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Memphis • THE CITY MAGAZINE • W W W.MEMPHISMAGAZINE.COM

Our

500 issue! th

  VESTA HOME SHOW | MAYOR DICK HACKE T T | ELWOOD’S SHACK

THE CITY MAGAZINE

VOL XLII NO 8 | NOVEMBER 2017

fourth ann ua l

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Holiday Gift Guide � ������������� � �

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J O N W. S PA R K S , H O M E G R O W N S A N TA

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From the baby years to retirement days, Baptist Memorial Hospital for Women treats women of all ages. Our wide range of services include high-risk pregnancy care, a comprehensive breast program, efficient diagnostic testing, gynecologic and breast cancer minimally-invasive surgeries. Our certified uro/gyn physical therapist can help with chronic conditions like incontinence and pelvic floor dysfunction. At Baptist Women’s, our exceptional care is all about women.

centrally located

|

baptistonline.org/womens

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easy access

|

convenient parking

Get Better.

10/17/17 12:32 PM


THE OYSTER PERPETUAL The incarnation of the original Oyster launched in 1926 is a distinctive symbol of universal style. It doesn’t just tell time. It tells history.

rolex

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oyster and perpetual are ® trademarks.

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OYSTER PERPETUAL 39

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THE WESTIN MEMPHIS BEALE STREET & BLEU HAVE SOME EXCITING HOLIDAY NEWS! We are already celebrating the season with a sleigh full of incentives for holiday party planners. Book by November 25, 2017 and receive additional incentives! Holiday revelers are encouraged to book now to secure desired dates. For more information please call Lorraine Chatman at 901.334.5924 or email Lorraine.chatman@westinmemphis.com The Westin Memphis Beale Street • 170 Lt. George W. Lee Ave., Memphis, TN 38103 • www.westin.com/bealestreet

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T:8”

T:9.875”

There’s never been a better time to upgrade your sleigh. The Mercedes-Benz Winter Event. Put everything else on hold, because the Mercedes-Benz Winter Event is coming to town. Get the Mercedes-Benz on your holiday wish list today, with incredible offers on the sporty and stylish CLA, the thrilling C-Class, the versatile GLA, the safe and secure GLE, the innovative GLC, or the unequaled E-Class — a true masterpiece of intelligence. So dash on over and take advantage of this jolly opportunity before it disappears. See your authorized dealer today. MBUSA.com/WinterEvent

THE 2018

GLA

STARTING AT

$

33,400

*

Mercedes-Benz of Memphis 5389 Poplar Avenue, Memphis, TN (901) 345-6211 www.mbofmemphis.com

Mercedes-Benz of Collierville 4651 S. Houston Levee Road, Collierville, TN (901) 316-3535 www.mbcollierville.com

2018 C 300 Sedan and 2018 GLC 300 shown in Iridium Silver metallic paint. 2018 GLA 250 SUV shown in Jupiter Red paint. Optional equipment shown. *MSRP excludes all options, taxes, title, registration, transportation charge and dealer prep. Options, model availability and actual dealer price may vary. See dealer for details. ©2017 Authorized Mercedes-Benz Dealers For more information, call 1-800-FOR-MERCEDES, or visit MBUSA.com.

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200 Varick St. New York, NY 10014 : Phone 212-805-7500

10/19/17 11:36 AM


Tradition Innovation Integrity Service Excellence

Our People Make the Real Difference.

When one says Memphis Funeral Home, E. C. Daves and Paul McCarver come to mind. No wonder. Together, they have devoted 85 years of dedicated service to families who have put their trust in us. They have become the face of Memphis Funeral Home and exemplify the tenets in which we deeply believe ... Tradition, Innovation, Integrity and Service Excellence.

E. C. Daves

(Senior Director 35 Years)

MEMPHIS Funeral Home

Paul McCarver

(Senior Director 50 Years)

The Most Trusted Name In Memphis Since 1931.

901-725-0100 Memphis Funeral Home 5599 Poplar Avenue

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Memphis Funeral Home and Memorial Gardens 3700 North Germantown Parkway

10/19/17 11:39 AM


Our

500thissue!

v21

VOL XLII NO 8 | NOVEMBER 2017

Up Front 12 14 18 20 22

in the beginning on the town fine print city journal out and about

Features

25 Sound Waves

A brief history of the oldest high school band in America.

~ by joe boone

34 One Mayor’s Memphis

Dick Hackett reflects upon his tenure in City Hall.

~ by jackson baker

55 901 health Lofty Goals

At Christ Community Health Services, Shantelle Leatherwood is crafting a new vision of wellness for the city’s poor. ~ by jane schneider

Small Hearts, Big Hopes Le Bonheur’s Jeffrey Towbin is aiming high to conquer pediatric heart disease, and more. ~ by jon w. sparks

v21 Homegrown Holiday Gift Guide

34

We’ve made a handy shopping list for you. Check it twice if you please. ~ by shara clark

Columns

on the cover: Jon W. Sparks, Santa (and Inside Memphis Business editor) gives a jolly welcome to our

4th Annual Homegrown Holiday Gift Guide. PHOTOGRAPH BY KAREN PULFER FOCHT

62 ask vance

High School Henry Our trivia expert solves local mysteries of who, what, when, where, why, and why not. ~ by vance lauderdale

113 garden variety

Keeping Your Garden Green Tips for maintaining a beautiful garden during the winter months. ~ by christine arpe gang

115 end game

A Tribute to Charles Billings

55

The curtain comes down on an integral part of Memphis culture. ~ by chris davis

116 dining out

25

The Little Restaurant That Could Diehard fans, smoked deli meats, and a dedicated kitchen team turn Elwood’s Shack into a scrumptious success story. ~ by pamela denney

118 city dining

Tidbits: Railgarten; plus the city’s most extensive dining listings.

128 last stand

Let Them Eat Cake! How we baked happiness into our family’s holidays. ~ by jane roberts

116

Memphis (ISSN 1622-820x) is published monthly for $15 per year by Contemporary Media, Inc., P.O. Box 1738, Memphis, TN 38101 © 2017. Telephone: 901-521-9000. For subscription info, please call 901-521-9000. Subscription customer service mailing address is Memphis magazine, P.O. Box 1738, Memphis, TN 38101. All rights reserved. • Periodicals Postage Paid at Memphis, TN. Postmasters: send address changes to Memphis, P.O. Box 1738, Memphis, TN 38101.

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BONUS

Memphis Magazine’s

THE 2017

FACE

In This Issue

OF

ORIENTAL RUGS

SPECIAL ADVERTISING SECTION

W E A LT H M A N AG E R S

2017 MEMPHIS AWARD WINNERS

Five Star Wealth Manager Criteria Determination of Award Winners Award candidates who satisfied 10 objective eligibility and evaluation criteria were named 2017 Five Star Wealth Managers.

Eligibility Criteria – Required 1. Credentialed as a registered investment adviser or a registered investment adviser representative.

Connect with Five Star Wealth Managers

2. Actively employed as a credentialed professional in the financial services industry for a minimum of five years.

A SELECT AWARD

5. Accepting new clients.

3. Favorable regulatory and complaint history review. 4. Fulfilled their firm review based on internal firm standards.

Finding a wealth manager who suits your needs can be a daunting task. In fact, many consumers have a hard time figuring out where to even begin. Sometimes, a few simple questions can set one off on the right path. Asking a wealth manager what makes working with him or her a unique experience can help you understand how they work and if their style meshes with your own. Further, asking a financial adviser to talk about any specialties they might have can help uncover skills you might find useful.

Evaluation Criteria – Considered 6. One-year client retention rate. 7. Five-year client retention rate. 8. Non-institutional discretionary and/or non-discretionary client assets administered. 9. Number of client households served. 10. Education and professional designations.

Ultimately, how do you find an experienced wealth manager who you feel comfortable working with? One who has high retention rates? One who has undergone a thorough complaint and regulatory review? One who has tenure in the industry? Five Star Professional uses its own proprietary research methodology to name outstanding professionals, then works with publications such as Memphis magazine to get word out about award winners who satisfy 10 objective eligibility and evaluation criteria. Among many distinguishing attributes, the average one-year client retention rate for this year’s award winners is more than 96 percent. Although this list is a useful tool for anyone looking for help in managing their financial world or implementing aspects of their financial strategies, it should not be considered exhaustive. Undoubtedly, there are many excellent wealth managers who, for one reason or another, are not on this year’s list. In order to consider a broad population of high-quality wealth managers, award candidates are identified by one of three sources: firm nomination, peer nomination or prequalification based on industry standing. Self-nominations are not accepted. Memphis award candidates were identified using internal and external research data. For the complete list of winners, go to www.fivestarprofessional.com.

Regulatory Review As defined by Five Star Professional, the wealth manager has not: • Been subject to a regulatory action that resulted in a license being suspended or revoked, or payment of a fine • Individually contributed to a financial settlement of a customer complaint • Been convicted of a felony

R E S E A R C H D I S C LO S U R E S

• Within the past 11 years:

• Wealth managers do not pay a fee to be considered or placed on the final list of Five Star Wealth Managers.

– Been terminated from a wealth management or financial services firm – Filed for personal bankruptcy

• The Five Star award is not indicative of the wealth manager’s future performance. • Wealth managers may or may not use discretion in their practice and therefore may not manage their clients’ assets. • The inclusion of a wealth manager on the Five Star Wealth Manager list should not be construed as an endorsement of the wealth manager by Five Star Professional or Memphis magazine. • Working with a Five Star Wealth Manager or any wealth manager is no guarantee as to future investment success, nor is there any guarantee that the selected wealth managers will be awarded this accomplishment by Five Star Professional in the future. • Five Star Professional is not an advisery firm, and the content of this article should not be considered financial advice. For more information on the Five Star award and the research/selection methodology, go to www.fivestarprofessional.com. • 400 award candidates in the Memphis area were considered for the Five Star Wealth Manager award. 52 (approximately 13 percent of the award candidates) were named 2017 Five Star Wealth Managers.

– Had more than a total of three settled or pending complaints filed against them (and no more than five total pending, dismissed, or denied) with any regulatory authority

FI V E-S TA R W E A LT H M A N AGERS 2017

after page 44 The leading Wealth Managers in our area, chosen by their peers.

Five Star Professional conducts a regulatory review of each nominated wealth manager using the Investment Adviser Public Disclosure (IAPD) website. Five Star Professional also uses multiple supporting processes to help ensure that a favorable regulatory and complaint history exists. Data submitted through these processes was applied per the above criteria: • Each wealth manager who passes the Five Star Professional regulatory review must attest that they meet the definition of favorable regulatory history, based upon the criteria listed above. • Five Star Professional promotes via local advertising the opportunity for consumers to confidentially submit complaints regarding a wealth manager.

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2017 V E S TA HOME SHOW

a special publication of Memphis magazine

Happy Holidays from the Taghavi family to yours.

sponsored by:

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after page 64 The official guide to the 2017 Vesta Home Show at Chapel Cove features renderings, floor plans, supplier information, and builder information for each of the six homes.

Coming in January 2018 STANDARD OF EXCELLENCE SINCE 1950

T HE W EDDING IS SUE

repairs reweaving handwash/cleaning

A look at wedding fashions, reception and rehearsal sites, and other features that will make your wedding a day to remember.

appraisals sales color run restoration pet and other stain removals moth damage odor removal storage and much more 3554 Park Ave., Memphis, TN • 901.327.5033 • taghavirugs.com • Like us on Facebook

Coming in March 2018

The Award-Winning Sheffield Memphis • THE CITY MAGA ZINE • W W W.MEMPHISMAGA ZINE.COM

hig retu hl t r an d st rip

f no

THE FACES AND PLACES ISSUE

THE CITY MAGAZINE

VOL XLI NO 1 2 | M A R C H 2 01 7

FACE S OF T HE MID-SOU T H 2018 Portraits and profiles of the leading professionals in our area.

!1

Rodd Bland the next generation

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of blues on beale.

—1

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2017

FACES OF THE

MID-SOUTH

THE THEFACE FACEOF OF

BEAUTIFUL BEAUTIFUL SMILES SMILES CHRISTOPHER CHRISTOPHERCOOLEY, COOLEY,DDS DDS >>> >>>

When you visit the office of Dr. Christopher Cooley, you become part of a caring dental family. Along with his highly trained, professional staff, Dr. Cooley is committed to listening to your needs and providing care that works for your lifestyle. Our team believes our patients should feel informed and comfortable during every step of their dental treatment. We believe that when our patients are relaxed and happy, they maintain better oral health. Dr. Cooley takes the time necessary to constantly improve his skills and the technological capabilities of the practice. He has trained with many of the best clinicians in the country, and insists on the best materials and highest quality lab work available. Thereby, you benefit from the latest treatment techniques, including innovative advances in patient comfort, the highest-quality and longest-lasting materials, and the most aesthetically pleasing results. Dr. Cooley is a lifetime Memphian who graduated in 1976 with honors from the

University of Tennessee Knoxville, then from the University of Tennessee College of Dentistry in 1982. Dr. Cooley has undergone training with the Hornbrook Group and PAClive, the country’s top program for hands-on continuing education for dentists. Dr. Cooley is also a proud member of: the American Dental Association, American Academy of Cosmetic Dentistry, Tennessee Academy of Cosmetic Dentistry and the Crown Council. These organizations keep Dr. Cooley abreast of developing studies in the fields of cosmetic, restorative and general dentistry. Dr. Cooley and his entire team love to volunteer their time and efforts both locally and globally taking care of patients in Memphis and Shelby Co. and on mission trips to the Dominican Republic. Dr. Cooley always welcomes new patients into his office with most referrals coming from existing, very satisfied patients. The highest compliment we receive is when our patients refer their family and friends.

7938 Wolf River Blvd., Germantown, TN 38138 | 901.754.3117 | CooleyDDS.com

SPECIAL PROMOTION

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2017

FACES OF THE

MID-SOUTH

684 West Poplar Avenue Collierville, TN 38017 Mon-Wed: 10:00 am-6:00 pm Thurs-Sat: 10:00 am-9:30 pm Sun: 11:00 am-6:00 pm

901.853.7822 sheffield-antiques.com

THE FACE OF

COMMUNITY BANKING INDEPENDENT BANK >>>

Strong. Safe. Customer Focused. Local. Since our founding in 1998, Independent Bank has been committed to supporting our customers and communities by helping you achieve your dreams and financial success. We are a full-service bank with personal and business loans, a variety of deposit and cash-management options, mortgage loans and wealth management. We offer innovative solutions, effective products and heroic service. We invite you to experience the i-bank difference — it’s a better way of banking. Proud to be the face of community banking. 5050 Poplar • 844.5051 | 1711 Union • 844.2050 | 450 Perkins • 842.2620 6209 Poplar • 842.2600 | 5995 Stage • 842.1210 | 2116 W. Poplar • 842.1170 | 40 S. Main • 312.8900 3295 Poplar • 844.2075 | 7635 Poplar • 842.1190 i-bankonline.com SPECIAL PROMOTION

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For more information on advertising or our upcoming special sections, please contact Margie Neal at margie@memphismagazine.com

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Memphis T H E CIT Y M AG AZIN E

General Excellence Grand Award Winner City and Regional Magazine Association 2007, 2008, 2010, 2014

&7

PUBLISHER/EDITOR kenneth neill EXECUTIVE EDITOR michael finger MANAGING EDITOR frank murtaugh SENIOR EDITOR shara clark ASSOCIATE EDITOR samuel x. cicci ARTS & LIFESTYLE EDITOR anne cunningham o’neill FOOD EDITOR pamela denney CONTRIBUTING EDITORS jackson baker, joe boone,

john branston, chris davis, michael donahue, christine arpe gang, vance lauderdale, jane roberts, jane schneider EDITORIAL INTERN julia baker

4

CREATIVE DIRECTOR brian groppe PRODUCTION OPERATIONS DIRECTOR margie neal SENIOR ART DIRECTOR carrie beasley ADVERTISING ART DIRECTOR christopher myers GRAPHIC DESIGNERS jeremiah matthews,

bryan rollins PHOTOGRAPHY justin fox burks, michael donahue,

karen pulfer focht ILLUSTRATION chris honeysuckle ellis

4

SENIOR ACCOUNT EXECUTIVES joy bateman,

sloane patteson taylor

Holiday

ACCOUNT EXECUTIVE jacob woloshin ADVERTISING ASSISTANT roxy matthews

CONCERT WEEKEND WEEKEND AT

memphis, tn 901-521-9000 p • 901-521-0129 f subscriptions: 901-521-9000

4

CHIEF EXECUTIVE OFFICER jennifer k. oswalt CONTROLLER ashley haeger

CHRISTMAS WITH ELVIS AT GRACELAND TM

DIRECTOR OF BUSINESS DEVELOPMENT jeffrey a. goldberg EDITORIAL DIRECTOR bruce vanwyngarden

WITH LIVE ORCHESTRA

Friday, December 15, 8:00 pm • Graceland Soundstage

SPECIAL PROJECTS DIRECTOR molly willmott

This unforgettable concert experience features a live orchestra presenting Elvis’ biggest Christmas hits with Elvis on the big screen. © EPE. Graceland and its marks are trademarks of EPE. All Rights Reserved.

4

published by contemporary media, inc.

DIGITAL MANAGER kevin lipe SOCIAL MEDIA MANAGER matthew preston DISTRIBUTION MANAGER lynn sparagowski EMAIL MARKETING MANAGER britt ervin

AN ELVIS GOSPEL CHRISTMAS

IT DIRECTOR joseph carey ACCOUNTING ASSISTANT celeste dixon

LIVE AT GRACELAND

RECEPTIONIST kalena mckinney

Saturday, December 16, 5:00 pm • Graceland Soundstage

Enjoy an evening of Elvis’ favorite Christmas and gospel classics performed by Terry Blackwood and The Imperials and The Blackwood Brothers Quartet.

&7

november 2017

ELVIS LIVE IN CONCERT WITH ALL-STAR MUSICIANS

Saturday, December 16, 8:30 pm • Graceland Soundstage

Celebrate the King of Rock ‘n’ Roll’s greatest hits with Elvis live in concert on the big screen, with a live, rock ‘n’ roll band of all-star musicians.

Tickets start at $35. For tickets or package options, visit Graceland.com/Holiday or call 800-238-2000.

member: City and Regional Magazine Association member: Circulation Verification Council

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IN THE BEGINNING | by kenneth neill

The Memphis 500

“The days of our years are threescore years and ten; and if by reason of strength they be fourscore years, yet is their strength labour and sorrow; for it is soon cut off, and we fly away.”

S

o sayeth the Book of Psalms. As someone fast approaching his own Biblical sell-by date, I find myself these days pondering this wisdom, especially the “fly away” part. At this stage, I’m just hoping to get a decent seat in coach, and not even thinking about a first-class ticket. Historically, magazines have had considerably shorter life spans. Only a handful make it to the human deadline of 70 years, including TIME, National Geographic, The New Yorker, and the granddaddy of them all, Scientific American, established in 1845. The last decade has seen

August 1978

March 1990

significant declines in the American magazine market, with many publications becoming all-digital, and others, unfortunately, just flying away. One publication category that has “taken a licking and kept on ticking,” however, even in these transformational times, is the city magazine category. I recently attended a City and Regional Magazine Association (CRMA) conference in Philadelphia, and found myself marveling not only at the current success of our peers — without question, city and regionals are the best-kept secret in the magazine industry — but also was reminded of just how long the successful ones have been in operation, often with continuous ownership that goes back generations. Count Philadelphia (1908), Boston (1962), Palm Springs Life (1965), and Indianapolis Monthly (1977) among that latter group. And of course Memphis magazine, founded in 1976, and blessed with ownership stability, a devoted pool of regular readers, and a loyal-to-the-core advertising base. Over those four-plus decades, scores of superb writers

and exceptional sales representatives, and an equal number of editors and artists have worked for Memphis, many of them moving on to national fame and fortune, but just as many staying right here in Memphis, either around town or still right here at our offices off South Main. This month’s Memphis is actually our 500th issue. We gave thought this month to running all 500 covers, but decided that would be even more self-indulgent (and some of those covers are real dogs; trust me) than simply running this single page calling attention to

October 1998

December 2015

our efforts. Our goal each and every month is to let the magazine speak for itself, rather than reflect editorial bias in any way, shape or form. If we are guilty of a point of view, it is, as founder Bob Towery, writing in our 25th anniversary issue, opined that “there was as much to be celebrated about the city as to reform.” Actually, there have been four different “Memphis” logos since City of Memphis changed its name to Memphis magazine in May 1978; we’re showcasing each of them on this page. But between the covers, you can be assured that our staff has had the same mission as regards the 500 issues we’ve published thus far, i.e. to inform, entertain, and enlighten our readers in Memphis and throughout the Mid-South. I feel certain that there have been times we have come up short in that regard, but more often than not, I believe we have largely fulfilled that mission. Thanks for your continued support, and look for Issue #501 next month. Kenneth Neill publisher / editor

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on the town

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2

^6 with michael donahue ^6 WHAT: Ave Maria Gala Dinner WHERE: Southwind WHEN: October 1, 2017

R

ev. Monsignor John McArthur, Barbara Spinosa, and three Wings of Ave Maria members were honored at the Ave Maria Gala Dinner, held October 1st at the Southwind clubhouse. McArthur, chaplain at Christian Brothers High School, is a longtime friend of the Ave Maria Home, and Spinosa is a longtime volunteer there. Libby Buring, Mary Webb, and Ann Wilson are members of Wings, a volunteer group of Catholic women that founded the Ave Maria Home in 1956 and raised funds to purchase land in Bartlett for the facility. Ave Maria’s Gala Week of events included the 17th annual Father Leonard Oglesby Memorial Golf Tournament, held October 2nd at Southwind. Proceeds benefit Ave Maria Home residents.

1 Becky and Frank Lewis 2 Shelby Corn, Monsignor John McArthur, and John McArthur 3 Kristi Pesce, Bishop Emeritus J. Terry Steib, and Nick Pesce 4 Frank and Jami Gattuso 5 John, Dana, and Stuart Webb 6 Mary Webb, Libby Buring, and Ann Wilson 7 Clockwise from left: Mary Ann Reber, Bill

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Reber, Joe Delfino, Jackie Turman, Mary Ann Dote, Helen Davis Benskin, Jean Morgan, Hugh Higginbotham, and Joy Maclin

8 Philip and Barbara Spinosa

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THE ONLY THING MORE IMPRESSIVE THAN SEEING THEM AT TOP SPEED IS SEEING THEM SITTING STILL. Not only do we have great convention facilities, but we have some pretty impressive facilities for after your meeting, too. Like the Barber Vintage Motorsports Museum – home to the largest motorcycle collection in the world. Standing amidst the 1,600 vintage and modern bikes and race cars you’ll actually feel the energy in the room. And the entire city. Right here in Birmingham.

inbirmingham.com | # INB irmingham | 800 - 458 - 8085

350K SQUARE FEET OF MEETING AND EXHIBITION SPACE • 18K SEAT ARENA • 4K SEATS IN TWO THEATERS • ALL ON THE BIRMINGHAM-JEFFERSON CONVENTION COMPLEX CAMPUS.

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on the town

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^6 with michael donahue ^6 WHAT: Wine & Dine

WHERE: Tower Center WHEN: September 29, 2017

A

rea and out-of-town chefs joined forces to prepare the cuisine at Wine & Dine, a benefit for Special Olympics of Greater Memphis. The event, which drew more than 400, was held September 29th at the Tower Center. “This is our seventh one,” said Lisa Taylor, Special Olympics of Greater Memphis director. What sets their event apart is “making it different from everyone else’s,” she said. “We’re setting the bar that way.” Taylor worked with chef chair Ryan Trimm, chef/ owner of Sweet Grass/Next Door and the upcoming Sunrise, and Shane Waldroup and Scott Barnes of Cotton Row Uniques. “We just try to add different things and a different atmosphere you don’t see at other events,” she said. “We try to keep it fresh each year. To keep people intrigued, and keep it classy.” Germantown Village Wine & Liquor was the wine sponsor. Among the contributing chefs were Samuel Monsour of Preux & Proper in Los Angeles, Josh Galliano of Companion Bakery in St. Louis, and Nick Rice of Forklift in Tupelo.

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1 Josh and Audra Galliano with Sawyer, Petra, and Emil Galliano. 2 Emily Redd and Trace Austin 3 Wunita and Jason Spigner 4 Dougan Grimes and Lisa Taylor 5 Miguel Canalo and Mayra Star 6 Ben Smith and Ian CouchSmith 7 Sammy Monsour 8 Amelia Lindsey and Austin Magruder 9 Todd English and Kelly English 10 Michael Hudman, Andy Ticer, Keith Bambrick, and Ryan Trimm 9

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WHERE HOLIDAYS ARE MAGICAL SANTAARRIVAL Santa Arrival and Santa Photo details can be found at ShopCarriageCrossing.com Sponsored by Sunrise Chevrolet Buick GMC

Please bring one new, unwrapped toy donation for Toys for Tots

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FINE PRINT

Memphis: It’s No Disaster! A sales pitch for the Bluff City that’s “not so bad.”

by john branston

Greetings from

cumulate” in a market that values Amazon eight times higher than FedEx. The city’s negatives are well known — the violent crime, bad schools, and lack of mountains, beaches, and blue-water lakes. But its fundamentals are good — central location, headquarters of FedEx, the aquifer, an underutilized airport, good utilities, and affordability. City slogans reflect their times. In the Forties and Fifties Memphis and Boss Crump sold quiet neighborhoods and stability. After the King assassination, Memphis was a “decaying river town,” a reminder that if you do not define yourself others will do it for you. In the Eighties and Nineties Memphis sold warehouses and distribution centers. Then we went through Millennial Madness for a decade want to move somewhere inor so, touting bike lanes, craft land, somewhere less exciting breweries, and Ikea. but safer. Maybe somewhere like These days boring looks betMemphis. Hurricane Elvis back ter and better. “Breathe Free” is in 2003, actually a derecho, was a dumb slogan unless you wear a mask at work and can count the over in minutes and didn’t kill anyone. The great flood of 2011 number of clear days this year on made it to the foot of Beale Street your fingers. “Abundant Water” but didn’t even keep the Grizzlies is boring unless you don’t have from playing in FedExForum. it after Walmart runs out and Scientists say the FEMA doesn’t show Thanks to the New Madrid earthup. “Af fordable” Memphis aquifer, means cheap unquake of 1812 was a less you are priced doozy, but without we are the Saudi Facebook and Twitout of your market. princes of water. ter how do they real“No Hurricanes or Blizzards” is blase ly know? More recent ones have been magnitude 3.7, unless you’ve lived through one. As I write this they’re filming which is a hiccup in California. scenes for the movie Brian Banks The closest thing to a wildfire in recent memory was at the Malon the football field at Rhodes co Ridgeway October premiere College and at the Shelby County of the firefighter movie Only the jail. Best and worst, Memphis has Brave produced by former Memit covered. The biopic, starring phian Molly Smith. Drought? Aldis Hodge and Greg Kinnear, Thanks to the Memphis aquifer, is set in California but is being we are the Saudi princes of water. shot in Memphis. In stock market terminology, a Nashville, Chattanooga, and case can be made that Memphis Murfreesboro surged, and mayis an undervalued stock worthy be Memphis can, too. Stranger of a “buy” rating or at least an “acthings have happened.

It’s N

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retty catchy marketing slogan, huh? Maybe not “The City that Never Sleeps” or “Virginia Is for Lovers” or “Silicon Valley USA” but it’s certainly as worthy as “America’s Distribution Center” or “America’s Quietest City” (both real Memphis monikers years ago) and as relevant as the latest news. Which has been one disaster after another in Houston, New Orleans, California, Montana, South Florida, and the Pacific Northwest. This was the year Harvey, Irma, and the phrase “Cat 5” became part of the family, when wildfires burned up part of the Napa and Sonoma valleys, when smoke from other wildfires obscured Portland, Seattle, and San Francisco, and when anyone living near the ocean from New Jersey to Miami or along the Gulf of Mexico felt dread during the four months — or is it five now? — of hurricane season. Climate change got serious attention, even from skeptics. The word “Armageddon” enjoyed a renaissance. The earthquake in Mexico City and Hurricane Maria in Puerto Rico were warnings

that things could be worse. In the aftermath, news stories focused on survivors facing a grim future of real estate prices and rents that are already sky high, outdated flood protections, complex building and zoning regulations, gridlocked highways, and environmental hazards. A recent column in Th e New York Times was headlined “Trying to Breathe in the Bay Area” with a picture of three employees of an Oakland hospital wearing protective masks because of the smoke. A woman goes out to pick lemons from her tree but puts her mask on first. Coffee shops are empty because their air conditioning systems could not filter the smoke, driving patrons to public libraries instead. It was enough to make you

POSTCARD ILLUSTRATION BY BG

! r e t s o Disa

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60 YEARS OF ADVENTURE AND DISCOVERY

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CITY JOURNAL

Soaring Above Poverty by tom jones

F

or much of his life, Ty Cobb has been flying high, not unlike early twentieth-century baseball legend Ty Cobb, also famous for sliding into bases with his spikes high. But unlike his namesake, Memphis’ contemporary Ty Cobb (no relation) has his feet firmly planted on the ground. While an Ole Miss cheerleader, this St. Louis native created the Dixie Daredevils (later the Bud Light Daredevils), the gravity-defying, airborne dunking teams that entertained basketball fans in 385 cities in 50 states and 23 countries. Cobb was living the good life and making more money than he had ever imagined earning, but he realized it wasn’t enough. He had been volunteering at urban gymnasiums and reached a decision: He could turn what he learned as a dunking daredevil in gyms around the world and use it to dare young people to participate in a program to give their lives better odds for success. To begin, the 57-year-old Cobb created an app to support his idea, which he called Corefire Leadership Training. His aim was to help young people tell their own stories, but he realized in time that it fell short. “They need our help to have better stories to tell,” he says.

His app created a social network so youths could create “digital resumes and portfolios” that would help them apply for jobs and college. “As the student makes an effort to participate in activities and volunteer for programs, they are building their resumes and aren’t just depending on an ACT score to explain who they are,” Cobb says, adding that students in “tough neighborhoods” are ground down by the realities of their lives. “Coaches make sure they are motivated and excited and show them their futures are not already written.” The same energy that led him to launch himself into the air toward basketball goals is evident as he talks about the improved version of his app, called CoreRocka. He says it is “experiential entertainment competitions that are designed to entertain, energize, and engage students and adults to ignite a passion for personal growth.” The app can be used to orga-

ing so many of Memphis’ youth. While poverty rates for the U.S. were taking a downward turn, the poverty rate for children in Memphis increased — from 43 percent in 2015 to 44.7 percent a year later. Meanwhile, Memphis has the highest proportion of opportunity youth of any city in the U.S. with 45,000 young people. To top it off, a child born into the bottom 20 percent in income has the worst odds of moving to the top 20 percent of any major city in the U.S. — just 2.6 percent. When these statistics are combined with the fact that Memphis nize volunteers, track progress, has a larger percentage of its popand provide incentives with ulation under 18 than many cities, prizes and competitions, Cobb it takes on even more meaning. says. To make sure all this is fun, For example, 26 percent of the there’s a comic book and trading Memphis population is younger cards personalized for students. than 18, compared to 21.7 per“We believe the only thing more cent in Nashville, 22.2 percent in powerful than a good story is the Austin, 21.5 percent in Baltimore, chance to become part of that and 21.1 percent in St. Louis. In story, and we are using the enother words, while Memphis thusiasm for that as a catalyst and Nashville have roughly the for life-changsame total popuIn Memphis, a child ing learning oplation, Memphis portunities,” he has 26,500 more born into the bottom 20 says. children. percent in income has “Ultimately, The search the worst odds of moving the aim of our and rescue themes in the training is to to the top 20 percent of comic books are create a network any major city in the U.S. translated into of support that on-the-ground is too often miss— just 2.6 percent. competitions ing for inner that can be held online or in city students,” says Cobb. “With gyms or other large rooms. It this program, one staff person brings together teams of up to can touch a dozen kids. It was 12 participants who work for 90 tested at Kroc Center where we minutes at tasks relying on team touched 20,000 kids. What we’ve building, mental tests, and delearned is that it is scalable and velopment of logical plans for it can go into schools to create achieving a goal. more touchpoints and greater While from the outside it looks success.” like fun and games for students, From Cobb’s perspective, getting more young people that’s not what motivated Cobb firmly grounded in ambition to shift the direction of his life. and results is what ultimately Rather, it was having a fuller allows them to soar as dare— and more personal — understanding of the challenges facdevils in their own lives.  

ILLUSTRATION BY MOHAMEDZARANDAH1991 | DREAMSTIME

A Memphis daredevil tries a new approach to help kids who have been “ground down by the reality of their lives.”

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OU T A ND A BOU T |

NOVEMBER 2017

compiled by Julia Baker

11.4

Keller Williams

One-man jam-band Keller Williams will perform his highly entertaining, genre-bending blend of bluegrass, folk, reggae, jazz, and more at Buckman Performing Arts Center. If you like String Cheese Incident, Yonder Mountain String Band, or Umphrey’s McGee, you’re bound to have a good time. Buckman Performing Arts Center @ St. Mary’s School, 60 Perkins Extd. stmarysschool.org/ the-buckman

11.5 - 11.28

11.24-12.29

PHOTOGRAPH COURTESY SHELBY FARMS PARK

Starry Nights

M

any Memphians grew up enjoying Starry Nights, and we were saddened when Shelby Farms Park temporarily discontinued the light spectacle years ago. However, Starry Nights is back, and now millennials (and non-millennials) can show our children a piece of our history at the park any time between November 24th and December 29th. Shelby Farms Park, 6903 Great View Drive N., shelbyfarmspark.org

11.3

JDRF Brew For A Cure

Beach Boys

11.1-11.6

Indie Memphis Film Festival

Indie movie buffs, rejoice! This weeklong festival will feature local and national indie films at seven different theaters throughout Memphis. Catering from Iris Etc. and other delectable food trucks will be available, accompanied by Memphis musicians at each venue. There are a number of admission packages to choose from, including single admission and unlimited admission. Various local theaters festival2017.indiememphis.com

11.2

Beach Boys

Take it back to the days of “Surfin’ USA” or “Pet Sounds” at the Orpheum on November 2nd. Led by Mike Love and Bruce Johnston (sorry, no Brian Wilson, Al Jardine, or David Marks), the group will keep the nostalgia alive for hours while they perform many of their well-known hits, like “Wouldn’t It Be Nice,” “Good Vibrations,” and “I Get Around.” The Orpheum Theater, 203 S. Main St. orpheum-memphis.com

11.2

Bendy Brewski Yoga

The beer-yoga fusion that made waves in Germany has made its way to our hometown. Show up at High Cotton Brewing every Thursday night at 6 p.m. for an evening of entry-level yoga, and then indulge in something hoppy directly afterwards. You may find yourself in such positions as downward dog and child’s pose, but absolutely no “watchasana.” High Cotton Brewing Company, 598 Monroe Ave. highcottonbrewing.com

Speaking of beer, attend this event to try some of the best local beers and food and listen to live music. These local breweries are brewing for the cure for diabetes type 1, so drink up for a noble cause. Also included in the price of admission is a Brew For A Cure mug. Cadre Building, 149 Monroe Ave. jdrf.com

11.4

India Fest

This festival celebrates and promotes the rich culture of India with a “kaleidoscope” of arts, including music, artwork, food, fashion, language, and literature. Various artists from India will perform (Bollywood, anyone?), attendees can try out unique cuisine and receive henna painting, children can learn through handson activities, and local performers will show off their skills in the talent show. Agricenter International, 7777 Walnut Grove Rd. indiafestmemphis.org

“Somewhere In Time” WKNO Art Exhibit Memphis photojournalist Karen Pulfer Focht presents a show and sales of her latest work. Gallery Ten Ninety-One WKNO Studio, 7151 Cherry Farms Rd., Cordova karenpulferfocht.com

11.10

The Jesus and Mary Chain

The Jesus and Mary Chain, a Scottish band who gained its inspiration from the Velvet Underground, formed in the 1980s with a riotous post-punk sound. Reunited after a long hiatus, the band returns to the U.S. with their updated dark, melodious tunes. The New Daisy Theatre, 330 Beale St. ticketfly.com

11.11

Memphis Flyer Crafts and Drafts

The Memphis Flyer combines crafts and drafts to bring you a festival at Crosstown Concourse that will promote local and national businesses alike. A number of craft vendors and brewing companies will showcase and sell their products, while an array of local food trucks are on site to provide culinary support. Crosstown Concourse, 1350 Concourse Ave. memphiscraftsanddrafts.com

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THIS IS WHAT A MULTI-ASSET PORTFOLIO LOOKS LIKE IN REAL LIFE...

