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THE FACES & PLACES ISSUE RIVERFRONT MAKEOVER | SPA GETAWAYS | CULINARY CROSSROADS | 901 FC & MORE! Memphis • THE CITY MAGAZINE • W W W.MEMPHISMAGAZINE.COM

THE CITY MAGAZINE

VOL XLIII NO 1 2 | M A R C H 2 019

USA $4.99

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ON ARTEN

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Neurologist Jesus Martinez, MD can help ease the pounding and pain for patients with chronic headaches

P

eople might hesitate to see a physician about frequent headaches, thinking it’s a fact of life and they can pop a few aspirin to mask the pain. But for many patients, a visit to a neurologist like Jesus Martinez, MD at Regional One Health’s East Campus Multispecialty Care clinic can be just what the doctor ordered. Neurologists specialize in conditions of the brain and spinal cord – and that covers a lot of medical territory. “I see many types of patients,” Dr. Martinez said. “I can help with headaches, back pain, numbness or tingling, balance problems and memory problems. I offer treatment and education – why things are happening the way they’re happening, and how to get control of them.” Headaches are one of the concerns he hears about most frequently. Dr. Martinez suggests patients with headaches consult a neurologist if they’re in pain three or four times a month, if their headache wakes them up, and/or if it’s accompanied by numbness or tingling. When he meets a new patient, his goal is to determine what type of headache they have. Migraines are a big cause of debilitating pain, but aren’t a catch-all category: headaches can also be caused by hypertension, hormone imbalances, muscle tension, sinus issues and other factors. He asks about the quality of the headache, if it’s throbbing, shooting, etc.; where the pain starts; what other symptoms accompany it; whether sounds and light are painful; the impact of weather; if it started as a child or teen; family history; etc. Dr. Martinez can also do imaging if symptoms have suddenly worsened, the condition is recent, or examination points to an abnormality – i.e. reflexes are better on one side than the other. The East Campus offers quick turnaround on imaging so patients don’t have to wait and worry, and so Dr. Martinez can start a treatment plan promptly. For most patients, headaches aren’t a sign of something like a clot or tumor – although if they are, Dr. Martinez can refer them to an appropriate specialist.

Jesus Martinez, MD focuses on treatment, prevention and education to help patients address the specific cause of their headaches.

I offer treatment and education – why things are happening the way they’re happening, and how to get control of them. Usually, “It’s like having allergies or asthma – it’s just the way the person is made,” he said. And, just like with allergies or asthma, “You need to have a preventative regiment, not just the inhalers you use when you have an attack.” One option is Botox administered by the doctor along the nose, temples, forehead, etc. to block neurotransmitters that carry pain signals. Another injectable, a CGRP blocker, is self-administered in the upper arm, abdomen or thigh and blocks a protein linked to migraines. There are also medications for attacks themselves – some are caffeine-based, others stimulate serotonin to stop the headache by reducing inflammation and constricting blood vessels. Some patients benefit from a short course of steroids, short-lived muscle relaxers, blood pressure medications and other options.

Bottom line, patients should consult an experienced neurologist like Dr. Martinez to decide their best option: “We can tailor the medication to the person’s characteristics,” he said. Dr. Martinez also has the full slate of Multispecialty Services at his disposal. He said the clinic’s physical therapists and pain specialists have been especially helpful with headaches, back pain, balance problems, stiffness and stroke, and all are available right at the East Campus.

Schedule an appointment with Dr. Martinez or learn more about our services online at

RegionalOneHealth.org or call 901.515.EAST

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Publication: Memphis Magazine

Client: Regional One Health Job No: 190027A


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Publication: Memphis Magazine

Client: Regional One Health Job No: 190127A


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V O L X L III N O 12 | M A R C H 2 019

56 47 Up Front 12 14 16 18 20

Features

47 Ready for Kick-off

It’s soccer city in Memphis and 901 FC takes the field.

~ by samuel x. cicci

50 Art Connects

IN THE BEGINNING WE SAW YOU

56

CLASSIC DINING

The Dixon Gallery and Gardens offers a new, thematic look at its permanent collection. ~ by shara clark THE MIND ’ S EYE

Louis “Ziggy” Tucker

50

Movement, mermaids, and Memphis moments through one local photographer’s lens. ~ by anna traverse

OUT AND ABOUT FICTION

C O V ER PH O T O GR A PH B Y L O UIS “ ZIGG Y ” T U C K ER

64 Revising the Riverfront 93

Working with urban strategists, Carol Coletta is leading the charge to revamp our city’s front door. ~ by jon w. sparks GREAT HOMES

Tournament Quality The Evans family home in Southwind scores a hole in one.

98

102

~ by anne cunningham o’neill TRAVEL

Winter Got You Down? Turn blahs into “ahhs” with a visit to these nearby luxury spas.

~ by jane schneider

64

102 Culinary Crossroads

A burgeoning food scene near the intersection of South Cooper and Central connects high-profile neighborhoods to the north and south.

~ by pamela denney

143 GARDEN VARIETY

Stopping the Pea Soup If you want to keep your water features clean and clear, you’ll need to start now, before the algae begin to bloom. ~ by john a. jennings

146 ASK VANCE

Elks Rest

148 Memphis (ISSN 1622-820x) is published monthly for $15 per year by Contemporary Media, Inc., P.O. Box 1738, Memphis, TN 38101 © 2019. Telephone: 901-521-9000. For subscription info, please call 901-521-9000. Subscription customer service mailing address is Memphis magazine, P.O. Box 1738, Memphis, TN 38101. All rights reserved. • Periodicals Postage Paid at Memphis, TN. Postmasters: send address changes to Memphis, P.O. Box 1738, Memphis, TN 38101.

Our trivia expert solves local mysteries of who, what, when, where, why, and why not. ~ by vance lauderdale

148 DINING OUT

The New Grisanti’s Determined to honor his family’s legacy, chef Judd Grisanti updates rustic Italian favorites with modern cooking.

~ by pamela denney

150 CITY DINING

Tidbits: Hu. Diner; plus the city’s most extensive dining listings.

160 ENDGAME

George Klein Known as one of Elvis’ best friends, he made his own impact on Memphis music. ~ by joe mulherin

160 MARCH 20 19 • MEMPHISMAGA ZINE.COM • 7

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BONUS

In This Issue FLOOR HEATING SYSTEMS

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pages 22-46, 68-92, 113-141 Profiles of the leading businesses in the greater Memphis area.

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ALTERNATIVE DISPUTE RESOLUTION (ADR) HOFFMAN LAW AND MEDIATION OFFICE >>> Left to right: Kim Wall, Sheree Hoffman, and Jenna McDonald The Hoffman Law and Mediation Office offers different options to our divorcing clients, all of which help them achieve satisfactory resolution while avoiding the risk and cost of litigation. We are a boutique law firm specifically trained in collaborative law, mediation and negotiation. Attorneys Sheree Hoffman and Jenna McDonald have an excellent track record of giving good advice, understanding clients' needs, and implementing creative solutions to troubleshoot

and problem-solve rather than fight. Both attorneys have over 39 years of combined experience in the local Circuit, Chancery, and Juvenile courts. We are proud that most of our clients come from direct referrals. We handle all aspects of family law and juvenile law, including divorce, custody, child support, adoption, protective orders, dependency and neglect issues and litigation, when necessary. Call Kim Wall to schedule your appointment today.

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Coming in May 2019 PE T S ON PA R A DE / MEMPHIS V E T S GUIDE

PET GUIDE

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Featuring our four-legged friends, and some of the professionals who keep them healthy.

FROM DER M ATOLOGY

TO OPHTH A LMOLOGY A ND BEYOND, A GROUP OF MEMPHIS SPECIALISTS CAN HELP YOUR A ILING PET. by shara clark

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ike many dogs — and humans — in Memphis, Cocoa suffers from allergies. Tell-tale signs for her owner Bethany Paulus: The 11-year-old Pomeranian was itchy, scratching her eyes and mouth, and constantly chewing on her paws. After being

treated with medicine for years through her veterinarian, the problem persisted. In March,

PHOTOGRAPH BY BCY909 / DREAMSTIME

Paulus noticed an irritated, discolored spot on Cocoa’s stomach and took her to Memphis Veterinary Specialists (MVS) — the only practice of its kind within hundreds of miles, with a team of board-certified veterinary specialists in a variety of fields — for a check-up. For the first time in her life, Cocoa was given an allergy test — the same kind that would be conducted on a human. Dr. Tina Brown, a dermatologist at MVS in Cordova, shaved a small patch of hair off Cocoa’s side and injected her with trace amounts of about 60 common local environmental allergens — ragweed, Bermuda grass, molds, etc. — to check for allergic reactions. M A Y 2 0 1 8 • M E M P H I S M A G A Z I N E . C O M • 73

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Our annual guide to the local American Heart Association’s Go Red For Women event.

RE A L E S TAT E A LL S TA RS Profiles of

the Memphis area’s best realtors.

Coming in June 2019 T OP DOC T ORS Our annual list of Top Doctors in the Memphis area as chosen by their peers via Castle Connolly Medical Ltd. Accompanied by institutional practice and individual practitioner profiles.

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READY TO EXPERIENCE compassionate care? Dr. Wade Clayton and Dr. Drew Mefford are excited to announce a new name, look, and location of their practices. Previously known as Clayton-Mefford Dental, they have rebranded all locations as Bellano Dental Health. With a new East Memphis addition and the prior locations in Germantown and Bartlett, they have united behind the mission of taking away the anxiety of coming to the dentist by providing comfortable and safe dental care. Committed to treating patients with respect and empathy, specialty services include advanced in-office whitening, Invisalign, and same-day crowns. Together with Dr. Lance Ashlock, Dr. Grant Dasher, Dr. Dana Henry, and Dr. Holly Legg, Bellano Dental Health is ready to care for you. Come experience the difference.

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For more information on advertising or our upcoming special sections, please contact Margie Neal at margie@memphismagazine.com

8 • MEMPHISMAGA ZINE.COM • MARCH 20 19

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AN EVENING WITH GRAMMY WINNERS AND

APRIL 13, 2019

MEMPHIS COOK CONVENTION CENTER 255 North Main Street • Memphis, TN 38103

Cocktail Reception 6–7 p.m. | Dinner, Pledge, Dancing 7 p.m.

To purchase a table or individual tickets, order securely online at RegionalOneHealthFoundation.org For more information, call 901.545.6405. Seating is first paid, first priority. BENEFITING

Publication: Memphis Magazine

Client: Regional One Health Job No: 190154A


Life is why we encourage you to take care of yourself as you take care of your loved ones.

Memphis THE C IT Y MAGAZ INE

General Excellence Grand Award Winner City and Regional Magazine Association 2007, 2008, 2010, 2014

&7

PUBLISHER/EDITOR kenneth neill EXECUTIVE EDITOR michael finger MANAGING EDITOR frank murtaugh SENIOR EDITORS shara clark, jon w. sparks ASSOCIATE EDITOR samuel x. cicci ARTS & LIFESTYLE EDITOR anne cunningham o’neill FOOD EDITOR pamela denney CONTRIBUTING EDITORS jackson baker,

michael donahue, john a. jennings, vance lauderdale, jane schneider, anna traverse EDITORIAL CONTRIBUTORS reagan andrews, jessica holmes,

catherine lavasseur, joe mulherin, hira qureshi, frank ramirez, bruce vanwyngarden, paige walter, emily zachry EDITORIAL ASSISTANT julia baker EDITORIAL INTERNS avery budin, angie harri

4

CREATIVE DIRECTOR brian groppe PRODUCTION OPERATIONS DIRECTOR margie neal SENIOR ART DIRECTOR carrie beasley ADVERTISING ART DIRECTOR christopher myers GRAPHIC DESIGNERS jeremiah matthews,

bryan rollins PHOTOGRAPHY justin fox burks, michael donahue,

ziggy mack, chip pankey, bryan rollins ILLUSTRATION chris honeysuckle ellis

4

SENIOR ACCOUNT EXECUTIVE sloane patteson taylor ACCOUNT EXECUTIVES kayla white, jacob woloshin SENIOR SALES CONSULTANT joy bateman

4

published by contemporary media, inc. memphis, tn 901-521-9000 p • 901-521-0129 f subscriptions: 901-521-9000

4

CONTROLLER ashley haeger

My daughter is why. Everyone has a reason to live a longer and healthier life. What is yours?

DIRECTOR OF BUSINESS DEVELOPMENT jeffrey a. goldberg EDITORIAL DIRECTOR bruce vanwyngarden DIRECTOR OF STRATEGIC INITIATIVES anna traverse DIGITAL SERVICES DIRECTOR kristin pawlowski CIRCULATION COORDINATOR julie ray SPECIAL EVENTS DIRECTOR molly willmott EMAIL MARKETING MANAGER britt ervin IT DIRECTOR joseph carey ACCOUNTING ASSISTANT celeste dixon RECEPTIONIST kalena mckinney

&7

march 2019

member: City and Regional Magazine Association member: Circulation Verification Council 10 • M E M P H I S M A G A Z I N E . C O M • M A R C H 2 0 1 9

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2/21/19 3:21 PM


IN THE BEGINNING | by kenneth neill

Building Blocks

We’ve been constructing our present out of our past for longer than you might think.

KEITH ALLEN

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CUSTOM HOMES RENOVATIONS & ADDITIONS

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owntown Memphis, it seems, has been all over the news these past six months. Newcomers to town can be forgiven for thinking that this is something special and different for our city, but those of us who have been here a while have seen this movie before. Perhaps we should call this particular wave of Downtown change a Second Coming, but more correctly, it’s probably a third or fourth, all part of an ongoing city-center renaissance that began with baby steps way back in the late 1970s.

The big news Downtown these days came 40-plus years, to the third annual Memphis in along last October, when Memphis Brooks May Festival, in 1978, when a then-tiny group Museum of Art announced that it was con- of organizers put together a music festival, a sidering a move from Overton Park — where Sunset Symphony, and the first-ever “world the museum’s been a fixture since 1916 — to a championship” barbecue contest over three site on a large riverside block on Front Street, weekends in May, in a seldom-used public park between Union and Monroe, alongside the Mississippi. Memnow occupied by a fire station phis in May, in fact, was perhaps and a parking garage. Brooks’ Act One in the now long-rundecision to move Downtown ning Downtown revival. And yes, was characterized as part of an the location was the very same evolving “civic terrace” along Tom Lee Park now about to be the bluff, envisioned in a Memrejuvenated and recreated. phis Riverfront Concept Plan Since 1978, Downtown has been steadily transforming itdeveloped by Studio Gang, a Chicago-based urban-developself; there’s been no shortage of ment consulting firm. urban pioneers over the past four The driving force, so to speak, decades. Look no further than behind the Brooks relocation The Peabody hotel, now 150 years April 1997 has been AutoZone founder young, abandoned in the 1970s, (and art collector) J.R. “Pitt” Hyde, long a piv- and brought back to life in 1981 by the Belz otal figure in shaping the destiny of Downtown family. In 1984, the equally dormant Orpheum Memphis. Hyde moved AutoZone’s headquar- Theatre was also revived, while Beale Street ters Downtown in 1995 — his was the first next door was slowly but surely brought back Fortune 500 company to do so — not long to life later in the same decade; it’s been the after he was instrumental in founding, in 1991, entertainment center of Downtown ever since. the nearby and now world-renowned National In the early 1990s developer Henry Turley Civil Rights Museum at the Lorraine Motel. ventured into the Mississippi itself, transformAnd it’s no coincidence that the baseball and ing an uninhabited sandbar called Mud Island soccer stadium at Union and Third opened in into a vibrant urban community now home to 2000 bears the name “AutoZone Park.” several thousand residents. And in this century, Studio Gang has not been idle since the we’ve witnessed the growth of similar DownBrooks announcement. This winter the group town residential communities, from Uptown put forward a master redevelopment plan in the north (around a burgeoning St. Jude for Tom Lee Park, the details of which you Children’s Research Hospital) to South Main can glean from Jon W. Sparks’ feature story at the opposite end of Downtown, stimulating this month on page 64. The plan is certainly explosive growth in terms of restaurants and ambitious, one that comes with a hefty $70 nightlife all across the center city. million price tag. No doubt, it will have its Fact is, it’s been quite a long time since share of detractors. One group that’s already Downtown stood still. The challenge we have expressed concern is the board of the Memphis today is to keep what we have viable, all while in May International Festival, producers of making our city ever more vibrant. Personally, the Beale Street Music Festival and the World I’m waiting now for enhanced rail transportaChampionship Barbecue Cooking Contest, tion. Wouldn’t it be great if we could take the claiming that Studio Gang’s plans will reduce train from Downtown to Nashville and Little significantly the space in the park for these Rock as well as to New Orleans and Chicago? two signature events. Kenneth Neill There’s more than a little irony involved in publisher / editor this contemporary disagreement. Flash back

12 • M E M P H I S M A G A Z I N E . C O M • M A R C H 2 0 1 9 K.AllenAd1/3PVertical3.19.indd 1

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2/20/19 3:35 PM

2/22/19 12:38 PM


Announcing the 2nd annual

FREE ADMISSION SATURDAY

MARCH 23RD

10am-1pm MEMPHIS BOTANIC GARDEN 750 CHERRY ROAD

Meet the staff and leadership of area camps and learn all about your child's spring, summer, and fall enrichment options. Representatives from day camps, sports camps, overnight camps, enrichment camps, educational camps, and more will be on hand! Check out memphisparentcampexpo.com for more information, and be sure to follow Memphis Parent on your favorite social channel for updates! ARK Farms Bodine School Camp Bear Track Camp Manitowa Christian Brothers High School Christian Brothers University Evangelical Christian School First Assembly Christian School Germantown Community Theater Harding Academy Healthy Kids & Teens - Camp Get Fit High Point Climbing and Fitness Hutchison School Idlewild Presbyterian Church Early Enrichment Center Kroc Center Lakeshore Camp Little Medical School of the Mid-South

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Memphis College of Art Memphis Public Library Memphis University School Memphis Zoo Missouri Military Academy New Ballet Ensemble Orpheum Theatre Panther Creek Stables Pinecrest Conference & Retreat Center Lichterman Nature Center Pinot's Palette Cordova Playhouse on the Square Revolutions Bicycle Cooperative Riverview Camp for Girls School of Rock - Perkins Shelby Farms Park Conservancy Shelby Farms Stables/ Catch Em Lake St. Agnes/St. Dominic St. Francis of Assisi School

St. George's Independent School St. Mary's University of Memphis School of Communication Sciences & Disorders Urban Air Collierville Woodland Presbyterian School YMCA of Memphis & the MidSouth Youth Academy of Dreams

2/21/19 3:37 PM


WE SAW YOU

Staxtacular sta x museum | februa ry 8, 2019

with michael donahue

M

emphis Grizzlies shooting guard Dillon Brooks was the host at the 14th annual Staxtacular. He was joined by fellow Grizzlies Jaren Jackson Jr., Ivan Rabb, and Jevon Carter at the Stax Music Academy fundraiser, held February 8th at the Stax Museum of American Soul Music. About 450 people attended, and more than $150,000 was raised. The Bar-Kays made their Staxtacular debut as the event’s headliner. Grammy Award-winner Kameron Whalum was one of the guests. Whalum, who sings and plays trombone with Bruno Mars and the Hooligans, is the new Stax Music Academy artist-in-residence. Asked what he thought about his new title, Whalum says, “Man, I’m excited. It’s a full-circle moment. I was a student over there in 2003 pretty much through high school. It’s a great feeling to come back to the literal place I honed some of those talents.” While at Stax, he says, “I’m trying to do the same thing and lend a hand where I can.”

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1 Jaren Jackson Jr., Dillon Brooks, and Ivan Rabb 2 Kim Novarese and Roman Novarese 3 Justin Tate 4 Paul McKinney 5 Molly and Jason Wexler 6 Stan and Amy Moser 7 Chad Forcier, Cassandra Lazenby, and Jevon Carter 8 Marlena Warner and Dylan McAlister 9 Deanie Parker 10 Joel Katz and Roy Mays 11 Johnny and Merry Moore and Jerry Stackhouse 12 David and Rhonda Porter 13 Doc Paugh and Chad Barton 14 Danielle Rushing and Kenny Fleming 15 Jennifer Kennedy and Glenda Hastings 16 The Bar-Kays 17 Ben Colar, Sumilia Colar, Kelli Zomer, Zach Smith, Lauren Williams, and Kirk Williams 18 Jordan Fleming and DeRobert Currie 19 Missy Barnhart, Austin Crowder, and Lauren Crowder 20 Kameron Whalum, Wendy Moten, and Kortland Whalum 11

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by michael donahue

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first encountered the famous Kahlua pie or “K-Pie” at Paulette’s Restaurant when I ran into my neighbor at the restaurant back in the 1970s. She was wearing a wide-brimmed straw

hat and eating a mammoth, six-inch-or-so-tall slice of Kahlua pie — by herself. She wasn’t sharing it with anyone. That was simply astonishing to me.

A full Kahlua pie — I was told by Paulette’s co-founder George Falls — weighs six pounds. That was when Paulette’s was in Overton Square. The restaurant moved years ago to Harbor Town, but Kahlua pie still is on the menu. “I think it and the hot chocolate crepe are the one and two [best] sellers,” Falls says. Asked where the pie came from, he says, “Paulette herself started it.” That was Paulette Fono. “She was my partner originally.” Fono was a founder of The Magic Pan, a fast-food creperie chain based in San Francisco. “She sold the concept to Quaker Oats Company,” says Falls. “After that, I called her and asked her to come to Memphis and build a restaurant.” What kind of restaurant? “Whatever she wanted it to be,” he says. “I’m serious. I’d been so fascinated with her Magic Pan concept that I thought, ‘Well, she can do something like that in Memphis.’ So, that’s what we did. We stayed together about three years, and then I bought her out.” The original restaurant, which opened in 1974, was “a bistro concept.” The menu included crepes and Hungarian cuisine, “because she was Hungarian.” Kahlua pie was on the menu from day one. “It was on there when we opened the doors.” The full name of the pie is Kahlua Mocha Parfait Pie. “I just remember it was the biggest dessert I ever saw,” Falls says. “And it made a statement any time a server walked through the dining room with it. Everybody said, ‘What is that? I want one, too.’ “The crust is pecan, butter,

a nd c o c o nut . And the ice cream is coffee ice cream with crushed toffee in it. It’s topped with whipping cream and a jigger of Kahlua. The Kahlua is optional.” Servers began calling it “K-Pie” — a name customers now use when referring to the dessert. The pie never was intended to be shared, Falls says. “No. It’s never said ‘for two.’ We’ve never put that on the menu. But people do try it and they’ll share.” Sometimes four people share one slice, he says. The pie originally sold “in the $2 range,” Falls says. Now it sells for $7.05. Why has Kahlua pie endured for more than 45 years? “I guess it’s a combination of the flavors,” says Falls. “It’s the Kahlua. It’s the crunch you get. It’s the coffee flavor. And it’s the crust. People just love that. It’s just a combination of all those things that make it work.” Paulette’s Restaurant is at 50 Harbor Town Square in The River Inn of Harbor Town; (901) 260-3300.

Server Davis Pernia with the famous Kahlua pie at Paulette’s. PHOTOGRAPH BY MICHAEL DONAHUE

KAHLUA PIE PHOTOGRAPH BY JUSTIN FOX BURKS

K-Pie at Paulette’s

to it f . s gs t o od ,” t g ow in par fo in tha e. kn th g t is in s en is the bi es c D he sc ph ng d a s b ssi dis ing em oi an doe Cla res din “ o l M d t, ep es ity s, pl ca ke s b is c erie ex lo e e e h s do t t w ahu th ha ne n on w is Do ry th el da In cha en g i M e le ar

CLASSIC DINING

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OU T A ND A BOU T |

MARCH 2019

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a week of performances that showcase classic Broadway hits like “If I Were a Rich Man” and “Tradition.” The Orpheum Theater, 203 S. Main St. orpheum-memphis.com

3.22

Weezer and Pixies

Say it Ain’t So. Weezer and Pixies come to FedExForum, bringing with them loveable ’90s tunes like Pixies’ “Where is My Mind?” and Weezer’s “Island in the Sun.” FedExForum, 191 Beale St. fedexforum.com

3.28 TruTV Impractical Jokers

Impractical Jokers

St. Patrick’s Day Parade

Starring The Tenderloins eloved comedy troupe The Tenderloins (you may recognize them from TruTV’s Impractical Jokers) makes a stop at FedExForum for an evening of antics in the midst of their “The Cranjis McBasketball World Comedy Tour.” FedExForum, 191 Beale St. fedexforum.com

B

3.1-3.3

Southern Women’s Show

The Southern Women’s Show is a one-stop shop where women can indulge in food and wine, shopping and fashion, demonstrations, contests and giveaways, and more. Special guest Savannah Chrisley, of reality TV show Chrisley Knows Best, will be joined by meteorologist Jim Jaggers and other celebrities throughout the weekend. Agricenter International, 7777 Walnut Grove Rd. southernshows.com

3.1-3.3

Third Annual Vintage 901 Spring Festival

Local nonprofit organization Vintage901 hosts its Third Annual Vintage901 Spring Festival, featuring three wine and food tasting events headlined by host Kym Clark of WMC Action News 5, Grand Sommelier Laurie Forster, and local chefs Andy Ticer and Michael Hudman. Proceeds benefit The Women’s Foundation for a Greater Memphis. Various Locations vintage901.org

Southern Women’s Show

3.09

The Rainbow Fish

Some parents might remember reading The Rainbow Fish as kids. At the Orpheum, parents will be able to share a bit of their childhood with their children as the book comes to life on stage. Based off Marcus Pfister’s award-winning series, this puppetry production includes two stories: “Rainbow Fish Discovers the Deep Sea” and “Rainbow Fish Opposites.” The Orpheum Theater, 203 S. Main St. orpheum-memphis.com

Vintage 901 Spring Festival

3.15-3.17

3.16

46th Annual Silky O’Sullivan St. Patrick’s Day Parade

Beale Street will be MidSouthCon swathed in green as Silky The 37th Annual O’Sullivan’s hosts its 46th MidSouthCon is an allAnnual St. Patrick’s Day encompassing, multi-genre Parade, where bands, cars, science fiction convention that features a multitude of dancers, floats, and more will entertain attendees programming (masquerade wearing their Irish best. costume contest, signings, Admission is free and open panel presentations, and to the public. workshops) and gaming Beale Street (RPGs, board games, bealestreetmerchants. miniatures). This year’s com guests of honor include science fiction and fantasy 3.19-3.24 writer Timothy Zahn, comic book artist Tom Nguyen, and Fiddler on the Roof The longest-running nuclear engineer Jim Beall. Broadway musical Hilton Memphis, of all time graces the 939 Ridge Lake Blvd. Orpheum stage for nearly midsouthcon.org

The Rainbow Fish

3.22

Whiskey Warmer Memphis

Say goodbye to winter and step into whiskey wonderland as the Memphis Flyer ushers in springtime warmth. Sample 15 varieties of whiskey, talk with distillers, listen to live music, and enjoy noshings from Babalu, Owen Brennan’s, and Laura’s Kitchen. Proceeds benefit Volunteer Memphis. Overton Square Courtyard whiskeywarmer.com

3.23

Memphis Parent Camp Expo

Parents interested in signing kids up for spring, summer, or fall camps should make a stop at the Memphis Parent Camp Expo. Parents will get the chance to meet with camp staff to learn information about more than 20 camps

MidSouthCon

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in this area. Attendees will also receive free entry to Memphis Botanic Garden and My Big Backyard for the day. Memphis Botanic Garden, 750 Cherry Rd. memphiscampexpo.com

3.23

Memphis Symphony Orchestra POPS: David Porter Tribute

Memphis Symphony Orchestra pays homage to the real “soul man” David Porter with a tribute concert, where rising pop, soul, and R&B stars will join MSO to play notable Porter hits. Cannon Center for the Performing Arts, 255 N. Main St. thecannoncenter.com

Spring Fling

3.29-3.30

Spring Fling 2019

This event, sponsored by Memphis Area Master Gardeners, covers anything and everything about gardening through seminars, demonstrations, a gardening marketplace, Kid’s Corner activities, and much more. Agricenter, 7777 Walnut Grove Rd.

CELEBRATING 39 YEARS SELLING

David Porter

ALL AROUND TOWN Jimmy Reed, President

Since 1868 JimmyReedRealtor.com | 901.682.1868

“A CAREER BUILT UPON TRUST”

65 Union Avenue, Memphis, TN 38103 901.531.7826 memphiscottonmuseum.org M A R C H 2 0 1 9 • M E M P H I S M A G A Z I N E . C O M • 19


MARCH’S VERY SHORT STORY CONTEST WINNER

High way to Zion by el a in e bl a nc h a r d

A

in’t blue your favorite color?” My grandson and I were both staring at the flashing blue lights behind us. “Yes, sweetheart. It is.” It was all I could do to speak calmly to the boy. Through the rearview mirror, I watched the officer return to his car, black boots crunching in the gravel. This whole thing had seemed so easy to do. Just regularly driving to Nashville from Memphis, and back again, in my Honda CR-V. My gray hair and fouryear-old grandson along for the ride. The idea had been hatched inside Shelby County Jail while I was volunteering, singing praise songs for the Lord. The officer led his dog, a long and lean shepherd, out of his car. Surely that nose would not be able to smell Lortabs. I whipped around in my seat, “Is your seat belt fastened?” I hadn’t intended to scare Zach. “What’s wrong, Granny? You mad at me?” “No, baby. Granny’s not mad at you. Just need a bit of God’s grace.” That boy was always on the edge of a nervous breakdown, ever since his mama’s back gave out. Sandra, my daughter, spends her time on the couch and poor little Zach runs and gets what-

ever she needs. He thinks it’s his fault his daddy left home. But everybody knows he left for that Jezebel, Lucinda. All f luffy and prissy. Plopped herself down in the front pew and waved those hips during hymn singing so no man could deny seeing them sway. That dog was sniffing around the back tires. Anvil had packed the plastic bags of pills into a metal case. Then he slid himself under the car and bolted that up in there somehow. “You gonna do the driving back to Memphis, lil’ man?” He ran his grimy hand through Zach’s curly hair. Anvil wasn’t the sort of man I wanted around Zach. He chewed tobacco and spit. Disgusting. I invited him to visit my church the first time we made this run. “The Lord has a plan for your life, Anvil.” I ventured to touch him that day, patting his oily sleeve. If nothing else, our clothes closet could offer him some pants that fit him. “Having God in your life can order your steps. My pastor, Brother Day, is altogether anointed. I’d love to see you at Temple of Holiness.” I took several steps back from Anvil’s chilly look. Never touched him again. There really is very little we need to say to each other. We both know what’s required. I feel bad about never

PHOTOGRAPH BY ILKIN GULIYEV | DREAMSTIME

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telling him where my church is located. Just never has seemed like the right time. That dog probably had a name. I considered getting out of the car and being friendly, asking the officer about his dog. I usually like dogs, have always been fond of them with their wagging tails and big, happy tongues hanging out of their mouths. I own cats myself, have four of them, all rescued after being abandoned on the green line behind my house. Persecution. That’s the word. I know that every good Christian must experience it. Here I was, doing my best to cover the cost of my daughter’s medicines and treatments, while the devil had his dog out there sniffing around to test my faith. I wouldn’t be out here, wouldn’t be delivering drugs from one town to another, if the museum provided decent insurance for Sandra. She works long hours and gets good evaluations. But her deductible is five thousand dollars! She would stay on the couch and suffer if the Lord hadn’t shown me a way to pay for doctor’s appointments and physical therapy. We were holding our weekly worship service at Shelby County Jail for Women when the Lord answered my prayers. One of the women, my inmate prayer partner, knew all about my worries. That night she took my hand and put a piece of paper in it. “Call Cedric, my boyfriend. He can help you.” She hugged me and reminded me, “We serve a miracle-working God!” I called Cedric and he met me at McDonald’s the next afternoon. We started praying together and Cedric gave me clear instructions. Now, I was making more money in a month than Sandra made in a year at her job. Cedric and I lifted our hands in praise every time I made a delivery to him out by the old depot. “Ma’am? Will you step out of the vehicle, please?”

ELAINE BLANCHARD is a storyteller. And when life does not offer a story to tell, she simply makes them up. She lives in Memphis where her neighbors, friends, and passing strangers freely provide her with unending material for her craft.

FRIDAY, MARCH 8 6:00 p.m. Greg Iles at CBU (Tickets at Eventbrite) Cemetery Road SATURDAY, MARCH 16 6:00 p.m. Maurice Carlos Ruffin We Cast a Shadow MONDAY, MARCH 18 6:00 p.m. C.J. Box Wolf Pack TUESDAY, MARCH 19 6:00 p.m. Steven Mulroy Rethinking US Election Law

SHORT AND SWEET (or notso-sweet), the Very Short Story Contest welcomes entries of up to 750 words, maximum. Writers are encouraged to incorporate the city into their work. Winning

SUNDAY, MARCH 24 2:00 p.m. Kinyah Bean Chillin My Way to Success! TUESDAY, MARCH 26 6:00 p.m. Nishta Mehra Brown White Black

stories will be published in Memphis and archived on memphismagazine.com. Whereas the fiction contest was in the past a once-a-year event, the Very

Novel is the presenter of Memphis magazine’s

Short Story Contest will publish a winning entry in each month’s issue. The Very Short Story Contest is presented by Novel, Memphis’ newest independent bookstore, where each winning author will be honored with a $200 gift certificate.

Mon–Sat: 9AM–9PM Sun: 10AM–5PM 387 Perkins Ext. Memphis, TN 38117 (901) 922-5526 • novelmemphis.com M A R C H 2 0 1 9 • M E M P H I S M A G A Z I N E . C O M • 21


2019

FACES OF THE

MID-SOUTH

THE FACE OF

ACADEMIC EXCELLENCE

ST. MARY’S EPISCOPAL SCHOOL >>>

Since 1847, every teacher, every lesson, by the National Merit Scholarship every resource at St. Mary’s has been Corporation as Finalists, Semifinalists, or dedicated to girls and how they learn best. Commended Students. The 65 members And they learn best at St. Mary’s. In our of the class of 2018 were accepted to robust academic environment, the heart 117 colleges and universities in the U.S. connects with the mind, and curiosity, and abroad. They matriculated to 39 compassion, and confidence are the norm. institutions in 22 states, D.C., and Canada, For the last 10 years, 22 percent of St. and earned more than $13 million in Mary’s graduates have been recognized merit-based scholarships. 60 Perkins Extended, Memphis, TN 38117 I 901.537.1405 I stmarysschool.org SPECIAL PROMOTION


2019

FACES OF THE

MID-SOUTH

THE FACE OF

ALTERNATIVE DISPUTE RESOLUTION (ADR) HOFFMAN LAW AND MEDIATION OFFICE >>> Left to right: Kim Wall, Sheree Hoffman, and Jenna McDonald The Hoffman Law and Mediation Office offers different options to our divorcing clients, all of which help them achieve satisfactory resolution while avoiding the risk and cost of litigation. We are a boutique law firm specifically trained in collaborative law, mediation and negotiation. Attorneys Sheree Hoffman and Jenna McDonald have an excellent track record of giving good advice, understanding clients' needs, and implementing creative solutions to troubleshoot

and problem-solve rather than fight. Both attorneys have over 39 years of combined experience in the local Circuit, Chancery, and Juvenile courts. We are proud that most of our clients come from direct referrals. We handle all aspects of family law and juvenile law, including divorce, custody, child support, adoption, protective orders, dependency and neglect issues and litigation, when necessary. Call Kim Wall to schedule your appointment today.

7515 Corporate Centre Drive, Germantown, TN 38138 | 901.754.9994 Sheree@HoffmanFamilyLaw.com | MemphisDivorceHelp.com/Faces SPECIAL PROMOTION


2019

FACES OF THE

MID-SOUTH

THE FACE OF

ANIMAL CARE

WALNUT GROVE ANIMAL CLINIC >>> With every patient and client, we are guided by our core values: Integrity, Excellence, and Compassion. Our professional staff is highly trained and well educated. All employees participate in regular training and development

programs. Walnut Grove Animal Clinic is a fullservice, state-of-the-art, small animal hospital located in the center of Memphis at the corner of Walnut Grove Avenue and Tillman. New clients are always welcome.

2959 Walnut Grove Road, Memphis, TN 38111 | 901.323.1177 | MyMemphisVet.com SPECIAL PROMOTION


2019

FACES OF THE

MID-SOUTH

THE FACE OF

ANTIQUE & ESTATE JEWELRY

VAN ATKINS JEWELERS >>> Left to right: Sam Cooper, Chuck Cooper, and Van Cooper What began as a family-owned group of department stores is now known for all things jewelry! Van Atkins Jewelers, the South's leader in Estate Jewelry and diamond solitaires, was opened by Chuck Cooper in 1990. Today three of his sons are leading the way. Chuck, Van, Sam and

Ray have all graduated from Gemological Institute of America in California. The original store is in historic downtown New Albany, Mississippi, where you will ďŹ nd Chuck most days and his son Sam. Chuck's eldest son Van is at the helm in the new location on the square in Oxford, Mississippi.

