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Memphis • THE CITY MAGAZINE • W W W.MEMPHISMAGAZINE.COM

hi e gh r tur la t nd st ri p

f no

THE FACES AND PLACES ISSUE

THE CITY MAGAZINE

VOL XLI NO 1 2 | M A R C H 2 01 7

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USA $4.99

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Rodd Bland the next generation of blues on beale.

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7

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What’s growing faster than your kids? Our expanded pediatric services.

With expanded pediatric services at The Spence and Becky Wilson Baptist Children’s Hospital, our commitment to your child’s health spans from newborn through adolescence. Our newly added pediatric intensive care unit, along with an experienced team of pediatric surgeons, specialists and nurses, helps Baptist deliver exceptional care for our youngest patients.

centrally located

baptistonline.org/pediatrics

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|

easy access

901-227-PEDS (7337)

|

convenient parking

Get Better. 2/16/17 8:21 AM


THE OYSTER PERPETUAL The incarnation of the original Oyster launched in 1926 is a distinctive symbol of universal style. It doesn’t just tell time. It tells history.

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OYSTER PERPE TUAL 34

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GIVE YOUR FINANCES THE SAME CARE AS YOU DO YOUR PATIENTS. In today’s uncertain markets, having a bank that tends to your financial health is vital. First Tennessee Medical Private Banking can help with today’s needs and tomorrow’s goals. Our Relationship Managers offer guidance and solutions tailored to medical professionals. So you can focus on your priority: your patients. To make an appointment with a Relationship Manager, please contact: Margaret Yancey Senior Vice President Medical Private Banking ph: 901-681-2526 email: myancey@ftb.com

Thomas Carlisle Relationship Manager Medical Private Banking ph: 901-681-2522 email: tcarlisle@ftb.com

Jeff McIlvain Vice President Medical Private Banking ph: 901-681-2555 email: jmcilvain@ftb.com

Chris Webb Vice President Medical Private Banking ph: 901-681-2523 email: cawebb@ftb.com

©2016 First Tennessee Bank National Association. Member FDIC. www.firsttennessee.com ©2017 First Tennessee Bank National Association. Member FDIC. www.firsttennessee.com

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2017 C 300 Sport Sedan in Iridium Silver metallic paint shown with optional equipment. *Stated MSRP excludes all options, taxes, title, registration, transportation charge and dealer prep. Options, model availability and actual dealer price may vary. See dealer for details. ©2017 Authorized Mercedes-Benz Dealers For more information, call 1-800-FOR-MERCEDES, or visit MBUSA.com.

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MEMPHIS FUNERAL HOME The Most Trusted Name In Memphis. Since 1931.

A gathering of family and friends will always be the cornerstone of a Celebration of Life. Memphis Funeral Home offers its Life Remembrance Center as the perfect choice for these gatherings. Unique? Indeed. The only one of its kind in the Mid-South. 5599 Poplar Avenue, Memphis, TN 38119 • 3700 North Germantown Road, Memphis, TN 38133 (901) 725-0100

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on the cover: Rodd Bland on Beale Street PHOTOGRAPH BY

VOL XLI NO 12 | MARCH 2017

JAMES WESSELS | ROCK MEMPHIS LIVE

78 56 178 120

62

Features

56 Beauty Behind Barbed Wire

182 Up Front 12 14 18 20 22

in the beginning spotlight fine print city journal out and about

A new exhibition showcases art produced by Japanese prisoners-of-war in Arkansas. ~ by jane schneider

62 Graduate Degree

Cocktails, updated menus, and an iconic rooftop sign reconnect the Highland Strip to its neighborhood roots. ~ by pamela denney

78 Rodd Bland

The son of blues legend Bobby “Blue” Bland keeps the beat alive on Beale Street. ~ by shara clark

120 Saving Pyradoptics

The creator of the first Memphis pyramid tells a not-so-tall tale.

~ by chris mccoy

192

Memphis (ISSN 1622-820x) is published monthly for $15 per year by Contemporary Media, Inc., P.O. Box 1738, Memphis, TN 38101 © 2017. Telephone: 901-521-9000. For subscription info, please call 901-521-9000. Subscription customer service mailing address is Memphis magazine, P.O. Box 1738, Memphis, TN 38101. All rights reserved. • Periodicals Postage Paid at Memphis, TN. Postmasters: send address changes to Memphis, P.O. Box 1738, Memphis, TN 38101.

Columns

124 great homes

A Chickasaw Gardens Treasure At home with interior designer Sarah Spinosa.

~ by anne cunningham o’neill

132 travel

Another Day in Paradise Destin is the heart of the Emerald Coast.

~ by chris mccoy

178 garden variety

Discovering the Greenery of Memphis Newcomers are often surprised at the natural beauty of the Bluff City. ~ by christine arpe gang

180 ask vance

Davis White Spot Our trivia expert solves local mysteries of who, what, when, where, why, and why not. ~ by vance lauderdale

182 city dining

Tidbits: Luna Bar and Restaurant; plus the city’s most extensive dining listings.

192 last stand

When GRIZ = KISS A basketball team and a rock band . . . finally united. ~ by frank murtaugh

MARCH 20 17 • MEMPHISMAGA ZINE.COM • 7

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BONUS

In This Issue 2017

2017

FACES OF THE

FACES OF THE

MID-SOUTH

MID-SOUTH

THE FACE OF

SOCIAL CHANGE

NATIONAL CIVIL RIGHTS MUSEUM >>> The National Civil Rights Museum, located at the historic Lorraine Motel where civil rights leader Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. was assassinated, gives a comprehensive overview of the American Civil Rights Movement from 1619 to the present. Since the Museum opened in 1991, millions of visitors from around the world

THE FACE OF

ARCHITECTURE LOONEY RICKS KISS>>>

Transforming Memphis. Great Places. Inspiring Spaces. 175 Toyota Plaza, Suite 500, Memphis, TN 38103 901.521.1440 | LRK.com

have come, including more than 80,000 students annually. Serving as the new public square, the Museum is steadfast in its mission to chronicle the American civil rights movement, examine today’s global civil and human rights issues, provoke thoughtful debate and serve as a catalyst for positive social change.

450 Mulberry Street, Memphis, TN 38103 | 901.521.9699 | CivilRightsMuseum.org SPECIAL PROMOTION

SPECIAL PROMOTION

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FACE S OF T HE MID-SOU T H pages 24-55, 88-119, 140-174 Profiles of the leading businesses in our area.

Coming in May GO RED F OR WOMEN

S

CARING FROM CROSSTOWN BEGINS SPRING 2017

“GO RED” IMPACT CONTINUES TO GROW

ince 2004, the American Heart Association’s Go Red for Women campaign has sought to educate women on the importance of knowing their risk factors for heart disease, which claims more lives each year than all forms of cancer combined. “One in three women will die each year from a cardiovascular event,” says Monica Wharton, senior vice president of legal affairs and general counsel for Regional One Health, and the chair of the 2016 Go Red for Women campaign in Memphis. “We have to ensure women are educated on the lifestyle changes they can make to help put an end to heart disease.” Wharton’s desire to get involved with the American Heart Association came after a family member passed away suddenly from heart disease. “He was only 47 years old and had been married for less than a year,” she says. “I was asked to chair just a few weeks after he passed, and given the impact of his death on my family and my understanding of the impact of heart disease in our community, I knew I had to get involved.” For the past year, Wharton and her leadership team – which includes executives from Lipscomb & Pitts Insurance, Southeastern Asset Management, Baptist Memorial Health Care, First Tennessee, and MLGW, among others – have been fundraising and planning for the 2016 Go Red for Women Luncheon, which will be held on Thursday, June 2nd at the Great Hall & Conference Center in Germantown.

1350 CONCOURSE AVE. SUITE 142

churchhealth.org/give

“The luncheon is our opportunity to educate executives and women in the community on the risks associated with heart disease, and to share the mission of the American Heart Association and the Go Red for Women campaign,” Wharton says. The luncheon kicks off with an hour-long health and wellness expo, which includes sponsor booths providing health messaging, screenings, and CPR training. Go Red for Women is sponsored nationally by Macy’s, and since the campaign launched in 2004, the company has contributed more than $55 million to support the movement. Go Red is locally sponsored by Regional One Health, Cigna, Ashley Furniture Home Store, Caesar’s Entertainment, Baptist Memorial Health Care, Ring Container Technologies, Blue Cross Blue Shield, Advanced Dermatology, and Visha Skincare, among others. Media sponsors include Local 24 Cares, Entercom, La M A Y 2 0 1 6 • M E M P H I S M A G A Z I N E . C O M • 83

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We partner with the American Heart Association to boost awareness of heart disease and prevention.

4/18/16 2:14 PM

PE T GUIDE 2/7/2017 1:10:22 PM PHOTOGRAPH BY KAREN PULFER FOCHT

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Useful information and insight about caring for your pets.

“I want women struggling with fertility issues to know

(PAW) TERNATIVE MEDICINE FOR YOUR A ILING PET, ACUPUNCTUR E M AY BE J UST WH AT THE DOCTOR OR DER ED. by shara clark

Y

ou’ve most likely heard about — or maybe even tried for yourself — acupuncture therapy. This form of traditional Chinese medicine, which involves inserting small needles along specific points on the body, has been used to treat a variety of conditions in humans, including musculoskeletal issues (arthritis, back or knee pain, shoulder stiffness), gastrointestinal disorders, headaches, seizures, insomnia, and more. Some acupuncture patients have also reported lower stress levels and better moods. Could this age-old treatment help our ailing pets, too? Advocates say the proof is in the pudding.

they are not alone.”

Dog-owner Dale Caen is an avid proponent of acupuncture, not only for herself (she’s been getting acupuncture for 10 years for autoimmune disease) but also for her pets. A few years ago, when Caen’s two elderly labradors’ health issues worsened, her veterinarian, Dr. Trudy Dunlap, suggested acupuncture. The older lab, Sugar, suffered from arthritis. “She would have moments of paralyzation where she couldn’t move at all,” Caen says, “and she was on

all sorts of medication.” The other pup, Casey, had kidney disease. Sugar had difficulty with her movements and getting up on things was a near impossibility, but Caen says she could tell a big difference after acupuncture. “She’d be trotting around and running around outside. It was wild to see.” Casey showed tremendous improvements as well. “I’m a big believer that you can really tell a dog’s health by its exterior — if their

M A Y 2 0 1 6 • M E M P H I S M A G A Z I N E . C O M • 93

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Laura Detti, MD

4/18/16 1:39 PM

Coming in June Memphis • THE CITY MAGA ZINE • W W W.MEMPHISMAGA ZINE.COM

Fertility Specialist at Regional One Health

Free seminars are available. To learn about fertility treatments and our other services, call us today at 901-515-3100.

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THREE OF A KIND! How Jennifer and Ashton Hall’s identical triplets made Memphis medical history.

USA $4.99

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ASHTON AND JENNIFER HALL, W I T H S O N S L E O , W Y L D E R , A N D C O LT O N

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DISPLAY UNTIL AUGUST 10, 2016

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B O R N AT R E G I O N A L O N E H E A LT H

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Results of a survey conducted by Castle Connolly Medical Ltd., which recognizes the top-rated physicians in our area as chosen by their peers.

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Your life. Our passion.

For more information on advertising or our upcoming special sections, please contact Margie Neal at margie@memphismagazine.com

9/30/2016 4:37:58 PM

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Memphis

EAT

T H E CIT Y M AG AZIN E

General Excellence Grand Award Winner City and Regional Magazine Association 2007, 2008, 2010, 2014

&7

PUBLISHER/EDITOR kenneth neill EXECUTIVE EDITOR michael finger MANAGING EDITOR frank murtaugh ARTS & LIFESTYLE EDITOR anne cunningham o’neill FASHION EDITOR augusta campbell

PLAY

FOOD EDITOR pamela denney ASSOCIATE EDITOR shara clark CONTRIBUTING EDITORS richard j. alley,

jackson baker, john branston, susan ellis, tom jones, vance lauderdale, jane schneider, lesley young EDITORIAL OPERATIONS ASSOCIATE sam cicci

4

CREATIVE DIRECTOR brian groppe PRODUCTION OPERATIONS DIRECTOR margie neal SENIOR ART DIRECTOR carrie beasley

STAY

ADVERTISING ART DIRECTOR christopher myers GRAPHIC DESIGNERS jeremiah matthews,

bryan rollins PHOTOGRAPHY justin fox burks, brandon dill,

karen pulfer focht, addie james, chip pankey, james wessels

4

SENIOR ACCOUNT EXECUTIVES joy bateman,

sloane patteson taylor ACCOUNT EXECUTIVE zach scott ADVERTISING ASSISTANT roxy matthews

4

published by contemporary media, inc. memphis, tn 901-521-9000 p • 901-521-0129 f subscriptions: 901-521-9000

1 BASS PRO DRIVE | MEMPHIS, TENNESSEE 38105 BASSPRO.COM/PYRAMID

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DISTRIBUTION MANAGER lynn sparagowski EVENTS MANAGER jackie sparks-davila MARKETING/COMMUNICATIONS MANAGER kendrea collins EMAIL MARKETING MANAGER britt ervin IT DIRECTOR joseph carey ACCOUNTING ASSISTANT celeste dixon RECEPTIONIST kalena mckinney

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member: City and Regional Magazine Association member: Circulation Verification Council

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you

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After an accident or illness, getting back to your life is the top priority. At the Center for Rehabilitative Medicine, we are dedicated to helping you recover and regain your physical health. Our care team, led by a boardcertified physical medicine and rehabilitation physician, collaborates with you to develop progressive paths to wellness that may include physical therapy, pain management, and other therapeutic services. It’s not just our job to give our patients the specialized care they need to return to an active life, it’s what we love to do.

Schedule an appointment online at RegionalOneHealth.org

or call 901.515.EAST

RegionalOneHealth.org/East

Your life. Our passion.

2/18/17 4:24 PM


IN THE BEGINNING | by kenneth neill

Old East Memphis

A Neighborhood in Search of a Name. elcome to our fourth annual “Faces and Places” issue. Every spring, we now produce this special issue as a salute to everything that defines this unique city that we call “home.” It goes without saying that there really is no other place quite like Memphis.

W CELEBRATING 38 YEARS SELLING

ALL AROUND TOWN Jimmy Reed, President

JimmyReedRealtor.com | 901.682.1868

“A CAREER BUILT UPON TRUST”

Memphis

Memphis • THE CITY MAGA ZINE • W W W.MEMPHISMAGA ZINE.COM

Since 1868

Next month, we will celebrate this maga- areas, dotted with historic homes, and catering zine’s 41st birthday. Needless to say, we are very to people of all ages and income brackets. It’s grateful for our advertisers’ confidence and home to the Benjamin L. Hooks Central Library, support of Memphis magazine over the past four the Pink Palace, Audubon Park, and The Dixon decades, and the loyalty of our readers. Gallery and Gardens. And with retail outlets The “Face” on this month’s cover may not and shopping centers all along Poplar, Old East be familiar to everyone, but his surname is Memphis is anything but old and tired. synonymous with music in this town, and inOld East Memphis, of course, includes the dicates the role his family has played in the campus of the University of Memphis. Indeed, a building boom is transdevelopment of Memphis’ THE FACES AND PLACES ISSUE blues heritage. Rodd Bland’s forming that campus, while famous father, of course, was around its margins the Bobby “Blue” Bland, a Beale University Neighborhoods Street icon whose music is as Development Corporation famous in Paris as it is in Mem(UNDC), has focused on im*7 provement as well. phis. On page 78, Shara Clark Memphis Goes to DOWNTON In recent years, the profiles the musical career of ABBEY *7 the younger Mr. Bland (Rodd UNDC has been responsiKROC CENTER It’s Working Out! is an accomplished drummer). ble for all kinds of improve*7 Insider’s Guide to He has two blues greats up in ments in The U District, as NASHVILLE *7 heaven, watching his back; it’s starting to be called by JOHN FORD Revisited B.B. King is Rodd Bland’s one and all. The most spec*7 godfather. tacular aspect of this develthe art of The “Place” that we’re feaopment has been the rebirth Willypictures Bearden turing this year is a bit harder — of the Highland Strip, just worth a thousand words to describe. As regular readers west of the main university April 2014 campus. know, we often profile Memphis neighborhoods; we’ve showcased dozens, The Strip itself is a historic part of the area, from South Main to Cooper-Young to Walnut having been the commercial hub of the MemGrove Lake. But describing this year’s neigh- phis State community for much of the twentieth borhood presents a special challenge. century. It’s gone through many incarnations Once upon a time, the area we’re writing a over the decades, not least of which was its lot about in this issue — east of East Parkway 1970s transformation into the city’s bohemian and west of Perkins, along the Poplar Corridor district. You can read all about what that was — was simply “East Memphis.” But over the like in David Dawson’s timeless story about the decades, that designation has become foggier old Strip, on page 72. Today, the Highland Strip has been reincarand foggier, as Memphis has sprawled ever eastward along that corridor, reaching and passing nated as one of the city’s leading dining and the Germantown city limits. entertainment districts, development spurred Today, you can live in Chickasaw Gardens by the major involvement in the area of Loeb (where this month we’re profiling a truly great Properties, the same group that redeveloped home; see page 40) or you can live far away, off Overton Square earlier this decade. You can Ridgeway, and safely describe yourself in “East check out all the details on page 62, where Memphis.” It’s perhaps the least descriptive dining editor Pam Denney has put together a neighborhood “name” in the city. That’s why comprehensive package about who’s who and we’re narrowing the focus a bit, and calling the what’s what along the new Highland Strip. relatively small area described above — at least Yes, Old East Memphis is alive and kicking, until one of our staffers or readers can think of and it’s our pleasure to salute this wonderful something better — as “Old East Memphis.” neighborhood as our “place” of the year. Enjoy Whatever its name, this particular neighbor- this issue! Kenneth Neill hood has lots to offer. Besides Chickasaw Garpublisher/editor dens, it has a wide variety of superb residential THE CITY MAGAZINE

USA $4.99

VOL XXXIX NO 1 | APRIL 2014

and much more!

0 4 1 4

DISPLAY UNTIL MAY 10, 2014

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2/22/17 3:18 PM


RANGE ROVER EVOQUE CONVERTIBLE

THE CITY. ITS NEW RANGE ROVER EVOQUE CONVERTIBLE NATURAL HABITAT. THE CITY. ITS NEW NATURAL HABITAT.

Introducing Land Rover’s first compact convertible SUV. The Range Rover Evoque Convertible inherits the striking looks and capability of the Range Rover Evoque and takes design and technology even further. With Terrain Response®† technology and Land Rover’s new InControl Touch ProTM infotainment system,‡ the Introducing Land Rover’s first compact convertible SUV. The Range Rover Evoque Convertible is uniquely adapted to stand out Range Rover Evoque Convertible inherits the striking looks and in the city and the great outdoors. capability of the Range Rover Evoque and takes design and technology even further. With Terrain Response®† technology and LAND ROVER BLUFF CITY Land Rover’s new InControl Touch ProTM infotainment system,‡ the 6335 Wheel Cove Memphis TN 38119 Range Rover Evoque Convertible is uniquely adapted to stand out 901-844-9400 in the city and the great outdoors. www.landroverbluffcity.com LAND ROVER BLUFF CITY 6335 Wheel Cove Memphis TN 38119 901-844-9400 www.landroverbluffcity.com

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SPOTLIGHT | Staxtacular 2017 | Soulsville | Saturday, February 11, 2017 | Photography by Andrea Zucker

1

2

S

3

taxtacular, the largest fundraising event for the Stax Music Academy, sponsored by SunTrust, took place on the Soulsville Foundation campus. The party ranged through the AutoZone “Get in the Zone” Gymnasium, Stax Music Academy, and the Stax Museum of American Soul Music. Southern Avenue, the first Memphis band signed to the new Stax Records/Concord Music Group label, performed. The band’s keyboardist, Jeremy “Mr. 88” Powell, is the first former Stax Music Academy student signed to Stax Records. Hosted by Grizzlies guard/forward Vince Carter and the Memphis Grizzlies, and now in its 13th year, the event has raised over $1 million to help provide financial need-based scholarships for underserved, primarily at-risk students to attend the school. — Anne Cunningham O’Neill

4

1 Andrew Harrison, Vince Carter, Toney Douglas, Troy Daniels 2 Preston Davis, Bena and George Cates 3 Dr. Reginald and Erica Coopwood 4 Monte and Teresa Gist 5 Stax Music Academy Band and Soulsville officers 6 Mary Catherine Burke, Michael Lightman Jr., Suzana Lightman. contin u ed on page 16 5

6

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SPOTLIGHT | Staxtacular 2017 | Soulsville | Saturday, February 11, 2017 | Photography by Andrea Zucker contin u ed from page 1 4 7

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7 Artist Jamond Bullock 8 Christina Pittman, Colby Bowen, Mike Bowen, Suzie Bowen 9 Daniel and Diane Weickenand, Bonnie and David Thornton 1 0 Jenny Koltnow and Kendrick Brooks 11 Christopher and Stefani Jenkins 12 David Cooper and Hannah Zachary 13 Cathy Dalfiume and Karen Ford 14 Angela Dixon (SunTrust major presenting sponsor) and Christy Valentine (director of development, Soulsville Foundation). 14

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FINE PRINT

Looking for a Secretary of Education? Our very own Dorsey Hopson fits the bill better than anyone.

PHOTOGRAPHS BY BRANDON DILL

by john branston

Dorsey Hopson

T

he choice of someone to run the Department of Education will probably be a moot point by the time this column comes out, but the credentials of said person are going to be much in the news for weeks if not months. The current nominee is Betsy DeVos. The person President Donald Trump should have nominated is Dorsey Hopson, superintendent of the Shelby County School System. Think about it. The qualifications of DeVos, who hails from my childhood home in West Michigan, are: A) a lot of money, B) a very rich husband who is the son of the cofounder of Amway, C) strong opinions about the wonderfulness of charter schools, and D) spending a lot of money to advance those opinions through political campaigns and vaguely named lobbying organizations. DeVos attended parochial (Christian Reformed, or Dutch Reformed as we used to say) elementary and secondary schools in Holland, Michigan, and Calvin College (also Christian

Reformed) in Grand Rapids. I played high school sports against some of those schools, and they were known for outstanding athletes, upright citizens, and beautiful blonde teenage girls. DeVos seems quite typical of those who grew up in that environment. The shortcomings of DeVos are: A) no experience as a teacher or school administrator, B) no children who attended public school, C) no government experience, and D) a shaky grasp of some of the basic vocabulary of school performance and testing. And Mr. Hopson? Well, he is superintendent of one of the largest public school systems in the United States. Before that, he was attorney for the Memphis City School System before it dissolved its charter and merged with Shelby County. He is a graduate of a public high school, and his

White Station High School. children attend public schools in Memphis. He worked for forThe person running the Demer Superintendent Kriner Cash, partment of Education should know this stuff — the f light who is black, and with former to quality, the hows and whys Shelby County Schools Superof resegregation, the pros and intendent John Aitken, who is cons of charters and teachers white. His staff is about as ethnically and gender diverse as a unions, the pitfalls of standardstaff could be. ized testing, the Dorsey Hopson is shifting thought Given the histoso battle-tested he about combining ry of the Memphis city and county and Shelby County could wear medals. systems. The only school systems in the last five years, it would be way to know it is to live it. Hopson did. DeVos did not. In fact, it impossible to throw a question is not clear if she has ever spent at him that he has not heard. more than a day or so in a public He is so battle-tested he could school. wear medals. In the three years I covered him as a reporter, I did In Senate hearings, DeVos not once see him act rudely, imwas asked by Senator Al Franpatiently, or arrogantly. On the ken about her thinking on using contrary, he was a model of protest scores to measure student fessionalism and courtesy, while performance by proficiency or always being his own man. growth. It was widely reported Memphis was ground zero for that DeVos flubbed the question the so-called “school reform” and “had no idea what Franken movement that started around was talking about.” 2005 when Teach For America I am no fan of DeVos but this came to Memphis and the Gates was a classic trap question, and Foundation and local foundations the educational equivalent of “inside baseball.” Once again, poured big money and influence into Tennessee education. It was Tennessee is the test case. For a good move. The Memphis sysa while, the emphasis was on tem had about 100,000 students, “value-added” scoring to reflect, say, improvement of two and only a small fraction of them graduated from high school and grade levels by a seventh-grader finished two or more years of colwho improved enough to read like a fifth-grader instead of a lege. Any Memphis taxpayer had third-grader. Then the focus a right to be concerned whether shifted to proficiency, which or not they had children in the means a seventh-grader reads system. Charter schools such as Soulsville give underprivileged like a seventh-grader. children some of the advantagI may be oversimplifying, but es and superior instruction that not by much. Like other reportblack and white children who ers, I had to try to explain this know how to play the game have jargon to a general audience, and, enjoyed for decades by enrolling believe me, I flunked more than in optional schools such as Graonce. There are better tests for hamwood, John P. Freeman, and our Secretary of Education.

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CITY JOURNAL

Down by the Riverside by tom jones

Dr. Martin Luther King Riverside Park

T

he word “renaissance” has been misused in Memphis for decades, by politicians describing the results of their leadership. But these days, the term finally applies accurately, as regards to public interest and support for parks, open spaces, and trails. In many ways, green and grassy is overtaking grit and grind as the best description of our city. There is of course the genuine $70 million renaissance of Shelby Farms Park, which has set a gold standard not just for Memphis, but for the nation; there is the Harahan Bridge, the country’s longest active rail/bicycle/pedestrian bridge; there are more than 30 miles of greenlines built in the county in the past decade; there is the Overton Park Conservancy, improving and protecting Memphis’ most famous park and its Old Forest (which itself is a flashback to what the area looked like 10,000 years ago). Everywhere, it seems, there is growing interest in a “park friends” organization to support better neighborhood parks. In the midst of all this, one park remains underappreciated and overlooked, and it just happens to

be the City of Memphis’ largest: Martin Luther King Riverside Park. It is as old as Overton Park, and like that park, it is a product of the same “parks and parkways” plan that was ahead of its time when the newly created Memphis Park Commission bought both park sites in 1901 and hired famed Kansas City urban planner and landscape architect, George E. Kessler, to design a system of impressive parkways — named North, East, and South, with the river to the west — anchored by these two grand parks. For the park anchoring the western terminus of South Parkway, the Park Commission bought 445 acres of the Wilderberger Farm overlooking Presidents Island (back when it was actually an island), but from the

beginning, it got less attention white to majority black during than Overton Park. Perhaps that the 1960s. Lack of appreciation was because it was considered for the park was demonstrated in remote, requiring a four-mile the 1990s when city government carriage ride or a 20-minute trip sold about 15 percent of Riverside by river steamer to reach it, or to the oil refinery on its southern because city faedge. The abthers (the term sence of an outDr. Martin Luther was especially cry reflects the King Riverside Park is appropriate at fact that most the time) urged Memphians arguably Memphis’ most Kessler to conlikely have never spectacular park setting. cent rate on even been there. Overton Park. Today, RiverSo while the park at the side Park’s off-the beaten-track intersection of East Parkway location eliminates its accidental and North Parkway got bridiscovery. And while it’s arguably dle paths, a bandstand, a golf Memphis’ most spectacular park course, and a mini-menagerie setting, the absence of amenities in the early 1900s, progress at and any kind of programming — Riverside Park was slow. Even and without a north-south road today, a large part of its 379 inside the narrow park itself acres is covered by a magnif— there is little to draw people icent urban forest that still there. lacks trails, let alone ameniA century ago, the parks and ties. Nor does the city take adparkways plan was launched as a way to rebrand Memphis vantage of Riverside’s unique history to upgrade visitors’ positively in the wake of Yellow experiences. Fever epidemics and the loss of For example, the park overthe city charter. It was central looked Presidents Island in 1865 to an early twentieth-century when it was used as a camp by progressive civic agenda pushed by the “Greater Memphis Movethe Freedmen’s Bureau for 1,500 freed slaves. Later, former slave ment.” Today, parks are once dealer and Confederate General again an important community Nathan Bedford Forrest, owner asset, central to rebranding cities of a significant part of the Island, nationally, as they compete for contracted with Shelby County college-educated workers, jobs, Government to operate a penal and population. farm there for 10 cents per day Perhaps it’s time for twenty-first century Memphis to per inmate. During the Yellow launch a modern “parkways Fever epidemics, the farm bestrategy,” using our historic came a quarantine camp. automobile greenways as the In 1968, the Memphis City Council voted to add Dr. King’s springboard for an even greater name to Riverside Park. Today, center-city renaissance, one that it is hard to detach the lack of truly deserves that appellation. attention to the park from the The idea makes a lot of sense, and lack of attention to the South maybe this time around RiverParkway neighborhoods nearby side Park will finally get the atthat moved from being majority tention it richly deserves.

PHOTOGRAPH COURTESY THOMAS R MACHNITZKI

Like Sleeping Beauty, a forgotten Memphis park awaits its discovery.

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OU T A ND A BOU T |

MARCH 2017 | compiled by sam cicci

Twenty One Pilots

3.4

Twenty One Pilots Yadier Molina

3.30

PHOTOGRAPH BY TAKA YANAGIMOTO-ST.LOUISCARDINALS

Redbirds vs. Cardinals

S

t. Louis comes to town for the “Battle of the Birds” exhibition game. Watch the Memphis Redbirds take on their parent club, the St. Louis Cardinals, in an exciting matchup to open the season. This is a rare chance to see former Redbirds like Yadier Molina, Stephen Piscotty, and Randal Grichuk, so come on out to see some professional baseball and see the Redbirds’ brand-new uniforms! AutoZone Park, 200 Union Ave. milb.com

Fresh off two simultaneous top 10 singles and three Grammy nominations, Twenty One Pilots bring their “Emotional Roadshow” tour to the forum. The schizophrenic pop duo should perform a diverse selection from their catalogue, including more recent hits such as “Heathens,” “Stressed Out,” and “Ride.” FedExForum, 191 Beale St. fedexforum.com

3.3-5

AMSOIL Arenacross

For the full story on “Beauty in a War Torn World,” see p. 56.

3.5-31

“Beauty in a War Torn World”

”Beauty in a War Torn World” is a compelling collection of photos and artwork curated by local Southern historian Sarah Wilkerson Freeman. The exhibit explores various pieces of art focused on a Japanese internment camp in Rohwer, Arkansas, during World War II. With photography prohibited inside the internment camps, Henry Sugimoto elected to

paint life lived behind barbed wire. Memphian Floy Hanson helped Sugimoto take his paintings public and later, the documenting of internment camp life and art by English professor/photographer Paul Faris. In addition to paintings and photos, the exhibit will include images of letter, diaries, furniture designs, and watercolors by Hanson. Memphis Botanic Garden, 750 Cherry Road Opening Reception: 2-4 p.m. memphisbotanicgarden.com

For a wild and crazy twist on bike racing, head on down to Southaven for the AMSOIL Arenacross at the Landers Center. The offspring of more conventional motocross racing, Arenacross whips together a high-octane blend of tight, banked corner, triple jumps, and heavy moguls on an indoor dirt track. For those in need of an exhilarating and adrenaline fueled excursion, Arenacross is sure to provide your fix. Landers Center, 4560 Venture Dr., Southaven, MS arenacross.com

AMSOIL Arenacross

3.3-5

3.9-13

What if dance were formulated through dissent? That is the question that 21 dancers from Up In Arms Collective tackle in RESPONSE. Performers come together to create works that explore the ideas of superwoman, femininity, first world privilege, shoes, burning bridges, and untarnished hope. Each night will feature completely original dances of various style. Tickets are available at the door. Crosstown Arts, 430 N. Cleveland crosstownarts.org

This four-day festival celebrates the comedic talent being fostered right here in Memphis. Stand-up acts, themed comedy shows, improv, open-mic slots, and more are all part of the fun. For those in need of a good laugh, the Memphis Comedy Festival is your best bet. A full list of participating comedians can be found on the official website. 2085 Monroe Ave. memphiscomedyfestival.com

Up In Arms Collective presents: RESPONSE

Memphis Comedy Festival

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3.11

St. Patrick’s Day Parade

Celebrate the greenest holiday of the year early at Silky O’Sullivan’s 44th Annual Beale Street St. Patrick’s Day parade. Wear your best or wackiest green outfit and bring out the whole family to see bands, floats, cars, dancers, and more. Beale St. bealestreet.com

3.22

Earth, Wind, & Fire

It may not yet be September, but Earth, Wind, & Fire are sure to help you remember. One of the top-selling bands of the 70’s, Earth, Wind, & Fire defies a category while always bringing the groove with amazing harmonies over gold and platinum-certified music. The Orpheum, 203 S. Main St. orpheum-memphis.com

3.24-6

Young Collectors Contemporary Art Fair

The Art Fair marks the second year of an annual event put on by Young Arts Patrons, an organization dedicated to helping local arts communities flourish. The Young Collectors Contemporary brings together emerging artists from around the city to meet collectors and make connections in the local

art scene. All artwork on display is available for purchase at the event and online. Accompanying the exhibits are lectures, panels, and talks with art professionals and artists. Clayborn Temple, 294 Hernando St. youngcollectorscontemporary.com

3.27

Voices of the South Writing Cabaret

Initiated early this year, the Voices of the South Writing Cabaret is a monthly event where emerging writers are

encouraged to come aonout and hone their craft. Based on a program at The Marsh Cafe in San Francisco, writers are given several prompts and encouraged to work for an hour. At the end of the evening, they are given an opportunity to share their work with other participants. The Writing Cabaret is a great opportunity for new writers to practice in a critically constructive environment. TheatreSouth, 1000 S. Cooper St. voicesofthesouth.org 

Earth, Wind & Fire

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2017

FACES OF THE

MID-SOUTH

THE FACE OF

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2017

FACES OF THE

MID-SOUTH

THE FACE OF

ANIMAL CARE

WALNUT GROVE ANIMAL CLINIC >>> With every patient and client, we are guided by our core values: Integrity, Excellence, and Compassion. Our professional staff is highly trained and well educated. All employees participate in regular training and development

programs. Walnut Grove Animal Clinic is a fullservice, state-of-the-art, small animal hospital located in the center of Memphis at the corner of Walnut Grove Avenue and Tillman. New clients are always welcome.

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2/18/17 5:16 PM


2017

FACES OF THE

MID-SOUTH

THE FACE OF

ANTIQUE & ESTATE JEWELRY VAN ATKINS JEWELERS >>> Left to right: Van Cooper, Ray Cooper, Chuck Cooper, and Sam Cooper. The owner of Van Atkins Jewelers, Chuck Cooper was in pre-med at Ole Miss in 1982. He could have been a fine medical doctor, but instead is a doctor of diamonds, fine gem stones, and precious metals. Chuck Cooper is so extraordinarily knowledgeable when it comes to jewelry. His passion of buying estate pieces and refurbishing them

to exquisite pieces have made him especially popular with his customers. Van Atkins is located in a beautiful new shop in historic downtown New Albany. Come see an almostoverwhelming and gorgeous selection of antique and estate jewelry. At Van Atkins it is not unusual to find celebrities shopping here as they enjoy the hometown charm.

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2017

FACES OF THE

MID-SOUTH

THE FACE OF

APARTMENT MANAGEMENT FOGELMAN MANAGEMENT GROUP >>>

There is no substitute for EXPERIENCE! Over the past 50 years, Fogelman Management Group has built a reputation for delivering exceptional property management services to both its clients and residents. The hands-on knowledge gained over these past five decades enables us to bring proven processes to the table to quickly respond to changing market conditions. Our unparalleled combination of leadership, experience, knowledge and a proven track record has made Fogelman Management Group a leader in the multifamily industry. Memphis area properties: • ADDISON AT COLLIERVILLE 400 Orchard Cir. W., Collierville, TN 38017 | AddisonCollierville.com • BRISTOL ON UNION 205 Pasadena Place, Memphis, TN 38104 | TheBristolOnUnion.com • CHEROKEE CABANA 3204 Sharpe Ave., Memphis, TN 38111 | CherokeeCabana.com • THE EDGE OF GERMANTOWN 1730 Hunters Trace Dr., Memphis, TN 38120 | TheEdgeOfGermantown.com • LEGACY FARM 1130 Legacy Farm Ct., Collierville, TN 38017 | Legacy-Farm.com • MADISON HUMPHREYS CENTER 330 N Humphreys Blvd., Memphis, TN 38120 | LiveAtMadison.com • THE PARK AT FOREST HILL 8285 Irene Blvd Memphis, TN 38125 | TheParkAtForestHill.com • THE PRESERVE AT FOREST CREEK 9230 Thornbury Blvd Memphis, TN 38125 | PreserveAtForestCreek.com • THE PRESERVE AT SOUTHWIND 7991 Capilano Dr., Memphis, TN 38125 | ThePreserveAtSouthwind.com • THE RETREAT AT GERMANTOWN 7865 Grove Court West, Germantown, TN 38138 | TheRetreatatGermantown.com • THE SUMMIT 4981 Hidden Lake Dr., Memphis, TN 38128 | TheSummitMemphis.com • THE TENNESSEE BREWERY 495 Tennessee St. Memphis, TN 38103 | AtTheBrewery.com Fogelman-Management.com SPECIAL PROMOTION

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2017

FACES OF THE

MID-SOUTH

THE FACE OF

ARCHITECTURE LOONEY RICKS KISS>>>

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2/21/17 8:06 AM


2017

FACES OF THE

MID-SOUTH

THE FACE OF

ARKANSAS REAL ESTATE

FARMS CABINS RANCHES & OUTDOOR PROPERTIES >>> TEAM BURCH — Joey Burch, Arkansas Principal Broker, and Pat Burch, Horseshoe Lake Agent For 21 years Joey Burch, broker, has traveled the region networking with sellers and potential buyers of real estate. Joey specializes in traditional sales and listings, 1031 tax exchanges, auction services, cabin designs, and agri tours. Pat specializes in lakefront homes and lots at Horseshoe. If you’re in the market for real estate there’s a good chance that Joey and Pat have it in inventory! Whether you’re looking for a weekend home on HORSESHOE LAKE, a cotton plantation along the MISSISSIPPI RIVER, a trout fishing cabin near MOUNTAIN VIEW, a ranch on CROWLEY’S RIDGE, or a duck hunting club on the L’ANGUILLE RIVER, Joey and Pat can assist you. FEATURED LISTINGS: HORSESHOE LAKE — Lakefront lot at Bonds Landing, $79,900; HORSESHOE LAKE — 190 Pecan Circle, $275,000; CROWLEY'S RIDGE — Clarke Estate, 200 acres trophy deer hunting, $360,000; ARKANSAS FARM LAND — 500 acres row crop $1,650,000; MISSISSIPPI — 915-acre corn and rice farm near Sledge $3,929,000; ARKANSAS TIMBER LAND — 750 acres in Lee County, $2,150,000; MOUNTAIN VIEW, ARKANSAS — Trout fishing cabin on White River, $159,000; OZARK MOUNTAINS — 350 acres near the town square with views and cabin sites $500,000. Visit more than 200 listings online FARMANDCABIN.COM or OUTDOORPROPERTIES.COM, Outdoor Properties, LLC Real Estate with offices in Arkansas and Tennessee Contact: Joey Burch or Pat Burch 501.454.1782. SPECIAL PROMOTION

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2017

FACES OF THE

MID-SOUTH

THE FACE OF

BBQ

TOPS BAR-B-Q >>> George Montague, President and General Manager J.W. Lawson started Tops Bar-B-Q back in 1952. Granville Messick came into the business in 1964 and George Montague in 1974. We have 11 locations in Memphis, two in Mississippi, one in Arkansas, and one in Millington. TOPS proudly celebrated our 60th anniversary in 2012. Now serving our third generation of customers, we still cook our pork shoulders just the way we did 60 years ago, with hardwood charcoal and green hickory wood. Thank you for keeping TOPS in mind for mouth-watering barbecue, and freshly ground cooked-to-order hamburgers for more than six decades. We offer the best ribs and brisket in the Mid-South. We look forward to serving the Mid-South for many more years to come. TopsBarBQ.com SPECIAL PROMOTION

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2/21/17 8:07 AM


2017

FACES OF THE

MID-SOUTH

THE FACE OF

BEAUTIFUL FACES

THE LANGSDON CLINIC >>> Phillip R. Langsdon, MD, FACS and Carol H. Langsdon, RNP Celebrating 30 years in practice, Dr. Phillip Langsdon, Facial Plastic Surgeon, has been treating patients one face at a time. He is the only surgeon in the Mid-South whose practice is limited to facial plastic surgery (rhinoplasty, facelift, eyelid surgery). Dr. Langsdon believes in “Compassionate Care with Natural-Looking Results.” Seeing each person’s face as unique, he treats the common and the complicated cases. Dr. Langsdon and Carol Langsdon, RNP, also provide expert nonsurgical facial aesthetics, such as

Botox®, dermal fillers, lasers, peels, and customized medical-grade skincare. Dr. Langsdon serves as Southern Region Director of the American Academy of Facial Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery (AAFPRS), and President of the Memphis Medical Society. He was also appointed as Program Director of the AAFPRS National Fall Meeting. Dr. Langsdon is Board Certified by the American Board of Facial Plastic & Reconstructive Surgery. Winner of Memphis Most “Best Cosmetic Surgery" six years in a row.

901.755.6465 | DrLangsdon.com | LangsdonClinic@BellSouth.net | Facebook.com/pages/The-Langsdon-Clinic SPECIAL PROMOTION

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2017

FACES OF THE

MID-SOUTH

THE FACE OF

BEAUTIFUL HAIR

MASTER DESIGN SALON AND WELLNESS STUDIO >>> Left to right: Melanie Jones, Sheila Wilson, and Amber Drewry Healthy scalp: Using the state-of-the-art hair microscope, we can determine the environment of the scalp therefore offering ways to stimulate blood supply which will increase hair growth and minimize hair loss. Strengthening the integrity of the hair: Knowing the correct reconditioner to use to build the protein in the hair will give bounce and body. Proper styling techniques:

Respecting the hair as a fabric when styling as well as the proper product to use will determine the staying ability of the style. Color and Cut: Make sure the cut is right for the texture of the hair and shape of your face. We are the only certified salon in Memphis offering Calligraphy Cutting. The color should always be applied properly without overlapping. We are the experts for Beautiful Healthy Hair.

5149 Wheelis Drive, Memphis, TN 38117 | 901.685.2351 | MasterDesign-Spa.com | CalligraphyCut.com SPECIAL PROMOTION

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2/20/17 4:10 PM


2017

FACES OF THE

MID-SOUTH

THE FACE OF

BOYS EDUCATION

PRESBYTERIAN DAY SCHOOL >>> Steve Hancock is the Headmaster of Presbyterian Day School, a national leader in the education of boys and character education. Since 1949, PDS has been preparing its boys to be the leaders of our city, our country, and our world. PDS knows that boys learn differently from girls. Boys have a tough time sitting still.

They love to get their hands dirty and their minds sometimes wander (that's okay.) But PDS isn't just a boys' school. It is a school built for boys — and all the ways they learn and grow. Presbyterian Day School is the Face of Boys Education in Memphis. Drop by some time and they can show you.