“Somewhere In Time” WKNO Art Exhibit PHOTOGRAPH BY KAREN PULFER FOCHT

11.24

North Mississippi Allstars

Our local talents are something to be proud of. The North Mississippi Allstars have received a Grammy Award for “Best Contemporary Blues Album,” along with other numerous Grammy nominations and a Blues Music Award for “Best

from glassware, metalware, woodware, photography, art, accessories, jewelry, apparel, and so much more. Get your Christmas shopping done as early as November 25th! Visit Winter Arts Memphis’ website for updated information on this year’s location. Location TBA winterartsmemphis.com

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WinterArts New Artist Debut.” They haven’t forgotten where they came from, either, considering they’re playing at Minglewood on the 24th, so make sure to come out and show your support. Minglewood Hall, 1555 Madison Ave. minglewoodhall.com

11.25-12.24

WinterArts Artists Market

Have you run out of gift ideas for loved ones? Or are they simply too hard to please? Winter Arts Memphis showcases unique handmade pieces made by different artists from the region. The works range

11.25

Moscow Ballet’s Great Russian Nutcracker

Matryoshka Dolls, Ded Moroz (Father Christmas), Snegurochka (Snow Maiden), and a set designed by Carl Sprague make up the new iteration of the Nutcracker. Couple those with the world-renowned Moscow Ballet, and you get one unforgettable experience. Attendees can also sign up for multiple Nutcrackerthemed gift packages to get in the holiday spirit. Cannon Center for the Performing Arts, 255 N Main St. ticketmaster.com

CNBC RANKS W&A 29 IN TOP 100 WEALTH MANAGEMENT FIRMS FOR 2015 * * Disclaimer: Waddell & Associates (“Waddell”) is an SEC-registered investment adviser. The “Top 100 Fee-Only Wealth Managers” is granted by CNBC, an independent association unaffiliated with Waddell. The CNBC Digital Team, along with Meridian-IQ created the Top 100 Fee-Only Wealth Management ranking based on scores for the following measures weighted according to a proprietary formula to arrive at a final total rank: AUM, staff with professional designations, average account size, client segmentation, growth of assets, years in business and other key factors. Additional information on the factors involved for inclusion in this ranking can be found at the following location: http://www.cnbc.com/id/102605785.

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Sound Waves by joe boone

W

ant to win a bar bet? Ask a localmusic know-it-all to name the oldest band still playing in Memphis. Nope, it’s not the Bar–Kays or Hi Rhythm. Wrong century, by

two. Here’s a hint: One of their leaders is said to have played at Ford’s Theatre the night of Lincoln’s assassination. One member died during the yellow fever epidemic. That was in 1878. Give up?

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The Christian Brothers Band was founded in 1872, which gives it the distinction of being the oldest still-playing school band in the entire country. Over that 145-year period, the CBHS band has existed in several forms and contributed to the musical dimension of Memphis’ civic life. Its band leaders and alumni literally built the musical foundation of the city, and the band continues to represent Memphis at such places as the Kennedy Center, the Lincoln Memorial, Lincoln Center, and Carnegie Hall. More Memphians might know of Manassas High’s Jimmie Lunceford, who led his students — known as the Chickasaw Syncopators — to the heights of twentieth-century

SoundWaves HIT TING THE R IGHT NOTES Here are four examples of how the CBHS band has inuenced Memphis and the world.

THE CHR ISTI A N BROTHERS HIGH SCHOOL BA ND IS THE OLDEST SCHOOL BA ND IN A MER IC A. jazz fame. (See sidebar on page 30.) That group played the Cotton Club in Harlem alongside Duke Ellington’s band. That may well be the greatest achievement ever by a local high-school band. But that was 50 years after the CBHS band was founded. Christian Brothers College was founded in Memphis in 1871 by Brother Maurelian following the closing of the Lasallian order’s Chicago school in the wake of the Chicago Fire of 1871. At the time, the school educated boys from age 8 through college at the original campus at 612 Adams, across the street from the current Shelby County Juvenile Court. The band was founded in 1872. In the intervening years, the band has produced alumni who went on to find great success in commerce, law, medicine, and athletics in this city. photos on page 25: Christian Brothers Band, Memphis, with music from Carl Fischer march book, circa 1890.

Frank Steuterman Sr., circa 1920

THE STEUTERMAN FAMILY

Musical histories of Memphis frequently mention the role of the German community in establishing concert music in the Mid-South region. Christian Brothers itself is in part a product of the migration south from St. Louis that established the German presence here. Among those musical families are the Steutermans, who left a legacy of sound in Memphis that can still be heard today. Dr. Frank J. Steuterman Sr., a friend and musical collaborator of W.C. Handy, treated his directorship of the CBHS band as a side gig to his music school on Linden. The band had been in a period of contraction when he arrived, but under Steuterman’s tenure (1923-1931), it morphed from being a cornet-style community band and embraced the emerging jazz sounds of the day. Steuterman’s male children attended

CBHS and had an enduring inuence on Memphis’ classical and liturgical music culture. Newspaper accounts testify to numerous performances by Frank and his sons Harry, George, and Adolph (class of 1908), playing an array of instruments and maintaining Memphis’ classical music culture. His son Harry became the organist for Holy Communion Episcopal Church. Adolph in particular enjoyed a distinguished performance career as a pipe organist both in the States and in Europe, Asia, and Africa. His extensive travels were funded by performances and documented in the local papers. But his most enduring legacy is the Aeolian-Skinner pipe organ that he personally installed in Calvary Episcopal Church downtown in 1935, an instrument still very much in use. Adolph was the ďŹ rst director of the Sewanee Church Music Conference in 1951. Today, the Steuterman-Hardison Festival Concert, supported by a sponsorship from the Hardison and Monypeny families, is held at Calvary annually and features the instrument’s elite performers. Simon Johnson, the organist at St. Paul’s Cathedral in London, gave a masterful recital in 2016. The next Steuterman-Hardison Festival Concert will feature the Boy Choristers from St. Paul’s Cathedral, London, on April 23, 2018, at Calvary Episcopal Church.

Adolph Steuterman with organ, circa 1935

ALL PHOTOGRAPHS COURTESY CBHS EXCEPT AS INDICATED.

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Ralph Hale, circa 1968

PHOTOGRAPH COURTESY UM SPECIAL COLLECTIONS

THE H A LE FA MILY

After Steuterman’s departure, Captain Charles Harrison (director from 19311941), a former Army bandleader and musical instrument salesman, gave the band a military-style orientation and established the group as a ďŹ xture in Memphis’ civic life. Harrison’s tenure was followed by that of Brother Raphael, who wrote the school song and chose the school colors of purple and gold. The CBHS band became a mainstay of parades and Cotton Carnival festivities. But while the Steutermans established musical depth and Harrison expanded the band’s reputation and scope, it is Ralph Hale who developed the band into the institution it is today.

Richard Nixon with CBHS band members

During his directorship (1947-1983) Hale, a band director who had been working in Monticello, Arkansas, presided over the band’s move from the East Parkway campus (where the school had been part of the college) to Walnut Grove. Under his leadership, the CBHS band assumed national prestige, playing for Richard Nixon and Spiro Agnew. Under Hale, the band played the prestigious Chicago Midwest Clinic in 1954. Another of Hale’s contributions is the tradition of guest soloists performing with the band, a tradition that began with Mexican virtuoso trumpeter Rafael Mendez in 1954. The Hale family has gone on to contribute a great deal to Memphis’ musical boun-

ty. His brother Jack was a trombonist with the Memphis Horns, whose credits include work with Rod Stewart, Willie Nelson, Johnny Cash, Al Green, Isaac Hayes, and Elvis Presley, while his son Jack Jr. (class of 1973) is a successful Nashville record producer and horn player and has worked with Johnny Cash, John Mayer, Etta James, and others.

Jesse Winchester, circa 2011 PHOTOGRAPH COURTESY CYNTHIA WINCHESTER

JESSE WINCHESTER Bill Justis, circa 1960 PHOTOGRAPH COURTESY UM SPECIAL COLLECTIONS

BILL JUSTIS

Bill Justis graduated from CBHS in the class of 1946. That placed him perfectly to be part of the rise of Sam Phillips’ Sun Records. According to Peter Guralnick’s recent Phillips biography (Sam Phillips: The Man Who Invented Rock ’n’Roll), Justis was a reformed country club sort, a saxophonist who overcame an aversion to rock-and-roll and made history. “Raunchyâ€? was a late-night afterthought from a 1957 session that had gone to the bottle. Justis, a renowned band leader, had worked up the number with guitarist Sid Manker and Roland Janes. According to Bob Spitz’s long-form history, The Beatles: The Biography, Paul McCartney was obsessed with “Raunchyâ€? and, in another interview, described George Harrison’s entry into the Beatles as “passing the auditionâ€? for Lennon by playing the song. A video from 1994 shows McCartney, Harrison, and Ringo Starr jamming on “Raunchy.â€? Justis’ advice led Charlie Rich to the country-soul style that would deďŹ ne his career. Justis and Jerry Reed are credited for the original motion picture soundtrack to Smokey and the Bandit (1977). Justis went on to a successful arranging and production career in Nashville until his death in 1982.

Jesse Winchester’s name is well known to Memphian baby-boomers, both personally and professionally. Nationally, he’s remembered as an insightful and soulful songwriter whose work was recorded by the Everly Brothers, Joan Baez, Jimmy Buffett, and Elvis Costello, to name but a few. Winchester was a percussionist in the CBHS band and a member of the class of 1962. In addition to his musical school work, he was involved in Memphis’ well-documented garage-rock culture. He called his band the Church Keys and deemed them “as insigniďŹ cant as we could possibly be.â€? That description would not apply over his course of a complicated musical career. During the Vietnam War era, Winchester emigrated to Toronto, where he fell in with members of The Band. His eponymous debut album from 1970 was produced by The Band’s lead guitarist and songwriter, Robbie Robertson, and features the playing of drummer Levon Helm. He and his music rightly accrued cult status, and his songs were often recorded by other folk and rock artists of the period. Winchester was granted draft amnesty in 1977 and performed regularly thereafter, recording more than a dozen other albums, many highly regarded by critics. If you don’t know his work, you’re missing out. His last album, A Reasonable Amount of Trouble, was released shortly after his death in 2014 and bears testament to his signature depth as a songwriter.

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A M ASTER’S THESIS

urrent band director Patrick Bolton (class of 1995) wrote a master’s thesis in 2011 on the history of the band from its inception through 1947. Bolton turned his thesis into a book, The Christian Brothers Band 1872 – 1947: The First 75 Years, published in 2013. The onus of carrying on such a tradition in an inherently musical city is a burden he enthusiastically bears. I recently snuck into his classroom during the summer band camp, where both boys and girls begin their musical adventures. His passion is evident, and his book is an excellent piece of Memphis history. One outstanding example of the band’s rich heritage is provided by the band’s second director, Professor Paul Schneider, who immigrated from Prussia in 1862. Schneider took over band duties from the school’s founder, Brother Maurelian, in 1882. The

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Brother Maurelian, circa 1872

former Union army bugler is said to have played at Ford’s Theatre the night that Lincoln was assassinated. Under his guidance, the band performed for President Grover Cleveland when his Goodwill Tour stopped here in 1887. A Harper’s magazine engraving shows Cleveland aboard the steamer Kate Adams before a massive crowd at the Memphis landing. The CBHS band has operated under several formats over the decades, under a long list of directors. Current director Bolton, an easy going, 40-year-old native Memphian, who doesn’t seem like he’s been teaching for 18 years, mines this rich historical background as a guide for the current incarnation. “We’re a very traditional concert band at this point. We play concerts; that’s our bread and butter,” he says. “We also have the pep band that existed when I got here.

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Now we have a concert band. We also have a historical program that is like a Civil War brass band, very similar in makeup and design to those original pictures of the band. In the fall, instead of a big field-show band, that’s what we do instead. We haven’t missed the Veterans Day parade in 18 years. That’s our ceremonial group. We also have a jazz band called Walnut Groove, that’s led by Bill McKee [class of 1965].” In his CBHS band thesis, Bolton explains, “I believe there are two major reasons the band was founded so early in Memphis and that it was able to prosper. First, we find that the Christian Brothers were strong

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supporters of bands and orchestras in their schools nationwide. Memphis was no exception. Brother Maurelian saw a need for a band not only to improve campus life, but to promote the school in civic parades and concerts. “Second, Brother Maurelian was supported by the many musicians who seemed to be drawn into Memphis because of the Musicians’ Protective Union,” he continues. “All of the band directors from Paul Schneider to Frank Steuterman played important roles in this organization that helped musicians secure work in the area.” While the legacy of the band is important, the day-to-day opportunity of teaching the discipline of music to kids is what matters. In his 18 years teaching at CBHS, Bolton has been a good and faithful servant, managing the talents that are entrusted with him every day. “These guys that come in, a lot of them are beginners,” Bolton says. “They don’t

In 1927, a young athletic director and English teacher at Manassas High School volunteered to teach music to interested students in addition to his regular duties, thus becoming the city’s first public high school band director. The teacher, a Mississippi native, had studied several instruments in Denver with the father of the great Paul Whiteman. Perhaps this inspired him to think big for his kids, whom he dubbed the Chickasaw Syncopators. Or perhaps his students were already accomplished, having grown up playing in local churches. For whatever reason, this highschool band began performing professionally by 1929. The following year, they made their first recording. By then, of course, they had ditched their original stage name, taking instead the name of their teacher and director: the Jimmie Lunceford Orchestra. After some years of touring, they took up residence at the Cotton Club in Harlem, where Duke Ellington and Cab Calloway were already featured. They soon became recognized for their tight ensemble playing and humorous theatrics, with songs like “I’m Nuts about Screwy Music.” This was when they really hit their stride, beginning a long run of vinyl releases on Decca through the rest of the 1930s. Then, in 1947, it all ended suddenly when Lunceford died of heart failure before a show in Oregon. The tradition he began at Manassas persisted, though, with that high school spawning some of the greatest jazz players the city has seen, including Phineas Newborn Jr., Booker Little, George Porter, Harold Mabern, Charles Lloyd, and Frank Strozier. As Miles Davis wrote in his autobiography, “Before I left for New York, I had tryouts for the band and that’s where I got all those Memphis musicians — Coleman, Strozier, and Mabern. (They had gone to school with the great young trumpet player Booker Little, who soon after this died of leukemia, and the pianist Phineas Newborn. I wonder what they were doing down there when all them guys came through that one school?)”

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know anybody here on the campus. We pull a lot of kids from all over the city; they come and get a home. More than just being a musician, it gives them a family to be a part of. And then when they get here to Christian Brothers, we can see them develop as styled musicians. They graduate and go on to college and get scholarships if they seek them. “And, you know, being a musician is something you keep for the rest of your

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life,” he continues. “A lot of these guys go on and start bands themselves and become musicians here in town. I didn’t know anybody and took on the clarinet. I’m still playing clarinet for bands here in town. So it’s definitely one of those things that can change your life.” The Christian Brothers Band will perform a concert on December 10th at 4 p.m. at the campus on Walnut Grove. Joe Boone is a former music editor for the Memphis Flyer .

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Memphis is published monthly. Annual subscription $15. Publisher/Editor Kenneth Neill. Managing Editor: Frank Murtaugh. Memphis is owned by Contemporary Media, Inc., P.O. Box 1738 Memphis, TN 38101. Stockholders: Ward Archer Jr., 1902 Nelson, Memphis, TN 38114; Jack Belz, 100 Peabody Pl. #1400, Memphis, TN 38103; Kate Gooch, 2900 Garden Lane, Memphis, TN 38111; Ira Lipman, P.O. Box 45, Memphis, TN 38101; Kenneth Neill, P.O. Box 1738, Memphis, TN 38101; Henry Turley Jr., 65 Union Ave. 12th Floor, Memphis, TN 38103. AVERAGE NUMBER COPIES EACH ISSUE DURING PRECEDING 12 MONTHS: Net press run- 21,183. Paid outside county mail subscriptions- 3,766. Paid inside-county mail subscriptions- 12,674. Sales through dealers, carriers, street vendors, counter sales and other Non-USPS paid distribution- 820. Other classes mailed through the USPS- 0. Total paid distribution- 17,260. Free or Nominal rate outside-county copies- 293. Free or Nominal rate inside-county copies- 1,697. Free or Nominal rate copies mailed at other classes through the USPS- 0. Free or Nominal rate distribution outside the mail- 1,192. Total Free or Nominal distribution- 3,182. Total distribution- 20,442. Copies not distributed- 741. ACTUAL NUMBER COPIES SINGLE ISSUE NEAREST TO FILING DATE: Net press run- 20,824. Paid outside -county mail subscriptions3,767. Paid inside -county mail subscriptions- 12,593. Sales through dealers, carriers, street vendors, counter sales and other Non-USPS paid distribution- 734. Other classes mailed through the USPS- 0. Total paid distribution- 17,094. Free or Nominal rate outside-county copies- 274. Free or Nominal rate inside-county copies- 1,717. Free or Nominal rate copies mailed at other classes through the USPS- 0. Free or Nominal rate distribution outside the mail- 1,068. Total Free or Nominal distribution- 3,059. Total distribution- 20,153. Copies not distributed- 671.

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ONE MAYOR’S MEMPHIS ^6

DICK H ACKET T R EFLECTS UPON HIS TEN UR E IN CITY H A LL

O

^6

by jackson baker

n a mid-October Saturday morning, bright and early, former Memphis Mayor Dick Hackett entered a meeting room of St. Francis of Assissi Church in Cordova and greeted a group of expectant lay volunteers in his relatively new role as executive director of Catholic Charities for the diocese of West Tennessee.

Having been this city’s de facto CEO for nearly a decade (late 1982 through the end of 1991), after which he worked for lengthy periods at both St. Jude Children’s Research Hospital and the Children’s Museum of Memphis (heading the latter organization from 2006 to 2016), Hackett is no stranger to speech-making. And his informal yet authoritative way with the assembled parishioners would have been no surprise to Memphians who saw him on the stump back in his political heyday during the 1980s. He was decidedly lanky in those days — “lean and hungry,” Julius Caesar’s term for “yon Cassius” in the Shakespeare play, would have been an appropriate description. At 68 now, Hackett’s face is rounder, and he has acquired a certain bulk and gravity appropriate to his years and standing as a long-term civic player. As is the way with many former political figures long past their term in office but still a presence, more or less, in the established sphere of society, the polemical bite of candidate rhetoric has yielded to a gentler and more generalized point of view. Speaking to these volunteers, giving a version of the pep talk he will repeat over and over as he tours the large diocese that takes in Jackson and numerous other towns in West Tennessee, Hackett seems genuinely moved as he describes the sight that had greeted him on his first day work-day in the office of Catholic Charities at Jefferson and Cleveland — a homeless man asleep and sprawled across the steps leading into the building. He tells his rapt listeners that along with the surge of compassion he felt came a rush of energy as he realized the “power” he now possessed to intervene more directly

in the lives of the unfortunates and hard-luck cases who had now become his main constituency. Hackett speaks of his charity’s various food-service projects for the indigent and, by way of stoking his listeners into a like measure of zeal, smiles broadly as he tells them that, once this morning meeting ends, he will be on his way to the nearest Sprouts to pick up some of the grocery supplies he has talked the store management into providing. For any political type who ever wondered if there is satisfaction to be found outside the grand public arena itself, the saga of Dick Hackett may suggest an answer. It has been 35 years now since Richard C. Hackett became Mayor of Memphis via a hastily declared special election in 1982. At the time, he was only 33, and the youngest urban mayor in the United States. His predecessor, Wyeth Chandler, had served for the previous ten years, succeeding the ill-fated Henry Loeb. Chandler’s enthusiasm for the city’s top job had waned, however, and that summer he surprised most Memphians by resigning to accept a judgeship. The special election of late 1982 drew three entries — former US Attorney Mike Cody, then Shelby County Clerk Hackett, and African-American City Councilman J.O. Patterson — with a provision in effect that would allow only the top two vote-getters to go forward in a runoff election. The three-way race was a nail-biter, with Patterson leading the field with 40 percent of the vote, and Chandler protégé Hackett beating progressive standard-bearer Cody by 2500 votes. Given the demographics of a city electorate that was still majority-white, Hackett won the runoff comfortably.

PHOTOGRAPH BY K AREN PULFER FOCHT

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JACKSON BAKER: The former mayor sat down with Memphis recently for a conversation about his political career. Here, abridged and edited, are some of his recollections. RICHARD HACKETT: I miss the way it used to be. It wasn’t as political [as today]. I came up under the old school [back when] the city charter prohibited partisan politics. You couldn’t run as a Democrat or Republican, which meant you shouldn’t govern as a Democrat or Republican. And too many people at one time came along and decided to ignore that, and it’s become too political. It’s just like Washington. Washington can’t get anything done. And it’s not any better on a state or local basis.

The future mayor got his start the way many officials do, by working in somebody else’s political campaign. My first job was in 1972. I walked up the back step with Mayor [Wyeth] Chandler when he first took office. I worked in his campaign. I had not known him. We lived in Whitehaven, and Whitehaven fought annexation. He put his first administration together with people from different parts of the community — Raleigh, Frayser, Parkway Village, Whitehaven, etc. And Whitehaven people put my name up. Hackett’s first governmental venue was in the Mayor’s Action Center. First, I was administrative assistant, and then when the director left, Chandler [left]

me in charge. In the Action Center days I knew every single phone number in the City Hall building, all six floors, every single phone number, private and public numbers. If I was out somewhere and needed something from a director or deputy director or one of the other staff members in public works, sanitation, general services, I knew the phone number. I have people kidding me saying, “I wouldn’t have worked for you if you’d had an iPhone back then,” because I called all hours of the day and night. At a certain point the ambitious young politician looked for other fields to conquer. I wasn’t dissatisfied at all. But when there was a vacancy for the County Clerk in 1978 because Robert M. Gray was not running for re-election, I filed as a candidate. When I came back and told Mayor Chandler, he said, “You did what?!” He said, “You’re not too young! I hate to lose you, and I’m gonna lose ya, cause you’re gonna win!” He was very, very supportive and there were never any hard feelings whatsoever. Working closely with Chandler, Hackett had advance knowledge of the mayor’s intention to leave office midway of his second term. Chandler resigned in 1982 and would be appointed a Circuit Judge by Governor Lamar Alexander. Surprising many people, including his wife Kathy, Hackett filed for mayor at the last possible moment.

PHOTOGRAPH BY KAREN PULFER FOCHT

When I left the house that morning, Kathy didn’t know I was going to run, nor did I.

Richard Hackett is the new executive director of Catholic Charities of West Tennessee. In October, he appeared at a Saturday morning breakfast at St. Francis of Assisi Catholic Church.

Hackett says he called home and told his wife, “You may want to come over here and get in on this one.” Her recollection: “He called just in time to get ready and drive from Whitehaven. [He] probably gave me an hour or so.” Meanwhile, Hackett friends Mike French, Don White, and Paul Gurley scrambled to put together the 25 signatures required for a filing petition. But in the days beforehand there had been a little crafty scene-setting on Hackett’s part. A day or two before Hackett’s filing Channel 13 reporter Joan Droege had come by the then clerk’s house in anticipation of his possible candidacy. Hackett ran a ruse of sorts on her. Joan came over to the house and said, “Everybody’s expecting you to run.” She came in the house and that’s the first, only, and last reporter that ever came into my house. But she was always nice to me. Anyway, so Bill Boyd went up to a friend of mine’s

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house ... an old high school friend about one street over. And he kept calling the house saying, “Now you be sure and run.” I’d say “Thank you, ma’am. Thank you.” And [the phone] would immediately ring again. Bill Boyd made every one of those phone calls. Joan was there an hour and the phone never stopped ringing. And she put in her story, a live report, saying, “Hackett’s phone never stopped ringing. I was a witness to it. I was there an hour and it never stopped ringing.” It sounded real good. What a great sendoff.

Numbers and colors. I thought I would lose by 5,000. You probably know that I said, “This election is close and Herenton is leading it right now.” It was no surprise. In fact, I told Kathy and the kids to stay home on election night. She ended up coming with me but got my parents to come over to the house and stay with the children. I said, “Don’t bring the children up there. I’m not going to win.” I was the only person on my campaign committee that believed that .”

The special election campaign was held in October and November 1982, and the three leading candidates were Hackett and two city council members, lawyer Mike Cody and minister J.O. Patterson. Hackett saw his main task to be that of beating Cody and then getting into a runoff with Patterson, since the electorate’s black/white dichotomy then favored a white candidate, all other factors being equal.

HER EN TON BEC A ME MEMPHIS’ FIRST BL ACK M AYOR , BY A M A RGIN OF J UST 146 VOTES OUT OF NE A R LY 250,000 C AST. TH AT M A RGIN OF VICTORY WAS SM A LL ENOUGH TH AT A VOTE CH A LLENGE SEEMED IN OR DER , BUT, IN A TENSE R ACI A L EN VIRONMEN T, H ACK ET T CHOSE NOT TO AUTHOR IZE ONE .

Yeah, I got into the runoff. It was fairly close between Patterson and myself. Cody wasn’t too far behind in third. He was a great guy. I had a joke I used to use on him all the time, calling him a fat cat, but I had a lot of respect for him. He was very talented, very smart; would have been a great mayor, frankly. But everybody runs to win ... Hackett had been indelibly identified with his erstwhile boss, Wyeth Chandler, but once he became mayor in his own right, he saw clearly that to be his own man he needed his own people. Well, I would’ve been seen as a fourth term of Chandler if I wasn’t careful. So the only way I could do it was to disconnect myself from other people that were known to be close to Chandler. Not because Chandler was bad, but the perception was that he was in office too long. I wanted my own people in. The time would come when Hackett’s electoral luck would run out. Although he was heavily favored to win a third term in 1991, that year African-American leaders in Memphis determined to field a consensus black candidate to win the mayoralty. That candidate turned out to be Willie Herenton, the recently resigned superintendent of Memphis schools. Hackett contends that in this first year of a majority-black electorate he always knew he was destined to lose. He avoided big public rallies and instead campaigned via a series of backyard house parties.

Herenton became Memphis’ first black mayor, by a margin of just 146 votes out of nearly 250,000 cast. That margin of victory was small enough that a vote challenge seemed in order, but, in a tense racial environment, Hackett chose not to authorize one. Well, I tell you what. The election was audited. And I don’t remember the law any more, but you only have so many days to find specifically how you voted illegally. The truth of the matter is that I had more illegal votes than Herenton. It’s a fact. Because that’s how the white community voted illegally. They move to Germantown, Crittenden County, Barber County, DeSoto, Collierville, and then, “Oh, I’m going to go back and vote at my home precinct one more time.” You could find [at least] one precinct that had 146 votes in it wrong. There’s a widely accepted version of the story that attributes Herenton’s hairbreadth victory to the last-minute heroics on his behalf by Congressman Harold Ford, Herenton’s none-too-secret rival for power. I don’t think Harold Ford voted for Willie Herenton. I know John Ford didn’t; he told

The October 1995 cover of Memphis magazine was the first time the three living mayors of this city had been photographed together. COVER PHOTOGRAPH BY MURRY RISS

me. Beforehand, he said, “You better win this thing.” And, in fact, I think he put us on his ballot one time. There was a general supposition at the time that Hackett took the election defeat hard, growing a beard and becoming something of a recluse in the last days of holding his office. You know what I did the next day? I went deer hunting. On the day [Herenton] was sworn in, I went deer hunting. Because he didn’t invite me to the swearing in, I wasn’t going to go. I don’t think he knew any better, and he’s not a hands-on guy. But I spoke at the next one or two elections. I went to all his swearing-ins after that. I don’t have any animosity toward anybody that ever ran against me. It’s not my office. But I also knew I had a job. By 10 a.m. the next morning, I had two people tell me I had a job. We were going to wait until July because I had some time off. I was going to play racquetball every morning, you know, spend time with Kathy and the kids. [But] St. Jude called and said, “See you Monday. We’re not going to risk losing you.” The job with St. Jude was appropriate and satisfying in numerous ways, not least because he and Shelby County Mayor Bill Morris had succeeded in 1986 in keeping St. Jude in Memphis when it was being courted by Washington University in St. Louis. The two mayors, contin u ed on page 40 N O V E M B E R 2 0 1 7 • M E M P H I S M A G A Z I N E . C O M • 37

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Children’s Research Hospital moving.” His reaction to that … I don’t know if he teared up then, but he teared up at other times. He just loved the mission and the cause. From that moment on, we were on the same side. And Morris and I looked at each other, nodded, winked, whatever. We knew we hit the home run.

H AC K E T T c o n t i n u e d f r o m p a g e 3 7 in office together over Hackett’s entire tenure, bonded in their efforts to attract major industry to Memphis. I know the calls he [Morris] and I had on St. Jude and the contact we had, the meetings [with] the board and we knew every one of them. We had their pictures almost on flashcards. We learned everybody’s name before we ever met them. And we knew the Memphians.

H ACK ET T A ND MOR R IS H A D WH AT C A N ONLY BE DESCR IBED AS A SYMBIOTIC R EL ATIONSHIP, BUT AT TIMES IT H A D ELEMEN TS OF GEN UINE F ULL-TIME R IVA LRY AS WELL .

Another ally in the successful effort to keep St. Jude in Memphis was philanthropist Sam Cooper. Hackett offers this explanation of how this well-known Memphis thoroughfare got its name.

The May 1984 cover depicted Hackett and Morris taking the same wheel of a single car. At times it was a bumpy road for the city/county leaders. COVER ILLUSTRATION BY MIKE COULSON

Al Joseph was the chairman of the board, and I said, “If St. Jude, after comparing Washington University in the city of St. Louis with Memphis and the University of Tennessee and our community … if, Mr. Joseph, you say the board

says it’s in the child’s best interest and research’s best interest to go to St. Louis and Washington University, I’ll stand here as mayor of this city, knowing it’s a lot of jobs, and I’ll say I support St. Jude

Sam Cooper was just fabulous. And he was on the St. Jude board. He always was a friend; in fact, he signed my very first political campaign letter as County Clerk. But Sam Cooper Boulevard, I named that one night over at St. Jude without going to the city council. [Councilman] Oscar Edmonds called me at home that night because he saw it on the news, “You don’t have the authority to do that!” I said, “Well, Oscar, why don’t you do this? Why don’t you vote Tuesday vote to take his name off? And you all just jump in there; that way you all can be part of the St. Jude effort.”

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I’d kid [Morris] sometimes, I’m not saying in what cases, and he’d say, “We need a good guy and a bad guy. Why am I always the bad guy?!” I’d say, ‘Well, you’re just a natural.” I’d say, “On behalf of the citizens of Memphis” when I would welcome people; he’d say “On behalf of 850,000 people in Memphis and Shelby County and all the cities in Shelby County.” He’d always do little things like that. Morris had a great sense of humor and what appeared to be sometimes a slap. I couldn’t have cared less because it didn’t make any difference to me. I used to tell people he’s just like a grandfather to me. I remember when our youngest child was born, I had it all set up to call Bill and I knew where he’d be and all. Turned out he was at his office. So I called his direct line and he said, “Well, how y’all doing?” And I said, “Bill, we’ve had a baby boy, and I just wanted you to be the first to know that we named him William.” He started crying. Tom Jones [Morris’ top aide at the time] will tell you that Bill came into him crying, contin u ed on page 53

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Eligibility Criteria – Required 1. Credentialed as a registered investment adviser or a registered investment adviser representative. 2. Actively employed as a credentialed professional in the financial services industry for a minimum of five years. 3. Favorable regulatory and complaint history review. 4. Fulfilled their firm review based on internal firm standards. 5. Accepting new clients.

Evaluation Criteria – Considered 6. One-year client retention rate. 7. Five-year client retention rate. 8. Non-institutional discretionary and/or non-discretionary client assets administered. 9. Number of client households served. 10. Education and professional designations.

Ultimately, how do you find an experienced wealth manager who you feel comfortable working with? One who has high retention rates? One who has undergone a thorough complaint and regulatory review? One who has tenure in the industry? Five Star Professional uses its own proprietary research methodology to name outstanding professionals, then works with publications such as Memphis magazine to get word out about award winners who satisfy 10 objective eligibility and evaluation criteria. Among many distinguishing attributes, the average one-year client retention rate for this year’s award winners is more than 96 percent. Although this list is a useful tool for anyone looking for help in managing their financial world or implementing aspects of their financial strategies, it should not be considered exhaustive. Undoubtedly, there are many excellent wealth managers who, for one reason or another, are not on this year’s list. In order to consider a broad population of high-quality wealth managers, award candidates are identified by one of three sources: firm nomination, peer nomination or prequalification based on industry standing. Self-nominations are not accepted. Memphis award candidates were identified using internal and external research data. For the complete list of winners, go to www.fivestarprofessional.com.

Regulatory Review As defined by Five Star Professional, the wealth manager has not: • Been subject to a regulatory action that resulted in a license being suspended or revoked, or payment of a fine • Individually contributed to a financial settlement of a customer complaint

R E S E A R C H D I S C LO S U R E S

• Been convicted of a felony • Within the past 11 years:

• Wealth managers do not pay a fee to be considered or placed on the final list of Five Star Wealth Managers.

– Been terminated from a wealth management or financial services firm

• The Five Star award is not indicative of the wealth manager’s future performance.

– Filed for personal bankruptcy

• Wealth managers may or may not use discretion in their practice and therefore may not manage their clients’ assets.

– Had more than a total of three settled or pending complaints filed against them (and no more than five total pending, dismissed, or denied) with any regulatory authority

• The inclusion of a wealth manager on the Five Star Wealth Manager list should not be construed as an endorsement of the wealth manager by Five Star Professional or Memphis magazine. • Working with a Five Star Wealth Manager or any wealth manager is no guarantee as to future investment success, nor is there any guarantee that the selected wealth managers will be awarded this accomplishment by Five Star Professional in the future. • Five Star Professional is not an advisery firm, and the content of this article should not be considered financial advice. For more information on the Five Star award and the research/selection methodology, go to www.fivestarprofessional.com. • 400 award candidates in the Memphis area were considered for the Five Star Wealth Manager award. 52 (approximately 13 percent of the award candidates) were named 2017 Five Star Wealth Managers.

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Five Star Professional conducts a regulatory review of each nominated wealth manager using the Investment Adviser Public Disclosure (IAPD) website. Five Star Professional also uses multiple supporting processes to help ensure that a favorable regulatory and complaint history exists. Data submitted through these processes was applied per the above criteria: • Each wealth manager who passes the Five Star Professional regulatory review must attest that they meet the definition of favorable regulatory history, based upon the criteria listed above. • Five Star Professional promotes via local advertising the opportunity for consumers to confidentially submit complaints regarding a wealth manager.

