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Memphis • THE CITY MAGAZINE • W W W.MEMPHISMAGAZINE.COM

ON THE TOWN WITH MICHAEL DONAHUE | GREAT HOMES | CLAYBORN TEMPLE | GREEN DINING

VOL XLII NO 3 | J U N E 2 01 7

THE CITY MAGAZINE

TOP DOCTORS 2017 Our peer-reviewed list with over USA $4.99

in

200 doctors

55 specialties.

0 6

—1 7

DISPLAY UNTIL JULY 10, 2017

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5/23/17 10:59 AM


SMALL MEETINGS. BIG IMPACT. Here’s what our Clients are saying about The Westin Memphis Beale Street: We’ve had this meeting at the Westin Memphis Beale Street 3 years in a row. Each year has been great, but this year was even better!!! Kudos to the staff!!! - Steve F. What’s not to Love? Location to FedEx Forum - Team was comfortable - Food was great - Service was terrific.- Jay D We always receive the best customer service from the Westin! - Mark G. I had high expectations, but I was still really impressed. AV was set up early and ran well, the food was delicious and the service was great, not disruptive to the speaker or presentation in the least. Hospitality is what Westin does best, and we really felt taken care of from the moment we walked in, to the minute we left. Staff was friendly and helpful, parking and valet was convenient, the entire event seemed very turn-key, leaving our team not having much to do beyond enjoy the event. Shaina G. Everyone was professional and handled everything beautifully. Great work! - Jessica G.

Contact our Professional Sales and Events Team to help plan your next event! 901-334-5920 • westin.com/bealestreet

The Westin Memphis Beale Street 170 Lt. George W. Lee Avenue, Memphis, TN 38103

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5/18/17 9:45 AM


We are your chest pain center when seconds count. ACCREDITED CHEST PAIN CENTERS: Baptist is the only health care system in the Mid-South that offers

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the full spectrum of heart care, from noninvasive cardiology to adult heart transplants. And when seconds matter, we use technology that provides rapid diagnostics and treatment for our patients. There’s

Baptist Memorial Hospital-DeSoto 7601 Southcrest Parkway Southaven, MS

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only one smart choice when it comes to advanced care for your heart. Get better with Baptist.

Get Better. 5/5/17 11:30 AM


THE OYSTER PERPETUAL The incarnation of the original Oyster launched in 1926 is a distinctive symbol of universal style. It doesn’t just tell time. It tells history.

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OYSTER PERPETUAL 39

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2017 C 300 Sport Sedan and 2017 GLE 350 shown in Selenite Grey metallic paint. 2017 GLA 250 shown in Polar Silver metallic paint. Optional equipment shown. *MSRP excludes all options, taxes, title, registration, transportation charge and dealer prep. Options, model availability and actual dealer price may vary. See dealer for details. ©2017 Authorized Mercedes-Benz Dealers For more information, call 1-800-FOR-MERCEDES, or visit MBUSA.com.

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5/9/17 12:38 PM


MEMPHIS FUNERAL HOME The Most Trusted Name In Memphis. Since 1931.

“Your guidance was gentle…the entire process was beautiful. You exceeded all our expectations.” Words from a family who experienced the Memphis Funeral Home difference. In fact, Memphis Funeral Home has been ranked in the top 3% of all funeral homes nationwide for its quality of service. This excellence in service is available at both locations. 5599 Poplar Avenue • 3700 North Germantown Road • 901-725-0100

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Features

24 Clarion Call VOL XLII NO 2 | JUNE 2017 Memphis • THE CITY MAGAZINE • W W W.MEMPHISMAGAZINE.COM

ON THE TOWN WITH MICHAEL DONAHUE | GREAT HOMES | CLAYBORN TEMPLE | GREEN DINING

THE CITY MAGAZINE

VOL XLII NO 3 | J U N E 2 01 7

The life, death, and rebirth of Clayborn Temple.

~ by chris mccoy

32 Radio Heaven

Fifty years ago, FM 100 became a Memphis music institution. ~ by george larrimore

39 Top Doctors

A comprehensive guide to the finest physicians in the Mid-South.

90 great homes Magnificat!

TOP DOCTORS 2017 Our peer-reviewed list

200 doctors 55 specialties.

with over in

USA $4.99

0 6

—1

This South Front Street home is a loving family affair for three outstanding women.

24

~ by anne cunningham o’neill

100 fiction contest winner Sketches

7

DISPLAY UNTIL JULY 10, 2017

COVER ILLUSTRATION BY LIGHTHOUSE STUDIO / ILLUSTRATION SOURCE

Did a baby circus elephant escape the way a young girl remembered? ~ by hannah heath johnson

Columns

110 road trip

Station to Station Americana and brisket are served in equal portions at the Bus Stop restaurant in Dyersburg, Tennessee.~ by chris davis

32

117 local treasures

A Life in Three Acts At 95, Lester Gingold has found the secret to aging well: Have a daily purpose in life.

~ by jane schneider

Up Front

14

12 in the beginning 14 on the town (also 36 and 98)

16 fine print 18 city journal 20 out and about

126 ask vance

Tommy O’Brien Our trivia expert solves local mysteries of who, what, when, where, why, and why not.

~ by vance lauderdale

130 garden variety Making Scents

A helpful guide to local flowers that smell as wonderful as they look.

90

~ by christine arpe gang

132 dining out Go Green

A trio of casual restaurants in Midtown and East Memphis puts a healthy and flavorful spin on fast food.

~ by pamela denney and lesley young

Memphis (ISSN 1622-820x) is published monthly for $15 per year by Contemporary Media, Inc., P.O. Box 1738, Memphis, TN 38101 © 2017. Telephone: 901-521-9000. For subscription info, please call 901-521-9000. Subscription customer service mailing address is Memphis magazine, P.O. Box 1738, Memphis, TN 38101. All rights reserved. • Periodicals Postage Paid at Memphis, TN. Postmasters: send address changes to Memphis, P.O. Box 1738, Memphis, TN 38101.

136 city dining

Tidbits: Sushi Jimmi; plus the city’s most extensive dining listings.

144 last stand

“Uncle Tim” An appreciation of a Bluff City sports legend: Tim McCarver. ~ by frank murtaugh

132 JUNE 20 17 • MEMPHISMAGA ZINE.COM • 7

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BONUS

In This Issue 2017MEDICALGUIDE

SPECIAL ADVERTISING SECTION

FOR OVER 50 YEARS, Adams Patterson has been delivering comprehensive women’s health care, offering the latest, most practical solutions. We were the first to introduce both the MonaLisa Touch laser for vaginal revitalization and SculpSure, non-invasive body contouring to the MidSouth. Whether you are a young woman just starting your family or are transitioning through menopause, we will address your concerns with a full evaluation. Our individualized approach allows us to be certain that the preventive, medical, educational, surgical, or cosmetic services you receive from us are tailor-made to suit you. All of our partners are board-certified specialists and clinical instructors at the University of Tennessee — Memphis. If you are looking for an experienced and knowledgeable team offering the most advanced solutions, Adams Patterson is your health and beauty resource. We provide comprehensive medical and surgical services in these areas: • Gynecology • Menopause management • Routine and high-risk obstetrics • Contraception

We also perform the following procedures in our office: • MonaLisa Touch™ Laser Treatment for Vaginal Revitalization • SculpSure Non-Invasive Body Contouring • Kybella, Injections used for the reduction of submental fat, also known as a “double chin” • Endometrial Ablation for heavy periods • Essure® — Permanent birth control procedure We offer in-office screening and diagnostic services for: • Digital mammography • Bone densitometry • High-definition ultrasound with 4-D images • Genetic screening • Amniocentesis

INS T I T U T ION A L A ND INDI V IDUA L PR AC T I T IONER PROFILE S

ADAMS PATTERSON GYNECOLOGY & OBSTETRICS Back row, left to right: Dr. Todd Chappell, Dr. Miriah Denbo, and Dr. Frank King Front row, left to right: Dr. Leigh Keegan, Dr. Sharon A. Butcher, Dr. Leah Tonkin, Dr. Regina Healy, and nurse practitioner, Darby Heitman

In addition, we offer Nexplanon contraceptive implants, and Mirena, Skyla and Paragard IUD insertion. Our doctors have special expertise in robotic surgery for outpatient hysterectomy, including one of the only surgeons in the Mid-South performing Single-Site® “Virtually Scarless” Robotic surgery and other minimally invasive procedures. Moreover, our aesthetic services include Botox® Treatment, Latisse® — to help promote eye lash growth, Obagi and Jan Marini® Skin Care Products, Juvederm® Ultra Cosmetic Fillers, and Chemical Peels, as well as Sclero Therapy for treatment of spider leg veins and Advanced Laser Therapy.

Baptist Women’s Hospital 6215 Humphreys Blvd. Suite 301 Memphis, TN 38120 Methodist Germantown Hospital 7705 Poplar Avenue Building B, Suite 220 Germantown, TN 38138 901.767.3810 adamspatterson.com

Pages 65 - 89 Profiles of the area’s leading medical practices and physicians.

J U N E 2 0 1 7 • M E M P H I S M A G A Z I N E . C O M • 65 CRYE-LEIKE, REALTORS MM_AdamsPattersonGynecologyAndObstetricsOBGYN_June17_fp.indd 65

SPECIAL ADVERTISING SECTION

5/16/17 2:53 PM

real estate ALL-STARS

SPECIAL ADVERTISING SECTION

VICKI BLACKWELL

JERRY LUCIUS

MARK SALLER

GAY YOUNG

YOUR TRUSTED REAL ESTATE ADVISOR. With over 30 years in Real Estate, Vicki is Vice President and Managing Broker with Crye-Leike Realtors. A Lifetime Member of the Multi-Million Dollar Club, Vicki has taken an active role in the real estate industry, serving on the Realtor Political Action Committee, The Grievance Committee, and Past President of the Young Realtors Group. She is a Certified Real Estate Specialist. Vicki received the Lion Heart Award for Volunteer Service for Youth Villages and served as two-term Race Director for the YV5K Run. In 2014 she established BARC, Blackwell Animal Rescue Center, a 501(c)(3) Charitable Organization to rescue, rehabilitate, and rehome abused and abandoned animals. Over 750 dogs and cats rescued since the beginning. In 2016 she was awarded the Rotary-Paul Harris Fellow Award as recognition for exceptional service. Vicki is licensed in Tennessee and Mississippi.

ONE OF MY specific areas of interest, focus and concentration is New Home Sales. Particularly, for Baby Boomers and Empty Nesters, who are Down-sizing or Right-sizing. The Real Estate Market is fast changing for this age group, with new trends, designs, and even subdivision specific, by catering to their needs and wants, especially for this Clientele. Builders and Developers in Shelby County and Fayette County are addressing these needs by building “all on one level” or even adding a grandkids playroom up. More specifically Collierville TN and Oakland TN have subdivisions that are specifically targeted to Baby Boomers. Please call for more details and floorplan specific information. It was not long ago when the news media made a Big Deal out of the youngest Baby Boomers had just turned 50.

A NATIVE MEMPHIAN with 30 years of real estate experience, Mark is currently representing Memphis Invest Group and sales manager for Premier Realty Group. Ranked the number-1 top-selling agent three years in a row with 1,800 sales over the last seven years, averaging 260 sales per year, Mark Saller is ranked as one of the top-selling agents in The Memphis Area Association of Realtors. Licensed in Tennessee and Mississippi, he served on both the ethics committee and professional standards committee and has served as a past chairman of The Realtors Political Action Committee. Call Mark for all your real estate needs.

MARX-BENSDORF REALTORS

CRYE-LEIKE, REALTORS

901.355.3076 (c) or 901.682-1868 (o) jerryluciusrealtor.com Jlucius@m-brealtors.com

PREMIER REALTY GROUP

GAY YOUNG IS one of the most well-respected and sought-after real estate agents in the Memphis and North Mississippi areas for both buying and selling homes. A resident of Collierville, Gay is involved in both community and church activities and is a Realtor resource for the many clients and contacts she calls “friends.” After a successful 20+ year career in the medical field in marketing, management and sales, Gay went to work fulltime in real estate with Keller Williams Realty, the largest real estate company in the World. Earning the Lifetime Member of the Multi-Million Dollar Club designation in record time, Gay works diligently to serve her clients’ best interests in their home purchase or sale. Energetic, professional and a top-notch negotiator with integrity are words to describe Gay’s style of taking care of clients. REAL Trends recognizes Gay as one of the top Realtors in America.

Broker

Broker/Vice President

901.521.9736 (o) 901.335.1441 (c) vblackwell@crye-leike.com

ABR

134 Timber Creek, Cordova, TN 38018 901.831.7650 marksaller@msn.com

ABR, SFR, MMDC

KELLER WILLIAMS REALTY

930 S White Station, Memphis, TN 38117 901.261.7900 (o) 901.581.6118 (c) www.gayyoungonline.com

RE A L E S TAT E A LL S TA RS Page 109 Profiles of the best realtors in the Mid-South.

Thousands of Gowns Sizes 2-32 | Special Plus Size Boutique Area Personal Consultant for Each Bride

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5/16/17 2:41 PM

Coming in August CIT Y GUIDE

C E L E BR AT IN G

Memphis • THE CITY MAGA ZINE • W W W.MEMPHISMAGA ZINE.COM

40 YEARS

THE CITY MAGAZINE

The ultimate resource for living in the MidSouth features the widely read “Who’s Who” in Memphis.

VOL XLI NO 5 | AUGUST 2016

CITY GUIDE 2016

USA $4.99

0 8

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COURT SQUAR E AT S U N S E T

DISPLAY UNTIL SEPTEMBER 10, 2016

7/22/16 12:06 PM

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2017 COLLEGE GUIDE

2016 COLLEGE GUIDE

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Essential information for selecting the school of choice, featuring many of the area's leading colleges and universities. 7/26/16 9:06 AM

Coming In September: MEMPHIS A S SOCI AT ION OF INDEPENDEN T SCHOOL S GUIDE

2016 Memphis Area

INDEPENDENT

SCHOOLS

GUIDE

Roof Replacement • Roof Repair Gutters • Painting • Siding CALL TODAY FOR A FREE INSPECTION

901-232-7732

mtownconstruction.com

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A comprehensive guide to the area's independent schools. 8/18/16 3:34 PM

For more information on advertising or our upcoming special sections, please contact Margie Neal at margie@memphismagazine.com

8 • MEMPHISMAGA ZINE.COM • JUNE 20 17

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our

Center for Rehabilitative Medicine

you

can help get

life back to

OPEN UNTIL

7 PM East Campus • 6555 Quince Road Memphis, TN 38119

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After an accident or illness, getting back to your life is the top priority. At the Center for Rehabilitative Medicine, we are dedicated to helping you recover and regain your physical health. Our care team, led by a boardcertified physical medicine and rehabilitation physician, collaborates with you to develop progressive paths to wellness that may include physical therapy, pain management, and other therapeutic services. It’s not just our job to give our patients the specialized care they need to return to an active life, it’s what we love to do.

Schedule an appointment online at RegionalOneHealth.org

or call 901.515.EAST

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Your life. Our passion.

5/16/17 10:16 AM


Memphis THE C IT Y MAGAZ INE

General Excellence Grand Award Winner City and Regional Magazine Association 2007, 2008, 2010, 2014 STANDARD OF EXCELLENCE SINCE 1950

&7

PUBLISHER/EDITOR kenneth neill EXECUTIVE EDITOR michael finger MANAGING EDITOR frank murtaugh

Memphis Magazine’s

THE 2017

FACE

SENIOR EDITOR shara clark ASSOCIATE EDITOR samuel x. cicci

OF

ARTS & LIFESTYLE EDITOR anne cunningham o’neill

ORIENTAL RUGS

FASHION EDITOR augusta campbell FOOD EDITOR pamela denney CONTRIBUTING EDITORS john branston,

tom jones, vance lauderdale, amy lawrence

4

CREATIVE DIRECTOR brian groppe PRODUCTION OPERATIONS DIRECTOR margie neal SENIOR ART DIRECTOR carrie beasley ADVERTISING ART DIRECTOR christopher myers GRAPHIC DESIGNERS jeremiah matthews,

bryan rollins

appraisals handwash/cleaning sales reweaving repairs color run restoration pet and other stain removals moth damage odor removal and much more

PHOTOGRAPHY justin fox burks,larry kuzniewski,

chip pankey

4

ADVERTISING SALES MANAGER raquel hinson SENIOR ACCOUNT EXECUTIVES joy bateman,

sloane patteson taylor ACCOUNT EXECUTIVE zach scott

Master Weaver Ali Taghavi Restoring a antique Persian Farahan rug.

ADVERTISING ASSISTANT roxy matthews

4

published by contemporary media, inc. memphis, tn 901-521-9000 p • 901-521-0129 f subscriptions: 901-521-9000

4

CHIEF EXECUTIVE OFFICER kenneth neill CHIEF OPERATING OFFICER molly willmott

3554 Park Avenue, Memphis, TN • (901) 327-5033 • taghavirugs.com

This is more than a Dumpster — This is moreIt than — It is atoCommitment is aa Dumpster Commitment Recyclingto Recycling

CONTROLLER ashley haeger DIRECTOR OF BUSINESS DEVELOPMENT jeffrey a. goldberg EDITORIAL DIRECTOR bruce vanwyngarden DIGITAL MANAGER kevin lipe SOCIAL MEDIA MANAGER matthew preston DISTRIBUTION MANAGER lynn sparagowski EMAIL MARKETING MANAGER britt ervin IT DIRECTOR joseph carey ACCOUNTING ASSISTANT celeste dixon RECEPTIONIST kalena mckinney

&7 june 2017

Everyday is Earthis Day at EBOX. Areat weEBOX. on your job? Everyday Earth Day

Are we on your job? 901-850-9996

901-850-9996

member: City and Regional Magazine Association member: Circulation Verification Council

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5/15/17 1:52 PM


IN THE BEGINNING | by kenneth neill

A State of Confusion

N

ot all states are created equal in these United States. Some are rich, some are poor. Some are mostly warm (Arizona) and some are mostly cool (Alaska). And some are just plain irregular. The 50 states that comprise our country vary widely in shape and size. Some are more or less square (Colorado and Arkansas), even though most are more or less rectangular (think South Dakota and Indiana).

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Then there are those other states, like ours, that come in odd shapes and sizes. And perhaps none are odder than our home state of Tennessee. Four hundred and forty miles long and just 120 miles in width, Tennessee is shaped like one gigantic cigar, given that it stretches 440 miles from Memphis to Kingsport. Given its formidable length, the Volunteer State shares with Missouri the distinction of bordering the largest number of other American states (eight). Just consider our state flag with its three stars, reflecting as that flag does, our three “grand divisions” (West, Middle, and East), neatly divided by the Tennessee River in two places. Those divisions, of course, are as cultural and political as they are geographical. Western Tennessee is pretty much as flat as a pancake, while the Smoky Mountains create a far different landscape in the east. While Tennessee seceded in 1861, eastern Tennessee remained staunchly pro-Union throughout the Civil War. Even today, Memphis has about as much in common with Kingsport as it did back then. I’ve been thinking about Tennessee’s cultural diversity, if you want to call it that, ever since Gannett acquired The Commercial Appeal in 2015, giving the Virginia-based company ownership of all of the major daily newspapers in our state save the Chattanooga Times Free Press. Since then, we have watched the transformation of the CA into a decidedly different kind of newspaper than it was just two years ago. Yes, there have been layoffs galore, but I for one am at least as much struck by the fact that Gannett seems to be trying to build a grand Tennessee brand for its papers across the state. Today, every CA reporter’s print byline is tagged with “USA Today Network – Tennessee.” Coverage is considerably broader than it used to be. Throughout the print edition of The Commercial Appeal, readers see more and more stories about news and events in other parts of our state, and fewer and fewer about what’s happening in and around Memphis.

I’m not making any kind of judgment here; I am simply observing that Gannett seems intent on making all its media properties across the state an integral part of what seems to be an evolving All-Tennessee network. Indeed, given that so many parts of its daily operations (proofing, printing, etc.) have already been moved out of town, I would not be surprised to see The Commercial Appeal transformed in the future into something called The Tennessean (Memphis edition). Of course, it’s none of my business to determine what Gannett will or won’t do with our 176-year-old daily – that’s the national newspaper chain’s job, not mine. But still, someone in Nashville needs to think twice or thrice about what they are attempting to do in terms of Memphis news coverage. They need to consider how strange this current attempt to provide a state-centered set of dailies in Tennessee actually is, and what may come from this major media transformation in a state that is just about as far from homogenous as any in our country. Yes, some states, because of their shape and the central location of their capital city, lend themselves easily to state-wide newspapers. Little Rock’s Arkansas Democrat-Gazette is a perfect example of a centrally located daily that can cover the news for all Arkansans. Tennessee's geographic circumstances are entirely different. People in Memphis, for example, care little about what happens to the NHL’s Nashville Predators. All the while, folks in Nashville probably care next to nothing about what happens to our beloved Memphis Grizzlies. There’s no criticism here, just a recognition of reality. Nashville is Nashville, Memphis is Memphis; period, the end. As two centuries of history should have told their powers-thatbe, the Gannett Company would be much the wiser if they simply recognized that, as regards a statewide newspaper network, never the twain shall meet. Kenneth Neill publisher / editor

12 • M E M P H I S M A G A Z I N E . C O M • J U N E 2 0 1 7

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on the town

^6 with michael donahue ^6 WHAT: FM 100 Anniversary Party WHERE: Lafayette’s Music Room WHEN: May 7, 2017

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ocks gathered in one room May 7, but it wasn’t a locker room. WMC-FM 100 reunited former deejays at FM 100’s 50th-anniversary party at Lafayette’s Music Room. The event, which included a panel discussion with former FM 100 deejays, was “a class reunion of sorts,” said emcee Steve Conley, a deejay from 1979 until 2006. “I had not seen some of them in decades.” What made the radio station so special from the get-go? “It was because we were a bunch of young guys who didn’t know what we were doing until we figured out we had more than 100,000 watts of power,” Steve said. “We didn’t know what that meant: ‘Alabama, Arkansas, Kentucky, you’re listening to us?’ ‘Yes. Loud and clear.’ At that point it sunk in that we have an audience.’” And, he said, “We were given the freedom to play what we wanted to. And we all had good ears for good music.” Steve, now vice-president of sales and marketing for Mirimichi Golf Course, recalled the time FM 100 interviewed David Bowie at his London townhouse in the early 1970s when The Rise and Fall of Ziggy Stardust was about to be released. “A week later we got a package from ‘Mr. D. Jones’ — David Bowie’s real name. It was the first copy of Ziggy Stardust.” He remembered getting a compilation CD record companies would use with a publication called Hit Makers. One of the songs was Marc Cohn’s “Walking in Memphis.” He played it on the air twice in one day. “I was the first guy to play ‘Walkin’ in Memphis.’” Jon Scott, who served as music director and deejay from 1967 to the mid-1970s, came up with the idea for the party, which featured entertainers Keith Sykes, Larry Raspberry, Susan Marshall, and Reba Russell. For more about the birth of FM 100, see “Radio Heaven” on page 32.