129 W. Bankhead Street, New Albany, MS 38652 | 662.534.5012 124 Courthouse Square, Oxford MS 38655 | 662.236.5012 VanAtkins.com SPECIAL PROMOTION


2019

FACES OF THE

MID-SOUTH

THE FACE OF

APARTMENT INVESTMENT AND MANAGEMENT FOGELMAN PROPERTIES >>>

Strength. Stability. Service. Fogelman is a pioneer in the multifamily industry, leading the way with innovative solutions. As a fully integrated property investment and management company, we have the proven experience and expertise to help maximize the investments of our clients and partners in all parts of the industry cycle. With an impressive infrastructure yet personalized approach, we have grown from a local real estate firm to one of the country’s largest and most respected privately owned multifamily firms. Today, we proudly manage more than 28,000 apartment homes in 88 communities, totaling $4 billion in asset value. Properties List: • ADDISON AT COLLIERVILLE 400 Orchard Cir. W., Collierville, TN 38017 | AddisonCollierville.com • ARBORS HARBOR TOWN 671 Harbor Town Edge Dr., Memphis, TN 38103 | ArborsHarborTown.com • BRISTOL ON UNION 205 Pasadena Pl., Memphis, TN 38104 | TheBristolOnUnion.com • CHEROKEE CABANA 3204 Sharpe Ave., Memphis, TN 38111 | CherokeeCabana.com • THE EDGE OF GERMANTOWN 1730 Hunters Trace Dr., Memphis, TN 38120 | TheEdgeOfGermantown.com • LEGACY FARM 1130 Legacy Farm Ct., Collierville, TN 38017 | Legacy-Farm.com • LEGENDS AT WOLFCHASE 8840 Bristol Park Dr., Bartlett, TN 38133 | LegendsAtWolfchaseApts.com • MADISON HUMPHREYS CENTER 330 N. Humphreys Blvd., Memphis, TN 38120 | LiveAtMadison.com • THE PARK AT FOREST HILL 8285 Irene Blvd., Memphis, TN 38125 | TheParkAtForestHill.com • THE RETREAT AT GERMANTOWN 7865 Grove Ct. W., Germantown, TN 38138 | TheRetreatatGermantown.com • THE SUMMIT 4981 Hidden Lake Dr., Memphis, TN 38128 | TheSummitMemphis.com • THE TENNESSEE BREWERY 495 Tennessee St., Memphis, TN 38103 | AtTheBrewery.com • THORNWOOD 7794 Kings College Ave., Germantown, TN 38138 | TheResidencesatThornwood.com Fogelman.com SPECIAL PROMOTION

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2019

FACES OF THE

MID-SOUTH

THE FACE OF

ARKANSAS REAL ESTATE

VACATION HOMES - FARMLAND - DUCK CLUBS - RANCHES & OUTDOOR PROPERTIES >>> TEAM BURCH — Joey Burch, Arkansas Principal Broker, and Pat Burch, Horseshoe Lake Agent For 24 years Joey Burch, broker, has traveled the region networking with sellers and potential buyers of real estate. Joey specializes in traditional sales and listings, 1031 tax exchanges, auction services, cabin designs, and agri tours. Pat specializes in lakefront homes and lots at Horseshoe. If you’re in the market for real estate there’s a good chance that Joey and Pat have it in inventory! Whether you’re looking for a weekend home on HORSESHOE LAKE, a cotton plantation along the MISSISSIPPI RIVER, a troutfishing cabin near MOUNTAIN VIEW, a ranch on CROWLEY’S RIDGE, or a duck-hunting club on the WHITE RIVER, Joey and Pat can assist you. Seated is Melinda Patrick, a potential client for real estate on Horseshoe Lake and furry friends, Bear, Lilly, and Tito. FEATURED LISTINGS: HORSESHOE LAKE — The Historic Snowden House, 1527 Bream Road $1,155,000 — 2721 Horseshoe Circle lake house $475,000; Plantation lake home at 11983 Horseshoe Circle $925,000; CROWLEY'S RIDGE — 199 acre trophy deer hunting, $350,000; ARKANSAS FARM LAND — 1,241 acre rice farm Jackson County; ARKANSAS LOCAL DUCK CLUB 850 acres and lodge $2,097,000 near Hughes. Visit more than 200 listings online FARMANDCABIN.COM or OUTDOORPROPERTIES.COM, Outdoor Properties, LLC Real Estate with offices in Arkansas and Tennessee Contact: Joey Burch or Pat Burch 501.454.1782. SPECIAL PROMOTION


2019

FACES OF THE

MID-SOUTH

THE FACE OF

BEAUTIFUL FACES

THE LANGSDON CLINIC >>> Phillip R. Langsdon, MD, FACS and Carol H. Langsdon, RNP Celebrating over 30 years in practice, Dr. Phillip Langsdon, facial plastic surgeon, has been treating one face at a time. He is the only surgeon in the Mid-South whose practice is limited to facial plastic surgery. Seeing each person’s face as unique, he treats the common and complicated cases and believes in “Compassionate Care with Natural Looking Results”. Carol Langsdon, RNP, provides expert nonsurgical aesthetics such as Botox®, dermal fillers, skin resurfacing and customized medical-grade skin care. Dr. Langsdon is the President of the American Academy of Facial Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery (AAFPRS) 2019. Dr. Langsdon is Board Certified by the American Board of Facial Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery. To view before and after photos, visit drlangsdon.com. 7499 Poplar Pike, Germantown, TN 38138 | 901.755.6465 | DrLangsdon.com SPECIAL PROMOTION


2019

FACES OF THE

MID-SOUTH

THE FACE OF

BEAUTIFUL SKIN

THE SKIN CLINICS >>> Dr. George Flinn, Heidi Shafer, Tomi Beckemeyer, Claudette Hawkins, Dede Sellers, Jac Curran, Courtney Waddell, Dr. Scott Nelson, Bari Metz, Kate France Parsons, Aisha Rogers, Stephanie Brick, Emily Van Epps, Sam Colvin, Courtney Brown, Carolina Oxley, Courtney Browning, Sarah Rasmussen, Amethyst Comacho, Selena Stuckey, Stacy Hubbard, Madelyn Smith, Sheila Smith, Karen Elledge, Dani Battles, Alicia George, Ashley Colburn, Mindy Shafer, Kayli Webb, Ashley Smith, Mallory Smith, Allison Ricketts, Leigh Gardner, Ana Smith, Kristy Caywood

EAST MEMPHIS: 1102 Brookfield, 38119 | direct: 901.474.7636 GERMANTOWN: 1300 Wolf Park Drive, 38138 | direct: 901.345.7546 GREENWOOD, MS: 115 Howard Street, 38930 | direct: 662.374.5008 901.345.SKIN SPECIAL PROMOTION


2019

FACES OF THE

MID-SOUTH

THE FACE OF

BEAUTIFUL SMILES

CHRISTOPHER COOLEY, DDS AND DIANE FLEXSENHAR, DDS >>> When you visit the office of Drs. Christopher country's top dental organizations, where Cooley and Diane Flexsenhar, you become they continue to learn alongside other part of a caring dental family. Along with their well-respected clinicians. Drs. Cooley and highly trained, professional staff, Drs. Cooley Flexsenhar love keeping their skills sharp as and Flexsenhar are committed to listening to the dental field evolves, so that you receive your needs and providing care that works for the best care possible. Whether cosmetic, your lifestyle. Their personalized approach restorative, or general dentistry, the doctors to dental care makes them stand out as the and staff stay on top of the learning curve. best dentists in the Greater Germantown Drs. Cooley and Flexsenhar are extremely and Memphis area, drawing patients from adamant about providing you with the best Arkansas, Mississippi, and even Missouri. materials and world-class lab work, never Their talent is worth the short drive, and their taking a shortcut. You benefit from the latest patients deserve the best. treatment techniques, including innovative Drs. Cooley and Flexsenhar's dental practice advances in patient comfort, the highestis devoted to restoring and enhancing the quality and longest-lasting materials, and the natural beauty of smiles using state-of-themost aesthetically pleasing results. art procedures that will result in beautiful, Drs. Cooley and Flexsenhar and their entire long-lasting smiles. A standard of excellence team love to volunteer their time and efforts in personalized dental care enables them to both locally and globally. They have taken provide the quality dental services their patients care of patients in Memphis and Shelby deserve. The office is known as the best County and others abroad on mission trips cosmetic practice in the area, with rave reviews to the Dominican Republic. Their teamfor their work on big cases such as veneers. building activities include food drives and Drs. Cooley and Flexsenhar, along with other community services to give back to the their entire staff, take the time necessary to amazing people in Memphis and Germantown. constantly improve their skills, so no matter Drs. Cooley and Flexsenhar always welcome what procedure you are having done, you are new patients into their office, with most receiving the most highly trained care. You get referrals coming from existing, very satisfied the best treatment possible at every step of patients. The highest compliment we receive your visit, from your basic cleaning to complex is when our patients refer their family and veneer cases and full-mouth reconstructions. friends. Contact us today for a free consult on The doctors are proud members of the any of your dental needs. 7938 Wolf River Blvd., Germantown, TN 38138 | 901.754.3117 | CooleyDDS.com

SPECIAL PROMOTION


2019

FACES OF THE

MID-SOUTH

THE FACE OF

BEHAVIORAL HEALTH

LAKESIDE BEHAVIORAL HEALTH SYSTEM >>> Bottom row: Hal Brunt, Lindsey Hightower, Alex Brasher, Gail Outland, Lenora Coleman, and Joy Golden Top row: Cathy Houpt, Lori Deason, Rita Dailey, Tommy Joyner, Theresa Jarvis, John Fisher, Teresa Scott, Robert Edwards, and Kevin Parker For 50 years, Lakeside has had one seniors who struggle with behavioral mission: to provide specialized behavioral health issues, addictive diseases or cohealth care and addiction treatment in occurring diagnoses. In addition to a welcome environment for people in providing targeted treatment for our search of healing. Our 37-acre campus patients, Lakeside is committed to helping near Memphis, Tennessee, was designed our community better understand and to make recovery an accessible, effective recognize the complexities associated with reality for everyone — from children to behavioral health and addiction. 2911 Brunswick Road, Memphis, TN 38133 | 901.377.4700 | LakesideBHS.com SPECIAL PROMOTION


2019

FACES OF THE

MID-SOUTH

THE FACE OF

BRANDING

TACTICAL MAGIC >>> Trace Hallowell has been an influential force in Memphis advertising for more than 30 years. Both strategist and creative leader, he is best known for developing high-impact brand identities and campaigns. His work has garnered national and international creative awards, and is featured in books, magazines, and college textbooks as examples of branding excellence. Trace founded Tactical Magic in 2001. The firm’s diverse clientele includes CGHP, Malasri Engineering, The Mighty Olive, Soundways, Sowell Realtors, Sterling National Bank, Trousseau, and Uniform Masters. 1460 Madison Avenue Memphis, TN 38104 901.722.3001 TacticalMagic.com

SPECIAL PROMOTION


2019

FACES OF THE

MID-SOUTH

THE FACE OF

BREAST HEALTH AND CANCER PREVENTION

MARGARET WEST COMPREHENSIVE BREAST CENTER >>> Front row left to right: Breast Surgeon,Michael Berry, MD; Breast Radiologist-Patricia Turner, MD; and Breast Surgeon-Richard Fine, MD, FACS Back row left to right: High Risk Breast Specialist,Kristen Hayes, NP; Breast Surgeon, Roy Oswaks, MD; Nurse Practioner, Ashley Dowdy, NP; and Physician’s Assistant, Katie Arnold, PA The Margaret West Comprehensive Breast Center offers the most comprehensive breast healthcare in the Mid-South. ONE POINT OF CARE with a team of breast-health specialists including: surgical oncologist, radiologist, medical oncologist, radiation oncologist and patient care support. All in one location. These breast specialists are all highly focused and trained to diagnose and treat both benign and malignant disease. 7945 Wolf River Blvd, Germantown, TN 38119 | 901.692.9600 | MargaretWestBreastCenter.com SPECIAL PROMOTION


2019

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THE FACE OF

BUSINESS BANKING TRIUMPH BANK >>>

Triumph is proud to serve as your local bank in and anywhere or offering our business customers the greater Memphis area, deeply invested in a diverse menu of cash management services serving our community and helping businesses from which to choose that help protect their and individuals grow, which in turn helps our companies’ assets and improve their bottom line economy grow. Our team strives to make by enabling them to better manage their cash banking easy for our customers, whether it’s flow and cash position. It gives you more control by offering the latest in online and mobile and confidence that when we say you matter, platforms so our customers can bank anytime you really matter. Let’s talk growth. 5699 Poplar Avenue, Memphis, TN 38119 | 901.333.8800 | TriumphBank.com SPECIAL PROMOTION


2019

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CATASTROPHIC INJURY & WRONGFUL DEATH LAW PEEL LAW FIRM >>> David B. Peel, injury attorney

PERSONAL SERVICE + SMALL TOWN RELATIONSHIPS = BIGTIME RESULTS has long been recognized by his peers as "AV+ For over 22 years, David B. Peel has walked with families shattered by distracted, drunk or Preeminent," the highest lawyer rating possible. reckless drivers, massive 18 wheelers, and careless And, nationally, he is a Life Member of the exclusive Multi-Million Dollar Advocates Forum facilities. His own mother was almost killed by a drunk driver when he was young, and he never (reserved for those with a single case result of over $2 million). Peel credits his many successes to forgot how helpless he felt. While the legal profession is now marked by his faith, his wonderful staff and “our great clients high-volume chains and blaring television ads, Peel who become friends.” brings a sincerity, warmth and personal service David and his bride of 25 years, Trish, are that is as unique as it is engaging. proud new grandparents. David Peel is active in international missions, Christian Legal Society, Locally, he has been voted “Best of the Best Attorney” in Readers' Choice Awards for many Academy of Truck Injury Attorneys, and serves on the Boards of Love Worth Finding Ministries, as years. Regionally, he has been named a Midwell as the Bellevue Foundation. South Super Lawyer since 2012. Professionally, he 8582 U.S. Highway 51 North, Millington, TN 38053 | 901.872.4229 | DavidPeel@PeelLawFirm.com | PeelLawFirm.com SPECIAL PROMOTION


2019

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CHRISTIAN COLLEGE-PREPARATORY EDUCATION HARDING ACADEMY >>>

Love. Think. Live. These three words are central to the mission at Harding Academy. We teach students to love others as Christ loves them, to think creatively and learn with open minds, and to live courageously to the glory of God. At Harding, students build a foundation for life that goes beyond chapel and daily Bible classes. They learn about God’s perfect design in science and engineering. They learn about

justice and advocacy in African-American history. And they learn empathy in theatre by mentally stepping into someone else’s shoes. Our East Memphis campus for senior kindergarten–grade 12 provides a onestop school in the heart of the city. Little Harding, our pre-school for 18 months–junior kindergarten, offers care at two locations in East Memphis and Cordova.

HARDING ACADEMY (SR. K–GRADE 12): 1100 CHERRY ROAD LITTLE HARDING (18 MOS.–JR. K): 8350 MACON ROAD | 1106 COLONIAL ROAD 901.767.4494 | HARDINGLIONS.ORG SPECIAL PROMOTION


2019

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COMMUNITY BANKING INDEPENDENT BANK >>>

Strong. Safe. Customer Focused. Local. Since our founding in 1998, Independent Bank has been committed to supporting our customers and communities by helping you achieve your dreams and financial success. We are a full-service bank with personal and business loans, a variety of deposit and cash management options, mortgage loans and wealth management. We offer innovative solutions, effective products and heroic service. We invite you to experience the i-bank difference — it’s a better way of banking. Proud to be the face of community banking. 5050 Poplar • 844.5051 | 1711 Union • 844.2050 | 450 Perkins • 842.2620 6209 Poplar • 842.2600 | 5995 Stage • 842.1210 | 2116 W. Poplar • 842.1170 | 40 S. Main • 312.8900 3295 Poplar • 844.2075 | 7635 Poplar • 842.1190 i-bankonline.com SPECIAL PROMOTION


2019

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COMPOUNDING PHARMACY PEOPLE'S CUSTOM RX >>>

Since 1969, People's Custom Rx — the oldest and largest compounding pharmacy in the Memphis area — has been helping people feel better. We are excited to be opening two brandnew, state-of-the-art sterile rooms in the coming months to prepare your customized medications. Our

pharmacists and technicians work hard to increase our knowledge and stay up-to-date with training in the fields of bio-identical hormone therapy, sterile compounding, pediatric compounding, veterinary compounding, dermatological compounding, and so much more. How can we help you feel better?

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2019

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CONSTRUCTION & INDUSTRIAL MATERIALS HAULING, RECYCLING & DISPOSAL EBOX >>> Seated left to right: Jonalyn Medling, Amy Carroll, Gina Brown, Jennie Tummins, and Loretta Sommer Standing left to right: Jennie Berrie, Don Lemons, Herb Honeycutt, Glyn Moore, Norman Brown III, President, and Tabitha Nance EBOX is a family owned business with a mission to provide our customers with the highest quality products and services at competitive prices. EBOX serves the construction, commercial and industrial industries in West Tennessee, North Mississippi and Eastern Arkansas by providing an environmentally

safe solution for construction, demolition and industrial waste created on jobsites and at businesses. In addition to our hauling services, EBOX also delivers mulch, soil mix, topsoil, sand and gravel. Our goal is to pursue recycling, LEED projects, and related sustainable enterprises with superior on-time service.

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2019

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COSMETIC DENTAL VENEERS MEMPHIS CENTER FOR FAMILY & COSMETIC DENTISTRY >>> Miles C. Moore, DDS

Creating beautiful smiles is just another day in the office for Miles C. Moore, dentist at Memphis Center for Family & Cosmetic Dentistry. With a friendly staff, a soothing atmosphere, and the latest technology, Dr. Moore’s practice offers all dental services, but specializes in cosmetic dentistry. Whether you seek a complete smile makeover, “invisible” braces, or teeth whitening, cosmetic dentistry can transform your smile in several ways. Dental veneers from Dr. Moore improve the form and function of your teeth, leaving results that you have to see to believe. 725 W. Brookhaven Circle Memphis, TN 38117 901.761.2210 | BeautifulSmiles.org SPECIAL PROMOTION


2019

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CRIMINAL LAW THE LAW OFFICE OF MASSEY, MCCLUSKY, MCCLUSKY & FUCHS >>> William D. Massey As senior partner in our law firm, I am proud of the strength our defense team brings to the table. When people come to us, not only is someone's freedom being threatened, but their good name as well. No one wants to be a victim of the criminal justice system. Our firm practices only criminal defense law. We protect and guide people when the government is investigating. We defend people when the government is prosecuting. We work as a team and present a team defense. It’s just stronger that way. If you ever need protection and a strong defense, call us. We bring the experience, knowledge and skilled advocacy you will need. We also bring the heart for the fight. Our clients expect that from us, and so do we. 3074 East Road Memphis, TN 38128 901.384.4004 MasseyMcClusky.com

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CUSTOM HOME BUILDING & REMODELING RKA CONSTRUCTION >>>

Formed in 2011, RKA Construction is a custom builder located in Memphis, Tennessee. Created out of a love for building and a desire to provide a better client experience, our focus is simple — provide superior quality, craftsmanship, and customer service in everything we do. 901.674.5522 | rka.build SPECIAL PROMOTION


2019

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DERMATOLOGY

UT DERMATOLOGY, A UNIVERSITY CLINICAL HEALTH PRACTICE >>> Left to right: Kristopher Fisher, MD, Emily H. Jones, MD, Sarah Greer Smith, MD, Allison Vaughn Jones, MD, and Tejesh Patel, MD UT Dermatology — the clinical faculty practice plan of the Kaplan-Amonette Department of Dermatology at the University of Tennessee Health Science Center — is a premiere full-service dermatology practice in the MidSouth, offering academic expertise and compassionate care in medical, surgical and cosmetic dermatology for all ages.

As board-certified dermatologists, our physicians have expertise in the diagnosis, treatment and prevention of diseases of the hair, skin and nails. With two convenient locations serving both the Downtown and East Memphis areas and appointments available within days, taking care of your skin has never been this easy.

930 Madison Ave., Suite 801 | 1065 Cresthaven, Suite 500 | 901.866.8805 UniversityClinicalHealth.com SPECIAL PROMOTION


2019

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DIVORCE LAW THE RICES >>>

Need a divorce? Consider yourself fortunate if you can hire the Rices. Their credentials show that they represent more than simply their three generations of family law experience. The ABA publishes the Rices’ Complete Guide to Divorce Practice. Fellow lawyers designated Larry as a Super Lawyer and Nick as a Super Lawyer Rising Star. NAFLA awarded Larry with its National Top Ten Ranking, while the AIOFLA placed Nick in the Tennessee Top Ten Under Forty in granting the Client Satisfaction Award. Avvo.com rates both with its highest ranking possible. Their divorce guide can be found at AboutDivorce.com. SPECIAL PROMOTION


2019

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DOGGY HOTEL, DAYCARE & SPA BROWNDOG LODGE

Since 2007, BrownDog Lodge has been the premier destination for the pampered pup, offering luxury boarding, grooming, and daycare in an environment designed for fun and safety. This year, we are proud to expand into veterinary care! BrownDog Lodge Veterinary is a full-service hospital with the BrownDog name and service you know and trust. Visit Dr. Jason Robinson and Dr. Lauren Fox at our Arlington location, drop by the clinic days held at our Memphis and Germantown lodges, or let our shuttle service provide a true door-to-door experience for luxury care and comprehensive wellness! Our friendly team of pet-care professionals is waiting to offer your furry family member the very best! EAST MEMPHIS: 4953 Black Road (near Poplar and Mendenhall) 901.767.1187 | memphis@browndoglodge.com SPECIAL PROMOTION


PHOTOGRAPHS BY BRYAN ROLLINS

Ready for KICK~OFF

It’s soccer city in Memphis as 901 FC takes to the field. by samuel x. cicci

W

hen the first week of practice kicked off in early February, the Memphis 901 FC players at AutoZone Park may as well have been greeted by a giant, neon-lit “Welcome to Memphis” sign. Temperatures fluctuated between bright, summeresque mornings and overcast days sinking down to the low 30s. But no one said being an expansion team would be easy, and the entire 901 FC organization has tackled every challenge in its path in preparation for the season opener on March 9th.

right: Midfielder Raul Gonzalez III dribbles during a training drill at AutoZone Park.

It’s no exaggeration to say that soccer culture is booming in America. ESPN, NBCSports, Bleacher Report, and many other services have been vying for coverage rights for international leagues from places like England, Spain, and Italy. While football has been the traditional juggernaut of the South, cities like Atlanta, which quickly embraced its own professional soccer team, show that there’s a huge appetite for the sport. Memphis is no exception; last December, NBC tweeted viewership statistics for a match between Chelsea and Manchester City, two of the top teams in England’s highest level of soccer, the Barclays Premier League. Out of all U.S. cities, Memphis had the second highest market share among viewers. Add prominent soccer bars like The Brass Door and Celtic Crossing, the Memphis branch of the U.S. soccer Men’s National Team fan group, the American Outlaws, and numerous grassroots pick-up efforts, and it’s easy to see that Memphis has been clamoring for a soccer outlet. Two members of the Redbirds ownership group were happy to oblige. Peter Freund and Craig Unger are part of Trinity Sports Holdings, whose portfolio includes interests in the New York Yankees, Memphis Redbirds, 901 FC, and recently Dagenham & Redbridge FC, a soccer club in East London. Since the Redbirds season ended last year, the two have been working hard to ensure that

all the necessary infrastructure is in place for a soccer team. Unger, the president of 901 FC, started by hiring sporting director Andrew Bell, a veteran of the United Soccer League (USL). “I think he’s been around the league for 20 years,” says Unger. “He knows all the ins and outs and the players.” Bell’s resume includes a long tenure at Charleston Battery, who under his stewardship won the USL Championship in 2012. Even though 901 FC is a fledgling team, Unger didn’t bring soccer to Memphis just to make up the numbers. “We want to win the USL Championship,” says Unger. “Crazier things can happen, even in year one. But our immediate goal is to reach the playoffs.” In addition to a regular league season, USL teams are also entered in the U.S. Open Cup, which will occasionally see clashes with Major League Soccer (MLS) franchises, the highest level of the sport in America. A long-term aim of 901 FC is to be able to compete toe-to-toe with MLS sides. While 901 FC is aiming high from a sporting perspective, leadership wants the team to be accessible and ingrained in Memphis. In soccer, players tend to stick around longer than other conventional American sports. Unger thinks that’s an advantage when it comes to building ties with the community. “They’ll all be Downtown, they’re going to be out places, out at restaurants,” says Unger. “We’ll be traveling for games, but the M A R C H 2 0 1 9 • M E M P H I S M A G A Z I N E . C O M • 47

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left (l to r): Principal owner Peter Freund stands with part-owner and former United States goalkeeper Tim Howard, and 901 FC president Craig Unger. right: Head coach Tim Mulqueen addresses players between exercises during practice.

PHOTOGRAPH COURTESY 901FC

opposite page: No. 16, forward Heviel Cordovés, evades pressure from No. 5, defender Triston Hodge.

players will be in Memphis maybe five or six days out of the week. And I think creating that connection with the community and really making this the city’s team is going to be paramount to our success.” Luckily for 901 FC, a ready-made Memphis connection was eager to be a part of the franchise. Colloquially known as “Superman” or “Captain America” after his heroics for the United States at the 2014 World Cup in Brazil, Tim Howard has called Memphis home since the early 2000s. The goalkeeper, who plans to retire at the end of his upcoming MLS season with the Colorado Rapids, heard about talks for a Memphis team early on and approached Freund about becoming a part-owner. Howard’s name alone brings instant credibility to the organization, not to mention his extensive experience at the highest level of international soccer with the U.S. national team and English powerhouses Manchester United and Everton. Howard agrees that Memphis is ready to embrace its own professional soccer organization. “It’s special to me, but more than anything, it’s special to the city of Memphis,” says Howard. “I’ve been here for 15 years now, and it’s a city that’s hungry for it. From the feedback I got, from Midtown, Downtown, East Memphis, people who aren’t even necessarily soccer fans are excited for the show we’re going to put on.” As a part-owner, Howard is hands-on with many aspects of the team. Even while balancing those administrative duties with a full-time playing career, he says there are “enough hours in the day” to fulfill his commitments to both Memphis and Colorado. He is always on the phone discussing player recruitment or contacting agents, is involved with the hiring process with Unger, and pays attention to other details like

getting the stadium soccer-ready, which includes locker room conversion or making sure the playing surface is up to standard. It’s certainly a big switch to go from playing regularly to administering a team, but Howard is fully prepared for it. “It’s been a good ride, “ he says, “21 years or so, and that’s why I’ve made this decision. I’m ready to put on a suit, get in the director’s box, and watch as we build this team from the ground up.” Finding the right coaching staff goes a long way to ensuring success, and the candidate chosen for the position has his own history with Howard. Tim Mulqueen showed his eye for talent when he discovered the United States goalkeeper at a clinic in New Jersey and has been a mentor ever since. Howard believes the coach has the right mentality to make the team successful in its first season. “Tim is tough, a great man-manager, and knows soccer inside and out,” Howard says. “He’s the man we entrusted to lead the charge, and I don’t think there’s anyone better to have that responsibility.” As coach of an expansion team, Mulqueen is essentially working with a group of strangers for the first time. As a veteran of the U.S. soccer world, the challenge is exciting rather than daunting, and the players are already buying in. “Their effort, their commitment to getting better and getting to know each other has been tremendous,” says Mulqueen. “We’re a good team, and with the effort and commitment the guys are putting in, we can’t help but get better every day.” Out on the AutoZone Park field, the players look hungry and sharp. At an early February practice, despite having trained together for only a few days, there are already good signs of chemistry. Mulqueen calls defense the “cornerstone” of a good team, and early practices focused on finding the right defensive shape.

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PHOTOGRAPH BY BRYAN ROLLINS

PHOTOGRAPH BY BRYAN ROLLINS

“What we don’t want to do is give up chances,” says Mulqueen. “As long as we’re organized defensively, then we can allow our free-flowing, attacking soccer plan. We have enough talented players that we’re going to create chances [to score]. We want to capture the ball as quickly as possible, and then enjoy it. I’m an aggressive person by nature, and I want my players to be bold, be aggressive, and to have confidence and be willing to take risks.” The playing squad that Mulqueen and 901 FC have assembled is diverse. Triston Hodge and Leston Paul played for the Trinidad & Tobago team that eliminated the U.S. National Team from World Cup qualifiers in 2017. Heviel Cordovés defected from Cuba in 2012 to play professionally in the states. And Louis Bennett II spent time playing abroad in Cyprus and the Czech Republic. To tie everyone together, Mulqueen named veteran Marc Burch as team captain. Burch, who turned down offers from MLS to play for Memphis, is ready to lead the team. “I’ve learned from a lot of great players and coaches. I think I’ve been a sponge,” says Burch. “And I’m in a place where I can share it with others. The guys are willing to learn, willing to listen and get better.” A defender, Burch played 234 games over 13 seasons in MLS, winning an MLS Supporters’ Shield and U.S. Open Cup during his career. As captain, Burch wants to set an example on the field for the rest of his teammates. “I want the guys to see what I’m doing and build on that,” says Burch. “They’re aspiring to do what I’ve done, which is play professionally for a long time, so I think my ability to be on the field doing what I do best is a great way to lead.” Like the rest of the organization, Burch is targeting an appearance in the playoffs at the end of the season.

That, he says, is the best way to honor the fans that are excited about the team. When the Tampa Bay Rowdies come to Memphis for 901 FC’s season opener, the stadium will be ready for soccer. The AutoZone Park infield will be fully converted to a soccer pitch, and fans will be right on top of the action. In comparison, even some MLS teams don’t have dedicated soccer stadiums. “When creating the experience here, our goal was to make sure that we had the field as close as possible to the fans,” says Unger. “When you look “We want to win the USL at facilities in Europe and the experience we have here, the fans are right Championship. Crazier on top of the game. And, that’s part of the allure of it.” things can happen, even in With opening day, March 9th, fast approaching, the team has been preparing year one. But our immediate through exhibition matches against the goal is to reach the playoffs.” University of Memphis and Christian Brothers University. Behind the scenes, — cr a ig unger Unger has long been in contact with fan groups to drum up excitement for the opener, and everyone is anxious to get the season started. “Now, it’s on us to put a quality product on the field and create a quality experience,” says Unger. If you look at the recent excitement around Penny Hardaway at the University of Memphis or the way the Grizzlies have meshed with the community, it’s clear that Bluff City takes its sports seriously. 901 FC’s competitive drive both on the field and in the front office makes it well poised for success in its opening season. Under the lights at AutoZone Park, set against the backdrop of Downtown, expect 901 FC to show the soccer world that Memphis can kick it with the best of them. M A R C H 2 0 1 9 • M E M P H I S M A G A Z I N E . C O M • 49

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••••••A • R •T••• C • O •N•N• E • C •T• S •••••• The Dixon Gallery and Gardens offers a new, thematic look at its permanent collection.

A

by shara clark

rt often gives us something intangible. When you see a work that speaks to you, it can inspire, transport you in time or place, or perhaps most importantly, provide a glimpse at our connection to nature, animals, and each other. With a closer look at processes, styles, and artists’ ideas, we’ll see, too, that art connects to art. The current exhibition, “Eye to Eye: A New Look at the Dixon Collection,” on view at The Dixon Gallery and Gardens through April 14th, shows us — with about 150 pieces from the Dixon’s permanent collection, including paintings, prints, sculptures, porcelain, and more — how the many subjects that have inspired artists have done so through the course of time. And how the stories we’ve longed to tell through art have, in some ways, gone unchanged. For the third time in 12 years, the Dixon is exhibiting its permanent collection throughout its galleries. This time, works are organized by theme, juxtaposing pieces that wouldn’t normally be shown side by side to demonstrate the connectedness of things that have influenced artists across generations and around the world. above: William James, Venice Mid-eighteenth century. Oil on canvas. Bequest of Mr. and Mrs. Hugo N. Dixon, 1975.1

right: Jean Charles Cazin, Landscape with Windmill ca. 1880. Oil on canvas. Museum purchase from the Julia Wood Buckner Estate by the Margaret Hyde Fund, 1990.2

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••

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above left: Henri Gervex, Young Woman with a Fan 1888. Pastel on paper. Museum purchase with funding provided by the 2017 Curator’s Circle and The Dixon Gallery and Gardens Endowment Fund, 2017.4.1

above right: Sir Joshua Reynolds, Portrait of Mrs. Richard Crofts 1775. Oil on canvas. Bequest of Mr. and Mrs. Hugo N. Dixon, 1975.2

opposite: Honoré Daumier, Crrrrrr...Woman! To leave a man alone 1838. Lithograph on newsprint. Gift of Dr. Armand Hammer, 1987.21

While some visitors may be familiar with the gallery’s permanent collection, many of the pieces on view have been kept away in storage, and those and others can now be seen in a different light via the thematic organization. “You may remember the individual works themselves,” says curator Julie Pierotti, “but seeing them in these groupings will help place them in a larger context. “Often, we talk about impressionism as this moment, but not always do we say the themes that these artists embrace — they weren’t just created in a vacuum,” she continues. “Artists were inspired by people who came before them, and then they, in turn, inspired artists a generation younger than them. And there’s this kind of cross-pollination between fine art and decorative art that happens all the time. So getting a chance to see works with their ‘cousin’ works of art from different time periods helps tell a larger story about the history of art and the themes artists flock to over time.” An example can be seen in the section of works portraying women and femininity. Portrait of Mrs. Richard Crofts was painted in 1775 by Sir Joshua Reynolds and shows Mrs. Crofts — dressed in a flowing gown, her long hair fixed in an elegant updo — holding a fan. The work is displayed next to an 1888 Henri Gervex pastel on paper, Young Woman with a Fan, in which the woman wears a sleeveless dress, her neck also bare with her hair clipped atop her head.

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“They’re separated by over 100 years, but there are so many similarities in them,” Pierotti says. “Even though the standard of beauty had really changed over the course of that 100 years, there are elements that speak to each other in both of those paintings.” One of Pierotti’s collection favorites, Mother Boudoux at Her Window (1876) by Adolphe-Félix Cals, can also be seen in this section. “It’s not always out,” she says. “Every once in a while I sneak it onto the walls. It’s a sweet image of an old woman sitting by a window with the windows open, and you can look out onto the rooftops that are nearby her home. I think it’s an underdog painting in our collection, and I just love it.” Other themes presented include country life (landscapes), entertainment (theater, horseback riding, card games), animals, waterways and seascapes, agriculture and farming, and men and masculinity. A section on family life depicts mother-and-child scenes across history and mediums and visitor-favorite sentimental portraits of children. In that section is a selection of prints by Honoré Daumier, “funny images from the 1830s, ’40s, and ’50s that show how people kind of bumbled their way through parenthood,” says Pierotti. “And they’re still doing it. We think of ourselves as struggling to balance it all, but people have been doing that for centuries, and artists have been poking fun at that, I think, for centuries.” One such image is Crrrrrr...Woman! To leave a man alone, an 1838 lithograph on newsprint by Daumier. A

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above: Henry Ossawa Tanner, View of the Seine, Looking toward Notre-Dame 1896. Oil on canvas. Museum purchase in memory of Joe Orgill with funds provided by an anonymous donor, 2018.4

opposite: Gaston La Touche, The Joyous Festival ca. 1906. Oil on canvas. Gift of Mrs. James D. Robinson in Memory of James D. Robinson, 1986.3

man holds a screaming baby as two other screaming children flank him. “I love that print because it’s so timeless,” Pierotti says. “And I love how engaging that work of art can be and how visitors can kind of chuckle when they see it and maybe make a connection with their own family experiences.” Another themed section, winter wonderland, features works with snowscapes and snow scenes. “Impressionists really took that up as a theme and wanted to make realistic images of snow and how it affects the landscape,” Pierotti says. “We happen to have a few really nice images like that in our collection.” The exhibition concludes with a section on Italy that demonstrates, Pierotti says, “how specifically Venice but areas all over Italy are a huge draw for artists all over the world. The landscape, these fabulous cosmopolitan cities, and the people that live there, too, are a source of inspiration.” Two pieces entitled Venice — an 1895 oil on panel by Eugène Louis Boudin and a mid-eighteenth-century oil on canvas by William James — show two very different artistic approaches (one incredibly detailed, the other less so) to the same subject matter, with gondolas floating through the Grand Canal against the backdrop of the city’s architectural beauty. 54 • M E M P H I S M A G A Z I N E . C O M • M A R C H 2 0 1 9

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Throughout “Eye to Eye,” Pierotti says, “We’ve been able to incorporate works of art that are normally in storage. Our space for showing our permanent collection is small, so most of the time we reserve that space for the works that our visitors know and love — our Monet, Pissarro, Cézanne, Gauguin, and Matisse.” She continues, “It’s tiny but mighty — but we have a lot of depth in our collection, and it was really fun for me to find those connections.” “Eye to Eye: A New Look at the Dixon Collection” can be seen now through mid-April, and Dixon director Kevin Sharp says it’s a wonderful opportunity for visitors to view the gallery collection in full and revisit old favorites in a new context. “We usually only show our permanent collection in the Dixon residence, and that’s maybe 30 paintings. Here we’ve got out just about everything,” he says. “And then matching, thematically, paintings with sculpture with porcelain with pewter with drawings with prints — it’s interesting. Julie [Pierotti] did a great job of finding these kind of evocative pairings and groupings. This is a treasure that is here for the people of Memphis.”