10/11/17 1:53 PM


SPECIAL ADVERTISING SECTION

W E A LT H M A N A G E R S

McAdams Tax Advisory Group

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YEAR WINNER

Left to right: Gary Osing; Four-year winner David McAdams; Richard Burt

Wealth Manager Award Winner The Five Star Wealth Manager award, administered by Crescendo Business Services, LLC (dba Five Star Professional), is based on 10 objective criteria. Eligibility criteria – required: 1. Credentialed as a registered investment adviser or a registered investment adviser representative; 2. Actively licensed as a registered investment adviser or as a principal of a registered investment adviser firm for a minimum of 5 years; 3. Favorable regulatory and complaint history review (As defined by Five Star Professional, the wealth manager has not; A. Been subject to a regulatory action that resulted in a license being suspended or revoked, or payment of a fine; B. Had more than a total of three settled or pending complaints filed against them and/or a total of five settled, pending, dismissed or denied complaints with any regulatory authority or Five Star Professional’s consumer complaint process. Unfavorable feedback may have been discovered through a check of complaints registered with a regulatory authority or complaints registered through Five Star Professional’s consumer complaint process; feedback may not be representative of any one client’s experience; C. Individually contributed to a financial settlement of a customer complaint; D. Filed for personal bankruptcy within the past 11 years; E. Been terminated from a financial services firm within the past 11 years; F. Been convicted of a felony); 4. Fulfilled their firm review based on internal standards; 5. Accepting new clients. Evaluation criteria – considered: 6. One-year client retention rate; 7. Five-year client retention rate; 8. Non-institutional discretionary and/or non-discretionary client assets administered; 9. Number of client households served; 10. Education and professional designations. Wealth managers do not pay a fee to be considered or placed on the final list of Five Star Wealth Managers. Award does not evaluate quality of services provided to clients. Once awarded, wealth managers may purchase additional profile ad space or promotional products. The Five Star award is not indicative of the wealth manager’s future performance. Wealth managers may or may not use discretion in their practice and therefore may not manage their client’s assets. The inclusion of a wealth manager on the Five Star Wealth Manager list should not be construed as an endorsement of the wealth manager by Five Star Professional or this publication. Working with a Five Star Wealth Manager or any wealth manager is no guarantee as to future investment success, nor is there any guarantee that the selected wealth managers will be awarded this accomplishment by Five Star Professional in the future. For more information on the Five Star award and the research/selection methodology, go to fivestarprofessional.com. 400 Memphis wealth managers were considered for the award; 52 (13 percent of candidates) were named 2017 Five Star Wealth Managers.

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10/11/17 1:53 PM


SPECIAL ADVERTISING SECTION

W E A LT H M A N A G E R S

We Believe the Best Client Is a Knowledgeable Client

Details matter. That’s a lesson learned the hard way by many investors. “Decisions that may appear inconsequential to the untrained eye can cost investors dearly. Without a knowledgeable advisor who is willing to carefully evaluate your entire financial position, investors can be subject to unnecessary taxes and erosion of assets. Perhaps worse, the wealth they built over a lifetime might not be bestowed to the people or causes they hold dear,” explains David McAdams, president of McAdams Tax Advisory Group, LLC in the Greater Memphis Tennessee area. Unfortunately, most financial advisors simply don’t have the ability to identify the many legal traps that are so easy to fall into, putting their clients’ assets in harm’s way. Those who do are rarely motivated to spend the hours it takes to find problems and develop solutions. Investors who want that level of service could pay up to $10,000. McAdams, a financial educator, Investment Advisor Representative, and accountant, is one of few in the industry to include review of wills, estate plans, social security forms, insurance policies, and other documents. He has decades of experience ferreting out conflicts and inaccuracies in important documents. Trusted advisor, not middleman. New clients who have had previous experiences with other advisors usually notice the difference immediately. Many of McAdams’ clients have shared with him that previous advisors didn’t know or care enough to delve deeply and spend the time required to fix their problems. “If you are talking to an advisor who wants to sell you an investment without regard to your age, income, and health and without careful consideration of tax implications, get up and walk away,” says McAdams, whose practice is truly independent. McAdams, Gary Osing, George Coules and Richard Burt are free to recommend solutions based solely on the clients’ best interests. Trained in accounting, McAdams brings 22 years of experience reviewing thousands of tax returns. “A new tax client of mine wondered why his planner hadn’t taken full advantage of tax laws that would have reduced his tax burden. e lack of planning by his former advisor cost him over $25,000 in unnecessary and avoidable taxes. The answer is simple. Tax laws are complicated and shift with every political wind. Only professionals who specialize in this area have the time and resources to stay abreast of these changes.” An independent advisory group specializing in issues concerning retirees, McAdams Tax Advisory Group is particularly attuned to common mistakes that would be calamitous for retirees. “We see more mistakes made in income planning than any other area,” says McAdams. The timing of withdrawals after retirement also has a dramatic impact on the retirement nest egg. According to McAdams, losses to your portfolio in the final few years before retirement or shortly thereafter can plunder a lifetime of disciplined savings. Just a couple of years of bad returns during the withdrawal phase could be catastrophic. “Income planning, tax planning and estate planning are our primary focuses,” says McAdams. “Our goal is to help clients achieve safe, secure income that won’t go away and make sure they are leaving the legacy they envision.”

C O NTAC T 98 Timber Creek Drive • Cordova, TN 38018 • Phone: 901-737-3883 tclaiborne@mcadamstax.com www.mcadamstaxadvisory.com McAdams Tax Advisory Group has an “A+” accredited rating with the Better Business Bureau, and is a member of the Greater Memphis Chamber of Commerce. Investment Advisory Services offered through Sound Income Strategies, LLC, an SEC Registered Investment Advisory Firm. McAdams Tax Advisory Group, LLC and Sound Income Strategies, LLC are not associated entities. Wealth Manager Award Winner The Five Star Wealth Manager award, administered by Crescendo Business Services, LLC (dba Five Star Professional), is based on 10 objective criteria. Eligibility criteria – required: 1. Credentialed as a registered investment adviser or a registered investment adviser representative; 2. Actively licensed as a registered investment adviser or as a principal of a registered investment adviser firm for a minimum of 5 years; 3. Favorable regulatory and complaint history review (As defined by Five Star Professional, the wealth manager has not; A. Been subject to a regulatory action that resulted in a license being suspended or revoked, or payment of a fine; B. Had more than a total of three settled or pending complaints filed against them and/or a total of five settled, pending, dismissed or denied complaints with any regulatory authority or Five Star Professional’s consumer complaint process. Unfavorable feedback may have been discovered through a check of complaints registered with a regulatory authority or complaints registered through Five Star Professional’s consumer complaint process; feedback may not be representative of any one client’s experience; C. Individually contributed to a financial settlement of a customer complaint; D. Filed for personal bankruptcy within the past 11 years; E. Been terminated from a financial services firm within the past 11 years; F. Been convicted of a felony); 4. Fulfilled their firm review based on internal standards; 5. Accepting new clients. Evaluation criteria – considered: 6. One-year client retention rate; 7. Five-year client retention rate; 8. Non-institutional discretionary and/or non-discretionary client assets administered; 9. Number of client households served; 10. Education and professional designations. Wealth managers do not pay a fee to be considered or placed on the final list of Five Star Wealth Managers. Award does not evaluate quality of services provided to clients. Once awarded, wealth managers may purchase additional profile ad space or promotional products. The Five Star award is not indicative of the wealth manager’s future performance. Wealth managers may or may not use discretion in their practice and therefore may not manage their client’s assets. The inclusion of a wealth manager on the Five Star Wealth Manager list should not be construed as an endorsement of the wealth manager by Five Star Professional or this publication. Working with a Five Star Wealth Manager or any wealth manager is no guarantee as to future investment success, nor is there any guarantee that the selected wealth managers will be awarded this accomplishment by Five Star Professional in the future. For more information on the Five Star award and the research/selection methodology, go to fivestarprofessional.com. 400 Memphis wealth managers were considered for the award; 52 (13 percent of candidates) were named 2017 Five Star Wealth Managers.

FIVES TARPROFES SIONAL.COM

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10/11/17 1:54 PM


SPECIAL ADVERTISING SECTION

W E A LT H M A N A G E R S

Brian Douglas, Darrell Douglas, Jimmy Shamoun, Julie Terry, Michael Turner, Susan Babina

Left to right: Front row: Sue Redfern; Deb Sossaman; 2012 – 2017 winners Michael Turner, CFP®, Financial Advisor and Julie Terry, CFP®, Financial Advisor; 2013 – 2017 winner Susan Babina, CFP®, Financial Advisor; 2012 – 2017 winner Darrell Douglas, CFP®, Private Wealth Advisor; Sandra Purdom Back row: Nicole Ridenhour; 2012, 2013 and 2015 – 2017 winner Jimmy Shamoun, Financial Advisor; Bud Milligan; Keith Matthews; 2013 – 2017 winner Brian Douglas, CFP®, ADPA®, CRPC®; Adam Martin; Jason DouBrava; Marissa Simonetti; Judy Bennett, Financial Advisor Wealth Manager Award Winner The Five Star Wealth Manager award, administered by Crescendo Business Services, LLC (dba Five Star Professional), is based on 10 objective criteria. Eligibility criteria – required: 1. Credentialed as a registered investment adviser or a registered investment adviser representative; 2. Actively licensed as a registered investment adviser or as a principal of a registered investment adviser firm for a minimum of 5 years; 3. Favorable regulatory and complaint history review (As defined by Five Star Professional, the wealth manager has not; A. Been subject to a regulatory action that resulted in a license being suspended or revoked, or payment of a fine; B. Had more than a total of three settled or pending complaints filed against them and/or a total of five settled, pending, dismissed or denied complaints with any regulatory authority or Five Star Professional’s consumer complaint process. Unfavorable feedback may have been discovered through a check of complaints registered with a regulatory authority or complaints registered through Five Star Professional’s consumer complaint process; feedback may not be representative of any one client’s experience; C. Individually contributed to a financial settlement of a customer complaint; D. Filed for personal bankruptcy within the past 11 years; E. Been terminated from a financial services firm within the past 11 years; F. Been convicted of a felony); 4. Fulfilled their firm review based on internal standards; 5. Accepting new clients. Evaluation criteria – considered: 6. One-year client retention rate; 7. Five-year client retention rate; 8. Non-institutional discretionary and/or non-discretionary client assets administered; 9. Number of client households served; 10. Education and professional designations. Wealth managers do not pay a fee to be considered or placed on the final list of Five Star Wealth Managers. Award does not evaluate quality of services provided to clients. Once awarded, wealth managers may purchase additional profile ad space or promotional products. The Five Star award is not indicative of the wealth manager’s future performance. Wealth managers may or may not use discretion in their practice and therefore may not manage their client’s assets. The inclusion of a wealth manager on the Five Star Wealth Manager list should not be construed as an endorsement of the wealth manager by Five Star Professional or this publication. Working with a Five Star Wealth Manager or any wealth manager is no guarantee as to future investment success, nor is there any guarantee that the selected wealth managers will be awarded this accomplishment by Five Star Professional in the future. For more information on the Five Star award and the research/selection methodology, go to fivestarprofessional.com. 400 Memphis wealth managers were considered for the award; 52 (13 percent of candidates) were named 2017 Five Star Wealth Managers.

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10/11/17 1:54 PM


SPECIAL ADVERTISING SECTION

W E A LT H M A N A G E R S

Guidingpoint Financial Group A financial advisory practice of Ameriprise Financial Services, Inc.

No matter the road you travel, we will be there to help you. At Guidingpoint Financial Group we understand that you want knowledgeable and talented financial advisors to work with you. Our team is here for you when you need us with answers to the questions that are important to you. For some, retirement is the most important issue that they want to tackle and develop answers around. For you, it may be purchasing a home, assessing your employer-sponsored retirement plan, or an old retirement account, saving for education or planning an investment strategy. We are here to help with these and many other of life’s everyday financial situations. As your financial advisors, we are available to you when you need us, in person, on the phone, via a virtual meeting, online or via email. No matter the road you travel, we want to make it easier. The advisors of Guidingpoint Financial Group will be with you every step of the way.

Guidingpoint Financial Group, a financial advisory practice of Ameriprise Financial Services, Inc. 138 Timber Creek Drive • Memphis, TN 38018 465 South Main Street • Memphis, TN 38103 Phone: 901-312-5099 • guidingpointgroup.com Investors should conduct their own evaluation of a financial professional as working with a financial advisor is not a guarantee of future financial success. Certified Financial Planner Board of Standards Inc. owns the certification marks CFP®, CERTIFIED FINANCIAL PLANNER™ and federally registered CFP (with flame design) in the U.S., which it awards to individuals who successfully complete CFP Board’s initial and ongoing certification requirements. Ameriprise Financial Services, Inc., Member FINRA and SIPC. ©2017 Ameriprise Financial, Inc., All rights reserved.

Wealth Manager Award Winner The Five Star Wealth Manager award, administered by Crescendo Business Services, LLC (dba Five Star Professional), is based on 10 objective criteria. Eligibility criteria – required: 1. Credentialed as a registered investment adviser or a registered investment adviser representative; 2. Actively licensed as a registered investment adviser or as a principal of a registered investment adviser firm for a minimum of 5 years; 3. Favorable regulatory and complaint history review (As defined by Five Star Professional, the wealth manager has not; A. Been subject to a regulatory action that resulted in a license being suspended or revoked, or payment of a fine; B. Had more than a total of three settled or pending complaints filed against them and/or a total of five settled, pending, dismissed or denied complaints with any regulatory authority or Five Star Professional’s consumer complaint process. Unfavorable feedback may have been discovered through a check of complaints registered with a regulatory authority or complaints registered through Five Star Professional’s consumer complaint process; feedback may not be representative of any one client’s experience; C. Individually contributed to a financial settlement of a customer complaint; D. Filed for personal bankruptcy within the past 11 years; E. Been terminated from a financial services firm within the past 11 years; F. Been convicted of a felony); 4. Fulfilled their firm review based on internal standards; 5. Accepting new clients. Evaluation criteria – considered: 6. One-year client retention rate; 7. Five-year client retention rate; 8. Non-institutional discretionary and/or non-discretionary client assets administered; 9. Number of client households served; 10. Education and professional designations. Wealth managers do not pay a fee to be considered or placed on the final list of Five Star Wealth Managers. Award does not evaluate quality of services provided to clients. Once awarded, wealth managers may purchase additional profile ad space or promotional products. The Five Star award is not indicative of the wealth manager’s future performance. Wealth managers may or may not use discretion in their practice and therefore may not manage their client’s assets. The inclusion of a wealth manager on the Five Star Wealth Manager list should not be construed as an endorsement of the wealth manager by Five Star Professional or this publication. Working with a Five Star Wealth Manager or any wealth manager is no guarantee as to future investment success, nor is there any guarantee that the selected wealth managers will be awarded this accomplishment by Five Star Professional in the future. For more information on the Five Star award and the research/selection methodology, go to fivestarprofessional.com. 400 Memphis wealth managers were considered for the award; 52 (13 percent of candidates) were named 2017 Five Star Wealth Managers.

FIVES TARPROFES SIONAL.COM

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10/11/17 1:55 PM


SPECIAL ADVERTISING SECTION

W E A LT H M A N A G E R S

J. Barry Jenkins Senior Vice President – Investments

HIGHLIGHTS 30-plus years of experience in the financial services industry Individual and corporate advisor

6 YEAR

Comprehensive wealth management and estate planning strategies

WINNER Left to right: Six-year winner J. Barry Jenkins, Sr. Vice President – Investments; Jessica Neal, Registered Client Associate

2012 – 2017 Five Star Wealth Manager Barry Jenkins I believe investing should be simple and straightforward. I believe the most important factors in a successful investing strategy are allocation, correlation and rebalancing. I believe in minimizing risk and paying as little tax as necessary. Finally, I believe in doing business honestly and with integrity.

6075 Poplar Avenue, Suite 650 • Memphis, TN 38119 Phone: 901-761-6340 • barry.jenkins@wfadvisors.com Wells Fargo Advisors is a trade name used by Wells Fargo Clearing Services, LLC, Member SIPC. [CAR 0917-03848]. Wealth Manager Award Winner

Century Wealth Management Everything we do at Century Wealth Management is driven by the question: “What would I want if I were the client?” We specialize in working with entrepreneurs and professionals looking for a single-source solution to managing their family wealth. We take on the role of the family CFO and manage investments, implement advanced planning strategies and perform a variety of administrative functions to ensure meticulous implementation and simplify our clients’ lives.

Family office Advanced planning strategies Institutional-quality asset management

C O N TA C T

6

1770 Kirby Parkway, Suite 117 • Memphis, TN 38138 Phone: 901-850-5532 • Info@CenturyWealth.com www.CenturyWealth.com

YEAR WINNER

Six-year winner Jay Healy

Third party recognition from ratings services or publications are no guarantee of future investment success and should not be considered an endorsement of the advisor. Wealth Manager Award Winner

The Five Star Wealth Manager award, administered by Crescendo Business Services, LLC (dba Five Star Professional), is based on 10 objective criteria. Eligibility criteria – required: 1. Credentialed as a registered investment adviser or a registered investment adviser representative; 2. Actively licensed as a registered investment adviser or as a principal of a registered investment adviser firm for a minimum of 5 years; 3. Favorable regulatory and complaint history review (As defined by Five Star Professional, the wealth manager has not; A. Been subject to a regulatory action that resulted in a license being suspended or revoked, or payment of a fine; B. Had more than a total of three settled or pending complaints filed against them and/or a total of five settled, pending, dismissed or denied complaints with any regulatory authority or Five Star Professional’s consumer complaint process. Unfavorable feedback may have been discovered through a check of complaints registered with a regulatory authority or complaints registered through Five Star Professional’s consumer complaint process; feedback may not be representative of any one client’s experience; C. Individually contributed to a financial settlement of a customer complaint; D. Filed for personal bankruptcy within the past 11 years; E. Been terminated from a financial services firm within the past 11 years; F. Been convicted of a felony); 4. Fulfilled their firm review based on internal standards; 5. Accepting new clients. Evaluation criteria – considered: 6. One-year client retention rate; 7. Five-year client retention rate; 8. Non-institutional discretionary and/or non-discretionary client assets administered; 9. Number of client households served; 10. Education and professional designations. Wealth managers do not pay a fee to be considered or placed on the final list of Five Star Wealth Managers. Award does not evaluate quality of services provided to clients. Once awarded, wealth managers may purchase additional profile ad space or promotional products. The Five Star award is not indicative of the wealth manager’s future performance. Wealth managers may or may not use discretion in their practice and therefore may not manage their client’s assets. The inclusion of a wealth manager on the Five Star Wealth Manager list should not be construed as an endorsement of the wealth manager by Five Star Professional or this publication. Working with a Five Star Wealth Manager or any wealth manager is no guarantee as to future investment success, nor is there any guarantee that the selected wealth managers will be awarded this accomplishment by Five Star Professional in the future. For more information on the Five Star award and the research/selection methodology, go to fivestarprofessional.com. 400 Memphis wealth managers were considered for the award; 52 (13 percent of candidates) were named 2017 Five Star Wealth Managers.

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W E A LT H M A N A G E R S

Independent Wealth Management, LLC HIGHLIGHTS We start with your goals We develop a plan for your success

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We implement your plan and suggest changes when needed

YEAR WINNER Left to right: Clayton Chapman; Six-year winner Stacey S. Hyde, CPA, CFA, CFP®; Four-year winner Hulon O. Warlick, CRC®; Six-year winner Hugh “Hank” Parks, CFP®

C O N TA C T

Independent Wealth Management is more than a name — it’s a commitment. We help you establish the foundation for your financial freedom — as uniquely defined by your dreams and objectives. Our core values guide us as we guide you: We treat you as we wish to be treated; we know you and your goals; we treat you as a person, not a portfolio balance; and we empower you to feel confident about your decisions and your financial future.

FOLLOW

5050 Poplar Avenue, Suite 2200 • Memphis, TN 38157 Phone: 901-844-0382 • info@i-wmonline.com • www.i-wmonline.com

Facebook: @IndependentWealthManagement

Securities and Advisory Services offered through Commonwealth Financial Network®, Member FINRA/SIPC, a Registered Investment Adviser. Not FDIC Insured, No Bank Guarantee, May Lose Value. Wealth Manager Award Winner

The Bilsky Bridgmon Group at Morgan Stanley A Culture of Excellence With a Local Address Successful people are often the busiest. The day-to-day demands of careers and family usually leave little time to focus on investments and financial planning. That’s where we come in. We help organize the financial affairs of wealthy individuals and families who want to enjoy a quality life, retire comfortably and leave a lasting legacy while not running out of money over their lifetimes. Your wealth plan should keep up with the changing circumstances of your life, as well as with the cycles in the financial markets. 2012 – 2017 Five Star Wealth Manager award winner Becky Bridgmon and 2012 – 2017 Five Star Wealth Manager award winner Stanley Bilsky.

• Results driven, not product driven • Investing for your life and your legacy • Aiming to protect what you worked hard to earn

C O N TA C T 6410 Poplar Avenue, Suite 600 • Memphis, TN 38119 Office: 901-766-6129 • becky.bridgmon@morganstanley.com stanley.bilsky@morganstanley.com www.morganstanleyfa.com/thebilskybridgmongroup.com

6 YEAR

WINNER Left to right: Six-year winners Stanley Bilsky, CIMA®, Senior Vice President, Wealth Advisor, and Becky Bridgmon, CFP®, Vice President, Financial Advisor,

Certified Financial Planner Board of Standards Inc. owns the certification marks CFP®, CERTIFIED FINANCIAL PLANNER™ and federally registered CFP® (with flame design) in the U.S. Investment Management Consultants Association, Inc. owns the marks CIMA® and Certified Investment Management AnalystSM (with graph element). ©2017 Morgan Stanley Smith Barney LLC. Member SIPC. Wealth Manager Award Winner

The Five Star Wealth Manager award, administered by Crescendo Business Services, LLC (dba Five Star Professional), is based on 10 objective criteria. Eligibility criteria – required: 1. Credentialed as a registered investment adviser or a registered investment adviser representative; 2. Actively licensed as a registered investment adviser or as a principal of a registered investment adviser firm for a minimum of 5 years; 3. Favorable regulatory and complaint history review (As defined by Five Star Professional, the wealth manager has not; A. Been subject to a regulatory action that resulted in a license being suspended or revoked, or payment of a fine; B. Had more than a total of three settled or pending complaints filed against them and/or a total of five settled, pending, dismissed or denied complaints with any regulatory authority or Five Star Professional’s consumer complaint process. Unfavorable feedback may have been discovered through a check of complaints registered with a regulatory authority or complaints registered through Five Star Professional’s consumer complaint process; feedback may not be representative of any one client’s experience; C. Individually contributed to a financial settlement of a customer complaint; D. Filed for personal bankruptcy within the past 11 years; E. Been terminated from a financial services firm within the past 11 years; F. Been convicted of a felony); 4. Fulfilled their firm review based on internal standards; 5. Accepting new clients. Evaluation criteria – considered: 6. One-year client retention rate; 7. Five-year client retention rate; 8. Non-institutional discretionary and/or non-discretionary client assets administered; 9. Number of client households served; 10. Education and professional designations. Wealth managers do not pay a fee to be considered or placed on the final list of Five Star Wealth Managers. Award does not evaluate quality of services provided to clients. Once awarded, wealth managers may purchase additional profile ad space or promotional products. The Five Star award is not indicative of the wealth manager’s future performance. Wealth managers may or may not use discretion in their practice and therefore may not manage their client’s assets. The inclusion of a wealth manager on the Five Star Wealth Manager list should not be construed as an endorsement of the wealth manager by Five Star Professional or this publication. Working with a Five Star Wealth Manager or any wealth manager is no guarantee as to future investment success, nor is there any guarantee that the selected wealth managers will be awarded this accomplishment by Five Star Professional in the future. For more information on the Five Star award and the research/selection methodology, go to fivestarprofessional.com. 400 Memphis wealth managers were considered for the award; 52 (13 percent of candidates) were named 2017 Five Star Wealth Managers.

FIVES TARPROFES SIONAL.COM

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10/11/17 1:55 PM


SPECIAL ADVERTISING SECTION

W E A LT H M A N A G E R S

John Paul “J.P.” Webber

William B. Howard, Jr.

Accredited Investment Fiduciary®

ChFC®, CFP®, President

William Howard & Co. Financial Advisors, Inc.

The Associated Agency Your Vision Forms Our Mission • Integrated life planning for individuals and families • Business benefit and succession planning • Comprehensive investment and risk management consulting

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YEAR WINNER

As an independent financial advisor, I believe success is both a function of your present financial well-being as well as your confidence in the future. My mission is to help you pursue your vision through a collaborative planning process that provides an objective, actionable framework seeking financial independence. This dynamic approach helps you to maintain a confident outlook regardless of what the future holds. 5050 Poplar Avenue, Suite 1200 • Memphis, TN 38157 Phone: 901-682-3301 • Toll-free: 877-843-2776 jpwebber@associatedagency.com Advisory services offered through Capital Analysts or Lincoln Investment, Registered Investment Advisors. Securities offered through Lincoln Investment, Broker Dealer, Member FINRA/SIPC. 9/17. www.lincolninvestment.com. The Associated Agency and the above firms are independent and non-affiliated.

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YEAR WINNER

• • • •

Comprehensive financial planning Focus on client goals and objectives Long-term advisory relationships built on trust and integrity Over 38 years of delivering sound financial advice

William Howard & Co. is an independent, fee-only financial planning and investment advisory firm. We are committed to providing excellent service to our clients by listening to them, working with them and crafting solutions that work for their future. Please contact us for more information.

Wealth Manager Award Winner

Wealth Manager Award Winner

George H. Moore, Jr. CLU®, ChFC®, Managing Partner

6410 Poplar Avenue, Suite 330 Memphis, TN 38119 Office: 901-761-5068 whoward@whcfa.com www.whcfa.com

2 YEAR

Award winners are listed by profession, primary service and then alphabetically by last name.

WINNER

Financial Planning Helping You Protect, Plan and Advance Your Unique Situations of Wealth George moved to Memphis in 2004 to take over the firm which he reorganized as Chartwell Financial Group (CFG). With 28 years of industry experience, his focus has been on comprehensive planning and outstanding client service. Based on a planning process that emphasizes a relationship rather than a transaction, George helps clients plan for, and transition into, income strategies to provide for a significant and memorable retirement. • Retirement income strategies • Unique wealth-building philosophy • Comprehensive wealth management and process 6363 Poplar Avenue, Suite 220 • Memphis,TN 38119 Phone: 901-692-5100 • george.moore@chartwellfg.com www.chartwellfg.com Registered Principal and Financial Advisor of Park Avenue Securities LLC (PAS), 6363 Poplar Avenue, Suite 220, Memphis, TN 38119. Securities products/services and advisory services are offered through PAS, a registered broker-dealer and investment advisor, 901-692-5100. General Agent, The Guardian Life Insurance Company of America (Guardian), New York, N.Y. PAS is an indirect, wholly owned subsidiary of Guardian. Chartwell Financial Group is not an affiliate or subsidiary of PAS or Guardian. 2017-46219, exp 10/18. Lic. 2157912.

Susan Babina ∙ Ameriprise Financial Services, Inc. Page 4 & 5 Stanley Bilsky ∙ Morgan Stanley Page 7 Larry Clayton ∙ Anchor Point Financial Gary Dering ∙ Voya Financial Advisors Brian Douglas ∙ Ameriprise Financial Services, Inc. Page 4 & 5 Darrell Douglas ∙ Ameriprise Financial Services, Inc. Page 4 & 5 William Howard ∙ William Howard & Company Financial Advisors Page 8 Stacey Hyde ∙ Independent Wealth Management Page 7 David McAdams ∙ McAdams Tax Advisory Group Page 2 & 3 George Moore ∙ Chartwell Financial Group Page 8

Hugh Parks ∙ Independent Wealth Management Page 7 James Shamoun ∙ Ameriprise Financial Services, Inc. Page 4 & 5 Julie Terry ∙ Ameriprise Financial Services, Inc. Page 4 & 5 Michael Turner ∙ Ameriprise Financial Services, Inc. Page 4 & 5 John Webber ∙ The Associated Agency Page 8

Investments Becky Bridgmon ∙ Morgan Stanley Page 7 Jay Healy ∙ Century Wealth Management Page 6 John Jenkins ∙ Wells Fargo Advisors Page 6 Hulon Warlick ∙ Independent Wealth Management Page 7

Wealth Manager Award Winner

The Five Star Wealth Manager award, administered by Crescendo Business Services, LLC (dba Five Star Professional), is based on 10 objective criteria. Eligibility criteria – required: 1. Credentialed as a registered investment adviser or a registered investment adviser representative; 2. Actively licensed as a registered investment adviser or as a principal of a registered investment adviser firm for a minimum of 5 years; 3. Favorable regulatory and complaint history review (As defined by Five Star Professional, the wealth manager has not; A. Been subject to a regulatory action that resulted in a license being suspended or revoked, or payment of a fine; B. Had more than a total of three settled or pending complaints filed against them and/or a total of five settled, pending, dismissed or denied complaints with any regulatory authority or Five Star Professional’s consumer complaint process. Unfavorable feedback may have been discovered through a check of complaints registered with a regulatory authority or complaints registered through Five Star Professional’s consumer complaint process; feedback may not be representative of any one client’s experience; C. Individually contributed to a financial settlement of a customer complaint; D. Filed for personal bankruptcy within the past 11 years; E. Been terminated from a financial services firm within the past 11 years; F. Been convicted of a felony); 4. Fulfilled their firm review based on internal standards; 5. Accepting new clients. Evaluation criteria – considered: 6. One-year client retention rate; 7. Five-year client retention rate; 8. Non-institutional discretionary and/or non-discretionary client assets administered; 9. Number of client households served; 10. Education and professional designations. Wealth managers do not pay a fee to be considered or placed on the final list of Five Star Wealth Managers. Award does not evaluate quality of services provided to clients. Once awarded, wealth managers may purchase additional profile ad space or promotional products. The Five Star award is not indicative of the wealth manager’s future performance. Wealth managers may or may not use discretion in their practice and therefore may not manage their client’s assets. The inclusion of a wealth manager on the Five Star Wealth Manager list should not be construed as an endorsement of the wealth manager by Five Star Professional or this publication. Working with a Five Star Wealth Manager or any wealth manager is no guarantee as to future investment success, nor is there any guarantee that the selected wealth managers will be awarded this accomplishment by Five Star Professional in the future. For more information on the Five Star award and the research/selection methodology, go to fivestarprofessional.com. 400 Memphis wealth managers were considered for the award; 52 (13 percent of candidates) were named 2017 Five Star Wealth Managers.

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H AC K E T T c o n t i n u e d f r o m p a g e 4 2 saying we’d named our son after him, [that] we named him William Hackett. I think Tom told him, “Well, you dumb ass. That’s his dad’s name and that’s his brother’s name.” He called me back and said, “You son of a bitch.” And I told him, “Well, I really meant to tell you differently, but you got so emotional, I didn’t have the heart.”

Stand Out

At Briarcrest, we believe every student is one of a kind. So, we focus on helping them find and develop themselves by providing more opportunities: Opportunities to discover their interests, talents, and strengths, and opportunities to strengthen their faith and values. In every aspect of our balanced education—academics, athletics, and arts in a distinctively Christian environment—our goal is to help every child stand out. To schedule a tour, call 901.765.4605 or visit briarcrest.com.

December 1990: Memphis Mayor Dick Hackett was voted “Best Public Official” in our readers poll. COVER PHOTOGRAPH BY LARRY KUZNIEWSKI

To say the least, not every relationship Hackett had with other public figures was a bromance. He had especial difficulty with the Rev. Kenneth Whalum Sr., an outspoken African-American member of the City Council. Now, Whalum Jr., I like him. But I went over to his dad’s office one time because he just wouldn’t talk with me; wouldn’t deal with us. And I went over to his office over there at Sutherland and Church, unannounced and walked in. I went up to his secretary and he was right inside his office. I could see right inside that door. I said, “Ma’am, my name is Dick Hackett. I’m with the mayor’s office.” That’s the way I always introduced myself. And she said, “I know who you are.” I said, “I wonder if Rev. Whalum would have a moment.” And she said, “Well, I’ll check and see.” And she went in there. I could see them ... right there as close as that door. And she said, “Rev. Whalum, Mr. Hackett’s here to see you.” And he said, “I’m not in.” She came back and said, “Mr. Hackett, he’s not able to see you.” I said, “Well, I can see him. Tell him don’t

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expect anything at all ever from this administration.” I just drew the line in the sand for us. I walked out and I never dealt with him.

People get tired of you. Bill Farris told me something a long time ago, “You accumulate enemies, not friends.” And that’s both in life and in politics. And it’s really bad in politics. You find you have more enemies at one time than you do friends. If you want to make a friend, ask somebody to do something for you. Not do something for somebody, but ask somebody to do something for you and you get a friend in politics.

PHOTOGRAPH BY KAREN PULFER FOCHT

After working for nearly a decade as CEO/Director of the Children’s Museum of Memphis, the former mayor recently assumed a new function as executive director of Catholic Charities of West Tennessee, commuting to the job “six days a week” from his home in Nesbit, Mississippi, and spending a seventh day in field service. His attitude toward his now long-ago mayoral loss and the end of his political career is relaxed and philosophical.

Dick Hackett, in his new role as the group’s executive director, heads a meeting at Catholic Charities.

But regrets? He has a few. If we would’ve been elected one more time, [the city] would have been virtually debt free. That was my goal, if we had just

kept that same formula. If I was re-elected, I would’ve run for governor [in 1994] because I would have virtually taken the city from a growing debt to a declining debt to almost no debt. 

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LOFTY GOALS &7

AT CHRIST COMMUNITY HEALTH SERVICES, SHANTELLE LEATHERWOOD IS CRAFTING A NEW VISION OF WELLNESS FOR THE CITY’S POOR.

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by jane schneider

any people in Memphis struggle with health woes prevalent across America today: diabetes, high blood pressure, obesity. But residents who live in underserved communities in Shelby County also face barriers and life stressors that make treating those illnesses far more difficult.

That’s why Christ Community Health Services (CCHS) opened its doors in 1995. Guided by the principles of Christian service, CCHS has long aimed to build relationships in communities that lack access to affordable care. And now at the helm is an African-American woman who understands exactly what this journey looks like, and is

Shantelle Leatherwood heads one of the country’s largest, federally qualified Christian community health centers.