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1 Ron Olson, Jon Scott, Steve Conley, and Mike Powell 2 FM 100 jocks taking part in a panel discussion 3 Susan Marshall, Pat Rainer, Reba Russell, Keith and Jerene Sykes 4 Greg Hamilton, J. W. Whitten, and Jaye Fleischman 5 Jeania Lucchesi and Jim Burge 6 Bob Nelson and Anne Tomlinson 7 Laura Rosas, Mark Anderson, and Kathy ThurmondEdwards 8 Rose Salles and George Merrifield

9 Jon Hornyak and Kevin Kane 10 David

Fleischman, Cindy Bailey, Jerry Williams, Leon Griffin, Pat Rainer, and Don Nix. 11 Dave Brown 12 Janet Rast, Keith Norwood, and Melody Meadows 13 Jeremiah Tucker and

Marie Pizano 14 Laurie Stark and Steve Cohen 3

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FINE PRINT

Paging Dr. Internet The doctor who’s always in and always right … or not.

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he doctor will see you now. The doctor will come to your house. There is no appointment necessary. The doctor will explain the diagnosis. Need an extra few minutes? An extra hour? No problem. Want a second opinion? No problem again. See a specialist? Of course, referrals are so easy. The doctor takes Medicare, Medicaid, or private insurance. Free works, too. Obamacare under fire? Don’t worry about it. Come on in. Or, rather, click on in. Because this doctor, of course, is Dr. Internet. Granted, there are some creeps, frauds, and imposters lurking around the office. But there are some first-rate docs too, from places such as the Mayo Clinic and Harvard Medical School. Some of these actual doctors, with licenses and medical school training and humanoid features and all that, try to share space with Dr. Internet and actually charge for their personal online attention. Good luck with that! They soon learn what musicians, newspapers, and writers learned long ago — once you give it away you can’t charge for it. Here’s the cold reality of healthcare in this day and age. If you’re broken or bleeding or unconscious or in imminent danger of dying, go to a real doctor and be prepared to wait and pay big money. If you’re suffering and don’t feel well, sleep well, eat right, drink right, or look well, consult Dr. Internet. Any hour, any day. It was recently widely re-

ported that diet soft drinks can have nasty side effects such as increased risk of strokes and dementia. Never mind that anything sold in 32-ounce cups in convenience stores and gas stations probably isn’t good for you. This warning came from a study by doctors at Boston University School of Medicine who wrote that “there are many studies now suggesting detrimental effects

of sugary beverages, but we also need to consider the possibility that diet drinks may not be healthy alternatives.” As a substitute, is orange juice good for you? Google that and get 8.4 million results. Drink up. Or throw it out. Your call. Grapefruit juice instead? Excellent source of Vitamin C, which prevents colds, scurvy, and hyper tension, according to conventional wisdom and “www.webmd. com. But not with Lipitor, the commonly prescribed statin drug for lowering cholesterol. “To be on the safe side, check with your doctor,” says the Harvard Medical School online publication. Sun exposure is good for you, says a 60-something doctor friend in Memphis who walks shirtless and hatless every day

If you’re suffering and don’t feel well, sleep well, eat right, drink right, or look well, consult Dr. Internet. Any hour, any day.

he can in order to get at least 30 minutes of full-body sunshine and Vitamin D. Bad for you, says another doctor friend who lathers up every square inch of his head and body with sunscreen and layers of clothing when he goes outside to lessen the risk of skin cancer. Dr. Internet says they’re both right. More on vitamin D. We all “know” by now that cheese is bad for cholesterol, and eggs (especially the dreaded yolk, a veritable dirty bomb waiting to explode in your bloodstream) are worse. Well, if you have had a physical recently, and that physical included a blood test screening for Vitamin D, you may have gotten a note from your doctor to add more Vitamin D to your daily diet. And if you then go see Dr. Internet and ask about “natural sources of Vitamin D” you will see the aforementioned cheese and eggs and egg yolks. To be fair, Dr. Internet often gives a detailed explanation that tamps down the alarm and straddles the medical fence. But the nightly television news shows and the big online newspapers have to boil it down to a minute or less to accommodate the attention span of viewers and online surfers, which leads to simplifications that can cause stress and anxiety and drive you to sleep aids that cause dependence and short-term memory loss that make you irritable, which leads to heart attacks, so you probably should consult a doctor right this minute. It’s no problem.  

PHOTOGRAPH BY TOM WANG | DREAMSTIME

by john branston

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5/15/17 1:55 PM


CITY JOURNAL

The Game of Life Mentors and role models are needed now, more than ever.

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hen you are 6 feet 9 inches tall and earn $6 million a year as an NBA player, people listen to you when you speak. That was clear from the interest in Tarik Black’s recent news conference announcing his new foundation, which will sponsor a four-day summer basketball camp at Ridgeway High School for 50 boys 11 to 15 years old. It is just the opening salvo in a broader campaign aimed at reducing poverty and “inspiring underserved youth to become visionaries.” Ultimately, the lifelong Memphian’s plan is to expand the program for boys, add a camp for girls, and arrange for young people to travel outside of Memphis to broaden their experiences. The Los Angeles Lakers center pointed out that Memphis is lucky to have so many local basketball stars return to help the city, including Andre Turner, Elliott Perry, Ken Moody, Penny Hardaway, and John Wilfong. As if to emphasize that point, days after his announcement, another NBA player, Thaddeus Young, proposed to spend $500,000 for a new youth program in South Memphis that would take over the former Head Start and Health Loop buildings next door to his alma mater, Mitchell High School. While basketball players in a basketball city center most of their programs on the court, Black made the point that he was “in the band first before basketball” and lamented cuts in arts and band programs. “We need to implement life skills and we can teach basketball or band and at the same time, through mentorships and positive experiences, we can give more young people a fighting chance at a successful life,” he said. “I am blessed by God that I can come back and be an advocate for change. I had a dream of helping the city I grew up in. Crime is running rampant because there are not as many opportunities for young people.

We want to open doors and help those needing help to rise above their circumstances.” At his announcement, in stressing the importance of mentors and role models, Black spotlighted people who kept him grounded, shaped his character, and made sure he didn’t lose confidence in himself or quit pushing toward his goals. “I was one of the fortunate ones,” he said. “Too many young people in Memphis don’t have that kind of support and parents to guide their paths. That’s where community organizations have to pick up the slack to give every young person a fighting chance.” His announcement raised this question: How many children in Memphis are in need of such interventions and how many are being touched by them? The answer, sadly, is that no one knows for sure. There are about 65,000 children in Memphis living in poverty, based on the city’s child poverty rate of almost 43 percent, second highest for an American city with more than 500,000 people; however, the number of children in need of interventions include more than just children in poverty. The scope of the problem was indicated when the Ad-

How many children in Memphis are in need of such interventions and how many are being touched by them?

Tarik Black with the Los Angeles Lakers competes with the Memphis Grizzlies at FedExForum in December 2016.

verse Childhood Experiences (ACE) Center Task Force of Shelby County reported that 52 percent of adults in Shelby County claim that they had at least one negative childhood experience, like abuse, neglect, household dysfunction, and violence in the home. Twenty percent reported two to three adverse childhood experiences and 12 percent experienced four or more, and with each experience, the toxic stress in youth’s lives is increased, dramatically stacking up the odds against them as they enter adulthood. Shelby County Chief Public Defender Stephen Bush, chairman of the ACE Task Force, said, “I see daily the consequences of adverse childhood experiences in the lives of the thousands of children as they enter Juvenile Court. In fact, the vast majority of children involved in the juvenile justice system are living with the trauma of adverse experiences that include actual exposure to violence. This is no surprise. For years we’ve known about the link between early childhood traumas and future justice system involvement.” Meanwhile, no one is tracking interventions like after-school activities and summer programs, and how often individuals use them. Local data does indicate that youths begin to show measurable improvement when they are enrolled in three or more programs. This remains one of Memphis’ most perplexing challenges. While we are grateful for every program for youths, the ultimate question is how we can expand them to reach the tens of thousands of children who deserve a fair chance in life. To quote Tarik Black, we can do it because we have to, because everybody deserves to believe in themselves.

PHOTOGRAPH COURTESY JOE MURPHY / NBAE VIA GETT Y IMAGES

by tom jones

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OU T A ND A BOU T | JUNE

2017 | compiled by samuel cicci

Beale Street Music Festival

6.16-18

RENT: The Twentieth Anniversary Tour

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or a limited time, catch one of the musicals that changed the landscape of

American theater. RENT traces the paths of seven artists struggling with their careers and personal lives in New York City. Follow along with smash hits such as

“Seasons of Love” and celebrate one of the most popular American musicals from the last two decades. The Orpheum Theater, 203 S. Main St., orpheum-memphis.com musical performances outside, taste food from some of the best local restaurants Memphis has to offer, and participate in a silent auction. National Civil Rights Museum 450 Mulberry St. civilrightsmuseum.org

6.3

Memphis Italian Festival

6.2-25

South Pacific

This Pulitzer Prize-winning musical tells the story of a World War II nurse who falls in love with a French plantation owner. The catalogue includes recognizable hits like “Some Enchanted Evening” and “I’m Gonna Wash That Man Right Outta My Hair.” Tickets cap at $30 for adults, $15 for students. Theatre Memphis 630 Perkins Extd. theatrememphis.org

Memphis brings the tradition of Italian family values to the fore, with the annual Italian Festival combining everything we love about Italy. Experience great food, participate in cooking contests, or test your mettle at bocce ball. Active Italians can even participate in the Luigi 5K. Marquette Park memphisitalianfestival.com

Memphis Italian Festival

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6.10

Night at the Lorraine

Celebrate the history of the Lorraine Motel to benefit the National Civil Rights Museum. Tour the exhibits or enjoy live

6.15, 20

ICEBERG New Music Collective

Crosstown Arts brings ICEBERG, a collective of New York City composers, to Memphis for a showcase of musical talent over the course of two concerts. The organization cultivates the idea that substance, not surface, is most important for music creation and perception. Each composer is from a different musical school and all bring diverse styles to the table. The collective is joined by Memphis’ own Blueshift Ensemble. Crosstown Concourse Atrium 1350 Concourse Ave. crosstownarts.org

contin u ed on page 22

ICEBERG New Music Collective

5/19/17 2:18 PM


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OU T A ND A BOU T contin u ed from page 2 0

Memphis Flyer Margarita Festival

6.17

Memphis Flyer Margarita Festival

Margaritas at Overton Park? Who can beat that? Come on out to the Memphis Flyer’s annual Margarita Festival to see which local establishment can whip up the best frozen drink. Enjoy cuisine from participating Mexican restaurants and and just enjoy a great summer party put on by Memphis’ best news outlet. Overton Park Greensward memphismargaritafestival.com

6.24

Stax Academy at the Levitt Shell

Four weeks of intense study at the Stax Music Academy Summer Music Experience pay off, with around 150 students using their experiences with the legendary record label to put on a now-annual show in Midtown. Students learn Stax Records history, songwriting, music production and business, marketing, and more skills, and use all their knowledge to put on one of the Shell’s best performances. Levitt Shell, 1928 Poplar Ave. levittshell.org The South’s leader in Estate Jewelry and Diamond Solitaires. 1.866.VANATKINS | HISTORIC DOWNTOWN NEW ALBANY | VANATKINS.COM

Photo by Layne Little Photography

Yo Gotti

6.29

Yo Gotti & Friends Birthday Bash

Multiplatinum Memphis rapper Yo Gotti gets his friends together for his fifth annual birthday party at FedExForum. With previous iterations featuring recognizable names such as Nicki Minaj, Nelly, and Meek Mill, this year’s hometown celebrity event is sure to feature yet another star-studded lineup. FedExForum, 191 Beale St. fedexforum.com

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CLARION CALL THE LIFE, DEATH, AND REBIRTH OF CLAYBORN TEMPLE

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by chris mc coy

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ince its opening in 2004, FedExForum has drawn millions of people to Downtown Memphis. As a goodly portion of those people waited on Linden (aka Martin Luther King Jr. Avenue) to park in the Grizzlies garage, they couldn’t help but notice the huge, boarded-up stone church across from the entrance, just south of bustling Beale Street. In a city beset by blight, Clayborn Temple seemed like something of a talisman. It wasn’t always this way, of course. For most of its existence, this historic church — first serving a white congregation, then an AfricanAmerican one — was a symbol of the community it served. “This was the largest church building south of the Ohio River when it opened in 1892,” explains Rob Thompson, president of Clayborn Reborn, the nonprofit group charged with Clayborn Temple’s restoration as a major community institution.

Originally built as Second Presbyterian Church, Clayborn Temple as it appeared in 1974. PHOTOGRAPH COURTESY LIBRARY OF CONGRESS, PRINTS & PHOTOGRAPHS DIVISION, TENN,79-MEMPH,11-1

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Frank Smith (left) and Rob Thompson survey the renovation work being done at Clayborn Temple in 2017. PHOTOGRAPH COURTESY CLAYBORN REBORN

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PHOTOGRAPH COURTESY CLAYBORN REBORN

When the thriving Second Presbyterian Church of Memphis that year completed the $100,000 Romanesque Revival structure on the corner of Hernando and Pontotoc, it became the crown jewel of a downtown district filled with houses of worship. Next door to the temple, where now there are only two rows of trees bordering an empty lot, was a large Episcopal Church. A Methodist church once stood where the Forum’s parking lot is now located. On Sunday mornings, the three blocks north of Linden were crowded with worshippers. “People rode their horses, or walked, to church,” explains Thompson. “Memphis was very dense and urban. The city’s eastern boundaries in the 1890s would have been no further than Manassas, if even that far. In the 1870 census, the population between Pontotoc and the Mississippi was 50-50 black and white. People were living together, on top of each other. I think it was interesting to think about how it was back then. A wealthy congregation built an opulent, beautiful place, a block and a half from Beale Street. This church’s organ was waking people up on Beale Street after a hard Saturday night.” That Temple’s organ was the first one in the city powered by electricity, and with at least 5,000 pipes, it remains the city’s largest. For more than five decades, this landmark building was the spiritual and physical home of Second Presbyterian Church. But by the end of the 1940s, the congregation wasn’t what it used to be. As the city expanded eastward, many of its wealthier members bought homes in the newly created suburbs. By then, the automobile had

above and opposite: A series of special events took place in the old sanctuary 124 years to the day after the building’s original dedication.

transformed the country, and the city of Memphis along with it — a transformation that proved to be a double-edged sword for Second Presbyterian. “A lot of the congregation was lost during World War II, because of gas rationing,” explains Thompson. In 1949, Second Presbyterian recorded only a single baptism. “It was an older congregation,” Thompson says. “There were no young people having babies.”

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hat year, the Second Presbyterian congregation decided to sell the building on Linden, and move to a new home at Goodlett and Central, which was then the eastern boundary of the expanding city. At the time, postwar suburbanization was in full effect, and the building’s buyers ref lected Downtown’s changing demographics. The African Methodist Episcopal (AME) Church had been founded in Philadelphia in 1816, making it the oldest independent Protestant church denomination in the world founded by African Americans. The AME church paid $100,000 for the building and grounds — the same amount of money in absolute terms it was built for, but the equivalent of $270,000 in 1891 dollars. The AME renamed the building “Clayborn Temple” after its dynamic pastor, Bishop J.M. Clayborn, and once again, it became the home to a large, thriving congregation with deep roots in the community. “[The AME] has had, since its founding, a long tradition of what we would call social activism,” says Thompson. “It was just natural that, once the group moved into this building, they would rename

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PHOTOGRAPH COURTESY CLAYBORN REBORN

it Clayborn Temple, after the bishop of this district. This was a socially motivated, socially active congregation.” Clayborn Temple’s location next to Beale Street, the historic economic and social hub of black life in the Mid-South, made it the most prominent African-American church in the city. When the first rumblings of the civil rights movement were heard in the 1950s, the church naturally became a local hub for activism, setting the church on the course to its date with destiny.

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y the late 1960s, the Jim Crow South was crumbling under the assault of the national civil rights movement. The Voting Rights Act of 1965 gave African-Americans unfettered access to the ballot box for the first time since Reconstruction. But the racist power structure was not giving up without a fight. Working conditions for white and black Memphis Sanitation Department workers showed a vast disparity, with black workers not even being allowed to use the showers, and thus having to ride the bus home while stinking of garbage. During the 1960s, tensions rose in the department until, on February 1, 1968, two black sanitation workers, Echol Cole and Robert Walker, were crushed to death while seeking shelter from the freezing rain in the back of a garbage truck. Ten days later, more than half of Memphis’ 1,200 African-American sanitation workers walked off the job. “It was a truly grassroots deal,” explains Thompson. “That’s what makes it so Memphis to me. … The

^6

WHEN THE FIRST RUMBLINGS OF THE CIVIL RIGHTS MOVEMENT WERE HEARD IN THE 1950S, THE CHURCH NATUR ALLY BECAME A LOCAL HUB FOR ACTIVISM.

^6

national union [ASCME] was frustrated. You don’t start a strike in February. You start a strike in July or August, when the garbage is really going to stink. … These guys risked everything for their dignity.” Clayborn Temple became the rallying point for the strikers, who would gather daily at the Temple and march en mass to the courthouse. “This particular African-American congregation had a white minister from Canada named Malcolm Blackburn,” Thompson says. “He was what today we could call a bi-vocational pastor — he had two jobs. He was a journeyman printer. He had a printing press in the basement. The original signs that the strikers used were printed on that press. They opened up the church and said, ‘You guys are welcome to come here every day and organize.’ Eventually, they had nightly meetings, and the community began showing up, too.” By mid February, the marching strikers were regularly being met with force by the police. On February 24th, after a particularly bloody march, Rev. James Lawson addressed the strikers assembled in Clayborn Temple. “For at the heart of racism is the idea that a man is not a man, that a person is not a person. You are human beings. You are men. You deserve dignity.” Since then, Lawson’s words, printed on placards by Malcolm Blackburn’s printing press, have reverberated across the world. “There were lots of different signs early on,” says Thompson. “In some of the old photos, you can see that. But ‘I Am A Man’ became the hallmark. When the Arab Spring happened six years ago in Egypt, there were people walking J U N E 2 0 1 7 • M E M P H I S M A G A Z I N E . C O M • 27

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PHOTOGRAPHS COURTESY CLAYBORN REBORN / JAMIE HARMON

PHOTOGRAPHS COURTESY CLAYBORN REBORN / MICHAEL KEE

around with ‘I Am A Man’ signs in Cairo. During the protests in Ferguson two years ago, it was ‘I Am A Human Being.’” After the passage of the Voting Rights Act in 1965, civil rights leader Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. became increasingly vocal about the economic plight of not only African Americans, but all poor people. In the Memphis sanitation workers’ strike, King and his organization, the Southern Christian Leadership Conference, saw an opportunity to address the intersection of race and class. On March 28th, King traveled to Memphis to lead the strikers on their daily march to the courthouse. But as the marchers rounded the corner at Linden and Main, someone broke a window at the Goldsmith’s department store, and police attacked the marchers, who retreated back to the Temple. Police surrounded the building and fired tear gas through the stained-glass windows, f looding the sanctuary filled with women and children with caustic gas. As the strikers dispersed throughout the city, running battles broke out. Larry Page, a 16-year-old boy, was killed by a shotgun-wielding policeman. His open casket funeral, attended by thousands, was held at Clayborn Temple. King vowed to return to Memphis and hold a peaceful march. On the afternoon of April 4, 1968, he was gunned down while standing on the balcony of the Lorraine Motel. Four days later, 42,000 people marched from Clayborn Temple to the court house. On April 18th, Mayor Henry Loeb agreed to the strikers’ demands.

above: Dance and musical performances, such as a concert by Kirk Whalum (right) have drawn people to the old church while it is being restored.

^6

“CLAYBORN TEMPLE IS BEAUTIFUL, IT’S RICH IN HISTORY AND CULTUR AL SIGNIFICANCE, AND IT HAS INDELIBLE TIES TO OUR COMMUNITY. AND YET IT WAS BOARDED UP AND FORGOTTEN FOR 18 YEARS.” — ROB THOMPSON

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he limestone walls are almost three feet thick,” says Thompson. “This thing is not going anywhere.” But the survival of the building doesn’t necessarily translate to the survival of the congregation. In the wake of the social chaos of the Sanitation Workers Strike, Downtown Memphis hollowed out. White flight intensified, and the black families who could leave also headed for the suburbs. The congregation dwindled in size throughout the 1970s and 1980s, but its commitment to social activism remained intact. In its final incarnation, the church ran a homeless shelter and soup kitchen, which helped ten of thousands of impoverished citizens. Then, in 1999, Clayborn Temple closed its doors for the last time. “The fact that it is the way it is, is a metaphor for Memphis in a lot of ways,” says Thompson. “Clayborn Temple is beautiful, it’s rich in history and cultural significance, and it has indelible ties to our community. And yet it was boarded up and forgotten for 18 years.” Several attempts have been made over the years to resurrect the structure. The city has repeatedly mulled plans to preserve it. The late Judge D’Army Bailey championed the idea of creating a gospel music museum in the space. In 2003-2004, the AME and Second Presbyterian churches worked together on a scheme to create a new congregation in the structure. Each would contribute a pastor, one black and one white, to create a racially integrated, diverse congregation. But the building’s state of disrepair was too great, and the movement floundered. There it would sit until Frank Smith came along.

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t was an easy, innocent beginning,” says Smith, owner of Wiseacre Brewery. “It has to do with my church. About a dozen years ago, I began to be disturbed by the fact that I looked around on Sunday mornings, and everybody looked like me. They vote like me, they process world issues like me. I needed some diversity in my life, some perspective.” Smith and his family joined the Downtown Church, a congregation dedicated to diversity in both race and class. “For the last three years, we’ve ended up meeting in the train station, which is undergoing redevelopment. So we got kicked out of the train station. There’s no good answer as to where a 350-member congregation goes to worship on Sunday downtown. “So instead of buying a piece of dirt and building another church building — Memphis doesn’t need another church building — I said, innocently, one day, ‘I wonder what would happen if we got that old church over by the Forum?’ I knew a little bit about it, not much. When I started digging on it, it took 15 months from the time I first had that thought to convince the AME church to part with it.” One of the reasons urban blight can be such an insoluble problem is that it is, at once, everyone’s problem and yet no one’s problem. Responsibility for abandoned and decaying properties is shared among the owners, the city, and the banks and financial institutions, with none of them having clear incentives to fix the problem. Neighborhood Preservation, Inc. (NPI) was founded to bridge those incentive gaps. “NPI gets involved when the government can’t, because they have no programs,” explains NPI attorney Steve Barlow. “The private sector won’t, because there’s no money to be made, but we really believe that somebody in our community must. Somebody must care about these properties and do something about it.” Neighborhood Preservation, Inc. stepped in to act as a go-between to facilitate the sale of Clayborn Temple to Smith and the Downtown Church. “We became a part of a community movement, where we said we would be willing to hold title to the property as long as we have an exit strategy,” Smith explains. “So long as we have some partners who are willing to occupy it, to do the work, to get creative about programming it.” Smith says the nonprofit structure created by NPI was vital to convincing AME to let go of the historic structure, which they loved but could not afford to maintain. “It was an emotional and painful thing for them to do,” he recollects, “but the Bishop for this district, Bishop Jeffery Leath, in Nashville, had a lot of courage. He spent a lot of relational capital inside his own organization, but finally they allowed us

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to put it into this nonprofit status. “It wouldn’t have worked if we had put it in a for-profit framework. … Steve’s group [NPI] is the perfect partner. They provided a financial structure to sort of park the title. We’re in the process now of forming our own not-for-profit.”

