2425 SOUTH GERMANTOWN (754-7282).

13th Annual Millington, TN Powwow

Dirty Movies Presents: Food Fight, terrible movies are commentated on by very good comedians. Free. Fri., May 11, 7:30-10 p.m.

826 N. SECOND (527-3427).

Local Artists, exhibition of work by Libby Anderson, Danny Broadway, Morgan Brookfield, Mandy Buchanan, Sherry and Wayne Carpenter, Donald Golden, Sandra Hill, Zoe Nadel, Rachel Rieves, and Joy Phillips Routt. (624-9067), www.stgchurch.org. Through May 29.

F EST IVA LS

LECT U R E /S P EA K E R

Sustainable Agriculture 101

A monthly lecture that covers urban agriculture and food, systems, marketing, and food security., free. Sat., May 12, 3-5 p.m. WHITEHAVEN COMMUNITY CENTER, 4318 GRACELAND (654-7470), WWW.WHITEHAVENKULLIYE.ORG.

$5. Sun., May 13, 12-10 p.m.

AGRICENTER INTERNATIONAL, 7777 WALNUT GROVE (757-7777), WWW.AMBIENTE1030.COM.

Dedicated to the life and music of Cotton-Patch Soul Blues musician Junior Kimbrough. Hosted by Robert Kimbrough Sr. with the Kimbrough Brothers and Soul Blues Boy Little Joe Ayers. $25. Fri., May 11, 4-6 & 7 p.m.-2 a.m., Sat., May 12, 10 a.m.-4 p.m. & 8 p.m.-2 a.m., and Sun., May 13, 10 a.m.-2 p.m., 2-3 & 3:30 p.m.-midnight. THE HUT, 475 WEST VALLEY, SONANDFRIENDSOFJUNIORKIMBROUGH.WORDPRESS.COM/.

Memphis in May

Join the fun at MIM Music Festival and World Championship Barbecue Contest. Honored country, Czech Republic. Visit website for more information and ticketed

continued on page 26


NOMINATIONS: JUNE 4-28 | BALLOT VOTING: AUG 1-23 memphis flyer.com

m e m p h i s f l y e r. c o m

Top 8 most nominated per category will make up the final ballot!

ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT

Nominate your local favorites

25


C A L E N DA R: M AY 1 0 - 1 6 continued from page 24 events. Through May 31. TOM LEE PARK, OFF RIVERSIDE DR., WWW.MEMPHISINMAY.ORG/.

Memphis in May: International Salute to the Czech Republic

Visit website for cultural events held at community centers, museums, galleries, performing arts centers, and schools throughout the city. Through May 13. WWW.MEMPHISINMAY.ORG.

Memphis in May: World Championship Barbecue Cooking Contest

$4-$40. Wed.-Sat., April 16-19. TOM LEE PARK, OFF RIVERSIDE DR., WWW.MEMPHISINMAY.ORG.

Natchez Festival of Music: “Sound Waves!”

Diverse series of events that celebrate the merging of historic eras, three different centennial seasons, and musical offerings. Opening gala featuring Mac McAnally. $10$315. Thursdays-Saturdays. Through May 26. NATCHEZ PERFORMING ARTS CENTER, 64 HOMOCHITTO (601-3049488), WWW.NATCHEZFESTIVALOFMUSIC.COM.

S PO RTS / F IT N ES S

Attitude MMA Fights XII $35-$55. Sat., May 12, 6 p.m. AGRICENTER INTERNATIONAL, 7777 WALNUT GROVE (757-7777), WWW.ATTITUDEMMA.COM.

Mother’s Day Brunch at Memphis Botanic Garden, Sunday, May 13th at 10:30 a.m.

Memphis in May: Crystals & Castles Gala Cocktails and dinner. $250+. Fri., May 11, 6:30 p.m.

THE PEABODY HOTEL, 149 UNION (529-4000).

Nominations for IMB Innovation Awards

Memphis Redbirds v. Nashville Sounds

Accepting nominations for October Awards issue. Include biographical or business info, why the person, business, or organization should be recognized as an innovative leader and your contact information. Email nomination to, Through July 15.

Sat., May 12, 6:35 p.m., Sun., May 13, 11:05 p.m., Mon., May 14, 11:05 p.m., and Tues., May 15, 2:05 p.m. AUTOZONE PARK, THIRD AND UNION (721-6000), WWW.MEMPHISREDBIRDS.COM.

South Memphis Glide Ride

The Big Jump Teen Ambassadors take scenic routes through South Memphis and consider how to improve bicycle facilities and connectivity within the area. Free. Thursdays, 6-7 p.m. Through May 31. SOUTH MEMPHIS FARMERS MARKET, CORNER OF MISSISSIPPI BOULEVARD AND SOUTH PARKWAY EAST (726-6409), WWW.REVOLUTIONSMEMPHIS.COM.

KIDS

Bee House Build

Featuring light refreshments, special treats, and presents for all mothers to honor them on Mother’s Day Weekend will be given away. Free. Sat., May 12, 9:30 a.m.-noon. EPIPHANY COMMUNITY GARDEN, CORNER OF BRAY STATION AND WOLF RIVER BLVD. (861-6227), WWW.EPIPHANYLU.ORG.