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THE MIND’S EYE

ZIGGY by anna traverse

Movement, mermaids, and Memphis moments through one local photographer’s lens. ABOUT THIS SERIES: Memphis has played muse over the years to artists across the spectrum, from the music of Johnny Cash, Elvis Presley, Al Green, and the collective at Stax Records, to the prose of Peter Taylor, Shelby Foote, and John Grisham. But what about visually? The look of Memphis has been described equally as gritty, dirty, active, eerie, beautiful, and captivating. In this series, “The Mind’s Eye” takes a closer look at some of this city’s most prominent photographers, a few homegrown, many transplanted, but all drawn in by that grittiness, that activity, that beauty. We’ll ask each and, along the way, learn what makes these photographers tick, what got them started on their professional paths, and what it is that keeps them looking around every corner and down every alley. We’ll turn the camera on the cameramen, as it were, capturing their portraits and seeing what develops. The work of other “Mind’s Eye” photographers — Bob Williams, Murray Riss, Saj Crone, Karen Pulfer Focht, Willy Bearden, Jamie Harmon, and Brandon Dill — is showcased on our online archives (memphismagazine.com).

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Louis “Ziggy ” Tucker is either levitating or about to make friends with hard concrete. He’s suspended in midair, in any event, in a long exterior arcade. His hands are open, relaxed; his feet are poised and pointed, ready to glide up one of the brick columns flanking him. Behind rectangular glasses, his eyes — daring, imploring, slightly worried — gaze back at the viewer. It’s a curious photo, one whose creation involved some visual trickery. It is also an image that absorbs and reflects so many of the elements that recur throughout Tucker’s body of work: portraiture and movement; stillness and softness; unlikely angles and uncanny abilities. A photograph can tell a story: About being on the threshold. About a moment the eye would blur, and miss, but that the camera’s lens freezes, holding in suspension. About the human body, and specifically the Black body: elemental, flowing, flying, free — contrasted with the heaving lead of expectations and constraints.

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Readers of this publication will recognize the name Ziggy Mack from his Street Style photos, which have been featured regularly since August 2018. Others know the photographer as J. Louis Tucker, his birth-certificate name, or as Fomoloop, his Instagram handle (@fomoloop), or simply as Ziggy. Tucker, 33, got his start as a photographer documenting the local nightlife scene, for club promoters; the photographs were posted to a site called In the Loop. A quick primer on names: Tucker describes himself as having suffered from FOMO (fear of missing out), a byproduct of needing to be always in the loop, wherever the photo-worthy action might be happening. Hence, Fomoloop was born. And “Ziggy”? Well, that’s because of his quick-moving, at times verging on frenetic, energy. If you’re at an event he’s photographing, you’re likely to see Tucker crawling the aisle, or contouring acrobatically to get the shot he’s already framed in his mind’s eye. And Mack is his half-brother, Ken Mack’s surname. Today, Tucker’s name (or, well, one of them) appears routinely alongside photos published by local media outlets (High Ground News, The Daily Memphian, Memphis Parent, the Memphis Flyer, Memphis magazine, and so on), and has turned up in some national publications, like Essence. He photographs a range of performing arts (dance, previous page: A dancer with Complexions Contemporary Ballet emerges from — or disappears into — the Vaillancourt Fountain in San Francisco. top: “I’m in love with concrete — it’s all nostalgia, and brutalism,” Tucker says. His photograph of a dancer whose limbs seem to have been pulled by multiple magnets was taken outside Memphis Fire Station #5 at Front and Union. right: On the 33rd day of the 2018-19 federal government shutdown, Tucker captured this image of a Puerto Rican man who “looked like he was snaking down a big wall” outside the Federal Building in downtown Memphis. opposite: Tucker’s photographs often communicate emotional tension. A photo of a dancer in a battle against gravity “was subconsciously a response to me identifying in a world that didn’t look like me or have my interests in mind.” 58 • M E M P H I S M A G A Z I N E . C O M • M A R C H 2 0 1 9

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music, opera, spoken word, theater) and has worked with local and national commercial clients (Red Bull, lululemon, to name a few). Since leaving his day job of nine years at MLGW in early 2018, Tucker’s art is his livelihood. The central challenge of working solely as a freelance photographer, he has found, is managing time and project flow. “Irony is missing a meeting for project management,” he says, “because you didn’t manage your time correctly.”

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ucker is a product of Memphis and has commented that Memphis offers an unusually fertile proving ground for artists — you can experiment with new ideas here, and watch them grow; you can find support, should you want it, among fellow artists; you can connect with people in all walks of life and all industries more seamlessly than you might be able to elsewhere, in cities with more established scenes. But that doesn’t mean growing up here was without its challenges, for a kid like Louis Tucker who was into video games and the anime-inflected idea of Japan. “Nerd things,” he says: student council and band. While attending Whitehaven High School, he spent a summer with the Bridge Builders program, a leadership conference organized by the local nonprofit Bridges and intended to connect young people across demographic lines, empowering them to improve their communities.

Tucker found he had a natural eye, and an ability to capture people in revealing, authentic moments. Prior to Bridge Builders, Tucker, who played trumpet in his high school’s marching band, had planned, loosely, to continue with marching band through college, likely at a historically black college. He had been raised in a musical family. His father would play the drums at home — fusion jazz, mostly, and at church, too (not much fusion jazz there). Tucker says, “Pretty much the only thing I looked forward to on Sundays was him playing.” So when he started on the trumpet, and his band was one of the top in the region — it seemed to follow that he should continue down that very neatly trodden path. To this day, hearing a college marching band, one of the really good ones, where every player is working as part of the whole, “the hair on my neck still rises every time,” he says. But Tucker began to reevaluate the HBCU idea in Bridge Builders. He already knew he was curious about, he says, “things that are not really standard for what you would think Black people like” — things like “breakdancing, futurism in general, futurism in fashion, Malcolm Gladwell, anthropology.” Wanting a broader experience, he wound up at Christian Brothers University, where he majored in psychology. In Bridge Builders, one summer while he was in college, Tucker was tasked with documenting the goings-on at the junior camp, using a still video camera. Despite the non-standard equipment, and M A R C H 2 0 1 9 • M E M P H I S M A G A Z I N E . C O M • 59

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below: A “B-side” to a Memphis magazine Street Style photoshoot. “The subject speaks about depression and how it’s always there, whether dormant or attacking you.” Tucker’s signature elements recur here: concrete, light and shade, a sense of pushing from one dimension into another.

the total lack of training (he has learned “by my wits — and lots of failure”), Tucker found he had a natural eye, and an ability to capture people in revealing, authentic moments. Though he had been drawn to visual art in earlier years, he had not pursued it seriously because, he says, “You know how some people, they won’t do something because they want it to be perfect the first time? Yeah, that was me.” Photography’s relatively immediate results, combined with the freedom of being able to shoot frame after frame, afforded him a less mediated, fraught relationship with the final creative product. Tucker graduated from college in 2008, at the height of the financial crisis. Getting a job just about anywhere proved difficult. He took a position as a retail manager at Abercrombie & Fitch, to make ends meet, and worked there for a few years, then moved to the MLGW gig, where he was procuring contracts (“I was a reverse bill collector,” he explains). His mother and brother joined forces to get him a camera, and that “gave me a reason to go out, for sport. I started out with nightlife photography, then it got warm really quick.” He shot

parties, events, the local club scene, starting to make a name for himself. He tells stories of taking photos in clubs with the camera hoisted up into the air, snapping blind, or the time he snagged a perfect shot with the camera over his shoulder, pointed behind him, as he walked away from the subject. He was working at a frenetic-even-for-him pace for a few years, between the day job and the nightlife photography.

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hen Louis Tucker was 27, in the aftermath of a “pretty bad breakup,” he remembers, one day “I thought I was having a stroke. Shooting pains through my left arm, lots of stress, chest pains, tension.” He went to the ER, then a thoracic surgeon, and the consensus was clear. Tucker had a mass lodged between his heart and his left lung. The mass was lymphoma, a cancer of the lymph nodes. A lightning strike. I ask what the diagnosis was like for him — was he scared? Nah. He was more worried about his parents, who he knew would fear for him, and more unmoored by the breakup, than he was frightened by the cancer.

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Tucker interrogates the edges between communities of people and the places where those edges become aqueous, permeable.

But the cancer did hasten a new chapter of Tucker’s photography. For one, he felt a sense of urgency about getting his work out into the world. Conscious that “so many artists have died in their 27th year,” he wanted to have his portfolio “organized, and out there, if I did happen to die.” So he spent time while in the hospital — he would go for in-patient chemotherapy, one week per month — digitally cataloguing his photos. Spending time in the hospital changed Tucker’s aesthetic, too. Looking at “all that white,” all that antiseptic blankness, urged him toward a more minimal aesthetic still present in much of his work today. It was in the hospital, too, that Tucker began spending time on Instagram, gathering inspiration and broadening his sense of direction as a photographer.

Tucker is always thinking about how to capture images that “hark to a world the viewer may not be a part of.” clockwise from top left: the MLK50 #IAM2018 march; a protest of the 2018 travel ban; a man with a rebel flag in Mississippi; faces in the crowd at a Black Lives Matter rally following the killing of Trayvon Martin in 2012.

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Tucker’s work began to sing, a harmony of softness and starkness, fluid movements undergirded by architectural elements. “She’s my mermaid friend!” Tucker says of the finned and tailed woman at top. He traveled to Key Largo, Florida, to photograph a group of mermaids in their, er, natural habitat.

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ater. Movement. Flowing, and f loating. After cancer and the difficult breakup that preceded it, Tucker began experimenting with underwater photography. “I was fascinated with levitation,” he says, “and gravity. So the easiest thing to do was to go in the water.” Being underwater has afforded Tucker access to a certain otherworldliness, to moments when people appear to hover at the surface dividing one world from another. One senses in Tucker’s underwater work that he’s doing more than making beautiful, graceful images. He’s contending with what it feels like to sink almost

to the bottom of existence — to feel the sort of suspended animation one might while in a hospital for long stretches of time, say — and then to rise to the edge of the air again, altered now by depths plumbed. In one remarkable photo (see front cover), a woman appears to have risen to the meniscus of the water — or perhaps the surface of another dimension — only to be propelled back, bouncing off the edge between here and there. Tucker also has interrogated the edges between communities of people and the places where those edges become aqueous,

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permeable. He’s photographed members of what he describes as subcultures — punk, Afro-punk, underground hip-hop, and smaller niche groups, like those who gather for mermaid conventions every so often. His entries into these worlds, to document the experiences of those within them, have been made possible largely by the world of social media. “When I was just learning photography, it was different; subcultures weren’t just there,” he says. “I didn’t find my own tribe when I was younger — you only just were part of your environment. The additional environment [of social media] has broadness, so you can find the people, you can pull in the things, and you can be a more authentic you.” He’s found his way into an expansive array of worlds, always thinking about the story behind the shot, the way his eye and lens unite a disparate range of subjects.

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ime has a habit of dilating when you’re in the hospital. Minutes feel like hours, and hours feel like days, yet days feel like minutes. It’s disorienting, and, for most people, makes thinking about anything beyond the most immediate circumstances all but impossible. While being treated for lymphoma, Tucker had a quantity of hour-minute-days to consider what his work meant, what purpose it served, and where he himself fit into the photos he made. “I had this mantra: one style. Because I realized I would shoot clubs one way, portraits another way, and so on, and they never really intersected. It was like I was two photographers. I was multiple people doing the same thing.” There was his nightlife and club photography; then there was portrait work and photojournalism; there was fashion and fine art; there was dance. When he started to think about how to piece it all together — how to be one artist rather than several photographers working in tandem — Tucker’s work began to sing, a harmony of softness and starkness, fluid movements undergirded by architectural elements. He found himself more in demand, commercially and editorially. Prior to writing this story, I sorted through Tucker’s portfolio, the 100 or so photos he curated and uploaded to a Dropbox folder. It’s a vibrant mixture of all the ingredients of his work, full of lots of interesting faces, a few of whom I recognize (because Memphis continues to be Memphis), but most of whom I cannot place. And then, as I was advancing the “next” button, appeared, unmistakably, Barack Obama. The photo was taken in May 2011, when Booker T. Washington High School, in South Memphis, won the national Race to the Top High School Commencement Challenge. The very existence of the photo evidences Tucker’s movement toward a unified yet multifaceted style. He got a call to come shoot the event because of his connections in the club scene; a friend who was assembling a small team to photograph the commencement called him, knowing his nimbleness as a photographer. At first, he remembers, he was corralled with the other news photographers, a couple hundred feet away from the stage. Even with a powerful zoom, a photo taken from that distance is prone to looking “flat,” lacking contour and shading. So Tucker did what someone who goes by Ziggy does: He zigged and zagged and

got himself closer to the stage, after the main event was over and Obama was handing out diplomas. Though the photo was never published anywhere, until now, Tucker knew immediately that he got the shot. His perfectionism hasn’t left him. While we’re talking about the Obama photo, Tucker gestures at the brightness illuminating one corner of the image. It’s just the way the light splashed his lens, and that light lends the photo a liveliness that feels right, as if the whole scene were framed with light and hope. But Tucker looks almost apologetic when he explains, “I remember I was shooting like crazy, making sure I got the shot. I was like, ‘Yes.’ Well, outside of this. This is lens flare, but outside of that…” Louis Tucker is never quite satisfied. That’s what makes his work so much fun to follow: No matter how much you like what you’ve seen, chances are he’s got something you haven’t imagined yet, waiting somewhere up his sleeve.  

below: A fellow photographer called Tucker one day in spring 2011. “I remember it like it was yesterday,” he says. “I was driving past Midtown Yoga. He was like, ‘Yo, Zig. I’m trying to build a team to photograph Barack Obama.’ And I’m like, ‘Uh, yes.’”

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Revising the Riverfront Working with urban strategists from Chicago and New York, Carol Coletta leads the charge to revamp Memphis’ front door.

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by jon w. sparks

wo centuries ago, Andrew Jackson, John Overton, and James Winchester agreed that the Memphis riverfront was a remarkable place with great potential. We still say it today. But agreeing that it’s a wondrous thing doesn’t mean there’s consensus on what to do with it. In 1924, a celebrated city planner came up with the first comprehensive vision of what was then, as it had always been, a location defined by whatever it took to get river traffic in and out. The riverfront then wasn’t pretty, yet the plan didn’t get much traction. There have been more than a score of other studies and projects since, and while Tom Lee Park and Mud Island have become established, there’s never been much in the way of a unifying concept. Now, however, there’s a vision that has legs. Two years ago, a plan commissioned by the then-Riverfront Development Corporation (RDC) was presented by Chicago-based architecture and urban design firm Studio Gang that proposed a way to connect five distinct zones along the six-mile stretch with bike trails, playgrounds, parks, performance areas, and plazas. The concept was comprehensive and intended to come to fruition in short-, medium-, and long-term stages. The major component was a makeover of Tom Lee Park designed by the New York-based landscape architects SCAPE, the details of which were revealed last month. The resulting discussion continues, with passion.

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above: William James, Venice

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At the center of Memphis’ ambitious $70 million reimagining of the riverfront is Carol Coletta. As president and CEO of the Memphis River Parks Partnership (the upgraded replacement to the RDC), the urban revitalization expert has been instrumental for some years in pulling together the resources necessary to make the project succeed: She’s had a role in eliciting money from foundations, support of politicians, participation of civic groups. She’s also championed the work of the two architectural design firms behind the concept. To understand how these elements have come together, it helps to know what it is that drives Coletta. She was born here, growing up in Longview Heights in South Memphis, and has always had a fascination with what makes a city tick. That goes back at least to high school when she wrote a letter to Mayor Henry Loeb advising him what to do with Beale Street.  Shy, she is not. Since then, she’s delved deeply into urban issues, researching how municipalities are affected by economics, the arts, community development, technology, and planning. Coletta’s passion is seeing how all those components can be made to work together to bring about vital, sustainable communities.  Coletta was an early believer in living and working downtown. An abridged list of associations shows she’s been involved with the Memphis Arts Council (now ArtsMemphis), the Downtown Neighborhood above (l to r): Kate Orff (SCAPE), Carol Coletta (Memphis River Parks Partnership), Gia Biagi (Studio Gang), and Jeanne Gang (Studio Gang), usher in an ambitious new look for the Memphis riverfront. below: The new plan for Tom Lee Park.

PHOTOGRAPH BY JUSTIN FOX BURKS | RENDERING COURTESY SCAPE AND STUDIO GANG

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Revising the Riverfront Association, Tennessee Leadership, the 911 Emergency Communications Board, and the Memphis Jobs Conference in the early 1980s. Her public relations company counseled firms on corporate giving, and she received the Initiative Award at the 1989 Women of Achievement ceremonies. In 2001 she started the Smart City radio interviews with urban experts, a show that was picked up by “It’s rare to have that the Public Broadcasting System and much real estate on your ran nationally for years. She was an organizer of the 1980 and 1981 Memwaterfront next to your phis Jobs Conference, and part of the Memphis Manifesto Summit. downtown area that isn’t 2003 All this was a prelude to the last several years when she’s been executive already repurposed.” director of the Mayors’ Institute on City Design, head of the public-pri— gi a bi agi vate collaboration ArtPlace, president and CEO of CEOs for Cities, vice president of Community and National Initiatives for the John S. and James L. Knight Foundation, and a senior fellow at the Kresge Foundation. These connections have been crucial to shaping what is being presented through the Memphis River Parks Partnership. In fact, Coletta still has the position with Kresge, which is paying her while she’s at MRPP. In 2016, Coletta was helping launch “Reimagining above right: The Studio the Civic Commons,” an initiative that aims to make Gang-designed Aqua the most of public spaces to encourage connection, Tower in Chicago. equity, economic development, and environmental below: Arkansas Arts sustainability. The three-year, five-city effort is a colCenter is a Studio Gang laboration of The JPB Foundation, Knight Foundaand SCAPE project. tion, the Kresge Foundation, the Rockefeller Foun-

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dation, and local partners. The five municipalities are Memphis, Chicago, Detroit, Philadelphia, and Akron, Ohio. The project investment of $40 million includes $20 million from national foundations and $20 million in local matching funds. The Memphis portion was the Fourth Bluff project that would bring new lighting, amenities, and events to the area that includes Memphis Park (formerly Confederate Park), the Cossitt Library, River Garden at Mississippi River Park (formerly Jefferson Davis Park), Court Square, and Main Street. November’s grand opening of the River Line trail and River Garden was a key element to the Civic Commons project and dovetailed with the MRPP plans. So when Coletta was named president and CEO of the RDC/MRPP a year ago, she was already up to speed, not only because she was already on the board, but she also knew the players involved in the plan.  The two architecture firms that have presented the evolutionary vision for the Memphis riverfront are top-tier, innovative enterprises, both headed by women with MacArthur Foundation Fellowships. Jeanne Gang (a 2011 MacArthur Fellow) founded Studio Gang 20 years ago in Chicago and has built a reputation for projects that are often daring but always grounded. Her big breakthrough was designing the Aqua Tower in Chicago, a striking 82-story building with curving concrete floor plates that protrude past the glass to give the structure a wave-like look.  Studio Gang has also done the Nature Boardwalk at Lincoln Park Zoo in Chicago and the Arcus Center for Social Justice Leadership at Kalamazoo College in Kalamazoo, Michigan. One project in particular — the one that got Coletta’s attention — was Polis

BOTTOM LEFT: RENDERING COURTESY SCAPE AND STUDIO GANG | TOP RIGHT: IMAGE COURTESY STEVE HALL

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Station, a project that rethought the architecture and space of a Chicago neighborhood police station. If a typical police station is where you go only if you’re in trouble or have had trouble happen to you, the Studio Gang concept turned it into a welcoming neighborhood center. The firm consulted with police, community leaders, and aldermen to create recreational space with the idea that such a station could be at the core of community activity.

how communities can come together and make decisions about what happens in their world and their neighborhood.”   Biagi’s worked for the City of Chicago Park District in planning and policy and is struck by the possibilities of the Memphis riverfront. “There’s the great potential of connecting those spaces to one another in a north and south way, but then also connecting it east-west,” she says. “How do you stitch the city to its

Coletta has always been deep into the issues of making the most of public space and realized that she and Gang shared that interest. “It was natural to explore with Studio Gang how we might think about the riverfront,” Coletta says. “Not just from a design standpoint, not just from a planning standpoint, but also how design planning supports programming, how you maintain what you do, how you think about this as a connected whole.” Coletta says Gang not only understands how to design sports programs, particularly in parks, but also knows what it takes to maintain parks. “So it all added up to Studio Gang being a really smart choice for the work we were trying to do on the riverfront,” she says. The Studio Gang team in Memphis is led by Gia Biagi, whose title is principal of urbanism and civic impact at the firm, and who, Coletta says, knows as much as anyone about the Memphis riverfront.   “I grew up in a family that cared deeply about community development and engagement,” Biagi says. “My father was a small-town mayor and community activist and I grew up really seeing the power of

riverfront and the riverfront to the city? It’s rare to above: Tom Lee Park’s have that much real estate on your waterfront next proposed Cutbank Bluff. to your downtown area that isn’t already repurposed, whether it’s a working waterfront or whether it’s been taken over by industries.” The landscape architecture firm SCAPE is charged with giving Tom Lee Park a new look. It’s led by Kate Orff (a 2017 MacArthur Fellow) who has written Toward an Urban Ecology, which has the same philosophical underpinnings that Gang and Coletta share: Cities and landscapes can be created to bring together social and ecological systems. Orff was studying to be an artist but was also fascinated by ecology, biology, and environmental sciences. In her twenties, she discovered landscape architecture and realized it was her calling.  Studio Gang and SCAPE have collaborated elsewhere, notably on the redesign of Little Rock’s Arkansas Arts Center. The $70 million project is reimagining the 81-year-old museum into a more functional and welcoming venue. Construction is to begin this year and be completed by 2022. contin u ed on page 1 40

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THE FACE OF

FINE JEWELRY

BOB RICHARDS JEWELERS >>> Bob, Polly, and Anthony Richards, Owners A gift from our fine jewelry collection will be a passionate reminder of your precious moments that will become lasting memories. Our sales associates, who have over 325 years combined in the business, will assist you with your fine jewelry needs.

Bob Richards Jewelers is the only store in the Mid-South with four watchmakers and two jewelers on premises. Fine jewelry lines include JB Star, Simon G, Spark Creations, Vahan, Gabriel, and Tacori. Watches by Rolex, Tag Heuer, Breitling, and Swiss Army.

1696 S. Germantown Road, Germantown TN 38138 | 901.751.8052 SPECIAL PROMOTION


2019

FACES OF THE

MID-SOUTH

THE FACE OF

FLORISTRY & FLORAL DESIGN PREMIER FLOWERS >>> Colby Midgett, Owner

Premier Flowers is a full-service florist that creates trendy, elegant, and luxury floral designs with a personal touch. We focus on delivering sensational florals with exceptional service. At Premier Flowers we offer custom and predesigned arrangements and bouquets with fresh and beautiful blooms for birthdays, get wells, birth announcements, weddings, corporate events, and other special occasions. We are located in the heart of Downtown Memphis and deliver all over Memphis and the surrounding areas, including West Memphis. Experience floral design at its best! 10 N. Second Street #105 Memphis, TN 38103 901.618.2661 premierflowerstn.com

SPECIAL PROMOTION

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2019

FACES OF THE

MID-SOUTH

THE FACE OF

FULL-SERVICE PLASTIC SURGERY

UNIVERSITY PLASTIC SURGEONS, A UNIVERSITY CLINICAL HEALTH PRACTICE >>> Left to right (back row): Petros Konofaos, MD, Robert Lachica, MD, Robert Wallace, MD, Edward Luce, MD, Ram Velamuri, MD Left to right (front row): Xi Lin Jing, MD, Cedric Hunter, MD, and Sonia Alvarez, MD. Not pictured: William Hickerson, MD and Kalyan Dadireddy, MD University Plastic Surgeons is a unique plastic surgery practice in Memphis and the Mid-South. Its renowned team of surgeons specializes in both cosmetic and reconstructive plastic surgery procedures. The group provides care for treating the full spectrum of plastic surgery problems including the most complex cases in craniofacial and cleft surgery, pediatric plastic surgery, breast reconstruction (including the latest microsurgery techniques), burn acute and reconstructive surgery, head and neck 1068 Cresthaven, Suite 500, Memphis, TN 38119 |

cancer reconstruction, trauma reconstruction (including head and peripheral nerve surgery). The physicians of University Plastic Surgeons bring extensive experience and the latest techniques to the ďŹ eld of cosmetic surgery of the face, breast, and body as well. Each doctor is a member of the faculty of the University of Tennessee Health Science Center and is a teacher of future plastic surgeons training in the UTHSC plastic surgery residency. For more information or an appointment, contact us today! 901.350.4858 | UTUniversityPlasticSurgeons.com

SPECIAL PROMOTION


2019

FACES OF THE

MID-SOUTH

THE FACE OF

FURS

HOLLOWAY FURS >>> Jim Holloway Holloway Furs, located at 404 Perkins Extended, was established in 1992 by Master Furrier Jim Holloway after eight years of apprenticeship with four different Master Furriers. We specialize in custommade garments, fur coat enlargements, reductions, and remodeling. All types of repairs, monograms and appraisals. Cold storage and cleaning/ glazing are also offered by Holloway Furs. We have a newly remodeled cold storage and cleaning facility located in East Memphis. We have the largest inventory with the best prices in the Memphis area. We accept trade-ins and offer a 12-month layaway program. All work is done in house by Jim Holloway and his staff. Jim also specializes in the manufacturing of beaver and mink blankets/throws. Open six days a week. Come meet Jim, his son Casey (now on an apprenticeship) and the friendly staff at Holloway Furs. 404 Perkins Extended 901.685.3877

SPECIAL PROMOTION


2019

FACES OF THE

MID-SOUTH

THE FACE OF

GASTROENTEROLOGY

BMG/GI SPECIALISTS FOUNDATION >>> Left to right: Edward Friedman, MD, Randelon Smith, MD, Paul Bierman, MD, Gerald Lieberman, MD, Kenneth Fields, MD, and James Whatley, MD COMMITTED TO EXCELLENCE: THE ART OF TREATMENT AND CARE Suffering from unpleasant stomach and bowel conditions can be challenging enough, without having to worry about finding a top-quality doctor! The highly skilled medical professionals at GI Specialists are experts in helping prevent, diagnose and treat everything from heartburn, food allergies and hemorrhoids, to colon and pancreatic cancers.

HIGH QUALITY AND CONVENIENT CARE The physicians and staff focus on each patient’s comfort in the onsite GI Lab. For added convenience, choose from five satellite locations: Brighton, Collierville, Covington, Millington, and Marion. Whether you need screening or treatment, our group is passionate about providing excellent care for every patient.

Main Office and GI Lab: 80 Humphreys Center, Suite 200, Memphis, TN 38120 901.201.6200 | GISpecialistsMemphis.com SPECIAL PROMOTION


THE FACE OF

GAMING

SOUTHLAND GAMING & RACING >>> David Wolf, President and General Manager David Wolf is the face of gaming at Southland Gaming & Racing, the area’s fastest growing gaming destination. As president and general manager, Wolf leads the property that has been a major racing venue for more than 50 years and boasts more than 2,000 gaming machines and table games, as well as a multipurpose event center and several restaurants. Wolf will also oversee a $250 million expansion of the property. The project will expand Southland’s gaming offerings to 2,400 gaming machines, as many as 60 live table games and a sportsbook. The new 113,000-square-foot casino complex will feature new and expanded dining options. The signature component of the expansion is a 20-story, 300-room hotel tower. On-site parking will be expanded via a new covered parking garage with 1,250 spaces. Wolf is excited about the future of Southland: “We’ve developed a loyal customer base and can’t wait to see more people discover Southland in the coming years and make it an overnight and weekend tourism destination.” Must be 21+. Play responsibly; for help quitting call 800-522-4700.

1550 North Ingram Blvd. West Memphis, AR 72301 870.735.3670 southlandpark.com

SPECIAL PROMOTION


2019

FACES OF THE

MID-SOUTH


2019

FACES OF THE

MID-SOUTH

THE FACE OF

GIRLS EDUCATION HUTCHISON SCHOOL >>>

Hutchison empowers every girl to ďŹ nd her unique place in the world. Here she can discover, create, and lead in a nurturing environment, surrounded by a group of strong young women. A Hutchison girl experiments with

new ideas, asks lots of questions, and won't back down from a challenge. If she can imagine it, she can do it. Her voice matters. Her ideas are valued. That's the strength of a Hutchison education.

1740 Ridgeway Road, Memphis, TN 38119 | 901.762.6672 | HutchisonSchool.org SPECIAL PROMOTION


2019

FACES OF THE

MID-SOUTH

THE FACE OF

HAIR RESTORATION HAIR TRANSITIONS STUDIO >>>

More than 80 percent of men and women (and 10 percent of children) will experience hair loss at some point. Hair Transitions Studio understands that hair loss is not only a cosmetic issue. Many times, loss of hair creates loss of conďŹ dence and upsets emotional well-being. From the moment you enter Hair Transitions Studio, you become

family. The friendly, professional staff and comfortable environment welcomes each client to offer an individualized solution, restoring both hair and conďŹ dence. With 34 years of experience, Hair Transitions Studio knows how to address every situation, from typical pattern types to hair loss caused by medical conditions, chemo/ radiation hair loss, or burns and scars.

5736 Stage Road, Memphis, TN 38134 | 901.384.1680 SPECIAL PROMOTION


2019

FACES OF THE

MID-SOUTH

THE FACE OF

HEMATOLOGY

UT HEMATOLOGY, A UNIVERSITY CLINICAL HEALTH PRACTICE >>> Left to right: Dr. Kaweeta, Dr. Sandeep Rajan, and Dr. Michelle Chi The UT/UCH Hemophilia and Thrombosis Treatment Center operates under the directorship of Sandeep Rajan, M.D., BoardCertified Hematologist-Oncologist. He is an expert in the management of hemophilia, hemostasis, and thrombosis. Dr. Rajan is joined by Board-Certified Hematologist Dr. Michelle Chi, and current Hematology Fellow, Dr. Kaweeta along with a multi-

disciplinary care team that includes skilled nurses, social work, physical therapy, lab specialists, pharmacy, and infusion therapy. The center is one of only 151 designated treatment centers in the United States delivering comprehensive care to patients with bleeding disorders. In Memphis, it is the only one of its kind within a 200-mile radius for the treatment of adults.

6401 Poplar Ave., Suite 195, Memphis, TN 38119 | 901.866.8547 SPECIAL PROMOTION

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2019

FACES OF THE

MID-SOUTH

THE FACE OF

HOME TECHNOLOGY MIESTRO HOME INTEGRATION >>>

Miestro: Home Integration is the premier solution provider for full-home technology integration. Whether it's a simple TV wall mount or a complete smart-home renovation, our technicians are masters at perfecting your audiovisual dreams. That's why Miestro was recently named winner of the internationally recognized Mark of

Excellence award by the Consumer Technology Association. Having rebranded from Memphis Home Theater to Miestro: Home Integration, our refreshed brand conveys our deep passion for utilizing a full range of home technologies and creating a finely tuned synthesis of sight, sound, security, and style. Visit us. www.MYMIESTRO.com

4966 Poplar Ave., Memphis, TN 38117 | 901.412.0810 SPECIAL PROMOTION


2019

FACES OF THE

MID-SOUTH

THE FACE OF

HOSPITALITY

THE WESTIN MEMPHIS BEALE STREET >>> The Westin Memphis Beale Street Executive Team Left to right: Lorraine Chatman, Jeremy DeWitt, Levelle Ruffin, Gary Morrison, Kelli Speed, Renee Fortune-Patten, Craig Marshall, and Keeanna Taylor

Located across from FedExForum and adjacent to Beale Street, the Westin Hotel offers its guests a one-of-a-kind location and a truly unparalleled AAA Four Diamond experience. General Manager Craig Marshall and the more than 140 Memphians who work for the Westin take their roles as ambassadors of this great city seriously. Guests of the Westin Memphis Beale Street continually say, “Your property and location can’t be beat, but your team is what really makes the difference!” The Westin offers 203 spacious guestrooms and over 7,000 square feet of meeting space. It is the top choice of corporate travelers and leisure guests alike from around the world. The entire Westin team looks forward to welcoming you to the Westin Memphis Beale Street and hopes to become your home away from home when in Memphis.

Beale Street, 170 Lt. George W. Lee Avenue, Memphis, TN 38103 | 901.334.5900 | Westin.com/BealeStreet SPECIAL PROMOTION


2019

FACES OF THE

MID-SOUTH

THE FACE OF

INFLUENCE

EVANGELICAL CHRISTIAN SCHOOL >>> Braxton Brady — Head of School Evangelical Christian School equips students with the skills necessary to achieve their dreams and be influencers in our world today. With a mission to provide the Christian family a Christ-centered, biblicallydirected education, our students are challenged in a vigorous academic culture.

From government officials to business owners to professional athletes, ECS alumni are positively influencing Memphis, the MidSouth, and beyond. Our students are our future, and we are committed to investing in their goals and preparing them for life beyond the classroom.

LOWER SCHOOL CAMPUS: 1920 Forest Hill-Irene Road, Germantown, TN 38139 SHELBY FARMS CAMPUS: 7600 Macon Road, Cordova, TN 38018 901.754.7217 | ecseagles.com SPECIAL PROMOTION


2019

FACES OF THE

MID-SOUTH

THE FACE OF

INSURANCE & SURETY CLAY & LAND INSURANCE, INC. >>>

Clay and Land is one of the largest locally owned insurance agencies in the MidSouth. The Agency represents more than 200 insurance carriers specializing in Commercial, Personal, Surety Bonds, and Employee BeneďŹ ts. With more than 45

Agents, the Agency brings a diverse and dedicated group of individuals that work together to bring expertise and unsurpassed customer service to the marketplace. Located in East Memphis (Ridgeway Center), licensed in 48 states.

866 Ridgeway Loop Road, Suite 200, Memphis, TN 38120 | 901.767.3600 | ClayAndLand.com SPECIAL PROMOTION


2019

FACES OF THE

MID-SOUTH

THE FACE OF

KITCHEN & BATH MINIMAX KITCHEN & BATH >>>

Beginning to End. Floor to Ceiling. Our DESIGN+BUILD process ensures a smooth transition from your kitchen or bath of today to your plans for the future. MINIMAX Kitchen and Bath has been a leading kitchen & bath dealer, fabricator and manufacturer in the Memphis area for 28 years. New or remodel, residential or commercial, MINIMAX Kitchen & Bath offers everything you need from design through installation. The key elements we offer our clients include: showrooms filled with popular products, experienced, in-house interior designers, lifelike 3-D preview illustrations (for new cabinets only), turn-key remodeling/ installation services, in-house MINIMAX construction professionals, and licensed plumbing, electrical & HVAC veterans. Plus, MINIMAX has a Contractor’s License. 2945 Brother Boulevard, Bartlett, TN 38133 | 901.386.6868 | MinimaxDesign.com SPECIAL PROMOTION


2019

FACES OF THE

MID-SOUTH

THE FACE OF

LANDSCAPE ARCHITECTURE

BLAIR PARKER DESIGN >>> Blair Parker Design, LLC. (BPD) is a Memphisbased Landscape Architecture firm with over 60 years of knowledge and experience, combined with new and creative ideas. They specialize in creating places for people and building relationships with clients and their peers. BPD is a respected firm with a wide range of skills and expertise in design, planning, stakeholder involvement, construction documentation and the public approval process. BPD has been involved in multiple projects in the city’s recent revitalization efforts

including the Tennessee Brewery, Uptown Planning Study, Memphis Union Mission as well as new real estate developments including TraVure mixed use development, Overton Gateway, and Hidden Creek. “Memphis is our home and we take pride in doing work to strengthen the city and surrounding areas, creating a dynamic place to live and work. We believe that all design constraints have a creative solution. We strive to create innovative, buildable projects to enhance the user experience.”

5159 Wheelis Drive, Suite 107, Memphis, TN 38117 | 901.767.6555 | blairparkerdesign.com SPECIAL PROMOTION


2019

FACES OF THE

MID-SOUTH

THE FACE OF

LASIK

HAMILTON EYE INSTITUTE , A UNIVERSITY CLINICAL HEALTH PRACTICE >>> Kourtney Houser, MD As an ophthalmologist at Hamilton Eye Institute, Kourtney Houser, MD, provides the very best in LASIK surgery in the Mid-South. Dr. Houser received her medical degree and completed her internship and residency at the University of Tennessee Health Science Center. After concluding her fellowship in cornea, anterior segment, and refractive surgery at the Baylor College of Medicine in Houston, Dr. Houser

returned to Memphis to practice ophthalmology at University Clinical Health’s Hamilton Eye Institute. Together with the industry-leading experts at HEI, Dr. Houser works hard to provide the most comprehensive approach to LASIK and Ophthalmologic Eye Care to patients in the Mid-South and beyond. To schedule an appointment for a LASIK consultation, please call 901.866.8580 or email utlasik@uthsc.edu.