PHOTOGRAPH BY KAREN PULFER FOCHT

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intimately familiar with the organization as diagnoses and writing prescriptions isn’t lost well as the challenges of the patients it serves. on Leatherwood. As a teen growing up in Shantelle Leatherwood is the new chief South Memphis, she says she often witnessed executive officer of Christ Community Health the toll poverty extracted on those in her Services. The 44-year-old Memphis native community, and that knowledge has shaped her passion. and mother of two accepted the position in February of this year, making her the organi“This drives me,” Leatherwood explains. “It zation’s first woman and first African-Americauses me to work all night, because I understand our patients’ struggles. You can’t say to can CEO. Leatherwood now leads one of the someone, ‘You need to eat right and exercise; city’s largest, federally qualified, Christian community health centers, that’s a challenge for someproviding healthcare serone who lacks resources.” Grants Leatherwood vices to 58,000 patients, the One of her goals for helped procure enabled majority of whom are poor CCHS is for the organizathe organization to grow and uninsured. tion to eliminate barriers that keep patients from The organization’s clinics substantially, expanding reaching optimal health. — located in communities from two clinics to six. It “If we focus on social delike Frayser, Binghampton, and Raleigh — represent a terminants of health and do also led to the building beacon of hope for neighsocial plans to overcome the of a much-needed clinic borhoods that long have barriers of poverty, housin Frayser, a $5 million, struggled with a shortage ing, and illiteracy, then of primary-care physicians 19,000-square-foot facility eventually, we will have impacted the health of a and healthcare resources. with medical, dental, and family,” she says. “Part of Christ Community operates eight health centers, five that work will need to come pharmacy staff. dental centers, five full-serfrom within CCHS, by betvice pharmacies, and one mobile medical ter coordinating care between departments van, which offers acute and primary care to and by improving the customer experience throughout the agency.” Memphis’ homeless population. The group manages patients with physical as well as Leatherwood has spent the last 18 years emotional issues. preparing for the challenges her new job presIn neighborhoods where poor nutrition, ents. After completing her master’s in health domestic violence, trauma, crime, and poveradministration at the University of Missouty dramatically impact health and wellness, ri-Columbia — she was the only student in the need for CCHS to go beyond treating a class of 20 to choose community health as

a concentration — Leatherwood determined that she would direct her energies toward developing wellness clinics in her hometown. She returned to Memphis in 1999 and started her career as an administrative assistant at CCHS, working for clinical psychologist Alex Galloway, who would become her mentor. It didn’t take long for Galloway to recognize her intelligence and drive. He steadily gave Leatherwood additional responsibilities but was also judicious in his mentoring. “He kept me away from other people,” Leatherwood recalls. “They’d say, ‘She’s gifted’ but as the boss, he’d say, ‘No, she’s not ready.’ You think you’re ready but that’s just youthful pride, Instead, I learned how to support my boss, how to be a team player, how to have a good attitude. And when you do that, people come to you and ask you to do more.” It turned out that her thoroughness and attention to detail were skills well-suited to grant writing. Several grant proposals she penned opened doors for CCHS, enabling the organization to procure millions of dollars in federal funding, money that helped the organization develop programs to better serve women and youth. “I worked so hard I would make myself sick,” says Leatherwood. “But those proposals were funded.” Her initiative was recognized and the young professional was soon working alongside Burt Waller, then CEO of CCHS, doing outreach service. In 2003, the administrative team asked her to consider accepting the practice administrator position, which entailed overseeing the organization’s two clinics. “I thought they were crazy!” Leatherwood says, with a laugh. “One clinic was having personnel problems. The person before me kept getting white paint poured onto her black Cadillac. There was significant upheaval and I was just 30 years old. I thought, ‘Have you lost your minds?’” But Waller was confident in Leatherwood’s abilities. He told her, “Go home and pray about it and come back on Monday with your decision.” Prayer and her Christian tenets play a significant role in Leatherwood’s life; it’s largely why she chose the work she does. So she spent one Saturday morning focusing on her daily devotion, “And I realized God leads you to

PHOTOGRAPH BY KAREN PULFER FOCHT

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challenges that seem fearful. That was when I knew I was supposed to do it.” Underwood’s promotion proved providential, as it gave Leatherwood an opportunity to learn all facets of the organization, doing most everything “except being a provider,” she says. During the next decade as the CCHS practice administrator, additional grants she helped to procure enabled the organization to grow substantially, expanding from two clinics to six. It also led to the building of a much-needed clinic in Frayser, a $5 million, 19,000-square-foot facility with medical, dental, and pharmacy staff. “And it’s beautiful,” she notes. Of course, Leatherwood’s ascent didn’t come without some heartache. A schism caused signif icant upheaval at CCHS during 2012, leading to a parting of ways with one of the organization’s founders. With him went more than 20 providers who, in a sign of fidelity, resigned en masse. The organization is still rebounding from that today, she says, since with the departees went much institutional knowledge. But Leatherwood did her best to stay neutral during the ordeal, and she believes the fracture also provided a valuable lesson. “Help someone carry out their vision,” she says, “and you might one day be able to carry out your own.” In 2013, she became the organization’s chief administrative officer, before taking the CEO position in 2017. Of course, carrying out a vision while being married and raising two school-aged children is no small task. Leatherwood readily acknowledges that unwavering support from her husband, Charles Leatherwood, enables her to find the elusive work/ life balance so many executives strive for. Charles works nights at the FedEx hub so he can be available for his family during the day. In addition to managing her work duties, Leatherwood makes time to participate in her children’s lives, taking 7-yearold son Charles Jr. to soccer practice or 10-year-old daughter Alexis to swim meets. Weekends are strictly devoted to her family and church life at Bellevue Baptist, where she sings in the choir. As for being a black woman in a leadership role, Leatherwood hopes her journey encourages other women who have dreams to strive for their goals. Her advice? “I would say be humble. Do what’s asked of you. Seek out opportunities to learn and grow. Don’t try to rush your way to the top. Take the necessary steps because there are lessons along the way,” she says. “Also, if your boss says to get professional development, do it. In a leadership role, you must be humble, relatable, and a team player to achieve goals — and I have lofty goals.” 

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SMALL HEARTS, BIG HOPES &7

LE BONHEUR’S JEFFREY TOWBIN IS AIMING HIGH TO CONQUER PEDIATRIC HEART DISEASE — AND MORE.

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by jon w. sparks

But a few years ago, Le Bonheur, even with solid clinical and surgical programs, wanted to do better. Making its heart institute worldclass required improving some areas and reinstituting its transplant program, which hadn’t done such an operation since 1998. Enter Dr. Jeffrey A. Towbin, who was hired in 2014 to be a co-leader with Dr. Christopher Knott-Craig of Le Bonheur’s Heart Institute. Towbin specializes in diagnostic and therapeutic advances for cardiomyopathies (heart muscle disease), heart failure, heart transplantation, and cardiovascular genetics. His research work and clinical expertise in pediatric heart failure is internationally known and he has an impressive string of achievements. Dr. Jon McCullers, pediatrician-in-chief at Le Bonheur and chair of the Department of Pediatrics at the University of Tennessee Health Science Center, contacted Towbin saying he wanted to build a better program and had some ideas. In recent years, Towbin had been improving and refining heart pro-

“I want to create the best program. I want to be able to be cutting edge. I want to create new knowledge. I want to change the field to be better.”

Dr. Jeffrey A. Towbin

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emphis is evolving as a major center of medical research and education, although not so long ago there were gaps in patient care — particularly in the pediatric area. It’s common knowledge that St. Jude Children’s Research Hospital is on the cutting edge of cancer treatment and Le Bonheur Children’s Hospital has been making strides in other kinds of care.

grams at children’s hospitals in Houston and then Cincinnati, boosting their rankings in the annual U.S. News & World Report’s Best Children’s Hospitals survey (both are in the top four this year). Towbin agreed to come to Le Bonheur with the idea of improving a good program. “I want to create the best program,” he says. “I want to be able to be cutting edge. I want to create new knowledge. I want to change the field to be better.” His plan was to not only build programs but also change the culture “from a general orientation where everybody does everything to an expertise-oriented scenario where people do what they’re best at.” That required recruitment, so he’s brought in people from around the country, including Denver, New York, Boston, Washington, and Cincinnati. Towbin says Le Bonheur’s heart transplant program started about a year ago and has done nine transplants in that time, a large program in pediatrics. The survival rate is 100 percent so far. Not only is he redefining Le Bonheur’s heart program, he’s also chief of cardiology at St. Jude Children’s Research Hospital and chief of pediatric cardiology at UTHSC, allowing him to get his heart muscle disease program into other institutions. “Cancer, chemotherapy, and some of the other things that happen to the kids who are being treated for cancer at St. Jude affect the

PHOTOGRAPHS COURTESY LE BONHEUR CHILDREN’S HOSPITAL

— Dr. Jeffrey A. Towbin

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Come see us for a merry healthy holiday! There’s still time to get your physical before year’s end! We know you’re busy shopping and celebrating, but stop and get a gift for yourself. Schedule an appointment with your primary care physician. It’s a great time of year to check up on your health, and you’re bound to feel better all through the holidays. We’ll help you start next year on the right foot. Now, while you’re feeling generous, give your doctor a visit.

Call 888-677-SFMP to find a physician or visit sfmp.com to schedule an appointment online.

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901 HE A LTH

6215 Humphreys Blvd., Suite 211 Memphis, TN 38120 901.259.2440 | mpheart.com

heart,” he says. “And it’s usually heart muscle “We’d rather get rid of the problem instead related problems and you’re best off having of having to deal with the symptoms all the experts. So I started going there pretty much time,” Towbin says. “The only way you’ll know every day, seven days a week, and developing how to deal with the original problem is to a large presence so they felt that they could know everything there is about the origirely on us, that we were part of their team.” nal problem. And if it’s genetic-based, you That collaboration has led to other efforts clearly need to know the gene, you need to where Le Bonheur programs for kidneys and know the proteins that the gene makes. You lungs are now integrated with St. Jude. “Now have to understand what the problem is with it’s a large multidisciplinary approach to the care of these kids, which is better for them,” Towbin says. “They get great cancer care, lots of great research going on, but now the things that are the negative effects of cancer and cancer therapy are being handled by experts, and I think that really helps St. Jude.” He wants to have the Le Bonheur name be as well regarded as that of St. Jude. “And I think partnering is the best way to do it because we get the best of “You have an abnormal gene that has one mistake in it both worlds and that’s ocand you can edit that mistake out and sort of change it curring at this point.” Meanwhile, the UTH- back to what it’s supposed to be, which then takes you SC connection further from that genetic disease to a non-disease.” strengthens Towbin’s mission. “There’s a linkage now that’s somewhat tighter than it has been bethe protein and why it gives a certain set of clinical features. Why does it progress or not fore,” he says. “I’m a professor at UTHSC and progress? Why do some people have a severe I do committee work with them and help in other ways. But I spend all of my time cliniproblem while someone else with the same cally here at Le Bonheur and over at St. Jude. gene has a very mild problem? Why do some It’s really three linked organizations instead people die? Why do some people live until of one organization that has umbrellas out they’re 90 with the same problem?” there, which some medical school orientThe answers to those questions will enable ed places across the country have. So it’s a therapies to directly deal with the problem slightly different makeup and one I think is rather than the aftereffects. It’s further imtwenty-first century.” portant to be able to identify potential probThe research Towbin is doing springs from lems in family members. If one member of the the notion that while medicine largely focusfamily has an issue, it should be possible to es on treating symptoms, there needs to be apply preventive medicine to another member more attention paid to pursuing the causes of who might have the same condition. But it disease. Necessary to that is identifying genes requires understanding the genetics. that cause a variety of heart problems, includ“It’s a stair-step approach to growth and it’s ing cardiomyopathies, rhythm abnormalities not growth necessarily in bigness,” Towbin that cause sudden cardiac death, and viruses says. “It’s growth in knowledge and in cutthat infect the heart causing myocarditis. ting-edge ideas and outcomes.” Over the years, Towbin has published Looking to the near future, he sees promise numerous papers and received several NIH in gene editing. “You have an abnormal gene grants supporting the research and has that has one mistake in it and you can edit moved his lab here from Cincinnati. “It’s that mistake out and sort of change it back to a combination of gene discovery,” he says, what it’s supposed to be, which then takes you “trying to identify the actual mechanisms from that genetic disease to a non-disease.” causing the clinical features so that we It’s an approach that holds the possibility of can develop new diagnostic approaches, working for a lot of diseases, heart or otherwhether it’s a blood test or something else, wise. “We’re moving into that arena ourselves,” and targeted therapy.” Towbin says. “I’m hopeful in five years we’ll He’s much like the relentless investigator have a clue whether or not this idea, which who won’t rest until he finds the answer. already has proof of concept, could work.” 

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ASK VANCE

High School Henry Our trivia expert solves local questions of who, what, when, where, why, and why not. Well, sometimes.

DEAR VANCE: Who was the interesting character known as High School Henry, who showed up at every Central High School football game in the 1960s and 1970s? — f.m., memphis.

this page: High School Henry was a constant presence in Central High School yearbooks.

DEAR F.M.: For years I had heard tales of this somewhat

elderly gentleman, who — often adorned in a long coat and caps of various styles — would prowl the sidelines and toot a plastic horn at Central’s football games, or blow a duck call at basketball games, cheering on the Warriors. Looking through old yearbooks, I found the photos you see here, and quite frankly I assumed he was a distant member of the Lauderdale family, because — let’s face it — who else does these things? So it was with some surprise that I discovered the man known as “High School Henry” to every boy and girl who attended Central actually hailed from a more prominent family than the Lauderdales. His full name, it seems, was Henry Clay Polk Jr., and he was a descendant of James K. Polk (17951849), the Tennessean who was this nation’s eleventh president. Impressive, no? But first, I suppose I should explain why he was called “High School Henry” and not simply “Central Henry.” Established in 1916, Central is regarded as the first high

school within the city limits (people from Tech might disagree, but I won’t spoil the fun here). For years, it was known simply as “The High School” and to this day, their players wear an “H” on their uniforms. So “High School Henry” it was. Now right here, I need to give credit where it is due, and almost everything you are about to read is the result of the hard work done by Tommy Pollard, Central High Class of 1969, who Scampering around town in a while back took it upon himself to odd clothes and blowing a look into the real horn might be something a story of this genLauderdale could get away tleman. What he did was send out a with. In fact, it’s expected message to dozens of us. But a man descended of his classmates, asking, “Who was from a U.S. president? Why High School Hendid he act this way? ry?” Through a series of emails that are too complicated to explain here, it seems that a classmate named Elizabeth Buchanan dropped a bombshell, by writing back, “High School Henry was my great uncle, Henry Clay Polk Jr.” That really got things rolling. “Once I had his full name,” says Pollard, “then I could do more research.” It seems Elizabeth’s mother, Katherine Buchanan, was Henry’s sister and served as his legal guardian for most of his life. “He was a dear, sweet old man, and I remember how much he loved Central High School,” Elizabeth Buchanan wrote. “In fact, his true joy came from CHS cheerleaders, players, coaches, and students.” Now every school has dedicated fans. But what’s really interesting is that Henry never attended that school, or any school, really. So, was something … not quite right with his mind? After all, scampering around town in odd clothes and blowing a horn might be something a Lauderdale could get away with. In fact, it’s expected of us. But a man descended from a U.S. president? Why did he act this way? Pollard’s classmate explains why: “When he was born in the early 1900s he became very sick, and doctors told the Polk family that by age 8 his mind would learn no more. So my loving family taught him as much as a child could in those days before computers. God blessed him with his love and gave him a happy life.” Now this is what Pollard discovered: Henry Clay Polk Jr. was actually born in Memphis in 1891 (some

HIGH SCHOOL HENRY PHOTOS COURTESY CENTRAL HIGH SCHOOL / TOMBSTONE PHOTO BY VANCE LAUDERDALE

by vance lauderdale

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CAFE TOULOUSE PHOTOGRAPH BY CLAY TOMAS

sources say 1888). The family owned cotton and grocery businesses here, and for a while ran the Polk Spinning Company on Front Street. The family lived in several homes in Midtown, but their last location was 1395 Goodbar — only four blocks from Crump Stadium, which then and now was located behind Central High School, and which surely explains why Henry was so attracted to the school. “Henry is listed in several censuses as having achieved a sixthgrade education,” says Pollard, “but they never show any work history, and he never married.” For most of his life, it seems he lived with his sister, along with several other members of the family (don’t ask me to get into all their names here) at the home on Goodbar. The Polk family is well-known to Memphians — and especially Memphis historians — for another reason besides their cotton and grocery interests. The patriarch of the family, Henry Clay Polk Sr., died after an appendectomy in 1915. After his death, according to Pollard’s research, another son took over the family businesses and expanded them to include printed materials, such as maps, the Tennessee State Gazetteer, and the well-known Polk Directories. Often called simply city directories, these listed by name, address, street, phone number, and other categories just about everything anyone would need to know about someone living in Memphis. The half-dozen readers of “Ask Vance” will know how many times I have cited a city directory to provide a business address or a person’s occupation. So let me say that the Lauderdales owe quite a debt of gratitude to the Polk family. Buchanan admits that a lot of people at the Central games probably wondered, “Who is this crazy old man?” To her, “he was a child at heart, and I know of the love people showed him at our home and at the games. The stories my mother told me as I grew up made me proud to call him my Great Uncle Henry.” High School Henry passed away on February 16, 1982. “My mother cared for him until the day he died,” says Buchanan. “He died peacefully and very happy in his sleep.” He is buried in the Polk family plot, next to his father at Forest Hill Cemetery. Even though his marker is a simple one (above), the tombstone carver added a nice touch. Instead of a hyphen separating the dates of his birth and death, there is an H. “Thank you to everyone who put up with his ways,” says

Buchanan. “You made a difference in his life.” Considering how many people remember “High School Henry” I think it’s safe to say he made a difference in theirs, too.

Cafe Toulouse DEAR VANCE: What was the name of the fancy restaurant that opened in Overton Square’s French Quarter Inn? — t.o., memphis.

DEAR T.O.: You are surely thinking about Cafe Toulouse, and if you have trouble remembering it, that’s because the northeast corner of Madison and Cooper has probably been home to more businesses than any other place in Overton Square. That’s just an opinion; I haven’t yet made a scientific study of the area. It’s always been a busy intersection, and for years the East Memphis Motor Company stood there, when Cooper was considered “east” Memphis. As the area evolved into an entertainment district the building was transformed into Godfather’s Pizza, and then Solomon Alfred’s, a popular venue for live music. After a fire ravaged the latter club, the ramshackle building was demolished, and the French Quarter Inn — a suites-only hotel — was constructed in 1985. Inside, guests could find Cafe Toulouse. Most of them probably enjoyed their visit, but our dining critic, Tom Martin, noted a few problems when the restaurant opened. “After three visits, and a sampling of almost all selections on the menu, I came away with mixed feelings,” he wrote in our September 1985 issue. Among his comments: “Don’t expect fresh new ideas at Cafe Toulouse” and “service on my three visits varied greatly. It appears the restaurant staff is getting settled in.” Nevertheless, he concluded that improvements would “help establish Cafe Toulouse as a permanent fixture in Overton Square.” It was not to be. The Square went through some lean years, the hotel closed, and things were beginning to look bleak for Overton Square. That’s when the Loeb Companies stepped in, and once again Madison and Cooper is the place to be. The French Quarter Inn, which had become an eyesore, was bulldozed, and this year that corner welcomed a new tenant, as the gleaming, modern, eye-catching home of Ballet Memphis. 

above: David Weathers attends to diners at Cafe Toulouse.

Got a question for vance? EMAIL: askvance

@memphismagazine.com MAIL: Vance Lauderdale,

Memphis magazine, 460 Tennessee Street #200, Memphis, TN 38103 ONLINE: memphismagazine.com/ ask-vance

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1 The voting period is 12:01 am November 1st, through 11:59 pm November 30th.

2 Your ballot must have at least 50 percent of the categories completed to be counted. Write-ins encouraged.

3 One ballot per reader, please. We reserve the right to discard any ballot we deem fraudulent.

Best Pizza (non-fast food) Best Mexican Best Taco Best Italian Best Mediterranean Best Chinese Best Japanese Best Indian Best Vietnamese Best Thai Best Food Truck Best Cajun/Creole Best Small Plates Best Deli Best Burger (non-fast food) Best Steak

CATEGORIES

Best Seafood (non-fast food) Best Barbecue Sandwich Best Barbecue Ribs Best Fried Chicken Best Brunch Best Breakfast Best Coffeehouse (non-chain) Best Date Night Best Dessert Best Kid-Friendly Best People-Watching Worth the Drive Best Late-Night Dining (after 10 p.m.) Best Patio Dining

Best Place to Impress Out-of-Towners Restaurant We Miss The Most Best Chain Restaurant Best Memphis Chef Best New Restaurant Best Restaurant Best Happy Hour Best Place to Watch The Game Best Dive Bar Best Craft Cocktails Best Wine List Best Beer Selection Best Local Brewery Best Category We Left Out

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CHAPEL COVE

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THE 2017 VESTA SHOW GENERAL INFORMATION Web site: www.vestahomeshow.com Dates: Saturday, November 18 to Sunday, December 10 Hours: Tuesday - Saturday: 10am to 7pm | Sunday: 1pm to 7pm Closed Monday | Closed Thanksgiving Day (November 23)

TICKETS & INFO Ticket prices:

General Adult: $13.00 Senior (65+): $10.00 Youth: (7-14): $5.00 Active Duty Police / Fire Military (with valid ID): Complimentary

CITY AMENITIES LOCATION & DIRECTIONS

Chapel Cove: A Grant & Company Community Adjacent to Germantown Baptist Church 9450 Poplar Ave. Germantown Tennessee Directions: Travel West on Poplar Avenue from Houston Levee and turn right into the main entrance of Germantown Baptist Church. Follow directions to an open parking space. Travel East on Poplar Avenue turn left on Johnson Road, then right into the entrance of Germantown Baptist Church. Follow directions to an open parking space.

Advance tickets are available at select branches of Renasant Bank. Visit www.vestahomeshow.com for details. Tickets can also be purchased on the website: www.vestahomeshow.com The 2017 Vesta Home Show is a production of the West Tennessee Home Builders Association and Sponsored by Renasant Bank. • Auto Sponsor: Landers Ford. Preview Party, held in the 84 Lumber tent, is sponsored by Cambria USA. Charity Partner is Germantown Education Foundation Download the free VESTA Home Show app available at the Apple App Store or on Google Play.

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PRESIDENT’S MESSAGE

Where every

Welcome to the VESTA Home Show at Chapel Cove in Germantown!

great

The West TN Home Builders Association is proud to have been able to bring you 35 years of outstanding VESTA Home Shows. These shows exemplify the commitment to excellence our members bring to their profession of building homes and communities for all families across the West TN area.

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Fall is an exciting time for the West TN Home Builders Association because it brings the VESTA Home Show and that means more beautiful homes for you to visit. This year, we’re returning to Shelby County and highlighting Chapel Cove, Keith Allen, president the newest Germantown community. It’s a beautiful subdivision, well laid out and convenient to all of the amenities that Germantown has to offer. I think you’ll enjoy the setting as much as you will the six beautiful VESTA homes.

“Builders that demand the best, use the best” Thanks to our loyal group of builders in this years show:

RKA Construction, LLC The Longtown Company, LLC Johnny Williams Construction Co. Steve Orians Construction Co.

1948 VANDERHORN DR., MEMPHIS, TN 38134

901-384-0070 • www.bishophome.com

As you tour each home, be reminded of the hundreds of people it takes to not only build these outstanding homes, but to put this VESTA Show together for you. It’s a very exciting process to be involved in and takes a strong commitment to excellence on everyone’s part. You’ll see that commitment in each home. And a very special thanks goes to the City of Germantown, local business and community leaders of this vibrant community, for their generous help and cooperation. I am especially proud of our partnership with the Germantown Education Foundation and look forward to a wonderful relationship as we work together on this year’s VESTA Home Show. I also want to publicly acknowledge and thank our Presenting Sponsor, Renasant Bank and our friends at Landers Ford in Collierville, who will be on hand to display the newest car and truck models. The Germantown Baptist Church, an important partner in this show, is providing parking and shuttle services. My personal congratulations and thanks go to the developers, builders, sponsors and organizers of this special 2017 VESTA Home Show. Without them, this show simply wouldn’t be possible. Welcome to the Show and I hope you enjoy visiting each outstanding home! -James Reid

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CHAIRMAN’S MESSAGE 901.870.1938

The West Tennessee Homebuilders Association’s VESTA Home Show is one of the most anticipated events in the Mid South and that continues to grow in popularity every year. Whether you are in the market for a new home or ideas to update your current residence, the VESTA Home Show has become the place to discover the very latest trends in home design and construction. This year is no exception. All six entries are built to the highest professional codes and standards, including energy efficient technology that leads the market today. This means that all of these homes are built to the latest and most innovative building techniques and provide long-lasting comfort, and outstanding energy savings.

Steve Weber

New Construction Whole House Renovation Kitchens, Baths, & Additions

We would like to thank Grant & Company for creating such a premiere development as Chapel Cove and for allowing the 2017 VESTA builders to showcase their homes. What Grant & Company has achieved in such a short time is incredible. Starting in January of this year they transformed a previously unused strip of land into one of the most sought-after communities in Germantown. We appreciate their tireless time and the efforts they have given to make this show possible.

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We are deeply indebted to our Presenting Sponsor, Renasant Bank, and to our Auto Sponsor, Landers Ford. I want to thank them and all of our many sponsors and contributors for their continued support. Also, without the support of the Germantown Education Foundation and the Germantown Baptist Church, the high quality of this show would not be possible. The builders, associates and staff of the West Tennessee Homebuilders Association would like to thank you for attending the 2017 Vesta Home Show at Chapel Cove. We hope you enjoy the show. -David Goodwin

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Boyle knows that finding the perfect home begins with finding the perfect neighborhood.

• Old Germantown’s BEST ADDRESS! Close to Schools, Shopping, Churches, everything... • AWARD-WINNING naturally preserved GATED COMMUNITY on Dogwood Road at Poplar Avenue. • Low Impact Development(LID) provides natural streams flowing under stone bridges and two ponds with fountains. • 16 home sites positioned around four acres of manicured park-like open spaces. Only 4 PREMIER ESTATE HOME SITES remain. • Home Sites beginning in the $300,000’s and up.

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Contact: Gary Thompson, 901/766-4246 Russell H. Kostka, 901/619-7103 boyle.com/thepinnacleofgermantown

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FACT SHEET

SECOND FLOOR

Heated sq. ft: 4,644 Total sq. ft: 6,082 Bedrooms: 4 Bathrooms: 4.5 Total number of rooms: 17 Interior Design: Ashley Toney, First Fruit Collection, 901-861-7111 Realtor: Hank Hogue, Crye-Leike Phone: 901-652-3644 List price: $965,000

FIRST FLOOR The Abbey

SUPPLIERS LIST Builder: The Dave Moore Companies 901.870.7372 Appliances: Cenwood Appliances 901.737.4343 Cabinets: Garrison Cabinets 901.496.4359 Concrete/Driveways: Crown Construction 901.870.0973 Countertops: Cambria Granite & Marble 901.854.5912 Doors & Millwork: Thrifty Building Supply 901.870.1811 Drywall: MW Construction 901.233.5142 Electric: Banks Electric 901.853.4920 Faucets/Fixtures: Ferguson Kitchen, Bath & Lighting Gallery 901.759.3820 (Moen/Andy Burrows) 901.201.7049 Fireplaces: Acme Brick & Tile 901.755.9400 Flooring: Cordova Floors 901.870.5001 Garage Doors: Precision Garage Doors 901.363.4999 HVAC: Absolute Comfort Heating & Air 901.375.0998 Insulation: Installed Building Products 901.233.9501 Landscaping: Shropshire Landscaping 901.461.2036 Lighting: First Fruit Collection/Graham's Lighting 901.861.7 111/ 901.274.6780 Lumber: 84 Lumber 901.861.8433 Masonry/Brick: General Shale Brick 901.363.1887 Outdoor Living: Graham's Lighting 901.274.6780 Plumbing: All About Plumbing 901.461.3346 Roofing: Spec Building Products 901.224.0700 Sod: Winstead Turf Farm 901.867.8116 Stone: Christie Cut Stone 901.274.0883 Teak Shower Floor: Van Kleef International 615.603.1337 Tile: Flooring Solutions 901.755.5574 Vanities: First Fruit Collection 9 01 . 8 61 .7 1 1 1 Windows: Pella Windows & Doors 901.401.9399 Wine/Storm Shelter: Express Shelters, LLC 901.451.0057 Outdoor Kitchen: Acme Brick & Tile 901.755.9400

DAVE MOORE Dave Moore Companies P.O. Box 1683 Collierville, TN 38027 (901) 870-7273 www.davemoorecompanies.com

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Lot 23

3220 Chapel Woods Cove

The Abbey

Designed by Ed Yendrek of Classic Home Designs, THE ABBEY was inspired by an English Country Cottage with strong emphasis on outdoor living. The floorplan wraps around the outdoor living space central to the design, creating rooms with windows that flood the house with natural light. The Abbey has four bedrooms, each with a private bath. The home features Pella casement windows with three dormers on the front and three on the rear. The two-story entry features a herringbone-pattern hardwood floor. The formal dining room has an open passageway with Pecky Cypress plank ceiling and a wall of French doors which open to the covered porch. The kitchen has an island, butler's pantry, and large cast-iron farm sink. Sightlines from the kitchen, which includes a large island, butler's, pantry and large cast-iron sink, extend through the breakfast area and living room to the formal dining room at the front of the home. The vaulted master bedroom has a large window on the east wall along with a large sitting area leading to the master bath, which includes a Smart shower system by Moen, soaking tub, and walk-in shower with Teak floors. Upstairs are two bedrooms and a media room prewired for a sound system with a wet bar and microwave. The Abbey strives to connect the homeowner with the past while providing for the desires of the contemporary family. This distinctive home has all the quality construction and attention to detail owners have come to expect from The Dave Moore Companies.

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BUTLER'S PA N T RY

FACT SHEET

FRIENDS' E N T RY

PA N T RY

GUEST B AT H

GUEST BEDROOM

Storage Area

KITCHEN

DINING ROOM

B R E A K FA S T ROOM

POWDER L A U N D RY ROOM Bench w/ hooks

4 CAR GARAGE

E N T RY PORCH

FOYER

FA M I LY R O O M

SCREENED PORCH

MASTER BEDROOM

MASTER BATH

HER CLOSET

HIS CLOSET

FIRST FLOOR

N

FIRST FLOOR PLAN 1

SCALE:

4"

= 1'-0"

A R E S I D E N C E F O R V E S T A H O M E S H O W - D AV I D C L A R K BR 1 BATH

BEDROOM 1

BEDROOM 2

Heated sq. ft: 5,128 Total sq. ft: 6,960 Bedrooms: 5 Bathrooms: 5.5 Total number of rooms: 19 Interior Design: Kim Loudenbeck, 901-867-6767 Realtor: Laura Clark, Coldwell Banker Phone: 901-483-2117 List price: SOLD

BR 2 BATH

FOYER BELOW

BEDROOM 3

BR 3 BATH

AT T I C P L AY R O O M

SECOND FLOOR

N

SECOND FLOOR PLAN SCALE:

1

4"

= 1'-0"

Arden Manor

SUPPLIERS LIST

A R E S I D E N C E F O R V E S T A H O M E S H O W - D AV I D C L A R K

Appliances: Ferguson Kitchen, Bath, & Lighting Gallery Architect: Jeff Bramlett Cabinets: Pro-Stone Kitchen & Bath Closets: Incognito Countertops: C&M Granite Drywall: M&W Contruction Electric: PAR Electric Faucets/Fixtures: Ferguson Kitchen, Bath, & Lighting Gallery Fireplaces: Christie Cut Stone Flooring: B&C Flooring Furnishings: Warehouse 67 HVAC: Cannon Heat and Air Insulation: County Line Insulation Lighting: Graham’s Lighting Lumber: Thrifty Building Supply Masonry/Brick: General Shale Brick Nana Wall: Hillyer Architechural Products Plumbing: Ford Plumbing Pool: Memphis Pool Roofing: LDM Roofing Security/Home Automation: Memphis Home Theater Sound/Entertainment Systems: Memphis Home Theater Stone: Christie Cut Stone Tile: Mid-South Interior Solutions Vanities: Pro Stone Kitchen & Bath Windows: Pella Windows & Doors

901.759.3820 9 0 1 . 6 1 9 .1 6 1 3 662.895.4795 901.387.4523 901.299.6254 901.233.5142 901.828.0017 901.759.3820 901.382.6242 901.359.0530 901.867.6767 901.854.7888 901.870.5006 901.757.2465 901.853.2200 901.363.1887 901.452.8462 901.849.9709 901.383.6064 901.373.3900 901.412.0810 901.412.0810 901.382.6242 901.212.8516 662.895.4795 901.286.7049

DAVID CLARK David Clark Construction PO Box 38099 Germantown, TN 38183 (901) 601-0662 www.davidclarkconstruction.com

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Lot 20

3210 Chapel Woods Cove

Arden Manor

David Clark Construction welcomes you to ARDEN MANOR. This Jeff Bramlett-designed home combines an open floorplan with the latest in design and technology. As you enter through the steel doors, you immediately notice the two-story foyer and floating staircase. The heart of the home rests in the center of the living room where you can view the kitchen as well as the outdoor living area. This room doubles in size when the 16-foot door is opened, allowing the interior and exterior of the home to become one. Arden Manor was designed with home entertainment in mind. The 5,130-square-foot home features a scullery kitchen just off the main kitchen, a private butler's pantry, an outdoor grilling area, and a screened porch with fireplace and an outdoor TV. The master suite features separate vanities and closets, with her closet hidden off the master bath. The upstairs features three bedrooms each with their own private baths and walkin closets. The playroom steps down a level and is separate from the rest of the upstairs rooms.

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Contemporary Flair

PRESENTING SPONSOR

Vesta Home Show Presenting Sponsor: Renasant Bank By Samuel X. Cicci

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From November 18th to December 10th, the Germantown subdivision of Chapel Cove will play host to the Vesta Home Show, where attendees will be treated to a display of the latest materials, techniques, furnishings, and finishes in home decór. For Phillip May, Renasant Bank president for Memphis and West Tennessee, the decision to become presenting sponsor was a no-brainer: “The West Tennessee Home Builder’s Association and the developer of Chapel Cove came to us with this opportunity, and we said ‘absolutely, we’ll do it.’” As a leading sponsor of the show, Renasant Bank will have multiple duties. First and foremost, attendees will be able to purchase tickets to the event at any of Renasant’s Memphis-area locations. Beyond that, the bank will have people on-site at Chapel Cove to represent the organization and provide information about the show and Renasant’s services, with the main focus on the mortgage division. “If people have questions about mortgages, purchasing new homes, or even refinancing, we’ll have people there to answer any questions,” says May. That easily accessible presence is simply a larger reflection of Renasant’s customer service. Purchasing a home or seeking refinancing can be arduous processes. It’s imperative to work with individuals who understand the tasks involved and can provide the best possible advice to homeowners. For those in the MidSouth, May is always looking to provide results. “We spend a lot of time listening to our clients to provide the right kind of advice to meet their goals.” After advice comes execution, and May believes that Renasant is perfectly poised to provide the right solution to its customer base, with locations across town and the Mid-South area available to the West Tennessee consumer base. The newest of those locations will be an office at 2046 Union Avenue which is scheduled to open in February 2016. The new location is the product of Renasant Bank’s recent merger with Metropolitan

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BancGroup, a development that gives Renasant a bigger reach in Memphis. In addition, another office is slated to follow the Union location at a later date. With all of the recent changes for Renasant, the Vesta Home Show became the perfect avenue to interact with potential customers and show support for the builders and developers with whom the organization works closely with. May believes that this year’s show is shaping up to be great for both developers and attendees. “It’s going to be a really great show this year being in Germantown. We’re expecting more than 25,000 people to come out. Plus, this new subdivision being on Poplar Avenue we think it will bring a lot of visibility.” Chapel Cove’s proximity to Baptist Church means that there will be easy and ample parking available for everyone wishing to come to the show. The ease of access to the event aligns with the bank’s excellent customer service model. Considering the blend of both quality and accessibility at the 2017 Vesta Home Show, Renasant Bank might just be the perfect match. Special Thanks to our partners: Germantown Baptist Church Germantown Education Foundation

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LAND DEVELOPMENT 10/17/17 3:06 PM

10/20/17 2:39 PM


Porte Cochere

FACT SHEET

Mud Room Wet Bar

Dining Room Three Car Garage

Kitchen Scullery

Covered Porch

Stair Hall

FIRST FLOOR

Foyer

Living Room

Guest Bedroom

Study

Master Bedroom

Screened Porch

Master Bath

Heated sq. ft: 4,750 Total sq. ft: 5,315 Bedrooms: 5 Bathrooms: 4.5 Total number of rooms: 19 Interior Design: York Binkley Interior Design, 901-573-6103 Realtor: Carrie Anderson, Marx-Bensdorf Phone: 901-237-2735 List price: $989,000

Guest Bedroom

Guest Bedroom

Upper Landing

SECOND FLOOR

Media Room

Guest Bedroom

Galloway House

SUPPLIERS LIST Builder: RKA Construction

901.674.5522

Appliances: Cenwood Appliances

901.737.4343

Closets: California Closets

901.486.7418

Concrete/Driveways: Cordova Concrete

901.362.6268

Electric: RD Electric

901.553.4374

Faucets/Fixtures: Ferguson Kitchen, Bath, & Lighting Gallery

901.759.3820

Fireplaces: Bishop Hearth & Home

901.384.0070

Flooring: Mid-South Flooring

901.494.2030

RKA CONSTRUCTION

Lighting: Graham's Lighting

901.274.6780

Lumber: Thrifty Building Supply

901.853.2200

714 S. Mendenhall Road

Masonry/Brick: General Shale Brick

901.363.1887

Roofing: Travis Roofing Supply

901.457.8661

Sound/Entertainment Systems: Memphis Home Theater

901.412.0810

RYAN ANDERSON

Memphis, TN 38117 (901) 674-5522

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Lot 2

3209 Chapel Woods Cove

Galloway House

GALLOWAY HOUSE is a stately brick home, designed for gracious family living. The home features an open kitchen for seamless entertaining. A wet bar provides a smooth transition from the kitchen to the dining room. A scullery leads to a covered outdoor patio with a fireplace and grill. The outdoor area can also be accessed through glass doors in the living room, which is adjacent to the kitchen. The living room provides a comfortable area to gather with its dramatic, raised ceilings and natural light. The ground-floor master suite includes a private study, large bath, and a screened porch. Also on the ground floor is an inviting guest bedroom with a private full bath. The second floor features three bedrooms, each with its own full bath and an airy open play room. A port cochere leads to a three-car garage.