INSIDEMEMPHISBUSINESS.COM.

One Night in Prague: A Sensory Celebration of the Czech Republic S P E C IA L E V E N TS

2017 Annual Meeting and Community Improvement Gala

A panel of four local social determinant experts representing safety, public health, mental health, and government affairs addresses “Community Impact of Social Determinants on Women’s Health” with actress/ activist Lynn Whitfield. Tues., May 16, 6:15-9 p.m. MEMPHIS HILTON, 939 RIDGE LAKE (800-5110), WWW.COMMONTABLEHEALTH.ORG.

30 Thursdays at the Garden

On Thursday nights through-

out Daylight Saving Time, extended hours until sunset open to members at no cost. Thursdays. Through Oct. 31.

valid ID. Free. Fridays, 6-9 p.m.

MEMPHIS BOTANIC GARDEN, 750 CHERRY (636-4100), WWW.MEMPHISBOTANICGARDEN.COM.

Inaugural Nurse’s Ball

39th Annual Blues Music Awards

$150. Thurs., May 10, 7-11 p.m. MEMPHIS COOK CONVENTION CENTER, 255 N. MAIN (576-1200), WWW.BLUES.ORG.

Friday Night Dance Party

Themed outdoor dance parties featuring illuminated dance floor, food vendors on site, and beer and wine available with a

True Story:

MEMPHIS PARK (FOURTH BLUFF), FRONT AND MADISON, WWW.THEFOURTHBLUFF.COM.

Celebrate nurses of the MidSouth. This is a formal black tie red carpet event featuring a swag bag. $65. Sat., May 12, 6-8 p.m.

MINGLEWOOD HALL, 1555 MADISON (866-609-1744), WWW.MINGLEWOODHALL.COM.

LGBTQ Senior Celebration

Sat., May 12, 7-9 p.m. OUTMEMPHIS: THE LGBTQ CENTER OF THE MID-SOUTH, 892 S. COOPER (278-6422), OUTMEMPHIS.ORG.

Memphis in May presents a taste of Czech cuisine and performances by Epoque Quartet, who fuse classical training with the sounds of jazz, rock, and funk. $18. Thurs., May 10, 6 p.m. THE ORPHEUM, 203 S. MAIN (5253000), WWW.ORPHEUM-MEMPHIS.COM.

Orpheum Sidewalk of Stars: Chicago

Hall of Famers Chicago will receive their star ahead of their sold out one-night engagement at the Orpheum in a public ceremony. Tues., May 15, 5 p.m. THE ORPHEUM, 203 S. MAIN (525-3000), WWW.ORPHEUM-MEMPHIS.COM.

Love one another. It’s that simple.

First Congregational Church

They wanted church to be relevant, not hip.

May 10-17, 2018

They found a church where talk and faith are real.

www.firstcongo.com Phone: 901.278.6786 1000 South Cooper Memphis, TN 38104 Sunday Worship 10:30 am

benefiting

SATURDAY, MAY 12, 2018 noon to 6pm

McGown Studio in The Edge District 405 Monroe Avenue

pinkwigmusicfest.org Local music, local beer and local food trucks!

26

LUCKY 7 BRASS BAND • MARCELLA & HER LOVERS • CASSETTE SET • ISLAND 45


C A L E N DA R: M AY 1 0 - 1 6 Peabody Rooftop Parties

Live music and beautiful views of the sun setting over the Mississippi River. Ladies get in free before 7 p.m. Visit website for scheduled entertainment. 21-plus. $10-$15. Thursdays, 6-10 p.m. Through Aug. 16. THE PEABODY HOTEL, 149 UNION (529-4000), WWW.PEABODYMEMPHIS.COM.

Teacher Appreciation Week: Recess at Railgarten

Finale to National Teacher Appreciation Week. Teach901 is hosting a party to thank Memphis teachers. Enjoy food and drink specials, games, and Silent Disco. Registration required. Free with registration. Fri., May 11, 7-11 p.m. RAILGARTEN, 2160 CENTRAL, WWW.TEACH901.COM.

Toward Justice: A City-Wide Upstanders’ Project

friends, painting with Dad, and family fun, Visit website for more information. $15-$35. Fri., May 11, 3-5 & 7:30-9:30 p.m., Sat., May 12, 11 a.m.-1 p.m. & 7:30-9:30 p.m., and Sun., May 13, 2-4 & 6-9 p.m.

Director of Perea Elementary School. Criminal Court Judge Loyce Lambert Ryan will provide the keynote. $30. Thurs., May 10, 6-8 p.m.

PINOT’S PALETTE, 5040 SANDERLIN, SUITE 111 (761-0012), WWW.PINOTSPALETTE.COM.

After tea, scones, lemon squares, and other delicious treats, there will be a short but sweet tour of the cemetery grounds. Advance registration is required. Register online. $35. Sat., May 12, 10:30 a.m.