930 Madison Ave., Suite 200 | 901.448.6650 | utlasik@uthsc.edu SPECIAL PROMOTION


2019

FACES OF THE

MID-SOUTH

THE FACE OF

LOCAL TEAM HEALTH PLAN BLUECROSS BLUESHIELD OF TENNESSEE >>>

Back row: Brooke McCulley, Clinical Director – Behavioral Health Services; Tavarski Hughes, Public Policy Liaison 3rd row: Tiffany Jackson, Provider Quality Consultant; Kevin Woods, Memphis Market President; William “Rob” Mitchum, Regional Director – Provider Contracting 2nd row: Gina Dudley, Medical Director; Claire Brulatour, Community Relations Specialist 1st row: Teresa Sims, Operations Supervisor; Melinda Shields, Quality Assurance Supervisor; Aaron Smith, Operations Manager BlueCross BlueShield of Tennessee employs more than 300 people here in Memphis, and they’re all focused on our commitment to improving the health and wellness of the individuals, families and communities we serve. We have a responsibility to give back, and one way we’re making a difference is by building the state’s first BlueCross Healthy Place at David Carnes Park in Whitehaven. We’re also helping Memphians get active together by supporting Explore Bike Share. BlueCross is proud to be right here for good in Memphis. bcbst.com SPECIAL PROMOTION

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2019

FACES OF THE

MID-SOUTH

THE FACE OF

MEDICAL AESTHETICS

GLO MEDICAL AESTHETICS >>>

Lisa Street, Nurse Practitioner and owner of Glo Medical Aesthetics in Midtown Memphis has been in nursing for 24 years. Her strong clinical background — including ER, ICU, and nursing education — has paved the way to a successful 14-year practice in Medical Aesthetics. As a national clinical educator for Allergan Medical Institute, Lisa is passionate about continuing education and keeping up with the latest innovations. Her priority when seeing aesthetic patients is always to ensure patient safety and satisfaction. Her philosophy on beauty is “the glow that makes people beautiful starts from within . . . if you love others, are kind to yourself, and strive to be the best person you can be, then that beauty will show on the outside." Glo offers ONLY the gold standards in medical-grade skin care, injectables, lasers and body treatments. Known for their warm, welcoming vibe, the professionals at Glo strive to make each patient feel “uniquely beautiful." 703 New York St. Memphis, TN 38104 901.552.3461 GloMedMemphis.com SPECIAL PROMOTION


2019

FACES OF THE

MID-SOUTH

THE FACE OF

MEMPHIS HAIR COLOR DIVA COLOUR STUDIO >>>

Ted Cortese, European-trained master corrective organic hair colorist. "Women from 17 states know I make the world more beautiful one woman at a time with natural, gorgeous, great-looking hair color." His fascination with color began early in his career when he finished 9th in the world hair competition in Paris, France and was subsequently featured by Vogue magazine. Through his world travels, Cortese fine-

tuned his unique style. Cortese's specialty is beautiful hair color with naturalappearing enhancements. He assisted in developing two color lines sold worldwide. Using skin tone and eye color, Cortese customizes the perfect shade to enhance each person. His salon, diVa colour studio, attracts women from 17 states, England, and France as well as his regular Memphis clients.

1068 Brookfield Rd., Memphis, TN 38119 | 901.761.4247 | DivaColourStudio.com SPECIAL PROMOTION

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TOURNAMENT QUALITY

GREAT MEMPHIS HOMES

by a nne cunningh a m o ’ neill | photography by c h i p p a n k e y

The Evans family home in Southwind scores a hole in one. Hollywood and Natasha strike a charming pose on their comfortable chaise with their smallest pooch, Gigi, in the foreground.

I

n my many years of featuring gorgeous Memphis homes in this magazine, I was surprised to realize that we have never showcased a residence in Southwind, the upscale community developed in the late 1980s in southeast Memphis, a place chock full of “great homes.” I therefore jumped at the chance to right this wrong when B.J. Worthy, a well-known realtor with ReMax Experts, called to suggest a story on a wonderful couple, Natasha Berry and Willie “Hollywood” James Evans III, who have recently bought a home in Southwind.

What makes driving through this now-mature neighborhood so special and attractive is that this is not a neighborhood of cookie-cutter homes, the development having been architecturally varied from the beginning. Of course, the centerpiece of Southwind remains the magnificent TPC golf course and clubhouse, home since

1989 of the FedEx St. Jude Classic every spring, and this year the site of the WGC-FedEx St. Jude Invitational tournament in July. And while the city has grown up all around Southwind over the past three decades, the development still maintains a genuine rural feel and a sense of true elegance. As I drove up to the Evans’ home, Natasha M A R C H 2 0 1 9 • M E M P H I S M A G A Z I N E . C O M • 93

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below right: A large gold mirror reflects the very special white piano, the dramatic focal point in the home’s lovely living room. below: The dining room features one of several beautiful chandeliers that first delighted the homeowners. bottom: The large painting in the two-story entrance hall was purchased specially for Natasha and is a constant reminder of her love of horses.

and Hollywood were both on hand to greet me and show me through their beautiful, 6,400-squarefoot house and tell me a bit about themselves. They married in the Turks and Caicos in June of last year and bought their new home this past October. Natasha attended Florida State University and later moved to Memphis from Houston to work at ServiceMaster. She is now a human resources professional with ABB, a global leader

in industrial technology. She has a daughter, Kennedy, and a son, Tristan. Hollywood was born and raised in Orange Mound and is a huge booster of that community, not surprising for a man once crowned “Mr. Melrose” by his fellow high-school classmates. He is active in the Orange Mound Council and Men of Memphis United. His business is One Solution, a construction company. And he has a 12-year-old daughter, Liberty, and two older

sons, DJ and London. Despite being built some 20 years ago, their new home was turn-key perfect with a great flow, which the Evans family found important, as they wanted a house suitable for entertaining. The ceilings throughout vary from 9 to 12 feet, and the walls are neutral. They love the handsome trim in the two-story entrance hall, and they changed the paint color there to a light gray. The large kitchen and breakfast

room area was a big selling point as both are accomplished cooks and “everyone congregates here.” Several beautiful chandeliers throughout the house delighted them, as did the beveled glass in the home’s windows. There are three staircases, with even a chair lift on one of them. Amazingly, Natasha and Hollywood furnished the six-bedroom, fiveand-a-half-bath home in just three months working room by room, all the while texting pictures

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back and forth to seek each other’s agreement on their “finds.” Both are very grateful to Natasha’s mother, Lorna Berry, who helped them move in, and when all was said and done they were ready to host a big Christmas party, the first of many events to be held down the road. Natasha has an elegant aesthetic design sense both in home décor and in her wardrobe. I commented on the gorgeous, bow-fronted outfit she was wearing, and she told me it was from the Style Boutique. She loves the thrill of the chase to find original pieces and shops in a variety of places, some more upmarket than others —from Stash and Decadent Av-

enue to Bargain Hunt and Homegoods. Color is an important element in her surroundings, and she leans toward pops of orange and purple. The artwork in the home is outstanding. There are some very special pieces, such as the horse painting in the entrance, purchased for Natasha who wanted a horse, but for now Hollywood says she will “have to make do with the image.” The focal point in the living room is a beautiful white piano that Natasha found on Craigslist. A bit of decorative whimsy are the pair of candelabrum in the dining room, chosen because Natasha loves the character of Lumiere,

the candelabra in Disney’s Beauty and the Beast. The master bedroom and a guest room are downstairs. The children are “in exile upstairs,” as is Hollywood when he is in his man cave watching golf and football. He loves his two Harley-Davidsons, so naturally the room is decorated in Harley colors — orange, black and green. Next step for the Evans family is to put in a swimming pool and an outdoor kitchen. Natasha travels extensively in her business, so having a wonderful, comfortable home to return to is a first priority. The two of them have successfully blended three dogs and five children

into a fabulous family. Speaking of their neighborhood, they said their neighbors in Southwind are very friendly and welcoming; both agreed that living in the area was an obvious choice, as they had already been members of the club. We had a wonderful visit together, and I was fascinated by all the couple had done with this excellent abode they had created together in record time. Like me, I suppose you’re wondering how “Hollywood” got his nickname. As he tells it, he roared up to Jackson State University in Jackson, Mississippi, as a freshman in a BMW car and, as so often happens with nicknames, was in-

The family room is as elegant as it is comfortable. It’s hard to believe that it and the other rooms were furnished in record time with pieces from both upmarket and bargain stores.

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top left: Hollywood and Natasha both love to cook, and everyone congregates in their handsome kitchen and adjoining breakfast room area.

middle: The downstairs master bedroom mixes neutral colors, textures, and mirrored surfaces to create a sophisticated, harmonious, and restful room

top right: With its large free-standing bathtub and built-in dressing table, the master bath is a welcome retreat for Natasha after days away on business.

bottom right: The upstairs man cave with its comfy couch and chairs, televisions, and HarleyDavidson color scheme is Hollywood’s pride and joy.

stantly christened “Hollywood.” I have to tell you too that while he may not exactly be a movie star ( yet!), he has plenty of charm and charisma and a genuine big personality. At the end of a truly delightful day, I spent some time with B.J. Worthy, and learned that — among her many interests — she is a member of our city’s Silver Bullet Ski Club. Who knew Memphis had a ski club? 

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Transforming the standard in health care education.

Utilizing state-of-the-art technology, innovation is at the forefront of our mission to transform health care, education, research, clinical care, and public service.

uthsc.edu


ROAD TRIP

Winter Got You Down? story and photographs by jane schneider

M

arch sits poised on the cusp of spring, teasing with balmy temperatures one week and freeze warnings the next. No

wonder you’re anxious to escape winter’s grasp. But no worries, we’ve found the perfect anecdote: a spa retreat. Relax and refresh

Turn blahs into “ahhs” with a visit to these two luxury spas in Alabama and Tennessee.

are the watchwords here. Whether you seek to energize with urban life or idle by the water, these tempting spa destinations will make you forget all about old man winter — just in time for spring.

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Water Delight The Grand Hotel Golf Resort & Spa — Point Clear, Alabama

PHOTOGRAPHS GRAND HOTEL GOLF RESORT & SPA | INSET PHOTO BY OLEKSANDR GRYBANOV | DREAMSTIME

B

egin unwinding with a drive to the Gulf Coast. As Mobile’s skyline steadily recedes, you’re soon treated to sweeping views of Mobile Bay. From I-10, turn south onto U.S. Highway 98, where the route begins its lazy descent into the Florida panhandle. You’ll pass the towns of Daphne and Fairhope, then join scenic Alt. 98 to Point Clear, Alabama. Here, the road parallels the shoreline, passing under gracious arbors of live oak as the water shimmers like diamonds in the sunlight. Before the route will surely peter out, you turn into the lush surrounds of the Grand Hotel Golf Resort & Spa. This 550-acre resort property is perfectly situated on a picturesque point that offers commanding views of the bay, with Mobile a cloudy dot on the horizon. Equally memorable are the elegant live oaks, scattered about the resort like massive umbrellas, providing sanctuary to shore and song birds alike. The Grand has been hosting guests since 1847, weathering hurricanes and fires as well as serving as a military hospital for wounded Confederate soldiers during the Civil War. As I make my way to the lobby one afternoon in mid-December, I’m struck by the quiet solitude and gracious surroundings. The waterfront, in concert with the beautiful landscaping, makes the Grand a relaxing getaway. The Grand is one of six resorts along Alabama’s Robert Trent Jones Golf Trail that feature luxury spa facilities. (Ask for the RTJ Spa Trail Card and receive service discounts at each location.) The Grand is also part of Marriott’s Autograph Collection brand, a prestigious group of 100 independently owned and operated properties worldwide. The resort recently completed a $32 million renovation, refurbishing the handsome, octagonal lobby that dates to the 1940s and all 405 guest rooms, including the spa building where I stay. My generous room, which boasts a balcony overlooking the marina, is freshly decorated in shades of periwinkle blue with a dreamy king bed worthy of a Netflix binge-fest.

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ut there’s too much to do here to justify lounging. As I walk the trail along the shoreline, I spy several sand beaches perfect for young children, a sprawling pool area, golf and tennis courts, even bikes for riding within the resort or to the charming neighboring town of Fairhope, if you feel ambitious. Had the weather been warmer, I would have explored the bay via a resort kayak. But I’m here for relaxation, so I head to the spa to try their Bayshore salt scrub. A full-service spa, you’ll find hair and nail services as well as a full complement of massage and body treatments. With 12 treatment rooms, a grotto-like relaxation room decorated with Roman-like tile mosaics, and a soaking hot tub, the effect is transportive.

The salt scrub is provided by my massage therapist, Jenny, who’s been working at the resort for more than a decade. Several of her regulars are locals in their 70s and 80s. “Some clients brighten my day as much as I do theirs,” she says graciously. One Birmingham couple even plan their bi-annual visits around Jenny’s schedule. How’s that for devotion? As she gets to her work, I understand why; Jenny’s hands are sure and strong. The salt rub feels itchy at first, then soothing. Between the pulse of the massage and the gentle scent of eucalyptus oil, my tension begins to ebb. “How does that feel?” she asks midway through our session, wrapping me in a sort of Saran wrap envelope that stimulates circulation while drawing out impurities. “Mrfssict,” I mumble, feeling a bit like Saturday-night leftovers. But then lying completely still in the wrap for 20 minutes feels rather zen. The result? My skin is silky smooth to the touch. The Grand Hotel spa features an array of treatments, from Swedish and aromatic warm-stone massages to cupping therapy, good for breaking up scar tissue and waking up the lymphatic system. Most popular is the HydraFacial, in which an esthetician wands the face, gently exfoliating the skin while hydrating with antioxidants. In just an hour, you leave

opposite page: Refresh in the whirlpool at the Grand Spa’s relaxation room. top: Expansive views of Mobile Bay await poolside. above: A former yoga studio with a bay view now serves as a station for mani-pedis and other salon offerings.

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with a dewy, youthful glow. Who can resist? Taylor Fields, corporate director of spas for the RTJ Resort Collection, tells me the spa industry continues its robust growth, having surpassed $17.2 billion in revenue in 2017, according to the Between the pulse of the International Spa Association. “One facet of the industry is still focused on massage and the gentle pampering, but there’s an intentional movement towards health and wellscent of eucalyptus oil, ness,” Fields says. If wellness means taking a bit of my tension begins to ebb. “me” time for a massage or facial, then do it. Spa customers can enjoy the Grecian-style relaxation room after their appointment, but I opt to melt in front of the marina instead. Sitting on the large extended patio, I find the tranquil view of sea and sky mesmerizing. After an extended moment of bliss, I leave to dress for dinner.

below: The handsome octagonal lobby of the Grand Hotel, often referred to as the “birthday cake” building, dates to the 1940s. above right: Downtown’s Omni Hotel Nashville is just steps away from the Country Music Hall of Fame and Museum and other popular attractions.

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he Grand has several restaurant options (most with gorgeous water views), but the upscale Southern Oaks best reflects the bayside locale. Seasonal menus feature locally sourced, farm-to-table fare, and among my favorites are the pan-seared scallops and chargrilled Oysters Grandfeller. Braised with greens and flavored with a Cajun hollandaise sauce peppered with smoky bacon bits from Bill-E’s Small Batch Bacon, these are some lucky little mollusks. A shout-out to William “Bill E” Stitt, a talented grower in Baldwin County who knows his way around salt-cured pork. His bacon is simply divine. Save room for dessert, too, as the bread pudding with whiskey sauce is scrumptious. Neither overly soggy nor cloyingly sweet, it’s a heavenly end to a stay at the Grand.

Urban Renewal Omni Nashville’s Mokara Spa — Nashville, Tennessee

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f catching an urban buzz is more your style, then make the drive to Nashville and visit the handsome Omni Nashville Hotel, where Mokara Salon and Spa awaits. Adjacent to downtown’s Music City Center, Nashville’s stylish convention complex, the Omni sports a classy corporate attitude. The cavernous lobby is done in rich earth tones, with clubby living room nooks, beautiful stone appointments, and contemporary light fixtures. The Omni’s central location puts you in the heart of downtown’s SoBro district and within easy walking distance to tony eateries, Broadway’s honkytonks, and other attractions, including the adjoining Country Music Hall of Fame and Museum. The hotel also offers a free, three-mile-radius shuttle service so you can whisk to the restaurants and breweries that dot the hip East Nashville and Five Points neighborhoods. After settling into my king suite, which includes an elegant living space, dining table for eight, and bar — not to mention a spacious bathroom — I admire Nashville’s lights from my 12th-floor aerie. King suites can also connect to a second room, enabling a party of six to sleep comfortably and entertain. (If you have allergy concerns, stay on the hotel’s 18th floor, where feathers pillows are verboten.) Eager for my appointment, I zip down to the fourth floor where Mokara’s delicate fragrance beckons before I even enter. An attractive seating area boasts down100 • M E M P H I S M A G A Z I N E . C O M • M A R C H 2 0 1 9

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above: The writer at work in Mokara’s elegant relaxation room.

PHOTO CREDITS | LEFT: COURTESY GRAND HOTEL GOLF RESORT & SPA | ABOVE: COURTESY OMNI NASHVILLE | ABOVE LEFT: BY JANE SCHNEIDER

left: The Johnny Cash Room at the Musicians Hall of Fame and Museum traces the country star’s illustrious career.

town views as well as an adjoining outdoor terrace. Mokara opened five years ago, offering its elegant, New Age vibe to an eager clientele and becoming downtown Nashville’s first full-service spa.

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he interior lounge, done in soothing shades of taupe and sage green, is well-appointed with lotions, plush bathrobes, and beautiful orchids. The relaxation room is decorated with pastoral landscapes and provides a nice selection of teas and granola for snacking. In addition to 12 treatment stations, you’ll find a steam room and sauna. The spa offers the latest in body, face, and hair care, like the new activated hemp massage with oils by Mary’s Medicinals of Colorado. CDB oil is reportedly good for easing achy muscles and inflammation. Couple’s side-by-side massages are popular as well. Since I’m feeling a bit tight, I opt for their signature Swedish massage by my therapist, Yolanda, who’s been with the company since Mokara opened. Her gentle demeanor belies her fabulous talent as a masseuse and I secretly scheme, trying to figure out how to woo her to Memphis. When I awaken, I thank her and waft to the relaxation room where a flute of champagne weakens what little resolve I have left. The good news is you don’t have to be a hotel guest to take advantage of Mokara’s services. Parking is complimentary to spa customers, and other amenities include the use of the hotel’s well-equipped fitness center and sexy rooftop pool. For bachelorette parties — and Nashville is a hot spot for these — the attractive spa terrace is perfect for social gatherings. When morning rolls around, don’t miss Omni’s Kitchen Notes restaurant. Their breakfast buffet has a tasty array of fruits, pastries, and egg dishes as well as ample vegetarian and gluten-free options.  

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hile in Nashville, I make a point to visit the newly reopened Tennessee State Museum, now located in Centennial Park across from the Farmers Market. It is free and though a bit stark (during my December visit displays were still being installed), it tells Tennessee’s compelling history with interesting artifacts — a lock of Andrew Jackson’s white mane, for example (who knew?) — pioneer furnishings, and an impressive display of artwork. The good news is you While I always enjoy a visit to the Country Music Hall of Fame, don’t have to be a hotel an interesting counterpoint is the Musicians Hall of Fame and guest to take advantage Museum, which tells behindthe-scenes stories of the many of Mokara’s services. musicians, producers, and songwriters who helped to create the songs that made the stars famous. Memphis is well represented here, with sizable displays celebrating Stax, Sun Studios, and much more. Nashville might call itself Music City, but we all know Memphis is the legitimate birthplace of rock-and-roll.  All in all, not a bad takeaway from a relaxing escape. For more information: grand1847.com omnihotels.com/hotels/nashville/spa M A R C H 2 0 1 9 • M E M P H I S M A G A Z I N E . C O M • 101

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Restaurants along South Cooper serve an eclectic mix of cafe favorites, baked goods, hot chicken, and juices. At Bob’s Barksdale, one of the neighborhood’s oldest restaurants, Beth Henry (opposite page) displays a Lamar Sorrento portrait of her late husband, Bob, the popular diner’s namesake.

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Culinary Crossroads A burgeoning food scene near the Midtown intersection of SOUTH COOPER and CENTRAL connects high-profile neighborhoods to the north and south.

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Culinary Crossroads Tourelle is most impressive. “I’ve had quite a few good chefs come through,” Glenn says. “And maybe a couple who weren’t so good. But they didn’t last long.” Café 1912, on the other hand, has lasted for 16 years — and counting. In 2002, Glenn bought the building at the intersection of Cooper and Peabody, and ever since, 1912 (as everyone calls it) has

CAFÉ 1912 serves bistro comfort food to a neighborhood cast of Midtown regulars. by bruce van wyngarden It was very late and everyone had left the café except an old man who sat in the shadow the leaves of the tree made against the electric light. In the daytime the street was dusty, but at night the dew settled the dust and the old man liked to sit late because he was deaf and now at night it was quiet and he felt the difference. ... — Ernest Hemingway, “A Clean, Well-Lighted Place”

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hen I go to Café 1912, which is often, I think sometimes of my favorite Hemingway short story, because it is a clean, well-lighted place that Glenn and Martha Hays have created at 1912 South Cooper — a home bar for a rotating crew of regulars and an ever-reliable restaurant of choice for so many who live nearby. It may be the quintessential Midtown bistro — warm and comfortable, utterly without pretension. As you first enter, a smoky aroma drifts from the open

kitchen, where chef Keith Riley and his crew make the magic happen. The staff — Tyler, Justin, Sara, Erin — greets most customers by name. They know what you drink, where you like to sit — and probably your politics. If you get there before 6 p.m., you’ll find proprietor Glenn Hays in his corner seat at the bar, drinking a negroni and reading The New York Times. But it’s easy to interrupt him and easy to get him talking, especially if the subject is France. Or French food. Or

At Café 1912, owners Glenn and Martha Hays (above left) serve cocktails like French Negroni and bistro favorites, including beef short ribs with Johnny cake and collard greens and arugula salad with strawberries, goat cheese, and grilled figs. For dessert, try vanilla mouse pie topped with blueberry compote. politics. Or the University or Memphis. Or whatever the Times is about today. Glenn and Martha Hays are Memphis restaurant legends, Francophiles, and long-time foodies — since before that was even a word. They were the founders of the late, great La Tourelle — for years, the only place for fine French dining in the city. The list of prominent chefs who plied — and learned — their trade at La

been serving excellent food that satisfies without showing off or trying too hard: a solid gourmet cheeseburger with pomme frites; lemon and thyme roasted chicken; pork tenderloin with an apricot glaze; a bacon-laced Lyonnaise salad; a bowl of tender mussels; a French onion soup that will have you longing for Provence. It’s not soul food, but it feeds the souls of Midtowners who come in week after week to talk and gossip and wave at friends across the room sitting under the Cinzano poster. Husbands and wives, old lovers and old friends, ex-husbands and ex-wives, gay, straight, and in-between — all is forgiven and forgotten and remembered again. Oh, and try the grouper. The barman looked at him but did not answer. It was too late at night for conversation. “You want another copita?” the barman asked. “No, thank you,” said the waiter and went out. He disliked bars and bodegas. A clean, well-lighted café was a very different thing. 243 S. COOPER S T. (90 1-7 22-2700)

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on the day of Bob’s funeral in 2014 — and their many supportive customers. “We felt that he wouldn’t have wanted us to close, so we didn’t,” says Beth. “On the day of his service, we had people lined up outside of the building to come eat and show us support.” When Beth suggested the idea of remodeling to her crew and loyal customers, she

With country cooking and a staff who cares, BOB’S BARKSDALE carries on without Bob. by reagan andrews

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egular customers at Bob’s Barksdale cram into worn leather booths to eat oversized Western omelets stuffed with cheddar, ham, tomato, bell pepper, and onion with a heaping side of hash browns. Others opt for slices of country ham so large that a bowl of homestyle cheese grits barely fits on the plate. Kids drench their Mickey Mouse-shaped hotcakes in syrup while their parents drink cups of hot black coffee out of mugs with a chip on the rim. On the table is a napkin dispenser bookended by pepper sauce, hot sauce, ketchup, and sugar packets — a true Southern diner centerpiece. On a busy weekend, the small restaurant on South Cooper can

serve as many as 550 breakfasts. But behind the breakfast plates and paneled walls decked out in sports and Elvis memorabilia is something much more essential: a makeshift family spearheaded by owner Beth Henry. Beth took over the diner after the unexpected death of her husband and longtime Barksdale owner, Bob Henry. So, how has the Midtown staple fared since her husband’s passing? “I’m trying to keep his legacy alive,” Beth says. “I never thought I would be running this place, but I had to really dig in and learn how it worked.” Beth credits the restaurant’s success to her staff — a group of servers and cooks who even kept the restaurant open

After owner Bob Henry’s unexpected death in 2014, servers and cooks (above) helped continue the Barksdale’s legacy of serving breakfast, including hash browns, biscuits, pancakes, and eggs, along with Southern plate lunches.

was met with shocked eyes and sharp protest. “Everyone requested that I do nothing to the place,” she says. One of those advocates was Ron McGhee, a longtime Barksdale cook. He started working in the kitchen more than 20 years ago and has been slinging breakfast and meat-and-threes ever since. Classic Southern-style lunch specials begin every day at 11 a.m. There’s a lot of variety on the lunch menu — meatloaf, fried chicken, catfish fillets — but my personal favorite is the huge country-fried steak swimming in brown gravy with salty turnip greens, carrots, and gooey mac and cheese on the side. It seems like the corner diner is running business a certain way after Bob’s death — exactly the same. “I like my job, and Bob was a good man and boss,” McGhee says. “But we just gotta keep on doing what he wanted us to do. We can’t stop now.” 237 S. COOPER S T. (90 1-7 22-2 193)

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Culinary Crossroads a blend of apple juice, avocado, spinach, and plant-based protein powder topped with granola, fresh fruit, almond butter, local honey, and chia seeds. For less sugar, customers can build smoothie bowls with an almond milk base without sacrificing flavor. Consider the Chocolate Bowl. Almond milk, avocado, banana, and raw cacao make up the blend base,

At I LOVE JUICE, smoothie bowls add an alternative to fresh-squeezed juices. by jessica holmes

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t first glance, a smoothie in a bowl seems like a menu oxymoron, especially for a juice bar that specializes in fresh-squeezed drinks. But at I Love Juice Bar, smoothie bowls are invigorating a menu with more hearty options made with the same kinds of fresh and healthy ingredients as the bar’s signature juices. Instead of combining all the ingredients into a blender and pouring them into a glass, bartenders blend only 50 percent of the bowl’s ingredients and place the other half — granola, banana, strawberries, almond butter, hemp seed, and honey — on top as garnishes. The Acai Bowl, a fun and more filling alternative to juicebased smoothies, started the bowls’ popularity at the South Cooper Street store, says man-

ager Adam Maldonado. “It was so popular they decided to make five other bowls,” he says. “So, they could kind of reach every person for what they like.” While smoothie bowls are new to Memphis, their introduction follows a national trend that started in 1999, when Ryan Black, then a college student, and his friend Ed Nichols were introduced to the Acai Bowl while vacationing in Brazil. The friends were so impressed with the bowl’s flavors and nutritional power punch of vitamins and antioxidants, they brought the art of smoothie bowl-making back to the U.S. and shared the idea. Maldonado tried his first smoothie bowl at a juice bar in California back in 2011. “I used to survive on those smoothie bowls,” says Maldonado. “I had

Fresh produce and juices, pictured above with owner Scott Tashie, are the heartbeat of I Love Juice Bar, but the restaurant also serves more diverse menu items, such as smoothie breakfast bowls, gluten-free Pad Thai, avocado toast, and spring rolls filled with avocado and spinach. a punch card. I would get one almost every day.” Owner Scott Tashie says the Acai Bowl is popular nationwide. “I’ve seen them everywhere,” he says. “I went to San Diego just a little over a year ago; it was crazy how many Acai Bowls you saw, even at burger restaurants.” At I Love Juice Bar, another refreshing energy-based breakfast bowl is the Go Green Bowl,

and on top, generous scoops of cacao nibs mingle with granola, bananas, and strawberries. 553 S. COOPER S T. (90 1-612-27 20)

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have some really cool people come here to work, and they brought things that they discovered in other places — like our Ginger Lemonade Zinger.” Today, Otherlands’ menu consists of an array of coffee beverages, such as mochas, lattes, and blended frozen drinks. However, they also offer coffee alternatives like a French soda or fruit punch. In addition, the shop’s “Oth-

For more than 25 years, OTHERLANDS has brewed coffee and creativity in the heart of Midtown. by emily zachry

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wner Karen Lebovitz used her background in natural food and restaurants to transform her futon and gift store on South Cooper into the neighborhood’s first coffeehouse. But her inspiration for Otherlands Coffee Bar and Exotic Gifts came from the popular television show Cheers. “I fell asleep to that show every night, and I wanted to create a place where people walked in and they knew your name,” Lebovitz says. An eclectic establishment reminiscent of the early 1970s, Otherlands brought coffee shop culture to Midtown in 1994. The shop’s ambience, fashioned by Lebovitz and longtime regulars, could be the main reason for Otherlands’ longevity. “I wanted to recreate European coffeehouses in Midtown

because after I worked in the natural food business, I knew there was a real lack of places for people to just hang out,” says Lebovitz. Twenty years ago, coffeehouse culture in Memphis was rare. “Coffee was exploding at the seams, not in Memphis, but in cities all over the country,” Lebovitz says. “We actually preceded Starbucks in the Memphis marketplace.” Likewise, Overton Square and Cooper-Young offered only a handful of businesses at that time. Still, Lebovitz wanted to position her business in between these two emerging Midtown neighborhoods. “This was an industrial area,” she says. “I was on the edge of really great neighborhoods. I could see that this would be the crossover between the two.” Over the years, Otherlands

has remained in its original location, but other popular restaurants, such as Muddy’s Bake Shop, Railgarten, and Hattie B’s Hot Chicken, have opened near the intersection of Central and Cooper. Despite changes in the neighborhood, the coffee culture at Lebovitz’s shop is much the same: Patrons not only drink coffee, but congregate to read, draw, work, and talk. Lebovitz wanted to create a place where different types of people feel comfortable. Nearly 25 years later, she has accomplished just that. “We’ve got 80-year-old and 2-month-old customers,” she says. “I’m on my second, if not third, generation of customers. A lot of people who came in here as teenagers are now adults with children, and those kids are now coming in.” She cites her “sheer stubbornness” as the reason Otherlands has remained a long-standing pillar in the Midtown community, and as her goals as a businesswoman have evolved, so have Otherlands’ offerings and retail mix. “Any time I go anywhere, I take inspiration,” Lebovitz says. “I’ve also been lucky enough to

Owner Karen Lebovitz (far left) credits the eclectic ambience of Otherlands to her staff, longtime customers, and her own travels and retail background. erfood” menu offers a variety of vegan and vegetarian dishes for both breakfast and lunch. Notably, their secret sauce is featured in almost all of their dishes, such as the Bagel Sandwich Thing, pimento cheese sandwich, and tuna melt. Grace John has worked at Otherlands for more than a year, and she assists in making both food and drinks. “We’ve got a lot of vegetarian options, so it’s a pretty nice place to go if you’re looking for something light as a vegetarian,” John says. “It’s a pretty accommodating menu. We’ve got a little bit of everything.” As Otherlands’ menu has developed, so has the culture of the shop itself, especially with the advent of technology. “People used to come in here and meet their friends and talk,” says Lebovitz. “Now they look at their devices. The world has changed, and we’ve changed with it.” 641 S. COOPER S T. (90 1-278-4994)

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Culinary Crossroads Manager Emily Wickliff (left) and barista Leah Chaney fill many roles at the Muddy’s on Cooper Street, where along with a full menu of hot and cold coffee drinks, the shop features sweet treats like cookies, pies, layer cakes, and cupcakes in dozens of flavors.

BARISTA LEAH CHANEY: Cold

Brew Latte! It’s basically just a good foundation for all the drinks I like. I can have it hot, I can have it iced, I can have it with just honey, or with caramel. It’s just a very smooth cup of coffee and it is always great, no matter how you dress it up.

So, tell me the secret to concocting a unique specialty drink?

At MIDTOWN MUDDY’S, manager Emily Wickliff and barista Leah Chaney talk customer service and the welcoming warmth of a cup of coffee. by paige walter

Memphis magazine: What makes working as a barista different from any other job? MANAGER EMILY WICKLIFF:

Working as a barista is unique and rewarding because you’re essentially getting to work in customer service and production at the same time. Very rarely in food or in retail do you get to make something and interact face-to-face with the person you are making it for. Watching someone get excited about something you just made for them never gets old.

Why did you choose to work at Muddy’s over other coffee shops in the Memphis area?

EW: I was nervous to start my training at first, but the coffee culture at Muddy’s is very approachable, and I learned a lot. Now that I’ve been doing this for a couple of years, I really enjoy sharing my coffee knowledge with others. And I love the days I get to work behind the counter using those skills.

What is your favorite drink on the menu?

Jan’s Famous Toffee Bars: a Grind House favorite

Served as squares of cookie crust coated in milk chocolate, the toffee bars at Muddy’s deliver a satisfying salty-sweet combination for only 85 cents apiece. Bakers start with the brown sugar cookie to build the bar’s foundation. Next come milk chocolate bars, which melt seamlessly into the freshly baked bars. Handfuls of toasted pecans scattered on top add a savory crunch to the bar’s

LC: My coworker Noah and I really wanted a drink that used Cubano espresso. We came up with a drink that combines that with honey, hazelnut, and cinnamon, and it is fantastic. It tastes like warm blankets feel.

What is the key to making a coffee shop great?

LC: I love our coffee shop for the same reason I love going to my mom’s house for a cup of coffee. I know the coffee is going to be good, and I’m in a welcoming environment, surrounded by people I enjoy being around. Someone’s always going to ask me how my day is going.