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fter years of neglect, the physical state of the building was not good. Much of the original hardwood flooring had rotted away. The giant organ is a long way from being able to make sweet music. “We’re trying to raise the money for a study to inventory everything that’s in there, to see if it can be restored,” says Thompson. “There are two major chamber rooms that have been vandalized. But the organ is critical; it’s the voice of the building that hasn’t been heard in at least 20 years.”

An artists’ roundtable event in the sanctuary. PHOTOGRAPH COURTESY CLAYBORN REBORN

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The restoration is well under way, and once the situation was stabilized enough for the Downtown Church to begin having weekly meetings there, they discovered that many people were eager to hold their events in the hallowed walls. This year’s Juneteenth celebration (Monday, June 19th) will feature a performance by the Prizm Ensemble and Chamber Orchestra. “It’s an orchestra that is racially diverse in a way that mirrors the demographics of Memphis,” says Lecolion Washington, executive director of Prizm. “We’re bringing that orchestra to this space on that day to perform a work called Seven Last Words of the Unarmed.” The contemporary classical piece was first performed last year in Ann Arbor, Michigan. Each of its seven movements is a eulogy to victims of police shootings. “It was originally just for a men’s choir and piano,” says Washington. “It’s been adapted and arranged for full orchestra.” Washington says Prizm is reaching out to choruses from different churches all over the city. “As we know, the most segregated hour in America is on Sunday morning. We’re going to make sure we’re pulling from a diverse group of churches, so that the product is as diverse as the stage, as diverse as the music that is happening.” And that’s just one of the events shaping up as the space slowly comes back to life. On June

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15th, the On Location: Memphis Film Festival will begin a 15-week film series focusing on Memphis history, art, and spatial justice. The films will include the critically acclaimed Fruitvale Station, the Memphis music documentary Verge, the groundbreaking Hallelujah by King Vidor, which was the first-ever sound film musical, filmed in Memphis in 1928, and The Invaders, the made-in-Memphis documentary about the black power group who was intimately involved in the sanitation workers’ strike. Frank Smith knows the building has a long way to go before it is restored to its former grandeur, but the surge of interest in Clayborn Temple gives him hope for the future. “Everybody wants this to happen so badly,” he says. “Once they gave us permission to let people in here, you can feel something. It

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evokes an emotional, spiritual kind of response out of people. “It also exposes vulnerability in a way that is really necessary for our city,” he continues. “You can’t heal until you first become vulnerable. That’s what we’ve decided now. We’re just going to live in this state of incompleteness. That’s like Memphis right now. We haven’t quite figured it out. Let’s use this place in its incompleteness to work it out. This runway up to the 50th anniversary of the King assassination seems like the kind of urgency we need to force relationships.” As Smith surveys the fallen grandeur of the Clayborn Temple sanctuary, emotion creeps into his voice. “This is a place to bring together opposing forces that do not naturally come together, but do it in a place of safety,” he says. “This place is way too important for it just to be a church on Sunday. It needs to be alive and breathe with the same kind of energy it did all of its life. “What amazing poetry,” he continues. “Both the rich, white, and privileged and the struggling, black, and disadvantaged abandoned the place. Now to come back and be reactivated, redeemed ... it’s sacred. I really feel something exciting in Memphis these days. I feel proud of our city. We could really do something important from here. We could be a model nationally.”

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by george larrimore o one can say precisely when FM 100 started to become a Very Big Deal. But it was sometime in the spring of 1971, the day when Jon Scott played the Jimi Hendrix version of “The Star Spangled Banner,” the one made famous in the Woodstock movie. That was also the day everything hit the fan at 1960 Union,

where the station shared space with WMC-TV Channel 5 and AM 60. Scott was 20-something and working the mid-day shift. The phones

started ringing almost as soon as the first 20 seconds of Hendrix’ Anthem had gone out over the air. The engineer at the WMC transmitter heard it and picked up the phone. The normal routine was that the playing of the National Anthem was the signal that the broadcast day was over. The engineer was puzzled because it was the middle of the day. Another call came from an advertiser, unhappy. He heard blasphemy and called FM 100’s general manager, Dean Osmundson. Scott’s memory is that, pretty quickly, the GM was at the studio door. “Take. That. Needle. Off. That. Record,” Osmundson said, emphatically. “So what am I supposed to do?” Scott asked. “Play The Monkees,” the GM said. Scott put on “Hey Hey We’re The Monkees.”

Station manager Dean Osmundsen with deejays (L-R) Jon Scott, David Day (Gingold), Greg Hamilton, and Ron Michaels toasting their high ratings in the early 1970s. J U N E 2 0 1 7 • M E M P H I S M A G A Z I N E . C O M • 33

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For several days, FM 100 played strictly Some of the originals who have passed on Top 40 hits. For four years the jocks had been were remembered that Sunday: David Day experimenting with a mix of hits, oldies, and (David Gingold) and Ron Michaels. “People album cuts. The station had found a core of remember you because you were a part of young listeners but it hadn’t exactly taken their lives,” Michaels once explained, “and it never hurts that you get to say your name 20 off with advertisers. And many veterans of times an hour over the radio.” Memphis radio thought the experiment was wrong-headed. At the time, the FM band Mike Powell was at Lafayette’s, as were was dominated by “easy listening” stations. Greg Hamilton, Carter Davis, Leon Griffin, In a 1984 interview Dean Osmundson recalled Clarence Johnson, Steve Conley, Gary Phillips being told “you can’t play rock-and-roll on an — all FM 100 DJs from the early days, and FM station.” Mitch McCracken, who started on the air A few days later, a small crowd of sign-carin 1970. He remembers calling the program rying protesters showed up in front of 1960 Union Avenue, asking where the real music went. A poster showcased the It’s still a mystery how they got original deejays (L-R): David themselves organized, in those Day (Gingold), Ron Scott, Ron days before the internet. The GM Michaels, Mike Powell, Greg looked hard at the ratings and Siggers, and Greg Hamilton. made two fateful decisions. He told the young jocks, “Play what you want,” and he moved Jon Scott to the seven-to-midnight shift. “When people think about that FM 100, what they’re really remembering is Jon Scott’s show,” says Mike Powell, who was the original program director. Powell credits Scott, along with Osmundson, the visionary GM, for giving FM 100 power well beyond its place: a startup rock station in a medium-sized market in the middle of the country.

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ast month, on Sunday, May 7th, the DJs who were there at the beginning held a kind of 50th class reunion at Lafayette’s Music Room in Midtown (see “On the Town” on p. 36). They huddled over drinks with friends and fans and talked about grandkids and retirement and took a lot of cell phone pictures. Keith Sykes, Reba Russell, Susan Marshall, and Larry Raspberry rocked the crowd with some of the more than 800 known songs with the word “Memphis’ in the lyrics. And they remembered the days when every new album from The Beatles, The Stones, Joplin, Hendrix, and The Who was groundbreaking. And a time when it felt like everybody important was in their 20s. Jon Scott remembered the time he did an hour-long interview with David Bowie, by phone from Bowie’s London home. And the time Memphis musician Don Nix showed up at the back door for an interview, having just returned from Bangladesh. With him was Beatles’ collaborator and artist Klaus Voorman, along with George Harrison’s father.

“Total freedom,” McCracken says. “Almost.” At the party at Lafayette’s, McCracken finally met in person some of those who had been listening, out there in the dark, all those years ago. “It was pure radio heaven.” To kick off the station, FM 100 sponsored a dance. “This girl came up to me and said, ‘Are you anybody?’” DJ Dick Byrd recalls. “Can I have your autograph?’ It’s the only autograph I ever signed in my career.” The station was an experiment, at first, and since there wasn’t a whole lot of money involved there weren’t a lot of rules. The jocks got together with musicians and promoters and produced live on-the-air concerts, originating from the original Lafayette’s Music Hall and Ardent Studios, with ZZ Top, Billy Joel, and Kiss, before most people even knew who those artists were. “We said what we wanted to say and played what we wanted to play,” says Scott. “We became more loose, and I mean loose.” Where AM radio stations at the time were playing twoand-a-half-minute singles, the FM 100 jocks were pulling long cuts from albums, such as “Light My Fire” (The Doors, seven minutes and seven seconds), “In-a-Gadda-da-Vida” (Iron Butterly, just over 17 minutes), and “Alice’s Restaurant,” (Arlo Guthrie, 18 minutes and 15 seconds). And as the jocks today admit, they would sometimes put on the long version, check their watches, and adjourn to the station’s boiler room or to the roof. And they still laugh at how funny-smelling smoke would waft through the hallways.

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director “two or three times a week,” until finally he was offered one shift, on Saturday afternoons. “The right place at the right time,” he says. He had just graduated from Frayser High School. Soon he was on the “graveyard shift,” right after Jon Scott. Scott would go home and listen to McCracken’s show and critique it. Scott became his mentor. Today they’re still friends. The jocks could play just about anything except songs condoning drug use and songs containing the FCC’s forbidden “seven words.”

y early 1967, form e r W M C Action News 5 weatherman Dave Brown had already been a disc jockey at WHBQ-AM for more than two years. He too had heard that “you don’t play rock-and-roll on FM,” and at first his station didn’t pay much attention to the upstart across town. After a couple of months, Brown and his peers decided “we’d better watch out.” In the mid-1960s radio in Memphis (and all across America) was dominated by AM stations. WDIA, a near monolith with African-American listeners, was the most powerful station in the market. WHBQ and WMPS were both playing some version of the Top

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40, so they split the white pop audience. At launch, the new guys at FM 100 were no immediate threat to the established powers. But the new FM station benefited from both timing and technology. The actual frequency itself was not new; WMC-FM had become the city’s first station on that band on May 22, 1947. For its first 20 years, WMC-FM remained an “easy listening” station, featuring Frank Sinatra, Patti Page, and Montovani for an older demographic. But it was something of a sleeping giant. Here’s the timing part: In 1962 the Federal Communication Commission (largely to protect the status quo) declared that new FM stations could only broadcast with 100,000 watts of power. Some were granted as little as 50 watts. But since WMC-FM had gone on the air with more than 300,000 watts — 15 years before the 1962 regulation — its listeners could tune in to Sinatra from a hundred miles away. Or, just as easily, to Jimi Hendrix. And here’s the technology part: While AM radio could broadcast at much greater distances, it was about to become a static-filled stepchild. By the early 1970s, more people had more sophisticated FM stereo radios in their cars, along with cassette players. At the same time popular music, post-Woodstock, was undergoing a seismic shift. Albums were in, while singles were on the way out. But the biggest change of all was in the audience. The Baby Boomers, the biggest American generation yet, were becoming young adults, getting jobs, and seizing economic power along with control of the culture.

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ean Osmundson was ready to take advantage of all that good luck. After looking at the model of a freeform FM station in San Francisco and another in New York, he decided to take his station in a totally new direction. “I think I’m gonna rock it!” he said, as several people recalled at the reunion. Osmundson passed away in 2014. On February 6, 1967, the top of the Billboard Top 40 chart looked like this: “I’m A Believer” by the Monkees, “Georgy Girl” by The Seekers, and “Kind of a Drag” by The Buckinghams, along with “Snoopy vs. The Red Baron” by The Royal Guardsmen and “The Beat Goes On” by Sonny and Cher. Pretty bland stuff. What FM 100 tried came to be called by a lot of names, including Album Rock or Progressive Rock. FM 100 drew from a much broader playlist, the Billboard Top 100. And the jocks dropped in oldies along with album cuts, not just the hits. “It was music that no one was playing or hearing on the radio,” says Mike Powell, one of the original cast. “It was the only place to hear albums on the air.” Greg Hamilton thinks the magic of FM 100

was that “we reflected what was going on in the community. We were a young people’s station. We were leading, a little bit. We didn’t say, ‘This is a hit.’ We said, ‘Listen to it.’” The jocks played what the audience wanted to hear, and the mix was eclectic: The FourTops, King Crimson, Booker T and the MGs, The Doors, Sam and Dave. Switching Jon Scott to nights had a sudden and surprising impact. The Memphis Press-Scimitar (the afternoon newspaper at the time) noted the station’s ratings had shot up 300 percent, its audience up 200 percent, making the station at least competitive with WDIA. And quickly, the national rock music industry found, in Memphis, a “breaking ground,” where new acts could be heard. FM 100 was instrumental in the early success of artists like David Bowie, ZZ Top, Jethro Tull, Yes, and Wishbone Ash. “We started playing bands before anybody else in America would, most of the time,” recalls Scott. “If bands got played on FM 100, they would sell records. David Bowie loved Memphis; the English musicians loved Memphis.” “Jon Scott had a loyal army,” says Leon Griffin, who eventually took over Scott’s time slot. “It took the night-time [slot] to really reach the people who didn’t watch TV, people who listened to the music.” In a way, FM 100 was modeled on the work of another Memphis radio pioneer, Dewey Phillips. After all, it was Phillips, on July 7, 1954, who played Elvis’ seminal first record, “That’s Alright Mama” 14 times in a row. Dewey played what he, and his audience, liked.

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s word of the FM 100 reunion got around Memphis, social media lit up. Among the hundreds of tweets: “We got up early to hear the sign-on and heard “Sock It To Me Baby” (the first song played). “I learned to play guitar listening to those DJs.” “The earliest Kiss bootleg [recording] was from live FM 100 broadcast at Lafayette’s.” “My dad and uncle are now on a mass email memory lane trip about it.”

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he city’s longest-tenured DJ, Ron Olson, started at FM 100 in 1974, left for a while, and then came back in 1983. To him, radio, with its request lines and faceless voices, was the original social media. He explains it all in a sentence: “It’s where you got your news, your information, your music.” Olson fell in love with radio as a kid, lying in bed at night, listening to the AM jocks (“from St. Louis to San Antonio”) on a transistor radio. “Always the music,” he recalls. “To be able to introduce somebody to great

music they haven’t heard has always been the coolest thing.” Over the weekend of the party, Jon Scott and Mike Powell (who now live in Los Angeles and Tampa, respectively) got a tour of 1960 Union during the weekend of the party. The area were FM 100 was located is boarded up now. Sold to new owners in 2006, it was moved across town to its current location on Mt. Moriah? Progressive Rock in Memphis lasted until the end of the 1970s. There was more money to be made in mainstream music, and FM 100 followed the money. But the original FM 100 has a legacy. “They invented album rock-and-roll on the local FM dial. FM 100 brought FM into the modern age,” says Dave Brown. There is a lesson in this: We should pursue our passions. Ron Olson was a radio gypsy, moving through college radio stations at UT Martin, then Southwestern (now Rhodes), then Memphis State to a a tiny country station where he was paid $1.25 an hour, and then, finally, to FM 100. He’s thankful, and what he sees as his good fortune still seems to mystify him. “Doing something you really wanted to do and have been able to do? And really like doing? And to still be doing it?” As much fun as it must have been, being a disc jockey in those days was not great money. “I doubt if I ever made more than a hundred dollars a week,” Scott says. He eventually left radio to become a record promotion man. Today he is given credit for breaking a number of superstar artists, including John Mellencamp and Tom Petty and the Heartbreakers. He had dropped out of Memphis State in favor of Keegan’s School of Broadcasting downtown. He found his first job in Lawrenceburg, Tennessee. When he saw an ad in the paper for the FM 100 startup, he walked in the door and said, “I want this job.” He had known all along there was never going to be anything, for him, but radio. “When I was a kid, my mom would call into the request line at this funky little country station,” Scott recalls. “I don’t even remember the call letters. She would ask them to ‘play something for Louise Slankard and my five brothers.’ And when they would play that song, she would smile. Right then I knew I wanted to be a DJ. I would do anything to make my mom smile.” George Larrimore grew up in Lake Cormorant, Mississippi, and now lives in Memphis. He worked for WMC from 1979 to 1983, and then worked for many years in Los Angeles with Access Hollywood and Entertainment Tonight. He is co-founder and executive producer of PropagandaTV, a digital television channel featuring historical films that were used for that purpose. J U N E 2 0 1 7 • M E M P H I S M A G A Z I N E . C O M • 35

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on the town

^6 with michael donahue ^6

WHAT: Derby Day benefit for Southern Reins Center for Equine Therapy WHERE: Shady Grove Road WHEN: May 6, 2017

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eersucker suits, mint juleps, and big hats — all the trappings for Derby Day — were evident at the second annual Jockeys and Juleps party to benefit Southern Reins Center for Equine Therapy. The sprawling party was held on the grounds, in a tent, and inside a home on Shady Grove Road. A live simulcast of the Kentucky Derby was shown on eight screens and the ceiling of the tent. The crowd cheered when Always Dreaming crossed the finish line. About 1,200 people attended this year’s event, said Jill Haag, Southern Reins executive director. Once again the event was held on a beautiful rainless day. “I think everyone had a great time,” Jill said. “Not only was it a great party, but it raised significant funding to help our program to help people with disabilities. It was a great venue to be able to share more information about what Southern Reins does and everyone coming together to make a difference.” Area restaurants and chefs provided the food, which included shrimp and grits and the Louisville staple the “Hot Brown.” Music was by The Riverbluff Clan. Chairing the party were Kirby and Glenn Floyd, Courtney and Bryan Smith, Bridget Trenary, and Kim and Bryan Jordan. Mike and Donna Glenn were honorary chairs.

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Harris 3 Michael and Joanie Lightman 4 Pat Kerr Tigrett 5 Mark Goodfellow 6 Stephen and Leslie Moten 7 David and Roberta Kustoff 8 Miller and Hunter Cowan 9 Bethany Stooksberry 10 Chris and Chelsey Mellon and Angela and Peter Simpson 11 James Williams and Elizabeth Whitton 12 George and Claudia Cogswell 13 Kim Jordan, Kirby Dobbs Floyd, Bridget Trenary, Sara Bryant, Courtney Smith, and Ginna Rauls.

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778 New Graduates

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TOP DOCTORS 2017

PHOTOGRAPH BY © KURHAN | DREAMSTIME

Castle Connolly Medical Ltd. is a healthcare research and information company founded in 1991 by a former medical college board chairman and president to help guide consumers to America’s top doctors and top hospitals. Castle Connolly’s established nomination survey, research, screening, and selection process, under the direction of an MD, involves many hundreds of thousands of physicians as well as academic medical centers, specialty hospitals, and regional and community hospitals all across the nation. Castle Connolly’s physician-led team of researchers follows a rigorous screening process to select top doctors on both the national and regional levels. Its online nominations process — located at www.castleconnolly.com/nominations — is open to all licensed physicians in America who are able to nominate physicians in any medical specialty and in any part of the country, as well as indicate whether the nominated physicians are, in their opinion, among the best in their region in their medical specialty or among the best in the nation in their medical specialty. Careful screening of the doctors’ educational and professional experience is essential before final selection is made among those physicians most highly regarded by their peers. The result — we identify the top doctors in America and provide you, the consumer, with detailed information about their education, training, and special expertise in our paperback guides, national and regional magazine “Top Doctors” features, and online directories. Doctors do not and cannot pay to be selected and profiled as Castle Connolly Top Doctors. Physicians selected for inclusion in this magazine’s “Top Doctors” feature may also appear online at www.castleconnolly. com, or in conjunction with other Castle Connolly Top Doctors databases online and/or in print.

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hen Memphis magazine presented its first Top Docs issue in 1996, the world of healthcare was very different than it is today. For one thing, few patients (if any) searched for a doctor “online.” If

technology at our fingertips has undergone a transformation — it’s actually undergone several — imagine what it’s done for medical research and the treatment of human ailments, large and small. How a “Top Doc” is defined today uses different criteria than what was utilized two decades ago. That said, you’ll find a few esteemed physicians on this year’s list who also appeared in that 1996 issue. We profiled three of them here, each an example of sustained and adaptive excellence in their specialty. ALLERGY & IMMUNOLOGY JOSEPH S. FAHHOUM, MD

Allergy & Asthma Specialists Of Memphis 2006 Exeter Rd. Germantown, TN 38138 901-202-4100

Asthma & Allergy

GREGORY A. HANISSIAN. MD

Baptist Memorial Hospital - Memphis Hanissian Allergy 2101 Merchants Row, Suite 3 Germantown, TN 38138 901-751-9696

Asthma & Allergy, Immune Deficiency

D. BETTY LEW, MD

Le Bonheur Children’s Hospital UT Le Bonheur Pediatric Specialists 51 N. Dunlap St., Suite 400 Memphis, TN 38105 901-287-7337

CHRISTIE F. MICHAEL, MD

Le Bonheur Children’s Hospital UT Le Bonheur Pediatric Specialists 51 N. Dunlap St., Suite 400 Memphis, TN 38105 901-287-7337

Asthma & Allergy, Autoimmune Disease

CARDIAC ELECTROPHYSIOLOGY ERIC E. JOHNSON, MD

Baptist Memorial Hospital - Memphis Methodist Le Bonheur Germantown Hospital Stern Cardiovascular Foundation 8060 Wolf River Blvd. Germantown, TN 38138

901-271-1000 Arrhythmias, Pacemakers

JEFFREY E. KERLAN, MD

Pediatric Allergy & Immunology, Immune Deficiency

Baptist Memorial Hospital - Memphis Methodist University Hospital - Memphis Stern Cardiovascular Foundation 6027 Walnut Grove Rd., Suite 112 Memphis, TN 38120 901-271-1000

PHILLIP L. LIEBERMAN, MD

DAVID ZHI-QIANG LAN, MD

Baptist Memorial Hospital - Memphis Allergy & Asthma Care 7205 Wolf River Blvd., Suite 200 Germantown, TN 38138 901-757-6100

Asthma & Allergy, Rhinitis, Anaphylaxis

Atrial Fibrillation, Defibrillators Baptist Memorial Hospital - Memphis Methodist Le Bonheur Germantown Hospital Stern Cardiovascular Foundation 8060 Wolf River Blvd. Germantown, TN 38138 901-271-1000

Arrhythmias J U N E 2 0 1 7 • M E M P H I S M A G A Z I N E . C O M • 39

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PHOTOGRAPH BY BRANDON DILL

DR. LYNN EBAUGH, MD

B

EAST MEMPHIS NEPHROLOGY

efore 1960, many of these people would be dead,” says Dr. Lynn Ebaugh, indicating the rows of patients hooked up to a battery of beeping and whirring machines at the Fresenius Dialysis Center, where she serves as medical director. “But dialysis has been life-sustaining for them, serving as an artificial kidney for them.” Every person is normally born with two kidneys, whose main purpose is to filter impurities that build up in the bloodstream. But when a kidney fails or is damaged — by diabetes, high blood pressure, or even the normal process of aging — toxins can’t leave the body, and a person grows sick and eventually dies. There is no cure for kidney failure, but thanks to advances in dialysis, which filter a patient’s blood, people can live longer. The problem is that dialysis is time-consuming; a typical patient may spend three to six hours hooked up to a machine, three times a week.