Mother’s Day with Afternoon Tea

Three-course tea menu of savory tea sandwiches, warm scones, assorted sweets, and a glass of champagne. Take home a heart-shaped shortbread for the whole family. Call for reservations. $38-$48. Sun., May 13, 2:30-5:30 p.m. CHEZ PHILIPPE, THE PEABODY, 149 UNION (529-4188), WWW.PEABODYMEMPHIS.COM.

Mothers of the NILE 10th Annual Mothers’ Day Banquet

The group will honor Alicia Norman, Executive

Wed., May 16, 6:30 p.m. LAFAYETTE’S MUSIC ROOM, 2119 MADISON (207-5097), WWW.LAFAYETTES.COM.

FIRST BAPTIST CHURCH, 2835 BROAD (272-3819).

Mother’s Tea

F I LM

ELMWOOD CEMETERY, 824 S. DUDLEY (774-3212), WWW.ELMWOODCEMETERY.ORG.

F O O D & D R I N K E V E N TS

Devils Backbone Five-Course Craft Brew Pairing

Featuring passed appetizer, five-course prix-fixe menu, and five Devils Backbone craft brews. $65.

Memphis-based leaders come together to present this project featuring keynote speaker Bob Zellner who was active in the Civil Rights Movement, art exhibitions and a film screening. Free. Tuesdays, Thursdays, 8 a.m.-8 p.m. Through May 31. MEMPHIS JEWISH COMMUNITY CENTER, 6560 POPLAR (761-0810), WWW.JCCMEMPHIS.ORG.

Babies

Free and open to the public Mother’s Day event. Sun., May 13, 7:30 p.m. HEALTH SCIENCES PARK, CORNER OF MADISON AND DUNLAP, WWW.MDCOLLABORATIVE.ORG.

We Are Not Cats

After losing everything, Eli meets Anya, a young woman who shares his fetish for eating hair. Grotesque situations give way to oddly heartwarming moments. Preceded by the short film Lance Lizardi. PWYC. Wed., May 16, 7-9 p.m. CROSSTOWN ARTS, 430 N. CLEVELAND (507-8030), WWW.CROSSTOWNARTS.ORG.

New and Inactive Members PLAY $100 OF RISK FREE GAMING AT TUNICA’S LUCKIEST CASINO.

Village Creek Star Party

An indoor program with sky maps, constellation mythology, and a slide show followed by an observing session. Sat., May 12, 7:30 p.m. VILLAGE CREEK STATE PARK, CO. ROAD 754 (870-2389406), WWW.MEMPHISASTRO.ORG.

VR Gaming Date Night $20. Fridays, 6-10 p.m.

BLUFF CITY VIRTUAL REALITY, 1026 N GERMANTOWN PKWY (585-5964).

HERE’S HOW IT WORKS: 1. Play your favorite slots on the day you sign up for or reactivate your card. 2. Any losses you incur between $20-$100 will be reimbursed in Promo Cash. 3. Your reimbursement will be mailed to you and is redeemable on a future visit.

H O L I DAY EVE N TS

Mother’s Day Pop-Up at The Art Factory

Featuring handmade pottery, sculpture, paintings, prints, and more. Sat., May 12, 12-5 p.m. THE ART FACTORY, 777 S. COX (251-459-3684), WWW.THEPALLADIOGROUP.COM.

Mother’s Day Brunch

Lavish brunch buffet served on the Mezzanine overlooking the Grand Lobby. Includes dozens of hot and cold breakfast items, salads, seafood, 32-foot dessert station, and more. $76, $28 kids. Sun., May 13, 10 a.m.-2:30 p.m. THE PEABODY HOTEL, 149 UNION (529-4000), WWW.PEABODYMEMPHIS.COM.

Mother’s Day Brunch at the Garden

Mother’s Day Brunch at The Guest House at Graceland Sun., May 13, 11 a.m.-3 p.m.

GUEST HOUSE AT GRACELAND, 3600 ELVIS PRESLEY (3323322), GUESTHOUSEGRACELAND.COM/.

Mother’s Day Dinner: Capriccio Grill

Three-course dinner with stuffed chicken or pan seared scallops topped off with one a decadent desserts. $45. Sun., May 13, 4-10 p.m. CAPRICCIO GRILL ITALIAN STEAKHOUSE, 149 UNION, THE PEABODY (529-4199), WWW.PEABODYMEMPHIS.COM.

Mother’s Day Hand-Tied Bouquet with Barton Lynch

FIGHTS AT FITZ SATURDAY, JUNE 9 7:30PM Hotel Package $189 • Deluxe Room • 2 Reserved Seats

Call 1-662-363-LUCK (5825) and mention code: CPFAF

Tickets Start at $30

Purchase tickets at Fitz or call Ticketmaster at 800-745-3000 or ticketmaster.com

Meet in the Catmur Horticulture Building where participants will learn techniques for making their own hand-tied floral bouquet, the perfect gift for Mother’s Day. Sat., May 12, 10:30 a.m. THE DIXON GALLERY & GARDENS, 4339 PARK (761-5250), WWW.DIXON.ORG.