4025 Poplar Ave, Memphis, TN 38111 | 901.842.4600 | pdsmemphis.org SPECIAL PROMOTION

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2/22/17 9:52 AM


THE FACE OF

BEAUTIFUL SMILES CHRISTOPHER COOLEY, DDS >>>

When you visit the office of Dr. Christopher Cooley, you become part of a caring dental family. Along with his highly trained, professional staff, Dr. Cooley is committed to listening to your needs and providing care that works for your lifestyle. Our team believes our patients should feel informed and comfortable during every step of their dental treatment. We believe that when our patients are relaxed and happy, they maintain better oral health. Dr. Cooley takes the time necessary to constantly improve his skills and the technological capabilities of the practice. He has trained with many of the best clinicians in the country, and insists on the best materials and highest quality lab work available. Thereby, you benefit from the latest treatment techniques, including innovative advances in patient comfort, the highest-quality and longest-lasting materials, and the most aesthetically pleasing results. Dr. Cooley is a lifetime Memphian who graduated in 1976 with honors from the

University of Tennessee Knoxville, then from the University of Tennessee College of Dentistry in 1982. Dr. Cooley has undergone training with the Hornbrook Group and PAClive, the country’s top program for hands-on continuing education for dentists. Dr. Cooley is also a proud member of: the American Dental Association, American Academy of Cosmetic Dentistry, Tennessee Academy of Cosmetic Dentistry and the Crown Council. These organizations keep Dr. Cooley abreast of developing studies in the fields of cosmetic, restorative and general dentistry. Dr. Cooley and his entire team love to volunteer their time and efforts both locally and globally taking care of patients in Memphis and Shelby Co. and on mission trips to the Dominican Republic. Dr. Cooley always welcomes new patients into his office with most referrals coming from existing, very satisfied patients. The highest compliment we receive is when our patients refer their family and friends.

7938 Wolf River Blvd., Germantown, TN 38138 | 901.754.3117 | CooleyDDS.com

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2017

FACES OF THE

MID-SOUTH

SPECIAL PROMOTION

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2/20/17 12:54 PM


2017

FACES OF THE

MID-SOUTH

THE FACE OF

BRANDING

TACTICAL MAGIC >>> Trace Hallowell is a brand visionary who understands the power of words and design — and how the world responds to them. Trace has spent more than 30 years in the creative branding business and his success is evident by the numerous national and international honors he has received from advertising and creative competitions. All the while his work has been published in books, magazines, and college textbooks as examples of branding excellence. Trace founded Tactical Magic in 2001. The firm’s diverse clientele includes Leadership Memphis, Sterling National Bank (New York), Trousseau, and Uniform Masters. 1460 Madison Avenue Memphis, TN 38104 901.722.3001 TacticalMagic.com

SPECIAL PROMOTION

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2/21/17 8:08 AM


2017

FACES OF THE

MID-SOUTH

THE FACE OF

BREAST HEALTH & WELLNESS

MARGARET WEST COMPREHENSIVE BREAST CENTER >>> The Margaret West Comprehensive Breast Center delivers a full suite of comprehensive services for the management of breast health. Whether it’s time for your screening mammogram or you require further diagnostic, treatment, surgical services or high risk assessment, our collaborative approach ensures you receive the most progressive care available for your wellness needs. This commitment is strengthened by the collaboration of the Mid-South’s breast experts, working side-by-side to deliver the type of care patients have come to know and trust from our health care team. Multiple locations across Memphis and the Mid-South for your breast health needs. For more information and to schedule your appointment, call 901.516.4300. WestCancerCenter.org SPECIAL PROMOTION

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2/21/17 8:09 AM


2017

FACES OF THE

MID-SOUTH

THE FACE OF

BRIDAL REGISTRY BABCOCK GIFTS >>>

Babcock Gifts has been helping brides and Mid-Southerners set tables and choose the perfect gifts for more than 40 years. In 2017 Babcock Gifts moved into a new space in Laurelwood Shopping Center designed expressly to serve our customers of today. Our

goal remains to provide Memphis a stellar collection of tabletop selections and gifts that are local, regional, and global in scope along with excellent customer service. If you have not seen Babcock Gifts lately, we invite you to come in soon.

Laurelwood Shopping Center, 4538 Poplar Avenue, Memphis, TN 38117 | 901.763.0700 SPECIAL PROMOTION

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2/18/17 3:09 PM


2017

FACES OF THE

MID-SOUTH

THE FACE OF

BUSINESS BANKING TRIUMPH BANK >>>

Triumph opened in 2006 when a group of respected local bankers and business leaders wanted to bring hometown banking back to the Memphis area. The foundation of success to date is more than convenience or friendly service, but to make every decision for the customer here

and nowhere else. With our roots firmly planted in the community, everyone can grow together. By remaining completely local, we have the power to be more flexible for you. It gives you more control and confidence that when we say you matter, you really matter. Let’s talk growth.

5699 Poplar Avenue, Memphis, TN 38119 | 901.333.8800 | TriumphBank.com

SPECIAL PROMOTION

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2/18/17 4:28 PM


2017

FACES OF THE

MID-SOUTH

THE FACE OF

CATASTROPHIC INJURY & WRONGFUL DEATH LAW PEEL LAW FIRM >>> David B. Peel, injury attorney

ATTORNEY PEEL DEMONSTRATES THAT THOSE DASHES IN THE CENTER OF THE ROAD ARE ACTUALLY 10 FEET LONG. Injury lawyer David B. Peel chooses to maintain Multi-Million Dollar Advocates Forum. He has also been named “Best of the Best Attorney” in local a small law practice. "I work closely with my Readers' Choice Awards for several years. He has clients," he says. "People don't like feeling like a claim number." For over 20 years, Peel has used been inducted into the “Top 100 Trial Lawyers" his personal approach to assist those with serious and has long been recognized by his peers as "AVinjuries, deaths, and disability from auto accidents, Preeminent" which is the highest rating possible. Peel serves on boards including that of Love Worth malpractice, and tractor-trailer crashes. His articles have been published in several newspapers and Finding Ministries and is a deacon at Bellevue he often speaks to churches and organizations. Baptist Church. "Keeping my practice small allows me to personally serve my clients, while still being Attorney Peel has been recognized as a Mid-South Super Lawyer since 2013, as well as being named an involved father and husband," he says. "I have a life member of both the Million Dollar and the been blessed." 8582 U.S. Highway 51 North, Millington, TN 38053 | 901.872.4229 | DavidPeel@PeelLawFirm.com | PeelLawFirm.com SPECIAL PROMOTION

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2/20/17 4:20 PM


2017

FACES OF THE

MID-SOUTH

THE FACE OF

CATERING

PARADOX CATERING & CONSULTING >>> Chef Jimmy Gentry and Alia Hogan Chef/Owner Jimmy Gentry of Paradox Catering was formally trained at Johnson and Wales College of Culinary Arts. Before starting his own business with partner Alia Hogan, he led kitchens across the Mid-South to win multiple awards. Six years ago, Paradox Catering was created with the vision in mind to redefine what people expected not only from the food itself, but from the presentation and service

as well. Paradox's Jessica Lambert and Chef Gentry work closely with clients to define their personal style, which we then translate into every aspect of their event so we can provide that one-of-a-kind experience they always envisioned. We have been truly fortunate to be embraced by the Mid-South and have in turn seen tremendous success with our creative and innovative approach to catering.

901.619.1196 | Event@ParadoxCuisine.com | ParadoxCuisine.com SPECIAL PROMOTION

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2/20/17 4:21 PM


2017

FACES OF THE

MID-SOUTH

THE FACE OF

CHRISTIAN COLLEGE-PREPARATORY EDUCATION HARDING ACADEMY >>> Harding Academy offers challenging collegepreparatory academics, an award-winning arts program, and championship athletics to help students realize their dreams. And because they are so devoted to students' spiritual growth, Harding has campus ministers on the school grounds every day, regular chapel programs, and a commitment to highlighting the truth of God in every class from kindergarten music to

AP Calculus. Whether because of the diversity of students or the welcoming atmosphere, visitors often say there's just something refreshingly different about Harding. Founded in 1952, Harding Academy is a coeducational, collegepreparatory Christian school that serves students ages 18 months through grade 12 in East Memphis and Cordova. Call 901.767.4494 to schedule a tour today.

EAST MEMPHIS LITTLE HARDING & LOWER SCHOOL (18 mos.–Grade 5): 1106 Colonial Rd., Memphis 38117 EAST MEMPHIS MIDDLE & UPPER SCHOOL (Grades 6–12): 1100 Cherry Rd., Memphis 38117 CORDOVA LITTLE HARDING & LOWER SCHOOL (18 mos.–Grade 5): 8360 Macon Rd., Cordova 38018 HardingLions.org | 901.767.4494 SPECIAL PROMOTION

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2/21/17 8:10 AM


2017

FACES OF THE

MID-SOUTH

THE FACE OF

COFFEE

CAFE ECLECTIC >>> Cafe Eclectic has been family-owned and -operated since 2008 when Cathy Boulden opened the doors of their full-service coffee shop, restaurant, and bakery in Midtown at 603 North McLean. After essentially founding the scratch bakery and fine coffee movement in Memphis the cafe has expanded with two additional smaller

locations in Harbortown and Highland near the University of Memphis. All three locations serve local ingredients, breakfast all day, artisan illy coffee, and scratch-baked breads, pastries, and donuts. The Eclectic team is very proud to have the honor of serving their 901 community pouring love into their food, beverages, and guest’s service.

MIDTOWN: 603 N. MCLEAN BLVD | 901.725.1718 • HIGHLAND: 510 S. HIGHLAND | 901.410.0765 HARBORTOWN: 111 HARBORTOWN SQUARE | 901.590.4645 CafeEclectic.net SPECIAL PROMOTION

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2/20/17 4:22 PM


2017

FACES OF THE

MID-SOUTH

THE FACE OF

COIN & SILVER

A COIN & SILVER SHOP >>> Left to right: Lisa Phillips, Kendall Phillips, and Tom Phillips A Coin & Silver Shop is a family business owned and operated by Kendall, Tom, and Lisa Phillips. We offer estate pre-owned sterling silver flatware, tableware, jewelry, collectible coins, paper money, precious metals, Civil War relics, and antique bottles. We offer

competitive buy prices in these areas as well. Tom has been a professional coin, collectibles, and silver dealer nationally for over 37 years. Kendall has grown up in the business and became full-time after graduating from the University of Tennessee in 2013.

4726 Poplar Avenue # 6, Memphis, TN 38117 | 901.590.2022 | ACoinAndSilverShop.com SPECIAL PROMOTION

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2/18/17 5:10 PM


2017

FACES OF THE

MID-SOUTH

THE FACE OF

COMMERCIAL REAL ESTATE

ERIC FUHRMAN, CCIM >>> Eric Fuhrman is a Chicago native who has made Memphis home for his family of seven. Over the past 12 years he has built a network larger than most native Memphians and attributes this success to his ability to provide "aggressive commercial real estate brokerage without the pompous attitude.” “I have found the 901 to be diverse, yet incredibly warm and welcoming. I cannot imagine a better place to raise a family and grow a business.” Eric specializes in the sale of commercial real estate and is president and managing broker of Crye-Leike’s commercial real estate division. Although he focuses on West Tennessee and North Mississippi, Eric’s professional accomplishments span the entire region, including the sale of the former Nashville Memorial Hospital to sale of the site where the Stratum now sits on Highland. CRYE-LEIKE COMMERCIAL 6525 Quail Hollow, Suite 401 Memphis, TN 38120 901.758.5670 (o) 901. 262.2055 (c) ericfuhrman.com eric.fuhrman@crye-leike.com

SPECIAL PROMOTION

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2/18/17 4:01 PM


2017

FACES OF THE

MID-SOUTH

THE FACE OF

COMMUNITY BANKING INDEPENDENT BANK >>>

Strong. Safe. Customer Focused. Local. Since our founding in 1998, Independent Bank has been committed to supporting our customers and communities by helping you achieve your dreams and financial success. We are a full-service bank with personal and business loans, a variety of deposit and cash-management options, mortgage loans and wealth management. We offer innovative solutions, effective products and heroic service. We invite you to experience the i-bank difference — it’s a better way of banking. Proud to be the face of community banking. 5050 Poplar • 844.5051 | 1711 Union • 844.2050 | 450 Perkins • 842.2620 6209 Poplar • 842.2600 | 5995 Stage • 842.1210 | 2116 W. Poplar • 842.1170 | 40 S. Main • 312.8900 3295 Poplar • 844.2075 | 7635 Poplar • 842.1190 i-bankonline.com SPECIAL PROMOTION

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2/20/17 4:23 PM


2017

FACES OF THE

MID-SOUTH

THE FACE OF

CONSTRUCTION & INDUSTRIAL MATERIALS HAULING, RECYCLING & DISPOSAL EBOX >>> Seated left to right: Jennie Berrie, Jonalyn Medling, Herb Honeycutt, Loretta Sommer, and Amy Carroll Standing left to right: Norman Brown III, President, and wife Gina, Susan Matthews, Glyn Moore, and Jennie Tummins EBOX is a family owned business with a mission to provide our customers with the highest quality products and services at competitive prices. EBOX serves the construction, commercial and industrial industries in West Tennessee, North Mississippi and Eastern Arkansas by providing an environmentally

safe solution for construction, demolition and industrial waste created on jobsites and at businesses. In addition to our hauling services, EBOX also delivers mulch, soil mix, topsoil, sand and gravel. Our goal is to pursue recycling, LEED projects, and related sustainable enterprises with superior on-time service.

10636 Shelton Road, Collierville, TN 38017 | 901.850.9996 | eplexebox.com SPECIAL PROMOTION

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2/18/17 4:03 PM


2017

FACES OF THE

MID-SOUTH

THE FACE OF

CORPORATE TRAVEL

A & I TRAVEL MANAGEMENT, AN ALTOUR COMPANY >>> Introducing four of the 28 travel professionals at A & I Travel. Would you trust your travel plans to these fun-loving people? Thousands of smart business travelers do! Meet LeAnn Argo, Onsite Travel Manager/Agent LeAnn is one of our specialist on-site travel consultants who works exclusively on behalf of one very happy corporation and its individual travelers. Because of her skills, her attention to their needs, and her larger-than-life personality, they simply won’t make a travel plan without her!

Meet LeAnne Kidwell, Operations Administrator LeAnne is our Jack (or Jane) of all trades and skills. She is our Operations Administrator, where she interprets, amends, finesses, and fixes all things that aren’t automated ... or that defy automation! She lends valuable support to her co-workers and that makes for a very merry team of “work hard, play hard” individuals.

Meet Tanya McKnight, Account Manager Tanya is an indispensable facilitator and advocate for multiple accounts with complex travel program needs. Her depth of knowledge, her organizational skills, and her track record of delivering timely, creative, and positive outcomes are validated by the long length of her relationships with the delighted clients that she serves.

Meet Rosie Gattas, Corporate Travel Consultant Rosie is one of our highly experienced and tenured Corporate Travel Consultants with experience in managing both domestic and international travel needs. She serves her individual customers with great skill AND a great sense of humor. Both are critically important in navigating today’s challenging travel landscape.

CONTROL YOUR COSTS. OPTIMIZE YOUR SPEND. SUPPORT YOUR TRAVELERS. aitvl.com SPECIAL PROMOTION

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2/18/17 3:06 PM


2017

FACES OF THE

MID-SOUTH

THE FACE OF

COSMETIC DENTAL VENEERS

MEMPHIS CENTER FOR FAMILY & COSMETIC DENTISTRY >>> Miles C. Moore, DDS Creating beautiful smiles is just another day in the office for Miles C. Moore, dentist at Memphis Center for Family & Cosmetic Dentistry. With a friendly staff, a soothing atmosphere, and the latest technology, Dr. Moore’s practice offers all dental services, but specializes in cosmetic

dentistry. Whether you seek a complete smile makeover, “invisible” braces, or teeth whitening, cosmetic dentistry can transform your smile in several ways. Dental veneers from Dr. Moore improve the form and function of your teeth, leaving results that you have to see to believe.

725 W. Brookhaven Circle, Memphis, TN 38117 | 901.761.2210 | BeautifulSmiles.org SPECIAL PROMOTION

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2/20/17 4:24 PM


2017

FACES OF THE

MID-SOUTH

THE FACE OF

COSMETIC SURGERY & BODY CONTOURING NUBODY CONCEPTS >>> NuBody Concepts, the award-winning cosmetic surgery practice, has recently expanded into the heart of Germantown and welcomes new customers. Whether you’re looking to remove stubborn fat where diet and exercise have left you frustrated,

or whether you’d like to soften the signs of aging, they have the right procedure for you. Visit them online to learn more about their range of body contouring options from liposuction to Brazilian Butt Lifts, hair restoration, and non-surgical facelifts.

901.235.5753 | NuBodyConcepts.com SPECIAL PROMOTION

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2/20/17 4:25 PM


2017

FACES OF THE

MID-SOUTH

THE FACE OF

CRIMINAL DEFENSE

LAW OFFICE OF STEPHEN R. LEFFLER, P.C. >>> Stephen R. Leffler If you're facing a serious legal situation, you need an experienced trial attorney. Stephen Leffler leverages 33 years of successful practice devoted to aggressively protecting his clients. Leffler handles a full range of federal and state criminal charges and appeals. His civil practice has secured multi-million dollar judgments in

cases that involve automobile and premises injuries, wrongful death, and traumatic injuries. Leffler offers experienced, insightful counsel and remains personally involved with the details of the case from start to finish. The firm offers 24-hour assistance through investigator and litigation consultant Timothy Norris.

707 Adams Avenue, Memphis, TN 38105 | 901.527.8830 | LefflerLaw.com SPECIAL PROMOTION

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2/18/17 4:10 PM


2017

FACES OF THE

MID-SOUTH

THE FACE OF

CUSTOM RENOVATION TIM DISALVO & COMPANY >>>

The primary mission of Tim Disalvo & Company is quality. The company is known for their ability to build long-term value in each unique renovation, creating a home for clients to share a lifetime of memories. The Tim Disalvo team, from the office to the field, has a 30-year history of customer

satisfaction with every remodel, renovation, and new home. All work is carefully planned well in advance of the start date, so customers aren’t left waiting for the finished product. Call a representative today to help you achieve your dream of a more attractive and enjoyable home.

2640 Faxon Avenue, Memphis, TN 38112 | 901.753.8304 | TimDisalvo.com SPECIAL PROMOTION

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2/21/17 8:12 AM


2017

FACES OF THE

MID-SOUTH

THE FACE OF

CYCLING

PEDDLER BIKE SHOP >>> Having been the mainstay in Memphis' cycling community since 1971, the Peddler Bike Shop has witnessed decades of positive change in the local riding environment, and they're in it for the long haul. Peddler Electric, the business's fourth location on South Main, will promote electric pedal assist bikes, or e-bikes for short. The shop will maintain a rental fleet of e-bikes,

as well as traditional bikes for residents, visitors, and tourists. Still the largest Trek Dealership in Tennessee, the Peddler Bike Shop's trained staff of 25 plus are on duty seven days a week to make sure you have a great cycling experience, not just in Memphis, but the entire Mid-South. Staff at each store is trained in proper sizing and fit and understand the needs of every type of cyclist.

PeddlerBikeShop.com SPECIAL PROMOTION

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2/20/17 4:26 PM


2017

FACES OF THE

MID-SOUTH

THE FACE OF

DIVORCE LAW THE RICES >>>

Need a divorce? Consider yourself fortunate if you can hire the Rices. Their credentials show that they represent more than simply their three generations of family law experience. The ABA publishes the Rices’ Complete Guide to Divorce Practice. Fellow lawyers designated Larry as a Super Lawyer and Nick as a Super Lawyer Rising Star. NAFLA awarded Larry with its National Top Ten Ranking, while the AIOFLA placed Nick in the Tennessee Top Ten Under Forty in granting the Client Satisfaction Award. Avvo.com rates both with its highest ranking possible. Their divorce guide can be found at AboutDivorce.com. SPECIAL PROMOTION

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2017

FACES OF THE

MID-SOUTH

THE FACE OF

DOGGY HOTEL, DAYCARE & SPA BROWNDOG LODGE >>>

Locally established in 2007, BrownDog Lodge is the premier destination for the pampered pup, offering luxury boarding, grooming, and daycare, complete with shuttle service! Whether your dog needs a play day, spa day, or an overnight vacation of its own, your furry family member will enjoy the finest

accommodations and personal attention throughout our indoor and outdoor lodge. Let our friendly staff of dog lovers cater to your pet’s every need in an environment designed for fun and safety. Stop by our East Memphis or Germantown Lodge for a tour and make your reservation today.Your dog will thank you!

EAST MEMPHIS: 4953 Black Road (near Poplar & Mendenhall) | 901.767.1187 | memphis@browndoglodge.com GERMANTOWN: 426 S. Germantown Pkwy (next to Lowe’s) 901.266.9100 | germantown@browndoglodge.com BrowndogLodge.com SPECIAL PROMOTION

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COURTES Y OF THE ARCHIVES AT RHODES COLLEGE

BE AUT Y BE HIND BARBE D WIRE A NE W E XHIB ITION SHOWCASE S ART PRODUC E D BY JAPANE SE PRISONE RS OF -WAR IN ARK ANSAS . by jane schneider

plined n the seness

nce ent.

56 • M E M P H I S M A G A Z I N E . C O M • M A R C H 2 0 1 7

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W

hen visitors see “Beauty in a War Torn World,” a

The 442nd Regiment of the Army, which was largely Japanese American, trained at Camp Shelby, Mississippi, so it was relatively easy for those young men to visit their relatives in the Arkansas camps. When Paul Faris documented camp life at Rohwer in 1945, he captured this scene of a soldier on leave meeting his daughter for the first time.

new exhibition at Memphis Botanic Garden this

month, they will glimpse a piece of Mid-South history that may come as a surprise — the existence of two JapaneseAmerican internment camps that operated in Jerome and

opposite page: Mushrooms, circa 1925 Floy Hanson Hanson’s family relocated from Mississippi to a farmstead just northeast of Lea’s Woods (now Overton Park). She studied abroad extensively during the 1920s and used two motifs in many of her watercolors: abundance (paintings set in the Delta), and mushrooms (set in the Old Forest). This piece was published as a color spread in Keramic Studio in 1922, after she had been working in China. She had to convince her teachers to allow her to use a colorful palette. Today, much of her work is featured in the Clough-Hanson Gallery at Rhodes College.

EXHIBIT ORIGINS When Freeman initially met with Mary Ann (Faris) Thurmond and Eliot (Tim) Faris several years ago, they presented a huge, well-documented collection of negatives. Thousands of photographs had been taken by their father, Paul Faris, a professor of English and photography at Hendrix College in Conway, Arkansas, where he worked from 1928 until his retirement in 1971. “Our father taught photography, so he was always developing pictures at the house,” says Thurmond. “His darkroom was really the heart of our home.” His photographs largely depicted rural life in Arkansas: landscapes, cotton production, homestead cabins, and craftsmen, as well as newsworthy events at the college. Some work was even published nationally by Life magazine and The New York Times. When Freeman encountered the 100+ images Faris shot in July 1945 during a visit to the Rohwer Relocation Center, however, she recognized their historic significance. The material was strengthened by the oral histories his wife, Ann Faris, wrote about each resident they photographed. Of particular interest to Professor Freeman was a picture that featured Henry Sugimoto encircled by several faculty members. In the center was a handsome, self-possessed woman. Who was she? Freeman wondered. This was her introduction to Floy Hanson, a gallery director at Hendrix College during the 1940s, whose expertise in Japanese art helped to bring Sugimoto and his work to the college.

PHOTOGRAPH BY PAUL FARIS

The photographs and artwork on display March 5-31 at Memphis Botanic Garden offer a two-fold purpose. One collection features approximately 30 black-and-white photographs taken from 1942 to 1945 by professor Paul Faris (1905-1989) that capture camp life at the Rohwer Relocation Center and the Japanese Americans who produced artwork while incarcerated there. The second collection highlights the intricate watercolors, letters, diaries, and furniture designs created by Memphian Floy Hanson (1878-1951). This talented artist’s sophisticated knowledge of Japanese art helped facilitate an exhibition at Hendrix College in 1944 by one of the incarcarees, Japanese painter Henry Sugimoto. The current show is curated by Sarah Wilkerson Freeman, a history professor at Arkansas State University who has been researching the lives of Faris and Hanson and the Japanese. “My aim is to shine a light on their work,” says Freeman.

Henry Sugimoto created this piece while incarcerated at Jerome in 1943. The picture was among the 15 works Sugimoto showed at Hendrix College in February 1944. The individual family barracks were heated by pot-bellied stoves, making the chopping and hauling of wood a daily chore in winter. The painting features Henry and his wife, Susie, with their 6-year0ld daughter, Madeleine.

PHOTOGRAPH BY PAUL FARIS

Rohwer, Arkansas, during World War II.

This picture by Faris was taken during Henry Sugimoto’s exhibition at Hendrix College in February 1944. In the background is the artist’s painting, Arrival at Jerome. Pictured left to right: Louise Freund, Susie Tagawa (Sugimoto’s wife), Floy Hanson, Elsie Freund, and Henry Sugimoto. It was this image that prompted historian Sarah Freeman to learn more about Floy Hanson. Hanson was teaching arts and crafts and curating exhibitions from the collection she and Jessie Clough had spent years developing. While at Hendrix, she and Elsie Freund traveled to Jerome and arranged for Sugimoto to show his work. Hendrix College purchased this painting, which now hangs in the Mills Center.

M A R C H 2 0 1 7 • M E M P H I S M A G A Z I N E . C O M • 57

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PHOTOGRAPH BY PAUL FARIS

PHOTOGRAPH BY PAUL FARIS

The painting depicts an elderly couple in the camp, perhaps thinking about a son or grandson who was fighting in World War II as part of the U.S. Armed Forces.

This picture of the cemetery at Rohwer includes two memorial monuments built by camp inmates to honor the fallen soldiers of the 442nd Regiment and 100th Infantry Battalion, the majority of whom were of Japanese ancestry. Much changed at the camps between 1943 and 1945. The guards eventually left and the barbed wire that encircled the camp came down. Many internees transferred to Rohwer once Jerome closed in June 1944 and were allowed to go to work or study in Chicago, though they were prohibited from returning to the West Coast.

PHOTOGRAPH BY PAUL FARIS

Children were rounded up with their families and sequestered in the camps some were even born there. These preschoolers play under sunflowers planted near barracks windows.

To understand the audacity of such an invitation, however, one must know something about the climate of the internment period. THE INTERNMENT CAMPS OF ARKANSAS Following the bombing of Pearl Harbor, President Franklin D. Roosevelt signed Executive Order 9066, authorizing the removal “of all people from military areas.” Fueled by decades of racial intolerance and worry about national security, a wave of anti-Japanese hysteria crested in the spring of 1942. Since 80 percent of the Japanese lived on the West Coast, the region was declared a military area, forcing the incarceration of Japanese Americans residing there, many of whom were U.S. citizens. Government notices began appearing in Japanese neighborhoods ordering residents to report to assembly centers. Some received less than two weeks’ notice as they scrambled to get their personal affairs in order, leaving behind homes, farms, and treasured keepsakes they would never see again. Parents arrived with children in tow, carrying but a single suitcase, uncertain of what the future held. Through that summer and fall, more than 110,000 Japanese Americans were relocated to internment camps built by the U.S. military. Most were in the West, but two camps were located in the Delta, at Jerome and Rohwer, Arkansas (110 miles southeast of Little Rock). Army barracks were hastily assembled at the sites, eventually housing some 16,000 Japanese Americans from September 18, 1942, to November 30, 1945. Upon arriving, families were settled in empty barracks, given a single room “apartment,” and issued one cot per person, three blankets, and a pot-bellied stove. Theirs was a life interrupted. SHINING A LIGHT ON INJUSTICE The building of the internment camps made headlines in Arkansas and sparked conversation at Hendrix College, a

private, liberal arts school where several art faculty decided to visit Jerome in 1943. There, Floy Hanson and Elsie Freund met Henry Sugimoto, an artist who had been trained and shown in California and France. Sugimoto was interned at Jerome (and later Rohwer) with his wife, Susie, and 6-year-old daughter, Sumile Madeleine. In an unpublished manuscript, Ann Faris wrote, “When Henry Sugimoto realized there would be minimal photographic record of the Japanese American internment experience, he changed his artistic style and began in secret to create what he called “documentary paintings” — works that depicted incarceration from a resident’s point of view.” Though he worried that his artwork would be considered subversive, camp administrators granted permission for him to continue. When Hanson and Freund saw the paintings, they, too, encouraged him. At the college’s invitation, Sugimoto and his family traveled to Hendrix in February 1944, where he showed 15 works. Faris photographed the event, and Hendrix purchased one painting, Arrival at Jerome, a beautiful portrait which still hangs at the school today. The Farises later traveled to Rohwer in July 1945, on assignment for folk art expert Allen H. Eaton. The author was gathering material for his book, Beauty Behind Barbed Wire: The Arts of the Japanese in Our War Relocation Camps (Harper & Brothers, 1952). With Sugimoto as his guide, the couple attended an arts exhibition at the camp and stayed several days, capturing the range of traditional arts being produced at Rohwer. The spartan conditions made waste unthinkable, and items such as gunnysacks and cardboard were recycled into things of beauty. The creation of art brought balance and peace. Faris’ photographs, which are artfully lit and well-produced, show Japanese doing ikebana, a spiritual form of flower arranging; kobu, the collection and

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EXAMINING THE WORK OF FLOY HANSON As a highly trained visual artist, Floy Hanson spent time studying and living in New York City and Kyoto, Japan, before eventually joining Hendrix College in 1940. What a shock the war and internment must have been to her. Hanson was part of a coterie of college-educated women during the early twentieth century in the Mid-South that included educator Mary Grimes Hutchison (the founder of Hutchison School), Nan Halliburton (the mother of travel writer Richard Halliburton), art instructor Jessie Clough, and Floy’s sister, musician Etta Hanson. Lovers of art and culture and travel, their knowledge of the world would have been decidedly broader than most of their era. Hanson met her mentor and

PHOTOGRAPH BY PAUL FARIS

the patient endurance of the unbearable.

COURTES Y OF THE ARCHIVES AT RHODES COLLEGE

burnishing of unusually shaped cypress knees; calligraphy, sculpture, and wood carving. As Paul shot, his wife, Ann, who did feature writing for the Arkansas Gazette, took oral histories from the residents, providing details about their lives and how they coped with internment and loss. Some of their work was published in Eaton’s book. Mary Ann and Tim consider their parents quiet activists, doing what they could to shine a light on intolerance and injustice. “Mom and Dad’s arms were always open,” says Thurmond. Living with those photographs, many of which decorate her home, Thurmond is reminded of how the Japanese Americans “created a life of creativity and joy in the midst of a terrible thing that had been done to them.” Japanese-American author Delphine Hirasuna refers to this as “the art of gaman” —

An established photographer, Paul Faris was recommended to folk-art expert Allen H. Eaton to photograph artwork created by the Japanese-American internees at Rohwer. Eaton included Faris’ work in his book, Beauty Behind Barbed Wire. Many of the 100plus photos he took in July 1945 focused on the artists, such as this image of calligraphy master Toyokichi Usui.

This black-and white photograph was taken by Floy Hanson (probably about 1930). For this composition, Hanson painted the background and then positioned a live branch over it to cast shadows on the original painting. She used a heavy book to help her set the shot. The piece shows clearly the influence of Asian art and culture on Hanson’s art.

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COURTES Y OF THE ARCHIVES AT RHODES COLLEGE

right and opposite page, top: As Floy Hanson and Jessie Clough traveled the world in the 1920s and 1930s, they painted and sketched in small sketchbooks. Hanson in particular had a great interest in the roles and the work of women in the world’s cultures. She was also very interested in indigenous uses of cotton as she had spent some of her childhood in the Mississippi Delta. Today, their work forms the basis for the collection of the Clough-Hanson Gallery at Rhodes College.

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PHOTOGRAPH BY JANE SCHNEIDER PHOTOGRAPH BY JOSH DAUGHERT Y

signs and watercolor paintings shown in the exhibit belie her aesthetic. Expertly crafted, her symmetrical designs reference nature themes in a muted palette of greens, ocre, and mauve. Ultimately, Floy and Clough assembled an 1,100-piece collection they used to study and teach art and design that included Italian and French brocades from the eighteenth century, Japanese woodblock prints, lacquerwork, obi textiles, and other objects from foreign lands. In 1950, Floy established the Jessie L. Clough Art Memorial for Teaching at Rhodes College, creating a trust in honor of her mentor. The collection is still in use today as a teaching tool for the arts and humanities. Short plans to reorganize the collection with information Freeman’s research is bringing to light.

Henry Sugimoto’s painting at Hendrix College was commemorated in 2014 by the new college president, Japanese-American William Tsutsui. The college brought Sugimoto’s daughter, Madeleine Sugimoto, to speak at the event. Her father’s painting now hangs in the Mills Center.

PHOTOGRAPH BY JANE SCHNEIDER

lifelong collaborator, Jessie Clough, at the esteemed college preparatory for young ladies, The Higbee School, where Clough taught art. Hanson graduated as Higbee’s valedictorian in 1897. She continued her education at Chicago Institute of Art and Columbia University Teachers College, where she was heavily influenced by Arthur Dow, a leading figure in the pre-World War I Arts and Crafts revival. Dow’s emphasis on Japanese-inspired appreciation of nature and the notion that art should be both pictorial and decorative would shape Hanson’s work. While in New York during the teens and 1920s, she designed handsome wood furniture with Jessie “overseeing the construction of textiles for Floy’s couches and chairs,” notes Bill Short, associate director of Barret Library at Rhodes College, where Hanson’s work now resides. Pictures of her furniture de-

History professor Sarah Freeman examining prints of Floy Hanson’s work at The Robinson Gallery. The artwork was printed by Emily Oppenheimer, the director of marketing and production. Rosie Meindl, visual resources curator at Rhodes College, also assisted with the scanning of images for this exhibition.

Mary Ann Thurmond and Tim Faris holding a sign that once hung outside a building at the Rohwer Relocation Center.

To learn more, visit densho. org, a clearinghouse on the 10 Japanese American internment camps in the United States.

BUTLER CENTER IN LITTLE ROCK EXPLORES INTERNMENT AT ROHWER “The American Dream Deferred: Japanese American Incarceration in WWII Arkansas” interprets the Butler Center’s Rosalie Santine Gould-Mabel Jamison Vogel collection of artwork produced at the Rohwer Relocation Center where Jamie Vogel was an art teacher. Exhibit curator Kimberly Sanders, who did her master’s thesis on the Vogel collection, organizes the artwork around themes of community life, identity, and patriotism. The exhibit, which includes self-portraits, wood carvings, bird pins, and kobu, is funded in part by a grant from the National Park Service. The Butler Center for Arkansas Studies in Little Rock is part of the Central Arkansas Library System. The show ends June 24. An exhibit by Sarah Freeman featuring Paul Faris’ camp photography runs July 14December 23. To learn more, go to butlercenter.org.

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Graduate Degree Cocktails, updated menus, and an iconic rooftop sign reconnect the Highland Strip to its neighborhood roots. edited by pamela denney | photography by justin fox burks

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ith a colorful history and proximity to the University of Memphis, the Highland Strip has been a playground for college kids for many decades. And while South Highland between

Central and Park still caters to young people, a renaissance is under way, connecting community and commercial development in more urban-friendly ways. Simply put, the University Neighborhood District is having a moment, thanks to substantial private investors who see the University of Memphis and the students who graduate as building blocks for the city’s future. Loeb Properties has invested $5 million in acquisitions and renovations into the Highland Strip, a row of a dozen store fronts stretching south from The Bluff to Burgerim, both new businesses for food and entertainment. A block away, Char Restaurant, a contemporary steakhouse and piano bar, and the Casual Pint Craft Beer Market, a fast-growing national franchise, anchor a mixed-used development with amenity-studded apartments called Highland Row. City leaders agree with the neighborhood’s potential. In October, Memphis City Council members approved a funding stream that will redirect a portion of property taxes from the University Neighborhood District back into the community. The money, about $80 million over the next 20 years, will pay for security, infrastructure, and street improvements such as crosswalks and lighting. Aaron Petree, brokerage vice president for Loeb, says the successful model of Overton Square, another Loeb project, steered

the Highland Strip’s redevelopment. “We like tired buildings with history,” Petree says. “Rather than razing them, we want to embrace their character and update all the things that people don’t even see, like the roof and the buildings’ infrastructures.” A clearly visible upgrade, however, is the district’s new 6-foot-tall sign which stretches across the Highland Strip rooftops in openface channel letters. Backlit with red neon, the retro signage nods to the Strip’s earlier store facades and invites the extended Normal Station neighborhood to its new retail offerings. “Our goal is to make the Highland Strip walkable, urban, and modern, a place where students engage with the community, so when they graduate, they want to stay in Memphis,” explains Ciara Neill, Loeb’s director of marketing. For principals Bob and Lou Loeb, the appeal of vibrant off- campus life is both personal and professional. The pair operated a bar called London Transport from 1977 to 1983 in the same Southern Avenue block where the student apartment complex The Gather on the Southern now stands. “Since then, they have really loved the area,” Neill says. — pa mel a denney M A R C H 2 0 1 7 • M E M P H I S M A G A Z I N E . C O M • 63

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Highl a nd S trip a Highl a nd Row exposed beams, the old wood ceilings. We felt like the building had a lot of character and, obviously, it has a lot of history. From what I know, the building was built in the 1930s, and it was originally a movie theater. Actually, it’s been a number of theaters: The Normal, the Studio. It was a comedy club. It was even an adult entertainment theater at one point. And, of course, the space was Newby’s for the next 40 years. The buildings connected where our men’s bathroom is now. Tell me a little more about your concept for the Bluff. Is the Bluff a lot like Rafters in Oxford?

Nickle Smith

The Bluff Don’t Bluff

With an impressive renovation and 7,000 square feet, the Bluff turns sports, music, and po’boys into an upbeat neighborhood party.

by pamela denney

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irst-time visitors will want to settle into a window table in the Bluff’s front room, charmed by rustic brick walls and the unplugged version of “Layla” on the loudspeakers. Please do. But after ordering a draft from one of 12 local crafts on tap, wander into the venue’s cavernous interior, where a 15-foot projection screen plays the Grizzlies game and garage doors roll open to greet warm-weather days. Wait around until 10 p.m. or so, and the music cranks up: local bands on Monday and Tuesday, DJs on Wednesday and Thursday, and bigger name acts when the weekend rolls around. “Think Club 152 and Lafayette’s had a baby,” explains bartender Tony Vaughan about the Bluff concept, fashioned after Rafters, a popular sports bar and music

venue off the Oxford town square. Rafters’ Hudson Chadwich is a partner in the Bluff, along with Austin Wallace and Nickle Smith, and the menus and music are much the same. Open since early January in a space formerly occupied by Newby’s, the Bluff includes two outdoor patios, a mezzanine bar, and a family-friendly vibe before the college kids show up. “We want to appeal to everyone,” says Smith, who took some time from a busy Saturday to discuss the Bluff’s renovation and its Cajun-inspired menu. “We don’t want the party to ever stop.”

Memphis: Your building has a colorful past. Can you tell a little about its history? Nickle Smith: We fell in love with the space right from the beginning: the height of the ceilings, the old brick, the

The Bluff plays off Rafters. It’s the same general concept. Basically, we don’t want to be just a place for college kids. We want to be a fun place for people of all ages to watch their favorite teams play, hear live music, and eat some Cajun-style food.

A mezzanine bar is one of three bars at the Bluff.

Let’s talk about the New Orleans food on the menu. Do you love the Big Easy?

I do love New Orleans. I’ve been going to New Orleans all my life. I think I went to Mardi Gras seven or eight years in a row. And the po’boys. People seem to be crazy about them.

Yes, they are. All of our po’boys are made from scratch, except for the French bread,

Crawfish boil: The happy face of spring

The Bluff kitchen boils crawfish, mushrooms, new potatoes, and corn on the cob every Saturday.

The Cajun-inspired playlist from the Bluff’s menu plays its sweetest song on Saturday afternoons, when kitchen cooks start up the crawfish boil with 300 pounds of Louisiana beauties. Although crawfish tails — fried and served with housemade remoulade — are permanent starters on the Bluff menu, the restaurant’s crawfish boils parallel peak crawfish season from about Mardi Gras through early summer. A boil newbie, I know more about crawfish culinary history than how to approach my plate. (Do I really suck out the heads?) But I’m an adventurous eater and skilled at hardshell crabs, so I dig in, charmed, quite honestly, by the bright orange feelers and little black eyes that look like a pair of Japanese seed beads. By the time I find the meat inside the tail’s ribbed shell — tiny morsels that taste sweeter and more delicate than lobster — I am elbow deep into the shells’ spicy seasoning and the sheer fun of a crawfish party. At the Bluff, two pounds of crawfish cost $14 and come with the boil’s other fiery fixings: potatoes, mushrooms, and corn on the cob. “You cook crawfish live, so we serve them on Saturdays until we run out,” says Bluff owner Nickle Smith. “We want them to be as fresh as they can possibly be.” — Pamela Denney

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which is from Leidenheimer bakery in New Orleans. Basically, we don’t cut any corners. Nothing is frozen, the remoulade is house-made, and the batter is also made in-house every day. The batter is a great recipe: airy, with a good crunch to it, and a little kick. And for chicken, catfish, and shrimp, you can get them grilled or fried. I saw a burger go by. It looks huge and delicious.

All of our burgers are half-a-pound, and they are definitely going to fill you up. We source all of our meat from Charlie’s here in town, so we patty them by hand every day. We have four kinds of burgers, but my favorite is the Babineaux. It comes with Pepper jack, bacon, fried onion, and remoulade. You mentioned before that you would be making some changes in the menu. Can you elaborate?

We will be adding cole slaw, some mac and cheese, and a few different desserts. We tested a bread pudding today made with Jameson Whiskey, and it was delicious. And we will have a dessert we are calling Butterfinger cake. Is it made with Butterfingers as in the candy bar?

It is. It’s a family recipe, and we love it.

You sprinkle the Butterfingers on top of a chocolate cake made with caramel that’s topped with whipped cream. The cake is served chilled. Are any other new events in the works?

We are starting a brunch with live music, maybe bluegrass or jazz, with a menu that is a little more upscale than our regular menu. We are excited for when the weather gets nice, and we can open the garage doors and have that nice indoor/ outdoor feel.

Friends John Sharp, left, and Rick Castleman spend most afternoons in front of CK’s for coffee and conversation.