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STANDARD OF EXCELLENCE SINCE 1950 Memphis Magazine’s

THE 2017

FACE

repairs reweaving handwash/cleaning

OF

ORIENTAL RUGS

sales appraisals color run restoration pet and other stain removals moth damage storage odor removal and much more

Master Weaver Ali Taghavi Restoring a antique Persian Farahan rug. 3554 Park Avenue, Memphis, TN • (901) 327-5033 taghavirugs.com • Like us on Facebook MM_FullPage_TrimSize_9x25_11x125.indd 1

10/18/17 3:38 PM


our fourth a nnua l

Homegrown

Holiday Gift Guide compiled by shar a clark

giving season is upon us, and if you’re still looking for the perfect presents for your loved ones, now’s the time to act. We’ve made it a bit easier for you here, with a list of locally produced items — from books and music to functional art and accessories (and a few things in between). Shop for the hard-

PHOTOGRAPH BY KAREN PULFER FOCHT

Have you made your list? Checked it twice? Gift-

to-buy-for people in your life while supporting our local makers, cooks, and creators with this truly “homegrown” gift guide.

Bracelet from Foxglove Pha r m Through her homegrown small business Foxglove Pharm, Memphian Sami Harvey hand-crafts “natural remedies for life’s ailments” — calming tea blends, soaking salts, soothing balms, candles, bath bombs, and more. She also hand-stamps these Grizz-centric Grit and Grind adjustable metal bracelets (and will happily customize them with different words or phrasing if you prefer). $13. Available at etsy.com/shop/ foxglovepharm.

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Homegrown HolidayGift Guide

Sweets from Dinstuhl’s Celebrating its 115th birthday this year, Dinstuhl’s knows how to satisfy Memphis’ sweet tooth. From handmade fudge and truffles to chocolate-covered fruits and delectable divinity, the longtime Memphis candy-makers have something for every craving. A Dinstuhl’s staple is the Cashew Crunch, a buttery cashew brittle sprinkled with fine-grain coconut. $10.95 (8 oz.), $19.95 (1 lb.), $36.95 (2 lb.). Another favorite are the Turtlettes — pecans and rich, chewy caramel enrobed in a layer of pure milk chocolate. $16.50 (8 oz.), $27.50 (1 lb.), $53 (2 lb.) Available at Dinstuhl’s locations (436 Grove Park, 7730 Poplar Avenue #3 in Germantown, and 5280 Pleasant View) and dinstuhls.com.

Improving Memphis, one ROOF at a time! CALL TODAY FOR A FREE INSPECTION

901-232-7732

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H O B S O N R E A LT O R S The Sign of Distinction since 1972

Joel Hobson

Jennifer Hobson

Lynda Biggs Baddour

Carrie Evans Benitone

Ellie Tayloe Bennett

Hallie Biggs

Barbara Cowles

Michele Crump

Barbie Dan

Mark Duke

Lisa Fields

Sally Fienup

Mary Ann Gano

Jenny Grehan

Allen Hamblin

Janis Canale Hasen

Thomas Henze

Katie Hill

Betsy Kelly

Michelle Koeppen

Charlotte Lyles

Eleanore Kelly Maynard

Jeannie Bruce

Carolina Capote

Mary Jane Fuller Palmer Gardner

Worth Jones

Faith Kaye

Jeanene Lawhead Camille LeMaster

Check out our website, updated every hour with accurate information... new listings, price changes, and open houses.

Deborah Mays

Laurie McBride

Ruth Morris

Amy Moss

HobsonRealtors.com (901) 761-1622 5384 Poplar Ave. Suite 250

Meredith & Paul Christina Morris McDonald

Tammy Oliver

Pam Pierce

Lisa Robinson

Debbie Rodda

Elizabeth Rodriguez

Bob Rowe

Mary Ruleman

Paula Sansom

Lila Saunders

Elizabeth Scott

Virginia Sharp

Kara Smith

Gordon Stark

Laurie Stark

Gardner Hobson Story

Conlee Stringfellow

Selling Memphis for over 45 years. Clay Templeton

MM_FullPage_TrimSize_9x25_11x125.indd 1

Alex Turner

Denise Ware

William Ware

Taylor Waring

Jennifer Williams

10/18/17 3:47 PM


FACT SHEET

Tub

Master Bath

Hers

FIRST FLOOR

Master Bedroom His

Clo. Covered Porch

Laundry D.

W.

Sink

Screened Porch

Breakfast Ref.

Covered Terrace

Pantry

Garage 2

Grilling

DW Sink

Cooktop

Ref.

Powder

Family Friends Entry

Kitchen Bar Ovens

Up

China

Barrel Vault

Wine Clo.

Garage 1

Foyer

Clo. Bath 2

Dining

Heated sq. ft: 5,000 Total sq. ft: 6,700 Bedrooms: 5 Bathrooms: 5.5 Total number of rooms: 20 Interior Design: Kim Williams, 901-331-3342 Realtor: Johnny Williams Phone: 901-634-3797 List price: $1,200,000

Study / Guest

Bracketed Overhang Covered Entry Open Terrace

First Floor

Attic

Attic

Clo. Dn.

Clo.

Bath 4

Bath 5 Children's Den Bed 5

Bath 3 Clo.

Bed 4 Desk Alcove

Bed 3

Second Floor

SECOND FLOOR

The Lexington

SUPPLIERS LIST Builder: Johnny Williams Construction Appliances: Cenwood Appliances Closets: Incognito Custom Closets Concrete/Driveways: Cordova Concrete Doors & Millwork: Dyke Industries Faucets/Fixtures: Ferguson Kitchen, Bath & Lighting Gallery Fireplaces: Bishop Hearth and Home Flooring: Cordova Floors Garage Doors: County Line Insulation and Garage Doors HVAC: William Cannon Insulation: County Line Insulation and Garage Doors Landscaping: Gurley’s Azalea Garden Lighting: Graham's Lighting Masonry/Brick: General Shale Outdoor Living: Graham's Lighting Paint: Sherwin Williams Patio Enclosure: Southern Screens Pest Management: Allied Pest Plumbing: Ford Plumbing Pool: Memphis Pool Sod: Winstead Turf Farms Stone: Christie Cut Stone Tile: Flooring Solutions/Venice Tile Windows: Jeldwen by Dyke Industries

9 01 . 63 4 . 3797 9 01 .737. 4 3 4 3 901.834.3340 901.369.9909 901.362.6262 901.759.3820 901.384.0070 9 01 . 870. 5 0 01 901.870.5006 9 01 . 8 5 4 .78 8 8 901.870.5006 9 01 .79 4 .7370 9 01 .757. 24 6 5 901.351.3831 9 01 .757. 24 6 5 9 0 1 . 7 5 5 .1 7 7 1 901.355.3761 901.754.0454 901.849.9709 9 01 . 6 2 6 . 6 8 01 9 0 1 . 8 6 7. 8 1 1 6 901.413.8372 901.755.5574/ 9 01 . 5 47. 97 70 901.362.6260

JOHNNY WILLIAMS Johnny Williams Construction 2070 Briarbrook Road Germantown, TN 38138 (901) 634-3797 www.johnnywilliamsconstruction.com

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Lot 1

3215 Chapel Woods Cove

The Lexington

THE LEXINGTON is inspired by the English country homes in the Cotswolds, designed by Brad Shapiro and Co., decorated by Kim Williams, and built by Johnny Williams Construction and his team. This magnificent home, completely furnished by Decadent Avenue, features an opulent 25-foot-long foyer, flanked by the study and a dining room large enough to accommodate all your family and friends for any occasion. The warm and inviting family room has 12-foot ceilings, a fireplace with bookshelves on either side, and ship lap rising to the beams. A chefs dream, the luxurious kitchen offers 10-foot cabinets, a unique zinc covered vent hood, and pendant lights over a 10-foot island. Next to the kitchen is a breakfast nook, with a chandelier mounted on a wooden beam. The windows in the open concept floorplan open onto the breathtaking backyard, an oasis complete with screened porch, fireplace, outdoor kitchen, and luxury pool. It is a perfect spot for entertaining or simpy to relax and breathe. Off the master bedroom, a pair of barn doors opens onto the master bathroom, with a stainless freestanding tub, curbless walk-in shower, a seven-foot bench seat, and even a shampoo niche. Behind the tub is a pair of windows overlooking a private outdoor retreat featuring a gas fire pit, ultra-comfortable outdoor furniture, landscaping, and music. It is a spectacular hidden gem meant to be accessed by the master bedroom occupants. Upstairs, three bedrooms have their own private baths and walk-in closets, tucked away from the rest of the house, adding to the overall privacy of the space. At the top of the stairs, a gathering area separates two of the rooms, with a third down the hallway.

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Have you looked at your trees lately?

Homegrown HolidayGift Guide

Maintenance Now Prevents Disaster Later Give your trees a preventative checkup by a certified arborist and a graduate urban forester.

Coasters from ARCHd Memphis-born sisters Kristen and Lindsey Archer have combined their skills of photography and graphic design to bring us ARCHd, offering a variety of handmade wood art pieces, bookends, art prints, ornaments, and more. We love the tumbled marble tile coaster sets (four per set) that feature original photography of some of our favorite local spaces. Coasters start at $29. Select products available at Stock & Bell, Bingham & Broad, Me & Mrs. Jones, Dixie Pickers, and Truffle Pig. Free local pickup with coupon code SHOP901 at getarchd.etsy.com.

901-363-3539 robinsontree.net

O

MMERCIA

DESIGN/BUILD

L

C

WE KNOW MEMPHIS TREES!

PROVIDING THE FINEST QUALITY ELECTRICAL AND FIRE/SECURITY SERVICES AT THE FAIREST POSSIBLE VALUE FOR OVER 30 YEARS.

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Images of Modern America: Libertyland by John Stevenson Longtime Memphians surely remember Libertyland, the theme park that opened here on America’s bicentennial, July 4, 1976, and shuttered in 2005. Once home to Elvis’ favorite roller coaster (the Zippin Pippin), the Grand Carousel, and historically significant themed areas — Colonial Land, Frontier Land, and Turn-of-theCentury Land — Libertyland, for many, held dear memories. Thanks to Memphian John Stevenson, some of those memories have been preserved in Images of Modern America: Libertyland, a chronological look at the life of the theme park, from blueprints to razing and beyond. Images featured within were gathered from former park employees, guests, historians, Memphis-area libraries, and the Shelby County Archives. $22.99. Available at Novel, Burke’s Books, South Main Book Juggler, Barnes & Noble, and rememberlibertyland.com.

a unique studio for kitchens, bath & home

901.458.2638

Buying or Selling in Germantown & Collierville, call a John Green Realtor®!

Molly Phillips Licensed Broker in TN & MS since 1996. Call me for all your real estate needs!

JOHN GREEN & COMPANY R E A LT O R S

®

johngreen.com

Cell: 901.336.1406 • Office: 901.853.0763 2017VESTAHOMESHOW • 27

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901-508-1040 | rka.build

Homegrown HolidayGift Guide

CALL HOOD AND

HE'LL COME A'RUNNIN!

With over 50 combined year in real estate, The Baker Team is a family business. We love Memphis so follow us as we explore “Mondays in Memphis!” Check out testimonials at Follow Mindy on Tumblr at jimhood.net. or like GreenLivingAgent.tumblr.com “The Baker Team “ on Facebook to seeo901.685.6000 what we have been up to and • c901.461.9711 to pick upEFAX: some green living tips. 901.969.1440 If you need to sell or buy a home, call “The Baker Team”! We are your jhood8@comcast.net • jimhood.net “Recipe for Success!”

Memphis Toddy

FRED REMMERS RUG CLEANERS & ORIENTAL RUG GALLERY

RKA-AD-MemMag-092217.pdf

1

9/26/17

5:13 PM

CUSTOM HOMES | RENOVATIONS l ADDITIONS

from Old Dominick Reviving a pre-prohibition recipe created and sold in Memphis in the late 1800s by Italian immigrant Domenico Canale, Downtown’s Old Dominick Distillery brings us Memphis Toddy. Enjoy this rye bourbon blend — with notes of citrus, botanicals, and honey — neat or in a creative cocktail, and sip the spirit of Memphis. $35.99-$39.99. Available at the Old Dominick Spirit Shop (305 South Front) and spirit retailers across the city.

Serving Tennessee, Mississippi, Arkansas, Missouri & Kentucky Since 1881 2186 Central Ave, Memphis, TN 38104 901.278.3704 • 901.278.1566 (fax) fredremmers@yahoo.com • fredremmers.com

CLEANING • REPAIR APPRAISAL • STORAGE

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Homegrown HolidayGift Guide

Memphis BBQ Sauce and Rub created by Melissa Cookston This year, home and kitchen retailer Williams-Sonoma tapped celebrity chef — and “Winningest Woman in Barbecue” — Melissa Cookston to create the new Memphis BBQ Sauce and Rub for its American Regional BBQ collection. A seven-time world barbecue champion, Cookston is the owner of Memphis Barbecue Co. and Steak by Melissa in North Mississippi, and has authored two barbecue cookbooks. Your giftees can grill like a champ with these smokin’ enhancements. Sauce: $12.95 (17.5 ounce container). Rub: $10.95 (3 oz. container). Available at williams-sonoma.com.

We are so much more than countertops.

Visit us at the Vesta Home Show in the Arden Manor, The Retreat and the Wray Manor home.

Cabinets • Granite • Flooring • Remodels & New Construction

Now Open Saturdays 9-1 • Free in-home estimates • Beautiful 4,000 sq ft showroom

8855 Cypress Woods Ln • Olive Branch, MS 38654 Phone: 662.895.4795 • Fax: 662.895.4797 • www.prostonellc.com

What is Landscape Architecture?

BPD

BLAIR PARKER DESIGN

landscape architecture | LID | master planning w wwww.blairparkerdesign.com w. b l a i r p a r k e r d e s i g n . c o m 990011..776676..69515354 site planning | hardscape design | LID | stormwater solutions | master planning | planting design

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FIRST FLOOR

Master Bath

Hers

Guest Bedroom

Master Bedroom

His

Office

Study

Covered Porch

Foyer Stair Hall

Utility

Scullery

Pantry

Kitchen

Dining Room

Living Room

Powder

Wet Bar

Three Car Garage

Gear

Breakfast

SECOND FLOOR Guest Bedroom

Landing

FACT SHEET Heated sq. ft: 5,760 Total sq. ft: 7.055 Bedrooms: 4 Bathrooms: 54.5 Total number of rooms: 15 Interior Design: Sean Anderson Design, 901-827-9909 Realtor: Judy McLellan, Crye-Leike Phone: 901-277-5839 List price: SOLD

Guest Bedroom

Sitting Area

Playroom

Wet Bar

The Retreat

SUPPLIERS LIST Builder: Longtown Co. LLC Appliances: Ferguson Kitchen, Bath & Lighting Gallery Cabinets: Pro-Stone Kitchen & Bath Concrete/Driveways: MMC Drywall: Davis Painting & Drywall Faucets/Fixtures: Ferguson Kitchen, Bath & Lighting Gallery Fireplaces: Bishop Hearth and Home Flooring: Mid-South Flooring Garage Doors: County Line Insulation and Garage Doors Lighting: Graham's Lighting Lumber: 84 Lumber Masonry/Brick: General Shale Brick Painting: Davis Painting and Drywall Plumbing: Ford Plumbing Siding/Carpentry: James Hardie 84 Lumber Sod: Winstead Turf Farms Stone: Christie Cut Stone

901.508.6998 901.759.3820 662.895.4795 662.393.9659 9 01 . 8 5 0. 8 4 3 1 901.759.3820 901.384.0070 901.494.2030 6 6 2 . 8 9 0.701 1 901.274.6780 9 01 . 8 61 . 8 4 3 3 9 01 . 3 5 1 . 8 9 9 2 9 01 . 8 5 0. 8 4 3 1 901.860.4076 9 01 . 8 61 . 8 4 3 3 9 0 1 . 8 6 7. 8 1 1 6 901.382.6242

JAROD WILDER & SAMMY STOVER The Longtown Co.

3023 Centre Oaks Way, Suite 102 Collierville, TN 38017 (901) 870-7263

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Lot 21

3216 Chapel Woods Cove

The Retreat

THE RETREAT is a warm and moody brick home, designed for relaxed entertaining and peaceful living. A light-filled foyer invites you through the stair hall, into a gracious living room that is open to the kitchen and informal dining. A wet bar connects back to the dramatic formal dining room. Floor-to-ceiling windows draw your focus to the backyard oasis. The house wraps around and contains an elegant pool courtyard. Wood-planked walls add organic warmth to the monochromatic interiors as it carries you along the main gallery to the master suite. The stately study features a full bath and storage closet. There is also a generous home office/craft room, and a secluded guest suite on the ground floor. Upstairs is a large media lounge with bath and bar areas. The upper landing leads to two more guest bedrooms, each with private baths and substantial closets.

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RESIDENCE FOR VESTA HOME SHOW B U I LT B Y S T E V E O R I A N S LOT 22 CHAPEL COVE SUBDIVISION GERMANTOWN, TN 38138

JEFF BRAMLETT / CUSTOM RESIDENTIAL DESIGN

FIRST FLOOR

4 CAR GARAGE 21'-3" x 46'-2"

MASTER BEDROOM

TERRACE

RESIDENCE FOR VESTA HOME SHOW

15'-3" x 19'-3"

B U I LT B Y S T E V E O R I A N S LOT 22 CHAPEL COVE SUBDIVISION GERMANTOWN, TN 38138 GUEST BRAMLETT / B E D R O OJ M E F F COVERED H S I G N C U S T O M R E S I D E N T I A L P ODR CE

HIS CLO.

13'-3" x 15'-3"

16'-5" x 20'-9"

5'-0" x 10'-0"

DINING ROOM 1 6 ' - 11 " x 1 3 ' - 1 "

GUEST BATH

FRIENDS' E N T RY

S TA I R HALL

POWDER ROOM

KITCHEN PA N T RY

MASTER B AT H

UP

7'-0" x 20'-3"

13'-1" x 16'-9"

1 3 ' - 1 " x 1 8 ' - 11 "

FA M I LY ROOM 2 0 ' - 11 " x 2 7 ' - 8 "

11 ' - 3 " x 1 2 ' - 6 "

L A U N D RY

HER CLO.

7 ' - 11 " x 1 3 ' - 3 "

7'-0" x 13'-3"

FACT SHEET Heated sq. ft: 5,400 Total sq. ft: 6,900 Bedrooms: 5 Bathrooms: 5.5 Total number of rooms: 20 Interior Design: Chestnut Hall, 901-753-8515 Realtor: Alta Simpson, Coldwell Banker Phone: 901-484-6040 List price: $1,150,000

FOYER 13'-3" x 10'-8"

E N T RY P O R C H

FIRST FLOOR PLAN NOT TO SCALE

MEDIA ROOM 1 7 ' - 3 " x 2 2 ' - 11 "

S TA I R HALL

AT T I C

AT T I C

13'-1" x 16'-9" DN

BEDROOM 3 13'-3" x 15'-3"

BEDROOM 2 1 5 ' - 11 " x 1 4 ' - 0 "

SECOND FLOOR

BEDROOM 1 13'-3" x 14'-8"

SECOND FLOOR PLAN

NOT TO SCALE

Wray Manor

SUPPLIERS LIST Builder: Steve Orians Appliances: Cenwood Appliances Cabinets: Pro Stone Closets: Incognito Custom Closets Concrete/Driveways: MMC Materials Countertops: Pro Stone Kitchen & Bath Doors & Millwork: Gates Lumber Company Faucets/Fixtures: Ferguson Kitchen, Bath & Lighting Gallery Fireplaces: Bishop Hearth & Home Flooring: Cordova Floors Garage Doors: Precision Garage Doors HVAC: Ray Nelson & Sons Landscaping: Gurley’s Azalea Garden Lighting: Graham's Lighting Lumber: Thrifty Building Supply Masonry/Brick: General Shale Security/Home Automation: Memphis Home Theater Sod: Winstead Turf Farm Sound/Entertainment Systems: Memphis Home Theater Stone: Christie Cut Stone Tile: Pro Stone Kitchen & Bath Vanities: Pro Stone Kitchen & Bath Windows: Thrifty Building Supply Wrought Iron Doors, Fence, Stairwell: Custom Fence

901.757.1565 901.259.7493 662.896.4795 901.834.3340 662.393.9659 662.895.4795 901.942.3201 901.759.3820 901.384.0070 901.870.5001 888.448.7932 901.212.9659 901.794.7370 901.757.2465 901.853.2200 901.363.1887 901.412.0810 901.867.8116 901.412.0810 901.382.6242 662.895.4795 662.895.4795 901.853.2200 901.854.7482

STEVE ORIANS Steve Orians Construction 342 Walnut Trace Drive Cordova, TN 38018 (901) 301-2871

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Lot 22

3218 Chapel Woods Cove

Wray Manor

WRAY MANOR offers all the amenities of modern living with the timeless hallmarks of traditional architecture. Designer Jeff Bramlett modeled the home in the British Arts and Crafts style, creating a low-maintenance exterior with classic appeal. A special emphasis on crafting a picturesque site includes the use of an entry courtyard and generous covered porches for outdoor living. The exterior demonstrates key aspects true to the style, including steep roofs with hip-and-gable combinations, sets of triple windows, and simple rake details. Additional attention to detail includes the use of timber posts and lintels, cut limestone, and plastered brick. Multiple window bays provide charming cottage-like aspects to the home, while bringing abundant amounts of natural light to the interior. Upon entering the custom-steel entry door, guests are greeted with hardwood flooring, 12-foot ceilings with beams, and shiplap siding that lends a rustic quality while contrasting with limestone surrounds, wroughtiron stair railings, and a breathtaking stair hall with commanding views. A cozy friends’ entry provides easy access while the rear-entry four-car garage provides ample storage and a climate-controlled fourth bay for hobbies and storage. A large caterer’s pantry makes entertaining easy. Beautiful interiors, carefully chosen colors and artwork are the signature artisanship of Chestnut Hall interiors, making it easy for the new homeowner to envision their own furnishings. The comfortable presence of the residence, with its stately exterior and understated interior, creates a wonderful opportunity for a modern family to make this magnificent mansion their new home.

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Come see our new collections of great fall colors!

Homegrown HolidayGift Guide

Premier Prints - sPecialty Fabrics - custom sewing trim - Pillow Forms

Our Stores:

Tupelo, MS: 662.269.3265 Meridian, MS: 601.483.4022 Jackson, MS: 601.899.8850 Raleigh, NC: 919.743.5794 Germantown, TN: 901.758.0090

premierprintsinc.com made in usa

LOVE WHERE YOU LIVE. Call me! 901.634.2800

Jeanne Coors Arthur

Save On Flooring for New Installations, Remodeling, Upgrades and New Home Construction.

• Free Estimates. • Professional installation of laminates, engineered wood floors, vinyl, carpeting & ceramic tile. • Impeccable service. • Accredited Business. • Finance Options Available.

#901-382-2155

901.767.9004 • crye-leike.com

Southern Avenue by Southern Avenue (Sta x Records) According to American Blues Scene, “If Memphis is a genre, this is it!” Earlier this year, Memphis-born band Southern Avenue released its self-titled debut, produced by veteran local engineer Kevin Houston (Lucero, North Mississippi Allstars, Amy LaVere), on the Stax Records label. Upon its release, the album soared to number one on the iTunes blues charts. A blend of soul-steeped, gospel-inspired R&B vocals and roots/blues instrumentation performed by Memphian sisters Tierinii (vocals) and Tikyra Jackson (drums); Ori Naftaly, an Israeliborn guitarist; and keyboardist Jeremy Powell, an early alumnus of Stax Music Academy, this music is Memphis. Signed CD + digital download, $12.98. Vinyl LP + digital download, $20. Available at select music retailers and southernavenueband.com.

gwenm@bellsouth.net buildersfloorsandinteriors.com 3085 Stage Post Road, Bartlett, TN 38133

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Blue Suede Shoes from L a nsky Bros. From Lansky Bros., longtime Memphis retailer whose cofounder Bernard Lansky helped a young Elvis establish his signature look in the early 1950s and dressed the King throughout his life, comes this pair of iconic blue suede shoes. Part of the Clothier to the King line, a collaboration with Hush Puppies, licensed by Elvis Presley Enterprises, these shoes — literally blue suede, with rubber soles — are perfect for walkin’ in Memphis. $155. Available at Lansky Bros. (126 Beale Street inside the Hard Rock Cafe or 149 Union Avenue inside The Peabody Hotel) and lanskybros.com.

Quality, Not Quantity Since 1942 David and Laura invite you to visit Arden Manor at the 2017 Vesta Home Show. Laura Clark, REALTOR® 901.483.2117 (c) • 901.259.8500 (o) 901.601.0662 / davidclarkconstruction.com

This is more than a Dumpster — This is moreIt than — It is atoCommitment is aa Dumpster Commitment Recyclingto Recycling

Everyday is Earthis Day at EBOX. Areat weEBOX. on your job? Everyday Earth Day

Are we on your job? 901-850-9996

901-850-9996

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Summer.

Winter.

Homegrown HolidayGift Guide

Anything in between. We’ve got you covered.

William Cannon Heating & Air Inc. FAMILY OWNED AND OPERATED FOR OVER 40 YEARS 854-7888 | 400 E. South St. | Collierville, TN

Soap from Cosgrove & Lewis From their homebase in Eads, Tennessee, the makers at Cosgrove & Lewis create luxury soaps using natural oils, butters, and minerals. Available in a variety of scents and skin-soothing blends, they’ll make a great addition to any gift list. Steel, the exfoliating soap shown above, incorporates luffa, dead sea salt, and a rich, colognelike botanical scent, making it a popular choice for men. The colorful 1960s-inspired Patchouli bars (below) are made with calming, fragrant patchouli oil. $8-$9 (per 4.5-oz. bar). Available at farmers markets, Babcock Gif ts, Falling into Place, Miss Cordelia’s, and cosgroveandlewis.com.

Lauren Harkins Wiuff (901) 682-1868 (901) 859-3565 www.laurenharkinswiuff.com 36 • 2017VESTAHOMESHOW

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serving the mid-south since 1967

SALE

Apron

L

from Humphrey ’s Prime Cut Shoppe Cook like a “Memphis Original” in this apron from Folk’s Folly’s next-door market, Humphrey’s Prime Cut Shoppe. Other gift items offered include steak knives like those used in the popular Memphis steak house, as well as prime cut packs — rack of lamb, filet mignon, duck breast, and more — available for overnight nationwide shipping. Prime cut packs vary. Apron, $24.95. Available at

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localolypeorwanteedd! &

Humphrey’s Prime Cut Shoppe (551 South Mendenhall) and humphreysmemphis.com.

Jimmy Whittington Lumber Company Wholesale Home-owned, Home-operated since 1966

For all your building supplies. Complete mill to market service.

3637 Jackson Ave. • Memphis, TN • 901-386-2800 9045 Macon Rd. • Cordova, TN • 901-757-2800 www.WhittingtonLumber.com 2017VESTAHOMESHOW • 37

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Homegrown HolidayGift Guide

KITCHENS BATHS ROOM ADDITIONS (901) 753-8304 TimDisalvo.com

Wine from Old Millington Winery Since 2000, this family-owned West Tennessee vineyard and winery has offered homemade libations. Estate-grown Chambourcin grapes and regionally sourced fruits are used to make their specialty wines. Popular varieties include the Seyval Blanc, a crisp, dry wine with hints of apple; Big River Red, an off dry, full-flavored wine; and Strawberry, a customer-favorite sweet wine. During the holidays, the winery offers a seasonal plum wine and Christmas Cranberry. Available at Old Millington Winery (6748 Old Millington Road, Millington). oldmillingtonwinery.com.

Trey’s Company From Sa rtoris Liter a ry Group

INSURANCE AGENCY

Looking for a great gift for the bookworm in your life? This is it. Take the coming-ofage classic Stand By Me, set it in the Eighties, and add a love triangle. These are the ingredients for Trey’s Company, the debut novel by Memphis managing editor Frank Murtaugh. A Memphis Flyer book review describes, “The warm nostalgia of family and a ballgame on the television are folded into every chapter; the ideals of Americana, just a neighboring porch away in Gran’s neighborhood.” $8.95 (digital version) to $19.95 (paperback). Available at Burke’s Book Store

342-2980 • 1-800-628-0194

(936 Cooper), barnesandnoble.com,

8705 NORTHWEST DR., Suite 4 • Southaven, MS 38671

and amazon.com.

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Booties by K atherine Cooke Designs Inspired by her children and nature, Katherine Cooke creates functional art such as hand-stitched children’s clothes, toys, pillowcases, ornaments, and more. Kids love her felt animal masks and stick animals constructed from up-cycled sweaters and blankets, and parents adore these cozy, stylish wool felt booties for wee ones. Baby booties: $40-$50. Select products available at The Cotton Museum, The Woman’s Exchange, and Diane’s Art, Gift, and Home. etsy.com/shop/K atherineCookeDesign. katherinecookedesigns.com

With over a decade of experience in selling real estate, Gay is hands-on and available — a true negotiator, representing her clients with calm determination! For expert assistance in one of the largest financial transactions you will ever make, contact Gay Young with Keller Williams Realty — your Real Estate Consultant for Life!

Gay Young

Jewelry

KELLER WILLIAMS REALTY 930 S. White Station Road, Memphis, TN 38117 901.261.7900 (o) • 901.581.6118 (c) • GayYoung@KW.com

by Funlol a’s Workshop Originally from Lagos, Nigeria, now residing in Memphis, Funlola Coker uses polymer clay and metal to create intricately detailed miniature jewelry, accessories, and figurines. One of her specialties is crafting tiny food — fried eggs, iced donuts, cheeseburgers, avocados — as rings, earrings, or charms for bracelets and necklaces. She also makes realistic miniscule clay succulents as jewelry. Avacado earrings, $22.

Licensed in TN and MS

FLOOR HEATING SYSTEMS

CHANGE THE WAY YOU HEAT

Select products available at Five in One Social Club. etsy.com/shop/ FunlolaCoker.

ph: 901.794.4636 | memphistileandmarble.com

2017VESTAHOMESHOW • 39

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Homegrown HolidayGift Guide

If they can't find it, they can't steal it. No thief has ever found one of our safes!

LET'S DO LIFE OUTSIDE Mug

Visit our showroom today!

by Erica Bodine Pottery

901-213-0111 1499 Bartlett Road, Memphis, TN 38134

Erica Bodine’s dad taught her the art of pottery-making when she was just 12 years old. At 15, she was teaching pottery classes at her father’s studio. With nearly 20 years’ experience, Bodine today hand-crafts Memphisinspired mugs, ornaments, and more. You can find her work at local craft fairs, farmers markets, and her 5th annual Holiday Show and Sale in the event room at Memphis Made Brewing Co. on Thursday, November 16th, from 4 to 7 p.m. Mugs: $20 (12 to 14-oz.), $25 (16 to 20-oz.). Select products available at the Memphis Farmers Market (check Facebook for dates) and at the Memphis Arts Collective Holiday Show (Black Friday through Christmas Eve).

Interested in buying or selling? Contact me first.

Jeanne Childress D: 901-331-0718 • O: 901-757-2500

facebook.com/ericabodinepottery

901.262.3090 serenityhardscapes.com ACCREDITED BUSINESS ®

40 • 2017VESTAHOMESHOW

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IS HOME YOUR FAVORITE PLACE TO BE? IF NOT, LET’S TALK. custom homes remodeling renovation

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Holiday Gift Guide 2017

Various Fur Accessories and Outerwear.

Memphis Magazine’s

THE 2017

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Come browse a delighfully curated collection of handmade and unusual holiday gifts. Christmas Shop Hours: Monday – Friday 10 am–4 pm Saturday 10 am–2 pm until December 22 88 Racine St, Memphis, TN 38111 | 901-327-5681 | womans-exchange.com

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2123 West St. South of Saddle Creek off Poplar Ave. 901.755.4388 www.morethanwords.com @morethanwordsgifts

Artisan Extra Virgin Olive Oil Aged Balsamic Vinegar Gift Sets & Samplers Olives & Spices 4615 Poplar Ave., #18 901-240-6226 Themightyolive.com

42 • 2017VESTAHOMESHOW

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of Good Tas Gifts the Discover Discover the Gifts of Good Taste u Yo hase! Create UniqueTaste for Any Gifts Occasion with the Occasion with the Any for Unique Create Discover thethe GiftsGifts of Good Purc Discover ofGifts Good Taste Discover the Gifts of Good Taste World’s Finest Oils, Vinegars, Spirits & Wines Create Unique Gifts for Any Occasion with the Spirits & Wines Vinegars, Oils, Finest World’s Discover the Gifts of Good Discover theGifts Gifts ofAny Good Taste Create Unique Gifts for Any Occasion with Taste the Create Unique for Occasion with the World’s Finest Oils, Vinegars, Spirits & Wines Discover the Gifts of Good Taste 432-5275 • info@vomfassgermant • (901) TN 38138 Germantown, Create Unique Gifts for Any Spirits Occasion with the •the Create Unique Gifts for World’s Any Occasion #12 Streetwith West 2055 Finest Oils, Vinegars, & Wines World’s Finest Oils, Spirits & Wines Create Unique Gifts forVinegars, Any Spirits Occasion with World’s Finest Oils, the Vinegars, Spirits & Wines World’s Finest Oils, Vinegars, & Wines ict en ils pres restr r deta Must . Some re fo . offer . see sto /23/17 apply pires 11 Ex

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2055 West Street #12 • Germantown, TN 38138 • (901) 432-5275 • info@vomfassgermantown.com

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featuring excellent customer service & fine quality 5100 Wheelis Drive #211, Memphis, TN 38117 901-763-0195 • 1-800-264-4146 JewelersChoiceInc.com

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d by nte es Academy-St. D ese omi Pr Ag n n

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SATURDAY DECEMBER

ND

8:00 a.m. - 4:00 p.m. $5.00 Admission

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Contact bhamilton@saa-sds.org for advanced tickets or online at https://forms.diamondmindinc.com/saa-sds/gbh St. Agnes Academy-St. Dominic School 4830 Walnut Grove Rd. • Siena Hall Sponsored by The Lott Team - Crye-Leike Realtors 2017VESTAHOMESHOW • 43

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Holiday Gift Guide 2017

M ATCH PEWTER MADE IN ITALY.

CHARLIE’S M E AT M A R K E T 1967 - 2017

Fabulous Fresh Fillets

Including a wide variety of custom cut steaks and tenderloin. 901-683-1192 or 901-682-6618 4790 Summer Ave., Memphis, TN 38122

charliesmemphis.com

4538 Poplar Avenue, Memphis, TN 38117 (901) 763-0700 | babcockgifts.com |

THIS HOLIDAY SEASON, LET US HELP YOU SPEND LESS TIME IN THE KITCHEN, AND MORE TIME AROUND THE TABLE. 855-442-6669 44 • 2017VESTAHOMESHOW

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Holiday Gift Guide 2017

WE CATER BUSINESS LUNCHEONS, PRIVATE PARTIES AND WEDDINGS. FULL SERVICE OPTIONS AVAILABLE.