Ebaugh, a graduate of the University of South Alabama College of Medicine and founder of the East Memphis Nephrology Center, notes that advances in kidney treatment have come a long way. “The newer dialysis machines are much better at determining how much fluid needs to be removed, so that patients don’t crash from low blood pressure.” Even so, she hopes for the day when an implantable, or portable, dialysis machine can be perfected. Vanderbilt, where she took her residency in nephrology, is working on such a device, “but we are still a long way off.” In the meantime, patients in end-stage kidney disease face few options: dialysis, a kidney transplant, or death. Transplant surgery has come a long way, Ebaugh notes, but that’s a last resort. People should be better informed about the risks of diabetes, obesity, high blood pressure, and other factors than can damage kidneys. There are several options for dialysis. Although the

Fresenius Center in Germantown currently sees more than 80 patients, who come in for regular hemodialysis sessions, which runs a patient’s blood through a large filter — essentially a disposable, artificial kidney — Ebaugh extols the benefits of home dialysis, where a patient can undergo a type of treatment called peritoneal dialysis while they sleep. “Then you’re free all day long to do whatever you want. Peritoneal dialysis cleans you as well as hemodialysis, and the outcomes are similar,” she says, “but without such a time burden on the patient.” Kidney disease isn’t going away, but Ebaugh is optimistic about the advances she’s seen, saying, “With the newer dialysis machines we’re able to make better decisions about how we treat our patients.” Even so, “the best thing is to keep people off dialysis — to have people recognize they have a problem, whether it’s obesity or high blood pressure, soon enough to do something about it.” — Michael Finger

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MEMPHIS TOP DOCTORS 2017 CARDIOVASCULAR DISEASE

CHILD & ADOLESCENT PSYCHIATRY

TODD D. EDWARDS, MD

JERRY D. HESTON, MD

Baptist Memorial Hospital - DeSoto Baptist Memorial Hospital - Memphis Stern Cardiovascular Foundation 8060 Wolf River Blvd. Germantown, TN 38138 901-271-1000

Le Bonheur Children’s Hospital St. Jude Children’s Research Hospital Child & Adolescent Psychiatry Associates 1135 Cully Rd., Suite 100 Cordova, TN 38016 901-752-1980

Transplant Medicine - Heart

ADD/ADHD, Depression, Autism Spectrum Disorders

STEVEN S. GUBIN, MD

CHILD NEUROLOGY

Baptist Memorial Hospital - Memphis Stern Cardiovascular Foundation 8060 Wolf River Blvd. Germantown, TN 38138 901-271-1000

Preventive Cardiology, Echocardiography

JASON I. INFELD, MD

Baptist Memorial Hospital - Memphis Methodist Le Bonheur Germantown Hospital Stern Cardiovascular Foundation 8060 Wolf River Blvd, Germantown, TN 38138

901-271-1000 Non-Invasive Cardiology, Echocardiography, Congenital Heart Disease

DAVID H. KRAUS, MD

Baptist Memorial Hospital - Memphis Stern Cardiovascular Foundation 8060 Wolf River Blvd. Germantown, TN 38138 901-271-1000

FRANK A. III MCGREW, MD

Baptist Memorial Hospital - Memphis Stern Cardiovascular Foundation 8060 Wolf River Blvd. Germantown, TN 38138 901-271-1000

Congestive Heart Failure, Acute Coronary Syndromes

DANIEL E. OTTEN, MD

Baptist Memorial Hospital - Memphis Stern Cardiovascular Foundation 8060 Wolf River Blvd. Germantown, TN 38138 901-271-1000

AMY L. MCGREGOR, MD

Le Bonheur Children’s Hospital UT Le Bonheur Pediatric Specialists 848 Adams Ave., Suite L400 Memphis, TN 38103 901-287-5060

Epilepsy

ROBIN L. MORGAN, MD

Le Bonheur Children’s Hospital UT Le Bonheur Pediatric Specialists 848 Adams Ave., Suite 400 Memphis, TN 38103 866-870-5570

Tourette’s Syndrome, Autism Spectrum Disorders

JAMES W. WHELESS, MD

Le Bonheur Children’s Hospital St. Jude Children’s Research Hospital UT Le Bonheur Pediatric Specialists 848 Adams Ave., Suite L400 Memphis, TN 38103 901-287-5060

Epilepsy/Seizure Disorders

CLINICAL GENETICS JEWELL C. WARD, MD/PHD

Le Bonheur Children’s Hospital UT Le Bonheur Pediatric Specialists 51 N. Dunlap St., Suite 400 Memphis, TN 38105 901-287-7337

Inborn Errors of Metabolism, Metabolic Genetic Disorders, Phenylketonuria (PKU), Reproductive Genetics

HOLGER P. SALAZAR, MD

COLON & RECTAL SURGERY

STACY C. SMITH, MD

Saint Francis Hospital - Memphis Baptist Memorial Hospital - Memphis Memphis Surgery Associates 6029 Walnut Grove Rd., Suite 404 Memphis, TN 38120 901-726-1056

Baptist Rehabilitation Hospital - Germantown Saint Francis Hospital - Memphis Stern Cardiovascular Foundation 8060 Wolf River Blvd. Germantown, TN 38138 901-271-1000 Baptist Memorial Hospital - Memphis Stern Cardiovascular Foundation 8060 Wolf River Blvd. Germantown, TN 38138 901-271-1000

Heart Disease in Women

MAUREEN A. SMITHERS, MD

Saint Francis Hospital - Bartlett Sutherland Cardiology Clinic 7460 Wolf River Blvd. Germantown, TN 38138 901-763-0200

JOSHUA A. KATZ, MD

Inflammatory Bowel Disease, Colon & Rectal Cancer, Anorectal Disorders, Laparoscopic Surgery

JUSTIN MONROE, MD

Saint Francis Hospital - Memphis Methodist Le Bonheur Germantown Hospital Memphis Surgery Associates 6029 Walnut Grove Rd., Suite 404 Memphis, TN 38120 901-726-1056

Colon & Rectal Cancer, Inflammatory Bowel Disease/ Crohn’s, Ulcerative Colitis, Hemorrhoids

Non-Invasive Cardiology, Heart Failure, Coronary Artery Disease, Arrhythmias

DERMATOLOGY

KARL T. WEBER, MD

LUELLA G. CHURCHWELL, MD

Regional One Health Outpatient Center 880 Madison Ave., Floor 5 Memphis, TN 38103 901-545-6969

Congestive Heart Failure

Baptist Memorial Hospital - Memphis Dermatology East 1335 Cordova Cove Germantown, TN 38138 901-753-2794

ALAN L. LEVY, MD 6254 Poplar Ave. Memphis, TN 38119 901-624-3333

Cosmetic Dermatology, Medical Dermatology, Mohs Surgery

FRANK G. WITHERSPOON JR., MD Memphis Dermatology Clinic 1455 Union Ave. Memphis, TN 38104 901-726-6655

Skin Cancer, Mohs Surgery

TERESA S. WRIGHT, MD

Le Bonheur Children’s Hospital UT Le Bonheur Pediatric Specialists Le Bonheur Outpatient Center - Main Campus 51 N. Dunlap St., Suite 235 Memphis, TN 38105 866-870-5570

Pediatric Dermatology, Acne & Rosacea, Eczema, Psoriasis

DEVELOPMENTAL-BEHAVIORAL PEDIATRICS TONI M. WHITAKER, MD

Le Bonheur Children’s Hospital UT Le Bonheur Pediatric Specialists Boling Center for Developmental Disabilities 711 Jefferson Ave. Memphis, TN 38105 901-448-6512

Autism Spectrum Disorders, Developmental Disorders, Neonatal Developmental Disorders, Developmental & Behavioral Disorders

DIAGNOSTIC RADIOLOGY HARRIS L. COHEN, MD

Le Bonheur Children’s Hospital Department of Radiology 848 Adams Ave. Memphis, TN 38103 901-287-6938

Pediatric Radiology, Fetal Ultrasound/Obstetrical Imaging, Ultrasound

SUE C. KASTE, DO

St. Jude Children’s Research Hospital Department of Diagnostic Imaging 262 Danny Thomas Place, MS 220 Memphis, TN 38105 901-595-3347

Bone Density in Pediatric Cancer, Pediatric Radiology

JAMES E. MACHIN, MD

Baptist Memorial Hospital - Memphis Mid-South Imaging and Therapeutics 6019 Walnut Grove Rd. Memphis, TN 38120 901-747-1000

Ultrasound, MRI, CT Body Scan

ENDOCRINOLOGY, DIABETES & METABOLISM A. JAY COHEN, MD

Baptist Memorial Hospital - Memphis The Endocrine Clinic 5659 S. Rex Rd. Memphis, TN 38119 901-763-3636

Diabetes

THOMAS A. HUGHES, MD

Saint Francis Hospital - Memphis G2Endo 6005 Park Ave., Suite 510 Memphis, TN 38119 901-537-7000

Cholesterol/Lipid Disorders, Diabetes J U N E 2 0 1 7 • M E M P H I S M A G A Z I N E . C O M • 41

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MEMPHIS TOP DOCTORS 2017 BEVERLY J. WILLIAMS-CLEAVES, MD

Baptist Memorial Hospital - Memphis Methodist University Hospital - Memphis Comprehensive Diabetes & Metabolic Center of Excellence 2829 Lamar Ave. Memphis, TN 38114 901-744-3362

Thyroid/Lipid Disorders, Diabetes

FAMILY MEDICINE O. LEE BERKENSTOCK, MD

Baptist Memorial Hospital - Memphis Primary Care Specialists 3109 Walnut Grove Rd. Memphis, TN 38111 901-458-0162

TINA K. BURNS, MD

Methodist University Hospital - Memphis Mid-South Family Medicine 9047 Poplar Ave., Suite 105 Germantown, TN 38138 901-752-2300

MARLAH H. MARDIS, MD

OccuMed 1785 Nonconnah Blvd, Suite 120 Memphis, TN 38132 901-345-6700

Occupational Medicine, Preventive Medicine

LEE W. MCCALLUM, MD

Methodist University Hospital - Memphis Mid-South Family Medicine 8115 Country Village Cordova, TN 38016 901-752-2300

CHARLES J. WOODALL, MD

Baptist Memorial Hospital - Memphis Saint Francis Hospital - Bartlett BMG Family Physicians Group Foundation 7685 Winchester Rd. Memphis, TN 38125 901-752-6963

GASTROENTEROLOGY RICHARD S. AYCOCK, MD

Baptist Memorial Hospital - Collierville Methodist Le Bonheur Germantown Hospital Gastro One 8000 Wolf River Blvd., Suite 200 Germantown, TN 38138 901-747-3630

Liver Disease, Gastroesophageal Reflux Disease, Endoscopy & Colonoscopy

EDWARD L. CATTAU JR., MD

Baptist Memorial Hospital - Memphis Methodist Le Bonheur Germantown Hospital Gastro One 8000 Wolf River Blvd., Suite 200 Germantown, TN 38138 901-747-3630

Endoscopy

MICHAEL S. DRAGUTSKY, MD

Baptist Memorial Hospital - Memphis Gastro One 1324 Wolf Park Drive Germantown, TN 38138 901-755-9110

KENNETH I. FIELDS, MD

Baptist Memorial Hospital - Memphis Gastrointestinal Specialists 80 Humphreys Center Drive, Suite 200 Memphis, TN 38120 901-761-3900

Endoscopy, Gastroesophageal Reflux Disease, Colon Cancer Screening, Gastrointestinal Disorders

SATHEESH P. NAIR, MD

Methodist University Hospital - Memphis UT Methodist Physician Group Transplant Institute 1265 Union Ave., Sherard Wing, Floor 1 Memphis, TN 38104 901-516-9183

Transplant Medicine - Liver

ROBERT S. WOOTEN, MD

Baptist Memorial Hospital - Memphis Gastro One 1324 Wolf Park Drive Germantown, TN 38138 901-755-9110

Celiac Disease, Crohn’s Disease

ZIAD H. YOUNES, MD

Saint Francis Hospital - Memphis Baptist Memorial Hospital - DeSoto Gastro One 2999 Centre Oak Way Germantown, TN 38138 901-684-5500

Endoscopy & Colonoscopy, Inflammatory Bowel Disease

GYNECOLOGIC ONCOLOGY JOSEPH T. SANTOSO, MD

Methodist University Hospital - Memphis Baptist Memorial Hospital - Memphis West Cancer Center 7945 Wolf River Blvd. Memphis, TN 38138 901-683-0055

Ovarian Cancer, Cervical Cancer, Uterine Cancer

LINDA M. SMILEY, MD

Baptist Memorial Hospital - Memphis Methodist University Hospital - Memphis West Cancer Center 7945 Wolf River Blvd. Memphis, TN 38138 901-683-0055

Cervical Cancer, Uterine Cancer, Ovarian Cancer

HAND SURGERY JAMES H. CALANDRUCCIO, MD

Baptist Memorial Hospital - Collierville Campbell Clinic 1400 S. Germantown Rd. Germantown, TN 38138 901-759-3111

Hand & Upper Extremity Surgery

DAVID L. CANNON, MD

Baptist Memorial Hospital - Collierville Campbell Clinic 1400 S. Germantown Rd. Germantown, TN 38138 901-759-3111

Hand & Wrist Surgery

R. JEFFREY COLE, MD

Baptist Memorial Hospital - Memphis Methodist Le Bonheur Germantown Hospital OrthoMemphis 6286 Briarcrest Ave., Suite 200 Memphis, TN 38120 901-259-1600

Hand & Upper Extremity Surgery, Sports Injuries, Trauma, Carpal Tunnel Syndrome

HEMATOLOGY PATRICIA E. ADAMS-GRAVES, MD Regional One Health Outpatient Center 880 Madison Ave. Memphis, TN 38103 901-545-8535

Sickle Cell Disease

DONALD S. GRAVENOR, MD

Baptist Memorial Hospital - Memphis Baptist Cancer Center 6029 Walnut Grove Rd., Suite 301 Memphis, TN 38120 901-747-9081

Anemia, Leukemia & Lymphoma, Non-Hodgkin’s, Multiple Myeloma

EDWARD S. MUIR, MD

Baptist Memorial Hospital - Memphis Methodist Le Bonheur Germantown Hospital Consolidated Medical Practices of Memphis 6799 Great Oaks Rd., Suite 150 Memphis, TN 38138 901-259-9794

Leukemia & Lymphoma, Bone Marrow & Stem Cell Transplant

SANDEEP K. RAJAN, MD

Methodist University Hospital - Memphis West Cancer Center 7945 Wolf River Blvd. Memphis, TN 38138 901-683-0055

Leukemia & Lymphoma, Hematology-Benign

INFECTIOUS DISEASE MICHAEL G. THRELKELD, MD

Baptist Memorial Hospital - Memphis Methodist Le Bonheur Germantown Hospital 1068 Cresthaven Rd., Suite 250 Memphis, TN 38119 901-685-3490

INTERNAL MEDICINE JOAN MICHELLE ALLMON, MD

Baptist Memorial Hospital - Collierville Baptist Memorial Hospital - Memphis Collierville Internal Medicine 1500 W. Poplar Ave, Suite 202 Collierville, TN 38017

901-861-9090 Preventive Medicine, Diabetes, Hypertension,Women’s Health

ROBERT BURNS, MD

Geriatrics Group of Memphis 2714 Union Ave., Extended, Suite 150 Memphis, TN 38112 901-725-0872

Geriatric Medicine,Dementia

GEORGE CHU, MD

Mid-South Internal Medicine 7550 Wolf River Blvd., Suite 102 Germantown, TN 38138 901-767-5000

WILLIAM C. CUSHMAN, MD VA Medical Center - Memphis Memphis VA Medical Center 1030 Jefferson Ave. Memphis, TN 38104-2127 901-523-8990

Hypertension, Preventive Cardiology

GREGORY K. JENKINS, MD

Baptist Memorial Hospital - Memphis Baptist Memorial Medical Group 8138 Country Village Drive Cordova, TN 38016 901-260-3100

CHARLES W. MUNN, MD

Methodist North Hospital Methodist South Hospital Methodist Medical Group - Primary Care 6570 Summer Oaks Cove Bartlett, TN 38134 901-373-7100

contin u ed on page 46

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Congratulations

Dr. Monroe, Dr. Katz, and Dr. Francis for being named as "Top Doctors"

We’re more than surgeons. We’re your medical partners. At Memphis Surgery Associates, it is our mission to treat patients with the latest procedures and most specialized surgical skill sets in the region. But just as importantly, we pledge to treat every individual with the humility, equality, dignity, and respect they deserve. We serve most area hospitals and specialize in the following surgical procedures: General, Endocrine, Oncologic, Colorectal, & Robotic. 6029 Walnut Grove Road, Medical Plaza #3, Suite 404, Memphis, TN 38120 2996 Kate Bond Road, Suite 309, Bartlett, TN 38134 300 S. Rhodes Street, West Memphis, AR 72301 901.726.1056 | MemphisSurgery.com William Scott King, Jr., MD, FACS; Carter E. McDaniel, III, MD, FACS; Hugh Francis, III, MD, FACS; Melvin P. Payne, III, MD, FACS;

Justin Monroe, MD, FACS; D. Benjamin Gibson, MD, FACS; D. Alan Hammond, MD, FACS; Joshua A. Katz, MD, FACS; and Robert Jean, MD

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PHOTOGRAPH BY BRANDON DILL

DR. R. JEFFREY COLE, MD

T

here are few tools in the natural world like the human hand. With 27 bones, more than 30 muscles (counting those in the forearm that help us move our fingers), and countless nerves, ligaments, and blood vessels, our hands are engineering marvels that contribute mightily to creative genius, from carpentry to a grand piano. With so many parts, though, a hand can be easily damaged. Dr. Jeffrey Cole has made a living out of repairing such damage. “My dad is an engineer,” says Cole. “When teachers gave us assignments to design something or build something, I was happy. Orthopedics is rooted in engineering, the physics.” As a freshman at Ole Miss, Cole and a few classmates convinced the physics department to start a degree program for pre-med students. “We learned so much. An MRI is common now,” notes Cole. “But back then [in the early Eighties], it was called NMR: Nuclear Magnetic Resonance.”

ORTHOMEMPHIS

A native Memphian (he attended Memphis Preparatory School), Cole developed his interest in hand surgery during his residency at UT-Chattanooga, at Erlanger Baroness Hospital. “There was a lot of trauma that came through that hospital,” says Cole. “Anytime someone came in with a hand injury, you saw people scramble. ‘Where’s the hand doctor?’ If I could do that, I knew I’d stay busy.” Cole recently marked his 20th year with OrthoMemphis. On a busy day, he’ll perform as many as eight surgeries, starting with what he calls “the simple stuff,” and finishing with more complicated procedures. “We get a lot of referrals from the orthopedic community at large,” explains Cole. “There are subspecialties, but hand doctors end up being the pediatric, sports-medicine, total joint, or trauma doctor for the upper extremity.” During his fellowship at Washington University in St. Louis, Cole cut his teeth as a hand surgeon with

the smallest of patients: babies with birth defects. “There’s not room for a lot of scar, or room for big metal implants,” says Cole. “A lot of times, the best thing you can do is just cover the wound itself, then examine what the function is beyond that. You don’t have to look into a wound to know a nerve’s been cut, or a tendon’s been cut.” Endoscopic techniques have largely replaced more invasive surgery for carpel-tunnel syndrome, the most common ailment Cole sees. Technology has also made recovery from trauma an entirely different experience . “The plating systems we use to fix bones have gotten drastically better over the last ten years,” he says. “Sometimes we’re able to get people with wrist fractures into a removable splint after just two weeks. They’re starting their rehab at the same time we’re waiting for the bone to heal, as opposed to wearing a cast for eight weeks.” — Frank Murtaugh

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GASTROENTEROLOGISTS

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Richard S. Aycock, M.D. Joseph G. Baltz, Jr., M.D.