Best Friends Forever

Highland Strip regulars keep watch over CK’s, despite fire at the longtime shop.

by john klyce

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orn Styrofoam cups and bits of paper lay scattered across the charred floor of the CK’s Coffee Shop on South Highland, while the seats rest empty and the kitchen ceiling, already weakened, looks ready to collapse. Outside, the classic bright-red CK’s sign stands tall. “CK’s Coffee Shop,” it reads. “Always open.” But after a grease fire October 30th, this location for the longtime local chain remains closed. “A lot of business they’re losing.” So says John Sharp as he takes a sip of lukewarm McDonald’s coffee and leans back in a metal foldup chair outside the store. The 53-year-old has been coming to this CK’s for 35 years, and he’s not about to let a fire and closing deter his daily routine. Twice a day, Sharp and friend Rick Castleman spend time outside the closed CK’s. They pick up coffee from McDonald’s down the street, plop down on their chairs, and chat. “We’ve just been sittin’ out here, drinking coffee, and watching traffic,” Sharp says. Next to him, Castleman lights a Pall Mall cigarette. A regular at this CK’s since the 1960s, he’s the store’s only customer who’s been around longer than Sharp. “We’re here every day,” he explains. “Every morning and every night, 365

approved. Castleman, who didn’t do drugs but spent time on the Strip, was considered by some to be bad news. “Back in the day, they thought I was a nark,” he says. “I was clean-cut.” days out of the year. Rain or shine.” Sharp looks at him and smiles. Sharp laughs. “What happened?” he asks. “Yeah,” he says. “We sit with an Time passed. And as years went by, umbrella in the rain. People look at us the Highland Strip changed. It faded, like, ‘What are they doing?’ Two sad-ass only to slowly rise again. More recently, guys out there in the rain.” Loeb Properties invested $5 million to Upon first glance, the hours Castleman refurbish commercial buildings, part of and Sharp spend each day outside the a push by the city and the University of coffee shop might seem like a waste of Memphis to position the area for future time. But the two men were practically growth. But while the rest of Highland is raised on the Strip, with Castleman rejuvenated, CK’s Coffee shop finds itself growing up just a mile down the road. drained, and Sharp and Castleman find They’re staple observers of the area, themselves a bit misplaced. and they’ve seen it undergo Which is too bad, because sharp changes over the according to the two, years. they don’t have much “It’s mostly turned else. into Memphis State “It’s all we now,” Sharp says. got,” Sharp says. “They’re trying to “We watch the turn it into the Memtraffic and the new CK’s manager Kathy Lanier phis State scene.” generations go by with John Sharp and But flashback 40 and say,‘Oh well.’ It’s Rick Castleman. years, and the Highsad.” land Strip painted a much “Yeah,” Castleman adds. different picture. CK’s was a Dobbs “Though I hate to say it.” house, McDonald’s was a Sandy’s HamSome comfort could come to the two burgers, and drugs were rampant. in the form of Kathy Lanier, the store’s “It was crazy,” Sharp recalls. “People general manager, who said recently did whatever the hell they wanted to that the store will likely reopen around do. Weed, acid, police didn’t care back the end of March. But until then, Sharp then. They pretty much knew who you and Castleman will be sitting out front, were.” drinking coffee, and watching the Of course, that didn’t mean everyone times change. M A R C H 2 0 1 7 • M E M P H I S M A G A Z I N E . C O M • 65

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University of Memphis students happily eat Insomnia cookies, pictured below with a delivery box, after waiting 30 minutes in line at the new location on the Highland Strip.

Midnight Munchies

With Insomnia Cookies, late-night snacking is only a click away.

by robby byrd

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ate-night cookie cravings — or early-morning cookie yens — have never been easier to satisfy. Like finding a new love, finding your cookie bliss takes only a few clicks and scrolls of the Insomnia Cookies app. But this time, there’s no awkward first date (unless you make a love connection with your delivery driver), just a heaven where cookies and milk forever flow. I found cookie nirvana a couple of weeks after the Insomnia location on the Highland Strip opened in mid-January. At 1 a.m. (maybe Insomnia packs its cookies in I should be embarrassed pizza-style delivery boxes. to tell this story), I ordered a dozen cookies — three double chocolate chunk, three classics with

M&Ms, and three peanut butter chip — two cartons of chocolate milk, and Insomnia added three free chocolate chunk cookies to the mix. The cookies arrived warm. Opening the folding box (think pizza delivery) released a divine perfume into the air, almost like I had spent hours in my kitchen baking. Who doesn’t like to have a house that smells like freshly baked cookies? Cookies have been my go-to latenight snack of choice since childhood. My youngest sister and I would fight over the last Chips Ahoy in the white plastic sleeve. With four kids in the house, the cookie bags seemed to always be empty — usually the milk carton, too. All that childhood strife, however, has been redeemed by the universe, and Insomnia Cookies has improved the old-fashioned approach. Now, I hold in my pocket a virtual, never-ending, bottomless cookie jar that delivers straight to my door until 3 a.m. Seth Berkowitz founded Insomnia Cookies in 2003 while attending the University of Pennsylvania. From Berkowitz’s dorm room, the company has grown to more than 90 locations nationwide.

After testing the cookies a few times, it’s easy to see why his concept has become popular. I do have a few suggestions for your Insomnia cookie bliss. The double chocolate chunk cookie from the traditional cookie menu is a classic for a reason. The chocolate cookie with the huge chunks of semi-sweet goodness pair great with a nice cold chocolate milk. If that sounds like death by chocolate, the peanut butter chip cookie with peanut butter chips may be the next best bet. A crowd favorite, Insomnia’s handmade “Whiches” feature a layer of hand-dipped ice cream between two freshly baked cookies of your choice. It’s a decadent but unbeatable afternoon snack. If schlepping to the store is too much, delivery — $6 for a minimum order — starts at 10 a.m. Monday through Friday and at noon on Saturday and Sunday and continues until 3 a.m. seven days a week. 545 SOUTH HIGHL AND STREE T (87 7-632-6654). $1.50 E ACH FOR TR ADITIONAL COOKIES AND $3 E ACH FOR JUMBO DELUXE.

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Newby’s Gets a Makeover

Family duo spruces up Newby’s with updated menu and renovated space.

by ana alford

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ith an endearing family connection to Memphis and the restaurant business, Sara O’Ryan took her nephew and business partner Larry Thompson’s word on the potential of a new and improved Newby’s, which reopened last year after being shuttered since 2014. The popular Highland Strip bar, a favorite haunt for University of Memphis students for four decades, is a natural fit for O’Ryan, who recently talked about her great-great-grandfather’s connection to the neighborhood (Hint: He was the first president of West Tennessee Normal School, the U of M’s predecessor) and the bar’s new expanded menu from consultant Chef Elfo Grisanti.

Memphis: Did you grow up in Memphis? Sara O’Ryan: I was born in Memphis, and so were my parents. My mother’s family, the Grahams, settled in Shelby County because of a Revolutionary War land grant given to General Joseph Graham. I spent most of my childhood in Indianapolis, where my father owned all three of the Howard Johnson franchises. He also owned some Red Barn fast-food hamburger restaurants in Indianapolis, Memphis, and West Memphis.

How did you become an owner of Newby’s?

My nephew, Larry Thompson, hired my husband’s and my former business partner, Debra Holder, as general manager of Newby’s. As the widow of Memphis musician/producer Jack Holder, Debra brings strong music background and connections to Newby’s. When was the first time you came to Newby’s?

The first time I entered Newby’s was after becoming a partner, with my nephew. Larry worked at Newby’s while he was earning his degree from the Kemmons Wilson School at the U of M. After graduation, Larry had a successful entrepreneurship with South Mouth Wings in Boulder, Colorado.

The Eddie Smith Band plays at Newby’s every Wednesday night.

Memphis Tigers Athletics. The U of M Music School performs here the third Tuesday of every month, under the direction of Professor Ben Yonas.

Being an owner of a bar and restaurant, does that cut into family time?

What is your favorite Newby’s story?

My favorite Newby’s stories are from married couples who met at Newby’s. We want to start a “We met at Newby’s” Facebook page and offer each couple two free drinks to celebrate their anniversaries.

Being a widow with grown children, Newby’s doesn’t cut into family time at all. Besides Larry, my daughter, Ruthie O’Ryan, works in marketing for Newby’s. Another nephew, Frank McLallen, is a musician and recording artist who has played here with his band, “The Sheiks.” My son, Robert O’Ryan, is a student at the U of M and comes by frequently for hamburgers and wings.

Do you have a favorite dish?

Newby’s and the University of Memphis share a real bond. Can you tell me about that relationship for you?

At Newby’s, owner Sara O’Ryan, third from left, socializes with her staff: Tabitha Finta, Debra Holder, Ruthie O’Ryan, Israel Gibbs, and Rodney Herman.

My great-great-grandfather Seymour A. Mynders, was the first president of West Tennessee Normal School, which is now the U of M. It is a privilege to work as an official sponsor of U of M Athletics, especially the Tubby Smith radio program. We have a Tubby Smith Burger on the menu, and our brunch menu includes a Rudd Breakfast Pizza. We are the official “Away Game Watch Site” for the U of M and a preferred caterer of the

My favorite dish is the French fries. Tim Harmon, who was at South Mouth Wings with Larry [in Colorado], created our French fries recipe. Larry and Tim came up with all of our recipes. Before Tim moved on to work for the Huey’s chain, he hired Elfo Grisanti. We have given Elfo a free hand to tweak the menu, and he has added a Sunday and Monday brunch to our food service, which includes a special eggs Benedict, chicken and waffles, and crabmeat sliders. Is there an interesting fact about you or Newby’s that most people might not know?

I don’t drink alcohol, which may be a secret to successful bar ownership, but Newby’s bar manager, Erica Otdoerfer, has created some wonderful concoctions.

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Julie Sanchez and Van M. Phillips dance to the combo Le Tumulte Noir during Sunday brunch at Char Restaurant.

Brunch, Lunch, & Munch At Highland Row, hop, skip or jump your way to cocktails, family recipes, or a 29-tap beer market.

by lesley young

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n the summer of 2016, the much-anticipated $58 million Highland Row development on Highland opened its doors to its first wave of residential tenants, adding to the momentum and vitality that the University District has been experiencing of late. Commercial tenants followed, and three restaurants — Char, a steakhouse with Southern and stylish leanings; Newk’s, a scratch-made, fast-casual franchise spreading across the country; and the Casual Pint, a beer market with a beer-lover’s menu — followed over the last several months, rubber-stamping the area as a diner’s destination. Here’s a look at what the restaurants offer.

Char Restaurant

Duck Eggs Benedict three ways.

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har offers brunch on both Saturdays and Sundays, and has already become such a beloved spot for brunch-crazed Memphis that general manager Andrew Fischer mentioned several times that reservations are encouraged. Eggs Benedict are probably an already perfect dish — perhaps that is why we all love brunch so — but Char chefs add duck eggs to their version, which can come with crab cakes on an English muffin, Southern style with fried green tomatoes and country ham on a buttermilk biscuit, or with skirt steak and greens. Throughout the week, Char offers daily specials, which feature a meatand-three, and on Sundays, that meat is fried chicken. According to Fischer, it’s fried chicken like you get at your grandmother’s house. They soak it overnight in sweet tea, dip it in buttermilk, add Memphis-seasoned breading, and fry it up in a skillet. “We weren’t trying to reinvent the wheel,” Fischer says. “It’s

just like your mother made at home.” Add two sides, such as Delta Grind garlic cheddar stone-ground grits and any number of Southern staples such as black-eyed peas, collard greens, or butter beans, or even chipotle sweet potato mash. Throw in a piece of cornbread, and suddenly it’s back home with grandmother forcing more food on your plate. No brunch is complete without a band (on Sundays, it’s the Memphis gypsy jazz combo Le Tumulte Noir) or an obligatory mimosa or Bloody Mary. Char comes with Jim O’Brian’s Crazy Mary Bloody Mary mix. “It’s wicked good Bloody Mary mix,” Fischer says. “We try to keep everything as local as we can when we can. We’ve really become a neighborhood restaurant. On any given Sunday, almost every single customer knows every single customer.” 431 S. HIGHL AND STREE T (901) 249-3533

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Newk’s Eatery

White sauce BBQ and an ultimate mac ’n cheese.

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f a chain could be a family restaurant, the Newcombs have figured it out. At Newk’s Eatery, the family’s popular fast-casual eateries, Newcomb Family Recipe dishes are a point of pride, along with freshly prepared sandwiches, California-style pizzas, soups, and salads. The Five Cheese mac and cheese comes as a side or a meal. This family recipe that owner Chris Newcomb ate at his grandmother’s house blends Asiago, Parmesan, Vermont white cheddar, and Ammerlander Swiss cheese in elbow macaroni. More cheddar and extra bacon come on top. Or opt for six cheeses if you want the pimento cheese family recipe thrown into the mix. “That just takes it to a whole other level,” associate manager Dustin Thompson says. The Newk’s Q — flame-grilled chicken and Swiss cheese on signature French bread — is one of their best sellers, primarily because of the sauce. What can you do in Memphis to beat out the heavy barbecue competition? Offer a white sauce. Legend has it that Chris’ dad Don, a dentist who helped start the franchise

with Chris, ate a sandwich in Florida with white sauce, the best barbecue sauce to ever meet his palate. After spending hours, maybe days, trying to convince the barbecue joint owner to give up his recipe, Don bought a bucket, took it home, and spent weeks trying to perfect the sauce. The restaurant also offers a different freshly made soup each day, and on Tuesdays, Thursdays, and Saturdays, that soup would be loaded potato, a muchloved mix of potatoes, sour cream, chives, cheese, and extra bacon. If all of the comfort food feels a little heavy, opt for a salad, an absolute win. The Newk’s Favorite comes with grilled chicken, cranberries, pecans, and grapes, topped with house-made sherry vinaigrette or one of 11 other dressings, such as lemon vinaigrette or ginger wasabi. “I’m interested in buying some of that and taking it with me next time I have sushi,” Thompson says. “It’s amazing.” 431 S. HIGHL AND, SUITE 105 (901) 207-4 421

The Casual Pint

Beer, brats, and pretzels with a side of beer cheese.

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ust across the parking lot from Newk’s in the neighboring complex is the craft beer marketplace the Casual Pint, which states on the left door entrance, “Where Beer,” and on the right door entrance, “Lovers Meet.” Inside the cleanly decorated, open-floor-plan establishment, the beer curious can find more than 400 beers to take home with them in six-mix cartons or crack open and pour inside. There are also 29 taps for drinking on site or for growler fill-ups, with include craft options from all of Memphis’ breweries. To feed these huddled masses of beer pilgrims, the menu at Casual Pint is an appetizing selection of finger foods, pizzas, and sandwiches. Franchise owner Lisa Caufield says hands-down the crowd favorite is the Bavarian pretzels and beer cheese. Over-sized pretzel sticks covered in chunky salt pay homage to a ramekin-type dish of warm English Mountain cheddar beer cheese, also salty, perfect for pairing with a late-day or early-evening beer. Caufield would put their wings up against any in the city. “They’re very, very good, to be honest,” says Caufield, who opened the first Casual Pint franchise in

Memphis last November. “We get quite a lot of comments on our wings, and this is a wings city.” An order comes with six roasted wings, tossed in either Buffalo, barbecue, or sweet and spicy chili sauce, and your choice of ranch or blue cheese sauce. There’s also guac and chips with salsa or hummus and flatbread, and the flatbread also shapes the base for three types of pizza, including grilled chicken breast and Wisconsin mozzarella topped with red onion and either Buffalo, barbecue, or spicy chili sauce. Sandwiches include a Southwestern chicken wrap, which is pretty much what you’d expect, but with jalapeño and Boom Boom sauce, a sort of spicy Remoulade, or the beer brat, which is a Johnsonville brat cooked in a seasonal craft beer and served on a Challah bun. Come for the beer, stay for the food. Or the life-size Jenga. Or dogs. “We’re encouraging everyone to bring their dogs,” Caufield says. 395 S. HIGHLAND STREET (901) 779-2967 contin u ed on page 7 6

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PHOTOGRAPH BY ADDIE JAMES

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Bottoms Up The drinks these days on Highland toast more than beer chasers.

The Whiskey at Char

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ourbon lovers will appreciate the impressive bourbon list at this new fine dining steakhouse in Highland Row. The cocktail list also includes a variety of bourbon cocktails, but one of the best is the Whiskey. Bartenders stir one-and-ahalf ounces of Rittenhouse Rye with five other ingredients. Melati amaro, a trendy digestive when served alone, takes on the role of vermouth, adding hints of anise, saffron, and botanicals to Cynar, another Italian bitter liqueur. Honey syrup and lemon juice add to the drink’s sweet and sour contrast. Even better, the Whiskey is served warm, complementing the cozy and sophisticated setting of the restaurant’s piano bar. — Sarah Wages 431 S. HIGHL AND STREE T (901-249-3533)

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PHOTOGRAPH BY ADDIE JAMES

PHOTOGRAPH BY ADDIE JAMES

Mermaid Wave at Newby’s

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ne way to never graduate from Newby’s, the longtime student hangout on Highland Strip, is to try a different drink. Instead of a shooter, order one of half-a-dozen cocktails concocted by bar manager Eric Otdoerfer. The cocktails — The Unicorn, Lavender Lemon, or Pirate Punch, for example — trend sweet with popular add-ins masking their punch. (Be forewarned.) The Dirty Shirley, for instance, turns the childhood classic into a very grown-up drink. But for wow appeal, dive into a Mermaid Wave, made with Tequila, pineapple juice, sour mix, and Blue Curacao. The brilliant blue liqueur adds a hint of orange taste, thanks to laraha, a citrus fruit from the Dutch Caribbean island for which Curacao is named. — Pamela Denney

539 S. HIGHL AND STREE T (901-7 30-0520)

The 535tini at The Bluff

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or a couple of beers, the Bluff’s first floor will do just fine, but for signature cocktails, head upstairs to the mezzanine bar, a more secluded space for conversation and people-watching. Check in with bartender Will Morris, whose new cocktail menu includes traditional favorites, along with updated and colorful blends. “When customers see a colorful drink go by a table, they say, I want that,” Morris explains as he shakes up a 535tini, a signature martini named after the Bluff’s Highland Street address. Built around Tanqueray gin, with Triple sec, pineapple juice, and grenadine, the drink glides into summer. And the color? Deep amber hues, serene and soulful, like the eyes of a wise old Tabby. — Pamela Denney 535 S. HIGHL AND STREE T (901-319-2942)

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The Nıght They Raided the&7 Strip by david dawson

Reprinted from the April 1980 issue of Memphis magazine. CURRENT PHOTOGRAPH BY JUSTIN FOX BURKS

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editor’s note: To anyone driving down Highland today, the shops and restaurants lining the blocks between Midland and Southern don’t seem particularly wild or crazy or dangerous. But in the early 1970s, the “Strip,” as it was called, was considered the epicenter of our city’s drug culture. Mom-andpop businesses that had flourished for years closed or struggled to survive, while youth-oriented establishments moved in. Pool halls and beer joints attracted young men and women with no place else to go and plenty of time on their hands, and this simmering stew erupted into fights, brawls, even small riots. Newspapers reported how easily anyone could buy drugs, ranging from pot to heroin. But everything came to a boil on a February night in 1972, when a police raid finally changed the face of Highland forever. First published in this magazine in April 1980, it’s a nostalgic reminder of just how dramatically the area has changed since the “flower power” days wilted.

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t was 9:37 on a Friday night, February 18, 1972. Outside, the cold pavement of Highland was bathed in pulsing blue light. There was a sudden silence about the place that was chilling and unreal. Crazy Bill was standing easy now, inside the Cue Ball, watch-

ing the cops root around in the pockets of the pool tables. At first, everybody had been lined up with their hands on the wall. Crazy Bill had stood and felt the big drops of sweat roll down his ribs, his hands going numb on the wood paneling,

his heart about to pound out of his chest. Crazy Bill was 21 and working on his first beard, and he had never seen anything like this. He had been a regular on the Highland Strip for over two years, which made him one of the originals, a real old-timer. He had been there when things were loud and super-cool and the place was happening every freaking night of the week. Some people had always stood like hedgepreachers, warning everybody that The Bust was on its way. Crazy Bill had called them paranoid. But here it was, happening live and in color right before his bloodshot eyes. Crazy Bill had gone into the Cue Ball that night searching for this soapy-looking chick with electric red hair that sprawled out around her face like last month’s Christmas wreath. She always wore a hazy photo-button of Baba Ram Dass, pinned just where your Grandmother would have worn her favorite cameo brooch. Crazy Bill knew who she was. He never knew her name or anything, but he knew she sold good stash. His friends claimed that the magic had all left the Strip when the junkies and the runaways invaded the place last fall. The mood had become frenetic and anxious. There were suddenly a lot of “garbage heads” around — people who would swallow, inject, or smoke anything, in any amount, so long as they

thought it would make rainbows dance on their eyelids and banshees scream in their ears. The garbage heads were depressing even to the Strip regulars, passing out the way they did in the most conspicuous places. Nobody wanted to put up with a bunch of habitual O.D.’s. Not to mention the people who were getting beaten up and left in the dark alleys that ran from the parking areas out to the street. The Strip had, in short, become a very unpleasant place to hang out. But Crazy Bill had stayed, even though most of the other old-timers had cleared out like dead leaves on a cold autumn breeze. The Strip was his spot — it was where he felt at home. Crazy Bill had believed that things were going to get better when the warm weather came back again. He had faith in the place. Now here he was, standing on the static-charged carpet of the Cue Ball, wonder-

ing just what was going to come down. He had only been in the pool hall for about five minutes, looking for the soapy-looking chick, when this tall dude with a distinct .38-caliber bulge in his jacket had come piling through the front door and announced in the voice of an Old Testament prophet, “Nobody is going to leave.” There had been some confusion at first as people began stuffing their stash down in the pockets at the corners of the pool tables, or dropping Baggies full of contraband onto the floor. Several people had somehow managed to kick at the big back door of the Cue Ball until the thing had fallen off its hinges, and they had gone out into the cold night air and run. But for most of the 150 or so people inside there had been nothing else to do but stand up against the wall and keep their hands on the paneling and keep their mouths shut. After about five minutes of the up-againstthe-wall routine, the police let the suspects stand easy (“But keep them hands out of them pockets”) while they began going down the line checking I.D. cards against a list of names slapped onto a clipboard. For some, there was a quick search, a quick dig into pockets and socks. The TV lights were already blaring outside, and Crazy Bill could see a big fellow hoist a camera onto his shoulder. And that was when he knew for sure that the Strip was about to become Big News for the fourth time. So while he stood there, waiting for the clipboard to make its way down the line to him, Crazy Bill got caught up in the glare of those TV lights, and he began to flash back to the old days, back before the newsmen had made the Strip their stomping ground, back when things were new and dangerous and exciting and it was all happening at the row of shops with the wide sidewalk out front down on South Highland Street. From the time when people f irst started calling the small business district that runs along Highland between Mynders and Southern “The Strip” to the cold Friday night in February 1972, when the police busted the place, it had all been like three Chinese dragons chasing each other’s tails around in a circle: the merchants, the street people, and the police. M A R C H 2 0 1 7 • M E M P H I S M A G A Z I N E . C O M • 73

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It was unclear just when it all began. The early development was slow and sporadic. In 1965 the Normal-Buntyn Shopping Center was just plain typical. It had a hardware store, a couple of grocery stores, a jewelry store, and a carpet showroom. There were two drugstores and two barbershops. In the middle of the row of shops, the Normal Tea Room offered genteel refreshment to lady shoppers. Across the street was a gas station and a bakery. All of it was pretty ordinary, fairly placid, and comfortably prosperous — just a nice convenient shopping center in the middle of a nice conservative residential area. Then in 1968 two record stores — Pop-I’s and Highland Hits – opened their doors to the growing Memphis State student population. Within a year there were more businesses aimed at a young clientele — two pool halls, a couple of small restaurants, and several clothing stores. By 1969, the Scene had started to roll. The merchants along the “Strip” (it had, by then, acquired its new name) could stick their heads out their front doors on a late afternoon and see little clots of longhairs dressed down to the hippest nines in elephant bell-bottoms and tiedyed T-shirts and headbands and army surplus j ackets w ith holes carefully torn in them. And the merchants could, on calm days, catch little whiffs of patchouli oil and strawberry incense in the air as they heard the scuffing of bare feet moving past on the gritty sidewalk. At first the merchants were patient about the growing numbers of freaks — they remained concerned, but calm, throughout the winter of 1969-1970. By the spring of 1970, though, the whole Scene got to be too much for them. Pop-I’s was drawing a sizable crowd almost every night of the week. With the warm weather had come a kind of semi-resident population of anywhere from 250 to 750 each night.

And none of the merchants were naive about the fact that these street people weren’t just looking for a place to sit and listen to music, no sir. They were dealing drugs. What was even worse for the merchants, though, was having to sit by and watch their customers disappear. To hell with Jimi Hendrix and Woodstock — they were losing business! Most of the merchants (the youth-oriented ones included) got together in June 1970 to form the Normal Business Community Improvement Association, designed to pressure city officials into providing some protection for their livelihoods. They went to the police and requested help, and soon there was a pair of cops strolling up and down the Strip, joking with the regulars on the sidewalk, calling them by name, acting as much like high school principals as policemen. But they weren’t being foolish. They too knew about the prospering drug trade going on just behind their backs. By the summer of 1970 drugs had become an all-important ingredient of Strip life. “It was a necessity to be heavily into the drug scene in order to exist on the Strip,” recalls one early member of the underground community on the Strip. “The Strip was an escape into all the forbidden pleasures I had been preached to about all my life. It was nirvana in the middle of the Bible Belt.” Heroin was present on the Strip in 1970, but it was not popular. The drugs of choice were marijuana, LSD, mescaline, and various amphetamines. These drugs were readily available to anyone who did not actually wear a badge, but the drug trade remained hidden, just out of sight. Toward autumn there were a lot of new faces on the Strip. One of these had a beard and was crowned by tousled brown hair and a floppy hat. Robert Lively — the Candyman — was beginning his tenure. Lively was a “narc.” He passed himself off as a heroin addict with a lot of rich underworld friends willing to underwrite his rather large drug purchases. Lively pricked his arms with needles to leave “tracks,” and he taught himself how to fake taking drugs — no dealer would have trusted someone who bought

Between 1970 and 1974 a whole host of new businesses popped up on the Strip,

presumably to try to tap the buying power of the young

freaks that gathered nightly.

large quantities of dope without at least sampling the stuff. By the time Lively’s three-month “visit” to the Strip had ended, he had compiled enough evidence to arrest 17 persons on charges of sale and possession of narcotics. After these arrests in late 1970, the Strip was suddenly, for the first time, Big News, as the Highland area was singled out as the city’s major drug distribution center. This exposure would not, however, curb the flow of either drugs or people into the area. The Strip might have been Big News, but it was also the unofficial freehold of the city’s counter-culture, who were just beginning to test their wings. Crazy Bill remembered the way that the paranoid people had overreached after the Candyman’s bust, running around with their brains out of fix, accusing everybody of being a narc. Things had remained low-key, but definitely suspicious, for months. The winter had passed in anxious, but unabated, drug trading. Then, in the spring of 1971, the people had started coming back in droves. Drugs became more plentiful than ever, and they were sold openly on the sidewalk or inside one of the hangouts. There developed a kind of comradeship among the freaks that had been lacking all along. Crazy Bill remembered it as a time of freedom, a time of wide-eyed dreamers, when a person could sit in the lotus position on the hood of a car for six hours without moving or run up and down the sidewalk screaming at lampposts — dig it, do it. It was all cool on the Strip, because this was, for the street people, a different reality, their brave new world. It was the beginning of utter desperation for the older merchants, though. A good many of them lost patience and moved out. But others were quickly taking their places. Between 1970 and 1974 a whole host of new businesses popped up on the Strip, presumably to try to tap the buying power of the young freaks that gathered nightly. Boutiques like U.S. Male, Oz, Base Four, Just Jeans, Sexy Sadie and Sam, Grand Central Station, and the Jeanery opened on South Highland, as did restaurants like the Taj Mahal and The Cafe. Many did not even last a year, while others continue to operate today. Between 1970 and the present, however, 14 out of the 20 businesses that occupied store space in the row of brick shops on the west side of the street have either moved, changed hands, or disappeared altogether. “How much business could you do,” asks Elliot Abel, who operated the Tobacco Corner at 553 South Highland, “when you had to go

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out to the alleys every morning and clean up last night’s O.D.’s so that cars could get through to your parking lot?” Abel has since relocated in East Memphis. On June 19, 1971, the Strip became Big News for the second time, this time not for drugs, but for mob violence. The “Highland Riots” were getting started. Crazy Bill remembered standing out in front of the U.S. Male, on the north end of the Strip. There were perhaps 1,000 people in the area, high and hanging loose, looking for their elusive nightly Buzz. The air was warm and muggy and it hung about a person’s skin like smoke. Then, for some reason (Crazy Bill was too far away), the cops began to hassle somebody out in front of one of the clothing shops down the sidewalk. Here were the smiling cops, the walking patrol, suddenly acting like cops. The street people didn’t like it a bit. The handcuffs came out and found their way around the wrists of a skinny-looking kid in a tank-top shirt and that was what started the yelling. A fellow named Chip came up with a cherry bomb, lit it, and tossed it into the crowd that had formed around the handcuffed kid, and that was when the brawl began. Crazy Bill moved back, away from the 300 people who had gathered in the middle of Highland to throw rocks and beer bottles at the police. Squad cars wailed up, bringing reinforcements, and the freaks squared off against the growing line of police officers in what was beginning to look, to Crazy Bill, like a very crazy sort of pitched battle over not much of anything at all. After the police had amassed sufficient numbers to feel secure, the nightsticks began to swing, and the smell of Mace filled the humid air. The “Highland Riots” resulted in 29 arrests. One participant was bound over to the grand jury on charges of inciting to riot. And now, instead of a couple of pairs of cops assigned to stroll along and placate the merchants and the area residents, the police cracked down: 22 walking patrolmen and 12 patrol cars were assigned to control an area barely as large as Court Square. As the summer trudged toward the dog days, the tensions faded a little, but the stalemate continued. The street people were determined to stay without being intimidated. The older merchants were desperately determined to get rid of the hippies before they were forced to move out of the area. And the police were still wondering what they could do, short of a cavalry charge, to clear the situation up. Throughout the summer of 1971 the drugs

continued to flow, the freaks remained contentedly stoned, and the loud music continued to blare over the heads of those who gathered each night on the Strip to ensure that the territory would remain theirs. That summer, there was freedom for the taking up on Highland. The Strip was peaking. The large numbers of police lasted only a few weeks, until it became apparent that the majority of the Strip regulars were not interested in making the kind of trouble that had happened in June. A few walking patrolmen were left behind, but as summer turned to fall, these policemen were withdrawn as well. The four main hangouts on the Strip — Pop-I’s, a long record shop lined with pinball machines where loud music soared over the heads of those stuffed inside; the Cafe, a bistro serving beer and food, offering the smokiest restroom in town; the Corner Pocket, a pool hall across the street, where the heroin dealers set up their trade; and the Cue Ball, another pool hall, where people used the dark game room as a kind of opium den — continued to thrive into the cool months of October and November. But now, becoming more noticeable each day, there was something new and ugly going on, something which would, in a few short months, force the Police Department’s hand. The amount of heroin that was dealt on the Strip is unknown. And, consequently, the number of genuine heroin addicts among the strip regulars has probably been exaggerated. But it is clear that during the late summer and fall of 1971 heroin and other “hard” (i.e., addictive) drugs like dilaudid, seconal, tuinal, and codeine became popular. The riots and the ensuing “revolutionary” atmosphere had attracted a new sort of regular to the Strip. The old-timers were, gradually, clearing out. The old magic was fading away. The junkies were moving in. Along with the hard drugs came violence — freaks beating on freaks — and the old comradeship became as trash blowing down the gutter beside the wide sidewalk. The new sort of Strip regular looked more like a yellow fever victim than a hedonistic flower child. Crazy Bill could remember them lining the sidewalk, their greasy hair hanging matted onto dirty collars, a kind of mean and hungry hollowness, their palms extended to any and every passer-

by, “Spare change?” their continual drone. “It wasn’t even safe to walk around up there,” one of those hippie-types remembers. “People had gotten themselves so dependent on hard drugs, and when the prices went up, they’d get violent with you. People would just walk up and grab you and start stealing things. That was when I got out.” Crazy Bill stayed on, though, his feelings for the Strip resembling one’s feelings for a worthless old dog that barks at friends and sheds all over the house and tries to eat all the new furniture, but who once was a best friend. The Strip had been Crazy Bill’s life for almost two years. He was a fixture around the place. Sure, the air was charged with a kind of electric survival anxiety. But that would pass. All things had to pass. Had Crazy Bill been just a little more attentive, he might have noticed that not all of the new faces on the Strip that fall belonged to either out-of-towners or junkies. Since October 1971, the newly formed Metro Narcotics Squad had been placing undercover “narcs” on the Strip. Lots of them. “Operation Strip” was off and rolling. When the Strip became Big News for the third time, it was almost anticlimactic. The regulars, the old-timers, the ones who would have reacted to such big news, were just about all gone, now hanging out around Cooper and Union, at Overton Square, or in Overton Park. The Highland Scene, the old one anyway, had sort of transplanted itself to half a dozen locations around town. But for the citizens of Memphis, the third Big News was dramatic and spectacular, the biggest yet. On January 16, 17, and 18, 1972, a series of three feature articles ran in The Commercial Appeal. A reporter, Leon Munday, detailed the ease with which he purchased 11 different drugs in the Cue Ball on three successive nights. The drugs Munday purchased ranged from heroin to LSD to PCP (angel dust, today) to the old standby, marijuana. People around town seemed to be shocked, not so much by the types of drugs as their availability. City administrators responded guardedly. On January 18th, Mayor Wyeth Chandler, facing one contin u ed on page 17 6 M A R C H 2 0 1 7 • M E M P H I S M A G A Z I N E . C O M • 75

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MegaBites

Burgerim ups the ante for fast-food fare.

by pamela denney

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above: Burgerim corporate chef Travis Limoge samples his favorite burger: lamb on a Brioche-style bun.

et’s get right to the heart of Burgerim, an international franchise that likes to break the rules. The mini-burgers? All natural, proprietary blends in 10 different flavors. The packaging? Adorable to-go boxes with tuck-in lids. And the vibe? Upbeat and contemporary with local beer on tap. Opened since early February, Burgerim fills a space between traditional fast food and more leisurely sitdown restaurants. COO Bryan Duff, in town last month for training, uses the term “gourmet fast-food casual” to describe the Burgerim approach. “We want to offer food with a higher quality, but still give customers the in-and-out experience,” he says. Donna Tuchner, an Israeli-born New York-trained chef, founded Burgerim in Tel Aviv in 2011, and the chain expanded to Europe, Asia, and America a few years later. The Highland location at the south end of the Highland Strip is the first Burgerim in Tennessee, part of an

contin u ed from page 71

aggressive national rollout for 100 more stores. Yet, despite its Israeli roots, the restaurant’s only Middle Eastern influence is the franchise name. Burgerim is a Hebrew word for “many burgers.” In fact, the mini-burgers, sold in twosomes, threesomes, and 16-combo packs, are the key attraction for local franchise owner Akta Patel, herself a vegetarian. “We like the duo and trio concept,” Patel says. “We thought here in Memphis, the city of barbecue, people would appreciate so many different burger choices.” Indeed. On Burgerim’s opening

Owner Akta Patel operates Burgerim, the franchise’s first restaurant in Tennessee.

weekend, students and nearby residents embraced the menu of burgers, fries, and drinks for one fixed price. Deciding what to order, however, is still a mixand-match puzzle. Ten different patties — at 2.8 ounces they are a little larger than sliders — include beef (the most popular), lamb, Wagyu, salmon, chorizo, chicken, merguez (a style of spicy beef), and an excellent veggie burger made in-house. Toppings start with the standards and build up, with pineapple, jalapeño, sautéed mushrooms, grilled onions (yum!), and an egg, sunny-side up. Buns, baked into shiny domes topped with sesame seeds, also come two ways: whole wheat and Brioche-style, custom-made for Burgerim locations. Cooked to order on an open flame, the patties are fatter and denser than fastfood competitors, a likely explanation for their juicy texture. In-house blends also balance seasonings with the fat content of different cuts of meat. “We work with a meat purveyor who blends for us based on our recipes,” says Chef Travis Limoge, who brings an impressive L.A. pedigree (celebrity studded restaurant The Nice Guy, for one) to the corporate table. “All our meat is USDA choice, all natural, organic without the stamp.” 569 S. HIGHL AND ST. (901-308-1203)

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DR. ANTON DIAS PERERA

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oday, the “Home of the Blues” is a neon-lit echo of what it once was. Tourists pile in on Saturday nights for diver buckets and live music, the heyday of true blues long past. But in early February, fans from around the world crowd into

Beale Street’s venues for the International Blues Challenge (IBC), and that history reverberates — through steel guitars, upright basses, washboards,

PHOTOGRAPH BY JAMES WESSELS | ROCK MEMPHIS LIVE

handmade instruments, and soulful singing from the hearts of IBC hopefuls. Inside B.B. King’s Blues Club, Rodd Bland mans the drums for a tribute set to his father, legendary blues singer Bobby “Blue” Bland, who hailed from nearby Barretville, Tennessee, and passed away in Germantown in 2013. The ensemble, a group of Rodd’s friends and Bobby’s former band mates, perform a selection of Bobby’s songs under the moniker Rodd Bland and the Members Only Band. The last act in a Thursday afternoon Galaxie Agency showcase, the group — fronted by Nashville-based blues guitarist Stacy Mitchhart — plays to an attentive, shoulder-to-shoulder crowd, a crowd who knew Blue’s songs, and sang along. “Bobby was always my favorite; anybody who knows me knows that,” Mitchhart says before the first notes of “Ain’t That Lovin’ You” hit. “Anything I can do to honor him and his legacy is a pleasure.” Rodd sits behind the drum kit, straightfaced and focused, soft blue stage lights shining overhead as he keeps the beat for some of his father’s most well-known tunes. A few days earlier, he’d expressed a twinge of nervousness about the tribute. “I haven’t really approached playing more than one or two of his songs since he passed,” he says. “But it will be some of my dad’s old horn section — Marc Franklin on trumpet and Art Edmaiston on sax, Chris Stephenson on B-3 organ, Harold Smith on guitar, Stacy Mitchhart — he opened up for dad several times; and rounding it out on bass, Russell Jackson, who played for B.B. [King]. It’s like a family thing, and if you’re going to venture to do something that you may or may not be ready to do, it’s good to do it with your brothers.” As smooth guitar riffs lead into “Ain’t No Love in the Heart of the City,” couples glide onto the dance floor, arm in arm, swaying to the sounds of Bobby’s 1974 R&B hit. By show’s

end, as the band closes with “Turn on Your Love Light” — horns screeching, keys jangling, Rodd in the back cracking a slight smile as he drums — the audience migrates to the foot of the stage, dancing ecstatically. After the set, Rodd prepares to judge an evening IBC solo/ duo showcase at King’s Palace Cafe. He’s made a name for himself on Beale — as a professional drummer for various blues/rock acts — continuing, in his own way, the musical legacy left by his father.

right: Rodd Bland on Beale Street, his home away from home, where he’s performed on various stages for nearly 20 years.

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PHOTOGRAPHS COURTESY RODD BLAND

top left: A young Rodd poses with B.B. King’s Gibson guitar, Lucille. top right: As a child, Rodd discovered a love for drumming. His mother, Willie, and his father, Bobby “Blue” Bland, encouraged his interests. bottom right: Rodd performed several shows with his godfather, blues legend B.B. King.

R

Growing up Blue

odd, 40, was born in Memphis and grew up in Germantown, attending Houston High School. Upon graduation, he went to Lambuth University in Jackson to pursue a marketing degree, but after a year, the music called him back home. Growing up in a musically rich environment, Rodd gravitated toward drums and says he was “destroying pots and pans” by the time he was 3 years old. “I would go in the kitchen at my grandmother’s and start pulling stuff out. Other kids would be playing with building blocks and I’d be building a drum kit,” he says. “Or I’d take spoons and go into the living room or dining room and hit furniture.” He recalls how Blue would scold him, “Hey! Hey, buddy!’’ with a hint of disapproval, but, Rodd says, “My grandmother, his mother, would get on to him and say, ‘Leave him alone. One day you’re going to need him. He’s going to be your drummer.’”

Grandmother was right. “I started playing drums on stage with him when I was 5,” says Rodd. “I was like this little sideshow novice, I guess, as a part of his show with a 10-piece band — 10-and-a-half, counting me.” Though Rodd says growing up with a legendary bluesman as a father was “probably no different than every other kid — he just happened to have a talent that no one else did, which was his job — being a singer, an entertainer,” his stories sing a different tune. During summer and winter breaks from school, he’d hit the road with his parents while his dad toured. He rubbed elbows with numerous celebrities and performed alongside a host of musical greats. “I’ve always been on and off the road with him,” he says. Rodd recalls a gig in New York, when he was 7 or 8 years old, during which he had an unpleasant encounter with Mick Jagger. “I didn’t like Mick Jagger,” he scowled. “Not that I didn’t like the Stones — at that time, my musical education centered around Bobby Blue Bland, B.B. King, Albert King, so I wasn’t exposed to rock-and-roll.”

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PHOTOGRAPHS COURTESY RODD BLAND

PHOTOGRAPH BY KAREN PULFER FOCHT

top: Rodd stands proudly with his father and Beale Street representatives on April 10, 1996, the day of Bobby “Blue” Bland’s brass note ceremony. Alongside them (left to right) are John Elkington, Gene Carlisle, and Jon Hornyak. Bottom Left: Beginning at the age of 5, Rodd performed on stage with his father. He continued into adulthood, as shown here, developing skills that led him to become a professional musician. Bottom right: Rodd sits near two important brass notes on Beale — his father’s and another that honors the late Corey Osborn, his friend and former bandmate.

But Jagger was a big fan of Blue and was invited to sit in during a song. Being a blues performance, Jagger pulled out a harmonica. “I think my dad was doing his version of the Merle Haggard tune ‘Today I Started Loving You Again,’” Rodd says. Tony Coleman, who Rodd considers his brother, was on one drum set and Rodd was on his, a “blue sparkle Slingerland kit” he received when he was 5 years old, and still has today. “And here comes this skinny dude — you can imagine

him doing his Mick Jagger moves — playing the mess out of this harmonica in my left ear.” Young Rodd was put off. “For quite a while I had no love for harmonicas,” he laughs. As Rodd grew older and more experienced at his craft, he became more than a “sideshow novice.” In the 1980s, many bands, including Bobby Blue Bland’s, had double drummers (two drummers playing two separate kits). “That was what led to my further development of becoming a seasoned drummer — learning how to be a show drummer; you play a designated set, it’s regimented,” he says. “There’s not going to be much ad lib and stretching out as a drummer or a bass player, everything is structured. I really did my lion’s share of work by the time I was in my teens.” Rodd was 19 when he “got the keys to the plane” and began to perform with his father as the sole drummer. “It grew to the point where he knew that I was always going to be dependable, that very seldom would he have to turn back and look at me to give me a cue,” he says. “I know a lot of the time what he’s M A R C H 2 0 1 7 • M E M P H I S M A G A Z I N E . C O M • 81

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PHOTOGRAPH BY JAMES WESSELS | ROCK MEMPHIS LIVE

above: At B.B. King’s funeral procession down Beale Street on May 27, 2015, Rodd led the march carrying B.B.’s Gibson guitar, Lucille.

going to do before he does it.” Over the years, Rodd played several shows with his dad, even touring internationally to Japan and Europe. He’d also play behind his godfather, Blue’s best friend, B.B. King.