LET US CATER YOUR HOLIDAY PARTY! 2249 Central Ave

901-272-9377 4375 Summer Ave

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DOWNTOWN LOCATION: 147 Butler Ave.

901-672-7760 • WWW.CBQMEMPHIS.COM

“The LG C7 is the best overall TV we've ever tested.” — cnet.com

“The best OLED TV we've reviewed is the LG C7.” — rtings.com

See it now at Dilday TV.

7915 Winchester at Hacks Cross • 794-4437 • dildaytv.biz 2017VESTAHOMESHOW • 45

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Homegrown HolidayGift Guide

Irrigation & Drainage Services Design • Install • Maintain

Landscape & Lighting Services Design • Install • Maintain

Our treatment works whenViagra, Cialis & Levitra don’t! Erectile dysfunction will no longer be a problem after you visit Mid-South Wellness Clinic for Men!

No pain or surgery • Licensed physicians Effective FDA approved medications

6005 Park Ave, Suite 704, Memphis, TN 38119 (901) 761-8100 www.midsouthwellnessclinicformen.com

Ask Questions. Get Answers! Ready To Shop For A Home? RULE #1, 2 & 3: GET PRE-QUALIFIED! Let’s Do It. One Phone Call. Now Go Shopping. Soon. They’re Running Out of Homes! Listen to “The Mortgage Lady” 8-9AM Mondays

Ludy Callaway, Vice-President I-Bank Mortgage Division

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ludy@i-bankonline.com www.yourmortgagelady.net

NMLS #267872

Locally owned and operated

Cookbook from Alcenia’s

1190 Big Orange Rd, Cordova, TN 38018

901-388-4111

sprinklersystemsllc.com

Since opening in 1997, Alcenia’s restaurant downtown has become a Southern dining staple, offering some of the city’s best fried chicken, catfish, pork chops, and soulful sides — with a warm welcome, a hug, and a kiss on the cheek from the proprietor, Betty Joyce “B.J.” Chester-Tomayo. The establishment’s homemade “cha cha” (chow chow) was a favorite find of Guy Fieri when he visited with the Diners, Drive-Ins, and Dives crew in 2011. Chester-Tamayo’s new cookbook Soul 2 Soul: From Alcenia’s to the World features three generations of recipes, traditions, stories, and photos. $28.95. Available at Alcenia’s (317 N. Main) and alcenias.com.

NANCY A CHASE, MD, PEDIATRIC CARDIOLOGY

30 Years of Excellence. 805 Estate Place, Suite 1 Memphis, TN 38120 901.287.4150

46 • 2017VESTAHOMESHOW

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Thank You to Our Sponsors

Larry E. Crum & Associates.

THANK YOU TO OUR PARTNERS:

Germantown Education Foundation • City of Germantown Special Thanks to Germantown Baptist Church A portion of the Proceeds go to support the work of the Germantown Education Foundation.

2017VESTAHOMESHOW • 47

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Po

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call 901.309.0710 | www.yourmagnoliahome.com | Oak Grove Realty, LLC

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G A R D E N VA R I E T Y public gardens such as the Memphis Botanic Garden, which has large collections of conifers and hollies, and The Dixon Gallery and Gardens, whose grounds are populated by numerous evergreens. One way to start a relationship with conifers is to purchase small (i.e., young) plants and put them into large containers where Have a question about plants or planting for our resident gardening expert, to be answered in a future “Garden Variety” column? Send your queries to christine.gang@gmail.com.

Keeping Your Garden Green Tips for maintaining a beautiful garden during the winter months. If you have limited familiarity with boxwood, take a look at new cultivars of every size and shape including those that grow into tight cones, loosely formed masses, or roundy-moundy orbs that never need pruning. PHOTOGRAPHS BY CHRISTINE ARPE GANG

by christine arpe gang

F

or nine months of the year, the color green is so ubiquitous in our landscape it rarely evokes much notice. But when fall turns to winter, our familiar lushly, leafy wooded areas become almost colorless. Our eyes naturally search for visual excitement among the browns and grays and quickly lock onto anything green, unless they are delighted and distracted by some red, yellow, or orange berries or even a colorful bird on the wing.

That, my friends, is why we have to include evergreen trees and shrubs in our gardening plans. Most professionals know this and liberally use evergreens in their landscaping projects no matter how modest or extravagant they may be. In our Zone 7 climate we have an overwhelmingly huge number of evergreen trees and shrubs to choose from, including Spreading Plum Yew is a popular groundcovering conifer.

hollies, azaleas, cold-hardy camellias, boxwood, Asian and native junipers, arborvitae, nandinas, aucubas, yews, and many more. Several of these hardworking plants also produce flowers and/or berries in other seasons. If you have limited familiarity with boxwood, take a look at new cultivars of every size and shape including those that

grow into tight cones, loosely formed masses, or roundy-moundy orbs that never need pruning. Plants with green leaves all year fall into two main types: the conifers that produce cones instead of f lowers and needles instead of leaves; and broadleaf plants with typical foliage. Almost all of them can be planted from now through the winter as long as the soil is not frozen. If you are planning a major re-do, I strongly suggest you get some professional help in selecting evergreens. The oft-quoted and seemingly simple key to great landscaping — “put the right plant in the right place”— isn’t always so simple, as many of us have learned the hard and expensive way. But if your project is less small and less complex, begin by observing evergreens in residential areas. Then visit nurseries and

they will be happy for at least two to three years before their size necessitates installation in the ground. Use any good potting soil in the container that includes both peat moss and compost. Be sure to monitor rainfall amounts during the winter and water the plant as needed. In warm weather, the containers will need a thorough soaking at least three times a week, according to Jason Reeves, horticulturist with the University of Tennessee Research and Education Center in Jackson. If you plant them directly into the ground, be sure to pick a place with good drainage. You can improve drainage by blending the native soil with compost and soil conditioner but if you regularly see water standing in the spot, don’t plant a conifer there, Reeves cautions. Dig a hole two to three times as wide as the root ball of the plant but only as deep as the root ball. The top of the root ball should be at or slightly above the grade of the ground. Wait until spring to sprinkle a slow-release fertilizer around the base of the plant. Here are some plant recommendations from Reeves and Dale Skaggs, director of horticulture at the Dixon: ◗ For tall columnar-shaped trees choose arborvitaes like DeGroot’s Spires or its golden counterpart, Jantar. Or try Taylor, a tough-as-nails eastern red cedar that may grow 30 feet tall but only 3 feet wide. ◗ Ground covering conifers include All Gold, a yellow juniper that is just one foot tall but spreads 8 feet, and Daub’s Frosted, whose speckled foliage reaches 15 inches in height and 5 feet in width. Spreading Plum Yew, which can be seen spilling over a short wall in the sensory garden at Memphis Botanic Garden, grows 2 to 3 feet tall and 4 feet wide. ◗ Filip’s Magic Moment is a tall cone of golden needles. Anna’s Magic Ball forms a golden orb 10 to 15 inches in diameter. And Globosa Nana is a dome-shaped Japanese cedar with short dreadlock-like N O V E M B E R 2 0 1 7 • M E M P H I S M A G A Z I N E . C O M • 113

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needles that beg you to touch them. ◗◗ Some broadleaf evergreens to consider include the boxwood varieties Morris, a dwarf mound 1-by-1 foot; John Baldwin, a cone-shaped shrub that reaches 4 feet in height; and Justin Brouwers, which forms a perfect small globe 4-by-4-feet. Another option is mahonia, a shrub with holly-like leaves that produces bright yellow flowers in late winter followed by powder-blue, grape-like fruit clusters. Content with your trees and shrubs in all seasons? Now is also the time to plant some tulips and daffodils for your spring enjoyment. The Dixon is becoming well known for its display of thousands of bulbs every spring,

so I asked Skaggs to give a few tips on successfully growing them. Tulips, he says, are basically one-shot wonders. If they return for another year they will likely be less plentiful and stunted so at the Dixon, they are dug up and discarded after they bloom. The Dixon is becoming well known for its display of thousands of bulbs every spring.

If your soil is loose and rich, he advises using a bulb planting device or trowel to create a hole about 4 to 5 inches deep. Drop in a tulip bulb, always with the pointy side up.

Garden Events Modern plant explorers, S U E A N D B L E D D Y N W Y N N - J O N E S , will focus on “Collecting New and Hardy Plants in the Mountains of Northern Vietnam” during their lecture at 11 a.m., November 16th, in the W I N E G A R D N E R A U D I T O R I U M A T T H E D I X O N G A L L E R Y A N D G A R D E N S , 4339 Park.   The couple is the owner of Crug Farm, a combination nursery and walled garden in northern Wales, where they grow rare plants propagated from more than 18,000 seeds and plants they collected over 20 years of botanizing in remote areas of the world. They have introduced more than 4,000 new cultivars in the United Kingdom, including a Taiwanese schefflera that is winter-hardy in northern Wales.   Their clients include Buckingham Palace and top UK garden designers.   The lecture series was established and endowed by the late Phoebe Cook Welsh in memory of her mother, Phoebe Cook. Co-sponsored by the Memphis Garden Club, it is free with regular admission or membership to the Dixon.

If you want to create a new bed for other f lowers next spring, remove the grass from the area and scratch the top of the soil with a rake. Set the tulip bulbs close together or “shoulder to shoulder,” says Skaggs. Push them down as far as they will go into the soil. It may be only a half-inch or so. Dump compost on top of them to a depth of 5 to 6 inches. After they bloom, discard the bulbs and work the compost into the soil before adding other plants. Don’t plant tulips in the same spot year after year because the soil may begin harboring a disease that brings on sparse and ill-shapen f lowers and foliage. Ideally daffodils should be in the ground by mid-November, but if you are a little late don’t fret. The worst that can happen, according to Skaggs, is they will emerge a little later than usual next spring. Because daffodils multiply and come back for years, be sure to dig holes three times the height of the bulbs and leave more room between them. Our plants may now be going dormant but some of us still have work to do.  

Woodland combines small class sizes, dedicated teachers, and personalized instruction to help grow your child’s success. Call 901-685-0976 to schedule a tour, or email admissions@woodlandschool.org. Open House Dates: Sunday, November 12: 2:00 – 4:00 | Tuesday, November 14: 9:00 – 2:00 Middle School Preview Day: Tuesday, December 5: 8:30 – 2:30 A co-ed, 2-year-old – 8th grade independent school in the heart of East Memphis. | woodlandschool.org

©2017 Woodland Presbyterian School. All rights reserved. 114 • M E M P H I S M A G A Z I N E . C O M • N O V E M B E R 2 0 1 7

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END GAME

Charles Billings

The curtain comes down on an integral part of Memphis culture.

by chris davis

S

ynchronicity’s a bear sometimes. I’ve spent the last month clearing clutter from closets, drawers, and cabinets — disposing of all those things I thought I needed but didn’t, and finding special places to store the many trivial nothings that grew into meaningful somethings while I wasn’t watching. Among the things that turned up was a handwritten note from Waynoka Avenue that began, “Dear One ....”

Even if his name hadn’t been embossed imprinted memory from 1986, when we were in red at the top of the card I’d have known both cast in a production of Richard Brinsley in those two words that this was a sum- Sheridan’s Restoration comedy, The Rivals, at mons from Charles Billings — actor, vocal- Rhodes College. These sparkly items, left ist extraordinaire, and the longtime voice over from some past show, were worn for our of WKNO. entertainment, and to let everybody know “Come have a drink with me at The Grove Prince Charles would be telling funny stories Grill soon,” it said, and I realized his phone until it was time for his next scene. number, scrawled at the bottom, wasn’t in It was my first Memphis show and my first my current contacts list. opportunity to learn from He was the kind of singer So I immediately logged professionals — like the it into my phone, thinking literally able to shake rafters man with the booming I’d surprise him with a call baritone voice wearing the while inserting incredible sometime soon. Charles tiara whose commitment to and I hadn’t had a proper excellence combined with nuance into every phrase. bull-session in a few years, wild and wonderful offand I’ve been trying to be better about stay- stage antics to teach a young aspiring actor ing in touch with old friends — particu- some valuable lessons about fearlessness and larly the people whom you sometimes just freedom. Now, because I’ve never known how want to write or call out of the blue to say, to write a proper obituary, let me share an “Dear one ....” off-color story. Days after unearthing his note from the botThe Rivals is most famous for introductom of my office filing cabinet, I received news ing Mrs. Malaprop, the character from that the great Charles Billings had passed away. whom we get the expression “malaI’m still processing … propism” — an accidental insertion Charles was such an integral part of Mem- of wrong, similar words into common phis’ cultural life for so long that there’s no phrases with humorous results. Backgood way to condense his accomplishments stage, between scenes, the into a paragraph or two, so instead I’ll share cast made its own my earliest, fondest memories of one of the modern malaprops most charming, gracious, and talented people inspired by lines in I’ve ever known. Sheridan’s script. Mrs. Whether he was acting in dramas by Ar- Malaprop’s already bunthur Miller, Leonard Bernstein musicals, or gled Shakespeare, “A stabelting one out for Opera Memphis, Charles tion like Harry Mercury,” Billings, the longtime director of music at became “A station like Farmington Presbyterian Church, made ev- Freddy Mercury,” while erything look effortless. Nothing impressed Charles’ line to a disobethe younger, only recently urbanized, me half dient son, “Damn me if so much as the way he could sit down to the I ever call you Jack mic at WKNO, drop his deep, honeyed South- again,” was given ern drawl, and wrap his tongue around the a decidedly NC-17 names of all those classical composers. twist. I’ll leave the Though generally dapper and dignified, I actual change to can’t think of the man without seeing him the reader’s imagidressed in eighteenth-century military drag, nation, but suffice it wearing a sparkling rhinestone tiara, and a to say, it was naughty, devilish, grinch-like smile bookended by a silly, made good use dangling pair of rhinestone ‘ear-bobs.’ It’s an of the word Jack, and ILLUSTRATION BY CHRIS HONEYSUCKLE ELLIS

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was all good fun until the night Charles, in the rarest of rare moments, became tonguetied and very nearly said the adult “backstage-only” variation in front of an audience. Keeping a straight face was impossible. “I’m gonna get all y’all,” he said, bursting into the green room beet red, and snickering like a schoolboy who’d just split his pants. I mention the dirty joke to contrast with the other thing I so strongly associate with Charles Billings — his vocal interpretation of sacred music. He was the kind of singer literally able to shake rafters while inserting incredible nuance into every phrase. It was a powerful, revealing, and otherworldly voice that made it easy to imagine other, better worlds. If I had only one sentence to summarize the man — very nearly a myth in local arts circles — I think I’d skip all the usual and well-deserved lines about gentility, elegance, generosity, etc. and go with something a little more hypostatic: Charles Billings was fully human and he was entirely divine. He’ll be missed. He already is.  Charles Billings passed away September 19th at the age of 62. Memorials may be sent to Calvary Episcopal Church or to Farmington Presbyterian Church.

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DINING OUT

left: Elwood’s owner Tim Bednarski samples his restaurant’s barbecue pizza, a popular combination of pulled pork and mozzarella and one of the menu’s seven pizza combinations. above: Elwood’s prep cook Juan Carlos pulls chicken wings from the restaurant’s rotisserie smoker. middle: Top-sellers at Elwood’s include Steelhead trout tacos topped with pico, avocado, and creamy horseradish cream.

The Little Restaurant That Could Diehard fans, smoked deli meats, and a dedicated kitchen team turn Elwood’s Shack into a scrumptious success story.

by pamela denney photographs by justin fox burks

F

or breakfast, lunch, and dinner, on any day of the week, vehicles hug the curb in front of Elwood’s Shack, a comfortable ramshackle place tucked across the parking lot from the loading dock of Lowe’s. The vehicle parade — a scruffy Honda CRV, a meticulously groomed Prius, and a Memphis city fire truck — mimic the restaurant’s assortment of customers: Silver-haired seniors with grandkids in tow, a foursome of firefighters (they get

their tacos, chili cheeseburger, and large brisket sandwich to go), and lots of old hippies, like the pony-tailed fellow who scans the memorabilia on the restaurant’s walls and says, a little wistfully, “Oh, man. I had that same Led Zeppelin poster back in the day.”

Welcome to Elwood’s Shack, a deli that feels more like a neighborhood cookout party than a wildly popular restaurant voted “Best Deli” by Memphis magazine readers, thanks to its menu of Southern comfort food built around barbecue. A self-effacing kind of guy from the south side of Houston, Tim Bednarski’s comfortable affability belies his three decades with corporate restaurants like Landry’s Seafood and Bahama Breeze, where he worked in management, design, and development. In 2012, Bednarski and managing partner Mandy Edwards opened Elwood’s. “It was a now-or-never sort of thing,” he says. Bednarski’s barbecue pathway started 15 years ago, when as a novice, he formed the competitive cooking team Pigs in Space. Over time, he perfected the dry rubs now used at Elwood’s, like the aptly named Magic Dust for pork and chicken. “The team

would come over to the house, and we would do satisfaction surveys,” Bednarski recalls. “Is it too salty, too smoky, too hot?” Similar taste tests directed Elwood’s not-too-sweet barbecue sauce, a restaurant staple made with molasses, maple syrup, and Old Charter 8, a more economical substitute for the recipe’s original Maker’s Mark. Today, Elwood’s four-chef team — Rodrigo Humildad, Juan Nunez, Manuel Serna, and Edwin Vega — runs through about 25 gallons of sauce every week to feed hundreds of customers. On a busy Saturday, as many as 800 people can file through the restaurant to eat in or take-out. I happily participate. Over the course of two weeks in October, I eat at Elwood’s four different times, and my only disappointment is a slice of pecan pie dusted with powdered sugar. (It’s pretty, but over-baked.) Longtime customer Tyler Lee, when he hears about my story, insists

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PAM’S PICS: THREE TO TRY

AVOCADO SKINS ($9) Warm from the oven, the avocado fits nicely in my hand, ready to snuggle. With a spoon, I dig in, scooping up baked egg, diced prosciutto, and pico de gallo that spills over the edge, like a colorful stream of confetti.

MEMPHIS STYLE RIBS ($22) The baby backs at Elwood’s are exceptionally good. Halfway through cooking, chefs baste the ribs with vinegar, barbecue sauce, and crushed garlic, wrap them in foil, and cook them again. The result? Crusty on the edges but tender inside.

CHOCOLATE CHIP COOKIE ($2) Go ahead. Grab a chocolate chip cookie and then thank Rodrigo Humildad, who bakes the cookies studded with three kinds of chocolate chunks every morning. Says owner Tim Bednarski: “He’s the only guy who can do it right.”

left: Elwood’s breakfast menu includes house-made 7-Up biscuits stacked with pimento cheese, vine-ripened tomato, and Applewood bacon. above: Managing partner Mandy Edwards. serves customers in Elwood’s dining room, rebuilt after an early-morning fire last December.

that I try the chicken Philly sub, a soft hoagie bun packed tight with smoked chicken and veggies and two kinds of cheese, and the bacon cheeseburger. Both are excellent, but the burger makes my heart sing when it arrives in a bright red basket lined with checkered paper. It is splendid. Pickle, tomato, green leaf lettuce, and a thick slice of raw onion rest on one half of the oversized bun. On the other, is the burger, seared on a flattop, but still one-inch thick, and draped with melted cheddar. Two strips of bacons crisscross the cheese like a pirate flag, warning: Eat the whole thing if you dare. At Elwood’s, it’s easy to order favorites time and again, like the roast beef debris po’boy or a 7-Up biscuit piled high with tomato and pimento cheese. Believe me, I know. Every time I stand in line, a relentless mantra tugs at my brain: Fish tacos, fish tacos, fish tacos. Other customers feel the

to cheese. And by all means, order an Elwood’s Shaq Attack, especially for a hungry group. A showcase of the restaurant’s barbecue finesse, the platter includes ribs, brisket, two wings, pulled pork, and half a chicken, along with Texas toast, potato salad, and green and purple cabbage slaw. same. Steelhead trout tacos are For our Shaq Attack meal, we the restaurant’s number- one top-seller, even though the taco head outside to a picnic table, isn’t really a taco at all. Yes, it bewhitewashed like discarded oysgins as a flour tortilla, buttered ter shells on a bayside beach. On a on both sides, sprinkled with second visit, we sit inside, where cheddar, and topped a dining room fire At Elwood’s, it’s with small chunks last December shut easy to order of Steelhead trout, a down the restaumigratory fish that rant for 94 days. Refavorites time and tastes like salmon. markably, Elwood’s again. Every time But pop it into a eclectic assortment I stand in line, a hot pizza oven, and of memorabilia, deer while the fish bakes, heads, and vintage relentless mantra the tortilla puffs up team pendants look tugs at my brain: into a dimpled deunfazed. licious pillow for Quick-thinking Fish tacos, fish fresh toppings like firefighters pulled tacos, fish tacos. everything off the avo cado , m i xe d greens, and creamy horseradish walls, explains Bednarski, who sauce. (Fish tacos, fish tacos, fish used photographs to recreate tacos.) the restaurant’s exact décor. But here’s some advice: Break He points to a support beam by out and explore menu specials the register covered with busilike creamy potato soup dressed ness cards. “Those cards are the with diced red onions, or arsame ones that were there bemadillo eggs, a catchy name in fore the fire,” he says. “I guess Texas for pickled jalapenos sliced I’m superstitious, but I wanted in half and stuffed with pimeneverything to be the same.”

ELWOOD’S SHACK 4523 Summer Ave. (901) 761-9898 ★★★★ ★★★ ★★ ★

Exceptional Very good Satisfactory Skip it!

STARS: ★★★1/2 FOOD: The menu at Elwood’s

elevates the ordinary with items like Texas beef brisket chili and house-made pastrami, sliced thin and piled high. DRINKS: Elwood’s doesn’t serve alcohol, but feel free to bring your own, especially for weekend brunch when the deli serves BYOVodka Bloody Mary’s. ATMOSPHERE: Part diner, part barbecue shack, Elwood’s feels easy-going, but service is efficient and friendly. EXTRAS: Owner Tim Bednarski travels often to his 48 acres in Texas, family-owned for the past 200 years. Elwood’s customers get some of the perks, like the jam he makes with the elderberries from a towering tree. UP NEXT: Look for a second location, possibly downtown, to open next year, but Elwood’s anticipated food truck is on permanent hold. PRICES: Breakfast ($3 to $6); brunch ($6.50 to $12.50); hotdogs ($6.50 to $8); burgers ($9 to $13); pizzas ($9 to $26); sandwiches and subs ($7 to $13). OPEN: Monday through Saturday, 7 a.m. to 9 p.m.; Sunday, 8 a.m. to 3 p.m.

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the

MEMPHIS DINING guide

Located at the corner of Central and Cooper, in the shadow of a railroad overpass, Railgarten is a sprawling playground for grownups with music, food, games, and drinks. Play ping-pong for free weekdays until 6 p.m., try a thick shake from the ice cream shop, or settle into the Railgarten Diner, where customer favorites include the Crispy Korean Chicken Sandwich (left), fish tacos, and a trio of Tiki cocktails, boozy and handcrafted.

Tidbits: Railgarten

D

rive west down Central long enough, and you’ll cross the gates of Midtown hipsterdom: Cooper Street. But stop a few buildings short, and you can pull into the parking lot of Railgarten Diner, part of an acre-and-a-half hangout with outdoor beach volleyball courts and indoor ping-pong tables. There’s plenty of seating, appropriately dim lighting, and didn’t your best friend date that waitress back in high school? That looks like her, but let’s not ask. Instead, let’s focus on the mix of “worldleague flavors and American cuisine,” as chef Aaron Gardner describes the menu, served since mid-April when the diner opened. The Korean Crispy Chicken Sandwich, a prime example of this marriage, includes a marinated

chicken thigh, kale kimchi, and Sriracha ginger chili aioli with scrumptious fries alongside. “We’ve taken the traditional kimchi and mixed it with a more Americanized version, so it would be kind of easier on the American palate,” Gardner says. Typically, kimchi includes fermented shrimp, but Railgarten’s kimchi eliminates the shrimp and heads in a different direction. “We use the ginger, the hot sauces, the chili pepper, but ours is more sweet and savory instead of that punch you get from the fermented shrimp,” Gardner explains. The result is a sweetness I mistake as the taste of honey. Korean and other global flavors extend across Railgarten’s menu, a collection of up-

scale diner food that includes interesting burgers, breakfast omelets, a Diner Dog, and entrees like Short Rib Mac & Cheese and fish tacos topped with avocado. For appetizers, don’t skip the cheese curds, battered and deepfried and served with a drizzle of hot sauce. Jordan Walker, general manager, credits his own introduction to the creamy curds to his time living in Chicago when he often traveled to Milwaukee, where cheese curds are ubiquitous menu options. “I’d never heard of cheese curds, and didn’t know what they were growing down in Memphis,” Walker says. “The first time I tried one, I was in love.” Railgarten, 2166 Central Ave. (901) 231-5043, $-$$)

PHOTOGRAPHS BY JUSTIN FOX BURKS

by gus carrington

We celebrate our city’s community table and the people who grow, cook, and eat the best Memphis food at M E M P H I S M A G A Z I N E . C O M / F O O D - D I N I N G 118 • M E M P H I S M A G A Z I N E . C O M • N O V E M B E R 2 0 1 7

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10/16/17 10:30 AM


CIT Y DINING LIST

A Curated Guide to Eating Out

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emphis magazine offers this curated restaurant listing as a service to its readers. Broken down alphabetically by neighborhoods, this directory does not list every restaurant in town. It does, however, include the magazine’s “Top 50” choices of must-try restaurants in Memphis, a DINING SYMBOLS group that is updated every August. Establishments open B — breakfast less than a year are not eligible for “Top 50” but are noted as L — lunch “New.” This guide also includes a representative sampling D — dinner of other Bluff City eating establishments. No fast-food SB — Sunday brunch facilities or cafeterias are listed, nor have we included WB — weekend brunch establishments that rely heavily on take-out business. X— wheelchair accessible Restaurants are included regardless of whether they ad MRA — member, Memphis vertise in Memphis magazine; those that operate in multi Restaurant Association ple locations are listed under the neighborhood of their $ — under $15 per person without drinks or desserts original location. This guide is updated regularly, but we $$ — under $25 recommend that you call ahead to check on hours, prices, $$$ — $26-$50 and other details. Suggestions from readers are welcome; $$$$ — over $50 please contact us at dining@memphismagazine.com.

CENTER CITY AGAVE MARIA—Menu items at this Mexican eatery include short rib stuffed poblanos, shrimp and crab enchiladas, and grilled lamb chops. 83 Union. 341-2096. L, D, X, $-$$ ALDO’S PIZZA PIES—Serving gourmet pizzas — including Mr. T Rex — salads, and more. Also 30 beers, bottled or on tap. 100 S. Main. 577-7743; 752 S. Cooper. 725-7437. L, D, X, $-$$ THE ARCADE—Possibly Memphis’ oldest cafe. Specialties include sweet potato pancakes, a fried peanut butter and banana sandwich, and breakfast served all day. 540 S. Main. 526-5757. B, L, D (Thurs.-Sat.), X, MRA, $ AUTOMATIC SLIM’S—Longtime downtown favorite specializes in contemporary American cuisine emphasizing local ingredients; also extensive martini list. 83 S. Second. 525-7948. L, D, WB, X, MRA, $-$$$ BANGKOK ALLEY—Thai fusion cuisine includes noodle and curry dishes, chef-specialty sushi rolls, coconut soup, and duck and seafood entrees. Closed for lunch Sat. and all day Sun. at Brookhaven location; call for hours. 121 Union Ave. 522-2010; 2150 W. Poplar at Houston Levee (Collierville). 854-8748; 715 W. Brookhaven Cl. 590-2585. L, D, X, MRA, $-$$ BARDOG TAVERN—Classic American grill with Italian influence, Bardog offers pasta specialties such as Grandma’s NJ Meatballs, as well as salads, sliders, sandwiches, and daily specials. 73 Monroe. 275-8752. B (Mon.-Fri.), L, D, WB, X, $-$$ BEDROCK EATS & SWEETS—Memphis’ only Paleocentric restaurant offering such dishes as pot roast, waffles, enchiladas, chicken salad, omelets, and more. Closed for dinner Sun. 327 S. Main. 409-6433. B, L, D, X, $-$$ BELLE: A SOUTHERN BISTRO—Brisket in a bourbon brown sugar glaze, and chicken with basmati rice are among the specialties; also seafood entrees and such vegetables as blackened green tomatoes. Closed for dinner Sun. and all day Mon. 117 Union Ave. 433-9851. L (Sat. and Sun.), D, WB, X, $-$$$ BELLE TAVERN—Serving soups, salads, sandwiches, and more, including smoked turkey and homemade dumplings with jalapeno Johnny cakes and beef short rib tamales. 117 Barboro Alley. 249-6580. L (Sun.), D, $ BLEU—This eclectic restaurant features American food with global influences and local ingredients. Among the specialties are a 14-oz. bone-in rib-eye and several seafood dishes. 221 S. Third, in the Westin Memphis Beale St. Hotel. 334-5950. B, L, D, WB, X, $$-$$$ BLUEFIN RESTAURANT & SUSHI LOUNGE— Serves Japanese fusion cuisine featuring seafood and steak, with seasonally changing menu; also, a sushi bar and flatbread pizza. 135 S. Main. 528-1010. L, D, X, MRA, $-$$

BRASS DOOR IRISH PUB—Irish and New-American cuisine includes such entrees as fish and chips burgers, sandwiches, salads, and daily specials. 152 Madison. 572-1813. L, D, SB, MRA, $ CAFE KEOUGH—European-style cafe serving quiche, paninis, salads, and more. 12 S. Main. 509-2469. B, L, D, X, $ CAFE PONTOTOC—Serves a variety of internationally inspired small plates, as well as salads and sandwiches. Closed for dinner Sun. 314 S. Main. 249-7955. L, D, WB, X, $-$$ CAPRICCIO GRILL ITALIAN STEAKHOUSE— Offers prime steaks, fresh seafood (lobster tails, grouper, mahi mahi), pasta, and several northern Italian specialties. 149 Union, The Peabody. 529-4199. B, L, D, SB, X, MRA, $-$$$$ CATHERINE & MARY’S—A variety of pastas, grilled quail, pâté, razor clams, and monkfish are among the dishes served at this Italian restaurant in the Chisca. 272 S. Main. 254-8600. D, X, $-$$$ CHEZ PHILIPPE—Classical/contemporary French cuisine presented in a luxurious atmosphere with a seasonal menu focused on local/regional cuisine. The crown jewel of The Peabody for 35 years. Afternoon tea served Wed.-Sat., 1-3:30 p.m. (reservations required). Closed Sun.Tues. The Peabody, 149 Union. 529-4188. D, X, MRA, $$$$ COZY CORNER—Serving up ribs, pork sandwiches, chicken, spaghetti, and more; also homemade banana pudding. Closed Sun.-Mon. 745 N. Parkway and Manassas. 527-9158. L, D, $ DEJAVU—Serves Creole, soul, and vegetarian cuisine, including po-boys, jambalaya, and shrimp and grits. 51 S. Main. 505-0212. L, D, X, MR, $-$$ DIRTY CROW INN—Serving elevated bar food, including poutine fries, fried catfish, and the Chicken Debris, a sandwich with smoked chicken, melted cheddar, and gravy. 855 Kentucky. 207-5111. L, D, $ EIGHTY3—Contemporary menu of steaks and seafood offers a variety of eclectic specialties; also weekly specials, small plates, appetizers, and patio dining. 83 Madison Ave. 333-1224. B, L, D, WB, X, MRA, $-$$$ EVELYN & OLIVE—Jamaican/Southern fusion cuisine includes such dishes as Kingston stew fish, Rasta Pasta, and jerk rib-eye. Closed for lunch Sat. and all day Sun.-Mon. 630 Madison. 748-5422. L, D, X, $ FELICIA SUZANNE’S—Southern cuisine with low-country, Creole, and Delta influences, using regional fresh seafood, local beef, and locally grown foods. Entrees include shrimp and grits. Closed Sun. and Mon. A downtown staple at Brinkley Plaza, 80 Monroe, Suite L1. 5230877. L (Fri. only), D, X, MRA, $$-$$$ FERRARO’S PIZZERIA & PUB—Rigatoni and tortellini are among the pasta entrees here, along with pizzas

(This guide, compiled by our editors, includes editorial picks and advertisers.)