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Alex E. Baum, M.D. Edward L. Cattau, Jr., M.D. Sufiyan H. Chaudhry, M.D. Michael S. Dragutsky, M.D. Raif W. Elsakr, M.D. Farees T. Farooq, M.D. Randall C. Frederick, M.D. Christopher M. Griffith, M.D. William G. Hardin, M.D. Frederick R. Harris, Jr., M.D. Terrence L. Jackson, Jr., M.D. Michael J. Levinson, M.D. Christopher D. Miller, M.D. Sri L. Narra, M.D. Eric J. Ormseth, M.D. Rajesh Ramachandran, M.D. Geza Remak, M.D. James H. Rutland, III, M.D. Carles R. Surles, Jr., M.D., M.P.H. Bryan F. Thompson, M.D. T. Carter Towne, M.D. John D. Ward, M.D. Robert S. Wooten, M.D. Gary A. Wruble, M.D. Lawrence D. Wruble, M.D. Ziad H. Younes, M.D. PATHOLOGISTS Yongxin Chen, M.D. Michael A. Huba, M.D. Pamela B. Sylvestre, M.D. NURSE PRACTITIONERS Amanda Berry, MSN, RN, NP Chantil Jeffreys, FNP, DNP Ashleigh Ray, MSN, RN, NP

1324 Wolf Park Dr. Germantown, TN 38138 901.755.9110

8000 Wolf River Blvd. Suite 200 Germantown, TN 38138 901.747.3630

2999 Centre Oak Way Germantown, TN 38138 901.684.5500

7668 Airways Blvd. 3350 N. Germantown Rd. Building B Bartlett, TN 38133 Southaven, MS 38671 901.377.2111 662.349.6950 901.766.9490

1325 Eastmoreland Ave. 76 Capital Way Cv. Suite 435 Atoka, TN 38004 Memphis, TN 38104 901.377.2111 901.377.2111

www.gastro1.com

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PHOTOGRAPH BY BRANDON DILL

DR. ROBERT W. SCHRINER, MD

A

BAPTIST SLEEP DISORDERS CENTER

mericans don’t get enough sleep, says Dr. Robert W. Schriner of Memphis Lung Physicians and medical director of Baptist Sleep Disorders Center at Baptist Memorial Hospital-Collierville. “We’re not nearly as productive and functional as we should be.” Sleep deprivation can lead to memory loss, headaches, increased stress, and in severe cases, cardiovascular issues and hallucinations. Individual sleep needs vary, with eight hours being the common recommendation for adults, but those who suffer with sleep disorders — such as apnea, restless legs syndrome, insomnia, and circadian rhythm abnormalities — have to do more than count sheep to get the sleep they need. To evaluate patients, Schriner — a Mid-South native who received his doctorate of medicine from the University of Tennessee Health Science Center — uses a combination of home sleep tests, laboratory

testing, and sleep studies. For studies, patients are connected to a web of wires, electrodes, and probes, and the clinical data collected is “scored” and interpreted to establish a treatment plan. Sleep studies look at brain waves, eye movements, nasal air flow, heart rate, oxygen saturation, limb movement, and breathing effort. Over Schriner’s 25 years in practice, technology has advanced, taking paper records online making it possible to analyze them from anywhere — and even monitor patients remotely. “If there is a problem, you can get into the system and watch it in real time, say if they had an EKG abnormality,” says Schriner. But some processes remain the same. “A lot of things were standardized in the ’70s and ’80s that we still use today,” he says. “There was a lot of promise that computers could help us score sleep, but computers still get confused — with brainwav-

es, it’s a pattern recognition rather than a microsecond to microsecond analysis of the waveform. Many advances in sleep medicine have been “behind the scenes” — via technology and pharmaceuticals — but what the patients see during a sleep study hasn’t changed much in recent decades. “I would love to see nanotechnology, for instance, instead of having wires and a hookup that makes [the patient] look like a spaceman,” Schriner says. Luckily though, for patients who suffer with breathing-related sleep problems, CPAP (continuous positive airway pressure therapy) devices have become less bulky and uncomfortable. As well, specialized devices have been developed to more effectively target a patient’s specific symptoms. Schriner hopes to see continuous improvements. “We’re trying to take more of an individual approach to the aspect of sleep medicine.” — Shara Clark

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MEMPHIS TOP DOCTORS 2017 contin u ed from page 4 2

NEONATAL-PERINATAL MEDICINE

H. HOWARD NEASE, MD

RAMASUBBAREDDY DHANIREDDY, MD

Preventive Medicine, Diabetes, Hypertension

CATHERINE R. WOMACK, MD

Methodist University Hospital - Memphis UT Methodist Physician Group Internal Medicine - Primary Care 57 Germantown Court, Suite 100 Cordova, TN 38018 901-758-7888

Women’s Health, Preventive Medicine, Obesity

INTERVENTIONAL CARDIOLOGY CLARO F. DIAZ, MD

Regional One Health Le Bonheur Children’s Hospital Regional One Health Newborn Center 853 Jefferson Ave., Suite 201 Memphis, TN 38103 901-448-5950

Neonatal Care, Prematurity/Low-Birth-Weight Infants

AJAY J. TALATI, MD

Regional One Health Le Bonheur Children’s Hospital Regional One Health Newborn Center 853 Jefferson Ave., Suite 201 Memphis, TN 38103 901-448-5950

Neonatal Care, Infections-Neonatal, Prematurity/Low-BirthWeight Infants, Neonatal Nutrition

Pediatric Neurosurgery, Brain Tumors, Chiari’s Deformity, Epilepsy

KEVIN T. FOLEY, MD

Methodist University Hospital - Memphis Baptist Memorial Hospital - Memphis Semmes-Murphey Clinic 6325 Humphreys Blvd. Memphis, TN 38120 901-522-7700

Spinal Surgery, Minimally Invasive Spinal Surgery

JON H. ROBERTSON, MD

Methodist North Hospital Sutherland Cardiology Clinic 7460 Wolf River Blvd. Germantown, TN 38138 901-763-0200

Methodist University Hospital - Memphis Baptist Memorial Hospital - Memphis Semmes-Murphey Clinic 6325 Humphreys Blvd. Memphis, TN 38120 901-522-7700

Peripheral Vascular Disease, Interventional Cardiology, Coronary Artery Disease

Brain & Spinal Cord Tumors, Skull Base Tumors, Stereotactic Radiosurgery, Acoustic Neuroma

MICHAEL A. NELSON, MD

NEUROLOGY

Proactive Heart & Vascular 7751 Wolf River Blvd. Germantown, TN 38138 901-297-4000

TULIO E. BERTORINI, MD

Angioplasty, Cardiac Catheterization, Preventive Cardiology, Echocardiography

MATERNAL & FETAL MEDICINE

NEPHROLOGY

GIANCARLO MARI, MD

LYNN EBAUGH, MD

Le Bonheur Children’s Hospital Regional One Health UT Regional One Physicians Le Bonheur Outpatient Center - Main Campus 51 N. Dunlap St., Suite 305 Memphis, TN 38103 901-287-6981

Baptist Memorial Hospital - Memphis Baptist Memorial Hospital - Collierville East Memphis Nephrology 7640 Wolf River Circle, Floor 2 Germantown, TN 38138 901-755-0208

Fetal Therapy, Obstetric Ultrasound, Pregnancy-High Risk

Methodist North Hospital Saint Francis Hospital - Bartlett Kidney Care Consultants 3950 New Covington Pike, Suite 300 Memphis, TN 38128 901-382-5256

MEDICAL ONCOLOGY ALEKSANDAR JANKOV, MD

Baptist Memorial Hospital - Memphis Baptist Cancer Center 6029 Walnut Grove Rd., Suite 301 Memphis, TN 38120 901-747-9081

C. MICHAEL JONES, MD

Methodist Le Bonheur Germantown Hospital Baptist Memorial Hospital - Memphis Baptist Cancer Center 80 Humphreys Center Drive, Suite 330 Memphis, TN 38120 901-685-5969

RAYMOND U. OSAROGIAGBON, MD Baptist Memorial Hospital - Memphis Baptist Medical Group Baptist Cancer Center 80 Humphreys Blvd, Suite 330 Memphis, TN 38120 901-752-6131

Esophageal Cancer, Lung Cancer, Gastrointestinal Cancer, Sickle Cell Disease

LEE S. SCHWARTZBERG, MD

Baptist Memorial Hospital - Memphis Methodist University Hospital - Memphis West Cancer Center 7945 Wolf River Blvd. Memphis, TN 38138 901-683-0055

Breast Cancer, Lung Cancer, Stem Cell Transplant

OMAR O. HAMZE, MD

Kidney Failure, Hypertension, Diabetic Kidney Disease, Dialysis Care

NAWAR E. MANSOUR, MD

Methodist University Hospital - Memphis Baptist Memorial Hospital - Memphis Kidney Specialists 1325 Eastmoreland Ave., Suite 335 Memphis, TN 38104 901-726-1199

MARC H. STEGMAN, MD

Methodist University Hospital - Memphis Kidney Group of Memphis 2225 Union Ave., Suite 100 Memphis, TN 38104 901-726-1161

NEUROLOGICAL SURGERY KENAN ARNAUTOVIC, MD

Baptist Memorial Hospital - Memphis Methodist University Hospital - Memphis Semmes-Murphey Clinic 6325 Humphreys Blvd. Memphis, TN 38120 901-522-7700

Chiari’s Deformity, Acoustic Neuroma, Skull Base Surgery, Brain & Spinal Cord Tumors

Methodist University Hospital - Memphis Wesley Neurology Clinic 8000 Centerview Pkwy., Suite 305 Cordova, TN 38018 901-261-3500

Clinical Neurophysiology, Neuromuscular Disorders, Electromyography (EMG)

MAROUN T. DICK, MD

Mid-South Neurology Clinic 8577 Cordes Circle Germantown, TN 38139 901-590-0886

Epilepsy, Sleep Disorders

MARK S. LEDOUX, MD/PHD

Methodist University Hospital - Memphis Wesley Neurology Clinic 8000 Centerview Pkwy., Suite 305 Cordova, TN 38018 901-261-3500

Parkinson’s Disease/Movement Disorders, Dystonia, Botox Therapy, Deep Brain Stimulation

BARBARA CAPE O’BRIEN, MD

Baptist Memorial Hospital - Collierville Neurology Clinic 8000 Centerview Pkwy., Suite 300 Cordova, TN 38018 901-747-1111

Alzheimer’s Disease, Multiple Sclerosis

LEE S. STEIN, MD

Baptist Memorial Hospital-Collierville Neurology Clinic 8000 Centerview Pkwy., Suite 300 Cordova, TN 38108 901-747-1111

ILLUSTRATION BY ARTINSPIRING | DREAMSTIME

Baptist Memorial Hospital-Memphis 8138 Country Village Drive Cordova, TN 38016 901-260-3100

FREDERICK A. BOOP, MD

Le Bonheur Children’s Hospital St. Jude Children’s Research Hospital Semmes-Murphey Clinic 6325 Humphreys Blvd. Memphis, TN 38120 901-522-7700

Multiple Sclerosis, Epilepsy

MERRILL S. WISE III, MD

Methodist University Hospital - Memphis Mid-South Pulmonary Specialists 5050 Poplar Ave., Suite 300 Memphis, TN 38157 901-276-2662

Sleep Disorders, Narcolepsy

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Comprehensive gynecologic oncology care. From the region’s leading team.

Todd Tillmanns, MD

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Linda Smiley, MD

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Mark Reed, MD

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Adam ElNaggar, MD

At West Cancer Center, we don’t just treat the patient, we treat the woman. Our multidisciplinary method ensures each patient receives rapid access to our world-class team of experts and a personalized treatment plan to carry them every step of the way. Learn more about our comprehensive approach to your wellness journey at westcancercenter.org. westcancercenter.org 901.683.0055

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A DV E R TO R I A L

For More Than Twenty Years,

Surgical Expertise

West Cancer Center’s Gynecologic Oncology Division has provided rapid access to the most comprehensive treatment for women across the Mid-South. Beginning with the hiring of Linda Smiley, MD, FACOG in 1995, West Cancer Center integrated a more refined approach to patient care, delivering customized — and multidisciplinary — treatment plans for women facing a gynecologic cancer diagnosis. Since then, the number of new gynecologic cancer diagnoses have grown to one of the highest volumes for all cancer types treated at West Cancer Center. In 2016 alone, the Division saw more than 4,000 patients — including almost 800 new patients in the same time frame.

Robotic-assisted surgery has quickly become one of the fastest growing technological advances in the treatment of gynecologic cancers. Today, this commitment to innovative technology and resources continues as the team uses the most advanced robotic and minimally invasive systems for surgical intervention. The net result is ultimate benefit to the patients — ensuring increased patient comfort, quicker recovery and superior surgical outcomes.

To accommodate this growing patient population, West now offers the region’s largest team of multidisciplinary experts in the field: Todd Tillmanns, MD, FACOG; Mark Reed, MD, FACOG; Adam C. ElNaggar, MD; and Dr. Smiley from the Gynecologic Oncology Division — all playing the unique, dual role of oncologist and surgeon. “From evaluation to diagnosis, through surgery and treatment planning, this team cares for the entire patient — throughout their spectrum of care,” said Dr. Tillmanns, Division Head and Program Director of the Gynecologic Oncology Division at the University of Tennessee Health Science Center. “Through our partnership with Methodist Healthcare and the University of Tennessee Health Science Center, West Cancer Center provides a highly personalized and unique patient experience, offering unparalleled access to the most advanced technology and innovative resources available — ensuring each patient receives the care they need.”

Comprehensive Care — on Your Home Front In addition to the flagship location in Memphis, Tenn., the Division provides points of access to comprehensive services throughout the Mid-South. From satellite locations in West Tennessee and Eastern Arkansas to two dedicated sites in North Mississippi, these experts provide multiple points of access to care for women across the region. This ensures not only the convenience of proximity, but also the benefit of more rapid access and appointment times across multiple sites. “As the patient’s partner in their health care journey, we meet the patient — on their home front — to guide them comprehensively and efficiently through the stages of diagnosis, treatment planning and, ultimately, survivorship,” said Dr. Smiley.

“In regards to cancer care, we were doing minimally invasive surgery here at West before anyone else in the city,” said Dr. Tillmanns. “We put our patients first, and that means finding the most successful methods that interrupt their lives as little as possible.”

The Therapies of Tomorrow, Today West Cancer Center features the largest portfolio of clinical trial opportunities in the Mid-South. This, coupled with a commitment to targeted therapy empowered by a comprehensive Genetics Program, ensures the patients benefit from the latest treatment opportunities available. Dr. ElNaggar, the newest Gynecologic Oncologist to join West Cancer Center, believes this is essential to not only the patient, but also to elevating access to innovative care throughout the region. “At West Cancer Center, we are shaping the future of cancer care with an innovative, patient-centered approach to cancer treatment,” said Dr. ElNaggar. “This includes providing patients access to the therapies of tomorrow — today — through our robust Clinical Research Program. ”

Patient and Caregiver Support Realizing that the patient experience extends far beyond the physician and treatment visits, the WINGS Supportive Care Division picks up where the doctor visit leaves off — providing patients access to the comprehensive, supportive services necessary for their cancer journey. “The cancer journey impacts not only the patient, but the entire network of family, friends and loved ones that surround them,” said Dr. Reed. “As their physician, we also become part of their network. And we realize that these additional supportive services are absolutely essential to the cancer journey.”

From nutrition to rehabilitation, and psychological services and spiritual counseling, these services are available at no additional cost to the patient. The WINGS Supportive Care Division also houses the Genetic Counseling Program — a resource critical to the treatment planning process. “In partnership with the patient’s Gynecologic Oncologist, Genetic Counselors provide patients access to education and resources to better understand how genetics may play a role in developing cancer,” said Dr. Reed. “And, when evaluation and care planning deems necessary, they can also provide genetic testing services to determine how this information can empower both preventative health as well as the cancer treatment process.”

Shaping the Future of Gynecologic Oncology In addition to excellence in comprehensive care, the Gynecologic Oncology Division is committed to providing access to education and training opportunities for specialists in the field through the Division’s Fellowship Program. Featuring a dual focus on both clinical excellence as well as laboratory research, the Fellowship provides future experts with the necessary surgical experience, scientific knowledge and laboratory focus to build a foundation for a career in this field. The highly competitive program also distinguishes West Cancer Center — and the Division — as not only the region’s premier cancer care provider, but also as the educational epicenter for gynecologic experts in the Mid-South. And while the Gynecologic Oncology Division represents a comprehensive web of multidisciplinary services, education, programs and expertise, its mission is singular — and very clear: to provide each woman with the care she needs for her unique wellness journey. “We are very proud of the program that we’ve built here at West — one that is equal to some of the largest and most robust Gynecologic Programs in the country,” said Dr. Tillmanns. “We will continue to build on this and will take what we have learned from our patients and their families into early 2019 to shape our new location as an integral part of the Methodist University Hospital expansion. At the end of the day, what truly makes us unique — what truly defines these expert physicians — is their commitment to each and every single patient that trusts us as their partner in their cancer journey. That is our focus. That is what gets us out of bed every day. We are with these patients, every step of the way.”

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MEMPHIS TOP DOCTORS 2017

NEURORADIOLOGY DAVID E. BUECHNER, MD

Methodist University Hospital - Memphis Memphis Vascular Center 7695 Poplar Pike Germantown, TN 38138 901-683-1890

Interventional Neuroradiology

OBSTETRICS & GYNECOLOGY AHMAD AZARI, MD Baptist Memorial Hospital for Women Baptist Medical Group 80 Humphreys Blvd., Suite 201 Memphis, TN 38120 901-227-9820

NATALIE C. KERR, MD

Le Bonheur Children’s Hospital St. Jude Children’s Research Hospital Hamilton Eye Institute 930 Madison Ave., Suite 400 Memphis, TN 38103 901-287-7337

Pediatric Ophthalmology, Strabismus, Cataract-Pediatric, Genetic Disorders-Eye

M. CATHLEEN SCHANZER, MD

Saint Francis Hospital - Memphis Methodist North Hospital LASIK at Southern Eye Associates 5350 Poplar Ave., Suite 950 Memphis, TN 38119 901-683-4600

Cataract Surgery

Sports Medicine, Knee Surgery, Shoulder Surgery

G. ANDREW MURPHY, MD

Pregnancy-High Risk, Pelvic Surgery

FRANK WEN-YUNG LING, MD

Regional One Health Le Bonheur Children’s Hospital Outpatient Center 880 Madison Ave., Suite 3E01 Memphis, TN 38103 901-515-3800

Adolescent Gynecology, Child Abuse

OPHTHALMOLOGY JAMES C. FLEMING, MD

Methodist University Hospital - Memphis Baptist Memorial Hospital - Memphis Hamilton Eye Institute 930 Madison Ave., Suite 200 Memphis, TN 38103 901-448-6650

Oculoplastic & Reconstructive Surgery

JAMES F. FREEMAN, MD MECA Eye & Laser Center 6485 Poplar Ave. Memphis, TN 38119 901-767-3937

Cataract Surgery, Glaucoma, Cornea Transplant, Laser Surgery

SUBBA R. GOLLAMUDI, MD

Baptist Memorial Hospital - Memphis Saint Francis Hospital - Memphis Eye Specialty Group 825 Ridge Lake Blvd. Memphis, TN 38120 901-685-2200

Corneal Disease, Cataract Surgery

MARY E. HOEHN, MD

Le Bonheur Children’s Hospital St. Jude Children’s Research Hospital Hamilton Eye Institute 930 Madison Ave., Suite 200 Memphis, TN 38103 901-287-7337

Pediatric Ophthalmology, Strabismus

JAMES L. GUYTON, MD

Methodist Le Bonheur Germantown Hospital Campbell Clinic 1400 S. Germantown Rd. Germantown, TN 38138 901-759-3100

RANDALL L. HOLCOMB, MD

Baptist Memorial Hospital for Women Methodist Le Bonheur Germantown Hospital Adams Patterson Gynecology & Obstetrics 6215 Humphreys Blvd., Suite 301 Memphis, TN 38120 901-767-3810

CLAUDETTE J. SHEPHARD, MD

Sports Medicine, Arthroscopic Surgery-Knee, Arthroscopic Surgery-Shoulder, Adolescent Sports Medicine

Baptist Memorial Hospital - Memphis Methodist Le Bonheur Germantown Hospital OrthoMemphis 6286 Briarcrest Ave., Suite 200 Memphis, TN 38120 901-259-1600

T. FRANKLIN KING, MD

Pain-Pelvic & Perineal, Vulvar & Vaginal Disorders, Menstrual Disorders

DAVID A. DENEKA, MD

Methodist Le Bonheur Germantown Hospital Baptist Memorial Hospital - Memphis OrthoMemphis 6286 Briarcrest Ave., Suite 200 Memphis, TN 38120 901-259-1600

Joint Replacement, Pelvic Trauma

Minimally Invasive Surgery, Laparoscopic Hysterectomy

Baptist Memorial Hospital - Memphis Methodist Le Bonheur Germantown Hospital Women’s Health Specialists 7800 Wolf Trail Cove Germantown, TN 38138 901-682-9222

Pediatric Orthopaedic Surgery, Fractures-Pediatric, Hip Disorders-Pediatric, Clubfoot

RICHARD E. SIEVERS, MD

Saint Francis Hospital - Memphis Mid-South Retina Associates 6005 Park Ave, Suite 624-B Memphis, TN 38119 901-682-1100

Retina/Vitreous Surgery

ROLANDO TOYOS, MD

Skyline Medical Center Toyos Clinic 1365 S. Germantown Rd. Germantown, TN 38138 901-683-7255

LASIK-Refractive Surgery, PRK-Refractive Surgery

MATTHEW W. WILSON, MD

St. Jude Children’s Research Hospital Methodist University Hospital - Memphis Hamilton Eye Institute 930 Madison Ave., Suite 200 Memphis, TN 38103 901-448-6650

Eye Tumors/Cancer, Retinoblastoma, Melanoma-Ocular

ORTHOPAEDIC SURGERY SUSAN M. AUSTIN, MD

Le Bonheur Children’s Hospital Baptist Memorial Hospital for Women The Austin Center 146 Timber Creek Drive, Suite 101 Cordova, TN 38108 901-753-4543

Pediatric Orthopaedic Surgery, Cerebral Palsy, Scoliosis

FREDERICK M. AZAR, MD

Methodist University Hospital - Memphis Campbell Clinic 1400 S. Germantown Rd. Germantown, TN 38138 901-759-3100

Shoulder Surgery, Rotator Cuff Surgery

JAMES H. BEATY MD

Le Bonheur Children’s Hospital Campbell Clinic 1400 S. Germantown Rd. Germantown, TN 38138 901-759-3100

Methodist Le Bonheur Germantown Hospital Campbell Clinic 1400 S. Germantown Rd. Germantown, TN 38138 901-759-3100

Foot & Ankle Surgery

MICHAEL D. NEEL, MD

Baptist Memorial Hospital - Memphis Methodist Le Bonheur Germantown Hospital OrthoMemphis 6286 Briarcrest Ave., Suite 200 Memphis, TN 38120 901-259-1600

Musculoskeletal Cancer, Hip & Knee Reconstruction, Arthritis

JEFFREY R. SAWYER, MD

Le Bonheur Children’s Hospital Campbell Clinic 1400 S. Germantown Rd. Germantown, TN 38138 901-759-3100

Pediatric Orthopaedic Surgery, Scoliosis, Spinal Deformity-Pediatric, Spinal Trauma

WILLIAM C. WARNER JR., MD Le Bonheur Children’s Hospital Campbell Clinic 1400 S. Germantown Rd. Germantown, TN 38138 901-759-3100

Pediatric Orthopaedic Surgery, Spinal Surgery, Scoliosis

OTOLARYNGOLOGY NEAL S. BECKFORD, MD

Baptist Memorial Hospital - Memphis Saint Francis Hospital - Memphis Otolaryngology Associates of the Mid-South 7675 Wolf River Circle, Suite 202 Germantown, TN 38138 901-737-3021

Vocal Cord Disorders, Laryngeal & Voice Disorders

BRUCE L. FETTERMAN, MD

Methodist Le Bonheur Germantown Hospital Baptist Memorial Hospital - Memphis Mid-South Ear Nose & Throat 7600 Wolf River Blvd., Suite 220 Germantown, TN 38138 901-755-5300