Mother’s Day Out at Concourse

Featuring artist market and craft fair with shopping, live jazz, and family activities. Sat., May 12, 11 a.m.-6 p.m. CROSSTOWN CONCOURSE (FORMERLY SEARS CROSSTOWN), N. CLEVELAND AT NORTH PARKWAY, WWW.CROSSTOWNARTS.ORG.

Mother’s Day Weekend Painting

Sessions feature a mother’s day out painting with

FitzgeraldsTunica.com • 1-662-363-LUCK (5825) • Must be 21 and a Key Rewards member. See Cashier•Players Club for rules. While supplies last. Tax and resort fee not included in listed price. Advance hotel reservations required and subject to availability. $50 credit or debit card is required upon hotel check-in. Arrivals after 6pm must be guaranteed with a credit card. Management reserves the right to cancel, change and modify the event or promotion. Gaming restricted patrons prohibited. Gambling Problem? Call 1-800-522-4700.

m e m p h i s f l y e r. c o m

MEMPHIS BOTANIC GARDEN, 750 CHERRY (636-4100), WWW.MEMPHISBOTANICGARDEN.COM.

ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT

Treat Mom to an unforgettable experience in the Japanese Garden, featuring a catered buffet, live music, children’s craft, and the most scenic setting in town. Cash bar available. $45 members, $55 nonmembers. Sun., May 13, 10:30 a.m.-noon.

27


420 S. GERMANTOWN PKWY STE 104

CORDOVA, TN 38018

901-435-6157

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At ROCKWOOL, we welcome employees with various backgrounds and abilities who share our values and are eager to face new challenges as part of our growing manufacturing team, located in Byhalia, MS—just south of Collierville. Concern for People, Planet and Prosperity go hand-in-hand at ROCKWOOL, the world’s leader in stonewool insulation. Would you be proud to work for a global company that is making a positive impact on global challenges like climate change and energy efficiency? Join us in releasing the natural power of stone to help improve modern living conditions for millions of people worldwide.

We’re hiring for the following positions: • Forklift Operator • Production Machine Operator • Raw Materials Handler

Qualified candidates may email a resume to HRInbox@rockwool.com with preferred positon in the subject line or stop in to fill out an application on-site.

We offer: - Competitive Pay in Permanent, Full-Time Positions - Medical, Dental and Vision Insurance - Paid Vacation Time and Holiday - Generous 401k Plan and Fringe Benefits - Company Provided Uniforms - Career Advancement: We Promote from Within!

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Job Overview: Mid South Milling is in search of an individual to join our team as an Accounting Data Entry Clerk. The company is located in East Memphis and has excellent Pay, Health Benefits, 401K and Vacation time. Job Description: • Keying Payables • Invoicing • Processing Checks • Cash Receipts Processing • Report Distribution • Keying Contracts • Keying Journal Entries • Must keypunch 8,000 KPH • Match up paperwork • Other duties as assigned If you are interested in working at a great company please send a resume to Kathy Cargile at payroll@msmilling.com. Only interested parties that match the above criteria will be considered. Thank you and look forward to hearing from you.

Multiple Myeloma Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia Acute Lymphocytic Leukemia Researchers are developing therapies that could program a person’s own white blood cells to target and destroy these types of cancer. If you have been diagnosed with one of these types of cancer, your blood cells may be useful to help with development of new ways of treating the disease in the future. The researchers would use your blood cells only for research and they would not be used to create a therapy for you. Financial compensation is provided.

28

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Accounting Data Entry Clerk

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Email: info@keybiologics.com or call: 901-252-3434

give a gift of

HOPE.

For a limited time you can name an apple on the Tree of Hope in our new distribution center.

You can share an apple with your friends, family or your employee group. The more who give, the more we can help. We’re so close to meeting our goal. But we can’t do it without you. www.midsouthfoodbank.org/hungertohope


BOOKS By Corey Mesler

First Person Julian Barnes’ The Only Story.

710 S. COX | OPEN MON-SAT | 11:30AM TIL 7:00PM @COCOANDLOLAS

VOTED#1 #1 IN VOTED IN 901 901

m e m p h i s f l y e r. c o m

ambitions for myself; my exaggerated ambitions were all for love,” he says. Once the affair is begun, they do little to hide their amour, not even from Susan’s husband. Eventually, they are kicked out of the tennis club and the scandal — modest British opprobrium, of course — helps cement them together. They wear their outlaw colors as if a badge. As with most chronicles of romantic relationships, fate enters in. Though this is Paul’s “one story,” it is a ragged affair, involving undying love, troublesome family members, unreal expectations, and, over time, a flux of emotions, all revealed by an unreliable narrator. The fantasy author, John Crowley, said, “Stories last longer, but only by becoming stories.” Paul says, “This is how I would remember it all if I could. But I can’t. There’s some stuff I left out… .” He admits that the story is told through his filters and no one else’s, and that the picture is distorted by his janky memory and by what he wants to include and what he wants to leave out. Between the lines, one senses that the hero of his story, himself, is not entirely without blame for the affair’s outcome. The tale toggles back and forth between first person narration (by Paul) and second person (the “you” being Paul). “You have no theories of life yet, you only know some of its pleasures and pains. You still believe, however, in love, and in what love can do, how it can transform a life, indeed the lives of two people.” In this varying narration, is Paul distancing himself from the story, sloughing off the responsibility of being the protagonist? Is he asking, what would you have done? Eventually, like all stories perhaps, Paul’s narrative switches to third person. Eventually all memoirs become novels. “For instance,” the narrator takes over, “he thought he probably wouldn’t have sex again before he died. Probably. Possibly. Unless. But on balance, he thought not. Sex involved two people. Two persons, first person and second person: you and I, you and me. But nowadays the raucousness of the first person within him was stilled.”

ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT

J

ulian Barnes became a household name — in bookish houses, of course — with his third novel, Flaubert’s Parrot. It’s a witty, crazy-quilt, postmodern meditation on reading and writing a novel, that is both literary and entertaining. Since then, he has gone from strength to strength — he won the Man Booker Prize for The Sense of an Ending — and The Only Story, his newest novel, is one of his best. Barnes is witty and urbane, pithy and highly readable, somewhat like his fellow countryman Ian McEwan. The Only Story is thoughtful and thought-provoking, with a depth of observation and analysis that, at times, seems Updikean. It begins, “Most of us have only one story to tell. I don’t mean that only one thing happens to us in our lives: there are countless events, which we turn into countless stories. But there’s only one that matters, only one finally worth telling. This is mine.” The story that follows is bittersweet, a sort of reverse Lolita tale — Paul is 19, Susan is 48 when they meet over country club tennis — told from Paul’s point of view, looking backward at what became much more than an immature indiscretion. The novel charts their course over decades. What begins in innocence — when Paul says he doesn’t have a reputation, Susan replies, “Oh dear. We’ll have to get you one then. Every young man should have a reputation” — becomes a tangle of emotions and responsibilities. The book’s essential question is, “How much do we owe the people who love us?” Barnes is wise and surgical in his examination of passion and its obligations. The Only Story cuts deep. It’s a dazzling, shrewd, painful consideration of who and what we are when we love. Paul wants to take care of Susan, which includes protecting her from an abusive husband. He’s naïve, but she is ready to cede decision-making to someone else. Paul decides to become a lawyer, partly so that they will not have to live off her money. “I decided to become a solicitor. I had no exaggerated

29


FOOD NEWS By Susan Ellis

Turn the Page Andrea LeTard’s Cooktales.

I

never cooked, ever,” says Andrea LeTard, author of the recently released cookbook Andrea’s Cooktales. LeTard was well into her 20s and married when her grandmother gave her a collection of family recipes. It was spiral-bound with family pictures in the back. In flipping through the book, LeTard was struck by something: “Recipes told stories,” she says. And it sparked an interest in cooking. The first recipe she tried was her grandmother’s holiday ravioli, a favorite of LeTard’s while growing up. She had no rolling pin in which to roll the handmade pasta. She used a wine bottle. From there, she kept on cooking, starting her blog Andrea’s Cooktales after friends begged her to start posting her recipes. LeTard calls her cookbook “next-generation Southern.” Recipes include Fried Chicken and Corncakes (LeTard says fried chicken and waffles is her “death-row” dish; she eats fried chicken most weekends); Coffee Rubbed Filet; and Balsamic BBQ Meatballs. A few of her more creative dishes: Moon Pie banana pudding; a brilliant blue cocktail, Seersucker Punch; and Buffalo Hot Wing Hummus, a healthier alternative to actual hot wings. Some of the recipes from the family’s spiral cookbook wound up in Cooktales, says LeTard. But they’ve been rewritten with a twist, updated. One thing that’s not so updated about Cooktales, a pretty book in grays and pinks with great images by Nicole Cole, is the pink ribbon that is sewn in the spine as a place marker. LeTard says the reasoning behind the ribbon was that she and the book’s publisher Susan Schadt were envisioning those using the book as a sort of journal, where recipes, thoughts, and memories are recorded. There’s also the “Splatter, Savor, Share” approach of the book. “Splatter, Savor, Share is

kind of a sum up of what we want readers to do with the book: Feel free to splatter on it — getting messy in your kitchen actually cooking as much from the book as possible, savor the recipes in it and the heirloom family recipes you choose to add to it on the blank pages, and share it — pass it to family members and friends to also use and write in. I want this book to be a book used in a family for years to come,” LeTard says. “Cooktales,” LeTard says, is a word she made up. “It’s about storytelling from the kitchen and the dinner table,” she writes in the book’s intro. “It’s memories around food that are meaningful and worth savoring.” There will be a booksigning and wine reception with appetizers Thursday, May 10th, 6 p.m., at Novel.