(whole or by the slice), with a variety of toppings. 111 Jackson. 522-2033. L, D, X, $ THE FIVE SPOT—Tucked behind Earnestine & Hazel’s, this popular eatery features innovative bar food by chef Kelly English. Closed Mon.-Tues. 531 S. Main. 523-9754. D, SB, X, $-$$ FLIGHT RESTAURANT & WINE BAR— Serves steaks and seafood, along with such specialties as bison ribeye and Muscovy duck, all matched with appropriate wines. 39 S. Main. 521-8005. D, SB, X, MRA, $-$$$ FLYING FISH—Serves up fried and grilled versions of shrimp, crab, oysters, fish tacos, and catfish; also chicken and burgers. 105 S. Second. 522-8228. L, D, X, MRA, $-$$ THE FRONT PORCH—Beale Street Landing eatery serves Southern-inspired appetizers, such as Crispy Grit Bites, along with burgers, sandwiches, and salads. Closed Monday. 251 Riverside Dr. 524-0817. L, X, $ GUS’S WORLD FAMOUS FRIED CHICKEN—Serves chicken with signature spicy batter, along with homemade beans, slaw, and pies. 310 S. Front. 527-4877; 215 S. Center St. (Collierville). 853-6005; 2965 N. Germantown Pkwy. (Cordova). 373-9111; 730 S. Mendenhall. 767-2323; 505 Highway 70 W., Mason, TN. 901-2942028. L, D, X, MRA, $ HAPPY MEXICAN—Serves quesadillas, burritos, chimichangas, vegetable and seafood dishes, and more. 385 S. Second. 529-9991; 6080 Primacy Pkwy. 683-0000; 7935 Winchester. 751-5353. L, D, X, $ HUEY’S—This family friendly restaurant offers 13 different burgers, a variety of sandwiches and delicious soups and salads. 1927 Madison. 726-4372; 1771 N. Germantown Pkwy. (Cordova). 754-3885; 77 S. Second. 5272700; 2130 W. Poplar (Collierville). 854-4455; 7090 Malco Blvd. (Southaven). 662-349-7097; 7825 Winchester. 624-8911; 4872 Poplar. 682-7729; 7677 Farmington Blvd. (Germantown). 3183030; 8570 Highway 51 N. (Millington). 873-5025. L, D, X, MRA, $ ITTA BENA—Southern and Cajun-American cuisine served here; specialties are duck and waffles and shrimp and grits, along with steaks, chops, seafood, and pasta. 145 Beale St. 578-3031. D, X, MRA, $$-$$$
 KOOKY CANUCK—Offers prime rib, catfish, and burgers, including the 4-lb. “Kookamonga”; also late-night menu. 87 S. Second. 578-9800; 1250 N. Germantown Pkwy. 1-800-2453 L, D, X, MRA, $-$$$ THE LITTLE TEA SHOP—Downtown institution serves up Southern comfort cooking, including meatloaf and such veggies as turnip greens, yams, okra, and tomatoes. Closed Sat.-Sun. 69 Monroe. 525-6000, L, X, $ LOCAL GASTROPUB—Entrees with a focus on locally grown products include truffle mac-and-cheese and braised brisket tacos. 95 S. Main. 473-9573; 2126 Madison. 725-1845. L, D, WB, X, MRA, $-$$ LOFLIN YARD—Beer garden and restaurant serves vegetarian fare and smoked-meat dishes, including beef brisket and pork tenderloin, cooked on a custom-made grill. Closed Mon.-Tues. 7 W. Carolina. 249-3046. L (Sat. and Sun.), D, $-$$ THE LOOKOUT AT THE PYRAMID—Serves seafood and Southern fare, including cornmeal-fried oysters, sweet tea brined chicken, and elk chops. 1 Bass Pro Dr. 620-4600/2918200. L, D, X $-$$$ LUNA RESTAURANT & LOUNGE—Serving a limited menu of breakfast and lunch items. Dinner entrees include Citrus Glaze Salmon and Cajun Stuffed Chicken. 179 Madison (Hotel Napoleon). 526-0002. B, D (Mon.Sat.), X, $-$$$ LYFE KITCHEN—Serving healthy, affordable wraps, bowls, sandwiches, and more; entrees include herb roasted salmon and parmesan crusted chicken. 272 S. Main. 526-0254; 6201 Poplar. 684-5333. B, L, D, WB, X, $ MACIEL’S TORTAS & TACOS—Entrees include tortas, hefty Mexican sandwiches filled with choice of chicken, pork, or steak. Also serving fried taco plates, quesadillas, chorizo and pastor soft tacos, salads, and more. Closed Sun. 45 S. Main. 526-0037. L, D, X, $ N O V E M B E R 2 0 1 7 • M E M P H I S M A G A Z I N E . C O M • 119

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CIT Y DINING LIST

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4726 Poplar Ave. Suite 6, Memphis, TN 901.590.2022 • Mon-Fri 10am - 5:30am acoinandsilvershop.com

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THE MAJESTIC GRILLE—Housed in a former silent-picture house, features aged steaks, fresh seafood, and such specialties as roasted chicken and grilled pork tenderloin; offers a pre-theatre menu and classic cocktails. Well-stocked bar. 145 S. Main. 522-8555. L, D, WB, X, MRA, $-$$$ McEWEN’S ON MONROE—Southern/ American cuisine with international flavors; specialties include steak and seafood, sweet potato-crusted catfish with macaroni and cheese, and more. Closed Sun., Monroe location. 120 Monroe. 527-7085; 1110 Van Buren (Oxford). 662-234-7003. L, D, SB (Oxford only), X, MRA, $$-$$$ MESQUITE CHOP HOUSE—The focus here is on steaks, including prime fillet, rib eyes, and prime-aged New York strip; also, some seafood options. 5960 Getwell (Southaven). 662-890-2467; 88 Union. 527-5337; 3165 Forest Hill-Irene (Germantown). 249-5661. D, SB (Germantown), X, $$-$$$ MOLLIE FONTAINE LOUNGE—Specializes in tapas (small plates) featuring global cuisine. Closed Sun.-Tues. 679 Adams Ave. 524-1886. D, X, $ OSHI ASIAN KITCHEN—Eatery offers Asian cuisine, including sushi and nigiri, with such entrees as Sticky Short Ribs, Wagyu Flank Steak and Quail Eggs, and Bi Bim Bap. 94 S. Main. 729-6972. L, D, X, $-$$ PAULETTE’S—Presents fine dining with a Continental flair, including such entrees as filet Paulette with butter cream sauce and crabmeat and spinach crepes; also changing daily specials, and great views. River Inn. 50 Harbor Town Square. 260-3300. B, L, D, WB, X, MRA, $-$$$ PEARL’S OYSTER HOUSE—Downtown eatery serving seafood, including oysters, crawfish, and stuffed butterfly shrimp, as well as beef, chicken, and pasta dishes. 299 S. Main. 522-9070. L, D, SB, X, MRA, $-$$$ RENDEZVOUS, CHARLES VERGOS’— Menu items include barbecued ribs, cheese plates, skillet shrimp, red beans and rice, and Greek salads. Closed Sun.-Mon. 52 S. Second. 523-2746. L (Fri.-Sat.), D, X, MRA, $-$$ RIZZO’S DINER—Chorizo meatloaf, lobster pronto puff, and lamb belly tacos are menu items at this upscale diner. Michael Patrick among the city’s best chefs. 492 S. Main. 304-6985. L (Fri.-Sat.), D, SB, X, MRA, $-$$ SABOR CARIBE—Serving up “Caribbean flavors” with dishes from Colombia, Venezuela, Puerto Rico, and Cuba. Closed Sunday. 662 Madison. 949-8100. L, D, X, $ SOUTH MAIN SUSHI & GRILL—Serving sushi, nigiri, and more. 520 S. Main. 249-2194. L, D, X, $ SPINDINI—Italian fusion cuisine with such entrees as wood-fired pizzas, gorgonzola stuffed filet, and fresh seafood; large domestic whiskey selection. 383 S. Main. 578-2767. D, X, $$-$$$ TERRACE—Creative American and Continental cuisine includes such dishes as filet mignon, beef or lamb sliders, chicken satay, and mushroom pizzetta. Rooftop, River Inn of Harbor Town, 50 Harbor Town Square. 260-3366. D, X, $$ TEXAS DE BRAZIL—Serves beef, pork, lamb, and chicken dishes, and Brazilian sausage; also a salad bar with extensive toppings. 150 Peabody Place, Suite 103. 526-7600. L (Wed.-Fri.), D, SB, X, $$-$$$ TUSCANY ITALIAN EATERY—Menu includes paninis, deli subs and wraps, soups, and desserts. Closed Sat.-Sun. 200 Jefferson, #100. 505-2291. B, L, X, $ TWILIGHT SKY TERRACE—Offers small plates of tostados, nachos, flatbreads, paninis; also hand-crafted cocktails and sweeping rooftop views of the downtown Memphis skyline. Open, weather permitting. The Madison Hotel, 79 Madison. 333-1224. D, WB, X, $ UNCLE BUCK’S FISHBOWL & GRILL—Burgers, pizza, fish dishes, sandwiches, and more served in a unique “underwater” setting. Bass Pro, Bass Pro Drive, 291-8200. B, L, D, X, $-$$ THE VAULT—Shrimp beignets, stuffed cornish hen, and bacon-wrapped chicken roulade are

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CIT Y DINING LIST among the dishes offered at this Creole/Italian fusion eatery. 124 G.E. Patterson. 591-8000. L, D, SB, X, $-$$

COLLIERVILLE 148 NORTH—French cuisine meets Southern comfort food here with menu items such as chicken and waffles, duck confit, and JKE’s Knuckle Sandwich, made with lobster knuckle and puff pastry. 148 N. Main. 569-0761. L, D, WB, X, $-$$ BROOKS PHARM2FORK—Serving fresh vegetables and meats responsibly grown by area farmers. Entrees include Marmilu Farms Pork Triangle Steak, Old School Salmon Patties, and Pan Seared Lake’s Catfish. 120 Mulberry. 853-7511. D, X, $-$$ CAFE PIAZZA BY PAT LUCCHESI—Specializes in gourmet pizzas (including create-your-own), panini sandwiches, and pasta. Closed Sun. 139 S. Rowlett St. 861-1999. L, D, X, $-$$ CIAO BABY—Specializing in Neapolitan-style pizza made in a wood-fired oven. Also serves house-made mozzarella, pasta, appetizers, and salads. 890 W. Poplar, Suite 1. 457-7457. L, D, X, $ EL MEZCAL—Serves burritos, chimichangas, fajitas, and other Mexican cuisine, as well as shrimp dinners and steak. 9947 Wolf River, 853-7922; 402 Perkins Extd. 761-7710; 694 N.Germantown Pkwy. (Cordova). 755-1447; 1492 Union. 274-4264; 11615 Airline Rd. (Arlington). 867-1883; 9045 Highway 64 (Lakeland). 383-4219; 7164 Hacks Cross Rd. (Olive Branch). 662-890-3337; 8834 Hwy. 51 N. (Millington). 872-3220; 7424 Highway 64 (Bartlett). 417-6026. L, D, X, $ EMERALD THAI RESTAURANT—Spicy shrimp, pad khing, lemon grass chicken, and several noodle, rice, and vegetarian dishes are offered at this family restaurant. Closed Sunday. 8950 Highway 64 (Lakeland, TN). 384-0540. L, D X, $-$$ FIREBIRDS—Specialties are hand-cut steaks, slow-roasted prime rib, and wood-grilled salmon and other seafood, as well as seasonal entrees.  4600 Merchants Circle, Carriage Crossing. 850-1637; 8470 Highway 64 (Bartlett). 379-1300. L, D, X, $-$$$ RONNIE GRISANTI’S ITALIAN RESTAURANT— This Memphis institution serves family classics such as Elfo’s Special and chicken ravioli, along with lighter fare and changing daily chef selection. Closed Sun. Sheffield Antiques Mall, 684 W. Poplar. 850-0191. L (Mon.-Sat.), D (Thurs.-Sat.), X, $-$$$ JIM’S PLACE GRILLE—Features American, Greek, and Continental cuisine with such entrees as pork tenderloin, several seafood specialties, and hand-cut charcoal-grilled steaks. Closed for lunch Sat. and all day Sun. 3660 Houston Levee. 861-5000. L, D, X, MRA, $-$$$ MULAN ASIAN BISTRO—Hunan Chicken, tofu dishes, and orange beef served here; some sushi, too.  2059 Houston Levee. 850-5288; 2149 Young. 347-3965; 4698 Spottswood. 609-8680. L, D, X, $-$$ OSAKA JAPANESE CUISINE—Featuring an extensive sushi menu as well as traditional Japanese and hibachi dining. Hours vary for lunch; call. 3670 Houston Levee. 861-4309; 3402 Poplar. 249-4690; 7164 Hacks Cross (Olive Branch). 662-890-9312; 2200 N. Germantown Pkwy. (Cordova). 425-4901. L, D, X, $-$$$ THE SEAR SHACK BURGERS & FRIES— Serving Angus burgers, fries, and hand-spun milkshakes. Closed Mon. 875 W. Poplar, Suite 6. 861-4100; 5101 Sanderlin, Suite 103. 567-4909. L, D, X, $ STIX—Hibachi steakhouse with Asian cuisine features steak, chicken, and a fillet and lobster combination, also sushi. A specialty is Dynamite Chicken with fried rice. 4680 Merchants Park Circle, Avenue Carriage Crossing. 854-3399. L, D, X, $-$$

CORDOVA BOMBAY HOUSE—Indian fare includes lamb korma and chicken tikka; also, a daily luncheon buffet. 1727 N. Germantown Pkwy. 755-4114. L, D, X, $-$$ THE BUTCHER SHOP—Serves steaks ranging from 8-oz. fillets to a 20-oz. porterhouse; also chicken, pork chops, fresh seafood.  107 S. Germantown Rd. 757-4244. L (Fri. and Sun.), D, X, MRA, $$-$$$ FOX RIDGE PIZZA—Pizzas, calzones, sub sandwiches, burgers, and meat-and-two plate lunches are among the dishes served at this eatery, which opened in 1979. 1769 N. Germantown Pkwy. 758-6500. L, D, X, $

GREEN BAMBOO—Pineapple tilapia, pork vermicelli, and the soft egg noodle combo are Vietnamese specialties here. 990 N. Germantown Parkway, #104. 753-5488. L, D, $-$$ KING JERRY LAWLER’S MEMPHIS BBQ COMPANY—Offers a variety of barbecue dishes, including brisket, ribs, nachos topped with smoked pork, and a selection of barbecue “Slamwiches.” 465 N. Germantown Pkwy., #116. 509-2360. L, D, X, $ JIM ’N NICK’S BAR-B-Q—Serves barbecued pork, ribs, chicken, brisket, and fish, along with other homemade Southern specialties. 2359 N. Germantown Pkwy. 388-0998. L, D, X, $-$$ MISTER B’S—Features New Orleans-style seafood and steaks. Closed for lunch Sat. and all day Sun. and Mon.  6655 Poplar, #107. 751-5262. L, D, X, MRA, $-$$$ PRESENTATION ROOM, THE—American bistro run by the students of L’Ecole Culinaire. Menu changes regularly; specialties may include such items as a filet with truffle mushroom ragu. Service times vary; call for details. Closed Fri.-Sun. 1245 N. Germantown Pkwy. 754-7115. L, D, X, MRA, $-$$ ON THE BORDER—Dishes out such Tex-Mex specialties as fajitas and Southwest chicken tacos; also fresh grilled seafood specials. 8101 Giacosa Pl .881-0808; 6572 Airways (Southaven). 662-655-4750. L, D, WB, X, MRA, $ SHOGUN JAPANESE RESTAURANT—Entrees include tempura, teriyaki, and sushi, as well as grilled fish and chicken entrees. 2324 N. Germantown Pkwy. 384-4122. L, D, X, $-$$ TANNOOR GRILL—Brazilian-style steakhouse with skewers served tableside, along with Middle Eastern specialties; vegetarian options also available. 830 N. Germantown Pkwy. 443-5222. L, D, X, $-$$$

EAST MEMPHIS

(INCLUDES POPLAR/ I-240) ACRE—Features seasonal modern American cuisine in an avante-garde setting using locally sourced products; also small-plates and iconic bar. Closed for lunch Sat. and all day Sun. 690 S. Perkins. 818-2273. L, D, X, $$-$$$ AGAVOS COCINA & TEQUILA—Camaron de Tequila, tamales, kabobs, and burgers made with a blend of beef and chorizo are among the offerings at this tequila-centric restaurant and bar. 2924 Walnut Grove. 433-9345. L, D, X, $-$$ AMERIGO—Traditional and contemporary Italian cuisine includes pasta, wood-fired pizza, steaks, and cedarwood-roasted fish. 1239 Ridgeway, Park Place Mall. 761-4000. L, D, SB, X, MRA, $-$$$ ANDREW MICHAEL ITALIAN KITCHEN— Traditional Italian cuisine with a menu from two of the city’s top chefs that changes seasonally with such entrees as Maw Maw’s ravioli. Closed Sun.-Mon. 712 W. Brookhaven Cl. 347-3569. D, X, MRA, $$-$$$ ANOTHER BROKEN EGG CAFE—Offering several varieties of eggs benedict, waffles, omelets, pancakes, beignets, and other breakfast fare; also burgers, sandwiches, and salads. 6063 Park Ave. 729-7020; 65 S. Highland. 623-7122. B, L, WB, X, $ BENIHANA—This Japanese steakhouse serves beef, chicken, and seafood grilled at the table; some menu items change monthly; sushi bar also featured. 912 Ridge Lake. 767-8980. L, D, X, $$-$$$ BLUE PLATE CAFÉ — For breakfast, the café’s serves old-fashioned buttermilk pancakes (it’s a secret recipe!), country ham and eggs, and waffles with fresh strawberries and cream. For lunch, the café specializes in country cooking. 5469 Poplar. 761-9696; 113 S. Court. 523-2050. B, L, X, $ BRYANT’S BREAKFAST—Three-egg omelets, pancakes, and The Sampler Platter are among the popular entrees here. Possible the best biscuits in town. Closed Mon. and Tues. 3965 Summer. 324-7494. B, L, X, $ BUCKLEY’S FINE FILET GRILL—Specializes in steaks, seafood, and pasta. (Lunchbox serves entree salads, burgers, and more.)  5355 Poplar. 683-4538; 919 S. Yates (Buckley’s Lunchbox), 682-0570. L (Yates only, M-F), D, X, MRA, $-$$

BUNTYN CORNER CAFE—Serving favorites from Buntyn Restaurant, including chicken and dressing, cobbler, and yeast rolls.  5050 Poplar, Suite 107. 424-3286. B, L, X, $ CAPITAL GRILLE—Known for its dry-aged, hand-carved steaks; among the specialties are bone-in sirloin, and porcini-rubbed Delmonico; also seafood entrees and seasonal lunch plates. Closed for lunch Sat.-Sun. Crescent Center, 6065 Poplar. 683-9291. L, D, X, $$$-$$$$ CASABLANCA—Lamb shawarma is one of the fresh, homemade specialties served at this Mediterranean/Moroccan restaurant; fish entrees and vegetarian options also available. 1707 Madison. 421-6949; 5030 Poplar. 725-8557 ; 7609 Poplar Pike (Germantown). 425-5908. L, D, X, MRA, $-$$ CIAO BELLA—Among the Italian and Greek specialties are lasagna, seafood pasta, gourmet pizzas, and vegetarian options. Closed for lunch Sat.-Sun.  565 Erin Dr., Erin Way Shopping Center. 205-2500. L, D, X, MRA, $-$$$ CITY SILO TABLE + PANTRY—With a focus on clean eating, this establishment offers fresh juices, as well as comfort foods re-imagined with wholesome ingredients. 5101 Sanderlin. 729-7687. B, L, D, X, $ CORKY’S—Popular barbecue emporium offers both wet and dry ribs, plus a full menu of other barbecue entrees. Wed. lunch buffets, Cordova and Collierville.  5259 Poplar. 685-9744; 1740 N. Germantown Pkwy. (Cordova). 737-1911; 743 W. Poplar (Collierville). 405-4999; 6434 Goodman Rd., Olive Branch. 662893-3663. L, D, X, MRA, $-$$ ERLING JENSEN—For 20 years, has presented “globally inspired” cuisine to die for: specialties are rack of lamb, big game entrees, and fresh fish dishes.  1044 S. Yates. 763-3700. D, X, MRA, $$-$$$ FLEMING’S PRIME STEAKHOUSE—Serves wet-aged and dry-aged steaks, prime beef, chops, and seafood, including salmon, Australian lobster tails, and a catch of the day.  6245 Poplar. 761-6200. D, X, MRA, $$$-$$$$ FOLK’S FOLLY ORIGINAL PRIME STEAK HOUSE—Specializes in prime steaks, as well as lobster, grilled Scottish salmon, Alaskan king crab legs, rack of lamb, and weekly specials. Now celebrating their 40th year.  551 S. Mendenhall. 762-8200. D, X, MRA, $$$-$$$$ FORMOSA—Offers Mandarin cuisine, including broccoli beef, hot-and-sour soup, and spring rolls. Closed Monday.  6685 Quince. 753-9898. L, D, X, $-$$ FRATELLI’S—Serves hot and cold sandwiches, salads, soups, and desserts, all with an Italian/Mediterranean flair. Closed Sunday. 750 Cherry Rd., Memphis Botanic Garden. 766-9900. L, X, $ FRANK GRISANTI’S ITALIAN RESTAURANT— Northern Italian favorites include pasta with jumbo shrimp and mushrooms; also seafood, fillet mignon, and daily lunch specials. Closed for lunch Sunday.  Embassy Suites Hotel, 1022 S. Shady Grove. 761-9462. L, D, X, MRA, $-$$$ THE GROVE GRILL—Offers steaks, chops, seafood, and other American cuisine with Southern and global influences; entrees include crab cakes, and shrimp and grits, also dinner specials.  Founder Jeff Dunham’s son Chip is now chef de cuisine. 4550 Poplar. 818-9951. L, D, SB, X, MRA, $$-$$$ HALF SHELL—Specializes in seafood, such as King crab legs; also serves steaks, chicken, pastas, salads, sandwiches, a ”voodoo menu”; oyster bar at Winchester location.  688 S. Mendenhall. 682-3966; 7825 Winchester. 737-6755. L, D, WB, X, MRA, $-$$$ HERITAGE TAVERN & KITCHEN—Featuring classic cuisine from the country’s five regions, including lobster rolls, fried chicken, smoked tamales, Green Goddess shrimp, and more. 6150 Poplar, Regalia. 761-8855.L, D, WB, X, $-$$$ HIGH POINT PIZZA—Serves variety of pizzas, subs, salads, and sides. Closed Monday. A neighborhood fixture. 477 High Point Terrace. 452-3339. L, D, X, MRA, $-$$ HOG & HOMINY—The casual sister to Andrew Michael Italian Kitchen serves brick-oven-baked pizzas, including the Red-Eye with pork belly, and small plates with everything from meatballs to beef and cheddar hot dogs; and local veggies. Closed for lunch Mon.  707 W. Brookhaven Cl. 207-7396. L, D, SB, X, $-$$$

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CIT Y DINING LIST

Memor a ble Memphia ns illustration by chris honeysuckle ellis

Charlie Vergos 1925 - 2010

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raceland may be Valhalla, our city’s singularly iconic landmark, but in terms of the local dining scene, Charles Vergos’ Rendezvous for seven decades has been the touchstone of our culinary culture.  Since 1948, locals and visitors alike have been beating a track to an understated but historically remarkable basement restaurant downtown, one that can clearly claim to have put the Q in “BBQ” in these here parts. The list of international celebrities who have enjoyed Charlie’s dry ribs is not just too long to print; it includes just about ever ybody you can imagine. Born in Memphis to Greek immigrants, Charlie was a World War II veteran who returned to open a sandwich shop where barbecued pork was king, developing a signature

HOUSTON’S—Serves steaks, seafood, pork chops, chicken dishes, sandwiches, salads, and Chicago-style spinach dip. Farmous for first-class service. 5000 Poplar. 683-0915. L, D, X $-$$$  INTERIM—Offers American-seasonal cuisine with emphasis on local foods and fresh fish; macaroni and cheese is a house specialty. Closed for lunch Sat.  5040 Sanderlin, Suite 105. 818-0821. L, D, SB, X, MRA, $-$$$ THE KITCHEN BISTRO—Tomato soup, pan-roasted ribeye, sticky toffee pudding, and dishes made using in-season fruits and veggies are served at this establishment at Shelby Farms Park. 415 Great View Drive E., Suite 101. 729-9009. L, D, X, $-$$ LA BAGUETTE—An almond croissant and chicken salad are among specialties at this French-style bistro. Closed for dinner Sun.  3088 Poplar. 458-0900. B, L, D (closes at 7), X, MRA, $ LAS DELICIAS—Popular for its guacamole, house-made tortilla chips, and margaritas, this restaurant draws diners with its chicken enchiladas, meat-stuffed flautas, and Cuban torta with spicy pork. Closed Sunday. 4002 Park Ave. 458-9264; 5689 Quince. 800-2873. L, D, X, $ LISA’S LUNCHBOX—Serving bagels, sandwiches, salads, and wraps. 5030 Poplar, 761-4044; 5885 Ridgeway Center Pkwy., Suite 101. 767-6465; 2659 Thousand Oaks Blvd., Suite 1200; 2525 Central (Children’s Museum); 166 S. Front. 729-7277. B, L, $ LOST PIZZA—Offering pizzas (with dough made from scratch), pasta, salads, sandwiches, tamales, and more.  2855 Poplar. 572-1803; 5960 Getwell (Southaven). 662-892-8684. L, D, X, $-$$

Greek sauce that proved the lodestone for what would become a Memphis institution. During the post-war era, the Rendezvous became the place to see and be seen, especially after Memphis State football games at nearby Crump Stadium. After the King assassination, many if not most businesses fled downtown. But not Charlie Vergos. He and two other Greek restaurateurs (Harry Zapatos at The Arcade and Sam Zambelis at the Bon Ton Café) stood their ground; the downtown revival that followed insured a Vergos legacy along what is now known as Rendezvous Alley. There is no place quite like it, anywhere in the world. — KN

LYNCHBURG LEGENDS—This restaurant with a Jack Daniels’ theme and Southern cuisine serves such entrees as Bourbon Street salmon, buttermilk-fried chicken, and grilled steak and wild mushroom salad. DoubleTree Hotel, 5069 Sanderlin. 969-7777. B, L, D, X, MRA, $- $$$ MARCIANO MEDITERRANEAN AND ITALIAN CUISINE—Veal Saltimbocca with angel hair pasta and white wine sauce is among the entrees; also steaks, seafood, and gourmet pizza. Closed Sun.  780 Brookhaven Cl. 682-1660. D, X, $-$$
 DAN MCGUINNESS PUB—Serves fish and chips, shepherd’s pie, burgers, and other Irish and American fare; also lunch and dinner specials.  4694 Spottswood. 761-3711; 3964 Goodman Rd. 662-890-7611. L, D, X, $ MAYURI INDIAN CUISINE—Serves tandoori chicken, masala dosa, tikka masala, as well as lamb and shrimp entrees; also a daily lunch buffet, and dinner buffet on Fri.-Sat.  6524 Quince Rd. 753-8755. L, D, X, $-$$ MELLOW MUSHROOM—Large menu includes assortment of pizzas, salads, calzones, hoagies, vegetarian options, and 50 beers on tap. 5138 Park Ave. 562-12119155 Poplar; Shops of Forest Hill (Germantown). 907-0243. L, D, X, $-$$ MOSA ASIAN BISTRO—Specialties include sesame chicken, Thai calamari, rainbow panang curry with grouper fish, and other Pan Asian/fusion entrees. Closed Mon. 850 S. White Station Rd. 683-8889. L, D, X, MRA, $ NAM KING—Offers luncheon and dinner buffets, dim sum, and such specialties as fried dumplings, pepper steak, and orange chicken.  4594 Yale. 373-4411. L, D, X, $
 NAPA CAFE—Among the specialties is miso-marinated salmon over black rice with garlic spinach and shiitake

mushrooms. Closed Sun.  5101 Sanderlin, Suite 122. 683-0441. L, D, X, MRA, $$-$$$ NEW HUNAN—Chinese eatery with more than 80 entrees; also lunch/dinner buffets.  5052 Park. 766-1622. L, D, X, $ OLD VENICE PIZZA CO.—Specializes in “eclectic Italian,” from pastas, including the “Godfather,” to hand-tossed pizzas, including the “John Wayne”; choose from 60 toppings.  368 Perkins Ext. 767-6872. L, D, SB, X, MRA, $-$$ ONE & ONLY BBQ—On the menu are pork barbecue sandwiches, platters, wet and dry ribs, smoked chicken and turkey platters, a smoked meat salad, barbecue quesadillas, and more. New on the BBQ scene, but worth a visit. 1779 Kirby Pkwy. 751-3615; 567 Perkins Extd. 249-4227. L, D, X, MRA, $ ONO POKÉ—This eatery specializes in poké — a Hawaiian dish of fresh fish salad served over rice. Menu includes a variety of poké bowls, like the Kimchi Tuna bowl, or customers can build their own by choosing a base, protein, veggies, and toppings. 3145 Poplar. 618-2955. L, D, X, $ OWEN BRENNAN’S—New Orleans-style menu of beef, chicken, pasta, and seafood; jambalaya, shrimp and grits, and crawfish etouffee are specialties. Closed for dinner Sunday. The Regalia, 6150 Poplar. 761-0990. L, D, SB, X, MRA, $-$$$ PARK + CHERRY—Partnering with CFY Catering, the Dixon offers casual dining within the museum. Menu features sandwiches, like truffled pimento cheese, as well as salads, snacks, and sweets. Closed for breakfast Sun. and all day Mon. 4339 Park (Dixon Gallery). 761-5250. L, X, $ PETE & SAM’S—Serving Memphis for 60-plus years; offers steaks, seafood, and traditional Italian dishes, including homemade ravioli, lasagna, and chicken marsala.  3886 Park. 458-0694. D, X, $-$$$ PF CHANG’S CHINA BISTRO—Specialties are orange peel shrimp, Mongolian beef, and chicken in lettuce wraps; also vegetarian dishes, including spicy eggplant. 1181 Ridgeway Rd., Park Place Centre. 818-3889. L, D, X, MRA, $-$$ PHO SAIGON—Vietnamese fare includes beef teriyaki, roasted quail, curry ginger chicken, vegetarian options, and a variety of soups. 2946 Poplar. 458-1644. L, D, $ PORCELLINO’S CRAFT BUTCHER—Small plates, charcuterie selections, specialty steaks, house-made pastries, and innovative teas and coffees are offered at this combination butcher shop and restaurant featuring locally sourced menu items. Restaurant open for breakfast and lunch. Butcher shop open until 6 p.m. 711 W. Brookhaven Cl. 762-6656. B, L, D, X $-$$ PYRO’S FIRE-FRESH PIZZA—Serving gourmet pizzas cooked in an open-fire oven; wide choice of toppings; large local and craft beer selection. 1199 Ridgeway. 379-8294; 2035 Union Ave. 208-8857; 2286 N. Germantown Pkwy. (Cordova). 207-1198; 3592 S. Houston Levee (Collierville). 221-8109. L, D, X, MRA, $ RIVER OAKS—Chef Jose Gutierrez’s French-style bistro serves seafood and steaks, with an emphasis on fresh local ingredients. Closed for lunch Sat. and all day Sun. 5871 Poplar Ave. 683-9305. L, D, X, MRA, $$$ RUTH’S CHRIS STEAK HOUSE—Offers prime steaks cut and aged in-house, as well as lamb, chicken, and fresh seafood, including lobster.  6120 Poplar. 761-0055. D, X, MRA, $$$-$$$$ SALSA—Mexican-Southern California specialties include carnitas, enchiladas verde, and fajitas; also Southwestern seafood dishes such as snapper verde. Closed Sun. Regalia Shopping Center, 6150 Poplar, Suite 129. 683-6325. L, D, X, $-$$ SEASONS 52—This elegant fresh grill and wine bar offers a seasonally changing menu using fresh ingredients, wood-fire grilling, and brick-oven cooking; also a large international wine list and nightly piano bar. Crescent Center, 6085 Poplar. 682-9952. L, D, X, $$-$$$ STAKS— Offering pancakes, including Birthday Cake and lemon ricotta. Menu includes other breakfast items such as beignets and French toast, as well as soups and sandwiches for lunch.  4615 Poplar. 509-2367. B, L, WB, X, $ SUSHI JIMMI—This food truck turned restaurant serves a variety of sushi rolls, fusion dishes — such as kimchi fries — and sushi burritos. Closed for lunch Sat. and all day Mon. 2895 Poplar. 729-6985. L, D, X, $ SWEET POTATO BABY CAFE—The Eggplant Parmesan panini and mac and cheese hushpuppies are among popular

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CIT Y DINING LIST dishes offered. Menu includes a variety of desserts, including Sweet Potato Baby Cake. Closed Sat.-Sun. 1005 Tillman. 6081742. L, D, X, $ TENNESSEE TACO CO.—From the creators of Belly Acres, offers such appetizers as crawfish and chorizo mac-n-cheese and homemade guacamole and specializes in street tacos. 3295 Poplar. 207-1960. L, D, X, $ THREE LITTLE PIGS—Pork-shoulder-style barbecue with tangy mild or hot sauce, freshly made coleslaw, and baked beans. 5145 Quince Rd. 685-7094. B, L, D, X, MRA, $ TOPS BAR-B-Q—Specializes in pork barbecue sandwiches and sandwich plates with beans and slaw; also serves ribs, beef brisket, and burgers. 1286 Union. 725-7527. 4183 Summer. 324-4325; 5391 Winchester. 794-7936; 3970 Rhodes. 323-9865; 6130 Macon. 371-0580. For more locations, go online. L, D, X, MRA, $e WANG’S MANDARIN HOUSE—Offers Mandarin, Cantonese, Szechuan, and spicy Hunan entrees, including the golden-sesame chicken; next door is East Tapas, serving small plates with an Asian twist. 6065 Park Ave., Park Place Mall. 763-0676. L, D, X, MRA, $-$$ WASABI—Serving traditional Japanese offerings, hibachi, sashimi, and sushi. The Sweet Heart roll, wrapped — in the shape of a heart — with tuna and filled with spicy salmon, yellowtail, and avocado, is a specialty. 5101 Sanderlin Rd., Suite 105. 421-6399. L, D, X, $-$$ WOMAN’S EXCHANGE TEA ROOM—Chicken-salad plate, beef tenderloin, soups-and-sandwiches, and vegetable plates are specialties; meal includes drink and dessert. Closed Sat.-Sun. 88 Racine. 327-5681. L, X, $ ZAKA BOWL—This vegan-friendly restaurant serves buildyour-own vegetable bowls featuring ingredients such as agave Brussels sprouts and roasted beets. Also serves tuna poke and herbed chicken bowls. 575 Erin. 509-3105. L, D, $

Broadway Pizza House Legendary Pizza Since 1977

629 South Mendenhall (901) 207-1546

2581 Broad Avenue (901) 454-7930

Memphis Magazine’s

THE 2017

FACE OF

PIZZA

We’re Not “Olds”,

We’re Classics.