Neuro-Otology

ILLUSTRATION BY ARTINSPIRING | DREAMSTIME

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901.821.8300

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MEDICALOFMEMPHIS.COM

5/15/17 1:57 PM


MEMPHIS TOP DOCTORS 2017

Sinus Disorders

PHILLIP R. LANGSDON, MD

Regional One Health Methodist University Hospital - Memphis The Langsdon Clinic 7499 Poplar Pike Germantown, TN 38138 901-755-6465

Facial Plastic Surgery, Rhinoplasty Revision

JEFFREY A. TOWBIN, MD

St. Jude Children’s Research Hospital Department of Oncology 262 Danny Thomas Place, MS 260 Memphis, TN 38105 901-595-2403

Cardiomyopathy, Congenital Heart Disease, Transplant Medicine-Heart

Neuroblastoma, Drug Development, Liver Cancer

BENJAMIN R. WALLER III, MD

St. Jude Children’s Research Hospital Department of Oncology 262 Danny Thomas Place, MS 260 Memphis, TN 38105 901-595-2544

Le Bonheur Children’s Hospital Cardiology Department 848 Adams Ave., Lobby Level Memphis, TN 38103 901-287-7337

Congenital Heart Disease

Wilms’ Tumor, Fertility in Cancer Survivors, Cancer Survivors - Late Effects of Therapy

Pain Management-Pediatric, Pain - Cancer

MELISSA M. HUDSON, MD

ALAN J. KRAUS, MD

St. Jude Children’s Research Hospital Department of Oncology 262 Danny Thomas Place, MS 735 Memphis, TN 38105 901-595-3445

Saint Francis Hospital - Memphis Memphis Pain Clinic 99 Market Center Drive Collierville, TN 38017 901-754-3365

Pain - Back & Neck, Spinal Cord Stimulation

Pain-Interventional Techniques, Pain - Neuropathic

AUTRY J. PARKER JR., MD

Saint Francis Hospital - Memphis Baptist Memorial Hospital - Memphis Semmes-Murphey Clinic 6325 Humphreys Blvd. Memphis, TN 38120 901-522-7700

Spinal Cord Stimulation, Pain-Chronic, Pain-Back & Neck, Complex Regional Pain Syndrome

MOACIR SCHNAPP, MD

Mays & Schnapp Pain Clinic and Rehab Center 55 Humphreys Center Drive, Suite 200 Memphis, TN 38120 901-747-0040

Pain-Interventional Techniques, Pain-Neuropathic

PATHOLOGY CAROLYN M. CHESNEY, MD

Baptist Memorial Hospital - Memphis Pathology Group of the Mid-South 7550 Wolf River Blvd., Suite 200 Germantown, TN 38138 901-542-6801

Hematopathology, Bleeding/Coagulation Disorders

PEDIATRIC CARDIOLOGY VIJAYA M. JOSHI, MD

PEDIATRIC ENDOCRINOLOGY ALICIA M. DIAZ-THOMAS, MD

Le Bonheur Children’s Hospital UT Le Bonheur Pediatric Specialists Le Bonheur Outpatient Center 51 N. Dunlap St., 3rd Floor Memphis, TN 38105 901-287-7337

Bone Disorders-Metabolic, Calcium Disorders, Sexual Development Disorders, Pituitary Disorders

JOAN C. HAN, MD

Le Bonheur Children’s Hospital Endocrinology Department 848 Adams Ave. Memphis, TN 38103 901-287-7337

Diabetes, Obesity

DENNIS D. BLACK, MD

Le Bonheur Children’s Hospital UT Le Bonheur Pediatric Specialists 51 N. Dunlap St., Suite 400 Memphis, TN 38105 901-287-7337

Nutrition, Obesity, Liver Disease, Cholesterol/Lipid Disorders

PEDIATRIC GASTROENTEROLOGY MARK R. CORKINS, MD

Le Bonheur Children’s Hospital UT Le Bonheur Pediatric Specialists 51 N. Dunlap St., Suite 400 Memphis, TN 38105 901-287-7337

Le Bonheur Children’s Hospital UT Le Bonheur Pediatric Specialists 51 N. Dunlap St. Memphis, TN 38105 901-287-7337

Nutrition, Inflammatory Bowel Disease, Celiac Disease

Echocardiography, Fetal Cardiology

MELODY J. CUNNINGHAM, MD

J. KEVIN STAMPS, MD

Baptist Memorial Hospital-Memphis Memphis Pediatric Heart 6215 Humphreys Blvd., Suite 211 Memphis, TN 38120 901-259-2440

Congenital Heart Disease, Arrhythmias, Marfan Syndrome

Brain Tumors, Medulloblastoma, Neuro-Oncology, Drug Development St. Jude Children’s Research Hospital Dept. of Epidemiology & Cancer Control 262 Danny Thomas Place, MS 735 Memphis, TN 38105 901-595-5914

St. Jude Children’s Research Hospital Dept. of Anesthesiology & Pain Management 262 Danny Thomas Place, MS 130 Memphis, TN 38105 901-595-4032

Mays & Schnapp Pain Clinic and Rehab Center 55 Humphreys Center Drive, Suite 200 Memphis, TN 38120 901-747-0040

AMAR J. GAJJAR, MD

DANIEL M. GREEN, MD

PAIN MEDICINE DORALINA L. ANGHELESCU, MD

KIT S. MAYS, MD

WAYNE L. FURMAN, MD

Le Bonheur Children’s Hospital UT Le Bonheur Pediatric Specialists 848 Adams Ave., Lobby Level Memphis, TN 38103 866-870-5570

PEDIATRIC HEMATOLOGYONCOLOGY Le Bonheur Children’s Hospital UT Le Bonheur Pediatric Specialists 848 Adams Ave. Memphis, TN 38103 866-870-5570

Palliative Care

Cancer Survivors - Late Effects of Therapy, Hodgkin’s Lymphoma

PALBERTO S. PAPPO, MD

St. Jude Children’s Research Hospital Department of Oncology 262 Danny Thomas Place, MS 260 Memphis, TN 38105 901-595-2322

Sarcoma-Soft Tissue, Melanoma, Gastrointestinal Stromal Tumors

PCHING-HON PUI, MD

St. Jude Children’s Research Hospital Le Bonheur Children’s Hospital St. Jude Children’s Research Hospital Department of Oncology 262 Danny Thomas Place, MS 260 Memphis, TN 38105 901-595-4329

Leukemia, Lymphoma

RAUL C. RIBEIRO, MD

St. Jude Children’s Research Hospital Department of Oncology 262 Danny Thomas Place, MS 260 Memphis, TN 38105 901-595-3300

Leukemia & Lymphoma

VICTOR M. SANTANA, MD

St. Jude Children’s Research Hospital Department of Oncology 262 Danny Thomas Place, MS 274 Memphis, TN 38105-2794 901-595-2801

Solid Tumors, Clinical Trials,Ethics

WINFRED C. WANG, MD

St. Jude Children’s Research Hospital Le Bonheur Children’s Hospital St. Jude Children’s Research Hospital Department of Hematology 262 Danny Thomas Place, MS 800 Memphis, TN 38105 901-595-4055

Sickle Cell Disease, Bone Marrow Failure Disorders, Anemia-Aplastic

ILLUSTRATION BY ARTINSPIRING | DREAMSTIME

DEAN A. KLUG, MD

Methodist Le Bonheur Germantown Hospital Baptist Memorial Hospital - Memphis Mid-South Ear Nose & Throat 7600 Wolf River Blvd., Suite 220 Germantown, TN 38138 901-755-5300

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MEMPHIS TOP DOCTORS 2017

ELISABETH E. ADDERSON, MD

PEDIATRIC RHEUMATOLOGY LINDA K. MYERS, MD

St. Jude Children’s Research Hospital Department of Infectious Diseases 262 Danny Thomas Place, MS 320 Memphis, TN 38105 888-226-4343

Le Bonheur Children’s Hospital UT Le Bonheur Pediatric Specialists 51 N. Dunlap St., Suite 400 Memphis, TN 38105 901-287-7337

Infections in Immunocompromised Patients, Clinical Trials, Histoplasmosis

Juvenile Arthritis

JOHN DEVINCENZO, MD

Le Bonheur Children’s Hospital UT Le Bonheur Pediatric Specialists 51 N. Dunlap St., Suite 400 Memphis, TN 38105 901-287-7337

PATRICIA M. FLYNN, MD

St. Jude Children’s Research Hospital Le Bonheur Children’s Hospital St. Jude Children’s Research Hospital Department of Infectious Diseases 262 Danny Thomas Place, MS 282 Memphis, TN 38105 901-595-6476

PEDIATRIC SURGERY ANDREW M. DAVIDOFF, MD

St. Jude Children’s Research Hospital Le Bonheur Children’s Hospital St. Jude Children’s Research Hospital Department of Surgery 262 Danny Thomas Place, MS 133 Memphis, TN 38105

901-595-4060 Neuroblastoma, Cancer Surgery

BETTINA H. AULT, MD

Le Bonheur Children’s Hospital UT Le Bonheur Pediatric Specialists 51 N. Dunlap St., Suite 400 Memphis, TN 38105 901-287-7337

JOHN J. BISSLER, MD

Kidney Disease, Tuberous Sclerosis Complex (TSC)

ROBERT J. WYATT, MD

Le Bonheur Children’s Hospital UT Le Bonheur Pediatric Specialists 51 N. Dunlap St., Suite 400 Memphis, TN 38105 901-287-7337

Kidney Disease-Autoimmune, Berger’s Disease (IgA Nephropathy)

PEDIATRIC OTOLARYNGOLOGY C. BRUCE MACDONALD, MD

Le Bonheur Children’s Hospital UT Le Bonheur Pediatric Specialists 51 N. Dunlap St., Suite 10 Memphis, TN 38105 901-287-7337

Hearing & Balance Disorders, Head & Neck Surgery, Neuro-Otology, Ear Disorders/Surgery

JEROME W. THOMPSON, MD

Le Bonheur Children’s Hospital UT Le Bonheur Pediatric Specialists 51 N. Dunlap St, Suite G10 Memphis, TN 38105 901-287-7337

Tonsil/Adenoid Disorders

PEDIATRIC PULMONOLOGY ROBERT SCHOUMACHER, MD

Le Bonheur Children’s Hospital UT Le Bonheur Pediatric Specialists 51 N. Dunlap St., Suite 400 Memphis, TN 38105 901-287-7337

Cystic Fibrosis, Sleep Disorders/Apnea

Chronic Illness

JANET D. GEIGER, MD

Baptist Memorial Hospital-Memphis Methodist Le Bonheur Germantown Hospital River City Pediatrics 6401 Poplar Ave., Suite 610 Memphis, TN 38119 901-761-1280

TIMOTHY G. GILLESPIE, MD

PEDIATRIC NEPHROLOGY

Le Bonheur Children’s Hospital UT Le Bonheur Pediatric Specialists 51 N. Dunlap St., Suite 400 Memphis, TN 38105 901-287-7337

NOEL K. FRIZZELL, MD

Le Bonheur Children’s Hospital Pediatric Consultants 51 N. Dunlap St., Suite 410 Memphis, TN 38105 901-523-2945

Le Bonheur Children’s Hospital Baptist Memorial Hospital for Women Memphis Children’s Clinic 1129 Hale Rd. Memphis, TN 38116 901-396-0390

AIDS/HIV, Infections in Immunocompromised Patients, Clinical Trials

Hemolytic Uremic Syndrome, Kidney Failure, Anemia

STEPHEN T. BAUCH, MD

Le Bonheur Children’s Hospital Methodist Le Bonheur Germantown Hospital Memphis Children’s Clinic 3155 Kirby Whitten Bartlett, TN 38134 901-379-0092

CHARLES C. HANSON, MD

JAMES W. EUBANKS III, MD

Methodist Le Bonheur Germantown Hospital Baptist Memorial Hospital for Women Laurelwood Pediatrics 5050 Sanderlin Ave. Memphis, TN 38117 901-683-9371

Minimally Invasive Surgery, Chest Wall Deformities, Pediatric Cancers, Trauma

Methodist Le Bonheur Germantown Hospital Memphis Children’s Clinic 7705 Poplar Ave., Suite 230 Germantown, TN 38138 901-755-2400

Le Bonheur Children’s Hospital UT Le Bonheur Pediatric Specialists 51 N. Dunlap St., Suite 235 Memphis, TN 38105 901-287-6031

MAX R. LANGHAM JR., MD

Le Bonheur Children’s Hospital UT Le Bonheur Pediatric Specialists 49 N. Dunlap St., Floor 2 Memphis, TN 38105 901-287-6031

Transplant-Liver, Congenital Anomalies, Liver Cancer, Wilms’ Tumor

PEDIATRIC UROLOGY DANA W. GIEL, MD

Le Bonheur Children’s Hospital St. Jude Children’s Research Hospital UT Le Bonheur Pediatric Specialists 770 Estate Place Memphis, TN 38120 901-287-7337

Neurogenic Bladder, Wilms’ Tumor

GERALD R. JERKINS, MD

Le Bonheur Children’s Hospital UT Le Bonheur Pediatric Specialists 1920 Kirby Pkwy., Suite 100 Memphis, TN 38138 901-751-0500

Urinary Reconstruction, Neurogenic Bladder

PEDIATRICS SEEMA ABBASI, MD

Baptist Memorial Hospital - Memphis Methodist Le Bonheur Germantown Hospital River City Pediatrics 6401 Poplar Ave., Suite 610 Memphis, TN 38119 901-761-1280

SCOTT M. KLOEK, MD

DEBORAH D. NELSON, MD

Le Bonheur Children’s Hospital UT Le Bonheur Pediatric Specialists 51 N. Dunlap St., Suite 400 Memphis, TN 38105 901-287-7337

ANGELA M. SCHULZ, MD

Baptist Memorial Hospital - Memphis Methodist Le Bonheur Germantown Hospital River City Pediatrics 6401 Poplar Ave., Suite 610 Memphis, TN 38119

901-761-1280

ELLEN J. STECKER, MD

Baptist Memorial Hospital - Memphis Methodist Le Bonheur Germantown Hospital River City Pediatrics 6401 Poplar Ave, Suite 610 Memphis, TN 38119

901-761-1280

PLASTIC SURGERY R. LOUIS ADAMS, MD

Baptist Memorial Hospital - Memphis Methodist University Hospital - Memphis Plastic Surgery Group of Memphis 80 Humphreys Center Dr., Suite 100 Memphis, TN 38120 901-761-9030

Breast Cosmetic Surgery, Breast Reconstruction, Breast Augmentation, Liposuction

ILLUSTRATION BY ARTINSPIRING | DREAMSTIME

PEDIATRIC INFECTIOUS DISEASE

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No pain or surgery • Licensed physicians Effective FDA approved medications

6005 Park Ave, Suite 704, Memphis, TN 38119 (901) 761-8100 www.midsouthwellnessclinicformen.com

6215 Humphreys Blvd Suite 500 Memphis, TN 38120

Left to right: DR. WADE CLAYTON // DR. ALLISON THOMAS // DR. GRANT DASHER // AND DR. DREW MEFFORD

901.509.2823 | thememphisdentist.com

Excellence in Women’s Health is our Legacy

Over 40 years of trusted care.

901.682.0630 ruchclinic.com A division of Women’s Care Center of Memphis, MPLLC

Welcome DR. ABBY TALBOT to Ruch Clinic

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MEMPHIS TOP DOCTORS 2017 PETER A. ALDEA, MD

Saint Francis Hospital - Memphis Cosmetic Surgery Specialists of Memphis 6401 Poplar Ave., Suite 360 Memphis, TN 38119 901-752-1412

Breast Cosmetic Surgery, Tummy Tuck/Abdominoplasty, Liposuction & Body Contouring

GEORGE L. BURRUSS, MD

Baptist Memorial Hospital - Memphis Methodist University Hospital - Memphis Plastic Surgery Group of Memphis 80 Humphreys Center Drive, Suite 100 Memphis, TN 38120 901-761-9030

Cosmetic Surgery - Face, Cosmetic Surgery - Breast, Rhinoplasty, Cancer Reconstruction

ROBERT G. CHANDLER, MD

Baptist Memorial Hospital - Memphis Methodist University Hospital - Memphis Plastic Surgery Group of Memphis 80 Humphreys Center Dr., Suite 100 Memphis, TN 38120 901-761-9030

Relief for marathon pain Don’t let joint or muscle pain limit your lifestyle. Our minimally invasive MAKOplasty knee procedure can relieve knee pain and get you going in a matter of days. We also offer a full range of orthopedic procedures for knees, hips, shoulders and ankles. Our skilled physical therapists will help you recover more quickly so that you won’t miss any of those special moments. East Memphis • 901-682-5642 6005 Park Ave., Ste. 309

Cosmetic Surgery - Face, Breast Cosmetic & Reconstructive Surgery

PATRICIA L. EBY, MD

Saint Francis Hospital - Memphis Cosmetic Surgery Specialists of Memphis 6401 Poplar Ave., Suite 360 Memphis, TN 38119 901-752-1412

Cosmetic Surgery, Facial Rejuvenation

WILLIAM L. HICKERSON, MD Regional One Health Burn Center 890 Madison Ave., Suite TG032 Memphis, TN 38103 901-448-2579

Burns - Reconstructive Plastic Surgery, TraumaReconstructive Plastic Surgery

ROBERTO D. LACHICA, MD

Methodist University Hospital - Memphis Methodist Le Bonheur Germantown Hospital University Plastic Surgeons 1068 Cresthaven Rd, Suite 500 Memphis, TN 38119 901-866-8525

Liposuction & Body Contouring, Cosmetic Surgery Face & Body

Bartlett • 901-791-0347 2996 Kate Bond Rd., Ste. 301

ROBERT D. WALLACE, MD

Methodist University Hospital - Memphis Baptist Memorial Hospital - Memphis University Plastic Surgeons 1068 Cresthaven Rd., Suite 500 Memphis, TN 38119 901-866-8525

www.eastmemphisortho.com Facebook: East Memphis Orthopedic

Cosmetic Surgery - Face & Body, Craniofacial Surgery, Reconstructive Plastic Surgery, Cosmetic Surgery - Breast

Memphis Children’s Clinic is all about

Knowledge. Quality. Compassion. Continuity.

PULMONARY DISEASE

WE WOULD LIKE TO SAY

“THANK YOU”

Methodist University Hospital - Memphis Mid-South Pulmonary Specialists 5050 Poplar Ave., Suite 800 Memphis, TN 38157 901-276-2662

Visit us today at

MATTHEW W. MABIE, MD

for choosing us in the 2017 Top Docs.

Asthma

www.memphischildrensclinic.org.

whitehaven 901.396.0390

germantown/collierville

901.755.2400

bartlett/Stage 901.379.0092 901.386.1683

kirby/hickory hill 901.795.9193

southaven 662.349.2555

RICHARD L. BOSWELL, MD

olive branch 662.890.0158

Methodist University Hospital - Memphis Mid-South Pulmonary Specialists 5050 Poplar Ave., Suite 800 Memphis, TN 38157 901-276-2662

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O P E N I N G M AY 2 0 1 7 !

The Future of Eyecare in Focus Offering a new approach to eye health and vision care, The FocalPoint at Crosstown Concourse is where the future of eyecare and eyewear converge.

In conjunction with Church Health Eyecare and the TearWell Advanced Dry Eye Treatment Center, you’ll find:

• EXCEPTIONAL CARE • UNIQUE EYEWEAR • PERSONALIZED CONCIERGE SERVICE • LIFESTYLE PRESCRIBING FOR YOUR EYECARE NEEDS • CONSULTATIVE STYLING IN THE EYEWEAR SALON

FocalPoint is located in Suite 264 in the new Crosstown Concourse, 1350 Concourse Avenue in midtown Memphis. Schedule your experience today, 901.252.3670!

A SOUTHERN COLLEGE OF OPTOMETRY PATIENT CARE & EDUCATIONAL FACILITY

FocalPointCrosstown.com

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Celebrating 75 Years of Caring for You: our neighbors, families, and friends. East | 38117 : 4515 Poplar Ave., Suite 206 North | 38128 : 3980 New Covington Pike, Suite 200 Germantown | 38138 : 8040 Wolf River Blvd., Suite 100

901.381.4MOG(4664) MemphisOrthoGroup.com Doctors pictured from Left to Right as follows:

Kenneth Grinspun, MD; W. Harold Knight, MD; Riley Jones, MD; Stephen M. Waggoner, MD; Christian Fahey, MD; Christopher M. Pokabla, MD; Marvin R. Leventhal, MD; Christopher Ferguson, MD; Mark Harriman, MD; and A.H. Manugian, MD.

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MEMPHIS TOP DOCTORS 2017 WILLIAM S. RICHARDS, MD

Methodist University Hospital - Memphis Mid-South Pulmonary Specialists 5050 Poplar Ave., Suite 800 Memphis, TN 38157 901-276-2662

a unique studio for kitchens, bath & home

Respiratory Infections, Lung Disease

901.458.2638

EDWIN O. TAYLOR, MD

Methodist University Hospital - Memphis Mid-South Pulmonary Specialists 5050 Poplar Ave., Suite 800 Memphis, TN 38157 901-276-2662

Pulmonary Hypertension, Pulmonary Infections

RADIATION ONCOLOGY MATTHEW T. BALLO, MD

Methodist University Hospital - Memphis West Cancer Center Radiation Oncology 1265 Union Ave., Thomas Basement Memphis, TN 38104 901-516-7367

Melanoma, Sarcoma

THOMAS E. MERCHANT, MD

St. Jude Children’s Research Hospital Department of Radiation Oncology 262 Danny Thomas Place, MS 210 Memphis, TN 38105 901-595-3604

Brain Tumors - Pediatric

JENNY TIBBS, MD

Saint Francis Hospital - Memphis Saint Francis Hospital Dept. of Radiation Oncology 5959 Park Ave. Memphis, TN 38119 901-765-2050

Prostate Cancer, Sarcoma

REPRODUCTIVE ENDOCRINOLOGY LAURA DETTI, MD

Regional One Health Methodist Le Bonheur Germantown Hospital Regional One Health Dept. of Reproductive Medicine 6555 Quince Rd., Suite 501 Memphis, TN 38119 901-515-3100

Infertility, Egg & Embryo Freezing, Polycystic Ovarian Syndrome, Pregnancy Loss - Recurrent

RAYMOND W. KE, MD

Baptist Memorial Hospital - Memphis Methodist Le Bonheur Germantown Hospital Fertility Associates of Memphis 80 Humphreys Center, Suite 307 Memphis, TN 38120 901-747-2229

Infertility-IVF,Polycystic Ovarian Syndrome,Adolescent Gynecology

WILLIAM H. KUTTEH, MD/PHD

Baptist Memorial Hospital for Women Methodist Le Bonheur Germantown Hospital Fertility Associates of Memphis Recurrent Pregnancy Loss Center 80 Humphreys Center, Suite 307 Memphis, TN 38120 901-747-2229

Miscarriage - Recurrent, Infertility - Female, Fertility Preservation in Cancer, Minimally Invasive Surgery

Tops Bar-B-Q Memphis Best Since 1952!