T

Honor Thy Father

he w eek end befor e the I B C festivities, Rodd, sporting a T-shirt marked with the Memphis skyline, a backwards Stax cap, and black-rimmed glasses, has lunch at Miss Polly’s Soul City Cafe before a gig with the Will Tucker Band across the street at B.B. King’s Blues Club. He sits at “the old man’s table” — a pub table adorned with a painting of an iconic image of Blue crooning into a mic — and talks about his father in the present tense, as if he’s still with him; in many ways, he is. On this day, red and yellow balloons are tied to a high-backed chair in celebration of what would have been Blue’s 87th birthday. Miss Polly’s is abuzz, so we relocate, shifting into a table next door in the quiet, notyet-opened Club 152, a venue in which Rodd regularly plays drums with blues/rock band Mercury Boulevard. Sun streams through the windows lighting the otherwise dimly lit club. Outside, sparse crowds meander down Beale — a quinceañera party, a rowdy crew pedaling a Sprock n’ Roll party bike — before the night sets in. The muffled melodies of the Eagles’ “Hotel California” play on an outdoor loudspeaker and sneak in through the closed doors. The first time Rodd played drums on Beale was at

the New Daisy Theatre, with his father’s band for the 1996 recording of the album Live on Beale Street (released in 1998). Within a year, he began receiving calls to sub for house-band drummers on the street, and when he wasn’t touring with Blue, he’d accept. “I didn’t want to get back on a gig with the old man and be cold; it was something to do to keep my chops up,” he says. “And it just snowballed from there.” A typical week for Rodd now sees him playing three or four nights a week in various venues on Beale. Weeknights at Club 152 with Mercury Boulevard; weekends at B.B. King’s Blues Club with the Will Tucker Band; gigs at Rum Boogie and Alfred’s, shows with Brimstone Jones or other acts. Sets are mostly a mix of blues and rock, with songs like Jimi Hendrix’s “Hey Joe” or Stevie Ray Vaughan’s “Cold Shot” on the lineup. It doesn’t go unnoticed that Rodd has made a career as a professional musician on a street where his father first gained momentum. “Rufus Thomas used to host amateur night down there at the old Daisy, as it’s called, and the grand prize was five bucks,” he says. “Blue was out there winning that as often as he could. I think he held a record for most consecutive wins before Rufus had to shut him down.” Back then, Blue, along with B.B. King, Rosco Gordon, and Johnny Ace formed a group called the Beale Streeters. “They got their start together here on Beale,” Rodd says. The first few times Rodd performed on Beale after the recording of Live on Beale Street, the significance hadn’t yet set in. “It wasn’t the focal point,” but these days, he says, “Say I’m playing 152, so I load my gear in, and I might take a moment to look out this window and

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try to envision what it was like for him back in the day. Obviously it’s not the same street they cut their teeth on, but at any given moment, it’ll hit me that I might be standing in the same spot [he stood] or where that iconic picture of him and Elvis was taken, down at the old Daisy, then the Palace Theatre.” “I’m a part — in my own way, shape, form — of a Beale Street legacy,” says Rodd. “Maybe I’m a new Beale Streeter?”

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Riding with the King

n 2003, Rodd got his first chance to play with his godfather and longtime family friend B.B. King at King’s namesake club on Beale Street. In 2005, he performed with him again. During a show in Biloxi, Mississippi, on B.B.’s 80th birthday tour, Rodd says, it was “Dickey Betts, Bruce Willis, Dr. John, Deborah Coleman, Kenny Wayne Shepherd, Bryan Lee, and my dad, of course — he had all these people sitting in at the same time; it was like the ultimate jam session.” The band’s then-drummer Calep Emphrey caught up to him and said, “You know you’re gonna have to help me out; I might have to sneak away.” So Rodd sat in. “It was an opportunity for me to be on stage with my dad and B.B. at the same time, which was a rarity for me,” he says. “It was one of those things where I was glad I was in the right place at the right time.” In 2010, when B.B.’s drummer Tony Coleman had to break away due to a family emergency, Coleman called Rodd to sub for him. “We’re talking 90-minute shows, tuxedo time,” says Rodd. “I had one show scheduled with my dad that ended up being during the time that I needed to go do the B.B. thing. My dad said, ‘Son, you need to do this, this is part of your legacy; I can get somebody to cover me for a night.’” Rodd played that show — with B.B. King and Buddy Guy — in Albuquerque, New Mexico, at the Sandia Casino Amphitheater. During the “maiden voyage,” as Rodd calls it, he was “on pins and needles. I don’t do nervous when it comes to playing drums — I set up the kit, sit down, grab sticks, and go. But this was [different]. I was groomed to be able to swing the drum mantle with my father and with B.B. The guys that I looked up to have all done that — John “Jabo” Starks, Tony Coleman — they flip-flopped between the two of them. It was my turn to follow in those two guys’ footsteps who I admire and love so much. I’m fortunate that I got to do that. “Of course, I’m still cheesin’ about some of the YouTubes I’ve seen of it,” he says with a grin.

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Rodd performing at B.B. King’s on Beale Street in 2017.

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They followed with a show in Telluride, Colorado, where Rodd met fellow musicians Allen Toussaint and Beth Hart. When B.B. King passed away in May 2015, Joe Whitmer, with the Blues Foundation, asked Rodd to carry B.B.’s Gibson guitar, Lucille, at the funeral procession. At first, he says, “I asked him, ‘Isn’t there someone else more dignified or qualified that you could ask?’ He helped me to realize that, in a sense, I’m honoring both B.B. and my dad — my two dads, as I always call them.” Rodd agreed. At the farewell, thousands of mourning fans gathered on Beale Street, with Rodd leading the procession, Lucille in hand. “It was powerful — the overwhelming sense of love and appreciation shown toward someone who was very impactful in my life,” he says. “But it was a bittersweet moment because I was being forced to say goodbye to the last piece of what my blues life had been built upon. I had just come to terms with the fact that I would never sit on the stage with my father again and play his music with him. The last true semblance of what real blues music is; it’s no longer there.”

Love in the Heart of the City

R

eal blues still echoes in the “Home of the Blues,” though, thanks in part to people like Rodd. Throughout the 2000s, playing with the Co-

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PHOTOGRAPH BY JAMES WESSELS | ROCK MEMPHIS LIVE

rey Osborn Band at B.B. King’s Blues Club, and still today, in the various bands with which he performs, he carries on that Beale Street blues legacy. While not all of the music is considered “true blues,” he keeps it alive as best he can. Just don’t ask him to sing. “My dad was the most soulful singer there ever was or will ever be in the blues. That’s my factual opinion,” he says. “I’ve attempted to do some background vocals — trying to help out, or so I thought, where I could while playing drums. God bless Blake Ryan and Patrick Dodd and Corey Osborn for letting me muddle up some words. Long story short: No, I don’t sing. I did attempt to sing to a couple of girlfriends; that’s probably why I’m single,” he laughs. As for playing on Beale for nearly 20 years, Rodd says, “It’s nice to know that I have support and backing from various venues and their managers and owners. It’s not often a sideman drummer gets a lot of love and respect, but they go above and beyond the call of duty to show you how important you are to them, to make you feel like you’re not just an employee, or just a sideman musician, but an integral part of their venues.” On any given week, you’ll find Rodd down on Beale, keeping the beat — and adding fuel to the flickering flame of “true blues.” “You don’t just wake up and say, ‘I got the blues.’ It’s a feeling — a cumulative thing,” he says. “It comes from deep within the heart and soul. It can’t be manufactured.” 

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THE FACE OF

FRIED CHICKEN

JACK PIRTLE'S CHICKEN >>> Cordell Pirtle with Carrie Watts and Flo Hearvey Cordell Pirtle with two of Jack Pirtle’s Oldest employees, Ms. Carrie Watts, who was hired by Mr. Jack Pirtle in 1970 and her sister Flo that has also been with the company for over 30 years and still serves Jack Pirtles customers with a smile at the Mt Moriah Store daily. Ms. Carrie has retired do to health problems. Celebrating our 60th year in Memphis. 2014 Memphis Distinguished Restaurateur of the Year. Since 1957, Jack Pirtle's Chicken has been serving the “Best Fried Chicken, Homemade Gravy, and Delicious Old Fashion Steak Sandwiches in the Mid South Market.” Founders Jack and Orva Pirtle turned the operation over to their only child, Cordell Pirtle, in 1979. At that time

Cordell had been the manager of their Jack Pirtle Highland Store for 17 years. Today, Cordell and his wife, Tawanda, together with devoted team employees, enjoy the business of making people happy by serving them great southern food at a reasonable price. Over the years, the Pirtles have loved sharing laughs, stories, and great food, with their customers. Jack Pirtle’s has eight Memphis Locations and is proud to say “Business is GREAT in MEMPHIS.” The Pirtles are very thankful for growing sales year after year and are also very proud to call Memphis home. The owners of Jack Pirtle’s believe in treating customers with loving care. Being active and giving back to community is one of the major keys to success.

901.372.9897 | Visit the Web...JackPirtlesChicken.com | See us on Facebook…Jack Pirtles Chicken SPECIAL PROMOTION

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2/21/17 8:15 AM


2017

FACES OF THE

MID-SOUTH

THE FACE OF

FURS

HOLLOWAY FURS >>> Jim and Casey Holloway Holloway Furs, located at 404 Perkins Extended, was established in 1992 by Master Furrier Jim Holloway after eight years of apprenticeship with four different Master Furriers. We specialize in custom-made garments, fur coat enlargements, reductions, and remodeling. All types of repairs, monograms and appraisals. Cold storage and cleaning/glazing are also offered by Holloway Furs. We have a newly remodeled cold storage

and cleaning facility located in East Memphis. We have the largest inventory with the best prices in the Memphis area. We accept trade-ins and offer a 12-month layaway program. All work is done in house by Jim Holloway and his staff. Jim also specializes in the manufacturing of beaver and mink blankets/throws. Open six days a week. Come meet Jim, his son Casey (now on an apprenticeship) and the friendly staff at Holloway Furs.

404 Perkins Extended | 901.685.3877 SPECIAL PROMOTION

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2/20/17 12:57 PM


2017

FACES OF THE

MID-SOUTH

w

THE FACE OF

GASTROENTEROLOGY BMG/GI SPECIALISTS FOUNDATION >>>

COMMITTED TO EXCELLENCE: THE ART OF TREATMENT AND CARE Suffering from unpleasant stomach and bowel conditions can be challenging enough, without having to worry about finding a top-quality doctor! The highly skilled medical professionals at GI Specialists are experts in helping prevent, diagnose, treat, and cure everything from heartburn, food allergies and hemorrhoids, to colon and pancreatic cancers.

HIGH QUALITY AND CONVENIENT CARE The physicians and staff focus on each patient’s comfort in their on-site surgery center. For added convenience, choose from five other satellite locations: Brighton, Collierville, Covington, Millington, and West Memphis. Whether you need screening or treatment, our group is passionate about providing excellent care for every patient.

Main Office and Surgery Center: Baptist East, 80 Humphreys Center, Suite 200, Memphis, TN 38120 901.761.3900 | GISpecialistsMemphis.com SPECIAL PROMOTION

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2/18/17 3:56 PM


THE FACE OF

GAMING

SOUTHLAND PARK GAMING & RACING >>> David Wolf, President and General Manager David Wolf is the new face of gaming at Southland Park, the area’s fastest growing gaming destination. Named president and general manager in November 2016, Wolf takes the helm of a property that recently underwent a massive $38 million expansion that added space and amenities to accommodate the needs of a growing customer base. And he’s currently making plans for even more expansion. The facility, located in West Memphis, Arkansas, has been a major racing venue for more than 50 years and boasts over 1,900 electronic games of skill, including video poker and blackjack. Southland Park is also home to several restaurants, such as the World Market Buffet, Bourbon Street Steakhouse Grill and Sammy Hagar’s Red Rocker Bar and Grill, and also a multipurpose event center. Southland Park has long been a pivotal fixture in the community — providing jobs, business stability and economic contributions. It has consistently won awards for outstanding customer service and has donated millions of dollars to neighborhood charities and educational institutions. Wolf, who has lived and worked in Memphis in the past, looks to continue the success of the property and build upon its history of community service and impact. “Southland has always been engaged in the community,” said Wolf. “We’ll be a big part of the fabric of the community; we’ll maintain all of that and go above and beyond, too.” 1550 North Ingram Blvd., West Memphis, AR 72301 870.735.3670 | SouthlandPark.com

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2/18/17 4:56 PM


2017

FACES OF THE

MID-SOUTH

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2/18/17 4:56 PM


2017

FACES OF THE

MID-SOUTH

THE FACE OF

GIRLS EDUCATION HUTCHISON SCHOOL >>>

Founded in 1902, Hutchison has produced generations of Memphis women who are resilient, independent thinkers. Under the leadership of Dr. Annette Smith since 2000, the school is known for innovative academics, an award-winning fine arts program, and competitive athletics. During her tenure, Dr. Smith’s focus on inspiring innovative programs and recruiting professional

faculty has paid off. Hutchison’s programs for world languages and leadership development have garnered national attention. The Center for Excellence brings more than 10,000 people from across the Mid-South to the unique 52-acre campus each year. With a farm and lake integrated into the educational experience, it is a year-round living laboratory for grades PK2 to 12.

1740 Ridgeway Road, Memphis, TN 38119 | 901.762.6672 | HutchisonSchool.org SPECIAL PROMOTION

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2/18/17 4:14 PM


2017

FACES OF THE

MID-SOUTH

THE FACE OF

GREAT STEAKS IN THE SOUTH THE MESQUITE CHOP HOUSE >>>

The Mesquite Chop House is like no other steak house in the South. Always at its prime is not just our brand, it’s how we try to live our lives as restaurateurs. We have built a concept in which high standards permeate all aspects of our restaurant. We

are passionate about great-tasting food and the pleasure of sharing it with others. When available, our menu items are prepared with locally grown produce from our very own Cherry Blend Farms in Holly Springs, Mississippi.

DOWNTOWN MEMPHIS: 88 Union Avenue, Memphis, TN 38103 | 901.527.5337 GERMANTOWN: 3165 Forest Hill-Irene Road, Germantown, TN 38138 | 901.249.5661 SOUTHAVEN: 5960 Getwell, Southaven, MS 38672 | 662.890.2467 OXFORD: 1001 Jackson Avenue East, Southaven, MS 38655 | 662.232.8855 mesquitechophouse.com SPECIAL PROMOTION

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2/20/17 1:00 PM


2017

FACES OF THE

MID-SOUTH

THE FACE OF

HAIR RESTORATION ALTREZZA SALON >>>

Over 80% of men and women (and 10% of children) will experience hair loss at some point. Altrezza Salon understands that hair loss is not only a cosmetic issue. Many times, loss of hair creates loss of confidence and upsets emotional well-being. From the moment you enter Altrezza, you become family. The friendly, professional staff and

comfortable environment welcomes each client to offer an individualized solution, restoring both hair and confidence. With 32 years experience, Altrezza knows how to address every situation from typical pattern types to hair loss caused by medical conditions, chemo/radiation hair loss, or burns and scars.

5736 Stage Road, Memphis, TN 38134 | 901.384.1680 SPECIAL PROMOTION

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2/18/17 3:04 PM


2017

FACES OF THE

MID-SOUTH

THE FACE OF

HEATING & AIR

BEST CARE HOME SERVICES >>> Brian Reed, President Nearly eight years ago, sitting around his kitchen table, Brian Reed never imagined that his little company of five people would become Memphis magazine's Face of Heating and Air. Today, with two consecutive years of Memphis Most Awards, Best Care Home Services has grown to 24 technicians with a fleet of 19 trucks and services the entire Memphis metro area and North

Mississippi. Born and raised in Germantown, Tennessee, Brian cares about his community and his customers and this mindset is ingrained in his employees. “Our staff takes as much pride in giving back to the community as they do in providing the highest level of service to each and every customer.� Give us a call today and let us get your air conditioner ready for summer!

5250 Pleasant View Road #1, Memphis, TN 38134 | hvac901.com SPECIAL PROMOTION

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2/18/17 3:14 PM


2017

FACES OF THE

MID-SOUTH

THE FACE OF

HOSPITALITY

THE WESTIN MEMPHIS BEALE STREET >>> Front left to right: John Juniker, Maggie Mazur, Wendy Trochez, and Alfonzo Lyons Back left to right: Joanna Darnell, Carl Wilson, Patrick Jordan, and Gary Morrison Located across from FedExForum and adjacent to Beale Street, the Westin Hotel offers its guests a one-of-a-kind location and a truly unparalleled AAA Four Diamond experience. General Manager Patrick Jordan and the more than 140 Memphians who work for the Westin take their roles as ambassadors of this great city seriously. Clients of the Westin Memphis Beale Street always say, “Your location and guestrooms are great, but your team is what really makes the difference!” The Westin offers 203 spacious guestrooms and over 7,000 square feet. of meeting space. It is the top choice for organizations and travelers from around the world. Beale Street, 170 Lt. George W. Lee Avenue, Memphis, TN 38103 | 901.334.5900 | Westin.com/BealeStreet SPECIAL PROMOTION

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2/18/17 4:27 PM


2017

FACES OF THE

MID-SOUTH

THE FACE OF

INFLUENCE

EVANGELICAL CHRISTIAN SCHOOL >>> Les Binkley III — VP, Boyle Investment Company Ashli Avis — Director of Wishes, Make-A-Wish Mid-South Lynda Wray Black — Law Professor, Cecil C. Humphreys School of Law and Faculty Athletic Representative for the University of Memphis Clint Dowdle — Creative Artists Agency, CAA Sports Evangelical Christian School equips students with the skills necessary to conquer their dreams and be influencers in our world today. With a mission to provide the Christian family with a Christ-centered, Biblically directed education, our students are challenged in a vigorous

academic culture. From business owners to sports agents to lawyers, ECS alumni are positively influencing Memphis, the Mid-South, and beyond. Our students are our future, and we are committed to investing in their goals and preparing them for life beyond the classroom.

LOWER SCHOOL CAMPUS: 1920 Forest Hill-Irene Road, Germantown, TN 38139 SHELBY FARMS CAMPUS: 7600 Macon Road, Cordova, TN 38018 901.754.7217 | www.ecseagles.com SPECIAL PROMOTION

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2/18/17 4:00 PM


2017

FACES OF THE

MID-SOUTH

THE FACE OF

INSURANCE & SURETY

CLAY & LAND INSURANCE, INC. >>> Sitting, left to right: Todd Dyson and Louis Clay Standing, left to right: Mike Henry, Stan Addison, and Jeff Michael Celebrating almost 50 years in business, Clay and Land is one of the largest locally owned Insurance Agencies in the Mid-South. The Agency represents over 200 Insurance carriers specializing in commercial, personal, surety bonds, and employee benefits. With

over 45 Agents, the Agency brings a diverse and dedicated group of individuals that work together to bring expertise and unsurpassed customer service to the marketplace. Located in East Memphis (Ridgeway Center), licensed in 48 states.

866 Ridgeway Loop Road, Suite 200, Memphis, TN 38120 | 901.767.3600 | www.clayandland.com SPECIAL PROMOTION

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2/20/17 1:01 PM


2017

FACES OF THE

MID-SOUTH

THE FACE OF

INTERIOR DESIGN

AMI AUSTIN INTERIOR DESIGN >>> Ami Austin, President Ami is nationally recognized by The Interior Design Society as Designer of the Year for four consecutive years. Ami is the President of Ami Austin Interior Design, P & B Design Source, and Parker Lauren by Ami Austin, her own custom furniture line manufactured in North Carolina and shipped across the United

States. Her design studio is located in the Historic Edge District at 667 Union Avenue. Ami’s clients include a list of prominent families and businesses that include multifamily development projects, both locally and around the country. She has joyfully designed and created their perfect space.

667 Union Avenue, Memphis, TN 38103 | 901.458.4255 | AmiAustinInteriors.com SPECIAL PROMOTION

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2/18/17 3:07 PM


2017

FACES OF THE

MID-SOUTH

THE FACE OF

KITCHEN & BATH MINIMAX KITCHEN & BATH >>>

Beginning to End. Floor to Ceiling. Our DESIGN+BUILD process ensures a smooth transition from your kitchen or bath of today to your plans for the future. MINIMAX Kitchen and Bath has been a leading kitchen & bath dealer, fabricator and manufacturer in the Memphis area for 28 years. New or remodel, residential or commercial, MINIMAX Kitchen & Bath offers everything you need from design through installation. The key elements we offer our clients include: showrooms filled with popular products, experienced, in-house interior designers, lifelike 3-D preview illustrations (for new cabinets only), turn-key remodeling/ installation services, in-house MINIMAX construction professionals, and licensed plumbing, electrical & HVAC veterans. Plus, MINIMAX has a Contractor’s License. 2945 Brother Boulevard, Bartlett, TN 38133 | 901.386.6868 | MinimaxDesign.com SPECIAL PROMOTION

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2/20/17 4:32 PM


2017

FACES OF THE

MID-SOUTH

THE FACE OF

LANDSCAPE ARCHITECTURE

BLAIR PARKER DESIGN >>> BPD is a team of licensed and degreed landscape architects with a total of 55 years of knowledge and seasoned experience combined with new and creative ideas. By utilizing the latest in technology and design software, their communication style and deliverables vary from producing hand sketches to computer drafting and renderings, depending on the client and the project’s needs. BPD works on a variety of project types and sizes. They are involved in all aspects of Landscape Architecture including master planning, land planning, planting design, hardscape design, stormwater solutions, irrigation design, site selection, land use feasibility, Sustainable Sites, LID, LEED, greenway design, and project management & presentations for the public approval process. “We enjoy the challenge of finding creative solutions to complex problems that are aesthetically pleasing, efficient, and functional. Landscape Architects strengthen the design team for all site related projects. We truly love creating spaces and places where people live, work, and play.” 5159 Wheelis Drive, Suite 107, Memphis, TN 38117 | 901.767.6555 | www.blairparkerdesign.com SPECIAL PROMOTION

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2/20/17 1:02 PM


2017

FACES OF THE

MID-SOUTH

THE FACE OF

LASALLIAN HIGHER EDUCATION

CHRISTIAN BROTHERS UNIVERSITY >>> Dr. John Smarrelli Jr. As president of Christian Brothers University, Dr. John Smarrelli Jr. leads the city's oldest baccalaureate-granting institution. Deeply rooted in the Lasallian educational tradition, CBU's faculty invest their time in fostering the growth of our students as whole persons, preparing them for life, work, and service to society. By combining its historical emphasis on providing practical, real-world experience with student-centered teaching, inventive technology, and creative scholarship, CBU is uniquely positioned to be an agent of change within the Mid-South of the 21st-century. Under Dr. Smarrelli’s leadership, CBU is partnering with Memphis educational institutions and the nonprofit and business communities, especially in the STEM and healthcare industries, to build a more innovative, just, and prosperous Memphis. CBU.edu

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2/18/17 5:13 PM


2017

FACES OF THE

MID-SOUTH

THE FACE OF

LIGHTING

GRAHAM'S LIGHTING FIXTURES >>> Graham’s stands for quality. It has from the beginning. “Our company employs over one hundred people,” Cathy Graham explained, “many of whom have spent their career with us. Mr. Graham, Jim’s father, instilled pride in what we do, and that has carried over to our employees. They are our family, too.” Sixty years ago, Graham’s began in a five room house at 554 South Cooper. Graham’s now includes a second Memphis showroom in Cordova, a Franklin, TN, showroom, a 40,000-square-foot distribution center, Fourteenth Colony Lighting (Memphis-made lighting shipped globally), Colony Imports (lighting imported from Italy), and a Dallas to-the-trade showroom. Retail product offerings expanded to include mirrors, lamps, accessories, architectural hardware, and outdoor furniture, making the Graham’s shopping experience all the more satisfying. Examples of Graham’s lighting fixtures can be found at Graceland, the former 19th Century Club, the Orpheum, Morgan Freeman’s home,

several U.S. President’s homes, Lafayette’s Music Room, and countless other homes, churches, and businesses throughout the Mid-South. Nationally renowned Fourteenth Colony is available locally only at Graham’s. “Fourteenth Colony is our creative outlet,” Bo Graham commented. “Each fixture is made by hand, and has a lifetime structural guarantee. Our people know they are making something special. They want it to be perfect and approach each fixture to make it unique.” Bo started at Graham’s at age 16 during holidays and summers, but started in earnest when he took the helm at Fourteenth Colony. His sister and her husband run the store in Franklin, TN. Jim Graham grew up in the business his daddy started. “We love what we do and we are thankful that God has given us the opportunity to be a part of the lives of our employees. Our employees are as important to us as the business is. They have given us a chance to grow and to make Graham’s a company worthy of their pride.”

550 S Cooper Street, Memphis, TN 38104 | 901.274.6780 8150 Macon Road, Cordova, TN 38018 | 901.757.2465 grahamslighting.com SPECIAL PROMOTION

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2/22/17 9:50 AM


2017

FACES OF THE

MID-SOUTH

THE FACE OF

MEMPHIS SURGERY

MEMPHIS SURGERY ASSOCIATES AN AFFILIATE OF SAINT FRANCIS MEDICAL PARTNERS >>> William Scott King, Jr., MD, FACS; Carter E. McDaniel, III, MD, FACS; Hugh Francis, III, MD, FACS; Melvin P. Payne, III, MD, FACS; Justin Monroe, MD, FACS; D. Benjamin Gibson, MD, FACS; D. Alan Hammond, MD, FACS; Norma M. Edwards, MD, FACS; Joshua A. Katz, MD, FACS; and Robert Jean, MD We’re more than surgeons. We’re your medical partners. At Memphis Surgery Associates, it is our mission to treat patients with the latest procedures and most specialized surgical skill sets in the region. But just as importantly, we pledge to treat every individual with the humility, equality, dignity, and respect they deserve. We serve most area hospitals and specialize in the following surgical procedures: General, Endocrine, Oncologic, Colorectal, & Robotic. 6029 Walnut Grove Road, Medical Plaza #3, Suite 404, Memphis, TN 38120 2996 Kate Bond Road, Suite 309, Bartlett, TN 38134 901.726.1056 | MemphisSurgery.com SPECIAL PROMOTION

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2/20/17 1:15 PM


2017

FACES OF THE

MID-SOUTH

THE FACE OF

MID-SOUTH'S MOST TRUSTED HEARING AID CENTER SHEA HEARING AID CENTER >>>

For 10 years, Shea Hearing Aid Center has been recognized by The Commercial Appeal as THE leader in the Mid-South for helping people with diminished hearing. Hearing loss is the third most common concern to people as they age. Shea Hearing Aid Center is proud of its history in being the first to introduce technology that makes a difference. Call for your FREE introduction to our RECHARGEABLE hearing instrument system. Let us help you take the next step in your journey to better hearing. For an appointment, please call 901.415.6667. 6133 Poplar Pike, Memphis, TN 38119 SPECIAL PROMOTION

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2/21/17 2:29 PM


2017

FACES OF THE

MID-SOUTH

THE FACE OF

MORTGAGE LENDING

LUDY CALLAWAY — THE MORTGAGE LADY >>> "It's not just a house. It's your home. I get that! I know how hard you work to get the home you want." A Vice-President of Independent Bank, Ludy's passion is to provide successful, problem-free mortgage loans. With her radio program ("The Mortgage Lady," 8 a.m. Mondays, KWAM-AM990) and website, (YourMortgageLady. net), Ludy is able to finance homes throughout the United States and to help her clients make smart mortgage decisions that will affect them for years to come. To teach, guide and help. That's "The Mortgage Lady." 901.494.4400 Ludy@i-BankOnline.com

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2/18/17 3:43 PM


2017

FACES OF THE

MID-SOUTH

THE FACE OF

MOVING

BLACK TIE MOVING >>> Cory Carpenter Founded in 2012, by Dustin Black, Black Tie Moving has become America's fastest growing privately-held moving company completing over 15,000 moves in its first three years. We believe everyone should be treated like a VIP on moving day and hire top-notch professionals

to provide our services. Black Tie offers a list of concierge-style services to make moving stress-free and less time-consuming. We are the official moving company of the Memphis Grizzlies and the highest rated moving company in Memphis on Yelp.com.

BlackTieMoving.com SPECIAL PROMOTION

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2/21/17 2:26 PM


2017

FACES OF THE

MID-SOUTH

THE FACE OF

NEPHROLOGY MINESH PATHAK, MD >>>

Kidney disease is an often unrecognized, silent disease caused by uncontrolled high blood pressure and diabetes. The diagnosis and treatment of kidney-related diseases requires an in-depth evaluation of various risk factors. Obesity, vascular abnormalities, autoimmune diseases, and kidney stones have been linked to renal failure. Dr. Pathak is a board-certified Nephrologist and member of The American Society of Nephrology and The National Kidney Foundation. He provides compassionate care with the highest-quality treatment of kidney disease. His goal is to provide early, preventive education along with diagnosis and relevant treatments of specific conditions to lessen the risk of progression to kidney failure and to improve a patient's quality of life. Dr. Pathak takes great interest in understanding the needs of his patients and providing them with quality care with the least invasive treatment. 6025 Walnut Grove Road, Ste. 400 Memphis, TN 38120 901.382.5256

SPECIAL PROMOTION

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2/18/17 4:12 PM


2017

FACES OF THE

MID-SOUTH

THE FACE OF

OB-GYN

MID-SOUTH OB-GYN A Division of Women’s Care Center of Memphis, MPLLC >>> Left to right: Thomas D. Greenwell, MD, Candace D. Hinote, MD, Mary Katherine Johnson, MD, Dominique Butawan-Ali MD, Paul D. Neblett, MD, Judi L. Carney, MD, and Herbert A. Taylor, MD Mid-South OB-GYN provides comprehensive Gynecological and Obstetrical health care for women of all ages. Some of our services include yearly wellness exams, fertility counseling, weight management, contraceptive options, MonaLisa Touch for vaginal atrophy and other in-office procedures. Our physicians deliver at Baptist Women’s Hospital and Methodist Germantown Hospital. All expectant mothers receive a complimentary 3D/4D ultrasound. Other services include mammograms, bone density, total body composition, PelleFirm body treatments and

cosmetic Laser procedures. The physicians of Mid-South OB-GYN have received award recognition from Baptist Memorial Hospital for Women for their leadership roles. They have also been recognized by The University of Tennessee for excellence in clinical teaching and have received certification by the American Board of Obstetrics & Gynecology. At Mid-South we don’t believe in a one-sizefits-all approach to women’s health care; we treat each patient with personalized plans, courtesy and compassion. We look forward to caring for you.

6215 Humphreys Blvd., Suite 100, Memphis, TN 38120 | 901.747.1200 | MidSouthObgyn.com SPECIAL PROMOTION

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2/20/17 4:34 PM


Saving Pyradoptics The creator of the first Memphis pyramid tells a not-so-tall tale. by chris mc coy

I

always thought of myself as Superman,” says Tom Wuchina. “Nothing was beyond my imagination. There was nothing I felt I couldn’t build.” Wuchina’s life experience seems to bear out his super visions. He played football at Vanderbilt University, ran an art gallery in downtown Memphis during the 1970s, and helped create one of Memphis’ great brands as the director for outdoor signage for a rapidly expanding company called Auto Shack that would later change its name to AutoZone. “We were building 100 Auto Shacks a year,” he recalls. After a hurricane damaged 90 stores, “I bought more neon in one day than anyone in the history of the South.” In 1985, Wuchina was an instructor at the Memphis College of Art when he was one of five winners of a grant competition sponsored by the Tennessee Arts Commission, the Tennessee Department of Transportation, and the Tennessee Department of Tourism Development. “It was a combined effort to put public art at all the welcome centers coming into the state of Tennessee,” he explains. His sculpture would welcome visitors arriving in Tennessee from Mississippi via I-55. Wuchina’s winning proposal looked back to the beginnings of human civilization. When James Winchester founded this city on the Chickasaw Bluff overlooking the Mississippi River, he decided to give it the name of another, much older river metropolis. The exact time and circumstances of the founding of Memphis on the Nile are lost to antiquity, but it served as the capital of Egypt for at least a thousand years, and for most of that time it was the largest city on the planet.

Tom Wuchina’s interactive sculpture Pyradoptics was inspired by the Great Pyramid of Kufu, located near the site of the ancient Egyptian city of Memphis. 120 • M E M P H I S M A G A Z I N E . C O M • M A R C H 2 0 1 7

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Artist Tom Wuchina straightens one of the 100 aluminum tubes sprouting from the base of Pyradoptics. M A R C H 2 0 1 7 • M E M P H I S M A G A Z I N E . C O M • 121

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“I’ve been aware of the city’s relationship to Egypt and its desire to have a pyramid for a long time. Somehow, when opportunity came along, I just felt it was my duty to be the one who did it.” — TOM WUCHINA

In 1897, our city of Memphis was represented at the Tennessee Centennial Exhibition in Nashville by a model pyramid, but there were no pointy buildings here. “When I came here, I was surprised that Memphis had never built a permanent pyramid,” Wuchina told The Commercial Appeal in 1986. “I’ve been aware of the city’s relationship to Egypt and its desire to have a pyramid for a long time. Somehow, when opportunity came along, I just felt it was my duty to be the one who did it.” Wuchina was the right man at the right place at the right time. “Around that time, the University of Memphis was designated as a Center of Excellence. They started a whole new department, devoted to ancient Egypt, at the University of Memphis under Dr. Rita Freed. They had a tremendous amount of funding, and a massive library was donated to kickstart the research.”

W

uchina, an intellectual omnivore, dove into the archives to learn all he could about the pyramids of Giza. Already a believer in the power of pyramids to concentrate spiritual and magical energy, he wanted his pyramid to mirror the Great Pyramid of Kufu (formerly anglicized as “Cheops”). The angle of the walls would be exactly 51 degrees, 52 minutes,

and 10 seconds. The colors would be derived from archeological evidence of the faded hues used in the Old Kingdom. At 481 feet, The Great Pyramid was the tallest manmade structure on Earth for 3,800 years. While one gets the sense that Wuchina would love to work that big, his pyramid would eventually rise to just under 20 feet in height with a base area of 961 square feet. In 2590 BC, Kufu’s architect Hemon had the wealth of a nation at his disposal to build the first wonder of the world. His work gangs employed tens of thousands to put in place more than 2.3 million limestone blocks over the course of decades. Wuchina’s materials and techniques were considerably lower budget and higher tech. “It was a collaboration between about 50 people and companies who produced this, because I was originally awarded $15,000. The sculpture eventually ended up costing me $45,000. That included my herd of cattle.” The bottom third of Wuchina’s pyramid is made of concrete; the top uses a forest of aluminum tubes to suggest the remainder of the shape. “I chose to use really heavy aluminum tubing, with quarter-inch walls.” Wuchina says. “The pipes themselves — I had a hundred of them — cost almost $12,000. My budget went out the window right there. But I didn’t care.” The system of tubes cut to the exact shape of the pyramid had a dual purpose. Each tube was painted with different colors — red, blue, yellow, and white — on their different faces. To someone in a car driving

by the welcome center, shifting perspective creates an optical illusion. The pyramid appears to be solid for a moment in one color, then disappears, only to reappear in another color. “I like to play around and manipulate to fool the eye.” Wuchina told The Daily News in 1987. The illusion draws people closer to the sculpture, where a flight of stairs takes them up into the phantom pyramid. “Part of the concept was to allow people to enter my works of art. I was doing rather large works of art at the time that were accessible to the public. I wanted them to be a part of it, to go inside of it, to see through it …. The tubes were left open so they captured the sound of the interstate. You could put your ear on one side of the pyramid and you can hear everything on the other side amplified.” The stainless steel “capstone” housed a lighting system. An arrangement of mirrors created the illusion of a tunnel of light leading to the infinite sky, while a second set below plunged the viewer’s perspective deep into the earth. “When you stood in the power center of the pyramid, you were bathed in neon light,” Wuchina says. By his own admission, Wuchina became obsessed with the work. The self-trained engineer designed a six-ton network of steel beams to stabilize the aluminum tubes. To keep the colors vibrant, he used expensive aircraft paint, painstakingly applied in a donated, climate-controlled warehouse over the course of a month. “They had to be kept above 60 degrees, but we did it in the dead of winter,” he recalls.

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s 1987 dawned, Memphis was gripped with Egyptomania. The first Wonders exhibit brought treasures from the reign of Rameses The Great to Memphis, drawing hundreds of thousands of visitors Downtown. The Wall Street Journal reported that the exhibit injected more than $75 million into the local economy. As the sculpture neared completion, a group of Memphis psychics gathered to imbue the structure with spiritual energy. Finally, on May 21, 1987, the dedication ceremony kicked off with a concert by the Overton High School Marching Band, whose students performed “Pyramid Suite,” an original composition by Memphis composer Lyn Gillick Joyner. Wuchina decided to call his visual symphony of aluminum and concrete Pyradoptics. The structure was christened with a mixture of waters from the Nile and Mississippi Rivers. “I hope this stimulates Memphis to build another pyramid,” Wuchina told the Journal. “This great city should be known for something besides barbecue and Elvis Presley.”

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opposite page: Wuchina with a scale model of Pyradoptics in 1986, this page: A complex system of steel beams holds the aluminum tubes in place (far left). Each tube received four coats of aircraft paint (center). The sculpture was christened in May 1987, with a marching band and waters from the Nile and Mississippi Rivers (right).

Long after the initial buzz wore off, Pyradoptics became something of landmark. For 30 years, its flashing colors and changing shape has provided an unexpected moment of mystery and magic for unsuspecting travelers. “I wanted it to be a permanent fixture, something that would last as long as humanly possible,” Wuchina says. “Years after I put it up, I was still getting letters from elementary schools where teachers actually brought students to the pyramid.” But Pyradoptics has not proven to be as durable as Kufu’s monument. The neon lighting no longer works, and concrete is not as permanent as desert limestone. Three years ago, the state decided to give the site a facelift. “When they tore the welcome center down, I had people on my Facebook page saying, ‘Now it’s finally perfect! They got rid of the building!’”

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att Seltzer of the Memphis architectural firm archimania was tapped to design the new welcome center. “When we first got the commission for the job, it was the oldest welcome center in the state. The one thing the state wanted to preserve on the site was the sculpture. … What’s interesting from an art standpoint is that it is conceived to work both on the one-to-one room level, and at speed on the highway hundreds of feet away. And it’s successful at both of them.” Seltzer adds that the years have added another layer of meaning to Pyradoptics. “It’s a time capsule of what people in Memphis thought was interesting at a particular time. … From a local perspective, there are a lot of us in the office who were around when Memphis was gripped with Egyptomania. The piece was born out of that. It helped cement that when you thought about Memphis, you thought about a pyramid, before there was a much larger one.” The architect says the design team’s goal was to draw the eye towards Pyradoptics.

“The buildings are laid out on a single walkway from north to south, and the walkway goes in and out of the main visitor’s center building. All of those buildings are aligned using the sidewalk as a critical path for the site. Everybody that walks onto the building site ends up on that walkway at some point in time. The only thing on the site that breaks that plane, that interrupts that walk, is the sculpture.” The pains Wuchina took to help the sculpture withstand the test of time paid off, Seltzer says. “It’s in relatively good condition considering its age. Some of the paint on the pipes has faded, but the pipes are in perfect condition. The electrical systems and infinity neon are not working any more, but the components are still there and they look fine. The concrete base shows more wear and tear than anything else. One corner was actually hit by a car that jumped the freeway shoulder and ended up on the site.”

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n January 2016, as the renovation took shape, Wuchina got some disturbing news. The Tennessee Department of Tourism informed him that there was no money available to finance the planned renovations to Pyradoptics, which was being swallowed by weeds, further cracking the concrete base. The initial repair estimate, given to Wuchina last May, was $80,000. If the structure could not be repaired, the artist was told, it would be destroyed. Wuchina, now a semi-retired teacher in Williamson County, Tennessee, could not afford to finance the renovations himself.

He reached out to his original contractors and friends in the construction industry, who were able to put together a counter bid of $38,000. Wuchina gathered support from ArtsMemphis and the UrbanArts Commission to help spread the word to donors. “Public art is a meaningful investment in our shared spaces and one that has to be maintained,” says Lauren Kennedy, executive director of the UrbanArts Commission. “It is unfortunate that the construction around the new welcome center did not take Tom Wuchina’s sculpture into consideration and that the integrity of the piece is now in jeopardy. We support Tom’s efforts to save the work and are working to address the ongoing maintenance of city projects as well.” Wuchina is gathering donations through the crowdfunding website GoFundMe and is seeking the support of individual donors. He has until July 2017 to raise the money to ensure that Memphis’ first permanent pyramid sticks around. Pyradoptics is the lasting symbol of his lifelong philosophy: “To think things no one has ever thought before, to see things no one has ever seen before, to make things no one has ever made before.”     M A R C H 2 0 1 7 • M E M P H I S M A G A Z I N E . C O M • 123

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GREAT MEMPHIS HOMES

A Chickasaw Gardens Treasure

by a n n e cu n n ingh a m o ’ n eill | photography by c hip pa n k ey 124 • M E M P H I S M A G A Z I N E . C O M • M A R C H 2 0 1 7

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At home with interior designer Sarah Spinosa.

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t is always fascinating to see how other people live, in particular those who work in the design profession. I long have wanted to feature an interior designer’s own “great home” for this series and was delighted when Sarah Spinosa graciously agreed to let us pay her a visit. Her house is a reflection of her professional talents, and, in this particular house, she is clearly her own client.