GERMANTOWN BLUE HONEY BISTRO—Entrees at this upscale eatery include brown butter scallops served with Mississippi blue rice and herb-crusted beef tenderloin with vegetables and truffle butter. Closed Sun. 9155 Poplar, Suite 17. 552-3041. D, X, $-$$$ BROOKLYN BRIDGE ITALIAN RESTAURANT— Specializing in such homemade entrees as spinach lasagna and lobster ravioli; a seafood specialty is horseradish-crusted salmon. Closed Sun. 1779 Kirby Pkwy. 755-7413. D, X, MRA, $-$$$ FOREST HILL GRILL—A variety of standard pub fare and a selection of mac ‘n’ cheese dishes are featured on the menu. Specialties include Chicken Newport and a barbecue salmon BLT. 9102 Poplar Pike. 624-6001. L, D, SB, X, $-$$ GERMANTOWN COMMISSARY—Serves barbecue sandwiches, sliders, ribs, shrimp, and nachos, as well as smoked barbecued bologna sandwiches; Mon.-night all-youcan-eat ribs. 2290 S. Germantown Rd. S. 754-5540. L, D, X, MRA, $-$$ LAS TORTUGAS DELI MEXICANA— Authentic Mexican food prepared from local food sources; specializes in tortugas — grilled bread scooped out to hold such powerfully popular fillings as brisket, pork, and shrimp; also tingas, tostados. Closed Sunday. 1215 S. Germantown Rd. 751-1200; 6300 Poplar. 623-3882. L, D, X, $-$$ MISTER B’S—Features New Orleans-style seafood and steaks. Closed for lunch Sat. and all day Sun. and Mon. 6655 Poplar, #107. 751-5262. L, D, X, MRA, $-$$$ THE PASTA MAKER RESTAURANT—This Italian eatery specializes in artisanal pasta. Entrées include Spaghetti allo scoglio, Penne Boscaiola, and Fusilli Primavera. Gluten-free options available. Restaurant closed Mon. and Sun. (cooking classes by reservation Sun.). 2095 Exeter, Suite 30. 779-3928. L (Thurs. only), D, X, $-$$ PETRA CAFÉ—Serves Greek, Italian, and Middle Eastern sandwiches, gyros, and entrees. Hours vary; call. 6641 Poplar. 754-4440; 547 S. Highland. 323-3050. L, D, X, $-$$ PIZZA REV—Specializes in build-your-own, personal-sized artisanal pizza. Choose from homemade dough options,

Olen M. “Mac” Bailey, Jr., Born 1964 Oldsmobile Starfire Convertible, Built 1964

Planning for All Generations

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2nd Mama Gaia NOW OPEN on the Square 2144 Madison Ave Happy Hour: Mon-Sat 3-6pm

CROSSTOWN CONCOURSE

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CIT Y DINING LIST all-natural sauces, Italian cheeses, and more than 30 toppings. 6450 Poplar. 379-8188. L, D, X, $ RED KOI—Classic Japanese cuisine offered at this family-run restaurant; hibachi steaks, sushi, seafood, chicken, and vegetables. 5847 Poplar. 767-3456. L, D, X $-$$ ROYAL PANDA—Hunan fish, Peking duck, Royal Panda chicken and shrimp, and a seafood combo are among the specialties. 3120 Village Shops Dr. 756-9697. L, D, X, $-$$ RUSSO’S NEW YORK PIZZERIA AND WINE BAR—Serves gourmet pizzas, calzones, and pasta, including lasagna, fettuccine Alfredo, scampi, and more.  9087 Poplar, Suite 111. 755-0092. L, D, WB, X, MRA, $-$$ SAKURA—Sushi, tempura, and teriyaki are Japanese specialties here. 2060 West St. 758-8181; 4840 Poplar. 572-1002. L, D, X, $-$$ SOUTHERN SOCIAL—Shrimp and grits, stuffed quail, and Aunt Thelma’s Fried Chicken are among the dishes served at this upscale Southern establishment. 2285 S. Germantown Rd. 754-5555. D, SB, X, $-$$$ WEST STREET DINER—This home-style eatery offers breakfast, burgers, po’boys, and more. 2076 West St. 757-2191. B, L, D (Mon.-Fri.), X, MRA, $

MIDTOWN (INCLUDES THE MEDICAL CENTER) ABYSSINIA RESTAURANT—Ethiopian/Mediterranean menu includes beef, chicken, lamb, fish entrees, and vegetarian dishes; also a lunch buffet. 2600 Poplar. 321-0082. L, D, X, $-$$ ALCHEMY—Southern fusion, locally grown cuisine features small and large plates; among the offerings are pan-seared hanger steak, quail, and lamb chops; also handcrafted cocktails and local craft beers. 940 S. Cooper. 726-4444. D, SB, X, $-$$ BABALU TACOS & TAPAS—This Overton Square eatery dishes up Spanish-style tapas with Southern flair; also taco and enchilada of the day; specials change daily.  2115 Madison. 274-0100; 6450 Poplar, 410-8909. L, D, SB, X, $-$$ BAR DKDC—Features an ever-changing menu of international “street food,” from Thai to Mexican, Israeli to Indian, along with specialty cocktails. 964 S. Cooper. 272-0830. D, X, $ BAR LOUIE—Serves small plates, flatbreads, sandwiches, burgers, salads, and such large plate entrees as blackened fish tacos and baked mac-and-cheese.  2125 Madison. 207-1436. L, D, WB, X, $-$$ BAR-B-Q SHOP—Dishes up barbecued ribs, spaghetti, bologna; also pulled pork shoulder, Texas toast barbecue sandwich, chicken sandwich, and salads. Closed Sun. 1782 Madison. 272-1277. L, D, X, MRA, $-$$ BARI RISTORANTE ENOTECA—Authentic Southeastern Italian cuisine (Puglia) emphasizes lighter entrees. Serves fresh fish and beef dishes and a homemade soup of the day. 22 S. Cooper. 722-2244. D, SB, X, MRA, $-$$$ BARKSDALE RESTAURANT—Old-school diner serving breakfast and Southern plate lunches.  237 Cooper. 722-2193. B, L, D, X, MRA, $ BAYOU BAR & GRILL—New Orleans fare at this Overton Square eatery includes jambalaya, gumbo, catfish Acadian, shrimp dishes, red beans and rice, and muffalettas.  2094 Madison. 278-8626. L, D, WB, X, MRA, $-$$ BEAUTY SHOP—Modern American cuisine with international flair served in a former beauty shop. Serves steaks salads, pasta, and seafood, including pecan-crusted golden sea bass. Perennial “Best Brunch” winner. Closed for dinner Sunday. 966 S. Cooper. 272-7111. L, D, SB, X, $-$$$ BELLY ACRES—At this festive Overton Square eatery, milkshakes, floats, and burgers rule. Burgers are updated with contemporary toppings like grilled leeks, braised tomatoes, and sourdough or brioche buns. 2102 Trimble Pl. 529-7017. L, D, X, $ BHAN THAI—Authentic Thai cuisine includes curries, pad Thai noodles, and vegetarian dishes, as well as seafood, pork, and duck entrees. Closed for lunch Sat.-Sun. and all day Mon.  1324 Peabody. 272-1538. L, D, X, MRA, $-$$ BLUE NILE ETHIOPIAN—Kabobs, flavorful chicken and lamb stew, and injera (flatbread) are traditional items on the

menu, along with vegetarian options. 1788 Madison. 474-7214. L, D, X, $-$$ BOSCOS—Tennessee’s first craft brewery serves a variety of freshly brewed beers as well as wood-fired oven pizzas, pasta, seafood, steaks, and sandwiches. 2120 Madison. 432-2222. L, D, SB (with live jazz), X, MRA, $-$$ BOUNTY ON BROAD—Offering family-style dining, Bounty serves small plates and family-sized platters, with such specialties as chicken fried quail and braised pork shank. 2519 Broad. 410-8131. L (Sat. and Sun.), D (Mon.-Sat.), SB, X, $-$$$ BROADWAY PIZZA—Serving a variety of pizzas, including the Broadway Special, as well as sandwiches, salads, wings, and soul-food specials. 2581 Broad. 454-7930; 627 S. Mendenhall. 207-1546. L, D, X, $-$$ CAFE 1912—French/American bistro owned by culinary pioneer Glenn Hays serving such seafood entrees as grouper and steamed mussels; also crepes, salads, and French onion soup. 243 S. Cooper. 722-2700. D, SB, X, MRA, $-$$ CAFE BROOKS BY PARADOX—Serving graband-go pastries, as well as lunch items. Menu includes soups, salads, and sandwiches, such as the Modern Reuben and Grown Up Grilled Cheese. 1934 Poplar (Memphis Brooks Museum of Art). 544-6200. B, L, X, $ CAFE ECLECTIC—Omelets and chicken and waffles are among menu items, along with quesadillas, sandwiches, wraps, and burgers. Menu varies by location. 603 N. McLean. 725-1718; 111 Harbor Town Square. 590-4645; 510 S. Highland. 410-0765. B, L, D, SB, X, MRA, $ CAFE OLE—This eatery specializes in authentic Mexican cuisine; one specialty is the build-your-own quesadilla. 959 S. Cooper. 343-0103. L, D, SB, X, MRA, $-$$ CAFE PALLADIO—Serves gourmet salads, soups, sandwiches, and desserts in a tea room inside the antiques shop. Closed Sun. 2169 Central. 278-0129. L, X, $ CAFE SOCIETY—With Belgian and classic French influences, serves Wagyu beef, chicken, and seafood dishes, including bacon-wrapped shrimp, along with daily specials and vegetarian entrees. Closed for lunch Sat.-Sun.  212 N. Evergreen. 722-2177. L, D, X, MRA, $-$$ CANVAS—An “interactive art bar” serving salads, sandwiches, and flatbreads. 1737 Madison. 619-5303. D, $ CELTIC CROSSING—Specializes in Irish and American pub fare. Entrees include shepherd’s pie, shrimp and sausage coddle, and fish and chips.  903 S. Cooper. 274-5151. L, D, WB, X, MRA, $-$$ CENTRAL BBQ—Serves ribs, smoked hot wings, pulled pork sandwiches, chicken, turkey, nachos, and portobello sandwiches. Offers both pork and beef barbecue.  2249 Central Ave. 272-9377; 4375 Summer Ave. 7674672; 147 E. Butler. 672-7760. L, D, X, MRA, $-$$ CHEF TAM’S UNDERGROUND CAFE— Serves Southern staples with a Cajun twist. Menu items include totchos, jerk wings, fried chicken, and “muddy” mac and cheese. Closed Sun. and Mon. 2299 Young. 207-6182. L, D, $ THE CRAZY NOODLE—Korean noodle dishes range from bibam beef noodle with cabbage, carrots, and other vegetables, to curry chicken noodle; also rice cakes served in a flavorful sauce. Closed for lunch Sat.-Sun. 2015 Madison. 272-0928. L, D, X, $ ECCO—Mediterranean-inspired specialties range from rib-eye steak to seared scallops to housemade pastas and a grilled vegetable plate; also a Saturday brunch. Closed Sun.-Mon. 1585 Overton Park. 410-8200. L, D, X, $-$$ FRIDA’S—Mexican cuisine and Tex-Mex standards, including chimichangas, enchiladas, and fajitas; seafood includes shrimp and tilapia. 1718 Madison. 244-6196. L, D, X, $-$$ FUEL CAFE—Focus is on natural dishes with such specialties as bison burgers, quinoa chili, and tacos; also vegan and gluten-free options. Closed Sun.-Mon. 1761 Madison. 725-9025. L, D, X, $-$$ GOLDEN INDIA—Northern Indian specialties include tandoori chicken as well as lamb, beef, shrimp, and vegetarian dishes. 2097 Madison. 728-5111. L, D, X, $-$$

GROWLERS—Sports bar and eatery serves standard bar fare in addition to a pasta, tacos, chicken and waffles, and light options. 1911 Poplar. 244-7904. L, D, X, $-$$ HM DESSERT LOUNGE—Serving cake, pie, and other desserts, as well as a selection of savory dishes, including meatloaf and mashed potato “cupcakes.” Closed Monday. 1586 Madison. 290-2099. L, D, X, $ IMAGINE VEGAN CAFE—Dishes at this fully vegan restaurant range from salads and sandwiches to full dinners, including eggplant parmesan and “beef” tips and rice; breakfast all day Sat. and Sun. 2158 Young. 654-3455. L, D, WB, X, $ INDIA PALACE—Tandoori chicken, lamb shish kabobs, and chicken tikka masala are among the entrees; also, vegetarian options and a daily all-you-can-eat lunch buffet. 1720 Poplar. 278-1199. L, D, X, $-$$ JASMINE THAI AND VEGETARIAN RESTAURANT—Entrees include panang chicken, green curry shrimp, and pad thai (noodles, shrimp, and peanuts); also vegetarian dishes. Closed Mon.-Tues.  916 S. Cooper. 725-0223. L, D, X, $ LAFAYETTE’S MUSIC ROOM—Serves such Southern cuisine as po boys and shrimp and grits, and wood-fired pizzas. 2119 Madison. 207-5097. L, D, WB, X, MRA, $-$$ LBOE—Gourmet burger joint serves locally sourced ground beef burgers, with options like the Mac-N-Cheese Burger and Caprese. Black bean and turkey patties available. 2021 Madison. 725-0770. L, D, X, $ LITTLE ITALY—Serving New York-style pizza as well as subs and pasta dishes. 1495 Union. 725-0280, L, D, X, $-$$ LUCKY CAT RAMEN—Specializes in gourmet ramen bowls, such as Bacon Collards Ramen, made with rich broth. Bao, steamed buns filled with various meats and veggies, also grace the menu. 247 S. Cooper. 6338296. L, D, X, $-$$ MAMA GAIA—Greek-inspired dishes at this vegetarian eatery include pitas, “petitzzas,” and quinoa bowls. 1350 Concourse Avenue, Suite 137. 203-3838 ; 2144 Madison. 214-2449. B, L, D, X, $-$$ MARDI GRAS MEMPHIS—Serving Cajun fare, including an etouffee-stuffed po’boy. Closed Mon.  496 Watkins. 5306767. L, D, X, $-$$ MAXIMO’S ON BROAD—Serving a tapas menu that features creative fusion cuisine; entrees include veggie paella and fish of the day. Closed Mon. 2617 Broad Ave. 452-1111. D, SB, X, $-$$ MEMPHIS PIZZA CAFE—Homemade pizzas are specialties; also serves sandwiches, calzones, and salads.  2087 Madison. 726-5343; 5061 Park Ave. 684-1306; 7604 W. Farmington (Germantown). 753-2218; 797 W. Poplar (Collierville). 861-7800; 5627 Getwell (Southaven). 662-536-1364. L, D, X, MRA, $-$$ MOLLY’S LA CASITA—Homemade tamales, fish tacos, a vegetarian combo, and bacon-wrapped shrimp are a few of the specialties.  2006 Madison. 726-1873. L, D, X, MRA, $-$$ NEXT DOOR AMERICAN EATERY—The Kitchen’s sister restaurant serves dishes sourced from American farms. Menu features chorizo bacon dates, spicy gulf shrimp, and dry-aged beef burgers. 1350 Concourse Avenue Suite 165. 779-1512. L, D, X, $ ONIX RESTAURANT—Serves seafood dishes, including barbecued shrimp and pecan-crusted trout, and a variety of salads and sandwiches. Closed Sun. 1680 Madison. 552-4609. L, D, X, $-$$ PAYNE’S BAR-B-QUE—Opened in 1972, this family owned barbecue joint serves ribs, smoked sausage, and chopped pork sandwiches with a standout mustard slaw and homemade sauce. About as down-toearth as it gets. 1762 Lamar. 272-1523. L, D, $-$$ PEI WEI ASIAN DINER—Serves a variety of Pan-Asian cuisine, including Japanese, Vietnamese, Korean, and Thai. Noodle and rice bowls are specialties; a small plates menu also offered.  1680 Union Ave., #109. 722-3780; 2257 N. Germantown Pkwy. 382-1822. L, D, X, $-$$
 PHO BINH—Vietnamese, vegetarian, and Cantonese specialties include lemon tofu and spring rolls. Closed Sunday. 1615 Madison. 276-0006. L, D, $

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CIT Y DINING LIST RAILGARTEN—Located in a former rail station space, this eatery offers breakfast items, a variety of salads and sandwiches, and such entrees as short rib mac-and-cheese and fish tacos. Also serves shakes, malts, floats, and cream sodas. 2166 Central. 231-5043. B, L, D, $-$$ RED FISH ASIAN BISTRO—From the former 19th Century Club building, serves sushi, teriyaki, and hibachi. Specialities include yuzu filet mignon and Chilean seabass. 1433 Union. 454-3926; 9915 Highway 64 (Lakeland). 729-7581; 6518 Goodman (Olive Branch). 662-8745254. L, D, X, $-$$$ RESTAURANT IRIS—French Creole cuisine includes shrimp and delta-grind grits, and New York strip stuffed with fried oysters. Chef Kelly English is a Food and Wine “Top Ten.” Closed Sun. 2146 Monroe. 590-2828. D, X, MRA, $$-$$$ ROBATA RAMEN & YAKITORI BAR—Serves ramen noodle bowls and Yakitori skewers as well as rice and noodle dishes. 2116 Madison. 410-8290. L, D, X, $ THE SECOND LINE—Kelly English brings “relaxed Creole cuisine” to his newest eatery; serves a variety of po-boys and such specialties as barbecue shrimp, and andouille, shrimp, and pimento cheese fries. 2144 Monroe. 590-2829. L, D, WB, X, $-$$ SEKISUI—Japanese fusion cuisine, fresh sushi bar, grilled meats and seafood, California rolls, and vegetarian entrees. Poplar/Perkins location’s emphasis is on Pacific Rim cuisine. Menu and hours vary at each location. 25 Belvedere. 725-0005; 1884 N. Germantown Pkwy. (Cordova). 309-8800; 4724 Poplar (between Perkins & Colonial). 767-7770; 2130 W. Poplar (Collierville). 854-0622; 2990 Kirby-Whitten (Bartlett). 377-2727; 6696 Poplar. 747-0001. L, D, X, MRA, $-$$$ STANLEY BAR-B-QUE—Serving a variety of barbecue dishes and smoked meats, as well as burgers, sauerkraut balls, and pretzels with beer cheese. 2110 Madison. 347-3060. L, D, WB, X, MRA, $-$$ STONE SOUP CAFE—Cooper-Young eatery serving soups, salads, quiche, meat-and-two specials; and daily specials such as Italian roast beef. Closed Monday.  993 S. Cooper. 922-5314. B, L, SB, X, $ STRANO SICILIAN KITCHEN & BAR— Presenting a Sicilian/Mediterranean mix of Arab, Spanish, Greek, and North African fare, Strano serves small plates, wood-grilled fish, and hand-tossed pizzas such as the King Alaska, with salmon and chevre. Closed Mon. 948 S. Cooper. 275-8986. L, D, WB, X, $$-$$$ SOUL FISH CAFE—Serving Southern-style soul food, tacos, and Po Boys, including catfish, crawfish, oyster, shrimp, chicken and smoked pork tenderloin. 862 S. Cooper. 725-0722; 3160 Village Shops Dr. (Germantown). 755-6988; 4720 Poplar. 590-0323. L, D, X, MRA, $-$$ SWEET GRASS—Chef Ryan Trimm takes Southern cuisine to a new level. Low-country coastal cuisine includes such specialties as shrimp and grits. Closed Mon. Restaurant’s “sister,” Sweet Grass Next Door, open nightly, serves lunch Sat.-Sun.  937 S. Cooper. 278-0278. D, SB, X, MRA, $-$$$ TART—Combination patisserie, coffeehouse, and restaurant serving rustic French specialties, including baked eggs in brioche, topped with Gruyere, and French breads and pastries. 820 S. Cooper. 725-0091; One Commerce Square. B, L, WB, X, $-$$ TROLLEY STOP MARKET—Serves plate lunches/dinners as well as pizzas, salads, and vegan/vegetarian entrees; a specialty is the locally raised beef burger. Also sells fresh produce and goods from local farmers; delivery available. Saturday brunch; closed Sunday. 704 Madison. 526-1361. L, D, X, $ TSUNAMI—Features Pacific Rim cuisine (Asia, Australia, South Pacific, etc.); also a changing “small plate” menu. Chef Ben Smith is a Cooper-Young pioneer. Specialties include Asian nachos and roasted sea bass. Closed Sunday. 928 S. Cooper. 274-2556. D, X, MRA, $$-$$$ SABROSURA—Serves Mexican and Cuban fare, including arroz tapada de pollo and steak Mexican. Closed Sun. 782 Washington. 421-8180. L, D, X, $-$$

TIS THE SEASON! Book your holiday event at ACRE Restaurant today. We also offer catering to your office, home, or event space. Where cuisine, ambience & service are second to none.

901-818-ACRE 690 S Perkins Road, Memphis, TN acrememphis.com

HOLIDAY CARD art by Burton Callicott

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SUGGESTED DONATION

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TO ORDER

BURTON CALLICOTT American (active in Memphis), 1907 - 2003

Differentiation and Unity #2, 1978

Oil glaze on canvas Memphis Brooks Museum of Art; Gift of AutoZone, Inc. 2001.15.7

Memphis Magazine’s

THE 2017

FACE OF

COFFEE

ARTISAN COFFEES

SCRATCH BAKERY - SODA FOUNTAIN

BREAKFAST - LUNCH - DINNER cafeeclectic.net Harbortown - Midtown - Highland

N O V E M B E R 2 0 1 7 • M E M P H I S M A G A Z I N E . C O M • 125

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CIT Y DINING LIST

SOUTH MEMPHIS (INCLUDES

PARKWAY VILLAGE, FOX MEADOWS, SOUTH MEMPHIS, WINCHESTER, AND WHITEHAVEN)

Musique de

Salon

Kimberly Patterson, cello and Patrick Sutton, guitar, awaken our senses to the enigmatic sound world of a seldom heard, but perfectly paired instrumental combination. Compositions by Hector Villa-Lobos and Ricardo Iznaola will leave you with a nostalgia for “La Belle Epoque” of Paris.

JOIN US

sunday November 12, 2017 3pm

3 02 0 G O ODW Y N GR E E N CIRC L E MEMPHIS, TN 38111

for ticket information and directions call 901.758.0150

COLETTA’S—Longtime eatery serves such specialties as homemade ravioli, lasagna, and pizza with barbecue or traditional toppings. 1063 S. Parkway E. 948-7652; 2850 Appling Rd. (Bartlett). 383-1122. L, D, X, MRA, $-$$ CURRY BOWL—Specializes in Southern Indian cuisine, serving Tandoori chicken, biryani, tikka masala, and more. Weekend buffet. 4141 Hacks Cross. 207-6051. L, D, $ DELTA’S KITCHEN—The premier restaurant at The Guest House at Graceland serves Elvis-inspired dishes — like Nutella and Peanut Butter Crepes for breakfast — and upscale Southern cuisine — including lamb chops and shrimp and grits — for dinner. 3600 Elvis Presley Blvd. 443-3000. B, D, X, $-$$$ DWJ KOREAN BARBECUE—This authentic Korean eatery serves kimbap, barbecued beef short ribs, rice and noodles dishes, and hot pots and stews. 3750 Hacks Cross, Suite 101. 746-8057; 2156 Young. 207-6204. L, D, $-$$ THE FOUR WAY—Legendary soul-food establishment dishing up such entrees as fried and baked catfish, chicken, and turkey and dressing, along with a host of vegetables and desserts. Around the corner from the legendary Stax Studio. Closed Monday. 998 Mississippi Blvd. 507-1519. L, D, $ INTERSTATE BAR-B-Q—Specialties include chopped pork-shoulder sandwiches, ribs, hot wings, spaghetti, chicken, and turkey. 2265 S. Third. 775-2304; 150 W. Stateline Rd. (Southaven). 662-393-5699. L, D, X, MRA, $-$$ LEONARD’S—Serves wet and dry ribs, barbecue sandwiches, spaghetti, catfish, homemade onion rings, and lemon icebox pie; also a lunch buffet.  5465 Fox Plaza. 360-1963. L, X, MRA, $-$$ MARLOWE’S—In addition to its signature barbecue and ribs, Marlowe’s serves Southern-style steaks, chops, lasagne, and more.  4381 Elvis Presley Blvd. 332-4159. D, X, MRA, $-$$ UNCLE LOU’S FRIED CHICKEN—Featured on Diners, Drive-Ins and Dives for good reason: fried chicken (mild, hot, or home-style); jumbo burgers four patties high; strawberry shortcake, and assorted fruit pies. 3633 Millbranch. 332-2367. L, D, X, MRA, $

SUMMER/BERCLAIR/ RALEIGH/BARTLETT ASIAN PALACE—Chinese eatery serves seafood, vegetarian items, dim sum, and more. 5266 Summer Ave. 766-0831. L, D, X, $-$$ ELWOOD’S—Casual comfort food includes tacos, pizza and sandwiches. Specialties include meats smoked in-house (chicken, turkey, brisket, pork), barbecue pizza and steelhead trout tacos. 4523 Summer. 761-9898. B, L, D, X, $ EXLINES’ BEST PIZZA—Serves pizza, Italian dinners, sandwiches, and salads. 6250 Stage Rd. 382-3433; 2935 Austin Peay. 388-4711; 2801 Kirby Parkway. 754-0202; 7730 Wolf River Blvd. (Germantown). 753-4545; 531 W. Stateline Rd. 662-3424544 (check online for additional locations). L, D, X, MRA, $ GRIDLEY’S—Offers barbecued ribs, shrimp, pork plate, chicken, and hot tamales; also daily lunch specials. Closed Tues.  6842 Stage Rd. 377-8055. L, D, X, $-$$ LA TAQUERIA GUADALUPANA—Fajitas and quesadillas are just a few of the authentic Mexican entrees offered here. A bona-fide Memphis institution. 4818 Summer. 685-6857; 5848 Winchester. 365-4992. L, D, $ LOTUS—Authentic Vietnamese-Asian fare, including lemon-grass chicken and shrimp, egg rolls, Pho soup, and spicy Vietnamese vermicelli. 4970 Summer. 6821151. D, X, $ MORTIMER’S—Contemporary American entrees include trout almondine, chicken dishes, and hand-cut steaks; also sandwiches, salads, and daily/nightly specials. A Memphis landmark since the Knickerbocker closed. Closed for lunch Sat.-Sun.  590 N. Perkins. 761-9321. L, D, X, $-$$

NAGASAKI INN—Chicken, steak, and lobster are among the main courses; meal is cooked at your table.  3951 Summer. 454-0320. D, X, $$ PANDA GARDEN—Sesame chicken and broccoli beef are among the Mandarin and Cantonese entrees; also seafood specials and fried rice. Closed for lunch Saturday.  3735 Summer. 323-4819. L, D, X, $-$$ QUEEN OF SHEBA—Featuring Middle Eastern favorites and Yemeni dishes such as lamb haneeth and saltah. 4792 Summer. 207-4174. L, D, $ SIDE PORCH STEAK HOUSE—In addition to steak, the menu includes chicken, pork chops, and fish entrees; homemade rolls are a specialty. Closed Sun.-Mon.  5689 Stage Rd. 377-2484. D, X, $-$$

UNIVERSITY NEIGHBORHOOD DISTRICT (INCLUDES CHICKASAW GARDENS AND HIGHLAND STRIP)

A-TAN—Serves Chinese and Japanese hibachi cuisine, complete with sushi bar. A specialty is Four Treasures with garlic sauce.  3445 Poplar, Suite 17, University Center. 452-4477. L, D, X, $-$$$ THE BLUFF—New Orleans-inspired menu includes alligator bites, nachos topped with crawfish and andouille, gumbo, po’boys, and fried seafood platters. 535 S. Highland. 454-7771. L, D, X, $-$$ BROTHER JUNIPER’S—This little cottage is a breakfast mecca, offering specialty omelets, including the open-faced San Diegan omelet; also daily specials, and homemade breads and pastries. Closed Mon.  3519 Walker. 3240144. B, X, MRA, $ CHAR RESTAURANT—Specializing in modern Southern cuisine, this eatery offers homestyle sides, char-broiled steaks, and fresh seafood. 431 S. Highland, #120. 249-3533. L, D, WB, X, $-$$$ DERAE RESTAURANT—Ethiopian and Mediterranean fare includes fuul, or fava beans in spices and yogurt, goat meat and rice, and garlic chicken over basmati rice with cilantro chutney; also salmon and tilapia. Closed Monday. 923 S. Highland. 5523992. B, L, D, $-$$ EL PORTON—Fajitas, quesadillas, and steak ranchero are just a few of the menu items.  2095 Merchants Row (Germantown). 754-4268; 8361 Highway 64. 380-7877; 3448 Poplar, Poplar Plaza. 452-7330; 1805 N. Germantown Parkway (Cordova). 624-9358; 1016 W. Poplar (Collierville). 854-5770. L, D, X, MRA, $-$$ JOES’ ON HIGHLAND—Specializes in fried chicken and comfort sides such as warm okra/green tomato salad and turnip greens. Entrees include salmon patties and chicken fried steak. Closed Mon. 262 S. Highland. 337-7003. L, D, X, $ MEDALLION—Offers steaks, seafood, chicken, and pasta entrees. Closed for dinner Sunday. 3700 Central, Holiday Inn (Kemmons Wilson School of Hospitality). 678-1030. B, L, D, SB, X, MRA, $-$$$ ROCK’N DOUGH PIZZA CO.—Specialty and custom pizzas made from fresh ingredients; wide variety of toppings. 3445 Poplar Ave., Ste. 1. 512-6760; 7850 Poplar, #6 (Germantown). 779-2008. L, D, SB, X, $$

OUT-OF-TOWN BIG JOHN’S SHAKE SHACK (TACKER’S)—This family-run establishment offers plate lunches, catfish dinners, homemade desserts, and a variety of hamburgers, including a mac ‘n’ cheese-topped griddle burger. Closed Sun. 409 E. Military Rd. (Marion, AR). 870-739-3943. B, L, D, $ BONNE TERRE—This inn’s cafe features American cuisine with a Southern flair, and a seasonal menu that changes monthly. Offers Angus steaks, duck, pasta, and seafood. Closed Sun.Wed.  4715 Church Rd. W. (Nesbit, MS). 662-781-5100. D, X, $-$$$ BOZO’S HOT PIT BAR-B-Q—Barbecue, burgers, sandwiches, and subs. 342 Hwy 70 (Mason, TN). 901-294-3400. L, D, $-$$ CATFISH BLUES—Serving Delta-raised catfish and Cajunand Southern-inspired dishes, including gumbo and fried green tomatoes. 210 E. Commerce (Hernando, MS). 662-298-3814. L, D, $

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CIT Y DINING LIST CITY GROCERY—Southern eclectic cuisine; shrimp and grits is a specialty. Closed for dinner Sunday.  152 Courthouse Square (Oxford, MS). 662-232-8080. L, D, SB, X, $$-$$$ COMO STEAKHOUSE—Steaks cooked on a hickory charcoal grill are a specialty here. Upstairs is an oyster bar. Closed Sun. 203 Main St. (Como, MS). 662-526-9529. D, X, $-$$$ LONG ROAD CIDER CO.—Specializes in hard apple ciders made with traditional methods. Cafe-style entrees include black eye peas with cornbread and greens, chicken Gorgonzola pockets, cider-steamed sausage, and housemade ice creams. Closed Sun.-Wed. 9053 Barret Road. (Barretville, TN). 352-0962. D, X, $

CASINO TABLES BOURBON STREET STEAKHOUSE & GRILL AT SOUTHLAND PARK—1550 Ingram Blvd., West Memphis, AR, 1-800-467-6182. CHICAGO STEAKHOUSE AT THE GOLDSTRIKE—1010 Casino Center Dr., Robinsonville, MS, 1-888-24KSTAY /662-357-1225. FAIRBANKS AT THE HOLLYWOOD—1150 Casino Strip Blvd., Robinsonville, MS, 1-800-871-0711. JACK BINION’S STEAK HOUSE AT HORSESHOE—1021 Casino Center Drive, Robinsonville, MS, 1-800-303-SHOE. LUCKY 8 ASIAN BISTRO AT HORSESHOE—1021 Casino Center Drive, Robinsonville, MS, 1-800-303-SHOE. SAMMY HAGAR’S RED ROCKER BAR & GRILL AT SOUTHLAND PARK—1550 Ingram Blvd., West Memphis, AR, 1-870-735-3670 ext. 5208 THE STEAKHOUSE AT THE FITZ —711 Lucky Ln., Robinsonville, MS, 1-888-766-LUCK, ext 8213. MANILA FILIPINO RESTAURANT—Entrees include pork belly cutlet with lechon sauce, and shrimp and vegetables in tamarind broth; also daily combos, rice dishes, and chef specials. Closed Sun.-Mon. 7849 Rockford (Millington, TN). 209-8525. L, D, X, $ MARSHALL STEAKHOUSE—Rustic steakhouse serves premium Angus beef steaks, seafood dishes, rack of lamb, and more. Breakfast menu features griddle cakes, and lunch offerings include hamburger steak and oyster po’ boys. 2379 Highway 178 (Holly Springs, MS). 628-3556. B, L, D, X, $-$$$ MEMPHIS BARBECUE COMPANY—Offers spare ribs, baby backs, and pulled pork and brisket, along with such sides as mac and cheese, grits, and red beans. 709 Desoto Cove (Horn Lake, MS). 662-536-3762. L, D, X, $-$$ NAGOYA—Offers traditional Japanese cuisine and sushi bar; specialties are teriyaki and tempura dishes.  7075 Malco Blvd., Suite 101 (Southaven, MS). 662-349-8788. L, D, X, $-$$$
 PANCHO’S—Serves up a variety of Mexican standards, including tacos, enchiladas, and mix-and-match platters; also lunch specials.  3600 E. Broadway (West Memphis, AR). 870735-6466. 717 N. White Station. 685-5404. L, D, X, MRA, $ PIG-N-WHISTLE—Offers pork shoulder sandwiches, wet and dry ribs, catfish, nachos, and stuffed barbecue potatoes. 6084 Kerr-Rosemark Rd. (Millington, TN). 872-2455. L, D, X, $ RAVEN & LILY—Eatery offers innovative Southern cuisine with such dishes as onion ring and pork rind salad, chipotle hot chicken with spiced cabbage, and shrimp and grits benedict. Closed for lunch Monday. 7700 Highway 64 (Oakland, TN). 235-7300. L, D, SB, X, $-$$ RAVINE—Serves contemporary Southern cuisine with an emphasis on fresh, locally grown foods and a menu that changes weekly. Closed Mon.-Tues. 53 Pea Ridge/County Rd. 321 (Oxford, MS). 662-234-4555. D, SB, X, $$-$$$ STEAK BY MELISSA—Aged, choice-grade, hand-cut steaks are a specialty here. Also serving fresh seafood dishes, plate lunches, burgers, and sandwiches. 4975 Pepper Chase Dr. (Southaven, MS). 662-342-0602. L, D, WB, X, $-$$$ WILSON CAFE—Serving elevated home-cooking, with such dishes as deviled eggs with cilantro and jalapeno, scampi and grits, and doughnut bread pudding. 2 N. Jefferson (Wilson, AR). 870-655-0222. L, D (Wed. through Sat. only), X, $-$$$ N O V E M B E R 2 0 1 7 • M E M P H I S M A G A Z I N E . C O M • 127

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LAST STAND

Let Them Eat Cake! How we baked happiness into our family’s holidays.

by jane roberts

I

grew up on the happy side of fruitcake, not far from Rochester, Minnesota. My siblings and I loved the bitter, myrrh-like taste of candied citron and lemon peel. We thought dark raisins in a dry, dense crumb cake were fabulous. Frankly, such was the family’s delight with our foil-wrapped loaves, as weighty and treasured as if from Fort Knox, that my mother would occasionally remind us that “some people don’t like fruitcake.”

often not at all. Then one season I realized that fruitcake and its trappings bow to the powers that rule the rest of the marketplace. I now find nice stashes of the clearance-reduced stuff in parts of town where the English and Scots are not the dominant tribe. I come home with my eyes glowing nearly as bright as the manager’s special stickers in the grocery bags. I put the loot in the freezer, where it will sit more than ten months for next year’s batch.

When I’m making the batter, heavy with nuts and raisins and all that fruit, I think of what it means to be a member of a family and what it means to keep a tradition.

make it, but I was not allowed to see the recipe. I remember it being just out of my reach and being put up a little higher once when I asked about it. That has stayed with me, too. When my grandma died, my mother read the whole thing to me over the phone. It seemed almost sacrilege. I wrote it down as fast as I could while she read. It is the only copy of the recipe I have ever seen. It is also the only recipe I never share, which puts me in fraternity, all these years later, with the generations of women who

it means to be a member of a family and what it means to keep a tradition. I am the oldest daughter, which may be part of it — a quiet, unspoken expectation. I make it every year, which means the day after every Christmas, I am hunting for markeddown candied fruit, those little plastic vessels of goodness outlandishly priced all through November and right up to December 26. I trudge from Kroger to Kroger, finding the castoffs in the oddest places — sometimes in the produce aisle, sometimes in the baking aisle, sometimes in the reduced holiday nook — and

When I was a child, my father sliced our fruitcakes very thinly, telling us that when done correctly, they should look like sheets of stained glass. I tend to be less disciplined; either that, or I have duller knives. I dole it out in thick slices that don’t threaten to dissolve on the dessert plate in a pile of crumbles. Some years, I never get a taste, except for the crumbs on the sides of the pans. I do have a friend, often on the gift list, who insists we take his loaf with us to dinner. He orders a wine to match and on a white cloth, with the same across our laps, we taste the goodness and prosperity of all the years, fused forever in those aromatic slices of fruit and nuts and time fermented. Minister of Communications at the Church of the Holy Communion, Jane Roberts was formerly business and education reporter at The Commercial Appeal.

PHOTOGRAPHS BY RON SUMNERS | DREAMSTIME (FRUITCAKE) AND EVERETT COLLECTION INC. | DREAMSTIME ( WOMAN IN KITCHEN)

We couldn’t imagine. So wide was the world into which we were about to be sprung. We only knew my grandmother’s fruitcake, a dark version ceremoniously wrapped in bourbon-soaked cheesecloth on the first Saturday after Thanksgiving and then tucked away, until Christmas, in a closet in the basement. What I know about how culture is handed down is symbolized in those loaves, those silver bars of bullion that have become my favorite presents to give: a heartfelt combination of time, tradition, and Schilling Extracts flavoring. First, a few things about the recipe. My grandparents made it together, in that my grandmother measured all the ingredients, cut the candied fruit, and soaked the raisins in a boozy mixture of goodness that would rival pumpkin spice if it could be appropriated into a coffee flavor. Then, she’d call Grandpa, hidden away behind The Wall Street Journal in the next room, to stir that enormous bowl of weighty, colorful chunks. I didn’t know until much later that the family recipe actually took the Grand Champion prize at the enormous Minnesota State Fair in the 1950s, submitted by a friend of my grandmother’s, who gave her the recipe but swore her to secrecy. As a teenager, I remember clearly that I could help Grandma

kept secrets. I cannot give it away because it is a symbol yet of all the things my grandma thought important. Having it makes me feel emotionally wealthy. I hold the key to a family treasure. When I’m making the batter, heavy with nuts and raisins and all that fruit, I think of what

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THE MAGIC RETURNS NOV. 11 – DEC. 24

E E R F Photo with

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PLUS! Toys for Kids of all ages! You'll find our store filled with magical gifts for folks of all ages, with plenty of awesome toys for girls and boys.

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10/23/17 8:46 AM

Memphis magazine, November 2017  

It's the 500th issue of MEMPHIS and it's our fourth annual Homegrown Holiday Gift Guide! See how to shop local this holiday season and still...