Mouth-watering Bar-B-Q, Ribs, Brisket and fresh ground, cooked to order Hamburgers, Cheeseburgers for 6 decades! Don’t forget to try our delicious Turkey burgers. Memphis Magazine’s

15 locations • topsbarbbq.com General offices: 5720 Mt. Moriah Road,

901.363.4007

THE 2017

FACE BBQ OF

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lets journey together Reed Family Dentistry is not here to judge your past. We want to focus on today, and what we can do to help prevent future dental health problems. Let’s start this journey together. For nearly 75 years - Reed Family Dentistry has journeyed with families just like yours. Let us become a part of your family today. At Reed Family Dentistry, we treat people, not just teeth. To start a relationship that will have you on your way to insuring your long-term dental health, give us a call today.

Call or Visit today! 8020 Highway 51 North in Millington • 901-872-3391 or 1003 S. College St. in Covington • 901-475-0805 • www.reedfamilydentistry.com

901- 866-8525 1068 Cresthaven Road, Memphis, TN 38119 www.utuniversityplasticsurgeons.com

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MEMPHIS TOP DOCTORS 2017 SLEEP MEDICINE ROBERT W. SCHRINER, MD

Baptist Memorial Hospital - Collierville Baptist Memorial Hospital - Memphis Memphis Lung Physicians 1500 W. Poplar Ave., Suite 309 Collierville, TN 38017 901-850-1170

Sleep Disorders/Apnea, Narcolepsy

SURGERY STEPHEN W. BEHRMAN, MD

Baptist Memorial Hospital - Memphis BMG Surgical Specialist 6027 Walnut Grove Rd., Suite 203 Memphis, TN 38120 901-226-5957

Gastrointestinal Cancer, Pancreatic Cancer, Inflammatory Bowel Disease

JAMES D. EASON, MD

Methodist University Hospital - Memphis Le Bonheur Children’s Hospital UT Methodist Physician Group Transplant Institute 1211 Union Ave., Suite 340 Memphis, TN 38104 901-516-9183

Transplant-Liver, Liver & Biliary Surgery, Liver Surgery Complex, Transplant - Kidney - Adult & Pediatric

RICHARD E. FINE, MD

Baptist Memorial Hospital for Women Methodist Le Bonheur Germantown Hospital Margaret West Comprehensive Breast Center 7945 Wolf River Blvd. Germantown, TN 38138 901-516-4300

ARCHITECTURE . INTERIORS . PL ANNING Memphis . Baton Rouge . Celebration . Dallas . Little Rock New Orleans . Philadelphia . Princeton . W W W.LRK .COM

Breast Cancer & Surgery

NOSRATOLLAH NEZAKATGOO, MD

Methodist University Hospital - Memphis UT Methodist Physician Group Transplant Institute 1265 Union Ave., Suite 184 Memphis, TN 38104 901-516-9183

Transplant - Kidney,Transplant - Pancreas & Liver

DAVID SHIBATA, MD

Methodist University Hospital - Memphis 1211 Union Ave., Suite 300 Memphis, TN 38104 901-609-3525

Colon & Rectal Cancer, Minimally Invasive Surgery, Laparoscopic Surgery

ALYSSA D. THROCKMORTON, MD

Baptist Memorial Hospital for Women Methodist Le Bonheur Germantown Hospital Baptist Medical Group Memphis Breast Care 6215 Humphreys Blvd., Suite 208 Memphis, TN 38120 901-227-8950

Breast Cancer & Surgery

LINDI HANNA VANDERWALDE, MD

Baptist Memorial Hospital for Women Methodist Le Bonheur Germantown Hospital Baptist Medical Group Memphis Breast Care 6215 Humphreys Blvd., Suite 208 Memphis, TN 38120

901-227-8950 Breast Cancer & Surgery, Nipple Sparing Mastectomy

PEEL LAW FIRM

CATASTROPHIC INJURY & WRONGFUL DEATH LAW

Memphis Magazine’s

THE 2017

FACE

OF CATASTROPHIC INJURY & WRONG DEATH LAW

Attorney Peel demonstrates that those dashes in the center of the road are actually 10 feet long. Injury lawyer David B. Peel has been handling serious injury auto accidents, tractortrailer crashes, deaths and disabilities for over 20 years. At the Peel Law Firm we make a difference in the lives of injured victims against incredible odds. Contact Us Today!

8582 U.S. Highway 51 North, Millington, TN 38053 901.872.4229 | DavidPeel@PeelLawFirm.com | PeelLawFirm.com J U N E 2 0 1 7 • M E M P H I S M A G A Z I N E . C O M • 61

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MEMPHIS TOP DOCTORS 2017

Landau

GUY R. VOELLER, MD

Baptist Memorial Hospital - Memphis Methodist Le Bonheur Germantown Hospital UT Medical Group 6029 Walnut Grove Rd., Suite 106 Memphis, TN 38120 901-866-8530

Group Programs YOUR IMAGE, MADE BETTER.

Minimally Invasive Surgery, Hernia, Gastrointestinal Surgery, Adrenal Surgery

THORACIC & CARDIAC SURGERY JAMES W. BLATCHFORD III, MD Saint Francis Hospital - Memphis Saint Francis Hospital - Bartlett Saint Francis Medical Partners 6005 Park Ave. Loewenberg Bldg - Suite 802 Memphis, TN 38119 901-236-0508

For more info please call our Outside Sales Department 901-523-9655

GREGORY W. FINK, MD

Methodist Le Bonheur Germantown Hospital The Cardiovascular Center 7655 Poplar Ave., Suite 350 Germantown, TN 38138 901-761-2470

Heart Valve Surgery, Endovascular Surgery, Coronary Artery Surgery, Minimally Invasive Surgery

HARVEY E. GARRETT JR., MD

Baptist Memorial Hospital - Memphis Cardiovascular Surgery Clinic 6029 Walnut Grove Rd., Suite 401 Memphis, TN 38120 901-747-3066

Aortic Surgery, Lung Surgery, Heart Valve Surgery, Robotic Surgery

DARRYL S. WEIMAN, MD

Medical News Ad 2017.indd 1

5/15/17 8:41 AM

VA Medical Center - Memphis Memphis VA Medical Center Department of Surgery 1030 Jefferson Ave., Floor 3 - Room CW353 Memphis, TN 38104 901-577-7352

Cardiothoracic Surgery, Lung Cancer, Esophageal Surgery

BENNY WEKSLER, MD

Methodist University Hospital - Memphis UT Methodist Physician Group Dept. of Thoracic Surgery 1211 Union Ave., Suite 300 Germantown, TN 38138 901-448-2918

Minimally Invasive Thoracic Surgery, Lung Cancer, Esophageal Cancer, Thymoma and Thymic Cancer

UROGYNECOLOGY/FEMALE PELVIC MEDICINE & SURGERY ROBERT L. SUMMITT JR., MD

Baptist Memorial Hospital for Women Methodist Le Bonheur Germantown Hospital Women’s Health Specialists 7800 Wolf Trail Cove Germantown, TN 38138 901-682-9222

Urogynecology, Pelvic Reconstruction, Pelvic Organ Prolapse Repair, Incontinence - Urinary

UROLOGY ANTHONY L. PATTERSON, MD

6215 Humphreys Blvd., Suite 211 Memphis, TN 38120 901.259.2440 | mpheart.com

Regional One Health Methodist University Hospital - Memphis Regional One Health Department of Urology 6555 Quince Rd., Suite 500 Memphis, TN 38119 901-515-5700

Laparoscopic Surgery, Kidney Stones, Urologic Cancer

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There’s an office within 10,000 steps (give or take) of your home Step into any of the nearly 30 Methodist Medical Group Primary Care offices around Memphis and you’ll find primary care re-imagined. Our physicians and supporting care team members serve as guides for all of your healthcare needs — offering comprehensive care throughout our extensive network of physicians.

To make an appointment today, call 901.758.9898. Learn more at MethodistHealth.org/primarycare

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Injuries don’t clock out at 5 p.m. Just because you’re injured outside normal office hours doesn’t mean you have to make a trip to the ER. The specialists at Campbell Clinic are available to treat your breaks and sprains on evenings and weekends. GERMANTOWN Mon – Thurs, 5-8pm | Sat, 8-11am 1400 S. Germantown Rd. SOUTHAVEN Mon – Thurs, 5-8pm 7545 Airways Blvd. ©2016 Campbell Clinic P.C. All rights reserved. Campbell Clinic is a registered trademark of Campbell Clinic P.C.

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SPECIAL ADVERTISING SECTION

FOR OVER 50 YEARS, Adams Patterson has been delivering comprehensive women’s health care, offering the latest, most practical solutions. We were the first to introduce both the MonaLisa Touch laser for vaginal revitalization and SculpSure, non-invasive body contouring to the MidSouth. Whether you are a young woman just starting your family or are transitioning through menopause, we will address your concerns with a full evaluation. Our individualized approach allows us to be certain that the preventive, medical, educational, surgical, or cosmetic services you receive from us are tailor-made to suit you. All of our partners are board-certified specialists and clinical instructors at the University of Tennessee — Memphis. If you are looking for an experienced and knowledgeable team offering the most advanced solutions, Adams Patterson is your health and beauty resource. We provide comprehensive medical and surgical services in these areas: • Gynecology • Menopause management • Routine and high-risk obstetrics • Contraception

We also perform the following procedures in our office: • MonaLisa Touch™ Laser Treatment for Vaginal Revitalization • SculpSure Non-Invasive Body Contouring • Kybella, Injections used for the reduction of submental fat, also known as a “double chin” • Endometrial Ablation for heavy periods • Essure® — Permanent birth control procedure We offer in-office screening and diagnostic services for: • Digital mammography • Bone densitometry • High-definition ultrasound with 4-D images • Genetic screening • Amniocentesis In addition, we offer Nexplanon contraceptive implants, and Mirena, Skyla and Paragard IUD insertion. Our doctors have special expertise in robotic surgery for outpatient hysterectomy, including one of the only surgeons in the Mid-South performing Single-Site® “Virtually Scarless” Robotic surgery and other minimally invasive procedures. Moreover, our aesthetic services include Botox® Treatment, Latisse® — to help promote eye lash growth, Obagi and Jan Marini® Skin Care Products, Juvederm® Ultra Cosmetic Fillers, and Chemical Peels, as well as Sclero Therapy for treatment of spider leg veins and Advanced Laser Therapy.

2017MEDICALGUIDE

ADAMS PATTERSON GYNECOLOGY & OBSTETRICS Back row, left to right: Dr. Todd Chappell, Dr. Miriah Denbo, and Dr. Frank King Front row, left to right: Dr. Leigh Keegan, Dr. Sharon A. Butcher, Dr. Leah Tonkin, Dr. Regina Healy, and nurse practitioner, Darby Heitman

Baptist Women’s Hospital 6215 Humphreys Blvd. Suite 301 Memphis, TN 38120 Methodist Germantown Hospital 7705 Poplar Avenue Building B, Suite 220 Germantown, TN 38138 901.767.3810 adamspatterson.com

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2017MEDICALGUIDE

COMMITTED TO EXCELLENCE: THE ART OF TREATMENT AND CARE Suffering from unpleasant stomach and bowel conditions can be challenging enough, without having to worry about finding a top-quality doctor! The highly skilled medical professionals at GI Specialists are experts in helping prevent, diagnose, and treat everything from heartburn, food allergies and hemorrhoids, to colon and pancreatic cancers. HIGH QUALITY AND CONVENIENT CARE The physicians and staff focus on each patient’s comfort in their on-site surgery center. For added convenience, choose from five other satellite locations: Brighton, Collierville, Covington, Millington, and Marion, Arkansas. Whether you need screening or treatment, our group is passionate about providing excellent care for every patient.

SPECIAL ADVERTISING SECTION

BMG | GI SPECIALISTS FOUNDATION Left to right: Gerald Lieberman, MD; Randelon Smith, MD; Paul Bierman, MD; Kenneth Fields, MD; Edward Friedman, MD

MAIN OFFICE 80 Humphreys Center, Suite 200 Memphis, TN 38120 901.761.3900 • GISpecialistsMemphis.com

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SPECIAL ADVERTISING SECTION

THE CHARLES RETINA INSTITUTE, founded in 1984, is proud to serve the citizens of Memphis and the Mid-South with adult and pediatric retinal medical and surgical consultations daily. We specialize in the treatment of retinal detachments, diabetic retinopathy, macular degeneration, retinopathy of prematurity, macular surgery as well as other retinal and vitreous problems. Our physicians are true leaders and authors on retinal surgery. Our textbook, Vitreous Microsurgery, currently in its 5th edition, has been translated into six languages and has been a leading source of retina surgery education worldwide since Dr. Charles’ first edition in 1981. We are committed to providing the best level of retina care available and to have the top medical technology for our patients. We are available for medical and surgical consults and second opinions.

2017MEDICALGUIDE

CHARLES RETINA INSTITUTE P.C. Left to right: Steve Charles, M.D., Jorge Calzada, M.D., and Mohammad Rafieetary, O.D.

1432 Kimbrough Road Germantown, TN 38138 901.767.4499 • charlesretina.com J U N E 2 0 1 7 • M E M P H I S M A G A Z I N E . C O M • 67

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2017MEDICALGUIDE

SPECIAL ADVERTISING SECTION

WHEN YOU VISIT THE OFFICE of Dr. Christopher Cooley, you become part of a caring dental family. Along with his highly trained, professional staff, Dr. Cooley is committed to listening to your needs and providing care that works for your lifestyle. Dr. Cooley’s dental practice is devoted to restoring and enhancing the natural beauty of smiles using conservative, state-of-the-art procedures that will result in beautiful, long lasting smiles. A standard of excellence in personalized dental care enables him to provide the quality dental services his patients deserve. Dr. Cooley takes the time necessary to constantly improve his skills and the technological capabilities of the practice. He has trained with many of the best clinicians in the country, and insists on the best materials and highest quality lab work available. Thereby, you benefit from the latest treatment techniques, including innovative advances in patient comfort, the highest-quality and longest-lasting materials, and the most aesthetically pleasing results. Dr. Cooley is a lifetime Memphian who graduated in 1976 with honors from the University of Tennessee Knoxville, then from the University of Tennessee College of Dentistry in 1982. Dr. Cooley has undergone training with the Hornbrook Group and PAClive, the country’s top program for hands-on continuing education for dentists. Dr. Cooley is also a proud member of: the American Dental Association, American Academy of Cosmetic Dentistry, Tennessee Academy of Cosmetic Dentistry and the Crown Council. These organizations keep Dr. Cooley abreast of developing studies in the fields of cosmetic, restorative and general dentistry. Dr. Cooley and his entire team love to volunteer their time and efforts both locally and globally taking care of patients in Memphis and Shelby Co. and on mission trips to the Dominican Republic. Dr. Cooley always welcomes new patients into his office with most referrals coming from existing, very satisfied patients. The highest compliment we receive is when our patients refer their family and friends.

CHRISTOPHER COOLEY, DDS

7938 Wolf River Blvd. Germantown, TN 38138 901.754.3117 www.cooleydds.com

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2017MEDICALGUIDE

SPECIAL ADVERTISING SECTION

KIDNEY CARE CONSULTANTS, PC is a comprehensive medical practice specializing in the diagnosis and management of Hypertension and Kidney Disease. We are committed to providing our patients with the best specialized care. Our board-certified Nephrologists include Dr. Omar Hamze, Dr. Rehan Shafique, Dr. Minesh Pathak and Dr. Mark Nader. We also have three nurse practitioners on our team: Karen Reames and Dorothy Alexander each with nearly a decade of Nephrology experience and Elizabeth White who has recently joined the practice with five years of Nephrology experience. Dr. Hamze founded Kidney Care Consultants in 2008 and has been practicing Nephrology since 2004. He is a Fellow of the American Society of Nephrology and the American College of Physicians. He has been voted as one of the Mid-South’s “Top Docs” in nephrology for the past four years. This is an honor bestowed upon him by his peers. Dr. Rehan Shafique is board-certified in Internal Medicine and Nephrology. He is a Fellow of the American Society of Nephrology. He has special expertise in the field of transplant nephrology and works closely with our post-transplant patients. In addition, he works closely with patients ailing from a wide variety of renal disorders. His areas of interest include management of chronic kidney disease, electrolyte and glomerular disorders. Dr. Minesh Pathak has been practicing nephrology since 2006. During his fellowship at UMMC, he worked on a highly published study determining the association of fluid weight gain in severely sick patients with sepsis and cardiac disease. His goal is directed towards early intervention of severely sick patients and a strong emphasis on minimizing risk of progression of chronic kidney disease. Dr. Mark Nader is board-certified in Internal Medicine and Nephrology. He completed his internal medicine residency at Mount Sinai Hospital and did his nephrology and hypertension training at Georgetown University. He has a strong interest in clinical and translational research, particularly as related to chronic kidney disease and glomerulonephritis. Dr. Nader’s clinical interests include chronic kidney disease, resistant hypertension, Lupus Nephritis, and onconephrology. We have several locations: 3950 New Covington Pike, Ste. 300, 6025 Walnut Grove Rd., Ste. 400 at Baptist Memphis, 2076 Union Ave., Suite 201, 290 S. Walnut Bend Rd., Cordova and a Ripley, Tennessee location: 868 Hwy 51 South. We provide a wide range of services: Nephrology consultations, Hypertension consultations, Renal Transplant Management, Hemodialysis and Peritoneal Dialysis Management and End Stage Renal Disease classes. To learn more, please visit our website at kidneycarememphis.com or call us at 901.382.5256.

KIDNEY CARE CONSULTANTS, PC Left to right: Rehan Shafique, MD Elizabeth White, ANP Minesh Pathak, MD Dorothy Alexander, FNP Omar Hamze, MD Karen Reames, ANP Mark Nader, MD

901.382.5256 kidneycarememphis.com

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2017MEDICALGUIDE

SPECIAL ADVERTISING SECTION

TOGETHER KIT S. MAYS, M.D. AND MOACIR SCHNAPP, M.D. have created what is now the oldest and most well-regarded pain management facility in the Mid-South. Dr. Mays’ and Dr. Schnapp’s clinical and pharmacologic research and pioneering work in nerve blocks spans over three decades. Effective treatment requires comprehensive evaluation by experienced physicians. The patients seen by Dr. Mays and Dr. Schnapp have access to diagnostic expertise gained from years of interventional pain management. For the best clinical outcome and functional improvement, diagnosis and treatment may include nerve blocks, medication management, and physical therapy. The physicians confer to make decisions on patient care. They are a perfect balance as personality opposites, but in pain management, they have one focus: relieving the suffering patient and meeting the challenges of the patient in pain. Their interest also extends to the design, development and production of rehabilitation instruments for the treatment of complex regional pain syndrome. They broke new ground together, and now continue in their indefatigable quest for answers and advances in the treatment and management of patients with pain. Each patient is treated individually with compassion, and always see a physician on each visit. Mays and Schnapp Pain Clinic and Rehabilitation Center is the only CARF certified outpatient pain clinic in the state as well as the region and is a Tennessee certified pain management clinic. The physicians’ private practice, physical therapy, and ambulatory surgery center are all in one convenient location. When the problem is pain, we’re here to help: world class care in the heart of the Mid-South.

MAYS AND SCHNAPP PAIN CLINIC AND REHABILITATION CENTER Left to right: Moacir Schnapp, MD and Kit S. Mays, MD

55 Humphreys Center Drive Suite 200 Memphis, TN 38120 901.747.0040 www.maysandschnapp.com

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SPECIAL ADVERTISING SECTION

DR. ARCOT has six board certifications including interventional cardiology, cardiology, venous disease, vascular, and endovascular medicine. He received his cardiovascular training at the University of California-San Francisco and has trained several practicing cardiologists in peripheral vascular percutaneous intervention. Dr. Arcot was voted most Compassionate Doctor 2010-2013 on Vitals.com. Memphis Cardiology and Vein Center was voted among the best clinics in the Commercial Appeal 2014, 2015 and 2016. At Memphis Vein Center, we treat all types of vascular problems from the simple to the very complex including varicose veins, DVT, peripheral arterial disease, leg ulcers, May-Thurners syndrome, and pelvic congestion syndrome. Dr. Arcot and his highly qualified medical team, who are board certified in their respective fields, offer comprehensive treatment for all vascular conditions including venous and arterial diseases. Varicose veins are abnormal veins that occur in the legs. They can be small, thin, purple lines (called spider veins), or they can appear as thick, bulging, or knotty veins. SYMPTOMS OF VARICOSE VEINS: • Achy, tired, heavy feeling in the area of the varicose veins

• Leg cramps, restless legs at night • Burning or throbbing pain along with swelling of the legs • Itching, rashes, bleeding • Discoloration of the foot • Non-healing ulcers • History of blood clots • Pain with menstruation While most people think that varicose veins are simply a cosmetic issue, an underlying medical problem often causes varicose veins; it’s called venous reflux/venous obstruction. In a normal vein, valves work to move the blood back to the heart. When a valve malfunctions it causes the blood to pool in the vein, a disorder known as venous insufficiency, which causes varicose veins. The procedure is covered by most insurance companies. Memphis Vein Center is the only outpatient stateof-the-art accredited vascular facility (IAC) to offer all modalities to treat varicose veins, including endovenous laser ablation treatment (EVLT), radio frequency (VNUS) and venous stenting for MayThurners syndrome, as well as ultrasound guided sclerotherapy, and a microsurgical procedure called phlebotomy. Please visit memphisvein.com for further information about varicose veins including personal testimonials and before-and-after pictures.

2017MEDICALGUIDE

MEMPHIS VEIN CENTER Back row: Whitney Bates, CMA, Ashley Treadaway, CMA Middle row: Casonya Jordan, Cathy Chandler, RN, Kishore Arcot, MD, FACC, FSCAI, FSVM, Kristy Farmer, RVT, Lindsey Mack, CMA Front row: Lanita Johnson, BS, Julie Changkachith, CMA, Kayla Lee, CMA, MeriTaylor Kurdelmeyer

6005 Park Avenue Suite 225B Memphis, TN 38119 901.767.6765 www.memphisvein.com J U N E 2 0 1 7 • M E M P H I S M A G A Z I N E . C O M • 71

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MID-SOUTH OB-GYN provides comprehensive healthcare for women across the age spectrum with individualized, compassionate care and an emphasis on patient empowerment. The group specializes in yearly wellness/preventive care; gynecological disorders; pre-conception/ fertility counseling; obstetric care for uncomplicated and high-risk pregnancies; non-invasive genetic testing; contraception, including long-term and permanent solutions; MonaLisa Touch for vaginal atrophy; nutrition counseling; and aesthetic services, including Botox, Radiesse, Perlane-L, laser treatments, Latisse and Obagi skincare products, Pellevé for facial tightening and PelleFirm for body tightening. Located in a state-of-the-art facility designed to meet patients’ needs, Mid-South OB-GYN has on-site ultrasonography and surgical suites to accommodate minimally invasive surgeries, incision-free procedures, and uterine ablations. Complimentary 3D/4D ultrasounds are given to every expectant mother for Baby’s first picture. The single, central location helps to ensure that you see your personal physician for each visit. Mid-South OB-GYN physicians have received awards from Baptist Memorial Hospital for Women for their leadership roles and The University of Tennessee for excellence in clinical teaching, as well as certifications by the American Board of Obstetrics & Gynecology. They serve Baptist Women’s Hospital and Methodist Germantown Hospital, and maintain community involvement through senior Medical Staff leadership positions and volunteer service programs. A team of support staff shares the vision of creating the best experience possible for each patient, whether it be scheduling referral appointments or just checking in on you after an office procedure. Staff is available for questions and concerns at all times to provide every patient with the information and reassurance she needs. To find out more or schedule an appointment please call 901.747.1200, or visit www. midsouthobgyn.com.