Sarah and Philip Spinosa have now lived in Chickasaw Gardens for four years, in an older home which they lovingly renovated. Funnily enough, the couple had previously built what they envisioned as their dream house further out in East Memphis. But when prospective buyers literally knocked on their door, the Spinosas pulled up stakes and moved several miles farther west. While their 1940s-era house had been well maintained, it was certainly in need of a basic facelift; the Spinosas also required more living and bedroom space. The plans for the renovations were drawn up by architect David Anderson, whose work Spinosa characterizes simply “as art,” adding “opinionated as I am with design, I loved his vision from the start.” In the talented hands of builder Ryan Anderson of RKA Construction, the house was completely gutted and reconfigured and ultimately transformed into the perfect personal living space for her family. Spinosa admits she likes “the quirks and charm” of an older home but fortunately the lessons learned from building

the first house were very helpful when it came to renovating the present one. Among other things, the master suite was shifted downstairs and an existing downstairs bedroom was transformed into the master bath and closet. Baby Bradford’s nursery is downstairs while 8-year-old son Graham’s bedroom and separate study nook are upstairs, along with a guest room and bathroom. The large screened-in porch was absorbed into the house, becoming the handsome, large family room which is the heart of this newly refurbished home. The rudimentary attic stairs were moved and new wrought-iron banisters were fashioned courtesy of the talented David Doss. All of the old windows were saved, and the floors are original, although stained a darker color. As Sarah Spinosa toured me around her house, she told me a bit about her background. Originally from Maryville in East Tennessee, where her family was in the newspaper publishing business, she is a graduate of the University of Tennessee. After moving here, she was studying for a

above: A charming 1940s-era home with beautiful bay windows and white-columned front porch has been transformed into a light-filled, personal living space for the Spinosa family. M A R C H 2 0 1 7 • M E M P H I S M A G A Z I N E . C O M • 125

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great memphis homes

above: Fresh fruit and flowers add warmth to the welcoming entry. right: The modern, streamlined kitchen and handsome breakfast

room flow together beautifully with the wonderful Freida Hamm painting and light fixture by Visual Comfort adding color and style.

master’s degree in counseling at the University of Memphis, but after working for 10 years with Lisa Mallory, the pull of the interior design business won her over. Spinosa has the highest praise for her close friend Mallory, saying: “She did so much for me and was my role model.”

er places in her travels. When I ask for one tiny design secret, Spinosa says simply, “Go to the grocery store and buy fresh fruit and flowers.” She clearly puts this philosophy into play in her own home, as when we visited, bright yellow tulips were arranged throughout the house in silver

Sarah defines her style as “traditional, timeless, but with modern, fresh touches.” And so it was that Sarah Spinosa Interior Design was born! She defines her style as “traditional, timeless, but with modern, fresh touches.” Her favorite sources in Memphis are Market Central, Blu d’or Interiors in Laurelwood, and, of course, Lisa Mallory’s shop in Chickasaw Oaks. Spinosa buys at the markets in Atlanta and Highpoint, North Carolina, and a variety of oth-

julep and loving cups. I asked her what designers she admires, and Spinosa immediately mentioned Aerin Lauder, whose 2013 book Beauty at Home she has read and relished cover to cover. Spinosa likes simple drapes — neutral linens and dupioni silks. She uses sisal rugs for the most part, to give texture and durability to her design scheme, though she says readily that she would

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She defines her style as “traditional, timeless, but with modern, fresh touches.”

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great memphis homes

Her walls are mostly neutral — Benjamin Moore’s White Dove and Ballet White are the paint colors — the better to set off her artworks. have Oushak orientals from Turkey everywhere “if she won the lottery tomorrow!” Her walls are mostly neutral — Benjamin Moore’s White Dove and Ballet White are the paint colors — the better to set off her artworks. In particular, Spinosa points to the contemporary abstract works of New Orleans painter Amanda Stone Talley on the living room wall. In that same room is a gorgeous one-of-

a-kind mixed-media piece over the fireplace, featuring a circle of metallic laurel leaves by local artist Megan Hurdle. It was a Christmas gift commissioned by Spinosa’s husband, Philip, and thus a treasured object. She did splash out with incredible, large print purple and grey “Iris” wallpaper by Cole and Son in the dining room. In fact, neutral walls notwithstanding, Spinosa confesses that she really

top: Sarah Spinosa’s love for wallpaper comes through loud and clear in her dining room with its bold “Iris” wallpaper; the antique column in the far corner was a gift from

Spinosa’s role model in the interior design business, Lisa Mallory. above: In the renovation, an existing bedroom was sacrificed to create a luxurious master bath and closet.

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top: The downstairs master bedroom with its original bay window, neutral color scheme, and light wood furnishings is elegant, comfortable, and most importantly — restful.

bottom: The light walls of the living room perfectly show off fabulous artworks by Megan Hurdle and Amanda Stone Talley (see the baby’s little red plastic car in the background!).

loves wallpaper; “if I could do it everywhere, I would.” She has a passion for sophisticated lighting — table lamps, pendants, and chandeliers such as the Currey and Company “Sputnik” fixture in the dining room. “Lamps are an easy decorative accessory,” she says, which add a lot of style. As to furniture for the new home, Spinosa confesses that she purged some pieces, reused some pieces, and bought some pieces. She points to the dining room table, a favorite which she loves in part because it was pur-

chased from the home’s previous owner, the late Betty Stewart, at her estate sale. She was gratified that Stewart could bring her family to see the renovated home, and everyone seemed to love the changes the Spinosas had made. Stewart, who sadly died very recently, was a well-known and beloved personality in the Chickasaw Gardens area for her dedication to its preservation and security. Spinosa’s favorite room is the den, where the family gathers and as she says, “where memo-

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great memphis homes

above: The large den, a former screened-in porch, is Sarah Spinosa's favorite room where the family gathers and “where memories are made.”

right: This sophisticated room with its bright green drapes in the bay window serves as a small sitting room and Sarah Spinosa’s home office.

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above: Philip and Sarah Spinosa are such a wonderful and welcoming couple, which shows in this photograph.

bottom: At the top of the stairs is son Graham’s little study nook located just outside his bedroom.

ries are made.” I remarked on her use of navy in this room which I noted seems to be very much in vogue this year, and she allows that she has always loved all shades of blue. The kitchen is open-plan and streamlined with honed granite counters and marble backsplash. She gives her

getaways” for the family, and Sarah Spinosa just had to smile. Clearly at the moment, what with juggling the schedules of two young children and a busy husband wearing two hats, she does a lot of her design work for clients on the weekend. And since a designer’s work is never

The kitchen is open-plan and streamlined with honed granite counters and marble backsplash. husband all the cooking credit — he’s “a great cook,” she explains. The Spinosas like to entertain at home, something that makes socializing easier, since they have two young children. I so appreciated Philip Spinosa’s taking time out from his job as district sales manager at FedEx Services to be photographed for this story. Of course, I knew he had been elected to the Memphis City Council in 2015, and he told me that in this capacity he loved being downtown and “trying to do the right thing.” I know that readers will applaud him for service and efforts to make, in his words, “a greater Memphis now.” I asked about “free-time

done, phase two of the renovation process for her own home will be the addition of a garage and playroom out back, whenever time permits. One of my personal favorite coffee table books is An Affair with a House by celebrated interior designer Bunny Williams, in which she lovingly describes her country house and the joys and challenges of its restoration. Like Williams, I can see that the Spinosas are proud of their beautiful home, and it was pure pleasure to share an afternoon with this welcoming family. Upon leaving I even got a friendly bear hug from Philip Spinosa. Now, that’s hospitality! 

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ROAD TRIP

ANOTHER DAY IN PARADISE

The white sand squeaks beneath my feet, stretching in a broad band from east to west. PHOTOGRAPH BY LAURA JEAN HOCKING

DESTIN IS THE HEART OF THE EMER ALD COAST.

T

^6

by chris mccoy

he ocean stretches out before me, emerald and infinite. The sky is a dome of flawless turquoise, flowing down to meet the sea along a horizon as perfectly straight as only a planet’s worth of gravity could create. The white sand squeaks beneath my feet, stretching in a broad band from east to

west. The waves roll in, one after the other, as they have for four billion years. The

sound of water advancing and retreating in rhythm is inexplicably soothing. Like the static between stations on the radio created by microwaves originated in the Big Bang, this is perfect white noise, here before we were and continuing long after we’re gone.

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The Henderson’s adult pool enjoys spectacular sunset views and is overlooked by the resort’s restaurant, bar, and guestroom suites. PHOTOGRAPH BY MATT OWEN

Right now, the beach at Destin, Florida, is nearly empty, just my wife and I walking between the waves and the scrub pine forest of Henderson State Park. But the solitude won’t last. It’s the off season now. In a few short months, this place will be teeming with people of all descriptions — kids playing in the breakers, young lovers on their first trip together, parents smearing sunscreen on toddlers, retirees in floppy hats taking a break from taking a break, girlfriends in bikinis sipping wine, hunky guys playing volleyball, joggers streaming by. Humanity, vulnerable, tiny, and for the most part, happy. Why do we come to the beach? It’s hot, sandy, with potentially life-threatening dangers like undertow, jellyfish, and sharks lurking in the water. And yet, we describe it as re-

laxing, soothing, and fun. There’s something primal about the shoreline. Standing on the beach listening to the waves is as ancient and comforting as sitting in a circle, staring into the camp fire. And there are few beaches as perfect or beautiful as those along the shore at Destin.

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eonard Destin brought his family to live on this barrier island around 1835, sailing from New Haven, Connecticut, on a vessel called the Primrose. There was no one here at the time, but the signs of former human habitation were — pottery shards have been found here dating back more than 2,500 years. The Destin family had the place to themselves for two decades, and the reason they were here was the same

as the pre-Columbian Americans: the fishing is fantastic. Today, Destin bills itself as “The World’s Luckiest Fishing Village.” Today, a hundred yards south of where the Primrose landed in Destin Harbor is Dewey Destin’s Harborside, a restaurant owned by Leonard Destin’s great-great grandchildren. Like pork barbecue is to Memphis, fresh seafood is to Destin. Dewey Destin’s would be The Rendezvous, the grand old standard-bearer of the local cuisine. One bite of grouper caught just off shore and prepared with minimal grilling will render eating the same meal anywhere else completely pointless, and the Harborside’s sushi chef is internationally renowned. Odds are, if you’ve had fish fresh from the Gulf of Mexico at a Memphis fine dining M A R C H 2 0 1 7 • M E M P H I S M A G A Z I N E . C O M • 133

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ROAD TRIP

DE S T IN

Gulf-view rooms at The Henderson look out over Henderson State Park to the sea beyond. PHOTOGRAPH BY LAURA JEAN HOCKING

restaurant, it came from Charles Morgan’s fishing fleet. “He’s a true seaman — salty and real,” says Chantelle Dedicke of the Emerald Coast Convention and Visitors Bureau. “He feels very, very strongly about the differentiation of seafood here.” Morgan’s also a restaurateur, and his flagship Harbor Docks is another can’t-miss seafood destination. “Harbor Docks is the origination point of the Gulf-To-Table dining concept,” Dedicke says. Like the organic Farm-To-Table dining concept, Gulf-To-Table means a commitment to short supply lines, direct relationships with the food producers, and serving only the local products that are in season. The Fish Tracks program allows you to find out exactly where the catch of the day came from. Fresh seafood comes with a QR code that you can scan with your smartphone to tell you the date of the catch, the boat and captain who caught it, and where they caught it. “This is THE place to get fish, up and down the Eastern seaboard,” Dedicke adds. Harbor Docks is not fancy. It’s a small place with an interior made of wood, the tables packed densely. You can watch the boats go by through the wall of floor-to-ceiling windows or from the deck overlooking the harbor. Even in the off season, which stretches from October to March, this part of town

The Henderson Park Inn is dwarfed by the towering resort hotels that line the Emerald Coast beach from Pensacola to Panama City. In a forest of gleaming tower blocks, it looks like it just mistakenly teleported here from the Hamptons. It’s adults only, and couples preferred. In 2016, Trip Advisor readers voted it the most romantic hotel in North America. “People come here from all over the world,” Channell says. “All sorts of couples. My parou wake up here in the mornents are in their eighties, and they always ing, and you don’t know what day it want me to get them a room here.” is, because every day is like you’re on The Henderson Park Inn was built by Memvacation,” says Deborah Channell. “My docphis’ own Dunavant Enterprises. For years tor asked me, ‘What kind of it sat alone on a strip of real Odds are, if you’ve age-defying cocktail do you estate on the eastern border of have?’ This place takes years Henderson State Park, a 200had fish fresh from off your age. It’s a different acre nature preserve sold to the Gulf of Mexico at a pace of life. It takes the stress the state by the Henderson down a few notches. I just go family in 1983 with express Memphis fine dining to the beach. The minute I instructions to keep it naturestaurant, it came walk out on that sand, I start ral and open to the public. If from Charles Morgan’s breathing.” Destin were New York City, More than a decade ago, this copse of dune rosemary fishing fleet. Channell sold her successful bushes and scrub pine would be Central Park. public relations firm and moved from Birmingham, Alabama, to Destin with her husLast November, the inn got a big sister. band. She no longer works 80-hour weeks, “This was a dream about 13 years in the makshe says, choosing instead to represent the ing,” says Zondra Wolfgram, who handles Henderson Park Inn. “This is the place that public relations for The Henderson Beach brings you back to old Destin,” she says. and Spa Resort. seems bustling. Beginning in the spring, the tourists come in like a tide, and the population can swell to 80,000 people inhabiting the tangle of hotels and condos stretching up and down the coast. “Destin just happened organically, because fishing happened here. It’s not a planned community. It just came to be. It definitely has personality,” says Dedicke.

Y

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Destin is known as the “World’s Luckiest Fishing Village.” Here, anglers crowd the best spots at the Okaloosa Island Fishing Pier. PHOTOGRAPH BY LAURA JEAN HOCKING

A R T H AV E N “Artists are drawn to this area. I don’t know if it’s the water or the sky or both. It’s been an extraordinary trend, in the last few years, to see the area blossom with artists, with studios, with galleries, with events, with music, visual, and performing arts,” explains Zondra Wolfgram. The Henderson is decorated with more than 400 paintings and sculptures, all created by local artists. Glass art is particularly hot. The centerpiece of the spa is a massive, hand-blown glass sculpture by Russ Gilbert, and smaller pieces by Mary Hong populate the area. “After they saw everything, they went back and ordered more,” says Wolfgram. “She lives right here in Destin. This is a great time for the arts. Mary Hong didn’t have two studios five years ago. She does the arts festival scene, like a lot of artists do. But she has a space to work out of and is building her business. A lot of artists are, and they’re being supported. It’s exciting to watch them succeed.” One of the most extraordinary of the emerging local arts institutions is the Emerald Coast Theatre Company. Set in a nondescript shopping center, as many things are here, the professional theater and educational center was founded by Nathanial and Anna Fisher. It offers theatrical experiences for both young audiences and more mature fare, such as Bakersfield Mist, a comedy about a man who discovers a priceless, lost Jackson Pollock painting in a thrift store. “This region of Florida is becoming more year-round. There’s a “30- A Songwriters Festival” in January,” Wolfgram says.

More than 400 pieces of art by local artists, including this spectacular glass sculpture in the spa’s main hallway, adorn The Henderson. PHOTOGRAPH BY MATT OWEN

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ROAD TRIP

DE S T IN

Henderson Beach State Park is more than 200 acres of pristine coastal habitat open to the public and preserved for posterity since 1983. PHOTOGRAPH BY MATT OWEN

WA L K T O T HE WAT ER

The Henderson’s rooftop Sunset Vista balcony offers guests an incredible view of the Gulf and sunsets. PHOTOGRAPH BY MATT OWEN

“Along 30-A, there’s a string of 16 beach communities, each one completely different. You can do 16 vacations, and each one of them feels very different, although you’re not going very far,” Wolfgram says. The area is currently booming, funded partially by the $20 billion settlement from the BP Deepwater Horizon oil spill of 2010. The Emerald Coast’s fate was determined long ago by the inexorable forces of geography. Every beach is different, and the deposit of fluffy white sand that makes this area unique in the world is made of fine, flat crystals of quartz eroded from the Appalachian mountains during the last Ice Age and swept down to its current position as the glaciers melted and receded. The fishing is so incredible for the same reason that the beaches are so clean. A 600-foot-deep sea canyon called the Hundred Fathom Curve lies just offshore, creating a haven for sea life and sweeping debris and shells down into the depths. No other bodies of water have their terminus here in this “sand desert,” which means the quartz sand is the purest of the Emerald Coast. The wind streaming in from the Gulf is perfect for kite flying. Every year in September, the Destin Kite Festival brings enthusiasts from all over the world to Norriego Point. Some of the spectacular rigs, which come in all shapes and sizes, cost into the thousands of dollars, but I popped into Kitty Hawk Kites in Harborwalk Village just off the pier and picked up a cool little kite for $25 emblazoned with the Jolly Roger. As my wife sketched under an umbrella, I stood knee deep in the emerald water flying my pirate kite as the sun went down, a little black triangle against the fading blue. Just another day in paradise.

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The Henderson Resort opened in November, 2016 after two years of construction. The interiors and exterior living areas were designed by the Atlanta firm Kent Interior Design. PHOTOGRAPH BY LAURA JEAN HOCKING

tupelo.net

The four-story, 170-room resort has been under construction just north of the Inn for the last two years. When we visited, the finishing touches were still being applied, with painters whitewashing the massive columns on the veranda that overlook the park’s green expanse. As they finished up, the painters, along with the guests sipping champagne and munching truffles on the comfy outdoor couches, were treated to one of, if not the most, spectacular sunsets I have ever been privileged to witness: a brilliant orange orb boiling away into the red as it sank beneath the emerald horizon.

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esigned by the internationally renowned architectural firm Cooper Carry, the new hotel is a seamless mix of the old and new, inspired by the beach cottage look of the Inn nearby. The sprawling lobby, conceived by Kent Interior Design out of Atlanta, is separated into discrete conversation areas defined by the circle of couches and chairs done up in blues and greens. “It’s very easy to kick off your shoes,” says Wolfgram. “You’re still at the beach, so we don’t want it to look pretentious or anything like that.” The Primrose restaurant, named for Leonard Destin’s ship, seats 90 and features farmand Gulf-to-table cuisine. The locally caught red snapper — supplied, like all the fish, by Charles Morgan’s fleet —is the early emerging favorite on the menu. There’s also a sushi

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ROAD TRIP

YOUTH VILLAGES

APRIL 1 RIDGEWAY CENTER

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10 MILER 5K RUN/WALK

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to the staff of the Henderson. Everyone was exceptionally friendly and eager to share this shiny new resort with the guests. One of our waiters had worked on the hotel as an electrician while it was being built, and decided to stay on after opening. The chef at the sushi bar had been recruited from a little restaurant a few blocks away from the hotel, and seemed to regard the shiny new kitchen like an expensive sports car he was putting through its paces. “These are people who live here, who have families here,” says Wolfgram. “This is a very locally owned and operated area. It’s a string of small businesses; there’s no major industry. There’s Eglin Air Force Base, which is huge, and the next is tourism. You want to eat, you want to shop, you want to play, you want the arts.” Standard beachside hotel amenities are available, but everything is done with stateof-the art flair. The two pools stretch a full city block long. The upper deck pool is adults only, with cabanas and palms straight out of Old Hollywood. Dancing water fountains line

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the pool, lit with adaptive LEDs. The lower pool is family friendly, with a big play area connecting to a looping lazy river where kids of all ages can float around on inner tubes.

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2017

FACES OF THE

MID-SOUTH

THE FACE OF

ORIENTAL RUGS TAGHAVI ORIENTAL RUGS >>>

At Taghavi's Oriental Rugs, we take great pride in our 60+ years in business and the type of services we offer, including sales, hand cleaning, reweaving, color-run restoration, moth-damage repair, stain and odor removal, and much more! With every customer, we are guided by our core values: integrity, experience, excellence, and professionalism. We have not only the largest stock in new and antique rugs, but also the best cleaning and restoration method in the country. We have built our reputation for more than 60 years, not on false promises, but integrity and excellence. 3554 Park Avenue Memphis, TN 38111 901.327.5033 TaghaviRugs.com

SPECIAL PROMOTION

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2017

FACES OF THE

MID-SOUTH

THE FACE OF

ORTHOPAEDICS AND SPORTS MEDICINE CAMPBELL CLINIC ORTHOPAEDICS >>>

Campbell Clinic has helped Mid-Southerners reach their peak performance and get back in the game faster for more than a century. The organization has built a reputation of excellence since 1909 by providing care in Memphis and the Mid-South that touches the world. The practice serves as the Official Sports Medicine Provider for the Grizzlies, Redbirds,

and Tigers, along with Rhodes College, Christian Brothers University, and countless other athletic programs throughout the region. Whether we’re treating NBA All-Stars or local Little Leaguers, our patients trust us as the Face of Sports Medicine in Memphis and the Mid-South. CampbellClinic.com

SPECIAL PROMOTION

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2017

FACES OF THE

MID-SOUTH

THE FACE OF

OUTDOOR LIVING SERENITY HARDSCAPES, LLC >>> Rocky Wisley, CBP

Rocky Wisley has been serving the Mid-South outdoor living industry for 17 years. As the years progressed, the opportunities expanded from landscape, drainage, irrigation, outdoor construction, and eventually to hardscapes and gunite pool management. As Rocky began working more with the pool industry, he developed a passion for the industry. Rocky received his Certified Building Professional from the Association of Pool and Spa Professional and is currently seeking his second certification, Society of Watershape Designers through Genesis. Rocky owns and operates Serenity Hardscapes, LLC, a design, build, and service company that specializes in the complete outdoor living project. He will work closely with the client to bring their dream to reality and with his attention to detail and workmanship, you will truly enjoy your new outdoor living environment! 901.262.3090 SerenityHardscapes.com

SPECIAL PROMOTION

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2017

FACES OF THE

MID-SOUTH

THE FACE OF

PAIN MANAGEMENT

MAYS AND SCHNAPP PAIN CLINIC AND REHABILITATION CENTER >>> Left to right: Moacir Schnapp, MD and Kit S. Mays, MD Kit S. Mays, MD, and Moacir Schnapp, MD, have been pioneers in the management of chronic pain for over 30 years. The physicians at Mays and Schnapp Pain Clinic and Rehabilitation Center are dedicated to providing state-of-the-art care for patients suffering from chronic pain. Continually certified by the Commission for Accreditation of Rehabilitation Facilities since its inception, it is still the only certified pain clinic within 500 miles of Memphis. The physicians' philosophy of care is to treat the whole patient by relieving

pain, restoring function and improving quality of life. That approach starts with taking a comprehensive and fresh look at each suffering individual. This unique multidisciplinary approach may include nerve blocks, physical therapy, and medical management, as well as psychological support when needed. Every patient is evaluated personally by a physician during each office visit. "When the problem is pain, we're here to help, offering world-class care in the heart of the Mid-South."

55 Humphreys Drive, Suite 200, Memphis, TN 38120 | 901.747.0040 | MaysAndSchnapp.com SPECIAL PROMOTION

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2017

FACES OF THE

MID-SOUTH

THE FACE OF

PANCHO'S

PANCHO'S MEXICAN FOODS, INC. >>> Say the name “Pancho’s” and you’re sure to get a smile, as the next word is likely to be “cheese.” Cheese Dip, that is. “Pancho’s Mexican Foods, Inc. has been part of the Memphis landscape since 1956,” explained Tim Wallace, Pancho’s general manager. “We realize that our customers are our biggest asset. Their loyalty over the years has positioned us so that we are now serving the third generation of many of our customers' families.” Over the last 20 years, the company has charted continued growth in its retail operations. “Pancho’s Cheese Dip is manufactured here and sold to major grocery stores in 11 states,” said Wallace. “And our cheese dip has been shipped to devoted customers in all 50 states.” BUSINESS ADDRESS: 2855 Lamb Place, Memphis, TN 38118 RESTAURANT LOCATIONS: 717 N. White Station, Memphis, TN 3600 E. Broadway, West Memphis, AR PanchosCheeseDip.com SPECIAL PROMOTION

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2017

FACES OF THE

MID-SOUTH

THE FACE OF

PEDIATRIC CARDIOLOGY MEMPHIS PEDIATRIC HEART>>> Dr. Kevin Stamps

Dr. Kevin Stamps is founder and sole physician of Memphis Pediatric Heart. Dr. Stamps is a boardcertified pediatric cardiologist who has extensive training locally, and nationally at Boston Children’s Hospital, in echocardiography and cardiac MRI imaging. This expertise allows him to offer the most specialized and customized care for his patients, as well as the crucial role of explaining the process to the parents and caregivers. Memphis Pediatric Heart offers the Mid-South’s only nationally certified

private practice echocardiography lab for children. Dr. Stamps treats all types of heart conditions in children of all ages, from congenital heart defects to screening and clearance of student athletes. As a father of two, Dr. Stamps understands and respects the emotional concern and fears for families of children with heart disease. He and his experienced staff make every family’s comfort and peace of mind an absolute priority and consider a family’s trust and positive experience to be the driving force in his practice.

6215 Humphreys Blvd., Suite 211, Memphis, TN 38120 | 901.259.2440 | mpheart.com SPECIAL PROMOTION

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THE FACE OF

PEDIATRICS

THE SPENCE AND BECKY WILSON BAPTIST CHILDREN’S HOSPITAL >>> At Baptist, we are experts at taking care of kids. Our services give the community another option in pediatric care and include the pediatric emergency department, inpatient care offered through the Hardin Pediatric Center, the Pediatric Intensive Care Unit, and PD’s Perch outpatient diagnostic center — all housed within the Spence and Becky Wilson Baptist Children’s Hospital. Other pediatric services offered are general surgeries; gastrointestinal; orthopedic; ear, nose and throat;

plastics and ophthalmology procedures, and anesthesiology. With a colorful and engaging nature theme designed to appeal to children, the hospital features a 400-gallon fish tank; whimsical artwork; quilts showcasing Baptist’s pediatric mascot, P.D. Parrot, and his group of friends; and other child-friendly touches. Our experienced team of pediatric surgeons, specialists, and nurses helps Baptist delivers exceptional care for our youngest patients.

6225 Humphreys Blvd., Memphis, TN 38120 | 901.227.PEDS (7337) | BaptistOnline.org/Pediatrics

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2017

FACES OF THE

MID-SOUTH

SPECIAL PROMOTION

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2017

FACES OF THE

MID-SOUTH

THE FACE OF

PIZZA

BROADWAY PIZZA >>> Legendary Broadway Pizza, one of Memphis’ favorite family-owned-and-operated restaurants, was opened by Lana Jeanette Cox in 1977 at 2581 Broad. Third-generation family members now offer Broadway East at 629 S. Mendenhall. Elder family members raised in extreme poverty

find it important that faithful friends “get their money’s worth and don't leave hungry.” Not just a pizzeria, Broadway offers salads, whole wings, fish, spaghetti, chicken parmesan, burgers; homestyle plate-lunch specials. Cakes made in-house daily. Call-in orders welcomed.

2581 Broad Ave., Memphis, TN 38112 | 901.454.7930 629 S. Mendenhall, Memphis, TN 38117 | 901.207.1546 BroadwayPizzaMemphis.com SPECIAL PROMOTION

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2017

FACES OF THE

MID-SOUTH

THE FACE OF

PLASTIC SURGERY

UNIVERSITY PLASTIC SURGEONS >>> Left to right: Roberto D. Lachica, MD; Ben Gbulie, MD; Petros Konofaos, MD PhD; Lin Xi Jing, MD; Robert D. Wallace, MD; and Ram Velamuri, MD Not pictured: Sonia M. Alvarez, MD; William L. Hickerson, MD; and Edward Luce, MD University Plastic Surgeons is a unique plastic surgery practice in Memphis and the Mid-South. Its renowned team of surgeons specializes in both cosmetic and reconstructive plastic surgical procedures. The group provides care for treating the full spectrum of plastic surgery problems including the most complex cases in craniofacial and cleft surgery, pediatric plastic surgery, breast reconstruction including the latest microsurgery techniques, burn acute and reconstructive surgery, head and neck cancer reconstruction, trauma

reconstruction including hand and peripheral nerve surgery. The physicians of University Plastic Surgeons bring extensive experience and the latest techniques to the field of cosmetic surgery of the face, breast, and body as well. Each doctor is a member of the faculty of the University of Tennessee College of Medicine in Memphis and are the teachers of future plastic surgeons training in the UTHSC plastic surgery residency. For more information or an appointment contact us today!

1068 Cresthaven Road, Suite 500, Memphis, TN 38119 | 901.866.8525 | UTPlasticSurgeons.com SPECIAL PROMOTION

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2/20/17 4:36 PM


2017

FACES OF THE

MID-SOUTH

THE FACE OF

PROFESSIONAL TREE SERVICE ROBINSON TREE SERVICE >>>

Robinson Tree Service, family owned since 1948. Jason Sengel and his wife, Cynthia, acquired the business from Pop Robinson’s grandson in 2001. Jason was well prepared to take the helm with a degree in Urban Forestry from Texas A&M. With the company came Wesley Rutherford,

hired way back by Pop in 1965. Robinson Tree has grown into one of the most respected and recommended tree services in the area. Much of that has to do with their emphasis on customer satisfaction and their experienced, professional crews. We Know Memphis Trees!

2807 Farrisview Blvd. #101, Memphis, TN 38118 | 901.363.3539 | RobinsonTree.net SPECIAL PROMOTION

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2017

FACES OF THE

MID-SOUTH

THE FACE OF

PUBLIC RELATIONS

MORRIS MARKETING GROUP >>> Left to right: Valerie Morris, President, and Patrick Collins, Executive Vice President With over 45 years of combined experience working in public relations, communications, and marketing, Valerie Morris and Patrick Collins are arguably the most experienced and accomplished public relations professionals overseeing local, regional, and national public relations efforts in the Mid-South. Morris and Collins have a long track record of working with media professionals to provide

accurate and up-to-date information during crisis or high-stress media situations for corporate clients and high-profile individuals. Businesses, organizations, and government entities trust Morris and Collins to provide creative news angles to garner earned media and provide consult on internal and external communications to keep audiences engaged and messages delivered and optimized.

456 Tennessee Street, Suite 102, Memphis, TN 38103 | 901.425.3770 | MMGMemphis.com SPECIAL PROMOTION

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2/20/17 1:04 PM


2017

FACES OF THE

MID-SOUTH

THE FACE OF

REHEARSAL DINNER

FLIGHT RESTAURANT AND WINE BAR >>> Flight Restaurant & Wine Bar has established itself as the premier venue in town for rehearsal dinners. The team at Flight, led by Jack Mahoney and Chef Eduardo Murillo, ensures that your event will become a special memory. The beautifully designed Wine Cellar

sits below Main Street, offering private space for up to 100 guests. It's the ideal setting to host parties, corporate events, and rehearsal dinners. High above the restaurant, the Loft accommodates 65 guests and features gorgeous views of downtown Memphis.

39 South Main, Memphis, TN | 901.521.8005 | FlightMemphis.com SPECIAL PROMOTION

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2017

FACES OF THE

MID-SOUTH

THE FACE OF

REPRODUCTIVE MEDICINE

FERTILITY ASSOCIATES OF MEMPHIS >>> Left to right: Paul Brezina, MD, William Kutteh, MD, PhD, Amelia P. Bailey, MD and Raymond Ke, MD

Fertility Associates of Memphis is a state-of-the-art practice providing comprehensive reproductive healthcare to couples of the Mid-South and beyond . . . treating patients struggling with infertility, recurrent pregnancy loss, and reproductive disorders. Our highly specialized team utilizes cutting-edge techniques, including in vitro fertilization with laser blastocyst biopsy, preimplantation genetic diagnosis, and fertility preservation has been designated as a Center of Excellence. Our compassionate physicians, board-certified in reproductive endocrinology and infertility, have been bringing dreams to life for more than 20 years. 80 Humphreys Center, Suite 307, Memphis, TN 38120 | 901.747.2229 | FertilityMemphis.com SPECIAL PROMOTION

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2017

FACES OF THE

MID-SOUTH

THE FACE OF

RESIDENTIAL CONSTRUCTION

ELKINGTON GREEN >>> Brian Green and Griffin Elkington

We aim to leave our mark on the greater Memphis area through timeless residential design and quality home construction. We offer the rare combination of newly constructed and remodeled homes with the latest amenities and high-end finishes, all within established Memphis

neighborhoods. Whether we’re building a new home, renovating an existing one, or providing new opportunities for home construction through infill development, we hold ourselves to the highest standard of excellence in our work and client satisfaction.

4928 William Arnold Road, Memphis, TN 38117 | 901.414.3344 | ElkingtonGreen.com SPECIAL PROMOTION

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2/18/17 3:55 PM


2017

FACES OF THE

MID-SOUTH

THE FACE OF

RESIDENTIAL REAL ESTATE JOSHUA SPOTTS >>>

Joshua Spotts, a premier Memphis real estate specialist ranked as a top producing RealtorÂŽ with Crye-Leike, Realtors, specializes in residential real estate. Spotts uses his unique high-touch, personal service style by accepting a limited number of listings and working diligently to ensure efficient results are produced for each client. Spotts uses years of market knowledge, the latest technology, a well-defined marketing plan, a cohesive network, energy, enthusiasm, and the excitement of a job well done to achieve great results. Crye-Leike, Realtors 6525 N. Quail Hollow Road Memphis, TN 38120 Josh@JoshuaSpotts.com (E) JoshuaSpotts.com (W) 901.361.4211 (C) 901.756.8900 (O)

SPECIAL PROMOTION

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2/18/17 4:13 PM


2017

FACES OF THE

MID-SOUTH

THE FACE OF

RETINA CARE

CHARLES RETINA INSTITUTE P.C. >>> Left to right: Steve Charles, M.D., Jorge Calzada, M.D., and Mohammad Rafieetary, O.D. The Charles Retina Institute, founded in 1984, is proud to serve the citizens of Memphis and the Mid-South with adult and pediatric retinal medical and surgical consultations daily. We specialize in the treatment of retinal detachments, diabetic retinopathy, macular degeneration, retinopathy of prematurity, macular surgery as well as other retinal and vitreous problems. Our physicians are true leaders and authors on retinal surgery. Our

textbook, Vitreous Microsurgery, currently in its 5th edition, has been translated into six languages and has been a leading source of retina surgery education worldwide since Dr. Charles' first edition in 1981. We are committed to providing the best level of retina care available and to have the top medical technology for our patients. We are available for medical and surgical consults and second opinions.

1432 Kimbrough Road, Germantown, TN 38138 | 901.767.4499 | charlesretina.com SPECIAL PROMOTION

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2/18/17 3:51 PM


2017

FACES OF THE

MID-SOUTH

THE FACE OF

RETIREMENT LIVING

VILLAGE AT GERMANTOWN>>> Front Row: Carolyn Tyler, Julie Klein, Lew Cross, CEO, Rebecca Cullison Back Row: Dr. Jerry Francisco, Rev. Jack Henton, Martha Ann Corlew, Jim Moore, and Walter Howard Opened in October 2005, The Village has flourished, in no small part due to the guidance of our elected Resident Council pictured above. More important is the Village’s dedication to resident satisfaction. This passion for meeting and exceeding both resident and visitor satisfaction has been a key component to The Village’s success, maintaining an average

occupancy of over 96%. We now have a newly opened state-of-the-art Assisted Living / Memory Care Building, along with an Adult Day Care center and the recently completed additional Skilled Nursing area. In April, we will be opening our new Independent Living Building. Come and experience “the difference” at The Village at Germantown.

7820 Walking Horse Circle, Germantown, TN 38138 | 901.737.4242 | Village-Germantown.com SPECIAL PROMOTION

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2/18/17 4:53 PM


2017

FACES OF THE

MID-SOUTH

THE FACE OF

ROLEX

BOB RICHARDS JEWELERS>>> Bob, Polly, and Anthony Richards, owners Bob Richards has been repairing Rolex watches for almost 50 years. He began his Certified Rolex career at Brodnax Jewelers. In 1984 he and his wife, Polly, and son, Anthony, opened their own store. In 2004 their store became an official dealer for Rolex watches. They now have three additional Rolex-trained watch

technicians as well as two bench jewelers that do custom jewelry work. Their Rolextrained knowledgeable sales staff assist the many customers looking to purchase a Rolex watch. In 2016, after 32 years in business, they opened a new 5,000-square-foot store with a larger custom-built Rolex sales corner.

1696 S. Germantown Road, Germantown, TN | 901.751.8052 SPECIAL PROMOTION

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2/18/17 3:19 PM


2017

FACES OF THE

MID-SOUTH

THE FACE OF

ROOFING

M-TOWN CONSTRUCTION, LLC >>> Michael Ingalsbe Often described as the “roof whisperer,” Michael has been in the roofing industry for over 20 years. He started from the ground up building roofs in Buffalo, New York, but has called Memphis home for the past 10 years walking over 10,000 roofs. The MidSouth’s weather more and more frequently damages roofs, enough for replacement. Hail, wind, and storm damage are considered “an Act of God” and do not count against you on your homeowner’s insurance policy.

Most insurance policies will pay the entire cost of the roof and/or interior, less your deductible. Our involvement at MTown Construction prevents you from receiving a settlement that won’t entirely cover your costs, or even worse, getting denied. When it comes to representing you, Michael’s unique background as a skilled roofer and a master adjuster sets him apart from all others, making MTown Construction A+ rated with the Better Business Bureau.

901.232.7732 | MtownConstruction.com SPECIAL PROMOTION

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2/18/17 4:08 PM


2017

FACES OF THE

MID-SOUTH

THE FACE OF

RUNNING

FLEET FEET SPORTS >>> Passion — defined as a strong feeling of enthusiasm or excitement for something — demands action. Passion for running, fitness, and a healthy lifestyle have continually inspired Fleet Feet Sports to be the local fixture for active Memphians. From training programs, fun runs, track workouts, and

sponsoring races to hosting yoga classes, paint parties, and various social events, community is central to Fleet Feet Sports’ identity. What began 24 years ago as the journey to become the best place in Memphis to get fit for running gear has shaped a shop that strives to be so much more.

4530 Poplar in Laurelwood | 901.761.0078 | FleetFeetMemphis.com | Facebook.com/FleetFeetMemphis SPECIAL PROMOTION

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2/18/17 3:58 PM


2017

FACES OF THE

MID-SOUTH

THE FACE OF

SALONS & SPAS

GOULD'S SALON • SPA >>> David and Philip Gould, Owners Celebrating 85 years in Memphis, Gould’s Gould’s Academy, founded in 2011, is a Salons & Spa is the oldest family-owned salon premier cosmetology school offering an exciting and spa company in the U.S. Founded in 1932 salon and spa curriculum to over 140 students enrolled in programs ranging from cosmetology by Sam Gould, Philip and David Gould now to esthetics and manicuring. own and operate 13 locations in the greater Memphis area and Olive Branch. More than When it comes to awards, Gould’s is proud to 400 Gould’s employees study to stay current have been voted #1 salon & spa in reader polls with, and receive training in, the most fashionthroughout Memphis including The Commercial Appeal, the Memphis Flyer, and At Home forward looks for men and women. Our Tennessee magazine. required continuing education programs keep our massage therapist and estheticians up Gould’s is proud to call Memphis home and looking forward to keeping Memphians looking to speed on the latest modalities in massage therapy and skin care. and feeling their best for another 85 years. GouldSalonSpa.com SPECIAL PROMOTION

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2017

FACES OF THE

MID-SOUTH

THE FACE OF

SECURITY

AVISION INC. >>> Stanley Zitron, CFO

Entrepreneur Stanley Zitron and AVISION Inc. have been providing SURVEILLANCE SOLUTIONS to Memphis and Mid-South businesses and industry since 1995. Avision focuses on protection of educational facilities, distribution centers, medical complexes, and infrastructure. Zitron, CFO of AVISION, selected AVIGILON, a North American manufacturer of innovative highdefinition surveillance systems and software that has raised the bar for the surveillance industry. In the past surveillance systems were reactive but today they need to be pro-active. The biggest game-changer in our industry is analytics — software providing the ability to program a system

that proactively prevents theft or accidents. Examples: Imagine a child enters the zoo with a parent and gets lost. That child’s identity on entering can immediately be recognized on every camera on the premises. If a dangerous package is left in an off-limits area, analytics software can email alerts, or activate alarms. Today Megapixel cameras see every detail live or recorded. New 360-degree fisheye cameras that see every detail are our choice for securing warehouses and retail stores that sell valuables such as jewelry, drugs, or guns. Demos of these systems can be seen at Avisionsecurity.com or Avigilon.com. Call for Free Estimate 901.682.0202.

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2017

FACES OF THE

MID-SOUTH

THE FACE OF

SKIN CARE

SKIN CLINICS >>> Dr. George Flinn, Heidi Shafer, Tomi Beckemeyer, Claudette Hawkins, Catherine Milligan, Dede Sellers, Dr. Scott Nelson, Bari Metz, Kate France, Tiffany Bishop, Aisha Rogers, Stephanie Brick, Jynie Riddick, Courtney Browning, Sarah Rasmussen, Amethyst Comacho, Selena Stuckey, Stacy Hubbard, Madelyn Smith, Jordan Baxter, Heather Cope, and Karen Elledge TOP TEN WAYS TO LOOK YOUR BEST: 10) Manage your weight with the Ideal Protein Protocol. 9) Protect your skin from UVA, UVB, and Infrared Rays (that includes smart phone lights!). 8) Rebuild collagen. You lose collagen every year after you turn 20! 7) Cleanse and exfoliate your skin with the right products for YOUR skin. 6) Utilize stable growth factors to improve skin tone and texture. 5) Get rid of sun damage (both seen and hidden) with lasers, RF and advanced medical grade products.

4) Inject high-quality fillers judiciously to enhance facial symmetry and restore a more youthful appearance. 3) Get a custom spray tan for a golden, healthy glow. 2) Get plenty of sleep, drink the right amount of water for your body, and do an exercise you love, followed by a massage! 1) Finally, whatever is true, whatever is honorable, whatever is just, whatever is pure, whatever is lovely, whatever is commendable, if there is any excellence, if there is anything worthy of praise, think about these things.

EAST MEMPHIS: 1102 Brookfield, 38119 | direct: 901.474.7636 GERMANTOWN: 1300 Wolf Park Drive, 38138 | direct: 901.345.7546 GREENWOOD, MS: 115 Howard Street, 38930 | direct: 662.374.5008 901.345.SKIN SPECIAL PROMOTION

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2017

FACES OF THE

MID-SOUTH

THE FACE OF

SLEEP MEDICINE

TMJ & SLEEP THERAPY CENTRE OF MEMPHIS >>> Dr. Melody A. Barron The TMJ & Sleep Therapy Centre of Memphis is the leader in dental sleep medicine and oral appliance therapy for sleep apnea patients. We are dedicated exclusively to the treatments of craniofacial pain, TMJ disorders, and sleepdisordered breathing in all ages. Our approach is a comprehensive evaluation for diagnosis and non-invasive treatment therapies. We provide diagnosis and treatment with state-of-the-art techniques and equipment

in a caring, friendly environment. Patients with loud snoring, diagnosed sleep apnea, and those who have difficulty tolerating CPAP should contact TMJ & Sleep Therapy Centre of Memphis to learn more. Dr. Barron has served Memphis and the surrounding Mid-South areas since 2005 treating only TMJ Disorders and Sleep Disorders by Oral Appliance Therapy and Dentofacial Orthopedics to improve airway in children and adults.

8950 U.S. Highway 64, Suite 104, Lakeland TN 38002 | 901.380.0734 | MemphisTMJ.com SPECIAL PROMOTION

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2017

FACES OF THE

MID-SOUTH

THE FACE OF

SOCIAL CHANGE

NATIONAL CIVIL RIGHTS MUSEUM >>> The National Civil Rights Museum, located at the historic Lorraine Motel where civil rights leader Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. was assassinated, gives a comprehensive overview of the American Civil Rights Movement from 1619 to the present. Since the Museum opened in 1991, millions of visitors from around the world

have come, including more than 80,000 students annually. Serving as the new public square, the Museum is steadfast in its mission to chronicle the American civil rights movement, examine today’s global civil and human rights issues, provoke thoughtful debate and serve as a catalyst for positive social change.