585 S. COOPER S T. (90 1-4 43-414 4)

sweet-hearted nature. Muddy’s owner Kat Gordon has been selling the homemade bars since the bakery’s opening in 2008. The popular dessert is her mother’s recipe, and Gordon grew up stealing a bar or two from the batches her mother would make for holiday gatherings. “She’s the ‘Jan’ in Jan’s Famous Toffee Bars, and she made them every Christmas season when I was a kid,” Gordon says. — Hira Qureshi and Frank Ramirez

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Aldo’s cheesecake: Add some sweet to your savory

ALDO’S PIZZA PIES brings a slice of New York to South Cooper Street. by catherine levasseur

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ldo Dean had a clear vision when he opened the first pizza restaurant in downtown Memphis six years ago: a New York-style pizzeria with an open kitchen. There was only one problem. He did not know one thing about making pizza. “I pitched my idea to investors, and they said, ‘All right, how do we go about it?’” recalls Dean, affectionately called Aldo by most people in Memphis. He told them, “I don’t know, but we are going to learn how to make pizza.” Later that year, Dean and dough master John Pearson traveled to the American Institution of Baking in Manhattan, Kansas. They enrolled in a pizza class and learned how to make different types of dough, from cracker crust and thin crust New York-style to Chicago’s

signature deep-dish pie. For Aldo’s Pizza Pies, the duo crafted a hybrid dough with a unique flour blend. Traditional pizza from Naples is made with 100 percent antimo caputo 00 flour, and New York-style pizza is 100 percent high-gluten flour. “What we did with ours is that we blended the two together,” Dean says. “We made our own proprietary dough blend.” The popularity of the first Aldo’s, on South Main, spurred the second location on South Cooper, in the building that formerly housed the beloved TwoWay Inn. With the help of the landlord, Aldo’s remodeled the interior, opened up the kitchen, and added a larger dining area, a bar, and a patio on the roof. Along with the proprietary dough, both Aldo’s locations use a deck oven to cook the pizza instead of an air impingement oven used by many

Owner Aldo Dean, astride the bar, clowns around with general manager Ashley McEntire at the midtown location of Aldo’s Pizza Pies. Along with a dozen different specialty pies, Aldo’s also serves salads, panini sandwiches, and appetizers like roasted Poblano peppers stuffed with goat cheese. other pizza makers. “It is a longer process because you have to be actively involved in turning the pizzas in the oven,” says Dean. “The pizzas take roughly 12 minutes to cook.” Authenticity is important for Dean and his employees, which is why most of the food served is made in-house. Ashley McEntire, the general manager at Aldo’s on Cooper, says they make their own sauces and mozzarella. Coming up soon: Aldo’s branded cheese blend. People from all over the Memphis area come to eat Aldo’s signature pizzas. They all sell well, but the Vodka pie is a favorite. “Our Vodka sauce is something nobody else does,” McEntire says. Other restaurant developments at Aldo’s include a new building that will serve as a

The New York-style cheesecake at Aldo’s Pizza Pies — tall and majestic — has a unique taste, thanks to its lemon meringue topping and macerated sliced strawberries served on the side. The cheesecake is made with cream cheese, eggs, and heavy cream for a smooth consistency. Aldo’s adds the tart lemon and berry flavors for a special twist. The dessert, priced at $6, is a restaurant favorite. Like Aldo’s pizzas, it’s New Yorkstyle, but made and sold in Memphis. Server Xanthe Mumm says the cheesecake is a staple. “It’s definitely one of our favorite desserts,” says Mumm. ”It’s completely homemade.” — Dima Amro

commissary kitchen, a possible expansion to East Memphis, and more synergistic menus between the downtown and Cooper locations. “We are doing panini sandwiches here, and we are going to do them downtown,” Dean says. “We just got a griddle here, so I think we are going to start doing cheesesteaks here, as well.” 752 S. COOPER S T. (90 1-7 25-7437)

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Culinary Crossroads

PHOTOGRAPHS BY JUSTIN FOX BURKS

The Railgarten diner serves sitdown meals like truffle mac and cheese and chicken-fried quail inside the restaurant, but also provides finger food and shareable plates to the bars and seating areas located throughout its sprawling venue near the intersection of Cooper and Central.

olate from Ecuador. The chocolate, a tip she picked up from Mexican chef Rick Bayless, deepens the chili’s flavor profile, and is also high in magnesium, an essential feel-good nutrient. “Magnesium is a wonderful mineral for the body,” Pickle explains, “and we are all deficient in it.” — Pamela Denney

PUMPKIN CHILI at Raw Girls

24 2 S. COOPER S T., IN T HE ECLEC T IC E YE /MIDT OWN YOGA PARKING LOT

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on’t be misled by Raw Girls, the name of two popular vegetarian food trucks parked at South Cooper and Poplar. Yes, the adorable converted campers sell cold-pressed juices, and my citrusy favorite — Antioxidant Bliss — is a must-try. But the trucks also sell seasonal soups, cooked in the Raw Girls catering kitchen under chef/owner Amy Pickle’s expert eye. I discovered the pumpkin chili on a dreary Tuesday afternoon when I needed a hearty but healthy lunch. Warm, rich, and delicious, the chili — nut-, gluten-, and meat-free — satisfied my appetite like its beef-and-bean cousins. Roasted vegetables (pumpkin, carrots, celery, tomatoes, sweet potatoes, and Yukon Golds) are key, along with spices (fresh ginger, cinnamon, nutmeg, and cloves) and Pickle’s secret ingredient: raw choc-

of soft yellow peaches and crumbly crust. Made from scratch, cooks start with a slurry for thickening, then add in the peaches and end with the crust. Served with vanilla ice cream, the dessert combines hot and cold for a glorious ending to a damn hot chicken plate. General manager Ariel Owens says the cobbler is especially popular in the fall and winter. Customers like to get their banana pudding in the summer and their cobbler in the winter. “It’s actually my favorite dessert,” Owens says. “The slurry is the most important part. It’s a very fine line of perfection, so our cooks really, really spend a lot of time getting it just right.” — Hira Qureshi and Frank Ramirez 596 S. COOPER S T. (90 1-4 24-5900)

TINY BOMB BBQ SHRIMP AND GRITS

at Railgarten Diner

PEACH COBBLER at Hattie B’s

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he hot chicken destination from Nashville has successfully tackled another regional classic: peach cobbler, for only $3 a slice. Gooey, ooey, and just peachy enough, the cobbler is a bowl full

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n November, Bounty on Broad chef Russell Casey revamped the menu at Railgarten, the sprawling entertainment complex at the corner of Central and Cooper. His goal? A polished menu with healthier options, shared plates, and more handheld items like vegetarian bánh mìs (excellent!) and Cuban sand-

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wiches with voodoo mustard on French baguettes. For more serious fare, the menu also features half-a-dozen entrees, including a stand-out shrimp and grits starring seven large Gulf shrimp, heads-and-tails-on. Casey describes the sauce’s preparation as traditional New Orleans-style made with Worcestershire, chicken stock, and Wiseacre’s beer. Ham and bacon help out, too, along with lemon, bay leaves, and thyme. “We also add cold butter at the end, after the sauce is strained, which makes it nice and creamy,” Casey explains. Butter and cream, along with smoked Gouda and white cheddar, also build up the entree’s grits, locally sourced from Hanna Farm, a favorite purveyor for Casey. He explains why: “Their grits are coarser than most, which gives more texture.” — Pamela Denney 2 166 CENT R AL AVE. (90 1-504-434 2)

A grab bag of LOCAL BREWS at Memphis Made Brewing Co.

R

egulars call Memphis Made’s taproom the “Cooper-Young Community Center.” Opened during the Memphis Great Craft Beer Rush of 2013 (during which Wiseacre, High Cotton, and Memphis Made all opened within six months of one another), Memphis Made has established itself with a loyal following in the taproom, in the more than 100 bars and restaurants that pour its beers, and in stores across town that carry the company’s cans. In the taproom, you’ll find a constantly rotating menu with everything from Prince Mango (which the company calls a mango-infused “Zambodian IPA”) to Orange Drewlius, an oatmeal stout brewed with orange peel. You also can find three Memphis Made beers on tap or in stores year-round: Junt, a cream ale; Fireside, an amber ale; and Cat Nap, an IPA. — Toby Sells

COCONUT CAKE at Cafe Palladio

M

ade with a secret family recipe, the coconut cake at Cafe Palladio is a Southern staple enhanced with extra details. Coconut flavored and topped with Cool Whip and coconut shavings, the two-layer cake is light and moist. A labor-intensive dessert, it has multiple processes. The cake is first baked, then chilled overnight and embellished with toppings. The dessert is a rendition from owner Mindy Roberts’ sister-in-law. Roberts included some of her own embellishments, as well, like doubling the cake to make two layers. “Normally coconut is made with one layer, but we doubled the recipe for two layers,” Roberts says. “When you are selling it in a restaurant, something that’s not grandiose is not going to sell as well.” — Hira Qureshi and Frank Ramirez

Mystery Train latte: 16 ounces of vanilla and hazelnut syrup, two shots of espresso, steamed milk, and whip cream. It is best paired with the coffee shop’s warm, chocolate brownie for just $6.95. Owner Mary Burns said most of the drinks at Java Cabana are named after artists, movies, and musicians. “Mystery Train is a fun drink,” Burns said. “It’s named after Jim Jarmusch’s film, ‘Mystery Train,’ which takes place in Memphis, Tennessee.” — Hira Qureshi and Frank Ramirez 2 170 YOUNG AVE. (90 1) 27 2-7 2 10

800 S. COOPER S T. (90 1-87 1-6879)

MIX & MATCH SLIDERS at Slider Inn

A

2 179 CENT R AL AVE. (90 1-278-0 129)

MYSTERY TRAIN LATTE at Java Cabana

chili marries spicy, sour, and savory into heavenly umami bliss. Katz is an experienced cook. Before opening her takeout restaurant in Cooper-Young, she owned a restaurant in the Southern College of Optometry in the Medical Center. And until recently, she was a fixture at local farmers markets, selling soups and other prepared foods such as caponata, hot tamale pie, and tarragon chicken salad. She says the soups are mostly her ideas, but combinations also riff off recipes she finds in magazines. “A lot of our recipes we just made up,” Katz says. “Or, I’d see coconut curry soup or roasted carrot soup, and I would tear out the article and bring it in to make.” — Dima Amro

BLACK BEAN CHILI

at Cooper Street 20/20

ustomers at Cooper Street 20/20 call Cabana is known for its unique Java owner Kathy Katz the “Soup Lady,” C drinks and homemade baked goods, and for good reason. Her black bean

and one of the quirkier drinks is the

768 S. COOPER S T. (90 1-207-5343)

Java Cabana owner Mary Burns names most of her shop’s drinks after films, artists, or musicians.

t Slider Inn, customers love the restaurant’s mix-and-match option, and no wonder. The menu offers more than 15 different sliders along with daily specials like meatball Mondays and on Thursdays, an excellent fried green tomato BLT. Customer Kyle Cardwell is a big fan of mix and match, which includes any three sliders plus shoestring fries for $10.99. Typically, his picks include Buffalo chicken, which starts with chicken breast soaked in Buffalo wing sauce before it is grilled or fried. Many first-timers also can’t resist the Big Deuce and its impressive stack of two beef patties, bacon, lettuce, tomato, onion, pickle, ketchup, mayo, mustard, and two cheeses: American and Swiss. “Mainly guys order it,” says server Kat Martinez. “It’s funny to see them bite into it because it’s so tall.” Located at the corner of Peabody and Cooper, the Slider Inn will soon have a second location downtown following an extensive renovation of the Kisber Auto Parts building on Mulberry Street. Look for an opening date sometime in April. — Max Vincent and Pamela Denney

2 117 PE ABODY AVE. (90 1-7 25-1155)

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2019

FACES OF THE

MID-SOUTH

THE FACE OF

MEMPHIS CATERING

PARADOX CATERING & CONSULTING >>> Chef Jimmy Gentry Chef/Owner Jimmy Gentry of Paradox Catering was formally trained at Johnson and Wales College of Culinary Arts. Before starting his own business with partner Alia Hogan, he led kitchens across the Mid-South to win multiple awards. Almost 10 years ago, Paradox Catering was created with the vision in mind to redeďŹ ne what people expected not only from the food itself, but from the presentation and service as well. Paradox's Jessica Lambert and Chef Gentry work closely with our clients to deďŹ ne their personal style, which we then translate into every aspect of their event so we can provide that one-ofa-kind experience they always envisioned. We have been truly fortunate to be embraced by the Mid-South and have in turn seen tremendous success with our creative and innovative approach to catering. 901.619.1196 Event@ParadoxCuisine.com ParadoxCuisine.com SPECIAL PROMOTION


2019

FACES OF THE

MID-SOUTH

THE FACE OF

MORTGAGE LENDING

LUDY CALLAWAY — THE MORTGAGE LADY >>> "It's not just a house. It's your home. I get that! I know how hard you work to get the home you want." As Vice-President of Independent Bank, Ludy's passion is to provide successful, problem-free mortgage loans. With her radio program ("The Mortgage Lady," 8 a.m. Mondays, The Voice FM107.9 / AM990) and website, (YourMortgageLady.net), Ludy is able to finance homes throughout the United States and to help you make smart mortgage decisions that will benefit you for years to come. To teach, guide and help. That's "The Mortgage Lady." 901.494.4400 ludy@i-bankonline.com

NMLS #267872 SPECIAL PROMOTION


2019

FACES OF THE

MID-SOUTH

THE FACE OF

NEPHROLOGY

MINESH PATHAK, MD >> >>>> >> >>

Kidney disease is an often unrecognized, silent disease caused by uncontrolled high blood pressure and diabetes. The diagnosis and treatment of kidney-related diseases requires an in-depth evaluation of various risk factors. Obesity, vascular abnormalities, autoimmune diseases, and kidney stones have been linked to renal failure. Dr. Pathak is a board-certified Nephrologist and member of The American Society of Nephrology and The National Kidney Foundation. He provides compassionate care with the highest-quality treatment of kidney disease. His goal is to provide early, preventive education along with diagnosis and relevant treatments of specific conditions to lessen the risk of progression to kidney failure and to improve a patient's quality of life. Dr. Pathak takes great interest in understanding the needs of his patients and providing them with quality care with the least invasive treatment. 6025 Walnut Grove Road, Ste. 400 Memphis, TN 38120 901.382.5256

SPECIAL PROMOTION


2019

FACES OF THE

MID-SOUTH

THE FACE OF

OB-GYN

MID-SOUTH OB-GYN A Division of Women’s Care Center of Memphis, MPLLC >>> Front row: Judi L. Carney, MD, Candace D. Hinote, MD, and Dominique Butawan-Ali, MD Back row: Paul D. Neblett, MD, Mary Katherine Johnson, MD, and Thomas D. Greenwell, MD Not pictured: Cheston M. Reed M.D. Mid-South OB-GYN provides comprehensive Gynecological and Obstetrical health care for women of all ages. Some of our services include yearly wellness exams, fertility counseling, weight management, contraceptive options, MonaLisa Touch for vaginal atrophy and other in-office procedures. Our physicians deliver at Baptist Women’s Hospital and Methodist Germantown Hospital. All expectant mothers receive a complimentary 3D/4D ultrasound. Other services include mammograms, bone density, total body composition, PelleFirm body treatments and

cosmetic Laser procedures. The physicians of Mid-South OB-GYN have received award recognition from Baptist Memorial Hospital for Women for their leadership roles. They have also been recognized by The University of Tennessee for excellence in clinical teaching and have received certification by the American Board of Obstetrics & Gynecology. At Mid-South we don’t believe in a one-sizefits-all approach to women’s health care; we treat each patient with personalized plans, courtesy and compassion. We look forward to caring for you.

6215 Humphreys Blvd., Suite 100, Memphis, TN 38120 | 901.747.1200 | MidSouthObgyn.com SPECIAL PROMOTION


2019

FACES OF THE

MID-SOUTH

THE FACE OF

OPHTHALMOLOGY

HAMILTON EYE INSTITUTE, A UNIVERSITY CLINICAL HEALTH PRACTICE >>> Left to right (standing): Dr. Kourtney Houser, Dr. Elliott Kanner, Dr. Penny Asbel, and Dr. Jesse Wesberry Left to right (seated): Dr. Brian Jerkins, Dr. Brian Fowler, and Jessica Lam, OD The Hamilton Eye Institute (HEI), part of University Clinical Health, provides specialty eye care for patients in Memphis and from throughout the nation. HEI is nationally renowned as among the top ophthalmology institutes in the country for its expertise in treating complex eye

conditions. For more than a decade, our eye-care specialists have been listed among the Best Doctors in America® for the quality of ophthalmic care they provide to patients. For more information visit universityclinicalhealth.com or call 901.448.6650.

930 Madison Ave., Suite 200 | 8001 Centerview Parkway, Suite 101 | 901.448.6650 SPECIAL PROMOTION


2019

FACES OF THE

MID-SOUTH

THE FACE OF

ORIENTAL RUGS TAGHAVI ORIENTAL RUGS >>>

At Taghavi's Oriental Rugs, we take great pride in our 60+ years in business and the type of services we offer, including sales, hand cleaning, reweaving, color-run restoration, moth-damage repair, stain and odor removal, and much more! With every customer, we are guided by our core values: integrity, experience, excellence, and professionalism. We have not only the largest stock in new and antique rugs, but also the best cleaning and restoration method in the country. We have built our reputation for more than 60 years, not on false promises, but integrity and excellence. 3554 Park Avenue Memphis, TN 38111 901.327.5033 TaghaviRugs.com

SPECIAL PROMOTION


2019

FACES OF THE

MID-SOUTH

THE FACE OF

ORTHODONTICS

MEMPHIS ORTHODONTIC SPECIALISTS >>> Dr. Scott Werner and Dr. Stanley Werner Celebrating more than 75 years of combined orthodontic experience, Dr. Scott Werner and Dr. Stanley Werner have ofďŹ ces in Memphis, Munford, and Collierville. They have cared for numerous generations of families, specializing in orthodontics and dentofacial orthopedics for children and adults. Both understand how a beautiful smile can change a

patient’s life, improving health and selfesteem with traditional appliances or Invisalign. Dr. Scott and Dr. Stanley have been included in the annual Memphis Top Dentists awards every year since its inception, achieved status as Diplomats of the American Board of Orthodontics, and are members of the American Association of Orthodontists.

6425 Quail Hollow Road, Suite 201, Memphis, TN 38120 | 901.767.5415 843 South Tipton Road, Suite A, Munford, TN 38058 | 901.837.7708 2002 Houston Levee Road, Collierville, TN 38017 | 901.854.6493 WernerOrthodontics.com SPECIAL PROMOTION


2019

FACES OF THE

MID-SOUTH

THE FACE OF

ORTHOPAEDICS AND SPORTS MEDICINE CAMPBELL CLINIC ORTHOPAEDICS >>>

Campbell Clinic has helped Mid-Southerners reach their peak performance and get back in the game faster for more than a century. The organization has built a reputation of excellence since 1909 by providing care in Memphis and the Mid-South that touches the world. The practice serves as the Official Sports Medicine Provider for the Grizzlies, Redbirds,

and Tigers, along with Rhodes College, Christian Brothers University, and countless other athletic programs throughout the region. Whether we’re treating NBA All-Stars or local Little Leaguers, our patients trust us as the Face of Sports Medicine in Memphis and the Mid-South. CampbellClinic.com

SPECIAL PROMOTION


2019

FACES OF THE

MID-SOUTH

THE FACE OF

PAIN MANAGEMENT

MAYS AND SCHNAPP PAIN CLINIC AND REHABILITATION CENTER >>> Left to right: William Schnapp, MD, Moacir Schnapp, MD, Ryan McGaughey, MD, Kit Mays, MD, and Bethany Owen, MD Kit S. Mays, MD, and Moacir Schnapp, MD, have been pioneers in the management of chronic pain for 40 years. The physicians at Mays and Schnapp Pain Clinic and Rehabilitation Center are dedicated to providing state-of-the-art care for patients suffering from chronic pain. Continually certified by the Commission for Accreditation of Rehabilitation Facilities since its inception, it is still the only certified pain clinic within 500 miles of Memphis. The physicians' philosophy of care is

to treat the whole patient by relieving pain, restoring function and improving quality of life. That approach starts with taking a comprehensive and fresh look at each suffering individual. This unique multidisciplinary approach may include nerve blocks, physical therapy, and medical management, as well as psychological support when needed. “Every patient is evaluated personally by a physician.” "When the problem is pain, we're here to help, offering world-class care in the heart of the Mid-South."

55 Humphreys Drive, Suite 200, Memphis, TN 38120 | 901.747.0040 | maysandschnapp.com SPECIAL PROMOTION


2019

FACES OF THE

MID-SOUTH

THE FACE OF

PHILANTHROPY

UNITED WAY OF THE MID-SOUTH >>> Left to right (front row): Mary Sexton, VP, Resource Development; Rev. Kenneth S. Robinson, M.D., CEO & President Left to right (back row): Lori Spicer Robertson, Chief Communications & Engagement Officer; Gia Stokes, Chief Financial Officer; Angelia Allen, VP, Strategic Development For over 95 years, United Way of the MidSouth has brought the time, talents and treasures of citizens together so individuals and families in need can enjoy a better quality of life. We do this by being the leading catalyst in stimulating support and services for individuals and families as they progress from poverty to prosperity. Located in Memphis, Tennessee, United Way serves an eight-county region which includes Shelby, Fayette, Tipton and Lauderdale counties in

Tennessee; DeSoto, Tate and Tunica counties in Mississippi; and Crittenden County in Arkansas. The mission of United Way is to improve the quality of life for Mid-Southerners by mobilizing and aligning community resources to address priority issues. We strive to advance people from where they are to where they dream to be by addressing the building blocks for success — education, financial stability and health. To learn more, please visit www.uwmidsouth.org.

1005 Tillman Street, Memphis, TN 38112 | 901.433.4300 | UWMidSouth.org SPECIAL PROMOTION


2019

FACES OF THE

MID-SOUTH

THE FACE OF

PIZZA

BROADWAY PIZZA >>> Legendary Broadway Pizza, one of Memphis’ favorite family-owned-andoperated restaurants, was opened by Lana Jeanette Cox in 1977 at 2581 Broad. Third-generation family members now offer Broadway East at 629 S. Mendenhall. Elder family members raised in extreme poverty

find it important that faithful friends “get their money’s worth and don't leave hungry.” Not just a pizzeria, Broadway offers salads, whole wings, fish, spaghetti, chicken parmesan, burgers; homestyle plate-lunch specials. Cakes made in-house daily. Call-in orders welcomed.

2581 Broad Ave., Memphis, TN 38112 | 901.454.7930 629 S. Mendenhall, Memphis, TN 38117 | 901.207.1546 BroadwayPizzaMemphis.com SPECIAL PROMOTION


2019

FACES OF THE

MID-SOUTH

THE FACE OF

PODIATRY

UT PODIATRY, A UNIVERSITY CLINICAL HEALTH PRACTICE >>> Expert podiatrists Dr. Brian N. Kiel, D.P.M., and Dr. David M. Moinester, D.P.M., have provided the premiere podiatry service to the Mid-South community for over 30 years, beginning with their partnership as founders of the Podiatry Centers of Memphis in 1985. Acquired in 2017 by University Clinical

Health — the clinical faculty practice plan of the University of Tennessee Health Science Center — the newly rebirthed UT Podiatry practice boasts a team of professionals led by Drs. Kiel and Moinester offering a wide variety of foot, ankle, and lower-extremity care from routine checkups to surgical procedures.

995 S. Yates, Suite 2, Memphis 901.767.5620 | 6575 Stage Rd., Bartlett 901.382.0393 SPECIAL PROMOTION


2019

FACES OF THE

MID-SOUTH

THE FACE OF

PROFESSIONAL TREE SERVICE ROBINSON TREE SERVICE >>>

Robinson Tree Service, family owned since 1948. Jason Sengel and his wife, Cynthia, acquired the business from Pop Robinson’s grandson in 2001. Jason was well prepared to take the helm with a degree in Urban Forestry from Texas A&M. With the company came Wesley Rutherford,

hired way back by Pop in 1965. Robinson Tree has grown into one of the most respected and recommended tree services in the area. Much of that has to do with their emphasis on customer satisfaction and their experienced, professional crews. We Know Memphis Trees!

2807 Farrisview Blvd. #101, Memphis, TN 38118 | 901.363.3539 | RobinsonTree.net SPECIAL PROMOTION


2019

FACES OF THE

MID-SOUTH

THE FACE OF

REPRODUCTIVE MEDICINE

FERTILITY ASSOCIATES OF MEMPHIS >>> Left to right: William H. Kutteh, MD, PhD, Raymond W. Ke, MD, Amelia P. Bailey, MD and Paul R. Brezina, MD

Fertility Associates of Memphis is a state-of-the-art practice providing comprehensive reproductive healthcare to couples of the Mid-South and beyond, treating patients struggling with infertility, recurrent pregnancy loss, and reproductive disorders. Our highly specialized team utilizes cutting-edge techniques, including in vitro fertilization with laser blastocyst biopsy, preimplantation genetic testing, and fertility preservation and has been designated a Center of Excellence. Our compassionate physicians, board-certified in reproductive endocrinology and infertility, have been bringing dreams to life for more than 20 years. 80 Humphreys Center, Suite 307, Memphis, TN 38120 | 901.747.2229 | FertilityMemphis.com SPECIAL PROMOTION


2019

FACES OF THE

MID-SOUTH

THE FACE OF

RESIDENTIAL REAL ESTATE RIP HANEY, MARX-BENSDORF REALTORS >>>

Rip Haney has provided the highest-quality personal representation to buyers and sellers of residential real estate in the Greater Memphis area since 1993. He is a native Memphian and proud to have spent his entire 26-year career as an affiliate-broker with Memphis’ oldest and most established firm. Marx-Bensdorf Realtors is celebrating its 151-year anniversary. Rip is a Past President and Life Member of the Memphis Area Association Multi-Million Dollar Club, which is limited to the top 1 percent of agents in the city. 5860 Ridgeway Center Pkwy. Memphis, TN 38120 RHaney@M-BRealtors.com RipHaneyRealtor.com 901.682.1868 (o) 901.351.2190 (c)

SPECIAL PROMOTION


2019

FACES OF THE

MID-SOUTH

THE FACE OF

RETIREMENT LIVING TREZEVANT >>>

Trezevant, located in the heart of Memphis, is the Mid-South’s premier LifeCare retirement community. From the views to the floor plans to the finishing touches, no two apartments or garden homes are the same. We customize each to fit your style and your life for years to come. It’s warm and inviting and more

than a place to call home. Enjoy unparalleled services and amenities and the peace of mind should you ever need more care in Assisted Living, Memory Support, or Skilled Nursing it is all available on one campus. Come see why Memphians have been calling Trezevant home for over 40 years.

177 North Highland Street, Memphis, TN 38111 | 901.515.2800 | trezevantmanor.org SPECIAL PROMOTION


2019

FACES OF THE

MID-SOUTH

THE FACE OF

RHEUMATOLOGY

UT RHEUMATOLOGY, A UNIVERSITY CLINICAL HEALTH PRACTICE >>> Left to right: Vaishnavi R. Pulusani, MD and Bradley Postlethwaite, MD In 2017, University Clinical Health recognized a need for a strong — and accessible — Rheumatology practice to serve the Mid-South community and hired two highly qualified Rheumatologists to create the new UT Rheumatology practice. Leading the charge, Vaishnavi Pulusani, MD and Bradley Postlethwaite, MD — both board-certified by the American Board of Internal Medicine and the American College of Rheumatology as well as faculty

members at the University of Tennessee Health Science Center — specialize in complex autoimmune diseases including arthritis and lupus and a wide spectrum of Rheumatic conditions that result in joint pain, bone pain, musculoskeletal disorders, organ system dysfunction and other unique symptoms. Along with physician services, UCH provides easy coordination of imaging, labs, infusion therapy and pharmacy management.

6401 Poplar Avenue, Suite 190, Memphis, TN | 930 Madison Avenue, Suite 801, Memphis, TN 1999 Hwy 51 South, Suite A, Covington, TN | 901.866.8770 | UniversityClinicalHealth.com SPECIAL PROMOTION


2019

FACES OF THE

MID-SOUTH

THE FACE OF

RUNNING FLEET FEET >>>

Passion — defined as a strong feeling of enthusiasm or excitement for something — demands action. Passion for running, fitness, and a healthy lifestyle has continually inspired Fleet Feet to be the local fixture for active Memphians. Community is central to Fleet Feet’s identity, and is evident at weekly hosted

fun runs, track workouts, and yoga classes, as well as supporting local races, youth cross country and track, and directing a Kids Run Memphis summer camp. What began 26 years ago as a journey to become the best place to get fitted for running gear has evolved into a shop that strives to be so much more.

4530 Poplar in Laurelwood | 901.761.0078 | FleetFeetMemphis.com Facebook.com/FleetFeetMemphis | Instagram.com/FleetFeetMemphs SPECIAL PROMOTION


2019

FACES OF THE

MID-SOUTH

THE FACE OF

SALONS & SPAS

GOULD'S SALON SPA >>> Philip and David Gould, Owners, and Gould’s Academy, Paul Gould, Director Celebrating 87 years in Memphis, Gould’s Gould’s Academy, founded in 2011, is a Salons & Spa is the oldest family-owned salon premier cosmetology school offering an exciting and spa company in the U.S. Founded in 1932 salon and spa curriculum to over 190 students enrolled in programs ranging from cosmetology by Sam Gould, Philip and David Gould now to esthetics and manicuring. own and operate locations throughout the greater Memphis area and Olive Branch. More When it comes to awards, Gould’s is proud to than 400 Gould’s employees study to stay have been voted #1 salon & spa in reader polls current with, and receive training in, the most throughout Memphis including The Commercial Appeal, the Memphis Flyer, and At Home fashion-forward looks for men and women. Tennessee magazine. Our required continuing education programs keep our massage therapist and estheticians up Gould’s is proud to call Memphis home and looking forward to keeping Memphians looking to speed on the latest modalities in massage therapy and skin care. and feeling their best for another 87 years. GouldSalonSpa.com SPECIAL PROMOTION


2019

FACES OF THE

MID-SOUTH

THE FACE OF

SOCIAL CHANGE

THE NATIONAL CIVIL RIGHTS MUSEUM >>> The National Civil Rights Museum, located at the historic Lorraine Motel where civil rights leader Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. was assassinated, gives a comprehensive overview of the American Civil Rights Movement from 1619 to the present. Since the Museum opened in 1991, millions of visitors from around the world

have come, including more than 90,000 students annually. Serving as the new public square, the Museum is steadfast in its mission to chronicle the American Civil Rights Movement, examine today’s global civil and human rights issues, provoke thoughtful debate and serve as a catalyst for positive social change.

450 Mulberry Street, Memphis, TN 38103 | 901.521.9699 | CivilRightsMuseum.org SPECIAL PROMOTION


2019

FACES OF THE

MID-SOUTH

THE FACE OF

STEAKS

FOLK'S FOLLY PRIME STEAK HOUSE >>> When real estate developer Humphrey Folk opened his namesake restaurant in 1977, friends scoffed at his endeavor, so he dubbed his fledgling steak house Folk’s Folly. To this day, the restaurant

remains a true Memphis original. Consistently voted the best steak house in the city, Folk’s Folly serves prime cuts, fresh seafood, and a variety of traditional favorites and innovative specials.

551 S. Mendenhall, Memphis, TN 38117 | 901.762.8200 | FolksFolly.com SPECIAL PROMOTION


2019

FACES OF THE

MID-SOUTH

THE FACE OF

STEM CELL RESEARCH

SCHRADER ORTHOPEDIC & STEM CELL TREATMENT CENTER >>> Lawrence F. Schrader, MD, FACS THE FOREFRONT OF CELLULAR THERAPIES Dr. Schrader has pioneered/championed many new technologies in his 35-year medical career. In 2012 he was invited to join a Californiabased research group to be part of their IRB-approved clinical research study of stem cell therapy. He became a patient as well as a provider. Training involved education in

the current science of stem cell therapy and surgical and medical techniques used for patient care and research protocols. Only approved techniques are used for any stem cell procedure following strict guidelines for treating these conditions. Dr. Schrader has personally developed many of these over the past ďŹ ve years.

927 Cordova Station Ave., Cordova, TN 38018 | 901.465.4300 | SchraderOrthopedicsAndStemCell.com SPECIAL PROMOTION


2019

FACES OF THE

MID-SOUTH

THE FACE OF

THE MULTI-SPECIALTY GROUP

CONSOLIDATED MEDICAL PRACTICES OF MEMPHIS, PLLC >>> Doctors include: Derene Akins, Michelle Allmon, Jeremy Avila, Reuben Avila, Robert Burns, John Buttross, Tommy Campbell, Laura Engbretson, Arthur Franklin, Maher Ghawji, Malini Gupta, Ara Hanissian, Gina Hanissian, Greg Hanissian, Raza Hashmi, Mary Margaret Hurley, David Iansmith, Margarita Lamothe, Kashif Latif, Shannon Riedley-Malone, Sonal Mehr, Edward Muir, Lisa Myers, Kristie Nowak, Imad Omer, Mohammad Qureshi, Nidal Rahal, Rabia Rehman, George Van Rushing, Bashar Shala, Henry Stamps, Allison Stiles, T. George Stoev, Ralph Taylor, Barton Thrasher, Michael Threlkeld, Stephen Threlkeld, Randy Villanueva, and Angela Watson CMPM, a “group practice without walls,” was established in 2008 to provide compassionate, convenient, and efficient care for those in the Mid-South. Since its formation CMPM has grown to 39 physicians in multiple specialties located across the area, from Midtown to Oakland. The physicians enjoy practice autonomy while benefiting from the economies of scale and scope provided by a larger group. With its network of nationally recognized physicians, nurse practitioners and health care providers, CMPM strives to provide compassionate, outstanding and personalized care to those living in Shelby County and the surrounding areas. 6799 Great Oaks Road #250, Memphis, TN 38138 | 901.821.8300 | MedicalOfMemphis.com SPECIAL PROMOTION


2019

FACES OF THE

MID-SOUTH

THE FACE OF

VASCULAR SURGERY

VASCULAR AND VEIN INSTITUTE OF THE SOUTH >>> Left to right: Dr. Prateek K. Gupta and Dr. Anton Dias Perera Dr. Anton Dias Perera and Dr. Prateek K. Gupta are board-certified vascular surgeons specializing in the treatment of complex vascular disease. The Vascular and Vein Institute of the South offers a broad range of services including outpatient angiography and endovascular intervention, vascular

laboratory studies, varicose vein care, and prosthetics. They have achieved excellence in treatment of peripheral arterial disease and limb preservation in patients with cardiovascular disease. Dr. Dias Perera and Dr. Gupta are dedicated to providing the highest quality of care to their patients.

1385 W. Brierbrook Rd., Germantown, TN 38138 | 2693 Union Ave. Ext., Memphis, TN 38112 901.390.2930 • VascularAndVeinInstitute.com SPECIAL PROMOTION


2019

FACES OF THE

MID-SOUTH

THE FACE OF

WEDDING REGISTRY BABCOCK GIFTS >>>

Babcock Gifts has been helping wedding registrants and Mid-Southerners set tables and choose the perfect gifts for 47 years. Even with the conveniences of modern technology, our goal remains to provide Memphis a stellar collection of

tabletop selections and gifts, coupled with exemplary customer service. If you have not been to Babcock Gifts lately, we invite you to come in soon and let us assist you with all your entertaining and gift-giving needs.

Laurelwood Shopping Center, 4538 Poplar Avenue, Memphis, TN 38117 | 901.763.0700 SPECIAL PROMOTION


2019

FACES OF THE

MID-SOUTH

THE FACE OF

WEIGHT LOSS & WELLNESS

DE LA BELLE WELLNESS & SPA >>> Renee Pinlac, MSN, FNP Nurse Practitioner, is the owner of De La Belle Wellness & Spa, in the Shops of Chickasaw Oaks Village. Renee received her Masters of Science in Nursing and is certified in Family Practice. She specializes in Comprehensive Weight Loss Management and Education, Endocrinology, and Facial rejuvenation. Renee holds certification as a Master Cosmetic Botox and Filler Injector, as well as certifications in Laser Facial Aesthetics and Non-invasive Laser Lipo treatments. Renee believes in providing only modern and state-ofthe-art cosmetic services; such as PRP (Platelet Rich Plasma) injections for facial rejuvenation and hair restoration. Her 17+ years of experience at St. Jude Children’s Research Hospital has allowed her to bring a higher level of professionalism and compassion to medical aesthetic and weight loss treatments. Renee cares about her clients' wellbeing, both inside and out at De La Belle Wellness and Spa. With her extensive clinical background, she's holding the Aesthetic industry of Memphis to a higher standard than ever before! 3086 Poplar Ave. Memphis, TN 38111 901.433.9024 DeLaBelle.net SPECIAL PROMOTION


2019

FACES OF THE

MID-SOUTH

THE FACE OF

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Revising the Riverfront contin u ed from page 67

BRINGING IN THE OUTSIDERS

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here are, inevitably, voices that complain of importing outside talent to change our city. But Coletta staunchly defends bringing in Studio Gang and SCAPE. “There are a limited number of firms in the country with a reputation for designing iconic parks,” she says. “This isn’t a knock on Memphians, because we have firms that are recognized nationally for their abilities, and we are pleased when they work in other cities. Just like Shelby Farms Park, the riverfront deserved the best design firm possible for this job, and that’s what we have with the team of Studio Gang and SCAPE. And the construction of a new park will be a big opportunity for Memphis companies, including MWBEs [Minority and Women’s Business Enterprise].” She further argues that there are compelling reasons that go beyond their expertise. Successful cities that maintain their vitality can absorb out-of-town

The Tom Lee Park Engagement Center at Beale Street Landing has a model of the proposed design with renderings and virtual-reality displays. The center will be up through May.

thinking and ideas while not giving up what makes up their character. For Memphis, it’s maintaining the grit and grind while welcoming guests to the table. “If any city becomes a place that does not welcome outsiders, I think you are clearly on a trajectory as a city for decline,” Coletta says. “What we ought to be saying is everybody who comes to our city should be able to do their very best work in Memphis. What’s the competitive advantage we have in making projects like this? It ought to be our size. It ought to be the fact that you can get things done easier, faster, cheaper, and do them brilliantly.” And then there’s the argument that an outsider can

bring a perspective not always visible to those who have been around a long time. “We really needed specialist eyes on the park and we needed fresh eyes,” she says. “I have a lot of imagination and can imagine things that aren’t. But honestly, when you’ve looked at something for as many years as many of us have looked at our riverfront, it’s hard to see it sometimes as something else, and something dramatically different. To appreciate what is really Memphis and special about it, but also to be able to push beyond what we see and let the greatness come out. And there’s a real advantage to having people with fresh eyes that have worked in really difficult circumstances — our riverfront is challenging, mainly because of the rise and fall of the river, 55 feet a year. It’s a real bear.”