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Rinse the ribs and pat dry with paper towels. In a small bowl, mix together the cocoa, brown sugar, salt, liquid smoke, allspice, paprika, and pepper. Rub the mixture onto the ribs and press to adhere. Cover the ribs and refrigerate for a few hours or overnight. Preheat your oven to 325 degrees. Prep two baking pans by pouring ¾ cup of cola into each pan. Place the chopped onions over the cola and place the ribs on top of the onions. Cover the pan tightly with foil. Bake for 2 ½ to 3 hours, or until meat is tender and almost falling off the bone. I like my ribs to still have substance to them —

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historic Piedmont region. It is one of the most beautiful places on Earth, what my sister-in-law calls “maybe France, maybe Italy.” It is famous for its bold reds like the Barbera or Nebbiolo. The arneis is a dry subtle grape with a fantastic aroma. It has become one of the stars of the region over the last 30 or so years, but because it is a low-yielding vine, it’s not likely to unseat the highvolume (and often excellent) pinot grigio. Roero Arneis is a wine with hints of those famous Peidmont white peaches, as well as crisp green apple and almond. The last generation or so of Italian winemakers has stepped up its game with massive overhauls in both technique and equipment. Not the least of which is modern temperature control and stainless steel vats. The reason your grandparents avoided Italian wines probably had something to do with the use of concrete vats. They are hard to clean. Ironically, it is the stainless steel that preserves some of the minerality of the Roero Arneis. That’s wine-speak for “tastes like a rock.” But picture the sort of stone God might have as a pet rock. I mention the minerality because it is so much a part of the profile that some winemakers, like Giovanni Almando, label theirs “vigne sparse” in reference to the dry, sandy soil in which it’s grown in the foothills of the Alps. Due to its popularity, though, production has expanded beyond the patch of northern Italy with a few experiments with the grape in the U.S., Australia, and New Zealand. You can get a lovely Vietti Roero Arneis around town at about $24.99, and it’s worth checking out. It’s one of those really perfect summer wines — used as an aperitivo wine in Tuscany. Or at least that’s what I was told at lunch. And being a Southerner, I tend to believe anything I’m told in lower Manhattan.

ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT

I

t was less than 40 hours after filing my last column — detailing the existential dangers of three-dollar wine — that I found myself in New York’s famed Union Square Café, having lunch with my agent/ producer/social better. We were talking about beer and mescal and vino, and he settled on an Italian wine he’d discovered while mooning around northern Italy with a more profitable client — because that’s the sort of life he leads. What he’s doing with me, I have no idea. He says, “It’s an $80 bottle of wine, but it drinks like a $120 bottle.” Well, I’ve certainly moved up in the world. What he ordered was a Roero Arneis — one of the stars of Italian white wines. You might want to write that down, because you likely won’t see a lot of it. But it is well worth remembering. I’m generally pretty hard on Italian reds, mostly because of the sangiovese grape, which requires a big loud bolognaise with lots of acidic tomatoes to bring whatever gets kick-started on the palate back into balance. Historically, Italian wine-making regions have not been subject to regulation with as much pedantic gusto as their Gallic cousins in France. And it showed. Italian wines have long suffered a reputation for being harsh and raw. The whites, however, are another story. Enter the arneis — a grape varietal that is commonly found in the hills of the Roero — that was all but extinct when it was rediscovered in the 1980s, following the Judgment of Paris. Not the one in Greek mythology that started the Trojan War, but a blind wine-tasting in 1976 wherein the Francophile wine establishment inadvertently ranked California wines higher than French ones. They’re still mad about it. The aftershock was that if great wine could be made in California, then where else? Certainly in Italy’s

33


FILM REVIEW By Chris McCoy

Pixie Dream Nanny Charlize Theron is magnificent in Diablo Cody’s motherhood dramedy Tully.

I

n the mid-1970s, film critic Laura Mulvey introduced the concept of “male gaze.” The vast majority of films, she said, were told from a male point of view, because the power structures that controlled Hollywood and all the other major film production centers of the world were overwhelmingly male. Men were the protagonists and antagonists, and women were mostly just there to be looked at. This point of view bias was so deeply ingrained in movies that it was difficult for many people of both sexes to even perceive it, much less imagine what a film devoid of male gaze would be like. Now it’s the woke 21st century, but the vast majority of films are still headed by men, despite

major initiatives by women inside and outside the industry. Tully is directed by a man (Jason Reitman, son of the legendary producer/director Ivan Reitman), but its point of view is decidedly female, thanks to the film’s other major creative partners. Diablo Cody, who broke into the business with 2007’s Juno, wrote the screenplay and produced it alongside its star, Charlize Theron. With a little mental work, one can imagine how Tully’s story would break out if it were from a male point of view. It would go something like this: Drew (Ron Livingston) is a hard working father whose wife Marlo (Charlize Theron) goes to great lengths to convince him to help out with the parenting duties. Maybe the I Love Lucy version is how it looks to Drew, but that’s not how it looks to Marlo. To her, pregnant with their third child, Drew is barely there. He travels frequently for work, and when he’s home, he spends his free time slaying video game zombies. Their kindergarten age son Jonah (Asher Miles Fallica) is starting to exhibit signs of serious autism, making his transition to school very difficult. The couple’s struggles are put into sharp relief by a visit to Marlo’s brother Craig’s (director/producer Mark Duplass) enormous modernist home, complete with