450 Mulberry Street, Memphis, TN 38103 | 901.521.9699 | CivilRightsMuseum.org SPECIAL PROMOTION

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2017

FACES OF THE

MID-SOUTH

THE FACE OF

STONE

TRITON STONE GROUP >>> In 2004, Triton Stone opened its doors with the intention of offering a one-stop shopping experience for anyone building or remodeling their home. Today Triton offers a huge selection of products combined with a high level of personalized service for its customers. This, along with a focus on the latest style and design trends, has

propelled Triton's growth into 19 locations in 11 states. Triton has become one of the largest names in the country when it comes to stone, tile, plumbing and more. Come visit our huge stone slab yard (open to the public), as well as our kitchen-and-bath showroom which has been recognized as one of the most beautiful in the Mid-South.

2363 W. Stateline Road, Southaven, MS 38671 | 901.259.2300 | TritonStone.com SPECIAL PROMOTION

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2017

FACES OF THE

MID-SOUTH

THE FACE OF

THE MEDICAL GROUP

CONSOLIDATED MEDICAL PRACTICES OF MEMPHIS, PLLC >>> Doctors include: Derene Akins, Reuben Avila, Robert Burns, John Buttross, Tommy Campbell, Laura Engbretson, Arthur Franklin, Malini Gupta, Ara Hanissian, Gina Hanissian, Greg Hanissian, Thomas Hughes, Mary Margaret Hurley, David Iansmith, Kashif Latif, Shannon Malone, Sonal Mehr, Edward Muir, Mohammad Qureshi, Nidal Rahal, Rabia Rehman, George Van Rushing, Mohamed Shala, Henry Stamps, Allison Stiles, T. George Stoev, Ralph Taylor, Barton Thrasher, Randy Villanueva, and Angela Watson CMPM, a “group practice without walls,” was established in 2008 to provide compassionate, convenient, and efficient care for those in the Mid-South. Its 30 physicians are located across the area, from Midtown to Oakland. CMPM is a unique alternative to the current employed physician practice models. The physicians enjoy practice autonomy while benefiting from the economies of scale and scope provided by a larger group. CMPM is the new face of the Medical Practice in a rapidly changing healthcare environment. 6799 Great Oaks Drive #250, Germantown, TN 38138 | 901.821.8300 | MedicalofMemphis.com SPECIAL PROMOTION

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2/18/17 3:52 PM


2017

FACES OF THE

MID-SOUTH

THE FACE OF

TRANSPLANT

METHODIST UNIVERSITY HOSPITAL TRANSPLANT INSTITUTE >>> Life-Saving Transplants, World-Class Care. Nationally recognized for its success with kidney, liver, kidney-pancreas, and pancreas transplants, Methodist University Hospital Transplant Institute has been a leader in the field for more than forty-five years. The Transplant Institute is composed of a highly skilled multidisciplinary team of transplant

professionals who provide care for a complex patient population. Partnering with the University of Tennessee, the program is dedicated to improving the quality of life and the life expectancy for its organ transplant patients through research breakthroughs, excellence in surgical techniques, and meticulous postoperative care.

1265 Union Avenue, Memphis, TN 38104 | 901.516.9183 | MethodistHealth.org SPECIAL PROMOTION

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2017

FACES OF THE

MID-SOUTH

THE FACE OF

VETERANS’ PENSION BENEFITS

THE BAILEY LAW FIRM >>> Matthew A. Rhoads

"Honor to the soldier and the sailor, who bravely bears his country’s cause. Honor, also, to the citizen who cares for his brother in the field, and serves the same cause.” — Abraham Lincoln. As a VA-accredited attorney, Matt assists veterans and their surviving spouses in

receiving benefits from the VA to aid in the cost of their long-term care, whether at home or in a facility. Matt develops customized plans to ensure that his clients receive the maximum monthly benefit available from the VA. Learn more about Matt and Veterans Benefits at TheBaileyLawFirm.com.

SPECIAL PROMOTION

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2017

FACES OF THE

MID-SOUTH

THE FACE OF

WEALTH MANAGEMENT

WADDELL AND ASSOCIATES, LLC >>> Not pictured: Caroline Kelly, Phyllis Scruggs, and Stacie M. Waddell The mission of Waddell and Associates is to improve the quality of life for their clients by providing financial clarity and confidence. W&A's 19 associates are highly qualified with 9 masters degrees and 25 professional designations across the firm. Each client's unique financial situation, combined with W&A's experience, leads to the construction of a personalized financial strategy and a targeted rate of investment return. This process is dynamic and supported by a deliberate communication

strategy to keep efforts synchronized. And W&A's associates' interests are aligned with their clients’ interests, investing their own personal assets in the same investment models recommended to clients. They use the same financial planning systems to plan for their own families, and the same investment vehicles to achieve their goals. In today’s treacherous and chaotic financial environment, W&A strives to provide a safe harbor of integrity, experience and clarity.

WaddellAndAssociates.com | 901.767.9187 | Locations in Memphis and Nashville SPECIAL PROMOTION

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2017

FACES OF THE

MID-SOUTH

THE FACE OF

WEIGHT LOSS & WELLNESS TOTAL HEALTH WELLNESS CENTER >>> Barbara Clenin

People invite Barbara into their lives to help them lose weight, enhance appearance, improve self-esteem, and boost health — something they struggle to do on their own. The opportunity to promote healthy lifestyle changes in the community is Barbara’s passion. Her clients strengthen their wellbeing through five medically developed protocols: body composition analysis, science-based nutrition, detoxification, the resultsoriented Ideal Protein Weight Loss Method, and stateof-the art SculpSure Body Shaping. Barbara is privileged to positively change lives daily. Enthusiasm, inspiration, education, and accountability are the hallmarks of her wellness center’s vision, purpose, and success. 1069 W. Rex Road Memphis, TN 38119 901.683.0178 LoseWeightMemphis.com SPECIAL PROMOTION

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2017

FACES OF THE

MID-SOUTH

THE FACE OF

WOMEN'S HEALTH

RUCH CLINIC >>> Front row, left to right: Diane Long, Leslie Norman, Huff Peeler, Laura Bishop, Alicia Wright, and Abby Talbot. Back row, left to right: Tom Crenshaw, Frank Kennedy, and Kristal Taylor. Women are unique. Women are special. Women are powerful. Our legacy is a dedication to the health and well-being of women. Let us walk with you through the stages of your life. We will hold your hand during joys as well as troubles and promise to keep our focus on you – the unique ... the special ... the powerful ... the woman. A Division of Women's Care Center of Memphis, MPLLC. 6215 Humphreys Blvd., Suite 500, Memphis, TN | 901.682.0630 | RuchClinic.com SPECIAL PROMOTION

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2017

FACES OF THE

MID-SOUTH

THE FACE OF

WINE & LIQUOR KIRBY WINES & LIQUORS >>> Left to right: Brian Herrera, Stephen Newport, Philip Forman, and Nermin Hodzic Thirty-two years ago the owners and staff at Kirby Wines & Liquors started with the mission of providing the best selection, pricing, and service to the Mid-South. Fast-forward and our goal is the same today. Our experience and dedication to the customer animates this endeavor, providing a broad international selection of wine and liquor, as well as ever-changing seasonal beer offerings. And it is our great pleasure to assist in planning parties from 2 to 2,000, including party supplies, gifts, and delivery too. We are truly your one-stop-shop. 2865 Kirby Road, Memphis, TN 38119 | 901.756.1993 | kirbywines.com SPECIAL PROMOTION

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2017

FACES OF THE

MID-SOUTH

THE FACE OF

WHIMSICAL ART & LOCAL CUISINE THE ART OF DINING >>> Joy Bateman

When the city’s top chefs give their endorsement to a series of books about food and dining, you can bet they will contain a myriad of flavorful recipes. Memphian Joy Bateman’s restaurant guidebooks, The Art of Dining, feature sought-after recipes from local institutions along with fanciful illustrations that are a treat for the senses. Chefs Wally Joe and Andrew Adams with Acre Restaurant along with Ben Smith and Erling Jensen are big fans of Joy’s books, especially those that focus on her hometown: The Art of Dining in Memphis (vols. 1, 2, and 3). In her part-cookbook, part-restaurant guide, Bateman masterfully combines her love of painting and dining to create a scrumptious mix of signature recipes

reflecting Memphis’ bustling restaurant scene, including newcomers and local icons. Bateman is planning to release a new series of books that will focus on family dining, featuring individuals and their favorite family recipes as well as inspirational quotations. The book includes colorful and whimsical art throughout. Other books published in The Art of Dining series profile the cities of Nashville, Knoxville, New Orleans, and Amelia Island. Her books can be found at Burke's Book Store, Brother Juniper's, Cafe Eclectic, More Than Words in Germantown, Folk's Folly, Menage Stationery & Fine Gifts, or at JoysArtofDining.com.

394 N. Perkins Road, Memphis, TN 38117 | 901.258.1955 | JoysArtofDining.com SPECIAL PROMOTION

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2/21/17 8:03 AM


MARCH

2016

sponsored by

YOU KNOW YOU'VE GOT CUTE KIDS.

WHY NOT SHARE THEM WITH MEMPHIS PARENT READERS? Grab your phone, go through your best photos, and submit a favorite for the annual Memphis Parent Cover Kids contest, presented by The Dental Connection. All contest entrants and the six (6) Cover Kids winners will be featured in the May issue of Memphis Parent magazine. We're accepting Cover Kids Contest submissions on memphisparent.com from March 1 to April 10, 2017. All entries must include a recent, good-quality JPG image of your child, a completed submission form, and the $20 entry fee.

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2/22/17 9:51 AM


Memphis Wine + Food Series Celebrating our 25th anniversary, the Memphis Wine + Food Series proudly continues our tradition of bringing together award-winning chefs and prominent vintners for a series of fundraising events that directly impact our museum’s ability to bring art education to some of the most underserved in our community.

March 31 Brooks Uncorked Our Series kicks off with this Disco BALL at the Brooks! General Admission $100 before March 20, $125 thereafter.

May 19 Grand Artisans’ Dinner This exclusive and intimate dinner will be held at the historic Hunt-Phelan mansion. $800 per person. Complimentary admission to the Grand Auction is included. WINEMAKERS: Scarpetta Lachlan Mackinnon-Patterson and Bobby Stuckey, Master Sommelier | Whetstone Jamey Whetstone | Rudius Jeff Ames CHEFS: Andy Ticer and Michael Hudman with Lachlan Mackinnon-Patterson and Ryan Prewitt

May 20 The Grand Auction Don’t miss this high-energy live auction under the tent on the museum’s plaza. Raise your paddle and raise a glass to the event that just gets better with age! $150 per person / $2000 reserved table for 12.

memphiswine.org/tickets Art from everywhere. An experience for everyone. Memphis Brooks Museum of Art in Overton Park

celebrating 46 years 3686 Summer Avenue | Memphis, TN 901.458.7541 · Mon.-Sat. 9-5 | kenrashmemphis.com Casual Furniture • Gas Logs • Grills • Accessories & Gifts

H IG H L A N D S T R I P contin u ed from page 75

of the first major problems of his administration, announced to the city council that steps were being taken to “clear up the situation” described by Munday. Meanwhile, instead of toning things down in the face of the latest Big News, the street people, the new Strip regulars, seemed determined to flat-out ignore the publicity. On January 16th, a man from New Orleans overdosed on PCP in the bathroom of The Cafe, and had to be coaxed out so that he could be carted off in an ambulance. Marijuana was smoked openly, as if to taunt the reporters who were making the Strip their temporary stomping ground. Then there was a month’s respite from the Big News syndrome. The reporters and the TV cameras all disappeared. It was the calm before the storm. Between October 1971 and February 1972 the Metro Narcotics agents on the Strip had made over 230 documented drug purchases. On February 18th, around 9 p.m., 60 police officers piled into 25 cars and made their — all according to a very strict schedule — to the Highland area. They were armed with felony indictments handed down earlier that week by the Shelby County Grand Jury against 54 persons who made two or more sales to the undercover agents. At precisely 9:25, police cars were parked sideways across Highland at Midland and Southern, sealing off all traffic. With military exactness, the entrances to the Cue Ball, Pop-I’s, The Cafe, and the Corner Pocket were sealed at the stroke of 9:30. “Operation Strip” was running right on schedule. The planning had been extensive, the preparations long, and the execution perfect. Almost. A big meaty finger jammed into Crazy Bill’s ribs and startled him out of his daze. “Show some identification,” the cop said. He seemed bored, eager to get the whole thing over with. Crazy Bill showed him his driver’s license, which was checked against a list of names on a clipboard. Then there was a quick search, and the whole thing was over. The cop told Crazy Bill to relax, then he moved on down the line. Crazy Bill tried to light a cigarette, but the whole thing became a wad of tobacco and paper in his trembling, sweaty palms. Just then, the police led the soapy-looking chick with the Baba Ram Dass button past him, her hands cuffed behind her back. She was no longer crying; instead, her face was red with anger and defiance. “Narcs!” she sneered at Crazy Bill and the others lined up around him. As she reached the door, a blinding f lash from a press camera exploded in her face. By 10 o’clock all the searching in the Cue

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Ball was over, and the newsmen were allowed to come in. After they knew that they were not going to be arrested, the street people let their fear turn to rage, and they lashed out at the newsmen, cussing at them, then turning their heads away from the cameras. Despite the meticulous timing and the weeks of preparation, “Operation Strip” did not work out quite the way police officials had hoped. Only four of the 54 indicted persons were nabbed during this raid. Thirteen more adults and 16 juveniles were arrested on charges ranging from sale and possession of drugs to disorderly conduct in threatening a TV cameraman. But as far as significant arrests went, the Bust proper was a bit of a flop. In terms of “clearing up” the problem on the Strip, however, the Bust was a huge success. The Strip was, suddenly, a very uncool place to be. Within a few weeks the Metro Narcotics officers had arrested 45 of the 54 indicted persons, many of them at their homes, three of them in jail on other charges, and one while wandering past the Metro Narcotics office downtown. The arrests, though, were almost superfluous — the Strip had become about as exciting as a petrified ghost town. Crazy Bill did not feel any hatred toward the police. For two years, he had known that the Strip was probably in for a bust someday. He had seen the magic fade to the sound of junkies trying to hustle enough money for their daily fix, and he had known, somewhere deep inside, that the halcyon days of the acid-head sidewalk jockeys were never going to come back. Today Pop-I’s is gone, fiberglass insulation taped up over its windows. The Cue Ball is now the Highland Cue, and you can actually shoot pool in there. The Cafe is now the Bull Shotte. The Corner Pocket has been a Goodwill Store for years. Business on the Strip is pretty good again, report the merchants. Few people regret the disappearance of the Highland Scene. Even the old-timers among the freaks seemed to realize that the dream had become a kind of broken nightmare that wanted to recur at nightly intervals. The Strip had become a far different place in February 1972 than it had been two years, or even eight months, earlier. Crazy Bill lives in Arizona now. Whenever he comes back to Memphis to visit his parents, he drives over to Highland and slows down when he reaches the row of brick shops, so foreign to him now, and he tries, just for a couple of minutes, to remember it all. He tries to bring back the feeling that he once had of being part of something big and dangerous and exciting and altogether worthwhile. Then, after the memories and the feelings have washed completely through him, Crazy Bill drives on over the railroad tracks and leaves the old wide sidewalk to forget itself according to its own time. 

Real experience. Real connections. Real results.

Affiliate Broker since 1993 Life Member and President, MAAR Multi-Million Dollar Club riphaneyrealtor.com rhaney@marx-bensdorf.com (901) 682-1868 - Office (901) 351-2190 - Cell

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REGISTER ONLINE @ www.kickit5k.racesonline.com M A R C H 2 0 1 7 • M E M P H I S M A G A Z I N E . C O M • 177

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Discovering the Greenery of Memphis Newcomers are often surprised at the natural beauty of the Bluff City.

by christine arpe gang

W

.C. Handy had Beale Street in mind in mind when he wrote, “I’d rather be here than any place I know.” In March and April, many of us feel the same way about our entire city when every day seems to bring forth another wonderment of nature. Is there a better place in America to watch spring unfold? Perhaps. But all we have to do is sit on our porches, walk around our neighborhoods, and drive through our city to take it in. I well remember my first introduction to the horticultural delights of Memphis. I drove into the city in late December 1972, just days before I began my job as food editor of The Commercial Appeal. As I navigated through the unfamiliar streets of Midtown, I was mesmerized by the glossy green leaves of behemoth Southern magnolias, trees I had never seen before. A few months later, April brought bold and colorful flowers to almost every front yard I passed. I asked a co-worker about the magnificent magenta, pink, purple, and white blooms I was seeing. “Are you talking about the azaleas?” the thoroughly Southern wom-

an replied in a voice tinged with disbelief. These shrubs, I quickly came to learn, are so common that natives of this region cannot imagine anyone NOT knowing them. Today I shudder in confronting my early ignorance. I grew up in St. Louis, where magnolias and azaleas struggle to thrive in its Midwestern climate. Then I spent three years in Michigan, where spring sort of arrives by mid-May but never with a bouquet of azaleas. Other transplants from northerly regions report having similar reactions to the exuberance of spring in Memphis. Rick Pudwell, director of horticulture at Memphis Botanic Garden, remembers how

struck he was by the prevalence of green in the city’s landscape when he arrived here in mid-February 1986 to interview for a job at the Memphis Zoo. He had traveled here from the mostly brown and white landscape of snowy Chicago to mild sunny Memphis with its abundance of broadleaf evergreens like hollies, Southern magnolias, and azaleas. Shortly after he assumed the job as foreman and horticulturalist at the zoo, he experienced his first Memphis spring, noticing not only its beauty but its length. “In the North, spring is later and more compressed,” he says. “Here it unfolds more slowly so we get to enjoy it for two or three months.” I don’t have to tell anyone spring is early this year. In my garden it began in January with the appearance of a daffodil that more than lives up to its name, Early Sensation, and continued with what seems like hundreds of long booming deep coral flowers. Without getting nipped by the usual frosts, Asian magnolias with abundant star and saucer shaped flowers in white and shade of pinky purple reached a pinnacle of perfection. Blooms on forsythias, loropetalums, quinces and cherry trees made early appearances, too. To those who fret about what weather surprises in the near future might do to plants that have yet to bloom, I say, don’t worry, be happy with what is. For Diane Meucci, who also hails from Chicago, the Memphis landscape is all about natural areas forested with deciduous trees. Although urban and suburban sprawl is eating up a lot of the native forest, we still experience it in parks like Shelby Farms, Meeman-Shelby Forest State Park, and Overton Park as well as the edges of developed areas. “When I first came here I was blown away by the dogwoods and redbuds,” says Meucci, who co-owns Gardens Oy Vey in Arlington with her husband, Wolfgang Marquardt. “I think those trees should be planted in every parking lot.” Because redbuds are fast growing, they seem to “protect” the dogwoods that need

PHOTOGRAPH BY BG

G A R D E N VA R I E T Y

UPCOMING E V EN TS Spring Fling, a garden show and plant sale in the Agricenter Red Barn, March 17-18, is a tonic for gardeners raring to get busy. The free event, which features vendors, demonstrations, and speakers, is open from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. both days. memp his a r e a m a st erga r dener s.org

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g

more time to reach their glorious maturity, Meucci says. Daffodils and hellebores give her pleasure and the sight and fragrance of wisteria growing up alongside Southern magnolias and tall trees excite her senses. I’m glad that after living here 44 years I still feel that newness and wonder. Native Memphians may have their exuberance tempered a bit by never knowing anything but this annual show. “It’s hard to celebrate what always been in your back yard,” says Dale Skaggs, director of horticulture at The Dixon Gallery and Gardens. Skaggs left his hometown in 1997 to pursue studies in horticulture, botany, and landscape architecture in Oregon, a region whose conifer-filled landscape captivated his attention. “But what I missed most when I was there were the dogwoods, azaleas, and spring ephemerals we have in Memphis,” he says. Spring brings a whirlwind of work to anyone who earns a living by making landscapes gorgeous for others. For Skaggs, Pudwell, and Meucci, it can be difficult to stop and smell the roses. “I probably stop and appreciate plants individually more in the winter than the spring,” Skaggs says. “But I am still enamored with trilliums and azaleas — especially native varieties — and I can’t get enough of wild blue phlox, foamf lowers, and yellow woodpoppies.” The best way to get to know great plants for the spring garden is to observe what you see all over the region. Take photos of the plants you admire and then ask an expert to identify them. Stopping and snapping pictures of flowers, trees, and shrubs is something I do so often I need a bumper sticker that reads: “Caution: I brake for plants.”  Christine Arpe Gang has been writing about gardening in Memphis for more than 30 years, primarily for The Commercial Appeal. She seeks out the best plants and growing techniques to share with her readers and use in her own garden.

Catch yellow fever at The Annual Daf fodil Show April 1 at The Dixon Gallery and Gardens. It’s an event serious enough for experienced daffodil exhibitors and laid back enough for first-timers and other novices who enter their blooms in the “just for fun” category. dixon.org

Life is why we encourage you to take care of yourself as you take care of your loved ones.

My daughter is why. Everyone has a reason to live a longer and healthier life. What is yours?

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ASK VANCE

Davis White Spot DEAR VANCE: What can you tell me about a restaurant in East Memphis where my parents dined often, called the Davis White Spot? — t.f., memphis.

DEAR T.F.: Since the dining hall of the Lauderdale Mansion was larger than a regulation tennis court, we had no reason to join the common folk at restaurants for our meals; our complement of chefs delivered us wondrous fare, and the danger of kidnapping was simply too great if we dined in public. But when our fortunes dwindled (as recounted so many times by the world newspapers), we changed our reclusive ways, and began to enjoy the bounty offered by establishments throughout the city. Even so, I had no clear memory of the White Spot. As well-known as it appeared to be (yours isn’t the first query I’ve received about this place, T.F.), the only

above: By no means a fancy restaurant, the White Spot was a popular East Memphis eatery.

information I gleaned about it for years came in the form of small ads in the back of White Station High School yearbooks, which invariably told me nothing more than the name, accompanied by a large black circle. I suppose this was their way of conveying “White Spot,” but it wasn’t much help. Nevertheless, I slowly began to accumulate bits and pieces of its history, and that’s when I ran into a nice fellow named Robert Wire, who as it turns out was related to the owners of the restaurant and — this was a red-letter day — sent me the photo of the place that you see here. I should mention that Gene Gill, who until recently hosted the fine historic-memphis.com website, also provided lots of helpful information. So finally, I can tell you what you need to know, T.F. In the 1940s, Robert and Pearl Winfield opened a restaurant in a rambling wooden building on Poplar, just east of present-day Estate. They lived in a small house attached to the back of the place, and Robert Wire recalls: “Pearl was my mother’s older sister. I grew

up in Indianapolis, and in the 1950s and 1960s we would visit them every year. I have a lot of fond memories of the place, because it was a kid’s paradise. I would play in the semi-formal gardens in the daytime, and in the evenings I would get to help out in the kitchen.” The building itself “was nothing special,” says Robert. “It was just white wood siding, and the two main dining rooms had knotty-pine paneling. The ambience on the whole was not classy, but very warm and inviting. The parking lot was gravel with a large tree in the center, and the gardens were pretty, with rose bushes and swings and a little artificial pond. One year, when we came down, Robert [Winfield] insisted that we admire his new large neon sign that had replaced an old original sign.” Oh, what I would give for a photo of that sign. And even more for the sign itself. Where did these things end up — in a landfill, somewhere? But if you’ve been paying attention, you would have noticed that the owners’ names were Winfield. So who was the Davis of Davis’ White Spot? Well, that’s The original owner when Gene Gill stepped of the house — and in. “I do know that the restaurant was originalhence the origin of ly listed as a ‘tavern’ in a the restaurant’s name house in the county,” Gill — was Ruby Davis. told me, “owned by Robert Winfield’s widowed sister, Ruby Davis. Robert managed the tavern. Ruby died in 1944, and Robert inherited the house. He and his wife, Pearl, turned it into the restaurant.” Did you catch that? The original owner of the house — and hence the origin of the restaurant’s name — was Ruby Davis. According to Gill, the White Spot was listed in city directories until 1960, which indicates that’s the year it closed. The menu in his possession — a rather plain thing printed on grey paper — offered basic fare, with a few oddities. Appetizers included plain celery (35 cents) or stuffed celery (50 cents). Entrees featured steaks, ravioli, and what must have been the White Spot specialty: chicken livers on toast. For breakfast, diners could even order a chicken-liver omelet. Yum! While I was doing all this research — well, okay, while I was sitting back and letting Robert Wire and Gene Gill do it for me — I did turn up something intriguing. Most Memphians, I hope, know about the Crystal Shrine Grotto inside Memphis Memorial Park. In addition to the grotto itself (a cave burrowed into a hillside) bridges and trees and benches were cast from concrete treated to look like wood — the work of a skilled Mexican artist named Dionicio Rodriguez, who traveled around the South, creating art for anybody who wanted it. Well, apparently he got in touch with

PHOTOGRAPH COURTESY ROBERT WIRE

Our trivia expert solves local questions of who, what, when, where, why, and why not. Well, sometimes.

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the Winfields, because one listing of his sculptures in Memphis mentions a “seal-shaped fountain” for the White Spot restaurant. Robert Wire doesn’t recall such a thing, and I’ve never seen a photo of it, but I hope that didn’t end up in the same landfill as the neon sign. Okay, so we’ve determined when the White Spot was in business and who owned it. A persistent mystery has always been: Where was it, exactly? Those old telephone directories list the address as 5341 Poplar, which would place it at the southeast corner of Poplar and Estate (Estate didn’t extend to Poplar in the 1950s). But various people recall it being farther east, where the Mercedes-Benz dealership is today. A few people even remember turning off the street onto a winding gravel drive and crossing the Southern railroad tracks, which would have placed it rather far back from Poplar. Others recall the building sitting right beside the road. I don’t think I’ll ever be able to answer every question about the White Spot. I’m just glad — thanks to Robert Wire — that I was able to share a nice photo of the place that so many readers remember.

goods, and the J.P. Jordan lumber company. The Lauderdale Library has somehow preserved this little snapshot showing The Peabody under construction. The view is looking northeast, with the Wm. R. Moore dry goods building in the background. Downtown looks quite a bit different today, don’t you think? 

Got a question for vance? EMAIL: askvance@memphismagazine.com MAIL: Vance Lauderdale, Memphis magazine,

460 Tennessee Street #200, Memphis, TN 38103 ONLINE: memphismagazine.com/ask-vance

below: An old snapshot shows The Peabody under construction in 1924-1925.

Building The Peabody

DEAR VANCE: What stood on the site of The Peabody before “The South’s Grand Hotel” was built there? — r.k., memphis.

That’s an intriguing question. The Peabody is such a Memphis landmark — and when it reopened in 1981 deserves all the credit for the downtown renaissance we are still enjoying today — that we tend to think it’s been there forever. But with a construction date of 1924-1925, it might be considered a relatively new building compared to other structures in the area. From what I’ve been able to determine, the builders of The Peabody didn’t demolish just one building to make room for their new hotel. They took out a whole row of two- and -three story buildings along Union, as well as a few that stretched southward down Second and Third Streets. Considering the size of the property involved, it didn’t involve as many businesses as you might think. Leafing through old city directories, it seems that on Union, the largest structure was Bender’s Garage, along with Tri-State Barber Supply, Greener & Sons dry goods, Shelby Electric Company, and an Arrow Food Store. On Third Street was a small business called the Interchangeable Unit Battery Company, and an auto repair company with the wonderful name of Mississippi & Louie. Perhaps the most impressive building to fall to the wrecking ball — the only one that might be considered a landmark — was the Fransioli Hotel, which had stood at the southeast corner of Second and Union since the 1880s. Next door along Second was Gayoso Catering Company, Southern Knitting and Hosiery, Wear Well Clothing, Alperin & Sons dry DEAR R.K.:

above: The Delta Sweete (1968) was Gentry’s second album.

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PHOTOGRAPHS BY JUSTIN FOX BURKS

CITY DINING OUR IN-DEPTH GUIDE TO MEMPHIS-AREA RESTAURANTS

TIDBITS

Luna Bar and Restaurant by pamela denney

F

or a journalist like me, schooled during the heyday of legacy newspapers, eating inside downtown’s historic Scimitar building holds a special allure. Recently renovated into a swank boutique hotel, the building constructed in 1902 was the original home of the Memphis Press-Scimitar. Bound newspaper books in the hotel’s lobby, yellowed and anachronistic, remember the hotel’s history, but in the Luna Bar and Restaurant, Chef Eric Hagerman’s choices are resolutely new American. At Hotel Napoleon’s grand opening earlier this year, the party’s clamorous millennials made a well-appointed match for Hagerman’s tapas menu. Asian beef tenderloin, marinated for 48 hours and skewered for easy eating, were scrumptious umami morsels, savory and sweet. Spicy olive pecan spread topped toasted slices of baguette, and kickin’ chicken sliders recaptured the mini-sandwiches’ glory days: roasted and shredded chicken, tossed with chipotle and lime juice sauce and stacked with Swiss cheese and house-made Ranch on a freshly baked bun. My husband and I returned for dinner a week or so later, and from the bar we see the Sterick Building, where the opulent mansion of the hotel’s namesake, Napoleon Hill, once stood. We order from an entrée menu that gets right to the point. The salmon’s glaze — orange juice, lime juice, Dijon, and a little sugar — is soft and true like the salmon’s pink center. And the shrimp and grits? A splendid rendition of extra-large shrimp sautéed with bacon and mushrooms and plated with creamy cheesy grits. Later, I chat with Hagerman about his inspirations, which include his mom (“She cooks better than anyone I know”), along with Asian, Italian, and Mexican dishes. Southern home-style cooking from his rural Louisiana roots plays a role, too. “One of my best friend’s mom used to make cream cheese French toast for me whenever I spent the night,” Hagerman recalls. “I loved it, and her recipe turned into the Napoleon French toast we make at the restaurant for breakfast.” 179 Madison Ave. (901-526-0002). Open for breakfast every day; lunch Monday through Friday, and dinner Monday through Saturday. $-$$$.

clockwise from bottom left: Sautéed mushrooms add flavor to the Luna Restaurant’s Louisiana shrimp and grits; Asian-inspired skewers lead the tapas menu; the restaurant’s contemporary décor complements murals on the Sterick Building across the street; Chef Eric Hagerman’s menu reflects a myriad of influences; spicy olive pecan spread plays off a family favorite, as does Napoleon French toast topped with berries and powered sugar. We celebrate our city’s community table and the people who grow, cook, and eat the best Memphis food at

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CIT Y DINING LIST

emphis magazine offers this restaurant listing as a service BONNE TERRE—This inn’s cafe features American cuisine with a flair, and a seasonal menu that changes monthly. Offers to its readers. The directory is not intended as a recommendation of the estab- Southern Angus steaks, duck, pasta, and seafood. Closed Sun.-Wed. 4715 lishments included, nor does it list every restaurant in town. It does, however, Church Rd. W. (Nesbit, MS). 662-781-5100. D, X, $-$$$ include most of the city’s finer restaurants, many specialty restaurants, and a representative BOSCOS—Tennessee’s first craft brewery serves a variety of freshly beers as well as wood-fired oven pizzas, pasta, seafood, sampling of other Bluff City eating establishments. No fast-food facilities or cafeterias brewed steaks, and sandwiches. 2120 Madison. 432-2222. L, D, SB (with are listed, nor have we included establishments that rely heavily on take-out business. live jazz), X, MRA, $-$$ BOUNTY ON BROAD—Offering family-style dining, Bounty Restaurants are included regardless of whether they advertise in Memphis magazine. serves small plates and family-sized platters, with such specialties as The guide is updated regularly, but we recommend that you call ahead to check on hours, chicken fried quail and braised pork shank. Closed Mon. 2519 Broad. 410-8131. D (Tues.-Sat.), SB, X, $-$$ prices, and other details. Suggestions from readers are welcome; please contact us. BOZO’S HOT PIT BAR-B-Q—Barbecue, burgers, sandwiches, Email dining@memphismagazine.com. and subs. 342 Hwy 70, Mason, TN. 901-294-3400. L, D, $-$$ BRASS DOOR IRISH PUB—Irish and New-American cuisine BAR LOUIE—Serves small plates, flatbreads, sandwiches, burgers, includes such entrees as fish and chips burgers, sandwiches, salads, 148 NORTH—French cuisine meets Southern comfort food here salads, and such large plate entrees as blackened fish tacos and baked and daily specials. 152 Madison. 572-1813. L, D, SB, MRA, $ with menu items such as chicken and waffles, duck confit, and Ke’s mac-and-cheese. 2125 Madison. 207-1436. L, D, WB, X, $-$$ BROADWAY PIZZA—Serving a variety of pizzas,including the Knuckle Sandwich, made with lobster knuckle and puff pastry. 148 BAR-B-Q SHOP—Dishes up barbecued ribs, spaghetti, bologna; Broadway Special, as well as sandwiches, salads, wings, and “soulN. Main (Collierville). 569-0761. L, D, WB, X, $-$$ also pulled pork shoulder, Texas toast barbecue sandwich, chicken food specials.” 2581 Broad. 454-7930; 627 S. Mendenhall. 207901 GRILLE & MARKET—Neighborhood market and eatery sandwich, and salads. Closed Sun. 1782 Madison. 272-1277. L, D, 1546. L, D, X, $-$$ serves burgers, gyros, falafel pitas, hot wings, and more. 711 E. X, MRA, $-$$ BROOKLYN BRIDGE ITALIAN RESTAURANT— Parkway S. 512-6171. B, L, D, $ BARDOG TAVERN—Classic American grill with Italian influence, Specializing in such homemade entrees as spinach lasagna and lobster ABUELO’S MEXICAN FOOD EMBASSY—Mejores de la Bardog offers pasta specialties such as Grandma’s NJ Meatballs, as well as ravioli; a seafood specialty is horseradish-crusted salmon. Closed casa — beef and stuffed shrimp — is a specialty here, along with salads, sliders, sandwiches, and daily specials. 73 Monroe. 275-8752. B Sun. 1779 Kirby Pkwy. 755-7413. D, X, MRA, $-$$$ tilapia Veracruz, quesadillas, chili rellenos, and chicken medallions. (Mon.-Fri.), L, D, WB, X, $-$$ BROOKS PHARM2FORK—Serving fresh vegetables and meats 8274 Highway 64 (Bartlett). 672-0769. L, D, X, $-$$ BARI RISTORANTE ENOTECA—Authentic Southeastern responsibly grown by area farmers. Entrees include Marmilu Farms ABYSSINIA RESTAURANT—Ethiopian/Mediterranean menu Italian cuisine (Puglia) emphasizes lighter entrees. Serves fresh fish and Pork Triangle Steak, Old School Salmon Patties, and Pan Seared Lake’s includes beef, chicken, lamb, fish entrees, and vegetarian dishes; also beef dishes and a homemade soup of the Catfish. 120 Mulberry. (Collierville). 853a lunch buffet. 2600 Poplar. 321-0082. L, D, X, $-$$ day. 22 S. Cooper. 722-2244. D, SB, X, DINING SYMBOLS 7511. D, X, $-$$ ACRE—Features seasonal modern American cuisine in a stylish MRA, $-$$$ BROTHER JUNIPER’S—Breakfast is the setting using locally sourced products; also small-plates/bar. Closed for BARKSDALE RESTAURANT— focus here, with specialty omelets, including B — breakfast lunch Sat. and all day Sun. 690 S. Perkins. 818-2273. L, D, X, Old-school diner serving breakfast and the open-faced San Diegan omelet; also daily $$-$$$ L — lunch Southern plate lunches. 237 Cooper. specials, and homemade breads and pastries. AGAVE MARIA—Menu items at this Mexican eatery include duck 722-2193. B, L, D, X, MRA, $ D — dinner Closed Mon. 3519 Walker. 324-0144. B, X, confit arepas, poached lobster enchiladas, and grilled lamb chops; also BAYOU BAR & GRILL—New SB — Sunday brunch MRA, $ tortas and small plate selections. 83 Union. 341-2096. L, D, X, $-$$ Orleans fare at this Overton Square eatery WB — weekend brunch BRYANT’S BREAKFAST—Three-egg ALCHEMY—Southern fusion, locally grown cuisine features small includes jambalaya, gumbo, catfish omelets, pancakes, and The Sampler Platter and large plates; among the offerings is the pan-seared hanger steak X — wheelchair accessible Acadian, shrimp dishes, red beans and are among the popular entrees here. Closed with duck-fat-roasted fingerling potatoes; also handcrafted cocktails rice, and muffalettas; also serves some MRA — member, Memphis Tuesday. 3965 Summer. 324-7494. B, L, X, and local craft beers. Closed for dinner Sun. 940 S. Cooper. favorites from the former Le Restaurant Association $ 726-4444. D, SB, X, $-$$ Chardonnay. 2094 Madison. 278-8626. $ — under $15 per person without BUCKLEY’S FINE FILET GRILL— ALDO’S PIZZA PIES—Serving gourmet pizzas — including Mr. T L, D, WB, X, MRA, $-$$ Specializes in steaks, seafood, and pasta. drinks or desserts Rex — salads, and more. Also 30 beers, bottled or on tap. 100 S. BEAUTY SHOP—Modern American (Lunchbox serves entree salads, burgers, and Main. 577-7743; 752 S. Cooper. 725-7437. L, D, X, $-$$ $$ — under $25 cuisine with international flair served in a more.) 5355 Poplar. 683-4538; 919 S. AMERIGO—Traditional and contemporary Italian cuisine includes former beauty shop. Serves steaks salads, $$$ — $26-$50 Yates (Buckley’s Lunchbox), 682-0570. L pasta, wood-fired pizza, steaks, and cedarwood-roasted fish. 1239 pasta, and seafood, including pecan$$$$ — over $50 (Yates only, M-F), D, X, MRA, $-$$ Ridgeway, Park Place Mall. 761-4000. L, D, SB, X, MRA, $-$$$ crusted golden sea bass. Closed for dinner BUNTYN CORNER CAFE—Serving SHADED — new listing ANDREW MICHAEL ITALIAN KITCHEN—Traditional Sunday. 966 S. Cooper. 272-7111. L, D, favorites from Buntyn Restaurant, including Italian cuisine with a menu that changes seasonally with such entrees as SB, X, $-$$$ chicken and dressing, cobbler, and yeast Maw Maw’s ravioli. Closed Sun.-Mon. 712 W. Brookhaven Cl. 347-3569. BEDROCK EATS & SWEETS—Memphis’ only Paleo-centric rolls. 5050 Poplar, Suite 107. 424-3286. B, L, X, $ D, X, MRA, $$-$$$ restaurant offering such dishes as pot roast, waffles, enchiladas, THE BUTCHER SHOP—Serves steaks ranging from 8-oz. fillets ANOTHER BROKEN EGG CAFE—Offering several varieties of chicken salad, omelets, and more. Closed Sun. 327 S. Main. 409to a 20-oz. porterhouse; also chicken, pork chops, fresh seafood. 107 eggs benedict, waffles, omelets, pancakes, beignets, and other breakfast 6433. B, L, D, X, $-$$ S. Germantown Rd. (Cordova). 757-4244. L (Fri. and Sun.), D, X, fare; also burgers,sandwiches, and salads. 6063 Park Ave. 729-7020; 65 BELLE: A SOUTHERN BISTRO—Brisket in a bourbon brown MRA, $$-$$$ S. Highland. 623-7122. B, L, WB, X, $ sugar glaze, and chicken with basmati rice are among the specialties; CAFE 1912—French/American bistro serving such seafood entrees as THE ARCADE—Possibly Memphis’ oldest cafe. Specialties include also seafood entrees and such vegetables as blackened green grouper and steamed mussels: also crepes, salads, and French onion sweet potato pancakes, a fried peanut butter and banana sandwich, tomatoes. Closed for dinner Sun. and all day Mon. 117 Union Ave. soup. 243 S. Cooper. 722-2700. D, SB, X, MRA, $-$$ and breakfast served all day. 540 S. Main. 526-5757. B, L, D 433-9851. L, D, WB, X, $-$$$ CAFE BROOKS BY PARADOX—Serving grab-and-go pastries, (Thurs.-Sat.), X, MRA, $ BENIHANA—This Japanese steakhouse serves beef, chicken, and as well as lunch items. Menu includes soups, salads, and sandwiches, ASIAN PALACE—Chinese eatery serves seafood, vegetarian items, dim seafood grilled at the table; some menu items change monthly; sushi bar such as the Modern Reuben and Grown Up Grilled Cheese. 1934 Poplar sum, and more. 5266 Summer Ave. 766-0831. L, D, X, $-$$ also featured. 912 Ridge Lake. 767-8980. L, D, X, $$-$$$ (Memphis Brooks Museum of Art). 544-6200. B, L, X, $ A-TAN—Serves Chinese and Japanese hibachi cuisine, complete BHAN THAI—Authentic Thai cuisine includes curries, pad Thai CAFE ECLECTIC—Spanish omelets, and chicken and waffles are with sushi bar. A specialty is Four Treasures with garlic sauce. 3445 noodles, and vegetarian dishes, as well as seafood, pork, and duck among menu items, along with sandwiches, wraps, and burgers. 603 Poplar, Suite 17, University Center. 452-4477. L, D, X, $-$$$ entrees. Closed for lunch Sat.-Sun. and all day Mon. 1324 Peabody. N. McLean. 725-1718; 111 Harbor Town Square. 590-4645; 510 S. AUTOMATIC SLIM’S—Longtime downtown favorite specializes 272-1538. L, D, X, MRA, $-$$ Highland. 410-0765. B, L, D, SB, X, MRA, $ in contemporary American cuisine emphasizing local ingredients; also BLEU—This eclectic restaurant features American food with global CAFE KEOUGH—European-style cafe serving quiche, paninis, extensive martini list. 83 S. Second. 525-7948. L, D, WB, X, MRA, influences and local ingredients. Among the specialties are a 14-oz. salads, and more. 12 S. Main. 509-2469. B, L, D, X, $ $-$$$ bone-in rib-eye and several seafood dishes. 221 S. Third, in the CAFE OLE—This eatery specializes in authentic Mexican cuisine; BABALU TACOS & TAPAS—This Overton Square eatery Westin Memphis Beale St. Hotel. 334-5950. B, L, D, WB, X, one specialty is the build-your-own quesadilla. 959 S. Cooper. 343dishes up Spanish-style tapas with Southern flair; also taco and $$-$$$ 0103. L, D, WB, X, MRA, $-$$ enchilada of the day; specials change daily. 2115 Madison. 274-0100. BLUE NILE ETHIOPIAN—Kabobs, flavorful chicken and lamb CAFE PALLADIO—Serves gourmet salads, soups, sandwiches, L, D, SB, X, $-$$ stew, and injera (flatbread) are traditional items on the menu, along and desserts in a tea room inside the antiques shop. Closed Sun. 2169 BAHAMA BREEZE—Baby back ribs, Jamaican chicken wings, with vegetarian options. 1788 Madison. 474-7214. L, D, X, $-$$ Central. 278-0129. L, X, $ and coconut shrimp are among the entrees at this Caribbean-fusion BLUEFIN RESTAURANT & SUSHI LOUNGE—Serves CAFE PIAZZA BY PAT LUCCHESI—Specializes in gourmet restaurant. 2830 N. Germantown Pkwy. (Cordova). 385-8744. L, Japanese fusion cuisine featuring seafood, duck, and steaks, with pizzas (including create-your-own), panini sandwiches, and pasta. D, X, MRA, $-$$ seasonally changing menu; also, a sushi bar and flatbread pizza. Closed Sun. 139 S. Rowlett St. (Collierville). 861-1999. L, D, X, BANGKOK ALLEY—Thai fusion cuisine includes noodle and Closed for lunch Sat.-Sun. 135 S. Main. 528-1010. L, D, X, MRA, $-$$ $-$$ curry dishes, chef-specialty sushi rolls, coconut soup, and duck and THE BLUFF—New Orleans-inspired menu includes alligator bites, CAFE PONTOTOC—Serves a variety of internationally inspired seafood entrees. Closed for lunch Sat. and all day Sun. at Brookhaven nachos topped with crawfish and andouille, gumbo, po’boys, and small plates, as well as salads and sandwiches. Closed Mon. 314 S. location; call for hours. 121 Union Ave. 522-2010; 2150 W. Poplar at fried seafood platters. 535 S. Highland. 454-7771. L, D, X, $-$$ Main. 249-7955. L, D, WB, X, $-$$ Houston Levee (Collierville). 854-8748; 715 W. Brookhaven Cl. BOMBAY HOUSE—Indian fare includes lamb korma and chicken CAFE SOCIETY—With Belgian and classic French influences, 590-2585. L, D, X, MRA, $-$$ tikka; also, a daily luncheon buffet. 1727 N. Germantown Pkwy. serves Wagyu beef, chicken, and seafood dishes, including baconBAR DKDC—Features an ever-changing menu of international (Cordova). 755-4114. L, D, X, $-$$ wrapped shrimp, along with daily specials and vegetarian entrees. “street food,” from Thai to Mexican, Israeli to Indian, along with BONEFISH GRILL—Serves wood-grilled fish,as well as steaks, Closed for lunch Sat.-Sun. 212 N. Evergreen. 722-2177. L, D, X, specialty cocktails. Closed Sun.-Mon. 964 S. Cooper. 272-0830. D, chicken and pork entrees. 1250 N. Germantown Pkwy. (Cordova). MRA, $$-$$$ X, $ 753-2220; 4680 Merchants Park Circle, Carriage Crossing (Collierville). 854-5822. L (Fri.-Sat.), D, SB, X, MRA, $-$$$ M A R C H 2 0 1 7 • M E M P H I S M A G A Z I N E . C O M • 183