LISTENING AND LEARNING

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t the heart of proposing something new for such a highly visible part of the city is the need to hear what people think — and to make sure those observations are given proper consideration. The MRPP says that more than 4,000 Memphians have been surveyed so far, plus another 800 visitors from outside Memphis who were passing through on Riverside Drive. More than 50 community meetings were held as well as other kinds of surveys. Last month, the Tom Lee Park plan was announced at Beale Street Landing, where the public engagement center has a large model of the proposed park and considerable information on the proposal. Coletta says the riverfront concept was not only built with respect to public comment but is consistent with other ongoing initiatives. One is Memphis 3.0, a collaborative effort of government and citizens to formulate a 20-year plan for the city. The plan, in the making for more than two years, involved interviews with about 15,000 citizens on which directions they think the city should go. “The riverfront concept is held up in Memphis 3.0 as a model for open space opportunities,” Coletta says. “In many ways, the riverfront is a case study for Mayor Jim Strickland, and 3.0’s mantra of Build Up, Not Out. With 3.0 predicting ‘modest growth’ for downtown and eastward, it calls for reinvestment and intensification downtown. The riverfront is critical to stimulating more development and investment.”    Memphis 3.0 has identified “anchors” to be leveraged for growth, “and downtown is identified as the anchor for all of Memphis,” Coletta says. “3.0 calls for undervalued and underleveraged land to be capitalized on, and there’s no better example for this than the riverfront project.”  Orff describes the design challenge for Tom Lee Park as figuring out how to “make a park

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MEMPHIS IN MAY that is beloved.” SCAPE, Studio Gang, and MRPP have painstakingly listened to the comments that have cascaded ne stakeholder that has a lot to say in. “Our job is to be more synthetic and visionary about the proposed riverfront changes, particand try to address those comments in the best way ularly in Tom Lee Park, is the Memphis in May we can,” Orff says, “while maintaining a kind of International Festival. The 30-acre park has been home holistic and purposeful vision to the Beale Street Music Festival of a park.” And that vision is and the World Championship BarBY THE NUMBERS how the park can best serve the becue Cooking Contest for decades. community for the next centuColetta says that MIM was inry. “How is it going to help catMRPP says the $70 million volved even before the design was campaign includes four apult Memphis forward? How being developed and that there projects on the most visican it meet the needs of indihave been numerous meetings and ble piece of the riverfront communications with them. It was viduals?” she says. “But also, between Jefferson and how can it serve a whole range not always so with past proposals Georgia. Of that $70 milof different stakeholders with to redo Tom Lee Park. lion, Tom Lee Park is about frankly different priorities? So “Memphis in May has opposed $60 million. we take these comments and changes in the past because they suggestions and fold them were not involved in the process,” into the design process in a Funding is expected to come she says. “We have made sure they from city, county, state, and very direct way.” have been involved and spent federal governments as Studio Gang’s Biagi says the $100,000 just to respond to their well as from philanthropies, questions about the park. As a successful process of creatcorporations, and individuing a connected network out result, the design has three huge als. The breakdown would of disparate parks, trails, and lawns essentially created for Membe about 60 percent public to spaces downtown is hinged phis in May, with built-in logisti40 percent private. on building relationships. “It’s cal and operational improvements about how we listen really well   to the park that will result in less The MRPP maintains 250 to people who live in the envidamage to the park and ought acres of riverfront under to save the festival money in reronments where we’re doing contract with the city, work,” she says. “How do we mediation costs.” which, it says, is essentially do a good job of getting someShe says MIM “will have the best the same cost to the city as one to sit at the table who has festival site in the country and the when the RDC was formed high stakes, maybe low inf lupark should be a competitive ad18 years ago. Last year ence? How do we reach out vantage for it.” MRPP signed a 13-year manand get a lot of voices? We use The proposed timeline for the agement agreement with a any number of methods: onepark makeover would begin this 10-year extension. The level on-one meetings, small focus summer and be completed by Deof city funding will continue groups, meetings far away cember 2020. This would mean to be set by the city council from the riverfront. We made that the 2020 MIM events would each year. sure we were accessible, even be held elsewhere. There is prec  edent: In 2011 the barbecue event going to a Grizzlies game and setting up a table and getting Staffing of the parks is done had to move to Tiger Lane because by MRPP. Its rangers patrol feedback that way. There’s an of slow-rising river f looding. the parks and can call on intentionality behind it, and Biagi says the expectation for the Memphis Police Departthe fundamental ethic of our Tom Lee Park is to not only make it ment for backup. work is that people who live better for MIM events but to bring in people the rest of the year. “We and work and commute have their voices at the table early can combine what they’ve been and often. This is meant to be a park that lives up doing on the site with how we can make it operationto all of those aspirations.”  ally better for everyone,” she says. “And I think that’s Biagi says one thing they do is identify points the long term goal that they have and that MRPP of convergence in what people are saying. “Where has, and I think everybody has, which is how can this people are saying a lot of the same thing, maybe be a great signature park, 365 days of the year, and it’s an issue to investigate more deeply,” she says. how we can do that in a way that makes operating “We’re trying to really sift through and make sure big events or small events or medium-size events we’re really addressing big concerns and learning throughout the year in a way that’s both economifrom the inside.” cally feasible and helps the park recover quickly.”

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GARDEN VARIETY

Stopping the Pea Soup If you want to keep your water features clean and clear, you’ll need to start now, before the algae begin to bloom.

by john a. jennings well into the summer, begins near the end of winter in the Memphis area.

PHOTOGRAPH BY PETRAAUSFICIROVA | DREAMSTIME

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IRST, if you have not done so already, clean out all leaves and other debris. Decaying organic matter is one source of food. Also, make sure your pump is adequately sized and working correctly to filter out and chew up the smaller organic matter you can’t get out with your hands and a net.

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o garden is complete without a water feature of some sort. In Memphis, one of the most common additions is an ornamental fish pond. But, as much joy as they bring, a poorly managed pond can bring with it a degree of consternation too.

Every year, usually beginning sometime in June, depending upon weather patterns, I start to hear complaints that a property owner’s pond water has turned green, the previously pleasant garden feature becoming a visual blight on an otherwise serene landscape.

Plants provide a place for fish to

ECOND, keep your bacterial levels high. Use a product like Microbe Lift PL, my favorite, dumping a quart to a gallon or more of the liquid in the pond in early March, depending upon the size of your pond, to jump-start your bacterial colony so that it will be ready to consume your fish’s feces as the fish come out of hibernation and begin to feed and defecate more as the water warms. Follow up by adding one to three ounces of the product each week through the end of fall. Moreover, since the size of your bacterial colony is a function of the surface area upon which it can grow, if you don’t already have a 2- to 3-inch layer of medium-brown gravel, a cheap commodity available at area mulch

above: Practice early prevention to prevent unattractive “algae bloom” from taking over your water feature. right: Some blooming water plants will attract dragonflies, lovely to watch and also an effective tool in reducing the mosquito population.

hide from predators, cool the water, and increase the oxygen level of the water in your garden feature. PHOTOGRAPH BY DENISE P. LETT | DREAMSTIME

Often compared to “pea soup,” this mess is algae bloom, a sudden increase in the population of algae, which I am told by biologists is the simplest organism on the planet. While there exist some reasonably effective algaecides on the market that claim not to hurt fish or desired plants, I remain skeptical of them. They take time to work, and you still have to clean out the dead algae. Prevention, begun before the problem starts, is better, and the problem, though often not noticed until M A R C H 2 0 1 9 • M E M P H I S M A G A Z I N E . C O M • 143

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yards in Memphis, you should add one, being sure to rinse it off thoroughly before adding it to the pond.

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6th Annual

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HIRD, since your beneficial plants get the sunlight they need through leaves above the water’s surface, lightly tint the water, using a product like Microbe Lift Bioblack, to decrease the amount of sunlight penetrating the surface. Remember, a little goes a long way and once you put it in, if you’ve put too much, it’s hard to undo it. Thus, maybe add one-fourth of the concentrate specified on the package for a pond your size and wait a week before adding another fourth, stopping when it is visibly tinted but not so much so that you cannot see the bottom of the pond.

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OURTH, choose plants around the edge of the pond that will arch over the pond and shade it, such as a small or medium-sized ornamental tree, some Fatsia


Choose plants around the edge of your pond that will shade it, such as a small or medium-sized ornamental tree, some Fatsia japonica, or other shrubs.

We’re Growing!

NURSERY GRAND OPENING

japonica, or other shrubs. If you add a tree, it should be deciduous and placed so that it shields the pond from eastern, southern, or western exposure, with a southwestern exposure being particularly problematic for ornamental ponds.

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INALLY, use water plants to cover at least 50 percent of the pond’s surface. You’ll want to use a combination of plants for deep water, shallow water, and plants that float, as well as a combination of plants that are evergreen, perennial, and annual for our area. In addition to reducing the sunlight that penetrates the water’s surface, water plants provide a place for fish to hide from predators, cool the water, and increase the oxygen level of the water. A good choice for evergreen — my favorite for ponds, in fact — is Equisetum hyemale, which clumps into slender stalks, providing year-round interest and needing little care. As an added benefit, it attracts dragonflies,

lovely to watch and also an effective tool in reducing the mosquito population. You’ll see the dragonflies resting atop the tall reeds and then dive-bombing the water as they spy their prey, which is their food and your enemy. Other water plants that are favorites of mine when I install a pond, include:

SATURDAY MARCH 23 10AM-5PM

1. Nymphaea; 2. A mix of annual floaters like Pistia stratiotes, Eichhornia crassipes, and Ceratophyllum demersum; 3. Louisiana irises, a group of five species of iris, which tend to grow well in pots in ponds; and, 4. Acorus gramineus. While I can’t absolutely guarantee that algae bloom won’t happen — Mother Nature can be rather unpredictable — I can say that I’ve never seen a client who carefully followed all of these steps experience an algae bloom. But, you must start now.

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ASK VANCE

Elks Rest Our trivia expert solves local mysteries of who, what, when, where, why, and why not. Well, sometimes.

by vance lauderdale DEAR VANCE: This old postcard shows “Elks Rest” in Memphis. What was this place, and where was it? — m.a., memphis.

magnetic personality.” The group first called themselves the “Jolly Corks” and they were mainly a social club, but as their numbers grew they began to focus their efforts on philanthropic endeavors. I’m not sure why they selected an elk as their image (though similar groups chose a lion or a moose), but in 1871, a charter was established in New York City for the first Elks lodge. The Elks history notes that “membership grew rapidly,” and that’s an understatement. In the next few decades, the Elks organized more than 2,800 lodges across North America, and Lodge #27 opened in Memphis in 1884 as the first one in the South. The Elks first met in members’ homes, before opening an impressive lodge on Jefferson, but the Elks are best-known here for the incredible structure they erected in 1927 at the corner of Front and Jefferson. The Elks Club and Hotel was one of this city’s landmarks, a stunning 12-story edifice that contained a restaurant, swimming pool, gymnasium, bowling alley, and all sorts of amenities. It also held an upscale hotel, which was later renamed the King Cotton, and it was this building that was dePolice believe the molished by dynamite in old bronze elk was 1984 to make room for the Morgan Keegan (now the carted away and Raymond James) tower. sold for scrap. The clubs took care of

Elks Rest, as it looked then and now (far right) in Forest Hill, with a marker for one of the Elks buried there. DEAR M.A.: The Benevolent

and Protective Order of the Elks, often shortened to BPOE, was (and still is, in some areas) one of this country’s largest and most prestigious fraternal organizations, second only to the Masons, I’d say. I don’t know that for certain, since my family never joined anything, believing that simply being a Lauderdale carried enough prestige. Even so, our family never had an Elks Rest, and for more than a century, Memphis had a really nice one — with an unfortunate emphasis on “had.” First things first: The Elks were formed by an Englishman named Charles Algernon Sidney Vivian. A successful actor and singer in London, he moved to New York City, where (according to an Elks history) “other actors and performers gravitated towards his

the Elks when they were living. The Elks Rests took care of them after death. More than 80 lodges purchased plots in local cemeteries to provide a final resting place for their members. The Elks Rest in our city was established in the early 1900s in Forest Hill Cemetery. An Elks history explains: “Scattered across the United States in peaceful corners of the landscape are sacred plots of ground — some small and simple, others quite grandiose — wherein rest the remains of Departed Brothers, still side-byside in fraternal unity, though their final summons to the Celestial Lodge came as far back as a century ago.” Each Elks Rest was guarded by a wonderful, life-size (or close to it) bronze statue of an elk, usually perched on a high stone base. A marker attached to the base

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reads: “In Memorium. Erected by Memphis Lodge No. 27, Benevolent and Protective Order of Elks of the U.S. of America, 1912-1913.” An engraved clock is stopped at 11 o’clock, a time which, again according to their history, “has a tender significance. Wherever an Elk may roam, whatever his lot in life may be, when this hour falls upon the dial of night the great heart of Elkdom swells and throbs. It is the golden hour of recollection, the homecoming of those who wander, the mystic roll call of those who will come no more.” That same history acknowledges that some may find this burial location unusual: “While we can’t fully understand all the social factors which induce an Elk to want to be buried in an Elks Rest as opposed to some more traditional family plot, we must accept it as irrefutable proof of a strong commitment to the Order, certainly on the part of the deceased Elk, but also by the Lodge which consecrated the site in the first place.” The graves of the Memphis members are marked by rather simple carved stones, and they include men from all walks of life (and yes, this was a men-only group). At Forest Hill, you’ll find insurance salesman Frederich Dichtel (1870-1923), feed dealer Harry Hasenwinkle (1869-1923), salesman Clarence Hopkins (1868-1924), Peabody Hotel steward John W. Bell (died 1904), and more than a dozen others. Among them is John Joseph Marron (1873-1943), who served as the longtime manager of the Elks Club here. The old postcard presumably shows the Elks Rest shortly after the statue was unveiled. Floral tributes carry such Elks attributes as brotherly love, justice, charity, and fidelity. The bronze elk watched over these graves for more than a century, but a visit to this place today shows a far different scene. On a December morning in 2014, cemetery workers arrived to discover the statue missing, its legs hacksawed at the hooves. Security cameras showed a pickup truck entering the cemetery the day before, and less than an hour later leaving with its bed covered in a tarp. Police believe the old bronze elk was in the back, carted away and sold for scrap. The statue was never recovered, and only the stone base marks the Elks Rest today.

Bemis Bag Company

DEAR VANCE: I have an old felt patch for Bemis Bags Memphis. What did this company make, and where was it located? — g.k., memphis.

A careful look at the stitching tells me this company made … bags. But I suppose you want more information than that [yes, he does, Vance – ed.] so I’ll keep typing until I tell you all I know about this company. First of all, anyone who thinks of a “bag company” probably assumes they made sacks like Kroger uses for your groceries. And Bemis, at one time or another, probably made those. But nowadays, if you unwrap a package of Kraft cheese, squeeze Crest toothpaste from a tube, or swig a Pepsi from a plastic bottle, Bemis made those too. In fact the Bemis Company — they dropped “bag” from their name years ago — makes about every kind of food container and packaging you can think of, with more than 25,000 employees and 80 plants, mills, factories, and distribution centers in 12 countries around the globe. DEAR G.K.:

The company was founded in St. Louis in 1858 by Judson Moss Bemis, a former shipping clerk who started making cloth bags for flour. What ensured his success was the ability to produce finely woven bags that resisted tearing or leaking. Bemis, now joined by his brother Stephen, also came up with a way to print a company’s name or logo directly onto the cloth bags. According to a company history, this innovation “saved millers the time-consuming, messy task of stenciling, and also appealed to the average consumer, long accustomed to buying flour in cumbersome wooden barrels.” Bemis Brothers Bag Company opened a branch here in 1900, first located in a downtown alley between Main and Front. In 1912, the company moved to a five-story building at 134 East Carolina, where they remained until the 1950s, when the firm moved its operations to 1975 Latham. In the meantime, the national headquarters of Bemis had also moved around a bit, with major plants in Boston and Seattle, before finally setting on Neenah, Wisconsin, where their worldwide operations are based today. The Memphis operation was part of the Converted Paper and Paperboard Products Division, where they made paper bags for groceries. But as more and more merchants offered their customers plastic bags, the paper sack market almost disappeared, and Bemis closed its Memphis plant in 1997. Now, that felt patch obviously wasn’t sewn onto any of these products, and it could have been part of a regular company uniform, but I wonder if it came from a baseball uniform. In the early 1900s, Bemis fielded its own baseball team, competing against other companies in town. The best way to prove the patch came from a ball player’s uniform is to find a photograph of the team. Well, looking through a “finder’s guide” to the company archives stored in the Seattle Museum of History and Industry, I came across a reference to Folder #1994.15.1.28.1-5, holding materials for “Bemis baseball teams from Memphis, New Orleans, Minneapolis, Indianapolis, and Omaha.” And what really caught my eye was this notation on that particular folder: “Includes letters extolling the relative good looks of the teams, apparently in response to a photograph of the Seattle team.” Well, I’ll decide for myself if the Memphis team was better-looking than those in other cities. Fuel up the limousine, Basil. We’re headed to Seattle!

The Memphis operation of Bemis remained in business here for close to a century.

got a question for vance? EMAIL: askvance@memphismagazine.com

MAIL: Vance Lauderdale, Memphis magazine, 65 Union Avenue,

Suite 200, Memphis, TN 38103 ONLINE: memphismagazine.com/ask-vance M A R C H 2 0 1 9 • M E M P H I S M A G A Z I N E . C O M • 147

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DINING OUT

The New Grisanti’s Determined to honor his family’s legacy, Chef Judd Grisanti updates rustic Italian favorites with modern cooking.

Chef Judd Grisanti whips up cocktail sauce sorbet.

by pamela denney ph otographs by justin fox burks

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igh-back booths — the black leather button-tufted kind — turn any meal, be it business or pleasure, into something special. Maybe it’s the privacy they afford or their throne-like perch, but tucked inside a classy restaurant booth, food tastes better, and relationships feel more intimate.

ily’s Italian homeland in Tuscany. For almost two hours, I speak with Judd about the restaurant and his decision to start cooking again after a 10-year break. He is forthright, and often emotional, about his relationship with Ronnie and with the extended family of Grisanti chefs, who for four generations have served classic Italian food at a string of popular restaurants in Memphis. “If anyone had told me five years ago I’d be sitting here talking to you about this beautiful new restaurant, I would have said they are crazy,” Judd s ay s . “ B ut here I am, and I can tell you this: I’m ve r y b le s s e d . I’m very pleased.” Admittedly, the past couple of years have been rough. After leaving Spindini, the Italian restaurant on South Main he opened in 2007, Judd walked away from cooking, despite a culinary focus he traces back to his boyhood days. (“I probably watched my mother make

cheesecakes for the restaurants several thousand times before I made my first one,” he recalls.) But when his father got ill, Judd came back to help with Grisanti’s in Collierville, the follow-up to Ronnie’s long-standing restaurant at Poplar and Humes. Family loss came quickly. First, Judd’s mother, Kay Francis Grisanti, died. Ronnie passed away next in 2017. And then in November, two months after the opening of the new Grisanti’s, restaurant partner Nick Belisomo died at 72. Judd ca l led hi m Uncle Nicki. “He was a mentor and a best friend,” Judd says. “I talked to him 10 times a day.” For Judd, the family deaths kindle memories, but they also build new resolve. “My family has been in the restaurant business for 110 years,” Judd says. “I didn’t used to think much about that, but now I do. I look at my grandfather and my uncle and my Dad, and sometimes, I still feel like a kid,

Slices of grilled sourdough come alongside meatballs simmered in Pomodoro sauce. and sprinkled with Ricotta Salata.

At Ronnie Grisanti’s, a dozen the East Memphis Regalia Center. “My dad loved a booth,” Judd or so booths direct the restaurant’s stylish design, connectsays. He is wistful and remembers ing the taupe-coleasily, “He would alored dining room “My family has been ways say I wish we to a busy cocktail had more booths. in the restaurant bar. But for Chef We need more business for 110 Judd Grisanti, the booths. He would booths are much even take a nap in years. I didn’t used a booth between more essential than nostalgia or decor. to think much about lunch and dinner.” They are instead an In late December, that, but now I do.” homage, a way to I settle into one of acknowledge Ronnie Grisanti, those black leather cocoons, the large circular one near the bar’s his late father and the namesake of his new Italian restaurant in mural of Lucca, the Grisanti fam148 • M E M P H I S M A G A Z I N E . C O M • M A R C H 2 0 1 9

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PAM’S PICS: THREE TO TRY

ZUPPA DI ISABELLA Luscious

in color and taste, a bowl of asparagus and lobster bisque — topped with green onions, more lobster, and a swirl of chili oil — is a meal in itself, so I like to split a serving for a perfectly proportioned appetizer. Bellísimo! ($9) Murals by Memphis artist Bill Turri dominate the new Ronnie Grisanti’s in the East Memphis Regalia Center. wanting to talk to them, to see basil and spinach rigatoni and what they think.” linguini flavored with saff ron. The machine — the CadilAfter several visits for dinlac of its genre — can ner and lunch, I feel turn out 25 pounds certain Judd’s forebears are smiling of pasta in 45 minutes, Judd with approval explains: “It’s at the g raciousness of fun and exciting, and I can the new Grisanti’s and i n f u s e t he its comprepasta w ith whatever flahensive menu vors I need to that includes enhance a dish.” appetizers (TusCreamy burrata and More complex can butter), salads tomato salad dishes update the (only burrata and tomato will do), 12-inch menu, as well. Fried oysters top Ahi tuna carpaccio, enpizzas (lobster or Pisano, please), crusted with pepper and sesame and for lunch, the Big Rinaldo, a marvel of a burger on a ciabatta seeds and plated with Asian slaw. bun made with a custom blend of Ginger and orange citrus sauce, cheerful as the sun, warms wild ribeye, short rib, and tenderloin. Other menu items showcase salmon and a crisscross of slenold-world recipes updated with der asparagus stalks. modern techniques. (Think sous Longtime customers will no vide cooking and wood smoke doubt be pleased by the many injector guns.) Grisanti’s oysGrisanti standards still on the ters, for instance, mix so many menu, a parade of Tuscan comtasty options you’ll be tempted fort food, brought to the table to try them all. Oysters Rockequickly and served piping hot: feller, a classic throwback, folElfo’s Special with 10 plump shrimp; lasagna layered with low the same recipe popularized beef and salsiccia; manicotti by Judd’s grandfather, Elfo. But in Tuscan gravy; lemon and the restaurant’s raw oysters, a rosemary chicken grilled unchanging selection from both coasts, are served with a scoop der a brick; and meatballs — a of savory sorbet made by whipcombination of veal, pork, and ping house-made cocktail sauce beef — simmered in Pomodoro with liquid nitrogen. It’s a bit of sauce and garnished with cherkitchen magic that adds flavor ry tomatoes. And while many and keeps the oysters cold. restaurants frown these days on A Bottene pasta-making mabread and butter, at Grisanti’s, a chine imported from Italy also basket of fragrant focaccia, with is invigorating the menu with a olive oil and balsamic alongslew of house-made pastas like side, are part of every meal.

RICOTTA CAKE Don’t be fooled: Ricotta cake is cheesecake made with a traditional recipe. While American cooks typically use cream cheese, Italians prefer ricotta, explains Chef Judd Grisanti. “With ricotta, the cheesecake is fluffier and lighter and not quite as dense.” ($9)

OYSTERS SAMPLER Mix-and-

match half-a-dozen oysters from the East and West Coasts with charming names like Momma Mia, Riptide, or Raspberry Point. Selections vary but all are served with mignonette, lemon aioli, and cocktail sauce spun into sorbet. ($20)

RONNIE GRISANTI’S ITALIAN RESTAURANT 6150 Poplar Ave., Suite 122 901-850-0191 ★★★

★★★★ ★★★ ★★ ★

Exceptional Very good Satisfactory Skip it!

FOOD: Satisfying Italian classics work hand-in-

hand with more chef-driven seafood dishes, a pizza and panini menu at lunch, and small bites at the bar served from 2 to 5 p.m. DRINKS: Try classic cocktails — Negronis, Bellinis, and whisky sours made with Limoncello and Maker’s Mark — expertly mixed by longtime Grisanti bartender Chris Backey and Leanna Tedford, who recently relocated from the Grove Grill. ATMOSPHERE: Even with the festive joy de vivre at Grisanti’s on busy weekend nights, diners can still talk (and hear) easily, thanks to a welcoming remodel by Memphis-based design firm Graham Reese. EXTRAS: Confused a little by the Grisanti restaurant family tree? A collection of framed memorabilia, including portraits and early menus when dinner for two cost $6.95, will help. PRICES: Soup, salad, and appetizers ($7-$15); paninis and pizzas ($13-$19); pastas ($17-$23); chef specialties ($23-$28); sides ($4); desserts ($3-7). OPEN: For lunch and dinner, Monday through Saturday, from 11 a.m. to 10 p.m. M A R C H 2 0 1 9 • M E M P H I S M A G A Z I N E . C O M • 149

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the

MEMPHIS DINING guide

Tidbits: Hu. Diner marries comfort with class by pamela denney

H

ave you noticed? Parker House rolls are having a moment, and at Hu. Diner, the folded throwbacks are delicious, deep-fried, and — much like the original recipe — sprung from a mistake. Here’s the back story from executive chef T J Harville: A batch of beignet dough, left unattended, over-proofed, so cooks punched it back down and, for a second time, forgot about it. The dough rose again, making it useless for beignets. So, the kitchen got creative. “We thought, let’s throw some into the deep fryer to see what happens, and we ended up with a dinner roll,” Harville says. By the time Hu. Diner opened in mid-January at the corner of Madison and Main, cooks had perfected the rolls’ preparation: Eliminate the sugar, intentionally double-proof the dough, deep-fry to order, and toss the pillowy rolls in a little salt, cardamom butter, and

benne seeds, a Southern heirloom variety similar to sesame. “The rolls are unique, a big hit, and one of the most lucrative mistakes we’ve ever made,” Harville says. Other surprise twists weave throughout the restaurant’s menu, developed for a modern American diner serving both quick lunches and more leisurely meals. Yes, customers can grab a good cup of coffee and a slice of classic pie. (Meringues! Berries! And chocolate chess, to name a few.) Burgers and milkshakes also are popular, including kid-friendly flavors and boozy adult combos. But look more closely at the menu, and the hand of an experienced chef is clearly at play: For brunch, Asian-inspired soufflé pancakes served with Chantilly cream; for lunch, crawfish mac and cheese made with smoked Gouda and Velveeta, or, for lighter choices, baby gem lettuce salad or white bean ragout with clams. And for dinner? Try cornflake

fried chicken served with house-made hot sauce, slaw, and pickles. A Kentucky native, Harville grew up canning, and he likes to incorporate pickled vegetables into his food. Diners can’t help but notice the half-gallon Mason jars filled with pickled produce that line the restaurant’s room divider, a practical component of Hu.’s classy design by Brooklyn-based Home Studios. Hu. Diner is an extension of the Hu. Hotel, formerly the Madison, and the restaurant’s light-filled interior features an open kitchen and upscale details, like copper light fixtures and a polished bar and kitchen pass made from zinc. Plus, there’s the restaurant’s oversized windows, which Harville can’t wait to throw open come spring. “Memphis has a lot of life. You can feel it,” Harville says. “And Main Street is absolutely beautiful.”

PHOTOGRAPHS BY JUSTIN FOX BURKS

“We want customers to feel comfortable with our food, but still surprised a little by what we do and the ingredients we use,” says Hu. Diner executive chef T J Harville, pictured above, about a lunch, brunch, and dinner menu that includes souffle pancakes, cornflake fried chicken, and Baby Gem lettuce salad with Green Goddess buttermilk dressing.

3 S. Main St. (901-333-1224) $-$$

We celebrate our city’s community table and the people who grow, cook, and eat the best Memphis food at M E M P H I S M A G A Z I N E . C O M / F O O D - D I N I N G

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2/14/19 11:23 AM


A Curated Guide to Eating Out

M

emphis magazine offers this curated restaurant listing as a service to its readers. Broken down alphabetically by neighborhoods, this directory does not list every restaurant in town. It does, however, include the magazine’s “Top 50” choices of must-try restaurants in Memphis, a DINING SYMBOLS group that is updated every August. Establishments open B — breakfast less than a year are not eligible for “Top 50” but are noted as L — lunch “New.” This guide also includes a representative sampling D — dinner of other Bluff City eating establishments. No fast-food SB — Sunday brunch facilities or cafeterias are listed, nor have we included WB — weekend brunch establishments that rely heavily on take-out business. X— wheelchair accessible Restaurants are included regardless of whether they ad MRA — member, Memphis vertise in Memphis magazine; those that operate in multi Restaurant Association ple locations are listed under the neighborhood of their $ — under $15 per person without drinks or desserts original location. This guide is updated regularly, but we $$ — under $25 recommend that you call ahead to check on hours, prices, $$$ — $26-$50 and other details. Suggestions from readers are welcome; $$$$ — over $50 please contact us at dining@memphismagazine.com.

CENTER CITY 117 PRIME—Restaurateurs Craig Blondis and Roger Sapp teamed up with Chef Ryan Trimm to recreate the traditional American steakhouse. Serving oysters on the half shell and a variety of surf and turf options. 117 Union. 433-9851. L, D, WB, X, $-$$$ 5 SPOT—Tucked behind Earnestine & Hazel’s, features Memphis barbecue, Italian, and Creole-inspired dishes, such as polenta incaciata, barbecue spaghetti, and a fried chicken plate with collards, slaw, and skillet cornbread. 531 S. Main. 523-9754. D, X, $-$$ ALDO’S PIZZA PIES—Serving gourmet pizzas — including Mr. T Rex — salads, and more. Also 30 beers, bottled or on tap. 100 S. Main. 577-7743; 752 S. Cooper. 725-7437. L, D, X, $-$$ THE ARCADE—Possibly Memphis’ oldest cafe. Specialties include sweet potato pancakes, a fried peanut butter and banana sandwich, and breakfast served all day. 540 S. Main. 526-5757. B, L, D (Thurs.-Sat.), X, MRA, $ AUTOMATIC SLIM’S—Longtime downtown favorite specializes in contemporary American cuisine emphasizing local ingredients; also extensive martini list. 83 S. Second. 525-7948. L, D, WB, X, MRA, $-$$$ BARDOG TAVERN—Classic American grill with Italian influence, Bardog offers pasta specialties such as Grandma’s NJ Meatballs, as well as salads, sliders, sandwiches, and daily specials. 73 Monroe. 275-8752. B (Mon.-Fri.), L, D, WB, X, MRA, $-$$ BEDROCK EATS & SWEETS—Memphis’ only Paleocentric restaurant offering such dishes as pot roast, waffles, enchiladas, chicken salad, omelets, and more. Closed for dinner Sun. 327 S. Main. 409-6433. B, L, D, X, $-$$ BELLE TAVERN—Serving elevated bar food, including a butcher board with a variety of meats and cheeses, as well as daily specials. 117 Barboro Alley. 249-6580. L (Sun.), D, MRA, $ BLEU—This eclectic restaurant features American food with global influences and local ingredients. Among the specialties are a 14-oz. bone-in rib-eye and several seafood dishes. 221 S. Third, in the Westin Memphis Beale St. Hotel. 334-5950. B, L, D, WB, X, MRA, $$-$$$ BLUEFIN RESTAURANT & SUSHI LOUNGE— Serves Japanese fusion cuisine featuring seafood and steak, with seasonally changing menu; also, a sushi bar and flatbread pizza. 135 S. Main. 528-1010. L, D, X, $-$$ BRASS DOOR IRISH PUB—Irish and New-American cuisine includes such entrees as fish and chips, burgers, shepherd’s pie, all-day Irish breakfast, and more. 152 Madison. 572-1813. L, D, SB, $-$$ CAFE KEOUGH—European-style cafe serving quiche, paninis, salads, and more. 12 S. Main. 509-2469. B, L, D, X, $ CAPRICCIO GRILL ITALIAN STEAKHOUSE—Offers prime steaks, fresh seafood (lobster tails, grouper, mahi mahi),

pasta, and several northern Italian specialties. 149 Union, The Peabody. 529-4199. B, L, D, SB, X, MRA, $-$$$$ CAROLINA WATERSHED—This indoor/outdoor eatery, set around silos, features reimagined down-home classics, including fried green tomatoes with smoked catfish, a buttermilk fried chicken sandwich, burgers, and more. Closed Mon.-Thurs. 141 E. Carolina. 321-5553. L, D, WB, $-$$ CATHERINE & MARY’S—A variety of pastas, grilled quail, pâté, razor clams, and monkfish are among the dishes served at this Italian restaurant in the Chisca. 272 S. Main. 254-8600. D, SB, X, MRA, $-$$$ CHEZ PHILIPPE—Classical/contemporary French cuisine presented in a luxurious atmosphere with a seasonal menu focused on local/regional cuisine. The crown jewel of The Peabody for 35 years. Afternoon tea served Wed.-Sat., 1-3:30 p.m. (reservations required). Closed Sun.Tues. The Peabody, 149 Union. 529-4188. D, X, MRA, $$$$ COZY CORNER—Serving up ribs, pork sandwiches, chicken, spaghetti, and more; also homemade banana pudding. Closed Sun.-Mon. 745 N. Parkway and Manassas. 527-9158. L, D, $ DIRTY CROW INN—Serving elevated bar food, including poutine fries, fried catfish, and the Chicken Debris, a sandwich with smoked chicken, melted cheddar, and gravy. 855 Kentucky. 207-5111. L, D, MRA, $ EVELYN & OLIVE—Jamaican/Southern fusion cuisine includes such dishes as Kingston stew fish, Rasta Pasta, and jerk rib-eye. Closed for lunch Sat. and all day Sun.-Mon. 630 Madison. 748-5422. L, D, X, $ FAM—Casual Asian restaurant serves sushi rice bowls, noodle bowls, sushi rolls, and spring rolls. Closed Sun. 149 Madison. 701-6666. L, D, X, $ FELICIA SUZANNE’S—Southern cuisine with low-country, Creole, and Delta influences, using regional fresh seafood, local beef, and locally grown foods. Entrees include shrimp and grits. Closed Sun. and Mon. A downtown staple at Brinkley Plaza, 80 Monroe, Suite L1. 523-0877. L (Fri. only), D, X, MRA, $$-$$$ FERRARO’S PIZZERIA & PUB—Rigatoni and tortellini are among the pasta entrees here, along with pizzas (whole or by the slice) with a variety of toppings. 111 Jackson. 522-2033. L, D, X, $ FLIGHT RESTAURANT & WINE BAR— Serves steaks and seafood, along with such specialties as bison ribeye and Muscovy duck, all matched with appropriate wines. 39 S. Main. 521-8005. D, SB, X, MRA, $-$$$ FLYING FISH—Serves up fried and grilled versions of shrimp, crab, oysters, fish tacos, and catfish; also chicken and burgers. 105 S. Second. 522-8228. L, D, X, $-$$ THE GRAY CANARY—The sixth restaurant from chefs Andy Ticer and Michael Hudman, offering small plates and entrees cooked on an open flame. Oysters, octopus, and hearty steaks are among the menu options at this eatery in Old Dominick Distillery. Closed Mon. 301 S. Front. 466-6324. D, WB, X, MRA, $-$$$.

(This guide, compiled by our editors, includes editorial picks and advertisers.)