Mackenzie Davis (above) stars opposite Charlize Theron (below) in Diablo Cody’s Tully. servants and a nanny. Craig, hinting at difficulties with post-partum depression Marlo had after Jonah was born, offers to foot the bill for a part-time nanny who will come in at night so Marlo can get some sleep. Drew’s pride is wounded by his more affluent brother-in-law, so at first they decline the offer, but once baby Mia is born, Marlo’s situation moves from difficult to impossible. That’s when Tully (Mackenzie Davis) arrives. Tully is the perfect helper — maybe a little too perfect. She’s almost like the female version of the male gaze trope of the quirky girlfriend who exists only to improve the life of the male comedic lead — a Manic Pixie Dream Nanny. Tully takes its time in the wind up, but that’s okay since it gives the audience more time with Theron. She was already one of cinema’s great actresses before her immortal turn as Furiosa in Mad Max: Fury Road. Since then, she’s been doing a lot of presumably well

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recycle we do. this issue is printed on partially-recycled paper. memphis flyer | memphisflyer.com


FILM REVIEW By Chris McCoy excellent Always Shine. Here, it’s less about jealous lesbian murder and more about cupcakes and self-care. But even as Marlo relaxes into the situation and accepts the help she didn’t think she needed, undercurrents of tension and subtext swirl around the two women. Reitman and Cody try for an ambitious ending, and don’t quite stick the landing. But then again, Tully is all about the problems of excessive expectations of perfection thrust upon women in general and mothers in particular. Once you watch it, you’re going to want to do something nice for your mom. Tully Now playing Ridgeway Cinema Grill

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paid action leads, such as the fun but slight Atomic Blonde. Seeing her do comedy/drama naturalism is like a sip of fine wine after drinking from the box for too long. From the first shot of the film, which focuses on her ready-topop pregnant belly, she is photographed in a series of increasingly unflattering situations, many of which involve breast pumps. Cody’s self-aware, wisecracking dialog hasn’t found an actor who worked with it so well since Ellen Page in Juno. Theron sells it by trying to sound polite and normal while delivering cutting barbs. Once Tully enters the scene, everyone fades to the background as the film becomes a tight two-hander between her and Marlo. Davis has masterfully handled an intense female relationship before, in Sophia Takal’s

35


EMPLOYMENT Legal Notices AUTO AUCTION White’s Wrecker will auction the following cars on 5/9/18 at 9am. ‘05 Cadillac1G6DC7A150135573 ‘10 Chevy 2G1FB1EV4A9184616 ‘06 Mits 4A3AB36F46E061579 ‘83 GMC 1GCDC14H6EF302203 ‘17 Acura19UUB1F58HA002607 ‘17 Nissan1N4AL3AP6HC246401 ‘07 Honda1HGCM56807A161675 ‘06 Chevy2G1WB58K569171678 ‘00 Suzi JS1GW71A1Y2104343

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Hospitality/ Restaurant CAFE 1912 Is in need of a cook for desserts, salads and other first courses. Call 901.734.0259 to set up an interview. _____________________ CAMY’S IS NOW HIRING ALL POSITIONS: Asst. Managers, Drivers, Cooks. Apply in person 2886 Walnut Grove Rd. Anytime. No Phone Calls. _____________________

EVELYN & OLIVE Jamaican and Southern Cuisine is now hiring for Wait Staff & Kitchen Help. Apply in person, Mon-Fri between 2-4pm. 630 Madison Ave Memphis, TN 38103. _____________________

RAFFERTY’S HIRING - Servers & Dayshift Greeters Are you a hardworking & service mindedindividual that loves to smile & earn $$Join us @ #65 4542 Poplar AveApply Now www.raffertys.com _____________________

RAFFERTY’S We are looking for service minded individuals, that don’t mind working hard. We work hard, but make $. Apply in the store. 505 N Gtown Pkwy _____________________ SALSA COCINA MEXICANA Mexican Restaurant in East Memphis is looking for Servers & Hostess. We are looking for Servers and Hostess with prior experience. Must have flexible schedule and be able to work 4-5 shifts lunch and or dinner weekly. Experience is preferred but will train the right person with the right attitude towards learning and growing from within the restaurant. Hourly pay is negotiable upon hiring for Hostess. Discounted employees meals, fast upbeat environment. We have 26yrs of business in the same location serving East Memphis guests and will need servers of which we do promote from within long term and for the upcoming season. Apply in person at 6150 Poplar Ave, Memphis, TN 38119

Accounting Data Entry Clerk Job Overview: Mid South Milling is in search of an individual to join our team as an Accounting Data Entry Clerk. The company is located in East Memphis and has excellent Pay, Health Benefits, 401K and Vacation time. Job Description: • Keying Payables • Invoicing • Processing Checks • Cash Receipts Processing • Report Distribution • Keying Contracts • Keying Journal Entries • Must keypunch 8,000 KPH • Match up paperwork • Other duties as assigned If you are interested in working at a great company please send a resume to Kathy Cargile at payroll@msmilling.com. Only interested parties that match the above criteria will be considered. Thank you and look forward to hearing from you.