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CIT Y DINING LIST CANVAS—An “interactive art bar” serving salads, sandwiches, and flatbreads.  1737 Madison. 619-5303. L, D, $ CAPITAL GRILLE—Known for its dry-aged, hand-carved steaks; among the specialties are bone-in sirloin, and porcini-rubbed Delmonico; also seafood entrees and seasonal lunch plates. Closed for lunch Sat.-Sun.   Crescent Center, 6065 Poplar. 683-9291. L, D, X, $$$-$$$$ CAPRICCIO GRILL ITALIAN STEAKHOUSE—Offers prime steaks, fresh seafood (lobster tails, grouper, mahi mahi), pasta, and several northern Italian specialties.  149 Union, The Peabody. 529-4199. B, L, D, SB, X, MRA, $-$$$$ CARRABBA’S ITALIAN GRILL—Serves chicken Bryan, calamari, various pastas, and other “old-world” Italian entrees.  4600 Merchants Park Cl., Carriage Crossing (Collierville). 854-0200; 5110 Poplar. 685-9900. L (Sat.-Sun.), D, X, $-$$$ CASABLANCA—Lamb shawarma is one of the fresh, homemade specialties served at this Mediterranean/Moroccan restaurant; fish entrees and vegetarian options also available. 1707 Madison. 4216949; 5030 Poplar. 725-8557. L, D, X, MRA, $-$$ CATFISH BLUES—Serving Delta-raised catfish and Cajun- and Southern-inspired dishes, including gumbo and fried green tomatoes. 210 E. Commerce (Hernando). 662-298-3814. L, D, $ CATHERINE & MARY’S—A variety of pastas, grilled quail, pâté, razor clams, and monkfish are among the dishes served at this Italian restaurant in the Chisca. 272 S. Main. 254-8600. D, X, $-$$$ CELTIC CROSSING—Specializes in Irish and American pub fare. Entrees include shepherd’s pie, shrimp and sausage coddle, and fish and chips.  903 S. Cooper. 274-5151. L, D, WB, X, MRA, $-$$ CENTRAL BBQ—Serves ribs, smoked hot wings, pulled pork sandwiches, chicken, turkey, nachos, and portobello sandwiches. Offers both pork and beef barbecue.  2249 Central Ave. 272-9377; 4375 Summer Ave. 767-4672; 147 E. Butler. 672-7760. L, D, X, MRA, $-$$ CHAR—Specializing in modern Southern cuisine, this eatery offers homestyle sides, char-broiled steaks, and fresh seafood. 431 S. Highland, #120. 249-3533. L, D, WB, X, $-$$$ CHEZ PHILIPPE—Classical/contemporary French cuisine presented in a luxurious atmosphere with a seasonal menu focused on local/regional cuisine. Afternoon tea served Wed.-Sat., 1-3 p.m. (reservations required). Closed Sun.-Tues. The Peabody, 149 Union. 529-4188. D, X, MRA, $$$$ CIAO BABY—Specializing in Neapolitan-style pizza made in a wood-fired oven. Also serves house-made mozzarella, pasta, appetizers, and salads. 890 W. Poplar, Suite 1. 457-7457. L, D, X, $ CIAO BELLA—Among the Italian and Greek specialties are lasagna, seafood pasta, eggplant rolotini, gourmet pizzas, and vegetarian options. Closed for lunch Sat.-Sun.  565 Erin Dr., Erin Way Shopping Center. 205-2500. L, D, X, MRA, $-$$$ CITY GROCERY—Southern eclectic cuisine; shrimp and grits is a specialty. Closed for dinner Sunday.  152 Courthouse Square (Oxford, MS). 662-232-8080. L, D, SB, X, $$-$$$ CITY SILO TABLE + PANTRY—With a focus on clean eating, this establishment offers fresh juices, as well as comfort foods re-imagined with wholesome ingredients.  5101 Sanderlin. 7297687. B, L, D, X, $ COLETTA’S—Longtime eatery serves such specialties as homemade ravioli, lasagna, and pizza with barbecue or traditional toppings.  2850 Appling Rd. (Bartlett). 383-1122; 1063 S. Parkway E. 948-7652. L, D, X, MRA, $-$$ CORKY’S—Popular barbecue emporium offers both wet and dry ribs, plus a full menu of other barbecue entrees. Wed. lunch buffets, Cordova and Collierville.  5259 Poplar. 685-9744; 1740 N. Germantown Pkwy. (Cordova). 737-1911; 743 W. Poplar (Collierville). 405-4999; 6434 Goodman Rd., Olive Branch. 662-893-3663. L, D, X, MRA, $-$$ COZY CORNER—Serving up ribs, pork sandwiches, chicken, spaghetti, and more; also homemade banana pudding. Closed Sun.Mon. 7 35 N. Parkway. 527-9158. L, D, $ THE CRAZY NOODLE—Korean noodle dishes range from bibam beef noodle with cabbage, carrots, and other vegetables, to curry chicken noodle; also rice cakes served in a flavorful sauce. Closed for lunch Sat.-Sun. 2015 Madison. 272-0928. L, D, X, $ CURRY BOWL— Specializes in Southern Indian cuisine, serving Tandoori chicken, biryani, tikka masala, and more. Weekend buffet. 4141 Hacks Cross. 207-6051. L, D, $ DEJAVU—Serves Creole, soul, and vegetarian cuisine, including po-boys, jambalaya, and shrimp and grits. 51 S. Main. 505-0212. L, D, X, MRA, $-$$ DELTA’S KITCHEN—The premier restaurant at The Guest House at Graceland serves Elvis-inspired dishes — like Nutella and Peanut Butter Crepes for breakfast — and upscale Southern cuisine — including lamb chops and shrimp and grits — for dinner. 3600 Elvis Presley Blvd. 443-3000. B, D, X, $-$$$ DERAE RESTAURANT—Ethiopian and Mediterranean fare includes fuul, or fava beans in spices and yoghurt, goat meat and rice, and garlic chicken over basmati rice with cilantro chutney; also salmon

LOCALITY GUIDE BARTLETT

J. Alexander’s Jerry Lawler’s BBQ Abuelo’s Jim N Nick’s Bar-B-Q Applebee’s Joe’s Crab Shack Cajun Catfish Company Logan’s Roadhouse Coletta’s Moe’s Southwest Grill Colton’s Steakhouse T.J. Mulligan’s Dixie Cafe O’Charley’s El Porton Olive Garden Exlines’ Best Pizza On the Border Firebirds Osaka Japanese Gridley’s Outback Steakhouse Hadley’s Pub Pei Wei Asian Diner La Playita Mexicana The Presentation Room O’Charley’s Pyro’s Fire Fresh Pizza Ruby Tuesday Rafferty’s Sekisui Red Lobster Side Car Cafe Romano’s Macaroni Grill Side Porch Steakhouse Sekisui Tops Bar-B-Q CHICKASAW GARDENS/ Shogun Skimo’s UNIV. OF MEMPHIS Tannoor Grill Another Broken Egg Cafe DOWNTOWN A-Tan Agave Maria The Bluff Aldo’s Pizza Pies Brother Juniper’s Alfred’s Camy’s The Arcade Char Automatic Slim’s Cheffie’s Bangkok Alley Derae Bardog Tavern El Porton B.B. King’s Blues Club The Farmer Bedrock Eats & Sweets La Baguette Belle — A Southern Bistro Los Compadres Bleu Lost Pizza Blind Bear Speakeasy Medallion Blue Monkey Newby’s Bluefin Newk’s Blues City Cafe Osaka Japanese Brass Door Irish Pub Pete & Sam’s Cafe Eclectic Rock’n Dough Pizza Cafe Keough R.P. Tracks Cafe Pontotoc Woman’s Exchange COLLIERVILLE/WEST TN. Capriccio Catherine & Mary’s (ARLINGTON, COVINGTON, Central BBQ MILLINGTON, OAKLAND) Chez Philippe 148 North City Market Bangkok Alley Cozy Corner Bonefish Grill DeJaVu Bozo’s Hot Pit Bar-B-Q Dirty Crow Inn Brooks Pharm2Fork Double J Smokehouse & Saloon Cafe Piazza Earnestine & Hazel’s Cajun Catfish Company Eighty3 Carrabba’s Italian Grill Felicia Suzanne’s Chili’s Ferraro’s Pizzeria Ciao Baby Five Spot Corky’s Flight Crepe Maker Flying Fish El Mezcal Flying Saucer El Porton T.G.I. Friday’s Emerald Thai Green Beetle Firebirds Ronnie Grisanti’s Italian Restaurant Gus’s Happy Mexican Gus’s Fried Chicken Hard Rock Cafe Hickory Tavern Havana’s Pilon Huey’s Huey’s Jim’s Place Grille Itta Bena Long Road Cider Co. Jerry Lee Lewis’ Cafe & Honky Tonk Manila Filipino King’s Palace Cafe Mulan Kooky Canuck Osaka Japanese Little Tea Shop Memphis Pizza Cafe Local Pig-N-Whistle Loflin Yard The Sear Shack Lookout at the Pyramid Sekisui Luna Restaurant & Lounge Silver Caboose Maciel’s Tortas & Tacos Stix Max’s Sports Bar Vinegar Jim’s McEwen’s on Monroe Wolf River Cafe The Majestic CORDOVA Memphis Lighthouse Bahama Breeze Mesquite Chop House Bombay House Mollie Fontaine Lounge Bonefish Grill The Office@Uptown Butcher Shop Paulette’s Cheddar’s Pearl’s Oyster House Chili’s Pig on Beale Corky’s Ray’z World Famous Dr. Bar-B-Que Crazy Italians Rendezvous, Charles Vergos’ East End Grill Rizzo’s Diner El Mezcal Rum Boogie Cafe El Porton Silky O’Sullivan’s T.G.I. Friday’s South of Beale Flying Saucer South Main Sushi & Grill Fox Ridge Pizza Spaghetti Warehouse Green Bamboo Spindini Gus’s The Terrace Happy Mexican Texas de Brazil Hunan Palace Tug’s Huey’s Tuscany Italian Eatery

Twilight Sky Terrace Uncle Buck’s Fishbowl & Grill Westy’s

EAST MEMPHIS

Acre Andrew Michael Italian Kitchen Asian Palace Bangkok Alley Belmont Grill Blue Plate Cafe Broadway Pizza Brookhaven Pub & Grill Buckley’s Fine Filet Grill Buntyn Corner Cafe Carrabba’s Italian Grill Casablanca Central B B Q Chili’s Ciao Bella City East Corky’s Dixie Cafe El Mezcal El Porton Fino’s from the Hill Folk’s Folly Fox & Hound Fratelli’s The Grove Grill Half Shell Hog & Hominy Houston’s Huey’s Interim Erling Jensen Jim’s Place The Kitchen Bistro Las Delicias Lisa’s Lunchbox LYFE Kitchen Lynchburg Legends Marciano Mayuri Indian Cuisine Dan McGuinness Pub Mellow Mushroom Memphis Pizza Cafe Mempops Mortimer’s Mosa Asian Bistro Napa Cafe Neil’s New Hunan Old Venice One & Only BBQ Park + Cherry Patrick’s Pimento’s Pizza Rev Porcellino’s Craft Butcher Rafferty’s The Sear Shack Sekisui Pacific Rim Soul Fish Cafe Staks Taziki’s Mediterranean Cafe Three Little Pigs Wasabi Whole Foods Market Zaka Bowl

GERMANTOWN

Belmont Grill The Cheesecake Factory Chili’s City East El Porton Exlines’ Best Pizza Germantown Comm. Mellow Mushroom Memphis Pizza Cafe Mesquite Chop House New Asia The Pasta Maker Petra Cafe Rock’n Dough Pizza Royal Panda Russo’s New York Pizzeria & Wine Bar Sakura Soul Fish Cafe Southern Social Stoney River Steakhouse and Grill West Street Diner

MEDICAL CENTER The Cupboard Evelyn & Olive Sabor Caribe Sabrosura Tops Bar-B-Q

Trolley Stop Market

MIDTOWN

901 Grille & Market Abyssinia Alchemy Aldo’s Pizza Pies Alex’s Applebee’s Babalu Tacos and Tapas Bar DKDC Bar Louie Bar-B-Q Shop Bari Barksdale Restaurant Bayou Bar & Grill Beauty Shop Belly Acres Bhan Thai Blue Nile Ethiopian Boscos Bounty on Broad Broadway Pizza House Cafe 1912 Cafe Brooks by Paradox Cafe Eclectic Cafe Ole Cafe Palladio Cafe Society Canvas Casablanca Celtic Crossing Central B B Q The Cove Cozy Corner The Crazy Noodle The Cupboard Dino’s DWJ Korean Barbecue Ecco El Mezcal Fino’s from the Hill Frida’s Fuel Cafe Golden India Growlers HM Dessert Lounge Huey’s I Love Juice Bar Imagine Vegan Cafe India Palace Izakaya Jasmine Thai Java Cabana Lafayette’s Music Room LBOE Little Italy Local Mardi Gras Memphis Maximo’s on Broad Memphis Pizza Cafe Midtown Crossing Grille Molly’s La Casita Mulan Chinese Bistro Murphy’s Old Zinnie’s Onix Otherlands Outback Steakhouse P & H Cafe Peabody Point Cafe Pei Wei Asian Diner Pho Binh Pho Saigon Restaurant Iris Robata Ramen & Yakitori Bar Schweinehaus The Second Line Sekisui Side Street Grill The Slider Inn Soul Fish Cafe Stone Soup Strano Sicilian Kitchen Sweet Grass Tart Tsunami Young Avenue Deli

NORTH MISSISSIPPI Ajax Diner Applebee’s Blue and White Bonne Terre Catfish Blues Chili’s City Grocery Colton’s Steakhouse Como Steakhouse Corky’s

Fox & Hound Huey’s Lee’s Family Restaurant Logan’s Roadhouse Lost Pizza McEwen’s Dan McGuinness Pub Memphis Barbecue Company Memphis Pizza Cafe Mesquite Chop House Nagoya O’Charley’s Olive Garden Osaka Japanese Cuisine Outback Steakhouse Ravine STEAK by Melissa

PARKWAY VILLAGE/ FOX MEADOWS Blue Shoe Bar & Grill Leonard’s Jack Pirtle’s Chicken Three Little Pigs Bar-B-Q

POPLAR/I-240

Amerigo Benihana Blue Plate Cafe Brooklyn Bridge Capital Grille, The City Silo Table + Pantry P.F. Chang’s Chipotle Exlines’ Best Pizza Fleming’s Frank Grisanti’s Happy Mexican Heritage Tavern & Kitchen Julles Posh Food Co. Mister B’s Olive Garden One & Only BBQ Owen Brennan’s Pyro’s Fire-Fresh Pizza Red Koi River Oaks Ruth’s Chris Salsa Seasons 52 Sekisui Wang’s Mandarin House

RALEIGH

Exline’s Best Pizza

SOUTH MEMPHIS Coletta’s The Four Way Interstate Bar-B-Q Jack Pirtle’s Chicken

SUMMER/BERCLAIR Bryant’s The Cottage Elwood’s Shack High Point Pizza La Taqueria Guadalupana Lotus Nagasaki Inn Orr Restaurant Pancho’s Panda Garden Queen of Sheba Tops Bar-B-Q

WEST MEMPHIS/ EASTERN ARK.

The Cupboard Pancho’s Sammy Hagar’s Red Rocker Bar & Grill

WHITEHAVEN Delta’s Kitchen Hong Kong Marlowe’s

WINCHESTER

Curry Bowl DWJ Korean Barbecue East End Grill Formosa Half Shell Happy Mexican Huey’s Logan’s Roadhouse Olive Garden Red Lobster Ruby Tuesday T.G.I. Friday’s Tops Bar-B-Q Tycoon

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CIT Y DINING LIST CASUAL DINING

These establishments offer American cuisine in a relaxed atmosphere. While some serve ethnic entrees, the emphasis is on steaks, salads, sandwiches, pasta, fish and seafood. Also some soul-food and homestyle cooking. J. ALEXANDER’S—2670 N. Germantown Pkwy. (Cordova). 381-9670. APPLEBEE’S—2114 Union Ave. 725-7136; 2890 Bartlett Blvd. (Bartlett). 213-5034; 710 DeSoto Cove (Horn Lake, MS). 662-7725914; 7515 Goodman Rd. (Olive Branch, MS). 662-893-7555. AJAX DINER—118 Courthouse Sq., Oxford, MS. 662-232-8880. BELLY ACRES—2102 Trimble Pl, 5297017. BLUE AND WHITE RESTAURANT—1355 U.S. 61 N., Tunica, MS. 662-363-1371. BLUE PLATE CAFE—5469 Poplar. 761-9696; 113 S. Court. 523-2050. BLUE SHOE BAR & GRILL—Hotel Memphis, 2625 Thousand Oaks Blvd. 362-6200. CAJUN CATFISH COMPANY—336 New Byhalia Rd. Collierville. 861-0122. MRA. CHEDDAR’S—2147 N. Germantown Pkwy. 380-1119. THE CHEESECAKE FACTORY—2760 N. Germantown Pkwy, Suite 193 (Wolfchase). 937-1613. CHILI’S—7810 Poplar (Germantown). 756-5203; 4609 Poplar. 685-2257; 8100 Giacosa Pl. 372-3132; 287 W. Goodman Rd.

(Southaven). 662-349-7002; 237 Market Blvd. (Collierville). 853-7520; 1260 N. Germantown Pkwy. (Cordova). 756-7771; 8526 Highway 51 (Millington). 872-0555. COLTON’S STEAKHOUSE—8030 Highway 64 (Bartlett). 383-8445; 8051 Goodman Rd. (Olive Branch). 662-890-4142. COMO STEAKHOUSE—203 Main St. Como, MS. 662-526-9529. THE COVE—2559 Broad Ave. 730-0719. THE CUPBOARD—1400 Union. 276-8015. MRA. ELWOOD’S SHACK—4523 Summer. 761-9898. MRA. T.G.I. FRIDAY’S—185 Union, Double Tree Hotel. 523-8500; 176 E. Goodman Rd. (Southaven). 662-349-4223; 7733 Winchester Rd. 752-1369; 8325 Highway 64. 372-2539. KEM’S RESTAURANT—2751 New Brunswick Rd., Holiday Inn & Suites. 2661952. LOGAN’S ROADHOUSE—2710 N. Germantown Parkway. 381-5254; 5901 Poplar. 684-2272; 7755 Winchester Rd. 759-1430; 6685 Airways Blvd. (Southaven). 662-772-5015. MAC’S BURGERS—4698 Spottswood. 512-4604. MIDTOWN CROSSING GRILLE—394 N. Watkins. 443-0502. O’CHARLEY’S—6045 Stage Rd., #74 (Bartlett). 373-5602; 1040 N. Germantown Pkw. 754-6201; 357 W. Goodman Rd. (Southaven). 662-349-6663; 656 W. Poplar (Collierville). 861-5811. THE OLIVE GARDEN—7778 Winchester. 624-2003; 8405 Highway 64,

and tilapia. Closed Monday. 923 S. Highland. 552-3992. B, L, D, $-$$ DIRTY CROW INN—Serving elevated bar food, including poutine fries, fried catfish, and the Chicken Debris, a sandwich with smoked chicken, melted cheddar, and gravy. 855 Kentucky. 2075111. L, D, $ DWJ KOREAN BARBECUE—This authentic Korean eatery serves kimbap, barbecued beef short ribs, rice and noodles dishes, and hot pots and stews. 3750 Hacks Cross, Suite 101. 746-8057; 2156 Young. 207-6204. L, D, $-$$ ECCO—Mediterranean-inspired specialties range from rib-eye steak to seared scallops to housemade pastas and a grilled vegetable plate; also a Saturday brunch. Closed Sun.-Mon.  1585 Overton Park. 410-8200. L, D, X, $-$$ EIGHTY3—Contemporary menu of steaks and seafood offers a variety of eclectic specialties; also weekly specials, small plates, appetizers, and patio dining. 83 Madison Ave. 333-1224. B, L, D, WB, X, MRA, $-$$$ EL MEZCAL—Serves burritos, chimichangas, fajitas, and other Mexican cuisine, as well as shrimp dinners and steak. 402 Perkins Extd. 761-7710; 694 N. Germantown Pkwy. (Cordova). 755-1447; 1492 Union. 274-4264; 11615 Airline Rd. (Arlington). 867-1883; 9045 Highway 64 (Lakeland). 383-4219; 7164 Hacks Cross Rd. (Olive Branch). 662-890-3337; 8834 Hwy. 51 N. (Millington). 872-3220; 7424 Highway 64 (Bartlett). 417-6026; 9947 Wolf River (Collierville) 853-7922. L, D, X, $ EL PORTON—Fajitas, quesadillas, and steak ranchero are just a few of the menu items. 2095 Merchants Row (Germantown). 754-4268; 8361 Highway 64. 380-7877; 3448 Poplar, Poplar Plaza. 452-7330; 1805 N. Germantown Parkway (Cordova). 624-9358; 1016 W. Poplar (Collierville). 854-5770. L, D, X, MRA, $-$$ EMERALD THAI RESTAURANT—Spicy shrimp, pad khing, lemon grass chicken, and several noodle, rice, and vegetarian dishes are offered at this family restaurant. Closed Sunday.  8950 Highway 64 (Lakeland). 384-0540. L, D X, $-$$ ERLING JENSEN—Presents “globally inspired” cuisine: specialties are rack of lamb, big game entrees,and fresh fish dishes. 1044 S. Yates. 763-3700. D, X, MRA, $$-$$$ EVELYN & OLIVE—Jamaican/Southern fusion cuisine includes such dishes as Kingston stew fish, Rasta Pasta, and jerk rib-eye. Closed for lunch Sat. and all day Sun.-Mon. 630 Madison. 748-5422. L, D, X, $

Wolfchase Galleria. 377-3437; 6615 Airways (Southaven). 662-536-3350; 5679 Poplar, #1. 761-5711. OSHI BURGER BAR—94 s. Main. 341-2091. OUTBACK STEAKHOUSE— 1110 N. Germantown Parkway. 751-9800; 2255 Union Ave. 728-5100; 125 W. Goodman Rd. (Southaven). 662-349-7488. MRA. RAFFERTY’S—4542 Poplar. 374-0096; 505 N. Germantown Pkwy. 755-4799. RUBY TUESDAY—1653 Sycamore View. 382-9280;7535 Winchester. 7556570. SIDECAR CAFE—2194 Whitten. 388-0285. MRA. SIDE STREET GRILL—31 Florence. 274-8955. MRA. SILVER CABOOSE—132 E. Mulberry (Collierville). 853-0010. SKIMO’S—1166 N. Houston Levee, #107 (Cordova). 756-5055. MRA. SOUL FISH CAFE—862 S. Cooper. 725-0722; 3160 Village Shops Dr. (Germantown). 755-6988; 4720 Poplar. 590-0323. MRA. SPAGHETTI WAREHOUSE—40 W. Huling. 521-0907. STONEY RIVER—7515 Poplar. 2071100. TUG’S—River Inn, 51 Harbor Town Square. 260-3344. MRA. VINEGAR JIM’S—12062 Forrest (Arlington). 867-7568. WOLF RIVER CAFE—460 U.S. 194 (Rossville). 853-2586.

PUBLIC SERVICE ANNOUNCEMENT

Saturday, May 6th, 2017

Save The Date 4:00-9:00 P.M.

Woodland Hills

10000 Woodland Hills Drive TN now as the MakeCordova, your reservation

Down Syndrome Association of Memphis Contact Martine Hobson & the Mid-South hosts 901.547.7588 office 901.262.0473 mobile the Sixth Annual “Get Down and Derby”

EXLINES’ BEST PIZZA—Serves pizza, Italian dinners, Saturday, May 6, 2017 sandwiches, and salads.  2935 Austin Peay. 388-4711; 6250 Stage Ladies, wear your best hats and Rd. (Bartlett). 382-3433; 2801 Kirby Parkway. 754-0202; 7730 men, your nicest seersucker suit Wolf River Blvd. (Germantown). 753-4545; 531 W. Stateline Rd. 4 to 9 p.m. 662-342-4544 (check online for additional locations). L, D, X, for the sixth annual “Get Down MRA, $ THE FARMER—Serving upscale Southern cuisine, with a focus on Woodland and Derby”. Attend theHills live locally grown ingredients. Among the specialties are smoked beef tenderloin and shrimp and grits. Closed for dinner Sun.-Mon. 3092 10000 Woodland Dr. viewing of the KentuckyHills Derby Poplar #11. 324-2221. L, D, X, $-$$ Cordova, TN 38018 FELICIA SUZANNE’S—Southern cuisine with low-country, benefiting the Down Syndrome Creole, and Delta influences, using regional fresh seafood, local beef, and locally grown foods. Entrees include shrimp and grits. Closed Sun. Association of Memphis and Entertainment • Food • Drink and Mon. Brinkley Plaza, 80 Monroe, Suite L1. 523-0877. L (Fri. the Mid-South! Food, drink, only), D, X, MRA, $$-$$$ FERRARO’S PIZZERIA & PUB—Rigatoni and tortellini are Silent Auction silent • Wineauction, Pull • Hat Parade entertainment, among the pasta entrees here, along with pizzas (whole or by the slice), with a variety of toppings. 111 Jackson. 522-2033. L, D, X, $ wine pull and much more. FIREBIRDS—Specialties are hand-cut steaks, slow-roasted prime $75 Individual Ticket • $30 Self-Advocate Ticket • $125 Couple Ticket rib, and wood-grilled salmon and other seafood, as well as seasonal entrees. 8470 Highway 64 (Bartlett). 379-1300; 4600 Merchants Tickets cost $75.00. Circle, Carriage Crossing (Collierville). 850-1637. L, D, X, $-$$$ Ask about our different Sponsorship Levels THE FIVE SPOT—Tucked behind Earnestine & Hazel’s, this Purchase tickets online at popular eatery features innovative bar food by chef Kelly English.  531 dsamemphis.org/getdownderby S. Main. 523-9754. D, X, $-$$ Proceeds Benefit FLEMING’S PRIME STEAKHOUSE—Serves wet-aged and or callAll901-547-7588. dry-aged steaks, prime beef, chops, and seafood, including salmon, Australian lobster tails, and a catch of the day. 6245 Poplar. 7616200. D, X, MRA, $$$-$$$$ Down Syndrome Association of Memphis & the Mid-South FLIGHT RESTAURANT & WINE BAR—Serves steaks and seafood, along with such specialties as pork ribeye and roasted duck, all matched with appropriate wines; also gourmet plate lunches. Purchase Tickets Online at Closed for lunch Sat.-Sun. 39 S. Main. 521-8005. L, D, X, MRA, $-$$$ FLYING FISH—Serves up fried and grilled versions of shrimp, crab,www.dsamemphis.org/getdownderby or call 901-547-7588 oysters, fish tacos, and catfish; also chicken and burgers. 105 S. Second. 522-8228. L, D, X, MRA, $-$$ FOLK’S FOLLY ORIGINAL PRIME STEAK HOUSE— Specializes in prime steaks, as well as lobster, grilled Scottish salmon, Alaskan king crab legs, rack of lamb, and weekly specials. 551 S. Mendenhall. 762-8200. D, X, MRA, $$$-$$$$

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CIT Y DINING LIST CLUBS/PUBS/SPORTS BARS

From Beale Street night spots to neighborhood bars/grills, these places dish out a variety of food. Many offer live entertainment, and patrons can’t miss the large-screen TVs.

Memphis Magazine Reader’s Poll 2017

Live Music. Patio. Great Beer. What else do you need? 28 BEERS ON TAP SINGLE BOTTLES GROWLERS PACKAGED MIX-A-SIX TO GO

(901) 779-2967

395 S Highland St, Memphis, TN 38111 HIGHLANDROW.THECASUALPINT.COM

Memories of Prague T H E BL A I R S T R I NG QUA RT E T from Vanderbilt, always an audience favorite, takes us on a journey through Bohemia, performing Dvořák’s E f lat Quartet and Smetana’s E minor Quartet “From My Life.” In addition they’ll perform the Memphis premiere of Pierre Jalbert’s Icefield Sonnets. Welcome our fellow Tennesseans! JOIN US

sunday march 19, 2017 3020

3pm

G O ODW Y N GR E E N CI RC L E MEMPHIS, TN 38111

for ticket information and directions call 901.758.0150

ALEX’S TAVERN—1445 Jackson. 278-9086. ALFRED’S—197 Beale. 525-3711. MRA. B.B. KING’S BLUES CLUB—143 Beale. 524-5464. MRA. BEALE STREET TAP ROOM—168 Beale. 576-2220. BELMONT GRILL—4970 Poplar. 767-0305; 9102 Poplar Pike (Germantown). 624-6001. MRA. BLIND BEAR SPEAKEASY—119 S. Main, Pembroke Square. 417-8435. MRA. BLUE MONKEY—2012 Madison. 272-2583; 513 S. Front. 5276665. BLUES CITY CAFE—138 Beale. 526-3637. MRA. BROOKHAVEN PUB & GRILL—695 W. Brookhaven Circle. 680-8118. MRA. BUFFALO WILD WINGS—3770 Hacks Cross Rd. 737-9463; 7188 Airways (Southaven). 662-349-7776; 8385 Highway 64. 3809294. DOUBLE J SMOKEHOUSE & SALOON—124 G.E. Patterson. 347-2648. EARNESTINE & HAZEL’S—531 S. Main. 523-9754. MRA. EAST END GRILL—7547 Highway 64. 937-1392; 7956 Winchester Rd. 432-4256. MRA. FLYING SAUCER DRAUGHT EMPORIUM—130 Peabody Place. 523-7468; 1400 Germantown Pkwy. 755-5530. MRA. FOX AND HOUND ENGLISH PUB & GRILL—847 Exocet Dr. 624-9060; 5101 Sanderlin Ave. 763-2013; 6565 Towne Center Crossing (Southaven). 662-536-2200. GREEN BEETLE—325 S. Main. 527-7337. MRA. HADLEY’S PUB—2779 Whitten Rd. 266-5006. HARD ROCK CAFE—126 Beale. 529-0007. HICKORY TAVERN—4600 Merchants Park Cir. 861-0196. HIGH POINT PUB—477 High Point Terrace. 452-9203. HUEY’S—1927 Madison. 726-4372; 1771 N. Germantown Pkwy. (Cordova). 754-3885; 77 S. Second. 527-2700; 2130 W. Poplar (Collierville). 854-4455; 7090 Malco Blvd. (Southaven). 662-3497097; 7825 Winchester. 624-8911; 4872 Poplar. 682-7729; 7677 Farmington Blvd. (Germantown). 318-3030. MRA. JERRY LEE LEWIS’ CAFE & HONKY TONK—310 Beale. 654-5171. KING JERRY LAWLER’S HALL OF FAME BAR & GRILLE—159 Beale. 523-1940. KING’S PALACE CAFE—162 Beale. 521-1851. MRA. MAX’S SPORTS BAR—115 G.E. Patterson. 528-8367. MRA. MEMPHIS SPORTS PUB—5012 Park Ave. 767-8632. MIDTOWN CROSSING GRILLE—394 N. Watkins. 443-0502. MURPHY’S—1589 Madison. 726-4193. MRA. NEIL’S MUSIC ROOM—5727 Quince Rd. 682-2300. NEWBY’S—539 S. Highland. 730-0520. OLD ZINNIE’S—1688 Madison. 726-5004. PATRICK’S—4972 Park Ave. 682-2852. MRA. P & H CAFE—1532 Madison. 726-0906. PIG ON BEALE—167 Beale. 529-1544 ROCKHOUSELIVE—2586 Poplar. 324-6300. 5709 Raleigh LaGrange. 386-7222. R.P. TRACKS—3547 Walker. 327-1471. MRA. RUM BOOGIE CAFE—182 Beale. 528-0150. SAMMY HAGAR’S RED ROCKER BAR & GRILL— Southland Park, 1550 North Ingram Blvd. (West Memphis). 872-7353670. SILKY O’SULLIVAN’S—183 Beale. 522-9596. MRA. THE SILLY GOOSE—100 Peabody Place. 435-6915. THE SLIDER INN—2117 Peabody. 725-1155. SOUTH OF BEALE—361 S. Main. 526-0388. T J MULLIGAN’S—8071 Trinity Rd. (Cordova). 756-4480; 1817 Kirby Pkwy. (Germantown). 755-2481; 2821 N. Houston Levee Rd. 377-9997. UBEE’S—521 S. Highland. 323-0900. WESTY’S—346 N. Main. 543-3278. MRA. THE WINDJAMMER—786 E. Brookhaven Cl. 683-9044. MRA.

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Saturday, April 15 @ Memphis

from 6-9PM

Farmers Market

Purchase tickets online starting March 1 at memphisbaconandbourbon.com

Now Accepting Participating Restaurant Sponsorship Applications. Other title sponsorship opportunities available. For more information please email advertising@memphisflyer.com or call (901) 575-9402. VISIT MEMPHISBACONANDBOURBON.COM FOR MORE INFO! THIS IS A 21+ EVENT. MM_FullPage_TrimSize_9x25_11x125.indd 1

2/21/17 2:24 PM


CIT Y DINING LIST FORMOSA—Offers Mandarin cuisine, including broccoli beef, hot-and-sour soup, and spring rolls. Closed Monday. 6685 Quince. 753-9898. L, D, X, $-$$ THE FOUR WAY—Legendary soul-food establishment dishing up such entrees as fried and baked catfish, chicken, and turkey and dressing, along with a host of vegetables and desserts. Closed Monday.  998 Mississippi Blvd. 507-1519. L, D (call to check hours.), $ FOX RIDGE PIZZA—Pizzas, calzones, subs, burgers, and meatand-two plate lunches are among the dishes served at this eatery. 1769 N. Germantown Pkwy. 758-6500. L, D, X, $ FRATELLI’S—Serves hot and cold sandwiches, salads, soups, and desserts, all with an Italian/Mediterranean flair. Closed Sunday.  750 Cherry Rd., Memphis Botanic Garden. 766-9900. L, X, $ FRIDA’S—Mexican cuisine and Tex-Mex standards, including chimichangas, enchiladas, and fajitas; seafood includes shrimp and tilapia.  1718 Madison. 244-6196. L, D, X, $-$$ FUEL CAFE—Focus is on natural dishes with such specialties as bison burgers, quinoa chili, and tacos; also vegan and gluten-free options. Closed Sun.-Mon. 1761 Madison. 725-9025. L, D, X, $-$$ GERMANTOWN COMMISSARY—Serves barbecue sandwiches, sliders, ribs, shrimp, and nachos, as well as smoked barbecued bologna sandwiches; Mon.-night all-you-can-eat ribs. 2290 S. Germantown Rd. S. (Germantown). 754-5540. L, D, X, MRA, $-$$ GOLDEN INDIA—Northern Indian specialties include tandoori chicken as well as lamb, beef, shrimp, and vegetarian dishes. 2097 Madison. 728-5111. L, D, X, $-$$ GREEN BAMBOO—Pineapple tilapia, pork vermicelli, and the soft egg noodle combo are Vietnamese specialties here.  990 N. Germantown Parkway, #104 (Cordova). 753-5488. L, D, $-$$ GRIDLEY’S—Offers barbecued ribs, shrimp, pork plate, chicken, and hot tamales; also daily lunch specials. Closed Tues. 6842 Stage Rd. (Bartlett). 377-8055. L, D, X, $-$$ FRANK GRISANTI’S ITALIAN RESTAURANT— Northern Italian favorites include pasta with jumbo shrimp and mushrooms; also seafood, fillet mignon, and daily lunch specials. Closed for lunch Sunday. Embassy Suites Hotel, 1022 S. Shady Grove. 761-9462. L, D, X, MRA, $-$$$ RONNIE GRISANTI’S ITALIAN RESTAURANT—This Memphis institution serves some family classics such as Elfo’s Special and chicken ravioli, along with lighter fare and changing daily chef selection. Closed Sun.  Sheffield Antiques Mall, 684 W. Poplar (Collierville). 850-0191. L (Mon.-Sat.), D (Thurs.-Sat.), X, $-$$$ THE GROVE GRILL—Offers steaks, chops, seafood, and other American cuisine with Southern and global influences; entrees include crab cakes, and shrimp and grits, also dinner specials. 4550 Poplar. 818-9951. L, D, SB, X, MRA, $$-$$$ GROWLERS—Sports bar and eatery serves standard bar fare in addition to a pasta, tacos, chicken and waffles, and light options. 1911 Poplar. 244-7904. L, D, X, $-$$ GUS’S WORLD FAMOUS FRIED CHICKEN—Serves chicken with signature spicy batter, along with homemade beans, slaw, and pies. 310 S. Front. 527-4877; 215 S. Center St. (Collierville). 853-6005; 2965 N. Germantown Pkwy. (Cordova). 373-9111; 730 S. Mendenhall. 767-2323; 505 Highway 70 W., Mason, TN. 901-294-2028. L, D, X, MRA, $ HALF SHELL—Specializes in seafood, such as King crab legs; also serves steaks, chicken, pastas, salads, sandwiches, a ”voodoo menu”; oyster bar at Winchester location. 688 S. Mendenhall. 682-3966; 7825 Winchester. 737-6755. L, D, WB, X, MRA, $-$$$ HAPPY MEXICAN—Serves quesadillas, burritos, chimichangas, vegetable and seafood dishes, and more. 385 S. Second. 529-9991; 6080 Primacy Pkwy. 683-0000; 7935 Winchester. 751-5353. L, D, X, $ HAVANA’S PILON—Tiny eatery serving Cuban cuisine, including fried plantains in a pilon topped with shrimp, ropa vieja (shredded beef in tomato sauce), roasted pork, and a Cuban sandwich. Closed Sunday.  143 Madison. 527-2878; 3135 Kirby-Whitten, Suite 108 (Bartlett). 512-6359. L, D, X, $ HERITAGE TAVERN & KITCHEN—Featuring classic cuisine from the country’s five regions, including lobster rolls, fried chicken, smoked tamales, Green Goddess shrimp, and more.  6150 Poplar, Regalia. 761-8855.L, D, WB, X, $-$$$ HIGH POINT PIZZA—Serves variety of pizzas, subs, salads, and sides. Closed Monday.  477 High Point Terrace. 452-3339. L, D, X, $-$$ HM DESSERT LOUNGE—Serving cake, pie, and other desserts, as well as a selection of savory dishes, including meatloaf and mashed potato “cupcakes.” Closed Sunday and Monday. 1586 Madison. 290-2099. L, D, X, $ HOG & HOMINY—The casual sister to Andrew Michael Italian Kitchen serves brick-oven-baked pizzas, including the Red-Eye with pork belly, and small plates with everything from meatballs to beef and cheddar hot dogs; and local veggies. Closed for lunch Mon. 707 W. Brookhaven Cl. 207-7396. L, D, SB, X, $-$$$