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GRECIAN GOURMET TAVERNA—Serves traditional favorites like spanakopita, pastitso, moussaka, and hand-rolled dolmathes, as well as lamb sliders and pita nachos. Closed Mon. 412 S. Main. 249-6626. L, D, X, $ GUS’S WORLD FAMOUS FRIED CHICKEN—Serves chicken with signature spicy batter, along with homemade beans, slaw, and pies. 310 S. Front. 527-4877; 215 S. Center St. (Collierville). 853-6005; 2965 N. Germantown Pkwy. (Cordova). 373-9111; 730 S. Mendenhall. 767-2323; 505 Highway 70 W., Mason, TN. 901-294-2028. L, D, X, MRA, $ HAPPY MEXICAN—Serves quesadillas, burritos, chimichangas, vegetable and seafood dishes, and more. 385 S. Second. 529-9991; 6080 Primacy Pkwy. 683-0000; 7935 Winchester. 751-5353. L, D, X, $ HU. DINER—An extension of Hu. Hotel, diner serves such dishes as country fried cauliflower, cornflake fried chicken, and octopus and grits. 3. S. Main. 333-1224. L, D, X, $-$$ HUEY’S—This family friendly restaurant offers 13 different burgers, a variety of sandwiches and delicious soups and salads. 1927 Madison. 726-4372; 1771 N. Germantown Pkwy. (Cordova). 754-3885; 77 S. Second. 527-2700; 2130 W. Poplar (Collierville). 854-4455; 7090 Malco Blvd. (Southaven). 662-349-7097; 7825 Winchester. 624-8911; 4872 Poplar. 682-7729; 7677 Farmington Blvd. (Germantown). 3183030; 8570 Highway 51 N. (Millington). 873-5025. L, D, X, MRA, $ HU. ROOF—Rooftop cocktail bar with superb city views serves toasts with a variety of toppings including beef tartare with cured egg, cognac, and capers or riced cauliflower with yellow curry, currants, and almonds. Also salads, fish tacos, and boiled peanut hummus. 79 Madison. 3331229. L, D, $ ITTA BENA—Southern and Cajun-American cuisine served here; specialties are duck and waffles and shrimp and grits, along with steaks, chops, seafood, and pasta. 145 Beale St. 578-3031. D, X, MRA, $$-$$$
 KOOKY CANUCK—Offers prime rib, catfish, and burgers, including the 4-lb. “Kookamonga”; also late-night menu. 87 S. Second. 578-9800; 1250 N. Germantown Pkwy. 1-800-2453 L, D, X, MRA, $-$$$ KREWE OF DEJAVU—Serves Creole, soul, and vegetarian cuisine, including po-boys, jambalaya, and shrimp and grits. Closed Sun. 936 Florida. 947-1003. L, D, X, $-$$ THE LITTLE TEA SHOP—Downtown institution serves up Southern comfort cooking, including meatloaf and such veggies as turnip greens, yams, okra, and tomatoes. Closed Sat.-Sun. 69 Monroe. 525-6000, L, X, $ LOCAL—Entrees with a focus on locally sourced products include lobster mac-and-cheese and ribeye patty melt; menu differs by location. 95 S. Main. 473-9573; 2126 Madison. 725-1845. L, D, WB, X, $-$$ LOFLIN YARD—Beer garden and restaurant serves vegetarian fare and smoked-meat dishes, including beef brisket and pork tenderloin, cooked on a custom-made grill. Closed Mon.-Tues. 7 W. Carolina. 249-3046. L (Sat. and Sun.), D, MRA, $-$$ THE LOOKOUT AT THE PYRAMID—Serves seafood and Southern fare, including cornmeal-fried oysters, sweet tea brined chicken, and elk chops. 1 Bass Pro Dr. 620-4600/291-8200. L, D, X $-$$$ LUNA RESTAURANT & LOUNGE—Serving a limited menu of breakfast and lunch items. Dinner entrees include Citrus Glaze Salmon and Cajun Stuffed Chicken. 179 Madison (Hotel Napoleon). 526-0002. B, D (Mon.-Sat.), X, $-$$$
 MACIEL’S—Entrees include tortas, fried taco plates, quesadillas, chorizo and pastor soft tacos, salads, and more. Downtown closed Sun. Bodega closed Wed. 45 S. Main. 526-0037; 525 S. Highland. 504-4584. L, D, SB (Highland), X, MRA, $ THE MAJESTIC GRILLE—Housed in a former silent-picture house, features aged steaks, fresh seafood, and such specialties as roasted chicken and grilled pork tenderloin; offers a pre-theatre menu and classic cocktails. Well-stocked bar. 145 S. Main. 522-8555. L, D, WB, X, MRA, $-$$$ McEWEN’S ON MONROE—Southern/American cuisine with international flavors; specialties include steak and seafood, sweet potato-crusted catfish with M A R C H 2 0 1 9 • M E M P H I S M A G A Z I N E . C O M • 151

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macaroni and cheese, and more. Closed Sun., Monroe location. 120 Monroe. 527-7085; 1110 Van Buren (Oxford). 662-234-7003. L, D, SB (Oxford only), X, MRA, $$-$$$ MESQUITE CHOP HOUSE—The focus here is on steaks, including prime fillet, rib eyes, and prime-aged New York strip; also, some seafood options. 5960 Getwell (Southaven). 662-8902467; 88 Union. 527-5337; 3165 Forest Hill-Irene (Germantown). 249-5661. D, SB (Germantown), X, $$-$$$ MOLLIE FONTAINE LOUNGE—Specializes in tapas (small plates) featuring global cuisine. Closed Sun.-Tues. 679 Adams Ave. 524-1886. D, X, MRA, $ THE NINE THAI & SUSHI—Serving authentic Thai dishes, including curries, as well as a variety of sushi rolls. Closed for lunch Sat. and Sun. 121 Union. 208-8347. L, D, X, $-$$ PAULETTE’S—Presents fine dining with a Continental flair, including such entrees as filet Paulette with butter cream sauce and crabmeat and spinach crepes; also changing daily specials and great views. River Inn. 50 Harbor Town Square. 260-3300. B, L, D, WB, X, MRA, $-$$$ PEARL’S OYSTER HOUSE—Downtown eatery serving seafood, including oysters, crawfish, and stuffed butterfly shrimp, as well as beef, chicken, and pasta dishes. 299 S. Main. 522-9070; 8106 Cordova Center Dr. (Cordova). 425-4797. L, D, SB, X, $-$$$ PONTOTOC LOUNGE—Upscale restaurant and jazz bar serves such starters as alligator filet fritters; entrees include Mississippi pot roast with jalapeno cornbread and tagliatelle with braised beef. 314 S. Main. 207-7576. D, X, $-$$ REGINA’S—New Orleans-inspired eatery offering po boys, Cajun nachos topped with crawfish tails, catfish platters, oysters, and more. Closed Mon. 60 N. Main. 730-0384. B, L, D, SB, X, $-$$ RENDEZVOUS, CHARLES VERGOS’—Menu items include barbecued ribs, cheese plates, skillet shrimp, red beans and rice, and Greek salads. Closed Sun.-Mon. 52 S. Second. 523-2746. L (Fri.-Sat.), D, X, $-$$ RIZZO’S DINER—Chorizo meatloaf, lobster pronto puff, and lamb belly tacos are menu items at this upscale diner. Michael Patrick among the city’s best chefs. 492 S. Main. 304-6985. L (Fri.-Sat.), D, SB, X, MRA, $-$$ SABOR CARIBE—Serving up “Caribbean flavors” with dishes from Colombia, Venezuela, Puerto Rico, and Cuba. Closed Sunday. 662 Madison. 949-8100. L, D, X, $ SLEEP OUT LOUIES—Oyster bar with such specialties as char-grilled Roquefort oysters and gulf oysters on the half shell with Prosecco mignonette; also serves flatbread pizzas and a variety of sandwiches. 150 Peabody Place, Suite 111. 707-7180. L, D, X, $ SOUTH MAIN MARKET—Food Hall featuring a variety of vendors serving everything from bagels and beer to comfort food and healthy cuisine. 409 S. Main. 341-3838. $-$$ SOUTH MAIN SUSHI & GRILL—Serving sushi, nigiri, and more. 520 S. Main. 249-2194. L, D, X, $ SPINDINI—Italian fusion cuisine with such entrees as woodfired pizzas, gorgonzola stuffed filet, and fresh seafood; large domestic whiskey selection. 383 S. Main. 578-2767. D, X, $$-$$$ SUNRISE MEMPHIS—From owners of Sweet Grass and Central BBQ. Serves breakfast all day, including house-made biscuits, frittatas, kielbasa or boudin plates, and breakfast platters. 670 Jefferson. 552-3144. B, L, X, MRA, $ TART—Combination patisserie and coffeehouse serving rustic French specialties, including baked eggs in brioche, topped with Gruyere, and French breads and pastries. One Commerce Square, 40 S. Main #150. 421-6276. B, L, WB, X, $-$$ TERRACE—Creative American and Continental cuisine includes such dishes as filet mignon, beef or lamb sliders, chicken satay, and mushroom pizzetta. Rooftop, River Inn of Harbor Town, 50 Harbor Town Square. 260-3366. D, X, MRA, $$ TEXAS DE BRAZIL—Serves beef, pork, lamb, and chicken dishes, and Brazilian sausage; also a salad bar with extensive toppings. 150 Peabody Place, Suite 103. 526-7600. L (Wed.-Fri.), D, SB, X, $$-$$$ UNCLE BUCK’S FISHBOWL & GRILL—Burgers, pizza, fish dishes, sandwiches, and more served in a unique “underwater” setting. Bass Pro, Bass Pro Drive, 291-8200. B, L, D, X, $-$$ THE VAULT—Oysters, shrimp beignets, flatbreads, stuffed cornish hen, and Smash Burger featured on “Late Nite Eats” are among the dishes offered at this Creole/Italian fusion eatery. 124 G.E. Patterson. 591-8000. L, D, SB, X, MRA, $-$$


WESTY’S—Extensive menu includes a variety of wild rice dishes, sandwiches, plate lunches, and hot fudge pie. 346 N. Main. 543-3278.L, D, X, $

COLLIERVILLE CAFE PIAZZA BY PAT LUCCHESI—Specializes in gourmet pizzas (including create-your-own), panini sandwiches, and pasta. Closed Sun. 139 S. Rowlett St. 861-1999. L, D, X, $-$$ CIAO BABY—Specializing in Neapolitan-style pizza made in a wood-fired oven. Also serves house-made mozzarella, pasta, appetizers, and salads. 890 W. Poplar, Suite 1. 457-7457. L, D, X, $ DAVID GRISANTI’S—Serving Northern Italian cuisine and traditional family recipes, like the Elfo Special, shrimp sauteed in garlic and butter, tossed with white button mushrooms and white pepper, and served over vermicelli with Parmigiano-Reggiano. Closed Sun. 684 W. Poplar (Sheffield Antiques Mall). 861-1777. L, D (Thurs.-Sat.), X, $-$$$ EL MEZCAL—Serves burritos, chimichangas, fajitas, and other Mexican cuisine, as well as shrimp dinners and steak. 9947 Wolf River, 853-7922; 402 Perkins Extd. 761-7710; 694 N.Germantown Pkwy. (Cordova). 755-1447; 1492 Union. 274-4264; 11615 Airline Rd. (Arlington). 867-1883; 9045 Highway 64 (Lakeland). 383-4219; 7164 Hacks Cross Rd. (Olive Branch). 662-890-3337; 8834 Hwy. 51 N. (Millington). 872-3220; 7424 Highway 64 (Bartlett). 417-6026. L, D, X, $ EMERALD THAI RESTAURANT—Spicy shrimp, pad khing, lemongrass chicken, and several noodle, rice, and vegetarian dishes are offered at this family restaurant. Closed Sunday. 8950 Highway 64 (Lakeland, TN). 384-0540. L, D X, $-$$ FIREBIRDS—Specialties are hand-cut steaks, slow-roasted prime rib, and wood-grilled salmon and other seafood, as well as seasonal entrees. 4600 Merchants Circle, Carriage Crossing. 850-1637; 8470 Highway 64 (Bartlett). 379-1300. L, D, X, $-$$$ JIM’S PLACE GRILLE—Features American, Greek, and Continental cuisine with such entrees as pork tenderloin, several seafood specialties, and hand-cut charcoal-grilled steaks. Closed for lunch Sat. and all day Sun. 3660 Houston Levee. 861-5000. L, D, X, MRA, $-$$$ MULAN ASIAN BISTRO—Hunan Chicken, tofu dishes, and orange beef served here; sushi and Thai food, too. 2059 Houston Levee. 850-5288; 2149 Young. 347-3965; 4698 Spottswood. 609-8680. L, D, X, $-$$ OSAKA JAPANESE CUISINE—Featuring an extensive sushi menu as well as traditional Japanese and hibachi dining. Hours vary for lunch; call. 3670 Houston Levee. 861-4309; 3402 Poplar. 249-4690; 7164 Hacks Cross (Olive Branch). 662-8909312; 2200 N. Germantown Pkwy. (Cordova). 425-4901. L, D, X, $-$$$ P.O. PRESS PUBLIC HOUSE AND PROVISIONS—Featuring house-aged meats and locally sourced produce, the menu changes with availability, with such items as seasonal fish, local beef, and fresh vegetable dishes. 148 N. Main. 457-7655. D (except Sunday), SB, X, $-$$ RAVEN & LILY—Eatery offers innovative Southerninspired cuisine with such dishes as crispy shrimp and cauliflower salad, spiced lamb sausage and parmesan risotto, and bananas foster pain perdu. Closed Monday. 120 E. Mulberry. 286-4575. L, D, SB, X, $-$$ SEAR SHACK BURGERS & FRIES—Serving Angus burgers, fries, and hand-spun milkshakes. Closed Mon. 875 W. Poplar, Suite 6. 861-4100; 5101 Sanderlin, Suite 103. 567-4909 ; 7424 Stage Road, Suite 121 (Bartlett). 382-3083; 6518 Goodman (Olive Branch). 662-4084932; 427 E. Commerce (Hernando). 662-469-4114. L, D, X, $ STIX—Hibachi steakhouse with Asian cuisine features steak, chicken, and a fillet and lobster combination, also sushi. A specialty is Dynamite Chicken with fried rice. 4680 Merchants Park Circle, Avenue Carriage Crossing. 854-3399. L, D, X, $-$$ ZOPITA’S ON THE SQUARE—Cafe offers sandwiches, including smoked salmon and pork tenderloin, as well as salads and desserts. Closed Sun. 114 N. Main. 457-7526. L, D, X, $

CORDOVA BOMBAY HOUSE—Indian fare includes lamb korma and chicken tikka; also, a daily luncheon buffet. 1727 N. Germantown Pkwy. 755-4114. L, D, X, $-$$ THE BUTCHER SHOP—Serves steaks ranging from 8-oz. fillets to a 20-oz. porterhouse; also chicken, pork chops, fresh seafood. 107 S. Germantown Rd. 757-4244. L (Fri. and Sun.), D, X, $$-$$$ FOX RIDGE PIZZA—Pizzas, calzones, sub sandwiches, burgers, and meat-and-two plate lunches are among the dishes served at this eatery, which opened in 1979. 1769 N. Germantown Pkwy. 758-6500. L, D, X, $ GREEN BAMBOO—Pineapple tilapia, pork vermicelli, and the soft egg noodle combo are Vietnamese specialties here. 990 N. Germantown Parkway, #104. 753-5488. L, D, $-$$ KING JERRY LAWLER’S MEMPHIS BBQ COMPANY—Offers a variety of barbecue dishes, including brisket, ribs, nachos topped with smoked pork, and a selection of barbecue “Slamwiches.” 465 N. Germantown Pkwy., #116. 509-2360. L, D, X, $ JIM ’N NICK’S BAR-B-Q—Serves barbecued pork, ribs, chicken, brisket, and fish, along with other homemade Southern specialties. 2359 N. Germantown Pkwy. 388-0998. L, D, X, $-$$ MISTER B’S—Features New Orleans-style seafood and steaks. Closed for lunch Sat. and all day Sun. and Mon. 6655 Poplar, #107. 751-5262. L, D, X, $-$$$ PEI WEI ASIAN DINER—Serves a variety of Pan-Asian cuisine, including Japanese, Vietnamese, Korean, and Thai. Noodle and rice bowls are specialties; a small plates menu also offered. 2257 N. Germantown Pkwy. 382-1822. L, D, X, $-$$ PRESENTATION ROOM, THE—American bistro run by the students of L’Ecole Culinaire. Menu changes regularly; specialties may include such items as a filet with truffle mushroom ragu. Service times vary; call for details. Closed Fri.-Sun. 1245 N. Germantown Pkwy. 754-7115. L, D, X, $-$$ SHOGUN JAPANESE RESTAURANT—Entrees include tempura, teriyaki, and sushi, as well as grilled fish and chicken entrees. 2324 N. Germantown Pkwy. 384-4122. L, D, X, $-$$ TANNOOR GRILL—Brazilian-style steakhouse with skewers served tableside, along with Middle Eastern specialties; vegetarian options also available. 830 N. Germantown Pkwy. 443-5222. L, D, X, $-$$$

EAST MEMPHIS

(INCLUDES POPLAR/ I-240) ACRE—Features seasonal modern American cuisine in an avante-garde setting using locally sourced products; also small-plates and enclosed garden patio. Closed for lunch Sat. and all day Sun. 690 S. Perkins. 818-2273. L, D, X, $$-$$$ AGAVOS COCINA & TEQUILA—Camaron de Tequila, tamales, kabobs, and burgers made with a blend of beef and chorizo are among the offerings at this tequila-centric restaurant and bar. 2924 Walnut Grove. 433-9345. L, D, X, $-$$ AMERIGO—Traditional and contemporary Italian cuisine includes pasta, wood-fired pizza, steaks, and cedarwood-roasted fish. 1239 Ridgeway, Park Place Mall. 761-4000. L, D, SB, X, MRA, $-$$$ ANDREW MICHAEL ITALIAN KITCHEN— Traditional Italian cuisine with a menu from two of the city’s top chefs that changes seasonally with such entrees as Maw Maw’s ravioli. Closed Sun.-Mon. 712 W. Brookhaven Cl. 347-3569. D, X, MRA, $$-$$$ ANOTHER BROKEN EGG CAFE—Offering several varieties of eggs benedict, waffles, omelets, pancakes, beignets, and other breakfast fare; also burgers, sandwiches, and salads. 6063 Park Ave. 729-7020; 65 S. Highland. 623-7122. B, L, WB, X, $ BANGKOK ALLEY—Thai fusion cuisine includes noodle and curry dishes, chef-specialty sushi rolls, coconut soup, and duck and seafood entrees. Closed for lunch Sat. and all day Sun. at Brookhaven location; call for hours. 715 W. Brookhaven Cl. 590-2585; 2150 W. Poplar at Houston Levee (Collierville). 854-8748. L, D, X, $-$$

BENIHANA—This Japanese steakhouse serves beef, chicken, and seafood grilled at the table; some menu items change monthly; sushi bar also featured. 912 Ridge Lake. 767-8980. L, D, X, $$-$$$ BLUE PLATE CAFÉ—For breakfast, the café’s serves old-fashioned buttermilk pancakes (it’s a secret recipe!), country ham and eggs, and waffles with fresh strawberries and cream. For lunch, the café specializes in country cooking. 5469 Poplar. 761-9696; 113 S. Court. 523-2050. B, L, X, $ BROOKLYN BRIDGE ITALIAN RESTAURANT— Specializing in such homemade entrees as spinach lasagna and lobster ravioli; a seafood specialty is horseradish-crusted salmon. Closed Sun. 1779 Kirby Pkwy. 755-7413. D, X, $-$$$ BRYANT’S BREAKFAST—Three-egg omelets, pancakes, and The Sampler Platter are among the popular entrees here. Possibly the best biscuits in town. Closed Mon. and Tues. 3965 Summer. 324-7494. B, L, X, $ BUCKLEY’S FINE FILET GRILL—Specializes in steaks, seafood, and pasta. (Lunchbox serves entree salads, burgers, and more.) 5355 Poplar. 683-4538; 919 S. Yates (Buckley’s Lunchbox), 682-0570. L (Yates only, M-F), D, X, $-$$ BUNTYN CORNER CAFE—Serving favorites from Buntyn Restaurant, including chicken and dressing, cobbler, and yeast rolls. 5050 Poplar, Suite 107. 424-3286. B, L, X, $ CAPITAL GRILLE—Known for its dry-aged, hand-carved steaks; among the specialties are bone-in sirloin, and porcini-rubbed Delmonico; also seafood entrees and seasonal lunch plates. Closed for lunch Sat.-Sun. Crescent Center, 6065 Poplar. 683-9291. L, D, X, $$$-$$$$ CASABLANCA—Lamb shawarma is one of the fresh, homemade specialties served at this Mediterranean/Moroccan restaurant; fish entrees and vegetarian options also available. 5030 Poplar. 725-8557 ; 7609 Poplar Pike (Germantown). 4255908; 1707 Madison. 421-6949. L, D, X, $-$$ CIAO BELLA—Among the Italian and Greek specialties are lasagna, seafood pasta, gourmet pizzas, and vegetarian options. Closed for lunch Sat.-Sun. 565 Erin Dr., Erin Way Shopping Center. 205-2500. L, D, X, MRA, $-$$$ CITY SILO TABLE + PANTRY—With a focus on clean eating, this establishment offers fresh juices, as well as comfort foods re-imagined with wholesome ingredients. 5101 Sanderlin. 729-7687. B, L, D, X, $ CORKY’S—Popular barbecue emporium offers both wet and dry ribs, plus a full menu of other barbecue entrees. Wed. lunch buffets, Cordova and Collierville. 5259 Poplar. 685-9744; 1740 N. Germantown Pkwy. (Cordova). 737-1911; 743 W. Poplar (Collierville). 405-4999; 6434 Goodman Rd., Olive Branch. 662-893-3663. L, D, X, MRA, $-$$ ERLING JENSEN—For over 20 years, has presented “globally inspired” cuisine to die for. Specialties are rack of lamb, big game entrees, and fresh fish dishes. 1044 S. Yates. 763-3700. D, X, MRA, $$-$$$ FLEMING’S PRIME STEAKHOUSE—Serves wetaged and dry-aged steaks, prime beef, chops, and seafood, including salmon, Australian lobster tails, and a catch of the day. 6245 Poplar. 761-6200. D, X, MRA, $$$-$$$$ FOLK’S FOLLY ORIGINAL PRIME STEAK HOUSE—Specializes in prime steaks, as well as lobster, grilled Scottish salmon, Alaskan king crab legs, rack of lamb, and weekly specials. Now celebrating their 40th year. 551 S. Mendenhall. 762-8200. D, X, MRA, $$$-$$$$ FORMOSA—Offers Mandarin cuisine, including broccoli beef, hot-and-sour soup, and spring rolls. Closed Monday. 6685 Quince. 753-9898. L, D, X, $-$$ FRATELLI’S—Serves hot and cold sandwiches, salads, soups, and desserts, all with an Italian/Mediterranean flair. Closed Sunday. 750 Cherry Rd., Memphis Botanic Garden. 766-9900. L, X, $ FRANK GRISANTI’S ITALIAN RESTAURANT— Northern Italian favorites include pasta with jumbo shrimp and mushrooms; also seafood, fillet mignon, and daily lunch specials. Closed for lunch Sunday. Embassy Suites Hotel, 1022 S. Shady Grove. 761-9462. L, D, X, $-$$$ THE GROVE GRILL—Offers steaks, chops, seafood, and other American cuisine with Southern and global influences; entrees include crab cakes, and shrimp and grits, also dinner specials. Founder Jeff Dunham’s son Chip is now chef de cuisine. 4550 Poplar. 818-9951. L, D, SB, X, MRA, $$-$$$ M A R C H 2 0 1 9 • M E M P H I S M A G A Z I N E . C O M • 153

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2/14/19 11:23 AM


Matinée Musicale

Mozart’s Clarinet Quintet, Debussy’s Trio for Flute, Viola and Harp, and Ravel’s Introduction and Allegro. –

Andre Dyachenko, clarinet, Elise Blatchford, flute, Frances Cobb, harp, Julie Johnson and Yennifer Correia, violins, Aaron Tubergen, viola, and Jonathan Kirkscey, cello JOIN US

sunday

march 3, 2019

3:00pm - 5:30pm at 1 7 3 8 R I D G E WAY R O A D MEMPHIS, TN 38119

for ticket information and directions call 901.758.0150 memphischambermusic.org

154 • M E M P H I S M A G A Z I N E . C O M • M A R C H 2 0 1 9

HALF SHELL—Specializes in seafood, such as King crab legs; also serves steaks, chicken, pastas, salads, sandwiches, a ”voodoo menu”; oyster bar at Winchester location. 688 S. Mendenhall. 682-3966; 7825 Winchester. 737-6755. L, D, WB, X, MRA, $-$$$ HIGH POINT PIZZA—Serves variety of pizzas, subs, salads, and sides. Closed Monday. A neighborhood fixture. 477 High Point Terrace. 452-3339. L, D, X, $-$$ HOG & HOMINY—The casual sister to Andrew Michael Italian Kitchen serves brick-oven-baked pizzas, including the Red-Eye with pork belly, and small plates with everything from meatballs to beef and cheddar hot dogs; and local veggies. Closed for lunch Mon. 707 W. Brookhaven Cl. 207-7396. L, D, SB, X, MRA, $-$$$ HOUSTON’S—Serves steaks, seafood, pork chops, chicken dishes, sandwiches, salads, and Chicago-style spinach dip. Farmous for first-class service. 5000 Poplar. 683-0915. L, D, X $-$$$ INTERIM—Offers American-seasonal cuisine with emphasis on local foods and fresh fish; daily chef specials. Closed for lunch Sat. 5040 Sanderlin, Suite 105. 818-0821. L, D, SB, X, $-$$$ LA BAGUETTE—An almond croissant and chicken salad are among specialties at this French-style bistro. Closed for dinner Sun. 3088 Poplar. 458-0900. B, L, D (closes at 7), X, MRA, $ LAS DELICIAS—Popular for its guacamole, house-made tortilla chips, and margaritas, this restaurant draws diners with its chicken enchiladas, meat-stuffed flautas, and Cuban torta with spicy pork. Closed Sunday. 4002 Park Ave. 458-9264; 5689 Quince. 800-2873. L, D, X, $ LIBRO AT LAURELWOOD—Bookstore eatery features a variety of sandwiches, salads, and homemade pasta dishes, with Italian-inspired options such as carbonara and potato gnocchi. Closed for dinner Sun. 387 Perkins Ext. (Novel). 8002656. B, L, D, SB, X, $-$$ LISA’S LUNCHBOX—Serving bagels, sandwiches, salads, and wraps. 5885 Ridgeway Center Pkwy., Suite 101. 767-6465; 2659 Thousand Oaks Blvd., Suite 1200; 166 S. Front. 729-7277. B, L, $ LOST PIZZA—Offering pizzas (with dough made from scratch), pasta, salads, sandwiches, tamales, and more. 2855 Poplar. 572-1803; 5960 Getwell (Southaven). 662-892-8684. L, D, X, $-$$ LYNCHBURG LEGENDS—This restaurant with a Jack Daniels’ theme and Southern cuisine serves such entrees as Bourbon Street salmon, buttermilk-fried chicken, and grilled steak and wild mushroom salad. DoubleTree Hotel, 5069 Sanderlin. 969-7777. B, L, D, X, $- $$$ MAHOGANY MEMPHIS—Upscale Southern restaurant offers such dishes as coffee-rubbed lamb chops and baked Cajun Cornish hen. Closed for dinner Sun. and all day Mon.-Tues. 3092 Poplar, Suite 11. 623-7977. L, D, SB, X, $-$$$ MARCIANO MEDITERRANEAN AND ITALIAN CUISINE—Veal Saltimbocca with angel hair pasta and white wine sauce is among the entrees; also steaks, seafood, and gourmet pizza. Closed Sun. 780 Brookhaven Cl. 682-1660. D, X, $-$$ DAN MCGUINNESS PUB—Serves fish and chips, shepherd’s pie, burgers, and other Irish and American fare; also lunch and dinner specials. 4694 Spottswood. 761-3711; 3964 Goodman Rd. 662-890-7611. L, D, X, $ MAYURI INDIAN CUISINE—Serves tandoori chicken, masala dosa, tikka masala, as well as lamb and shrimp entrees; also a daily lunch buffet, and dinner buffet on Fri.-Sat. 6524 Quince Rd. 753-8755. L, D, X, $-$$ MELLOW MUSHROOM—Large menu includes assortment of pizzas, salads, calzones, hoagies, vegetarian options, and 50 beers on tap. 5138 Park Ave. 562-12119155 Poplar; Shops of Forest Hill (Germantown). 907-0243. L, D, X, $-$$ MOSA ASIAN BISTRO—Specialties include sesame chicken, Thai calamari, rainbow panang curry with grouper fish, and other Pan Asian/fusion entrees. Closed Mon. 850 S. White Station Rd. 683-8889. L, D, X, MRA, $ NAM KING—Offers luncheon and dinner buffets, dim sum, and such specialties as fried dumplings, pepper steak, and orange chicken. 4594 Yale. 373-4411. L, D, X, $ NAPA CAFE—Among the specialties is miso-marinated salmon over black rice with garlic spinach and shiitake

mushrooms. Closed Sun. 5101 Sanderlin, Suite 122. 683-0441. L, D, X, MRA, $$-$$$ NEW HUNAN—Chinese eatery with more than 80 entrees; also lunch/dinner buffets. 5052 Park. 766-1622. L, D, X, $ ONE & ONLY BBQ—On the menu are pork barbecue sandwiches, platters, wet and dry ribs, smoked chicken and turkey platters, a smoked meat salad, barbecue quesadillas, Brunswick Stew, and Millie’s homemade desserts. 1779 Kirby Pkwy. 751-3615; 567 Perkins Extd. 249-4227. L, D, X, $ ONO POKÉ—This eatery specializes in poké — a Hawaiian dish of fresh fish salad served over rice. Menu includes a variety of poké bowls, like the Kimchi Tuna bowl, or customers can build their own by choosing a base, protein, veggies, and toppings. 3145 Poplar. 618-2955. L, D, X, $ OWEN BRENNAN’S—New Orleans-style menu of beef, chicken, pasta, and seafood; jambalaya, shrimp and grits, and crawfish etouffee are specialties. Closed for dinner Sunday. The Regalia, 6150 Poplar. 761-0990. L, D, SB, X, MRA, $-$$$ PARK + CHERRY—Partnering with CFY Catering, the Dixon offers casual dining within the museum. Menu features sandwiches, like truffled pimento cheese, as well as salads, snacks, and sweets. Closed for breakfast Sun. and all day Mon. 4339 Park (Dixon Gallery). 761-5250. L, X, $ PATRICK’S—Serves barbecue nachos, burgers, and entrees such as fish and chips; also plate lunches and daily specials. 4972 Park. 682-2852. L, D, X, MRA, $ PETE & SAM’S—Serving Memphis for 60-plus years; offers steaks, seafood, and traditional Italian dishes, including homemade ravioli, lasagna, and chicken marsala. 3886 Park. 458-0694. D, X, $-$$$ PF CHANG’S CHINA BISTRO—Specialties are orange peel shrimp, Mongolian beef, and chicken in lettuce wraps; also vegetarian dishes, including spicy eggplant. 1181 Ridgeway Rd., Park Place Centre. 818-3889. L, D, X, $-$$ PHO SAIGON—Vietnamese fare includes beef teriyaki, roasted quail, curry ginger chicken, vegetarian options, and a variety of soups. 2946 Poplar. 458-1644. L, D, $ PIZZA REV—Specializes in build-your-own, personal-sized artisanal pizza. Choose from homemade dough options, all-natural sauces, Italian cheeses, and more than 30 toppings. 6450 Poplar. 379-8188. L, D, X, MRA, $ PYRO’S FIRE-FRESH PIZZA—Serving gourmet pizzas cooked in an open-fire oven; wide choice of toppings; large local and craft beer selection. 1199 Ridgeway. 379-8294; 2035 Union Ave. 208-8857; 2286 N. Germantown Pkwy. (Cordova). 207-1198; 3592 S. Houston Levee (Collierville). 221-8109. L, D, X, MRA, $ RIVER OAKS—Chef Jose Gutierrez’s French-style bistro serves seafood and steaks, with an emphasis on fresh local ingredients. Closed for lunch Sat. and all day Sun. 5871 Poplar Ave. 683-9305. L, D, X, $$$ RONNIE GRISANTI’S ITALIAN RESTAURANT— This Memphis institution serves some family classics such as Elfo’s Special and handmade ravioli, along with house-made pizza and fresh oysters. Closed Sun. 6150 Poplar, #122. 850-0191. D, X, $-$$$ RUTH’S CHRIS STEAK HOUSE—Offers prime steaks cut and aged in-house, as well as lamb, chicken, and fresh seafood, including lobster. 6120 Poplar. 761-0055. D, X, $$$-$$$$ SALSA—Mexican-Southern California specialties include carnitas, enchiladas verde, and fajitas; also Southwestern seafood dishes such as snapper verde. Closed Sun. Regalia Shopping Center, 6150 Poplar, Suite 129. 683-6325. L, D, X, $-$$ SEASONS 52—This elegant fresh grill and wine bar offers a seasonally changing menu using fresh ingredients, wood-fire grilling, and brick-oven cooking; also a large international wine list and nightly piano bar. Crescent Center, 6085 Poplar. 682-9952. L, D, X, $$-$$$ STAKS—Offering pancakes, including birthday cake and lemon ricotta. Menu includes other breakfast items such as beignets and French toast, as well as soups and sandwiches for lunch. 4615 Poplar. 509-2367; 7704 Poplar (Germantown). 800-1951. B, L, WB, X, $ STRANO BY CHEF JOSH—Presenting a Sicilian/ Mediterranean mix of Arab, Spanish, Greek, and North African fare, Strano serves hand-tossed pizzas, woodgrilled fish, and such entrees as Chicken Under the Earth, cooked under a Himalayan salt block over a seasoned white oak woodfired grill. 518 Perkins Extd. 275-8986. L, D, WB, X, MRA, $-$$$


Food • AR • T T AR

•M us

ART festival

sponsored by

• ic

T! R A

April 5 – 7

On Ridgeway Loop Road

Fr 1p-7p • Sa 10a-6p • Su 11a-4p

THE CITY MAGAZINE

www.artintheloop.org presented by ArtWorks Foundation N2U_7.875x4.8125 MempMag.pdf

1

2/15/19

10:03 AM

C

M

Y

THE COLUMNS 1 SOUTH MAIN STREET 6:30 p.m. VIP RECEPTION 7:00 p.m.-10:00 p.m. CELEBRATION

CM

MY

CY

CMY

K

Party th Anniversary Celebrating 95 years of Community Impact!

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SUSHI JIMMI—This food truck turned restaurant serves a variety of sushi rolls, fusion dishes — such as kimchi fries — and sushi burritos. Closed for lunch Sat. and all day Mon. 2895 Poplar. 729-6985. L, D, X, $ TENNESSEE TACO CO.—From the creators of Belly Acres, offers such appetizers as crawfish and chorizo mac-ncheese and homemade guacamole and specializes in street tacos. 3295 Poplar. 207-1960. L, D, X, $ THREE LITTLE PIGS—Pork-shoulder-style barbecue with tangy mild or hot sauce, freshly made coleslaw, and baked beans. 5145 Quince Rd. 685-7094. B, L, D, X, $ TOPS BAR-B-Q—Specializes in pork barbecue sandwiches and sandwich plates with beans and slaw; also serves ribs, beef brisket, and burgers. 1286 Union. 725-7527. 4183 Summer. 324-4325; 5391 Winchester. 794-7936; 3970 Rhodes. 323-9865; 6130 Macon. 371-0580. For more locations, go online. L, D, X, $ VENICE KITCHEN—Specializes in “eclectic Italian” and Southern Creole, from pastas, including the “Godfather,” to hand-tossed pizzas, including the “John Wayne”; choose from 50 toppings. 368 Perkins Ext. 767-6872. L, D, SB, X, $-$$ WANG’S MANDARIN HOUSE—Offers Mandarin, Cantonese, Szechuan, and spicy Hunan entrees, including the golden-sesame chicken; next door is East Tapas, serving small plates with an Asian twist. 6065 Park Ave., Park Place Mall. 763-0676. L, D, X, $-$$ WASABI—Serving traditional Japanese offerings, hibachi, sashimi, and sushi. The Sweet Heart roll, wrapped — in the shape of a heart — with tuna and filled with spicy salmon, yellowtail, and avocado, is a specialty. 5101 Sanderlin Rd., Suite 105. 421-6399. L, D, X, $-$$ WOMAN’S EXCHANGE TEA ROOM—Chicken-salad plate, beef tenderloin, soups-and-sandwiches, and vegetable plates are specialties; meal includes drink and dessert. Closed Sat.-Sun. 88 Racine. 327-5681. L, X, $ ZAKA BOWL—This vegan-friendly restaurant serves buildyour-own vegetable bowls featuring ingredients such as agave Brussels sprouts and roasted beets. Also serves tuna poke and herbed chicken bowls. 575 Erin. 509-3105. L, D, $

GERMANTOWN BLUE HONEY BISTRO—Entrees at this upscale eatery include brown butter scallops served with Mississippi blue rice and herb-crusted beef tenderloin with vegetables and truffle butter. Closed Sun. 9155 Poplar, Suite 17. 552-3041. D, X, $-$$$ FARM & FRIES—A burger-centric menu features 100 percent grass fed and finished beef served in creative combinations like roasted portobellos and Swiss cheese. Try the Brussels with cheddar, bacon and quick-fried sprout leaves or fries, house-cut with dipping sauces. Closed Sun. 7724 Poplar Pike. 791-2328. L, D, X, $ FOREST HILL GRILL—A variety of standard pub fare and a selection of mac ‘n’ cheese dishes are featured on the menu. Specialties include Chicken Newport and a barbecue salmon BLT. 9102 Poplar Pike. 624-6001. L, D, SB, X, MRA, $-$$ GERMANTOWN COMMISSARY—Serves barbecue sandwiches, sliders, ribs, shrimp, and nachos, as well as smoked barbecued bologna sandwiches; Mon.-night all-youcan-eat ribs. 2290 S. Germantown Rd. S. 754-5540. L, D, X, MRA, $-$$ LAS TORTUGAS DELI MEXICANA— Authentic Mexican food prepared from local food sources; specializes in tortugas — grilled bread scooped out to hold such powerfully popular fillings as brisket, pork, and shrimp; also tingas, tostados. Closed Sunday. 1215 S. Germantown Rd. 751-1200; 6300 Poplar. 623-3882. L, D, X, $-$$ MISTER B’S—Features New Orleans-style seafood and steaks. Closed for lunch Sat. and all day Sun. and Mon. 6655 Poplar, #107. 751-5262. L, D, X, $-$$$ NOODLES ASIAN BISTRO—Serves a variety of traditional Asian cuisine, with emphasis on noodle dishes, such as Singapore Street Noodles and Hong Kong Chow Fun. 7850 Poplar, #12. 755-1117. L, D, X, $ PETRA CAFÉ—Serves Greek, Italian, and Middle Eastern sandwiches, gyros, and entrees. Hours vary; call. 6641 Poplar. 754-4440; 547 S. Highland. 323-3050. L, D, X, $-$$

RED KOI—Classic Japanese cuisine offered at this family-run restaurant; hibachi steaks, sushi, seafood, chicken, and vegetables. 5847 Poplar. 767-3456. L, D, X $-$$ ROCK’N DOUGH PIZZA CO.—Specialty and custom pizzas made from fresh ingredients; wide variety of toppings. 7850 Poplar, #6. 779-2008. L, D, SB, X, MRA, $$ ROYAL PANDA—Hunan fish, Peking duck, Royal Panda chicken and shrimp, and a seafood combo are among the specialties. 3120 Village Shops Dr. 756-9697. L, D, X, $-$$ RUSSO’S NEW YORK PIZZERIA AND WINE BAR—Serves gourmet pizzas, calzones, and pasta, including lasagna, fettuccine Alfredo, scampi, and more. 9087 Poplar, Suite 111. 755-0092. L, D, WB, X, $-$$ SAKURA—Sushi, tempura, and teriyaki are Japanese specialties here. 2060 West St. 758-8181; 4840 Poplar. 572-1002. L, D, X, $-$$ SOUTHERN SOCIAL—Shrimp and grits, stuffed quail, and Aunt Thelma’s Fried Chicken are among the dishes served at this upscale Southern establishment. 2285 S. Germantown Rd. 754-5555. D, SB, X, MRA, $-$$$ WEST STREET DINER—This home-style eatery offers breakfast, burgers, po’boys, and more. 2076 West St. 757-2191. B, L, D (Mon.-Fri.), X, $ WOLF RIVER BRISKET CO.—From the owners of Pyro’s Fire Fresh Pizza, highlights include house-smoked meats: prime beef brisket, chicken, and salmon. Closed Sun. 9947 Wolf River Boulevard, Suite 101. 316-5590. L, D, X, $-$