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EMPLOYMENT • REAL ESTATE • SERVICES IT APPLICATION DEVELOPER III sought by ServiceMaster BSC, LLC, in Memphis, TN to provide high-level analysis and estimates

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TH E LAST WO R D by Aylen Mercado

Wheels on the Bus

m e m p h i s f l y e r. c o m

Remember elementary school? No one was worrying about their taxes, gas prices, or whether there would be a viable planet for our future generations. No, the hot topic in our circles in the then Memphis City Schools was “If it’s raining today, what are we doing for recess?” That may still be a relevant, pressing issue today — that is, if students these days are able to go outside at all in between mandatory state testing — but I haven’t checked in with the primary school population recently for a quote. In those years, I took the bus to school and back. Two days out of the week, however, I would be on the bus four times a day. It was not because I had a long commute to school that required city bus transfers. Rather, I was taking the bus during school. In the middle of the day, my friend (we’ll call him Dev) and I, two little brown kids, would be called out of class, board the bus, and be taken to another elementary school just two miles away. As a now seasoned Memphis driver, two miles is not impressive, but Dev and I were nine and we felt that our commute and having to ride to and from classes made us professional 4th graders. Granted, this cut some serious time into our recess schedule, but we didn’t complain. We had the entire bus to ourselves for Two. Whole. Miles. Sure the rides were bumpy, some of the vinyl in the seats had rips that exposed the cloth underneath, and several sharpie scribbles by morning and afternoon commuters decorated the inside of the bus, but that was nothing compared to the warmth and hospitality of our companion and driver that facilitated our trip to a school that promised smaller classroom sizes and our choice of candy at the end of each lesson. Dev and I were in a program called CLUE, Creative Learning in a Unique Environment, which had a small group curriculum that gave the instructor more flexibility to personalize to each student. Dev started CLUE a year earlier than I did because I had transferred from a Miami public school where I was set to start the program in 1st grade but was passed around taking Florida and then Tennessee assessments that would later label me as an intellectually and academically “gifted” student. These arbitrary and subjective tests ultimately determined the investment I received as a student such that by the age of six, the trajectory of my academic career was planned before me. These scores do not truly tell us whether a child has the ability or capacity to take honors and Advanced Placement college courses years ahead in high school. No assessment can measure that. They determine the kind of preparation a child receives — that is, whether they will be receiving challenging, cognitively engaged learning that will prepare them for “advanced” classes in the future. Dev and I received this preparation that eased the transition into honors and advanced courses in middle school and later high school. But that also meant that many of our peers did not receive that level of investment and preparation, which over the years, adds up. Barely at the double-digits age mark, Dev and I did not have the language to express how public education programs and policy such as these affected our daily lives and relationships, but we felt it. We felt the nuances of enforced separation and isolation from our classmates. Twice a week, we were physically separated from them, pulled from our zoned school which was predominantly black, Latinx, and poor and bussed to a better-funded, optional elementary school down the street. There, we engaged with brainteasers, word games, read short stories about history, and were encouraged to express ourselves through creative writing, which made going to class an enjoyable experience. We weren’t being asked to memorize and regurgitate facts or sit quietly in our desks with busy-work; we were challenged to ask questions and learn about ourselves and each other through a critical pedagogical approach. We wanted to share these experiences (and the candy) with our friends. There was definitely room in the bus for the other 22 students in our class to join us on our trips … why couldn’t they come with us? Why couldn’t we bring our puzzles and word games to them? These questions troubled our minds in the background as we rode back and forth to schools. Dev and I did not understand what about the CLUE assessment was so significant to adults that they divided us from our friends who we believed would also enjoy being challenged to think creatively in class. We were all students at the end of the day, all with limitless potential and all deserving of a quality, well-funded, gifted education. I’m not sure where or how Dev is today. In 5th grade, my parents were advised by administrators and faculty to transfer me to the second school because I was missing instructional time during the drive in between schools. I stopped taking the bus with my fellow commuter. The decisions my folks made were difficult, as all decisions regarding a child’s education and future are for parents. They wanted a better education for me than the one they had, and for that, I am eternally grateful. The education I received through the challenging learning environments in CLUE and similar programs equipped me with the tools, language, and critical thinking to believe in and expect more in a public education system, to have the resources and well-paid teachers and staff who can facilitate engaged learning for all students to ask these questions, too. Aylen Mercado is a brown, queer, Lantinx chingona purusing an Urban Studies and Latin American and Latinx Studies degree at Rhodes College. A native of Argentina, she is researching Latinx identity in the South.

THE LAST WORD

KRISCHAM | DREAMSTIME.COM

Getting a clue on CLUE.

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MINGLEWOOD HALL

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Memphis Flyer, 5.10.18  

This week: The story of a young Memphian who became an Islamic terrorist, and what his father is doing to heal the wounds. Also: Andrea's Co...

Memphis Flyer, 5.10.18  

This week: The story of a young Memphian who became an Islamic terrorist, and what his father is doing to heal the wounds. Also: Andrea's Co...