HONG KONG—Cantonese and Mandarin standards are sweetand-sour chicken, and pepper beef. Closed Sunday. 3966 Elvis Presley. 396-0801. L, D, X, $ HOUSTON’S—Serves steaks, seafood, pork chops, chicken dishes, sandwiches, salads, and Chicago-style spinach dip.  5000 Poplar. 683-0915. L, D, X $-$$$  I LOVE JUICE BAR—Serving an extensive line of juices and grab-and-go lunch items. 553 S. Cooper. 612-2720. L, D, X, $ IMAGINE VEGAN CAFE—Dishes range from salads and sandwiches to full dinners, breakfast items served all day. 2158 Young. 654-3455. L, D, SB, X, $ INDIA PALACE—Tandoori chicken, lamb shish kabobs, chicken tikka masala are among the entrees; also, vegetarian options and a daily lunch buffet. 1720 Poplar. 278-1199. L, D, X, $-$$ INTERIM—Offers American-seasonal cuisine with emphasis on local foods and fresh fish; macaroni and cheese is a house specialty. Closed for lunch Sat. 5040 Sanderlin, Suite 105. 818-0821. L, D, SB, X, MRA, $-$$$ INTERSTATE BAR-B-Q—Specialties include chopped porkshoulder sandwiches, ribs, hot wings, spaghetti, chicken, and turkey. 2265 S. Third. 775-2304; 150 W. Stateline Rd. (Southaven). 662393-5699. L, D, X, MRA, $-$$ ITTA BENA—Southern and Cajun-American cuisine served here; specialties are filet Oscar and shrimp and grits, along with steaks, chops, seafood, and pasta. 145 Beale St. 578-3031. D,X, MRA, $$-$$$
 IZAKAYA—This fine dining Asian fusion steakhouse, located in the historic 19th Century Club mansion, serves sushi and a variety of steakhouse-style dishes, such as Wagyu beef steaks, pasta, and seafood. 1433 Union. 454-3926. L, D, X, $-$$$ JASMINE THAI AND VEGETARIAN RESTAURANT—Entrees include panang chicken, green curry shrimp,and pad thai (noodles, shrimp, and peanuts); also vegetarian dishes. Closed Mon.-Tues. 916 S. Cooper. 725-0223. L, D, X, $ JIM ’N NICK’S BAR-B-Q—Serves barbecued pork, ribs, chicken, brisket, and fish, along with other homemade Southern specialties. 2 359 N. Germantown Pkwy. 388-0998. L, D, X, $-$$ JIM’S PLACE/JIM’S PLACE GRILLE—Features American, Greek, and Continental cuisine with such entrees as pork tenderloin, several seafood specialties, and hand-cut charcoal-grilled steaks. Closed for lunch Sat. and all day Sun. 518 Perkins Extd. 766-2030; 3660 Houston Levee (Collierville). 861-5000. L, D, X, MRA, $-$$$ JOE’S CRAB SHACK—Serves a variety of seafood, along with chicken, steak, and pasta. 7990 Horizon Center Blvd. 384-7478. L, D, X, $-$$$ JULLES POSH FOOD CO.—The changing menu features seasonal “cooking light” dishes such as salmon-shrimp cakes with green salad and roasted sweet potato wedges; also cold-pressed juices, to-go dishes, and desserts.  6300 Poplar. 509-8675. B, L, D, X, $-$$ KING JERRY LAWLER’S MEMPHIS BBQ CO.—Offers a variety of barbecue dishes, including brisket, ribs, nachos topped with smoked pork, and a selection of barbecue “Slamwiches.”  465 N. Germantown Pkwy., #116 (Cordova). 509-2360. L, D, X, $ THE KITCHEN BISTRO—Tomato soup, grilled fish, sticky toffee pudding, and dishes made using in-season fruits and veggies are served at this establishment at Shelby Farms Park.  415 Great View Drive E., Suite 101. 729-9009. L, D, X, $-$$ KOOKY CANUCK—Offers prime rib, catfish, and burgers, including the 4-lb. “Kookamonga”; also late-night menu. 87 S. Second. 578-9800; 1250 N. Germantown Pkwy. 1-8002453. L, D, X, MRA, $-$$$ LA BAGUETTE—An almond croissant and chicken salad are among specialties at this French-style bistro. Closed for dinner Sun. 3088 Poplar. 458-0900. B, L, D (closes at 7), X, MRA, $ LA PLAYITA MEXICANA—Specializes in seafood and Mexican entrees, including red snapper, tilapia, oysters, chimichangas, tostadas, and taco salad. 6194 Macon (Bartlett). 377-2282. L, D, X, $-$$ LA TAQUERIA GUADALUPANA—Fajitas and quesadillas are just a few of the authentic Mexican entrees offered here. 4818 Summer. 685-6857; 5848 Winchester. 365-4992. L, D, $ LAFAYETTE’S MUSIC ROOM—Serves such Southern cuisine as po boys and shrimp and grits, and wood-fired pizzas; also live music. 2 119 Madison. 207-5097. L, D, WB, X, MRA, $-$$ LAS DELICIAS—Popular for its guacamole, house-made tortilla chips, and margaritas, this restaurant draws diners with its chicken enchiladas, meat-stuffed flautas, and Cuban torta with spicy pork. Closed Sunday. 4002 Park Ave. 458-9264; 5689 Quince. 8002873. L, D, X, $ LAS TORTUGAS DELI MEXICANA—Authentic Mexican food prepared from local food sources; specializes in tortugas — grilled bread scooped out to hold such fillings as brisket, pork, and shrimp; also tingas tostados and such sides as steamed corn. Closed Sunday. 1215 S. Germantown Rd. 751-1200. L, D, X, $-$$ LBOE—Gourmet burger joint serves locally sourced ground beef burgers, with options like the Mac-N-Cheese Burger and Caprese. Black

bean and turkey patties available. 2021 Madison. 725-0770. L, D, X, $ LEONARD’S—Serves wet and dry ribs, barbecue sandwiches, spaghetti, catfish, homemade onion rings. and lemon icebox pie; also a lunch buffet. 5465 Fox Plaza. 360-1963. L, X, MRA, $-$$ LISA’S LUNCHBOX—Serving bagels, sandwiches, salads, and wraps.  5030 Poplar, 761-4044; 5885 Ridgeway Center Pkwy., Suite 101. 767-6465; 2659 Thousand Oaks Blvd., Suite 1200; 2525 Central (Children’s Museum). B, L, $ LITTLE ITALY—Serving New York-style pizza as well as subs and pasta dishes.  1495 Union. 725-0280, L, D, X, $-$$ THE LITTLE TEA SHOP—Downtown institution serves up Southern comfort cooking, including meatloaf and such veggies as turnip greens, yams, okra, and tomatoes. Closed Sat.-Sun.  69 Monroe. 525-6000, L, X, $ LOCAL GASTROPUB—Entrees with a focus on locally grown products include lobster mac-and-cheese and pork osso bucco. 95 S. Main. 473-9573; 2126 Madison. 725-1845. L, D, WB, X, MRA, $-$$ LOFLIN YARD—Beer garden and barbecue restaurant with barbecue and vegetarian fare cooked on a custom-made grill. 7 W. Carolina. 249-3046. L (Sat. and Sun.), D, $-$$ LONG ROAD CIDER CO.—Specializes in hard apple ciders made with traditional methods. Cafe-style entrees include black eye peas with cornbread and greens, chicken Gorgonzola pockets, cidersteamed sausage, and housemade ice creams. Closed Sun. through Wed. 9053 Barret Road. (Barretville, TN). 352-0962. D, X, $ THE LOOKOUT AT THE PYRAMID—Serves Southern fare, including catfish tacos and crawfish tails. 1 Bass Pro Dr. 6204600/291-8200. L, D, X $-$$$ LOS COMPADRES—Serves enchiladas, burritos, tamales, tacos, and vegetarian dishes; also Cuban entrees. 3295 Poplar. 458-5731. L, D, X, $-$$ LOST PIZZA—Offering pizzas (with dough made from scratch), pasta, salads, sandwiches, tamales, and more. 2855 Poplar. 5721803; 5960 Getwell, Southaven. 662-892-8684. L, D, X, $-$$ LOTUS—Authentic Vietnamese-Asian fare, including lemon-grass chicken and shrimp, egg rolls, Pho soup, and spicy Vietnamese vermicelli. 4970 Summer. 682-1151. D, X, $ LUNA RESTAURANT & LOUNGE—Serving a limited menu of breakfast and lunch items. Dinner entrees include Citrus Glaze Salmon and Cajun Stuffed Chicken. Closed for lunch Sat. Breakfast only on Sun. 179 Madison (Hotel Napoleon). 526-0002. B, L, D, X, $-$$$ LYFE KITCHEN—Serving healthy, affordable wraps, bowls, sandwiches, and more; entrees include roasted salmon and “unfried” chicken. 6201 Poplar. 684-5333; 272 S. Main. 526-0254. B, L, D, WB, X, $ LYNCHBURG LEGENDS—This restaurant with a Jack Daniels’ theme and Southern cuisine serves such entrees as Bourbon Street salmon, buttermilk-fried chicken, and grilled steak and wild mushroom salad. DoubleTree Hotel, 5069 Sanderlin. 969-7777. B, L, D, X, MRA, $- $$$ MACIEL’S TORTAS & TACOS—Entrees include tortas, hefty Mexican sandwiches filled with choice of chicken, pork, or steak. Also serving fried taco plates, quesadillas, chorizo and pastor soft tacos, salads, and more. Closed Sun. 45 S. Main. 526-0037. L, D, X, $ THE MAJESTIC GRILLE—Housed in a former silent-picture house, features aged steaks, fresh seafood, and such specialties as roasted chicken and grilled pork tenderloin; offers a pre-theatre menu and classic cocktails. 145 S. Main. 522-8555. L, D, WB, X, MRA, $-$$$ MANILA FILIPINO RESTAURANT—Entrees include pork belly cutlet with lechon sauce, and shrimp and vegetables in tamarind broth; also daily combos, rice dishes, and chef specials. 7 849 Rockford (Millington). 209-8525. L, D, X, $ MARCIANO MEDITERRANEAN AND ITALIAN CUISINE—Rack of lamb with roasted potatoes and demi-glace is among the entrees; also steaks, seafood, and gourmet pizza. 780 Brookhaven Cl. 682-1660. D, X, $-$$
 MARDI GRAS MEMPHIS—Serving Cajun fare, including an etouffee-stuffed po’boy. 496 Watkins. 530-6767. L, D, X, $-$$ MARLOWE’S—In addition to its signature barbecue and ribs, Marlowe’s serves Southern-style steaks, chops, lasagne, and more. 4381 Elvis Presley Blvd. 332-4159. D, X, MRA, $-$$ MAXIMO’S ON BROAD—Serving a tapas menu that features creative fusion cuisine. Closed Mon. and Tues.  2617 Broad Ave. 4521111. L, D, SB, X, $-$$ MAYURI INDIAN CUISINE—Serves tandoori chicken, masala dosa, tikka masala, as well as lamb and shrimp entrees; also a daily lunch buffet, and dinner buffet on Fri.-Sat. 6524 Quince Rd. 7538755. L, D, X, $-$$ MCEWEN’S ON MONROE—Southern/American cuisine with international flavors; specialties include steak and seafood, sweet potato-crusted catfish with macaroni and cheese, and more. Closed Sun., Monroe location.  120 Monroe. 527-7085; 1110 Van Buren (Oxford). 662-234-7003. L, D, SB (Oxford only), X, MRA, $$-$$$

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CIT Y DINING LIST DAN MCGUINNESS PUB—Serves fish and chips, shepherd’s pie, burgers, and other Irish and American fare; also lunch and dinner specials. 4694 Spottswood. 761-3711; 3964 Goodman Rd. 662890-7611. L, D, X, $ MEDALLION—Offers steaks, seafood, chicken, and pasta entrees. Closed for dinner Sunday. 3700 Central, Holiday Inn (Kemmons Wilson School of Hospitality). 678-1030. B, L, D, SB, X, MRA, $-$$$ MELLOW MUSHROOM—Large menu includes assortment of pizzas, salads, calzones, hoagies, vegetarian options, and 50 beers on tap. 9155 Poplar, Shops of Forest Hill (Germantown). 907-0243; 5138 Park Ave. 562-1211. L, D, X, $-$$ MEMPHIS BARBECUE COMPANY—Offers spare ribs, baby backs, and pulled pork and brisket, along with such sides as mac and cheese, grits, and red beans.  709 Desoto Cove (Horn Lake, MS). 662-536-3762. L, D, X, $-$$ MEMPHIS LIGHTHOUSE—Chicken and waffles, shrimp and grits, and oxtails are among the dishes served at this soul food/Cajun restaurant in Court Square. Closed Sat. and Sun.  60 N. Main. 310-5711. L, D, X, $-$$ MEMPHIS PIZZA CAFE—Homemade pizzas are specialties; also serves sandwiches, calzones, and salads. 2087 Madison. 726-5343; 5061 Park Ave. 684-1306; 7604 W. Farmington (Germantown). 7532218; 797 W. Poplar (Collierville). 861-7800; 5627 Getwell (Southaven). 662-536-1364. L, D, X, MRA, $-$$ MEMPOPS—Specializes in handcrafted popsicles. Cream and fruit pop flavors include Mexican Chocolate and Hibiscus Lemonade; menu changes. 1243 Ridgeway. 421-5985. L, D, X, $ MESQUITE CHOP HOUSE—The focus here is on steaks, including prime fillet, rib eyes, and prime-aged New York strip; also, some seafood options. 5960 Getwell (Southaven). 662-890-2467; 88 Union. 527-5337; 3165 Forest Hill-Irene (Germantown). 249-5661. D, SB (Germantown), X, $$-$$$ MISTER B’S—Features New Orleans-style seafood and steaks. Closed for lunch Sat. and all day Sun. and Mon. 6655 Poplar, #107. 751-5262. L, D, X, MRA, $-$$$ MOLLIE FONTAINE LOUNGE—Specializes in tapas (small plates) featuring global cuisine. Closed Sun.-Tues. 679 Adams Ave. 524-1886. D, X, $ MOLLY’S LA CASITA—Homemade tamales, fish tacos, a vegetarian combo, and bacon-wrapped shrimp are a few of the specialties. 2006 Madison. 726-1873. L, D, X, MRA, $-$$ MORTIMER’S—Contemporary American entrees include trout almondine, several chicken dishes, and hand-cut steaks; also sandwiches, salads, and daily/nightly specials. Closed for lunch Sat.Sun. 590 N. Perkins. 761-9321. L, D, X, $-$$ MOSA ASIAN BISTRO—Specialties include sesame chicken, Thai calamari, rainbow panang curry with grouper fish, and other Pan Asian/ fusion entrees.  850 S. White Station Rd. 683-8889. L, D, X, MRA, $ MULAN—Hunan Chicken, tofu dishes, and orange beef served here; some sushi, too. 2059 Houston Levee (Collierville). 850-5288; 2149 Young. 347-3965. L, D, X, $-$$ NAGASAKI INN—Chicken, steak, and lobster are among the main courses; meal is cooked at your table. 3951 Summer. 454-0320. D, X, $$ NAGOYA—Offers traditional Japanese cuisine and sushi bar; specialties are teriyaki and tempura dishes. 7075 Malco Blvd., Suite 101 (Southaven). 662-349-8788. L, D, X, $-$$$
 NAM KING—Offers luncheon and dinner buffets, dim sum, and such specialties as fried dumplings, pepper steak, and orange chicken.  4594 Yale. 373-4411. L, D, X, $
 NAPA CAFE—Among the specialties is miso-marinated salmon over black rice with garlic spinach and shiitake mushrooms. Closed for lunch Sat. and all day Sun. 5101 Sanderlin, Suite 122. 683-0441. L, D, X, MRA, $$-$$$ NEW ASIA—Specializing in authentic Chinese food, including roast Peking duck. 2075 Exeter, Suite 90. 758-8388. L, D, X, $ NEW HUNAN—Chinese eatery with more than 80 entrees;also lunch/dinner buffets. 5052 Park. 766-1622. L, D, X, $ THE OFFICE@UPTOWN—Offering sandwiches, wraps, pizza, soups, salads, and several vegetarian options. Closed Sunday. 594 N. Second St. 522-1905. B, L, D, X, $ OLD VENICE PIZZA CO.—Specializes in “eclectic Italian,” from pastas, including the “Godfather,” to hand-tossed pizzas, including the “John Wayne”; choose from 60 toppings. 368 Perkins Ext. 767-6872. L, D, SB, X, MRA, $-$$ ON THE BORDER—Dishes out such Tex-Mex specialties as fajitas and Southwest chicken tacos; also fresh grilled seafood specials. 8101 Giacosa Pl. (Cordova).881-0808; 6572 Airways (Southaven). 662-655-4750. L, D, WB, X, MRA, $ ONE & ONLY BBQ—On the menu are pork barbecue sandwiches, platters, wet and dry ribs, smoked chicken and turkey platters, a smoked meat salad, barbecue quesadillas, and more. 1779 Kirby Pkwy. 7513615; 567 Perkins Extd. 249-4227. L, D, X, MRA, $ ONIX RESTAURANT—Serves seafood dishes, including barbecued shrimp and pecan-crusted trout, and a variety of salads and sandwiches. Closed Sun. 1680 Madison. 552-4609. L, D, X, $-$$

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CIT Y DINING LIST ORR RESTAURANT—Serves Mediterranean/African cuisine, such as lamb Kowzi flavored with raisins and roasted nuts and served with white bean soup. 661 N. Mendenhall, Suite 101. 275-8692. L, D, X, $-$$ OSAKA JAPANESE CUISINE—Featuring an extensive sushi menu as well as traditional Japanese and hibachi dining. Hours vary for lunch; call.  3670 Houston Levee (Collierville). 861-4309; 3402 Poplar. 249-4690; 7164 Hacks Cross. 662-890-9312; 2200 N. Germantown Pkwy. 425-4901. L, D, X, $-$$$   OWEN BRENNAN’S—New Orleans-style menu of beef, chicken, pasta, and seafood; jambalaya, shrimp and grits, and crawfish etouffee are specialties. Closed for dinner Sunday. The Regalia, 6150 Poplar. 761-0990. L, D, SB, X, MRA, $-$$$ PANCHO’S—Serves up a variety of Mexican standards, including tacos, enchiladas, and mix-and-match platters; also lunch specials. 3600 E. Broadway (West Memphis). 870-735-6466. 717 N. White Station. 685-5404. L, D, X, MRA, $ PANDA GARDEN—Sesame chicken and broccoli beef are among the Mandarin and Cantonese entrees; also seafood specials and fried rice. Closed for lunch Saturday. 3735 Summer. 323-4819. L, D, X, $-$$ PARK + CHERRY—Partnering with chefs Wally Joe and Andrew Adams of Acre Restaurant, the Dixon offers casual dining within the museum. Menu features sandwiches, like truffled pimento cheese, as well as salads, snacks, and sweets. Closed Monday. 4339 Park (Dixon Gallery). 761-5250. L, X, $ THE PASTA MAKER—This Italian eatery specializes in artisanal pasta. Entrees include Spaghetti allo scoglio, Penne Boscaiola, and Fusilli Primavera. Gluten-free options available. Restaurant closed Sunday (cooking classes by reservation). 2095 Exeter, Suite 30 (Germantown). 779-3928. L, D, X, $-$$ PAULETTE’S—Presents fine dining with a Continental flair, including such entrees as filet Paulette with butter-pepper cream sauce and popovers with strawberry butter; also changing daily specials. River Inn. 50 Harbor Town Square. 260-3300. B, L, D, WB, X, MRA, $-$$$ PEABODY POINT CAFE—Serves dinner salads, paninis, and pasta. Entrees include lasagna and build-your-own pasta dishes with choice of noodles and sauce. 2 43 Cooper. 722-2700. D, X, $ PEARL’S OYSTER HOUSE—Downtown eatery serving seafood, including oysters, crawfish, and stuffed butterfly shrimp, as well as beef, chicken, and pasta dishes. 299 S. Main. 522-9070. L, D, SB, X, MRA, $-$$$ PEI WEI ASIAN DINER—Serves a variety of Pan-Asian cuisine, including Japanese, Vietnamese, Korean, and Thai. Noodle and rice bowls are specialties; a small plates menu also offered. 1680 Union Ave., #109. 722-3780; 2257 N. Germantown Pkwy. 382-1822. L, D, X, $-$$
 PETE & SAM’S—Serving Memphis for 60-plus years; offers steaks, seafood, and traditional Italian dishes, including homemade ravioli, lasagna, and chicken marsala. 3886 Park. 458-0694. D, X, $-$$$ PETRA CAFÉ—Serves Greek, Italian, and Middle Eastern sandwiches, gyros, and entrees. Hours vary; call. 6641 Poplar (Germantown). 7544440; 9155 Poplar (Germantown). 755-5440. L, D, X, $-$$ PF CHANG’S CHINA BISTRO—Specialties are orange peel shrimp, Mongolian beef, and chicken in lettuce wraps; also vegetarian dishes, including spicy eggplant. 1181 Ridgeway Rd., Park Place Centre. 818-3889. L, D, X, MRA, $-$$ PHO BINH—Vietnamese, vegetarian, and Cantonese specialties include lemon tofu and spring rolls. Closed Sunday. 1615 Madison. 276-0006. L, D, $ PHO SAIGON—Vietnamese fare includes beef teriyaki, roasted quail, curry ginger chicken, vegetarian options, and a variety of soups. 2946 Poplar. 458-1644. L, D, $ PIG-N-WHISTLE—Offers pork shoulder sandwiches, wet and dry ribs, catfish, nachos, and stuffed barbecue potatoes.  6084 KerrRosemark Rd. (Millington). 872-2455. L, D, X, $ PIZZA REV—Specializes in build-your-own, personal-sized artisanal pizza. Choose from homemade dough options, all-natural sauces, Italian cheeses, and more than 30 toppings.  6450 Poplar. 379-8188. L, D, X, $ PORCELLINO’S CRAFT BUTCHER—Small plates, charcuterie selections, specialty steaks, house-made pastries, and innovative teas and coffees are offered at this combination butcher shop and restaurant featuring locally sourced menu items.  711 W. Brookhaven Cl. 7626656. B, L, D, X $-$$ PRESENTATION ROOM, THE—American bistro run by the students of L’Ecole Culinaire. Menu changes regularly; specialties may include such items as a filet with truffle mushroom ragu. Closed Fri.-Sun. 1245 N. Germantown Pkwy. (Cordova). 754-7115. L, D, X, MRA, $-$$ PYRO’S FIRE-FRESH PIZZA—Serving gourmet pizzas cooked in an open-fire oven; wide choice of toppings; large local and craft beer selection. 1 199 Ridgeway. 379-8294; 2035 Union Ave. 208-8857; 2286 N. Germantown Pkwy. 207-1198. B, L, D, X, MRA, $ QUEEN OF SHEBA—Featuring Middle Eastern favorites and Yemeni dishes such as lamb haneeth and saltah. 4792 Summer. 207-4174. L, D, $ RAVINE—Serves contemporary Southern cuisine with an emphasis on fresh, locally grown foods and a menu that changes weekly. Closed Mon.Tues. 5 3 Pea Ridge/County Rd. 321 (Oxford, MS). 662-234-4555. D, SB, X, $$-$$$ 190 • M E M P H I S M A G A Z I N E . C O M • M A R C H 2 0 1 7

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CIT Y DINING LIST RAY’Z WORLD FAMOUS DR. BAR-B-QUE—Serves dry-roasted barbecue, pulled or chopped pork, beef brisket, ribs, salads, and more. Closed Mon. 302 S. Main. 527-9026. L, D, X, $ RED KOI—Classic Japanese cuisine offered at this family-run restaurant; hibachi steaks, sushi, seafood, chicken, and vegetables.  5847 Poplar. 767-3456. L, D, X $-$$ RED LOBSTER—Specializes in crab legs, lobster, and shrimp dishes; also pastas, salads, steaks, and chicken. 8161 Highway 64 (Cordova). 387-0056; 6535 Airways (Southaven). 662-536-1960; 7750 Winchester. 759-9045. L, D, X, $-$$ RENDEZVOUS, CHARLES VERGOS’—Menu items include barbecued ribs, cheese plates, skillet shrimp, red beans and rice, and Greek salads. Closed Sun.-Mon. 52 S. Second. 523-2746. L (Fri.Sat.), D, X, MRA, $-$$ RESTAURANT IRIS—French Creole cuisine includes shrimp and delta-grind grits, and New York strip stuffed with fried oysters and blue cheese. Closed Sun. 2146 Monroe. 590-2828. D, X, MRA, $$-$$$ RIVER OAKS—A French-style bistro serving seafood and steaks, with an emphasis on fresh local ingredients. Closed for lunch Sat. and all day Sun. 5871 Poplar Ave. 683-9305. L, D, X, MRA, $$$ RIVERFRONT BAR & GRILL—Beale Street Landing eatery serves Southern American specialties, including Tom Lee Catfish, and Tennessee Caviar, a fresh veggie salsa of black-eyed peas and cilantro with pimento cheese and toast points; also sausage-cheese appetizer. Closed Monday.  251 Riverside Dr. 524-0817. L, D, X, $ RIZZO’S DINER—Chorizo meatloaf, lobster pronto puff, and brisket are menu items at this upscale diner, Closed for dinner Sun. and all day Mon.  492 S. Main. 304-6985. L, D, WB, X, MRA, $-$$ ROBATA RAMEN & YAKITORI BAR—Serves ramen noodle bowls and Yakitori skewers as well as rice and noodle dishes, and sake.  2116 Madison. 410-8290. D, WB, X, $ ROCK’N DOUGH PIZZA CO.—Specialty and custom pizzas made from fresh ingredients; wide variety of toppings. 3445 Poplar Ave., Ste. 1. 512-6760; 7850 Poplar, #6 (Germantown). 7792008. L, D, SB, X, $$ ROMANO’S MACARONI GRILL—Serves MediterraneanItalian cuisine, including hand-crafted pasta Milano and penne rustica, and create-your-own pasta; also steaks, seafood, and salads.  2859 N. Germantown Pk wy. (Cordova). 266-4565. L, D, X, $-$$ ROYAL PANDA—Hunan fish, Peking duck, Royal Panda chicken and shrimp, and a seafood combo are among the specialties.  3120 Village Shops Dr. (Germantown). 756-9697. L, D, X, $-$$ RUSSO’S NEW YORK PIZZERIA AND WINE BAR— Serves gourmet pizzas, calzones, and pasta, including lasagna, fettuccine Alfredo, scampi, and more. 9087 Poplar, Suite 111. 7550092. L, D, WB, X, MRA, $-$$ RUTH’S CHRIS STEAK HOUSE—Offers prime steaks cut and aged in-house, as well as lamb, chicken, and fresh seafood, including lobster. 6120 Poplar. 761-0055. D, X, MRA, $$$-$$$$ SABOR CARIBE—Serving up “Caribbean flavors” with dishes from Colombia, Venezuela, Puerto Rico, and Cuba. Closed Sunday. 662 Madison. 949-8100. L, D, X, $ SABROSURA—Serves Mexican and Cuban fare, including arroz tapada de pollo and steak Mexican.  782 Washington. 421-8180. B, L, D, X, $-$$ SAKURA—Sushi, tempura, and teriyaki are Japanese specialties here. 2060 West St. (Germantown). 758-8181. 4840 Poplar. 572-1002. L, D, X, $-$$ SALSA—Mexican-Southern California specialties include carnitas, enchiladas verde, and fajitas; also Southwestern seafood dishes such as snapper verde. Closed Sun. Regalia Shopping Center, 6150 Poplar, Suite 129. 683-6325. L, D, X, $-$$ SCHWEINEHAUS BBQ—Serving barbecue and Bavarianinfluenced fare with a Southern twist; includes wurst platters, pork schnitzel, smoked brisket, pulled pork, and more. 2110 Madison. 347-3060. L, D, WB, X, MRA, $-$$ THE SEAR SHACK BURGERS & FRIES—Serving Angus burgers, fries, and hand-spun milkshakes. Closed Mon. 875 W. Poplar, Suite 6 (Collierville). 861-4100; 5101 Sanderlin, Suite 103. 567-4909. L, D, X, $ SEASONS 52—This elegant fresh grill and wine bar offers a seasonally changing menu using fresh ingredients, wood-fire grilling, and brick-oven cooking; also a large international wine list and nightly piano bar. Crescent Center, 6085 Poplar. 682-9952. L, D, X, $$-$$$ THE SECOND LINE—Kelly English brings “relaxed Creole cuisine” to his new eatery; serves a variety of po-boys and such specialties as barbecue shrimp, and andouille, shrimp, and pimento cheese fries.  2144 Monroe. 590-2829. L, D, WB, X, $-$$ SEKISUI—Japanese fusion cuisine, fresh sushi bar, grilled meats and seafood, California rolls, and vegetarian entrees. Poplar/Perkins location’s emphasis is on Pacific Rim cuisine. Menu and hours vary at each location. 2 5 Belvedere. 725-0005; 1884 N. Germantown Pkwy. (Cordova). 309-8800; 4724 Poplar (between Perkins & Colonial). 767-7770; 2130 W. Poplar (Collierville). 854-0622; 2990

DELI DISH

Serving sandwiches and salads, burgers and bagels, wings and chicken, these are popular spots. BOGIE’S—715 S. Mendenhall. 761-5846. MRA; 2098 LaSalle Place. 272-0022. MRA; 80 Monroe. 525-6764; 2028 W. Poplar (Collierville). 854-8555.Cheffie’s—483 High Point Terrace. 3430488. CAMY’S—2886 Walnut Grove. 725-1667. MRA. CHEFFIE’S—483 High Point Terrace. 343-0488. MRA. CHING’S HOT WINGS—1264 Getwell. 743-5545. CITY EAST BAGEL & GRILLE—6698 Poplar at Kirby. 754-2660. CITY MARKET—66 S. Main. 729-6152. CORDELIA’S TABLE—737 Harbor Bend Rd. 526-4772. FINO’S FROM THE HILL—1853 Madison. 272-3466; 703 W. Brookhaven Cir. 334-4454. MRA. HOLIDAY HAM—2087 Union. 881-6433; 585 Erin Dr. 7634499; 7652 Poplar (Germantown). 869-6650; 3750 Hacks Cross Rd., #112. 624-4848. MRA. JASON’S DELI—1213 Ridgeway. 685-3333; 1585 Chickering (Cordova). 844-1840; 3473 Poplar. 324-3181. KWIK CHEK—2013 Madison. 274-9293. LENNY’S SUB SHOP—2893 Poplar. 320-0022; 7424 Stage Rd. 937-0800; 22 N. Front. 543-9230; 521 S. Highland. 454-7077; 2095 Exeter, Suite 30 (Germantown). 755-0750; 4970 Raleigh-LaGrange. 371-9979; 1016 W. Poplar (Collierville). 8548299; 4726 Spottswood. 202-4800; 4740 Showcase. 368-4215; 8950 Hwy. 64 (Lakeland). 12 S. Cooper. 276-5775; 6300 Poplar, #111. 761-2403. MRA. LETTUCE EAT SALAD COMPANY—6641 Poplar, Suite 106 (Germantown), 552-5604. LUCCHESI’S BEER GARDEN—84 S. Reese. 452-3002. LUCCHESI’S RAVIOLI—540 S. Mendenhall, #3. 7669922. MRA. LUNCHBOX EATS—288 S. Fourth. 526-0820. MCALISTER’S DELI—3482 Plaza Ave. 452-6009; 7990 Trinity Rd. (Cordova). 737-7282; 7710 Poplar (Germantown). 753-1507; 975 580 S. Mendenhall. 763-2711; 3855 Hacks Cross. 881-6068; 6600 Stage Rd. (Bartlett). 213-3311. 9091 Poplar (Germantown) 756-5292. MRA. NEWK’S EATERY—3680 S. Houston Levee (Collierville). 861-1221; 2200 Germantown Pkwy. (Cordova). 377-8796; 5336 Poplar. 820-0415. PANERA BREAD—714 N. Germantown Pkwy. (Cordova). 754-5813; 4530 Poplar. 767-3116; 5865 Poplar, Ridgeway Trace. 683-9384; 7850 Poplar. 759-1439; 7501 Goodman Rd. (Olive Branch). 662-890-1985. MRA. PARADISE CAFE—6150 Poplar, Suite 120. 821-9600. PIMENTO’S—6450 Poplar, #123. 602-5488. JACK PIRTLE’S FRIED CHICKEN—3571 Lamar. 7941254; 2520 Mt. Moriah. 565-0203. MRA. RAFFE’S DELI—3358 Poplar. 458-5110. SCHLOTZSKY’S DELI—4758 Poplar. 763-0741. UNCLE LOU’S FRIED CHICKEN—3633 Millbranch. 332-2367. MRA. WHOLE FOODS MARKET—5014 Poplar. 685-2293. YOUNG AVENUE DELI—2119 Young. 278-0034. Kirby-Whitten (Bartlett). 377-2727; 6696 Poplar. 747-0001. L, D, X, MRA, $-$$$ SHOGUN JAPANESE RESTAURANT—Entrees include tempura, teriyaki, and sushi, as well as grilled fish and chicken entrees. 2324 N. Germantown Pkwy. (Cordova). 384-4122. L, D, X, $-$$ SIDE PORCH STEAK HOUSE—In addition to steak, the menu includes chicken, pork chops, and fish entrees; homemade rolls are a specialty. Closed Sun.-Mon. 5689 Stage Rd. (Bartlett). 3772484. D, X, $-$$ SOUTHERN SOCIAL—Shrimp and grits, stuffed quail, and Aunt Thelma’s Fried Chicken are among the dishes served at this upscale Southern establishment. 2285 S. Germantown Rd. (Germantown). 754-5555. D, X, $-$$$ SOUTH MAIN SUSHI & GRILL—Serving sushi, nigiri, and more.  520 S. Main. 249-2194. L, D, X, $ SPINDINI—Italian fusion cuisine with such entrees as wood-fired pizzas, gorgonzola stuffed filet, and fresh seafood; pizza specials on Mon.; large domestic whiskey selection.  383 S. Main. 578-2767. D, X, $$-$$$ STAKS— Offering pancakes, including Birthday Cake and lemon ricotta. Menu includes other breakfast items such as beignets and French toast, as well as soups and sandwiches for lunch. 4615 Poplar. 509-2367. B, L, WB, X, $

STEAK BY MELISSA—Aged, choice-grade, hand-cut steaks are a specialty here. Also serving fresh seafood dishes, plate lunches, burgers, and sandwiches. 4975 Pepper Chase Dr. (Southaven). 662-342-0602. L, D, X, $-$$$ STIX—Hibachi steakhouse with Asian cuisine features steak, chicken, and a fillet and lobster combination, also sushi. A specialty is Dynamite Chicken with fried rice.  4680 Merchants Park Circle, Avenue Carriage Crossing (Collierville). 854-3399. L, D, X, $-$$ STONE SOUP CAFE—Cooper-Young eatery serving soups, salads, quiche, meat-and-two specials; and daily specials such as Italian roast beef. Closed Monday. 993 S. Cooper. 922-5314. B, L, SB, X, $ STRANO SICILIAN KITCHEN & BAR—Presenting a Sicilian/Mediterranean mix of Arab, Spanish, Greek, and North African fare, Strano serves small plates, wood-grilled fish, and hand-tossed pizzas such as the King Alaska, with salmon and chevre. Closed Mon.  948 S. Cooper. 275-8986. L, D, SB, X, $$-$$$ SWEET GRASS—Low-country coastal cuisine includes such specialties as shrimp and grits. Closed Mon. The restaurant’s “sister,” Sweet Grass Next Door, open nightly, serves lunch Sat.-Sun. 937 S. Cooper. 278-0278. D, SB, X, MRA, $-$$$ TANNOOR GRILL—Brazilian-style steakhouse with skewers served tableside, along with Middle Eastern specialties; vegetarian options also available.  830 N. Germantown Pkwy. 443-5222. L, D, X, $-$$$ TART—Combination patisserie, coffeehouse, and restaurant serving rustic French specialties, including baked eggs in brioche, topped with Gruyere, and french breads and pastries.  820 S. Cooper. 725-0091. B, L, WB, X, $-$$ TERRACE—Creative American and Continental cuisine includes such entrees as filet mignon, beef or lamb sliders, five-spice salmon, and grilled vegetarian eggplant; also small plates. Rooftop, River Inn of Harbor Town, 50 Harbor Town Square. 260-3366. D, X, $$ TEXAS DE BRAZIL—Serves beef, pork, lamb, and chicken dishes, and Brazilian sausage; also a salad bar with extensive toppings. 150 Peabody Place, Suite 103. 526-7600. L (Wed.-Fri.), D, SB, X, $$-$$$ THREE LITTLE PIGS—Pork-shoulder-style barbecue with tangy mild or hot sauce, freshly made coleslaw, and baked beans.  5145 Quince Rd. 685-7094. B, L, D, X, MRA, $ TOPS BAR-B-Q—Specializes in pork barbecue sandwiches and sandwich plates with beans and slaw; also serves ribs, beef brisket, and burgers. 1286 Union. 725-7527. 4183 Summer. 324-4325; 5391 Winchester. 794-7936; 3970 Rhodes. 323-9865; 6130 Macon. 371-0580. For more locations, go online. L, D, X, MRA, $ TROLLEY STOP MARKET—Serves plate lunches/dinners as well as pizzas, salads, and vegan/vegetarian entrees; a specialty is the locally raised beef burger. Also sells fresh produce and goods from local farmers; delivery available. Saturday brunch; closed Sunday.   704 Madison. 526-1361. L, D, X, $ TSUNAMI—Features Pacific Rim cuisine (Asia, Australia, South Pacific, etc.); also a changing “small plate” menu. Specialties include Asian nachos and roasted sea bass. Closed Sunday.  928 S. Cooper. 274-2556. D, X, MRA, $$-$$$ TUSCANY ITALIAN EATERY—Serves classic Italian dishes. Menu includes paninis, deli subs and wraps, pasta, soups, and more. Closed Sunday. 116 S. Front. 626-8848. L, D, X, $ TWILIGHT SKY TERRACE—Offers small plates of tostados, nachos, flatbreads, paninis; also hand-crafted cocktails and sweeping rooftop views of the downtown Memphis skyline. Open, weather permitting.  The Madison Hotel, 79 Madison. 333-1224. L (Sat.Sun.), D, WB.X, $ TYCOON—Among the Asian entrees are spicy garlic shrimp, Thai gumbo, and special house noodle soup. 3307 Kirby Parkway. 3628788. B, L, D, X, $ UNCLE BUCK’S FISHBOWL & GRILL—Burgers, pizza, fish dishes, sandwiches, and more served in a unique “underwater” setting.  Bass Pro, Bass Pro Drive, 291-8200. L, D, X, $-$$ WANG’S MANDARIN HOUSE—Offers Mandarin, Cantonese, Szechuan, and spicy Hunan entrees, including the goldensesame chicken; next door is East Tapas, serving small plates with an Asian twist.  6065 Park Ave, Park Place Mall. 763-0676. L, D, X, MRA, $-$$ WASABI—Serving traditional Japanese offerings, hibachi, sashimi, and sushi. The Sweet Heart roll, wrapped — in the shape of a heart — with tuna and filled with spicy salmon, yellowtail, and avocado, is a specialty.  5101 Sanderlin Road, Suite 105. 421-6399. L, D, X, $-$$ WEST STREET DINER—This home-style eatery offers breakfast, burgers, po’boys, and more. 2076 West St. (Germantown). 757-2191. B, L, D (Mon.-Fri.), X, MRA, $ WOMAN’S EXCHANGE TEA ROOM—Chicken-salad plate, beef tenderloin, soups-and-sandwiches, and vegetable plates are specialties; meal includes drink and dessert. Closed Sat.Sun. 88 Racine. 327-5681. L, X, $ ZAKA BOWL—This vegan restaurant serves build-your-own vegetable bowls featuring ingredients such as agave Brussels sprouts and roasted beets. 575 Erin. 509-3105. L, D, $ M A R C H 2 0 1 7 • M E M P H I S M A G A Z I N E . C O M • 191

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LAST STAND

When GRIZ = KISS A basketball team and a rock band . . . finally united.

by frank murtaugh

T

his being our Faces and Places issue, I found myself pondering the Memphis Grizzlies’ “Face of the Franchise.” You know how this works. Who is the player who comes to mind — without a moment’s thought — when you consider a professional team. New York Jets? Joe Namath. Chicago Bulls? Michael Jordan. Kansas City Royals? George Brett. The fact is, the Grizzlies have four Faces of the Franchise, and they’re all currently wearing Beale Street Blue: point guard Mike Conley (here since 2007), center Marc Gasol (2008), forward Zach Randolph (2009), and swingman Tony Allen (2010). A four-man band, better as a unit than any of them would be as solo acts. Which reminded me of four other famous faces . . . those of rock-and-roll Hall of Famers KISS. (If Seventies glam metal has a “Face of the Franchise,” they’re wearing face paint, one with its serpentine tongue extended.) Taking this parallel a step further, which Grizzly “Face” belongs with which character in KISS? These matches are worth a deuce.

T HE SPA C E M A N

T HE DE MON

T HE S TA R C HIL D

#3

#3

originally Ace Frehley, currently Tommy Thayer — Tony Allen

Gene Simmons — Zach Randolph

The backbone, the heartbeat, the pulse of his team. A position that requires a proper combination of muscle and touch, rhythm always paramount. I like to picture Gasol in his younger, shaggier days with the Grizzlies when I see him wearing the whiskered face-paint made famous by Criss. Gasol rose from obscurity (overshadowed by the older brother for whom he was traded) to become the first Memphis player to start in the All-Star Game (2015). Just as Criss carried the vocals for “Beth,” the ballad that ironically carried his speaker-blowing band to the top of the charts in 1976.

This is the easiest pairing of the four. Whether you picture Allen kicking Clipper All-Star Chris Paul in the head or pummeling teammate O.J. Mayo on an airplane, the Frehley classic “Shock Me” would make for a nice soundtrack. Muscle-flexing, arms pumping during timeouts (as the rest of his team listens to instructions). Full-body gyrations upon the ball being awarded to Memphis after a turnover. Not to mention nightly assignments to lock down the opponent’s top scoring threat. If any Grizzly ever spontaneously bursts into smoke (as Ace’s guitar did for hundreds of concerts), it will be Tony Allen. The Grindfather’s tenure in Memphis has been a “Rocket Ride” from the start.

Line the Grizzlies up on the baseline and ask for a volunteer to regurgitate blood and, later in the show, spit lighter fluid over a burning torch (thus “breathing fire”). After Allen is excluded (imagine the consequences of a flame in his hands), there’s only one man for such showmanship. Just as Gene’s bat-wing makeup has become the definitive “face” of KISS, so Randolph embodies the Grizzlies’ most successful, enduring run as a perennial playoff team. The only way I see the ferocity of Randolph’s image growing is for him to add knee-high boots with scales and seven-inch fangs as platforms. Z-Bo’s soundtrack would open with “I Love It Loud” and close with “God of Thunder.”

#3

#3

Paul Stanley — Mike Conley

Their surnames are similar and each is the youngest member of his band. (Paul is the youngest of the original four KISS members.) Every group needs a front man, and the Grizzlies’ longtime point guard has been front and center for his team since starting 46 games as a 20-year-old rookie in the 2007-08 season. No one has sung more KISS tunes than Stanley and no one has played in more Grizzly games than Conley. He even wears a mask well (see Conley’s 2015 broken-face playoff performance). When Conley drains a three-pointer and brings that “okay” sign to his face, I like to picture his right eye within a black star. Conley’s signature KISS song? As the franchise’s career leader in steals, it has to be “I Stole Your Love.”

Grit and grind all night. And party every day. 

PHOTOGRAPHS COURTESY JOE MURPHY / MEMPHIS GRIZZLIES | KISS ICONS BY ZOKAD182G | DREAMSTIME

T HE C AT M A N

originally Peter Criss, currently Eric Singer — Marc Gasol

192 • M E M P H I S M A G A Z I N E . C O M • M A R C H 2 0 1 7

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2/15/17 2:11 PM


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2/18/17 4:47 PM


S:8”

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2/18/17 4:22 PM

Memphis magazine, March 2017  

In this issue: It's our Faces and Places issue! Rodd Bland is the next face of blues on Beale Street; In-depth looks at the Highland Strip's...

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