MIDTOWN (INCLUDES THE MEDICAL CENTER) ABYSSINIA RESTAURANT—Ethiopian/Mediterranean menu includes beef, chicken, lamb, fish entrees, and vegetarian dishes; also a lunch buffet. 2600 Poplar. 321-0082. L, D, X, $-$$ ALCHEMY—Southern fusion, locally grown cuisine features small and large plates; among the offerings are pan-seared hanger steak, quail, and lamb chops; also handcrafted cocktails and local craft beers. 940 S. Cooper. 726-4444. D, SB, X, $-$$ ART BAR—Inventive cocktails feature locally foraged ingredients; snacks include house-cured salt & vinegar potato chips and herb-roasted olives. Closed Mon. 1350 Concourse Avenue #280. 507-8030. D, X, $ ATOMIC TIKI—Island-inspired dishes such as barbecue nachos with pineapple mango relish, Polynesian meatballs, and shrimp roll sliders are served in a tiki bar atmosphere. Closed Mon. 1545 Overton Park. 279-3935. D, $ BABALU TACOS & TAPAS—This Overton Square eatery dishes up Spanish-style tapas with Southern flair; also taco and enchilada of the day; specials change daily. 2115 Madison. 274-0100; 6450 Poplar, 410-8909. L, D, SB, X, MRA, $-$$ BAR DKDC—Features an ever-changing menu of international “street food,” from Thai to Mexican, Israeli to Indian, along with specialty cocktails. 964 S. Cooper. 272-0830. D, X, MRA, $ BAR-B-Q SHOP—Dishes up barbecued ribs, spaghetti, bologna; also pulled pork shoulder, Texas toast barbecue sandwich, chicken sandwich, and salads. Closed Sun. 1782 Madison. 272-1277. L, D, X, MRA, $-$$ BARI RISTORANTE ENOTECA—Authentic Southeastern Italian cuisine (Puglia) emphasizes lighter entrees. Serves fresh fish and beef dishes and a homemade soup of the day. 22 S. Cooper. 722-2244. D, SB, X, MRA, $-$$$ BARKSDALE RESTAURANT—Old-school diner serving breakfast and Southern plate lunches. 237 Cooper. 722-2193. B, L, D, X, $ BAYOU BAR & GRILL—New Orleans fare at this Overton Square eatery includes jambalaya, gumbo, catfish Acadian, shrimp dishes, red beans and rice, and muffalettas. 2094 Madison. 278-8626. L, D, WB, X, MRA, $-$$ BEAUTY SHOP—Modern American cuisine with international flair served in a former beauty shop. Serves steaks salads, pasta, and seafood, including pecan-crusted golden sea bass. Perennial “Best Brunch” winner. Closed for dinner Sunday. 966 S. Cooper. 272-7111. L, D, SB, X, MRA, $-$$$ BELLY ACRES—At this festive Overton Square eatery, milkshakes, floats, and burgers rule. Burgers are updated with contemporary toppings like grilled leeks, braised tomatoes, and sourdough or brioche buns. 2102 Trimble Pl. 529-7017. L, D, X, $

BHAN THAI—Authentic Thai cuisine includes curries, pad Thai noodles, and vegetarian dishes, as well as seafood, pork, and duck entrees. Closed for lunch Sat.Sun. and all day Mon. 1324 Peabody. 272-1538. L, D, X, MRA, $-$$ BLUE NILE ETHIOPIAN—Kabobs, flavorful chicken and lamb stew, and injera (flatbread) are traditional items on the menu, along with vegetarian options. 1788 Madison. 474-7214. L, D, X, $-$$ BOSCOS—Tennessee’s first craft brewery serves a variety of freshly brewed beers as well as wood-fired oven pizzas, pasta, seafood, steaks, and sandwiches. 2120 Madison. 432-2222. L, D, SB (with live jazz), X, MRA, $-$$ BOUNTY ON BROAD—Offering family-style dining, Bounty serves small plates and family-sized platters, with such specialties as chicken fried quail and braised pork shank. 2519 Broad. 410-8131. L (Sat. and Sun.), D (Mon.-Sat.), SB, X, MRA, $-$$$ BROADWAY PIZZA—Serving a variety of pizzas, including the Broadway Special, as well as sandwiches, salads, wings, and soul-food specials. 2581 Broad. 454-7930; 627 S. Mendenhall. 207-1546. L, D, X, $-$$ CAFE 1912—French/American bistro owned by culinary pioneer Glenn Hays serving such seafood entrees as seared sea scallops with charred cauliflower purée and chorizo cumin sauce; also crepes, salads, and onion soup gratinée. 243 S. Cooper. 722-2700. D, SB, X, MRA, $-$$$ THE CAFE AT CROSSTOWN—Features plantbased meals, with such menu items as chicken fried tofu over grits and greens and a seitan pastrami sandwich, as well as daily chef specials. Closed Sun.-Mon. 1350 Concourse Avenue #280. 507-8030. B, L, D, WB, X, $ CAFE BROOKS BY CITY & STATE—Serving graband-go pastries, as well as lunch items. Menu includes soups, salads, and sandwiches, such as the Modern Reuben and Grown Up Grilled Cheese. 1934 Poplar (Memphis Brooks Museum of Art). 544-6200. B, L, X, $ CAFE ECLECTIC—Omelets and chicken and waffles are among menu items, along with quesadillas, sandwiches, wraps, and burgers. Menu varies by location. 603 N. McLean. 725-1718; 111 Harbor Town Square. 590-4645; 510 S. Highland. 410-0765. B, L, D, SB, X, MRA, $ CAFE OLE—This eatery specializes in authentic Mexican cuisine; one specialty is the build-your-own quesadilla. 959 S. Cooper. 343-0103. L, D, SB, X, MRA, $-$$ CAFE PALLADIO—Serves gourmet salads, soups, sandwiches, and desserts in a tea room inside the antiques shop. Closed Sun. 2169 Central. 278-0129. L, X, $ CAFE SOCIETY—With Belgian and classic French influences, serves Wagyu beef, chicken, and seafood dishes, including bacon-wrapped shrimp, along with daily specials and vegetarian entrees. Closed for lunch Sat.-Sun. 212 N. Evergreen. 722-2177. L, D, X, MRA, $-$$ CELTIC CROSSING—Specializes in Irish and American pub fare. Entrees include shepherd’s pie, shrimp and sausage coddle, and fish and chips. 903 S. Cooper. 274-5151. L, D, WB, X, MRA, $-$$ CENTRAL BBQ—Serves ribs, smoked hot wings, pulled pork sandwiches, chicken, turkey, nachos, and portobello sandwiches. Offers both pork and beef barbecue. 2249 Central Ave. 272-9377; 4375 Summer Ave. 767-4672; 147 E. Butler. 672-7760 ; 6201 Poplar. 417-7962. L, D, X, MRA, $-$$ CHEF TAM’S UNDERGROUND CAFE—Serves Southern staples with a Cajun twist. Menu items include totchos, jerk wings, fried chicken, and “muddy” mac and cheese. Closed Sun. and Mon. 2299 Young. 207-6182. L, D, $ THE COVE—Nautical-themed restaurant and bar serving oysters, pizzas, and more. The Stoner Pie, with tamales and fritos, is a popular dish. 2559 Broad. 730-0719. L, D, $ THE CRAZY NOODLE—Korean noodle dishes range from bibam beef noodle with cabbage, carrots, and other vegetables, to curry chicken noodle; also rice cakes served in a flavorful sauce. Closed for lunch Sat.-Sun. 2015 Madison. 272-0928. L, D, X, $ ECCO—Mediterranean-inspired specialties range from rib-eye steak to seared scallops to housemade pastas and a grilled vegetable plate; also a Saturday brunch. Closed Sun.-Mon. 1585 Overton Park. 410-8200. L, D, X, $-$$ ELEMENTO NEAPOLITAN PIZZA—Crosstown pizzeria specializes in Neapolitan-style, wood-fired pizza with from-scratch dough. 1350 Concourse Avenue. 6727527. L, D, X, $

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ELWOOD’S SHELLS—Cajun/Creole eatery offers po’ boys and such specialties as Red Fish Courtbouillon, fresh Gulf red-fish pan-seared in authentic Creole sauce, topped with shrimp and crawfish. Closed for dinner Sun. 916 Cooper. 552-4967. B, L, D, X, $-$$ FARM BURGER—Serves grass-fed, freshly ground, locally sourced burgers; also available with chicken, pork, or veggie quinoa patties, with such toppings as aged white cheddar, kale coleslaw, and roasted beets. 1350 Concourse Avenue #175. 800-1851. L, D, X, $ FRIDA’S—Mexican cuisine and Tex-Mex standards, including chimichangas, enchiladas, and fajitas; seafood includes shrimp and tilapia. 1718 Madison. 244-6196. L, D, X, $-$$ GLOBAL CAFE—This internationational food hall hosts three immigrant/refugee food entrepreneurs serving Nepalese, Sudanese, and Syrian cuisines. Samosas, shawarma, and kabobs are among the menu items. Closed Mon. 1350 Concourse Avenue #157. L, D, X, MRA, $ GOLDEN INDIA—Northern Indian specialties include tandoori chicken as well as lamb, beef, shrimp, and vegetarian dishes. 2097 Madison. 728-5111. L, D, X, $-$$ GROWLERS—Sports bar and eatery serves standard bar fare in addition to a pasta, tacos, chicken and waffles, and light options. 1911 Poplar. 244-7904. L, D, X, $-$$ HATTIE B’S—Fried chicken spot features “hot chicken” with a variety of heat levels; from no heat to “shut the cluck up” sauce. Sides include greens, pimento mac-and-cheese, and black-eyed pea salad. 596 Cooper. 4245900. L, D, X, $ HM DESSERT LOUNGE—Serving cake, pie, and other desserts, as well as a selection of savory dishes, including meatloaf and mashed potato “cupcakes.” Closed Monday. 1586 Madison. 290-2099. L, D, X, $ HOPDODDY BURGER BAR—Focus is on locally sourced ingredients, with freshly baked buns and meat butchered and ground in-house. Patty options include Angus or Kobe beef, bison, chicken, and more; also vegetarian/ vegan. 6 S. Cooper. 654-5100; 4585 Poplar. 683-0700. L, D, X, $ IMAGINE VEGAN CAFE—Dishes at this fully vegan restaurant range from salads and sandwiches to full dinners, including eggplant parmesan and “beef” tips and rice; breakfast all day Sat. and Sun. 2158 Young. 654-3455. L, D, WB, X, $ INDIA PALACE—Tandoori chicken, lamb shish kabobs, and chicken tikka masala are among the entrees; also, vegetarian options and a daily all-you-can-eat lunch buffet. 1720 Poplar. 278-1199. L, D, X, $-$$ INSPIRE COMMUNITY CAFE—Serving breakfast all day, in addition to quesadillas, rice bowls, and more for lunch and dinner. 510 Tillman, Suite 110. 509-8640. B, L, D, X, $ LAFAYETTE’S MUSIC ROOM—Serves such Southern cuisine as po boys and shrimp and grits, and wood-fired pizzas. 2119 Madison. 207-5097. L, D, WB, X, MRA, $-$$ LBOE—Gourmet burger joint serves locally sourced ground beef burgers, with options like the Mac-N-Cheese Burger and Caprese. Black bean and turkey patties available. 2021 Madison. 725-0770. L, D, X, $ THE LIQUOR STORE—Renovated liquor store turned diner serves all-day breakfast, sandwiches, and entrees such as Salisbury steak and smothered pork chops. Closed for dinner Sun.-Mon. 2655 Broad. 405-5477. B, L, D, X, $-$$ LITTLE ITALY—Serving New York-style pizza as well as subs and pasta dishes. 1495 Union. 725-0280; 106 GE Patterson. L, D, X, $-$$ LUCKY CAT RAMEN—Specializes in gourmet ramen bowls, with such ingredients as braised pork belly and housemade blackened garlic, made with rich broth. Bao, steamed buns filled with various meats and veggies, also grace the menu. Closed Sun. 2583 Broad. 208-8145. L, D, X, $-$$ MAMA GAIA—Greek-inspired dishes at this vegetarian eatery include pitas, “petitzzas,” and quinoa bowls. 2144 Madison. 214-2449. B, L, D, X, $-$$ MARDI GRAS MEMPHIS—Serving Cajun fare, including an etouffee-stuffed po’boy. Closed Mon. 496 Watkins. 530-6767. L, D, X, $-$$ MAXIMO’S ON BROAD—Serving a tapas menu that features creative fusion cuisine; entrees include veggie paella and fish of the day. Closed Mon. 2617 Broad Ave. 452-1111. D, SB, X, $-$$

Love a little, die a little and break the law. Trey Milligan did all three in the summer before his 14th birthday. From Sartoris Literary Group, the debut novel by Frank Murtaugh. Available NOW at Amazon.com. Paperback ($19.95) and eBook ($8.95). Also available at Burke’s Book Store (936 S. Cooper) and Novel (387 Perkins Extd). M A R C H 2 0 1 9 • M E M P H I S M A G A Z I N E . C O M • 157


MEMPHIS PIZZA CAFE—Homemade pizzas are specialties; also serves sandwiches, calzones, and salads. 2087 Madison. 726-5343; 5061 Park Ave. 684-1306; 7604 W. Farmington (Germantown). 753-2218; 797 W. Poplar (Collierville). 861-7800; 5627 Getwell (Southaven). 662-536-1364. L, D, X, $-$$ MOLLY’S LA CASITA—Homemade tamales, fish tacos, a vegetarian combo, and bacon-wrapped shrimp are a few of the specialties. 2006 Madison. 726-1873. L, D, X, MRA, $-$$ NEXT DOOR AMERICAN EATERY—The Kitchen’s sister restaurant serves dishes sourced from American farms. Menu features chorizo bacon dates, spicy gulf shrimp, and dry-aged beef burgers. 1350 Concourse Avenue Suite 165. 779-1512. L, D, X, $ ONIX RESTAURANT—Serves seafood dishes, including barbecued shrimp and pecan-crusted trout, and a variety of salads and sandwiches. Closed Sun. 1680 Madison. 552-4609. L, D, X, $-$$ PAYNE’S BAR-B-QUE—Opened in 1972, this family owned barbecue joint serves ribs, smoked sausage, and chopped pork sandwiches with a standout mustard slaw and homemade sauce. About as down-toearth as it gets. 1762 Lamar. 272-1523. L, D, $-$$ PHO BINH—Vietnamese, vegetarian, and Cantonese specialties include lemon tofu and spring rolls. Closed Sunday. 1615 Madison. 276-0006. L, D, $ RAILGARTEN—Located in a former rail station space, this eatery offers breakfast items, a variety of salads and sandwiches, and such entrees as short rib mac-and-cheese and fish tacos. Also serves shakes, malts, floats, and cream sodas. 2166 Central. 231-5043. B, L, D, $-$$ RED FISH ASIAN BISTRO—From the former 19th Century Club building, serves sushi, teriyaki, and hibachi. Specialities include yuzu filet mignon and Chilean sea bass. 1433 Union. 454-3926; 9915 Highway 64 (Lakeland). 729-7581; 6518 Goodman (Olive Branch). 662-874-5254. L, D, X, $-$$$ RESTAURANT IRIS—French Creole-inspired classics, such as gulf shrimp and rice grits congee served with lap chong sausage and boiled peanuts, are served at this newly remodeled restaurant owned by Chef Kelly English, a Food and Wine “Top Ten.” 2146 Monroe. 5902828. D, X, $$-$$$ ROBATA RAMEN & YAKITORI BAR—Serves ramen noodle bowls and Yakitori skewers as well as rice and noodle dishes. 2116 Madison. 410-8290. L, D, X, $ SABROSURA—Serves Mexican and Cuban fare, including arroz tapada de pollo and steak Mexican. Closed Sun. 782 Washington. 421-8180. L, D, X, $-$$ SAUCY CHICKEN—Specializes in antibiotic-free chicken dishes with locally sourced ingredients, with such items as hot wings and the Crosstown Chicken Sandwich, and a variety of house-made dippings sauces; also, seafood, salads, and daily specials. L, D (Mon.-Fri.), $ SECOND LINE, THE—Kelly English brings “relaxed Creole cuisine” to his newest eatery; serves a variety of po-boys and such specialties as barbecue shrimp, and andouille, shrimp, and pimento cheese fries. 2144 Monroe. 590-2829. L, D, WB, X, $-$$ SEKISUI—Japanese fusion cuisine, fresh sushi bar, grilled meats and seafood, California rolls, and vegetarian entrees. Poplar/Perkins location’s emphasis is on Pacific Rim cuisine. Menu and hours vary at each location. 25 Belvedere. 725-0005; 1884 N. Germantown Pkwy. (Cordova). 309-8800; 4724 Poplar (between Perkins & Colonial). 767-7770; 2130 W. Poplar (Collierville). 854-0622; 2990 Kirby-Whitten (Bartlett). 377-2727; 6696 Poplar. 747-0001. L, D, X, $-$$$ STONE SOUP CAFE—Cooper-Young eatery serving soups, salads, quiche, meat-and-two specials; and daily specials such as Italian roast beef. Closed Monday. 993 S. Cooper. 922-5314. B, L, SB, X, $ SOUL FISH CAFE—Serving Southern-style soul food, tacos, and Po Boys, including catfish, crawfish, oyster, shrimp, chicken and smoked pork tenderloin. 862 S. Cooper. 725-0722; 3160 Village Shops Dr. (Germantown). 755-6988; 4720 Poplar. 590-0323. L, D, X, MRA, $-$$ SWEET GRASS—Chef Ryan Trimm takes Southern cuisine to a new level. Low-country coastal cuisine includes such specialties as shrimp and grits. Closed Mon. Restaurant’s “sister,” Sweet Grass Next Door, open nightly, serves lunch Sat.-Sun. 937 S. Cooper. 278-0278. D, SB, X, $-$$$

TROLLEY STOP MARKET—Serves plate lunches/dinners as well as pizzas, salads, and vegan/vegetarian entrees; a specialty is the locally raised beef burger. Also sells fresh produce and goods from local farmers; delivery available. Saturday brunch; closed Sunday. 704 Madison. 526-1361. L, D, X, $ TSUNAMI—Features Pacific Rim cuisine (Asia, Australia, South Pacific, etc.); also a changing “small plate” menu. Chef Ben Smith is a Cooper-Young pioneer. Specialties include Asian nachos and roasted sea bass. Closed Sunday. 928 S. Cooper. 274-2556. D, X, MRA, $$-$$$

SOUTH MEMPHIS (INCLUDES

PARKWAY VILLAGE, FOX MEADOWS, SOUTH MEMPHIS, WINCHESTER, AND WHITEHAVEN)

COLETTA’S—Longtime eatery serves such specialties as homemade ravioli, lasagna, and pizza with barbecue or traditional toppings. 1063 S. Parkway E. 948-7652; 2850 Appling Rd. (Bartlett). 383-1122. L, D, X, $-$$ CURRY BOWL—Specializes in Southern Indian cuisine, serving Tandoori chicken, biryani, tikka masala, and more. Weekend buffet. 4141 Hacks Cross. 207-6051. L, D, $ DELTA’S KITCHEN—The premier restaurant at The Guest House at Graceland serves Elvis-inspired dishes — like Nutella and Peanut Butter Crepes for breakfast — and upscale Southern cuisine — including lamb chops and shrimp and grits — for dinner. 3600 Elvis Presley Blvd. 443-3000. B, D, X, $-$$$ DWJ KOREAN BARBECUE—This authentic Korean eatery serves kimbap, barbecued beef short ribs, rice and noodles dishes, and hot pots and stews. 3750 Hacks Cross, Suite 101. 746-8057; 2156 Young. 207-6204. L, D, $-$$ THE FOUR WAY—Legendary soul-food establishment dishing up such entrees as fried and baked catfish, chicken, and turkey and dressing, along with a host of vegetables and desserts. Around the corner from the legendary Stax Studio. Closed Monday. 998 Mississippi Blvd. 507-1519. L, D, $ INTERSTATE BAR-B-Q—Specialties include chopped pork-shoulder sandwiches, ribs, hot wings, spaghetti, chicken, and turkey. 2265 S. Third. 775-2304; 150 W. Stateline Rd. (Southaven). 662-393-5699. L, D, X, $-$$ LEONARD’S—Serves wet and dry ribs, barbecue sandwiches, spaghetti, catfish, homemade onion rings, and lemon icebox pie; also a lunch buffet. 5465 Fox Plaza. 360-1963. L, X, $-$$ MARLOWE’S—In addition to its signature barbecue and ribs, Marlowe’s serves Southern-style steaks, chops, lasagne, and more. 4381 Elvis Presley Blvd. 332-4159. D, X, MRA, $-$$ UNCLE LOU’S FRIED CHICKEN—Featured on Diners, Drive-Ins and Dives for good reason: fried chicken (mild, hot, or home-style); jumbo burgers four patties high; strawberry shortcake, and assorted fruit pies. 3633 Millbranch. 332-2367. L, D, X, MRA, $

SUMMER/BERCLAIR/ RALEIGH/BARTLETT ASIAN PALACE—Chinese eatery serves seafood, vegetarian items, dim sum, and more. 5266 Summer Ave. 766-0831. L, D, X, $-$$ ELWOOD’S—Casual comfort food includes tacos, pizza and sandwiches. Specialties include meats smoked in-house (chicken, turkey, brisket, pork), barbecue pizza and steelhead trout tacos. 4523 Summer. 7619898. B, L, D, X, $ EXLINES’ BEST PIZZA—Serves pizza, Italian dinners, sandwiches, and salads. 6250 Stage Rd. 382-3433; 2935 Austin Peay. 388-4711; 2801 Kirby Parkway. 754-0202; 7730 Wolf River Blvd. (Germantown). 753-4545; 531 W. Stateline Rd. 662-3424544 (check online for additional locations). L, D, X, MRA, $ GRIDLEY’S—Offers barbecued ribs, shrimp, pork plate, chicken, and hot tamales; also daily lunch specials. Closed Tues. 6842 Stage Rd. 377-8055. L, D, X, $-$$ LA TAQUERIA GUADALUPANA—Fajitas and quesadillas are just a few of the authentic Mexican entrees offered here. A bona-fide Memphis institution. 4818 Summer. 685-6857; 5848 Winchester. 365-4992. L, D, $

$

LOTUS—Authentic Vietnamese-Asian fare, including lemon-grass chicken and shrimp, egg rolls, Pho soup, and spicy Vietnamese vermicelli. 4970 Summer. 682-1151. D, X,

MORTIMER’S—Contemporary American entrees include trout almondine, chicken dishes, and hand-cut steaks; also sandwiches, salads, and daily/nightly specials. A Memphis landmark since the Knickerbocker closed. Closed for lunch Sat.-Sun. 590 N. Perkins. 761-9321. L, D, X, $-$$ NAGASAKI INN—Chicken, steak, and lobster are among the main courses; meal is cooked at your table. 3951 Summer. 454-0320. D, X, $$ PANDA GARDEN—Sesame chicken and broccoli beef are among the Mandarin and Cantonese entrees; also seafood specials and fried rice. Closed for lunch Saturday. 3735 Summer. 323-4819. L, D, X, $-$$ QUEEN OF SHEBA—Featuring Middle Eastern favorites and Yemeni dishes such as lamb haneeth and saltah. 4792 Summer. 207-4174. L, D, $ SIDE PORCH STEAK HOUSE—In addition to steak, the menu includes chicken, pork chops, and fish entrees; homemade rolls are a specialty. Closed Sun.-Mon. 5689 Stage Rd. 377-2484. D, X, $-$$

UNIVERSITY NEIGHBORHOOD DISTRICT (INCLUDES CHICKASAW GARDENS AND HIGHLAND STRIP)

A-TAN—Serves Chinese and Japanese hibachi cuisine, complete with sushi bar. A specialty is Four Treasures with garlic sauce. 3445 Poplar, Suite 17, University Center. 452-4477. L, D, X, $-$$$ THE BLUFF—New Orleans-inspired menu includes alligator bites, nachos topped with crawfish and andouille, gumbo, po’boys, and fried seafood platters. 535 S. Highland. 454-7771. L, D, X, $-$$ BROTHER JUNIPER’S—This little cottage is a breakfast mecca, offering specialty omelets, including the open-faced San Diegan omelet; also daily specials, and homemade breads and pastries. Closed Mon. 3519 Walker. 3240144. B, X, $ CHAR RESTAURANT—Specializing in modern Southern cuisine, this eatery offers homestyle sides, char-broiled steaks, and fresh seafood. 431 S. Highland, #120. 249-3533. L, D, WB, X, MRA, $-$$$ DERAE RESTAURANT—Ethiopian and Mediterranean fare includes fuul, or fava beans in spices and yogurt, goat meat and rice, and garlic chicken over basmati rice with cilantro chutney; also salmon and tilapia. Closed Monday. 923 S. Highland. 552-3992. B, L, D, $-$$ EL PORTON—Fajitas, quesadillas, and steak ranchero are just a few of the menu items. 2095 Merchants Row (Germantown). 754-4268; 8361 Highway 64. 380-7877; 3448 Poplar, Poplar Plaza. 452-7330; 1805 N. Germantown Parkway (Cordova). 624-9358; 1016 W. Poplar (Collierville). 854-5770. L, D, X, MRA, $-$$ JOES’ ON HIGHLAND—Specializes in fried chicken and comfort sides such as warm okra/green tomato salad and turnip greens. Entrees include salmon patties and chicken fried steak. Closed Mon. 262 S. Highland. 337-7003. L, D, X, $ MEDALLION—Offers steaks, seafood, chicken, and pasta entrees. Closed for dinner Sunday. 3700 Central, Holiday Inn (Kemmons Wilson School of Hospitality). 678-1030. B, L, D, SB, X, MRA, $-$$$ OPEN FLAME—Authentic Persian and Mediterranean eatery specializes in shish kebabs and kosher and halal fare. 3445 Poplar. 207-4995. L, D, X, $

OUT-OF-TOWN TACKER’S SHAKE SHACK—This family-run establishment offers plate lunches, catfish dinners, homemade desserts, and a variety of hamburgers, including a mac ‘n’ cheese-topped griddle burger. Closed Sun. 409 E. Military Rd. (Marion, AR). 870-739-3943. B, L, D, $ BONNE TERRE—This inn’s cafe features American cuisine with a Southern flair, and a seasonal menu that changes monthly. Offers Angus steaks, duck, pasta, and seafood. Closed Sun.-Wed. 4715 Church Rd. W. (Nesbit, MS). 662-781-5100. D, X, $-$$$

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BOZO’S HOT PIT BAR-B-Q—Barbecue, burgers, sandwiches, and subs. 342 Hwy 70 (Mason, TN). 901-294-3400. L, D, $-$$ CATFISH BLUES—Serving Delta-raised catfish and Cajunand Southern-inspired dishes, including gumbo and fried green tomatoes. 210 E. Commerce (Hernando, MS). 662-298-3814. L, D, $ CITY GROCERY—Southern eclectic cuisine; shrimp and grits is a specialty. Closed for dinner Sunday. 152 Courthouse Square (Oxford, MS). 662-232-8080. L, D, SB, X, $$-$$$ COMO STEAKHOUSE—Steaks cooked on a hickory charcoal grill are a specialty here. Upstairs is an oyster bar. Closed Sun. 203 Main St. (Como, MS). 662-526-9529. D, X, $-$$$ LONG ROAD CIDER CO.—Specializes in hard apple ciders made with traditional methods. Cafe-style entrees include black eye peas with cornbread and greens, chicken Gorgonzola pockets, cider-steamed sausage, and housemade ice creams. Closed Sun.-Wed. 9053 Barret Road. (Barretville, TN). 352-0962. D, X, $

CASINO TABLES BOURBON STREET STEAKHOUSE & GRILL AT SOUTHLAND PARK—1550 Ingram Blvd., West Memphis, AR, 1-800-467-6182. CHICAGO STEAKHOUSE AT THE GOLDSTRIKE—1010 Casino Center Dr., Robinsonville, MS, 1-888-24KSTAY /662-357-1225. FAIRBANKS AT THE HOLLYWOOD—1150 Casino Strip Blvd., Robinsonville, MS, 1-800-871-0711. JACK BINION’S STEAK HOUSE AT HORSESHOE—1021 Casino Center Drive, Robinsonville, MS, 1-800-303-SHOE. LUCKY 8 ASIAN BISTRO AT HORSESHOE—1021 Casino Center Drive, Robinsonville, MS, 1-800-303-SHOE. SAMMY HAGAR’S RED ROCKER BAR & GRILL AT SOUTHLAND PARK—1550 Ingram Blvd., West Memphis, AR, 1-870-735-3670 ext. 5208 THE STEAKHOUSE AT THE FITZ —711 Lucky Ln., Robinsonville, MS, 1-888-766-LUCK, ext 8213. MANILA FILIPINO RESTAURANT—Entrees include pork belly cutlet with lechon sauce, and shrimp and vegetables in tamarind broth; also daily combos, rice dishes, and chef specials. Closed Sun.-Mon. 7849 Rockford (Millington, TN). 209-8525. L, D, X, $ MARSHALL STEAKHOUSE—Rustic steakhouse serves premium Angus beef steaks, seafood dishes, rack of lamb, and more. Breakfast menu features griddle cakes, and lunch offerings include hamburger steak and oyster po’ boys. 2379 Highway 178 (Holly Springs, MS). 628-3556. B, L, D, X, $-$$$ MEMPHIS BARBECUE COMPANY—Offers spare ribs, baby backs, and pulled pork and brisket, along with such sides as mac and cheese, grits, and red beans. 709 Desoto Cove (Horn Lake, MS). 662-536-3762. L, D, X, $-$$ NAGOYA—Offers traditional Japanese cuisine and sushi bar; specialties are teriyaki and tempura dishes. 7075 Malco Blvd., Suite 101 (Southaven, MS). 662-349-8788. L, D, X, $-$$$
 PANCHO’S—Serves up a variety of Mexican standards, including tacos, enchiladas, and mix-and-match platters; also lunch specials. 3600 E. Broadway (West Memphis, AR). 870-7356466. 717 N. White Station. 685-5404. L, D, X, MRA, $ PIG-N-WHISTLE—Offers pork shoulder sandwiches, wet and dry ribs, catfish, nachos, and stuffed barbecue potatoes. 6084 Kerr-Rosemark Rd. (Millington, TN). 872-2455. L, D, X, $ RAVINE—Serves contemporary Southern cuisine with an emphasis on fresh, locally grown foods and a menu that changes weekly. Closed Mon.-Tues. 53 Pea Ridge/County Rd. 321 (Oxford, MS). 662-234-4555. D, SB, X, $$-$$$ STEAK BY MELISSA—Aged, choice-grade, hand-cut steaks are a specialty here. Also serving fresh seafood dishes, plate lunches, burgers, and sandwiches. 4975 Pepper Chase Dr. (Southaven, MS). 662-342-0602. L, D, WB, X, $-$$$ WILSON CAFE—Serving elevated home-cooking, with such dishes as deviled eggs with cilantro and jalapeno, scampi and grits, and doughnut bread pudding. 2 N. Jefferson (Wilson, AR). 870-655-0222. L, D (Wed. through Sat. only), X, $-$$$

The Memphis magazine Fiction Contest for Mid-South writers is back ...with a lean and hungry new look!

T

he Very Short Story Contest welcomes entries up to 750 words, maximum. Winning stories will be published in Memphis and will be archived on memphismagazine.com. Whereas the fiction contest was in years past a once-a-year event, the Very Short Story Contest will recognize the winning entry every month. The Very Short Story Contest is presented by Novel, Memphis’ newest independent bookstore. Winning authors will be honored with a $200 gift certificate at Novel.

CONTEST RULES: 1. Authors are strongly encouraged to bring Memphis or the Mid-South into their stories. How to do this is open to your interpretation. 2. Entries will be accepted throughout the year. The winning entry in any given month must have been received by the end of the second month prior (i.e. May’s winner must be received by the end of March). 3. Each story should be typed, double-spaced, and should not exceed 750 words. 4. With each story should be a cover letter that gives your name, brief author bio, address, phone number, and the title of your story. Please do NOT put your name anywhere on the manuscript itself. 5. Manuscripts may not have been previously published. 6. Manuscripts should be sent to fiction@memphismagazine.com as .doc, .rtf, or .pdf files. M A R C H 2 0 1 9 • M E M P H I S M A G A Z I N E . C O M • 159


ENDGAME

George Klein Known as one of Elvis’ best friends, he made his own impact on Memphis music.

by joe mulherin

W

They met in 1948 in the eighth grade at Humes High School. George, the mover and shaker, became president of their senior class; Elvis, the outsider in flashy clothes and styled hair, played guitar and sang at school events. Klein found his musical passion when he spun his radio dial from the pop sounds of WHBQ 560 up to 1070, where WDIA’s black DJs played very different music for black listeners (and adventurous white kids like George). “This stuff sounded wild and a little dangerous,” he wrote in his autobiography, “and I couldn’t get enough of it.” While in college, George was hired on at WHBQ as an assistant to DJ Dewey Phillips, whose color-blind idea of “good music for good people” influenced Klein for the rest of his life. One Sunday night, broadcasting live from allblack East Trigg Baptist Church, George looked back at the handful of white faces in the rear pews and there was Elvis, reveling in the powerful gospel music. Klein’s career quickly grew from small Arkansas stations to powerful WMC in Memphis, where the music and his jivetalking style made Rock & Roll Ballroom a big hit. George was proud to play his friend’s new Sun records and Elvis would drop by the studio. They were kindred spirits on their way up, and their friendship grew. By 1957, Elvis was the hottest artist in the music business, and George was a prominent radio personality. But WMC decided that rockand-roll was just a passing fad, changed its format, and fired

Klein. Elvis immediately hired him as a “traveling companion,” a charter member of his Memphis Mafia. After a year of the rockand-roll road and movie glamor, George was back on the air at a small Millington station. Elvis returned to the road, but Klein stayed in Memphis to rebuild his radio career. He landed back at WHBQ in the early 1960s, becoming a top-rated disc jockey, later program director, and the influential host of Talent Party every Saturday on WHBQ-TV. It was a savvy combo of music and interviews, with go-go dancing from the WHBQties, pretty high school girls who were regulars. He booked major stars by adjusting to their schedules. George drove the artists to WHBQ after their shows; the 10 o’clock news crew stayed late and recorded performances and interviews for later broadcast. Fats Domino’s appearance made Talent Party the first Mid-South TV show to feature a black artist. A galaxy of stars followed — James Brown, Ray Charles, Stevie Wonder, and many more. George was an unflagging supporter of all Memphis music. He constantly scouted local groups to appear on Talent Party and sent them to Sonic Recording to cut songs that they lip-synced on the show. Hundreds of musicians were Talent Party alumni, from future hit-makers to great local groups who didn’t get the right breaks. For all, the program meant higher visibility and more gigs, and George steered several to record deals. It’s fair to say that Klein and Talent Party

were instrumental in the incredibly fertile local music scene of the 1960s and early ’70s. Like the music, the performers on Talent Party were black, white, and both, and within a few years the WHBQties welcomed their first black dancer. The importance of George’s integration of Talent Party can’t be underestimated. During those unsettled times, Mid-South young people saw a vivid picture of racial harmony every Saturday for years. Klein was also nationally known as a top disc jockey with a sure instinct for hit records. He turned down repeated offers from major market stations because he thought Memphis was where he should be. After WHBQ, George used his well-honed PR skills in several non-radio jobs, but remained on the air with his Original Elvis Hour, the internationally broadcast George Klein Show on Sirius/ XM Satellite Radio, and he interviewed musical friends old and new every week on Memphis Sounds with George Klein on WYPL-TV. Through it all he remained one of Elvis’ most loyal and trusted friends. After the King’s death Klein became a beloved figure in the Elvis fan world, sharing his memories at hundreds of events. Forty-two years of George

Klein Christmas Charity Shows raised serious money for Memphis charities, and when they ended, the show’s “rainy day fund” endowed a broadcasting scholarship at the University of Memphis. At his funeral, childhood friends sat next to Elvis fans. Memphis Mafia widows shared pews with singers T.G. Sheppard and Ronnie McDowell. Musicians who got their first break on Talent Party joined friends who’d flown in from across the country. Rabbi Micah Greenstein said that he’d officiated at more than a thousand funerals, “but this is the first time I feel like I’ve come to a family reunion.” George Klein treasured the large diverse family of friends he’d made in his long life, and he loved Memphis and its music until his final breath. May we all carry his open-hearted spirit of loyalty and love with us into our city’s future and our own. Joe Mulherin is a writer, producer of video/TV and live events, and musician. He regularly wrote about music for Memphis in the late 1970s.

ILLUSTRATION BY CHRIS HONEYSUCKLE ELLIS

hen George Klein died on February 5th, headlines nationwide described him as “Friend of Elvis Presley,” “Elvis Presley confidante,” or “Elvis’ best friend.” The King was a deep and important relationship in his life, but George had just as deep a connection to Memphis and its music.

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Profile for Contemporary Media

Memphis Magazine March 2019  

The Faces & Places Issue! Riverfront Makeover | Spa Getaways | Culinary Crossroads | 901 FC and more!

Memphis Magazine March 2019  

The Faces & Places Issue! Riverfront Makeover | Spa Getaways | Culinary Crossroads | 901 FC and more!