MID-SOUTH OB-GYN Left to right: Thomas D. Greenwell, MD, Candace D. Hinote, MD, Mary Katherine Johnson, MD, Judi L. Carney, MD, Paul D. Neblett, MD, Dominique Butawan-Ali MD, and Herbert A. Taylor, MD

6215 Humphreys Blvd., Suite 100 Memphis, TN 38120 901.747.1200 www.midsouthobgyn.com A DIVISION OF WOMEN’S CARE CENTER OF MEMPHIS, MPLLC

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CREATING BEAUTIFUL SMILES is what Dr. Miles Moore does best. Dr. Moore, along with the rest of his team at Memphis Center for Family & Cosmetic Dentistry, specializes in the latest dental technologies, while offering an office environment that is both calming and friendly. Not only does Dr. Moore approach each patient with compassion and respect, but he is also committed to finding the best solutions for every dental problem. Whether you are seeking a complete smile makeover, “invisible” braces, or teeth

whitening, Dr. Moore can transform your smile with an array of cosmetic dentistry options. If you are looking for ways to make your or a family member’s smile healthier, the office treats patients of all ages with general dentistry services. Memphis Center for Family & Cosmetic Dentistry’s convenient location and dedication to serving patients has made it a Memphis favorite for years. After one appointment, you’ll see what a difference Dr. Moore makes!

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MILES C. MOORE, DDS MEMPHIS CENTER FOR FAMILY & COSMETIC DENTISTRY 725 W. Brookhaven Circle Memphis, TN 38117 901.761.2210 BeautifulSmiles.org J U N E 2 0 1 7 • M E M P H I S M A G A Z I N E . C O M • 73

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MEMPHIS TOP DOC FOR INTERVENTIONAL CARDIOLOGY 2014, 2015, 2016, and 2017! We feel fortunate and privileged to be the recognized Venous Insufficiency and Varicose Vein treatment leaders of the Mid-South. ProActive Heart & Vein Center offers comprehensive Cardiac and Vascular care, advanced treatment for Varicose Veins and Cosmetic Spider Veins as well as specialized treatment for Peripheral Arterial Disease (PAD). At ProActive we offer the truly personalized attention that you deserve to address the vascular cause of your leg symptoms, be it your arteries or your veins, in addition to comprehensive cardiac care from prevention to cutting-edge treatment. We take the time to get to know you as a person and to explain your vein issues and the options we can offer to provide you the relief you deserve so you can get back to the active lifestyle you once had. We pride ourselves in fully discussing the veins you can’t see beneath the skin that are the frequent cause of leg discomfort, swelling, Charlie horse, and disturbed sleep such as restless legs that are such common problems for so many people. Dr. Nelson is board-certified in Phlebology (Vein Disease), Vascular Medicine, Endovascular Disease (Leg Circulation), General Cardiology, Interventional Cardiology, Nuclear Cardiology, and Internal Medicine. Originally from New York, Dr. Nelson earned his medical degree at the Albert Einstein College of Medicine and completed his internship and residency in Internal Medicine at Yale University. Dr. Nelson continued his training at Emory University for his fellowship in General Cardiovascular Disease and then completed advanced fellowship training in Interventional Cardiology, Vascular Disease, and Peripheral Vascular Interventions at Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center of Harvard University.

PROACTIVE HEART & VEIN CENTER Michael A. Nelson, MD

7751 Wolf River Boulevard Germantown, TN 38138 901.297.4000 901.531.8344 (f) proactivehv.com

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MEET DR. KATHRYN SNEED. With her warm, friendly, and kind personality, she knows how to make you feel right at home. At Sneed Dental Arts, she and her team of skilled dental professionals provide a variety of dental services in a convenient, peaceful, and comfortable office environment. From routine cleanings to advanced implant surgeries, Botox to braces, veneers and pediatric dentistry, sedation and Invisalign, Dr. Kathryn Sneed is dedicated to serving the needs of her patients with first class customer service. Come experience her hospitality in her state of the art practices located in both Cordova and Collierville.

SNEED DENTAL ARTS Kathryn A. Sneed, DMD, MBA, FAGpO, FMii

1122 Poplar View Lane N., Collierville, TN 38017 | 901.853.2575 8095 Macon Road, Suite 109, Cordova, TN 38016 | 901.756.9150 SneedDentalArts.com J U N E 2 0 1 7 • M E M P H I S M A G A Z I N E . C O M • 75

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UT REGIONAL ONE PHYSICIANS is an academic physician group offering expert care with the patient at the center of every decision. Regional One Health and the University of Tennessee Health Science Center (UTHSC) partnered to form UT Regional One Physicians to enhance the delivery of health care throughout the region. UT Regional One Physicians offers primary care and more than 20 medical specialties including cardiology; ear, nose and throat (ENT); endocrinology; gastroenterology; obstetrics and gynecology; physical and rehabilitative medicine; general surgery; rheumatology and more. Through a true partnership, UT Regional One Physicians is a smart approach to integrating an academic mission and personalized physician care to improve patient outcomes and the health of the community. With more than 180 physicians and advanced practitioners, UT Regional One Physicians is the largest academic-affiliated physician organization in the Mid-South. All physicians in UT Regional One Physicians are UTHSC faculty members. To find a UT Regional One Physicians provider, visit UT-ROP.org.

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UT REGIONAL ONE PHYSICIANS Front row, left to right: Jose Duncan-Arosemena, MD, OB/GYN; Ana Tobiasz, MD, Maternal Fetal Medicine; Danielle Tate, MD, Maternal Fetal Medicine; Saba Khayal, MD, Endocrinology; Nisreen Abu Al Hommos, MD, Internal Medicine; and Pooja Sethi, MD, Internal Medicine. Second row, left to right: Mauro Schenone, MD, Maternal Fetal Medicine; Pallavi Khanna, MD, OB/GYN; Jacques Samson, MD, Maternal Fetal Medicine; Giancarlo Mari, MD, Maternal Fetal Medicine; Antonio Martinez, MD, Emergency Medicine; Roberto Levi-D’Ancona, MD, OB/GYN; and Loyrirk Temiyakarn, MD, Interventional Radiology. Third row, left to right: Chantay Smartt, MD, Emergency Medicine; Aneel Kumar, MD, Hospitalist, Internal Medicine; James Bailey, MD, Internal Medicine; Anthony Patterson, MD, Urology; and Fernand Samson, MD, OB/GYN. Fourth row, left to right: Raymond Lebron Cooper, MD, Anesthesiology; Christopher Sharp, MD, Anesthesiology; Sridhar Shankar, MD, Body Imaging; Claudette Shephard, MD, Gynecology; Peter Fischer, MD, Trauma Surgery; Craig Dorko, MD, Internal Medicine; and Ayotunde Dokun, MD, Endocrinology.

regionalonehealth.org/utrop

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DR. WOODALL IS a third-generation Memphian. He received his undergraduate degree from the University of Mississippi and his medical degree from the University of Mississippi Medical Center in 1986. He completed his residency at the University of Tennessee/St. Francis Family Practice program in 1989. He is board-certified by the American Board of Family Practice. Dr. Woodall joined The Family Physicians Group, P.C. in 1991 and currently is the Medical Director. Dr. Woodall became the President of BMG Family Physicians Group Foundation, Inc. in 2013. He is active in several professional societies in the area. He has served as treasurer of the Memphis and Shelby County Academy of Family Practice, as well as a member of the Tennessee and American Academies of Family Practice and the Memphis and Shelby County Medical Society. He is married to Dr. Melanie Woodall and enjoys Ole Miss sports and travel. He is active with the Episcopal Church and various other activities.

2017MEDICALGUIDE

CHARLES J. WOODALL, M.D.

BARTLETT: 3091 Kirby Whitten Rd., Bartlett, TN 38134 SOUTHEAST: 7685 Winchester Rd., Memphis, TN 38125 901.752.6963 • thefamilyphysiciansgroup.com J U N E 2 0 1 7 • M E M P H I S M A G A Z I N E . C O M • 77

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JAMES W. BLATCHFORD, MD, FACS DR. JAMES W. BLATCHFORD, III, Thoracic and Cardiovascular Surgeon, has been voted by his peers as one of the Memphis-area Top Docs for the past four years. His practice started here in Memphis in 2012 after a move from Montgomery, Alabama. Dr. Blatchford is a magna cum laude graduate of Duke University and a graduate of the Duke University School of Medicine. He trained in general surgery at the Yale University School of Medicine where he was Chief Resident and Instructor in Surgery, and completed a fellowship in thoracic and cardiovascular surgery at the University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center at Dallas (Parkland Memorial Hospital). Dr. Blatchford is a diplomate of the American Board of Thoracic Surgery; a Fellow of the American College of Surgeons; and a member of the Society of Thoracic Surgeons. He is the author of numerous scientific papers in his specialty. Dr. Blatchford’s practice includes cardiac surgery; aortic aneurysm surgery; stent grafting; surgery of the lungs and esophagus; and peripheral vascular surgery.

THORACIC & CARDIOVASCULAR SURGERY ASSOCIATES AN AFFILIATE OF SAINT FRANCIS MEDICAL PARTNERS 6005 Park Ave., Ste. 802, Loewenberg Building Memphis, TN 38119 901.236.0508 • 901.682.2143 (f) • sfmp.com

NANCY A. CHASE, MD, FAAP, FACC DR. NANCY A. CHASE has been practicing Pediatric Cardiology in the greater Memphis area for over 30 years. She is proud to offer state-of-the-art office and hospital consultative care for the newborn, child, adolescent and adult with congenital heart disease, rhythm disorders or other cardiac concerns of childhood. She and her caring staff offer on-site EKG, Echo, and Holter as well as outpatient hospital-based syncope and exercise tests. Appropriate referral is made for in-patient heart catheter interventions and surgery. Always interested in promoting good education and life experiences, Dr. Chase, a 2015 Emissary of Memphis Music honoree, often gifts concert, theater, and sports tickets to her patients. She is proud and happy to help her young patients enter life’s normal patterns and treasures the many announcements of commencements, career choices, marriages, and births she receives.

NANCY A. CHASE, MD, PEDIATRIC CARDIOLOGY 805 Estate Place, Suite 1 Memphis, TN 38120 901.287.4150 78 • M E M P H I S M A G A Z I N E . C O M • J U N E 2 0 1 7

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2017MEDICALGUIDE

DENTAL IMPLANT AESTHETIC CENTER Dr. Carl W. Schulter, DDS and Dr. Darren R. Williams, DDS THE DENTAL IMPLANT AESTHETIC CENTER brings highly trained and experienced surgeons and prosthodontists together for a single purpose: to restore, enhance and preserve the aesthetics of your smile. Dr. Carl Schulter and Dr. Darren Williams founded the Dental Implant Aesthetic Center in 2008. Dr. Schulter and Dr. Williams provide a combined 50 plus years of experience with dental implants and restorative techniques, from a simple, singletooth replacement to full-mouth reconstruction. With specialization in fixed prostheses’, Same Day Teeth and All on 4, the team at the Dental Implant Aesthetic Center works together to enhance the aesthetics of your smile in one visit. From your initial consult, the staff at the Dental Implant Aesthetic Center shows the utmost care for their patients and strives to enhance the aesthetics of every smile that walks through their doors. A great smile is a healthier you!

795 Ridge Lake Blvd. Suite 101 Memphis, TN 38120 901.682.5001 • dentalimplantac.com

PHILLIP R. LANGSDON, MD, FACS DR. PHILLIP LANGSDON HAS provided world-class expertise in facial cosmetic surgery for over 25 years. He is the only surgeon in this area of the nation whose practice has been limited to plastic surgery of the nose, eyelids and face. He has been voted a member of “America’s Top Plastic Surgeons” and “America’s Best Doctors.” The Clinic has also been voted ‘Best Cosmetic Surgery’ in the Commercial Appeal for the past six years. The Langsdon Clinic is solely specialized in the face, eyelids and nose. Seeing each person’s face as unique, Dr. Langsdon treats the common and the complicated cases. The Clinic’s on-site, state-licensed surgical center is private for strict confidentiality and focused care. Dr. Langsdon and his team of experts use stateof-the-art equipment and believe in providing natural results and compassionate care in a comfortable, personal, private, and convenient atmosphere. Dr. Langsdon is President, Memphis Medical Society / DirectorSouthern Region, American Academy of Facial Plastic & Reconstructive Surgery / Professor & Chief, Division of Facial Plastic Surgery, Dept. of Otolaryngology-Head & Neck Surgery University of Tennessee Health Science Center, Memphis. Dr. Langsdon is board-certified by the American Board of Facial Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery.

7499 Poplar Pike, Germantown, TN 38138 901.755.6465 • www.drlangsdon.com J U N E 2 0 1 7 • M E M P H I S M A G A Z I N E . C O M • 79

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MECA — MEMPHIS EYE AND CATARACT ASSOCIATES, PLC FOR ALL YOUR eye care needs, medical and surgical. Convenient outpatient eye and laser surgery center. Cataract, Cornea, Glaucoma, Retina, LASIK and Refractive. Trust MECA...Because Experience Counts.

SPECIAL ADVERTISING SECTION

Left to right: W. David Irvine, MD, John M. Freeman, MD, Tom C. Gettelfinger, MD, James F. Freeman, MD, Hal B. Wright, MD, and Brian M. Jerkins, MD

6485 Poplar Avenue, Memphis, TN 38119 901.767.3937 • mecavision.com

MID-SOUTH NEPHROLOGY CONSULTANTS Jacinto Hernandez, MD, Julio Ruiz, MD, Patrick Kulubya, MD, Bernadette Deogaygay. MD, Konrad Stepniakowski, MD, FASN, Naing Htike, MD, Jim Angell, FNP, and Dominga Hernandez, Executive Director SERVING THE MID-SOUTH since 1982. Specializing in kidney diseases and hypertension. State-of-the-art facilities with dedicated clinics for glomerular disorders, polycystic kidney diseases and transplant nephrology. Our nephrologists also provide dialysis for both acute inpatient and chronic outpatient hospitals and clinics throughout the Mid-South region. “Always There, Always Care.”

6490 Mt. Moriah Ext., Ste. 200, Memphis, TN 38115 901.565.0244 2047 Highway 51 S., Covington, TN 38019 901.565.0244 7318 Southcrest Pkwy., Southaven, MS 38671 662.349.8323 310 S. Rhodes, West Memphis, AR 72301 870.735.7290 midsouthnephrologyconsultants.com 80 • M E M P H I S M A G A Z I N E . C O M • J U N E 2 0 1 7

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2017MEDICALGUIDE

MINESH PATHAK, MD KIDNEY DISEASE is an often unrecognized, silent disease caused by uncontrolled high blood pressure and diabetes. The diagnosis and treatment of kidney-related diseases requires an in-depth evaluation of various risk factors. Obesity, vascular abnormalities, autoimmune diseases, and kidney stones have been linked to renal failure. Dr. Pathak is a board-certified Nephrologist and member of The American Society of Nephrology and The National Kidney Foundation. He provides compassionate care with the highest-quality treatment of kidney disease. His goal is to provide early, preventive education along with diagnosis and relevant treatments of specific conditions to lessen the risk of progression to kidney failure and to improve a patient’s quality of life. Dr. Pathak takes great interest in understanding the needs of his patients and providing them with quality care with the least invasive treatment.

KIDNEY CARE CONSULTANTS 6025 Walnut Grove Road, Ste. 400 Memphis, TN 38120 901.382.5256

ANTON DIAS PERERA , MD DR. ANTON DIAS PERERA is a vascular and endovascular surgeon who specializes in treating patients with complex vascular disease. He is one of the few board-certified vascular surgeons in the Mid-South region. Areas of specialization include: • Peripheral arterial disease (PAD) • Aortic aneurysm repair (thoracic, abdominal and thoraco-abdominal) • Carotid disease • Mesenteric artery disease • Venous disease • Lower extremity amputations Complex aortic and peripheral arterial problems are treated using both open and endovascular techniques. He is also certified in Fenestrated Endovascular aneurysm repair (FEVAR). Cardiovascular Surgery Clinic provides a broad range of cardiovascular surgical services including open-heart surgery, complex vascular repair, peripheral endovascular intervention and prosthetics. Practice location has a state-of-the-art angiography and intervention suite, vascular laboratory for outpatient services and a prosthetics clinic.

CARDIOVASCULAR SURGERY CLINIC, PLLC 6029 Walnut Grove Rd, Suite 401 Medical Plaza Building 3, Memphis, TN 38120 901.747.3066 • antondiaspereramd.com J U N E 2 0 1 7 • M E M P H I S M A G A Z I N E . C O M • 81

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NIDAL RAHAL, MD, FAAFP, ABFM, ABHPM DR. NIDAL RAHAL has been in private medical practice for 18 years. His specialty is in Family Medicine, Geriatrics, Hospice and Palliative care with special interests in elderly population. Dr. Rahal provides a unique practice module, combining inpatient geriatric practice at Methodist Germantown Hospital with outpatient clinical practice in his office and multiple assisted living facilities in the city of Memphis, Germantown and Olive Branch. He is board certified in family practice, hospice care and palliative medicine. Dr. Rahal finished his residency at UT, Family Medicine department in 2002, Geriatrics medicine Fellowship at UT, Knoxville 2002-2003. His professional memberships include American College of Physicians, American Academy of Family Physicians and the American Medical Association. Dr. Rahal is a Clinical Assistant Professor for UT, family medicine department. He considers it an honor to help tutor and guide medical students, interns, and residents in experiencing family practice medicine first hand. Dr. Rahal is the Medical Director of The Village of Germantown. Dr. Rahal strives, to provide all of his patients with the best possible medical care, personal touch and an exceptional experience. He looks forward to serving you and those you love.

EAST MEMPHIS INTERNAL MEDICINE 6027 Walnut Grove, Suite 317, Memphis, TN 38120 901.818.3921 • (f) 901.767.3056

JENNIFER VALLI AASECT CERTIFIED PSYCHOTHERAPIST JENNIFER VALLI IS A licensed psychotherapist specializing in sexual health. Sex is one of the deepest and most powerful experiences, yet it can cause tremendous shame when it doesn’t go smoothly. Valli focuses on improving emotional and physical intimacy, offering individuals and couples an opportunity to talk through sensitive issues in a non-judgmental space. She draws from 24 years of experience in psychiatry, with additional comprehensive training in sexual therapy and sex education. She is a licensed therapist in Tennessee but also certified with the American Association of Sexual Educators, Counselors and Therapists, and an instructor at the University of Tennessee Health Science Center. Valli shares information and specific suggestions based on current research in the field of sexual health. Whether it has been months or years, it’s possible to add intimacy into your relationship.

Wolf River Blvd Office Complex 1384 Cordova Cove, Suite 1, Germantown TN 38138 www.JenniferValli.com 82 • M E M P H I S M A G A Z I N E . C O M • J U N E 2 0 1 7

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WILSON DENTAL CARE IS proud to serve the Mid-South as a specialist in cosmetic, preventive, and restorative dentistry, as well as Invisalign treatment. With over 20 years of combined experience, Dr. Charlyn Wilson and Dr. Jessica Gursakal are at the forefront in the field of dentistry with the use of state-of-the-art equipment and treatment options. Drs. Wilson and Gursakal make every decision with you in mind. They are dedicated to beautifying your smile and appearance, patient education, and maintaining your dental health. Along with their team of dental professionals, Dr. Wilson and Dr. Gursakal strive to bring a personal touch to dentistry and provide exceptional care for all patients.

CHARLYN WILSON, DDS AND JESSICA GURSAKAL, DDS Left to right: Elissa, Shelly, Courtney, Kelly, Amber, Elizabeth, Larissa, Tonya, Jan, and Dena; Center: Dr. Charlyn Wilson and Dr. Jessica Gursakal

WILSON DENTAL CARE 7520 Enterprise Ave, Germantown, TN 38138 901.751.1100 • wilsondentalcare.net

DANIEL D. SUMROK, MD, FAAFP, DABAM, DFASAM Addiction Medicine

SPECIAL INTERESTS: Addictions; primary care; PSTD; trauma BOARD CERTIFICATIONS: American Board of Addiction Medicine and American Board of Family Medicine MEMBERSHIPS:American Society of Addiction Medicine; Tennessee Society of Addiction Medicine; American Academy of Family Practice; Tennessee Medical Association – West Tennessee Console Chapter

UNIVERSITY CLINICAL HEALTH, UT ADDICTION MEDICINE 1325 Eastmoreland Avenue, Suite 440, Memphis, TN 38104 901.866.8630 • (f) 901.302.2630 • www.universityclinicalhealth.com

ELIZABETH H. LEE, DDS

Dentistry - Cosmetic & General SPECIAL INTERESTS: Cosmetic smile design, Comprehensive restorative dentistry EDUCATION: Christian Brothers University, #1 in class at University of Tennessee College of Dentistry MEMBERSHIPS: Am. Academy of Cosmetic Dentistry, Am. Dental Assoc., Tennessee Dental Assoc., Memphis Dental Society, Am. Assoc. of Women Dentists, Fellow of the Am. College of Dentists PERSONAL INTERESTS: Health and nutrition, mission trips to Kenya, spending time at the lake ADDITIONAL INFORMATION: Experienced in Six Month Smiles adult cosmetic braces, cosmetic crowns, veneers, dental implants. Love people of all ages.

DR. LEE’S BEAUTIFUL SMILES 5180 Park Avenue, Suite 280, Memphis, TN 38119 901.763.1600 • www.elizabethleedds.com

ALEXANDRA OLIVE GARRETT, DDS, LLC

CHRISTINA T. ROSENTHAL, DDS, MPH

SPECIAL INTERESTS: Cosmetic Smile Makeovers, Invisalign braces, Botox and Juvederm, and comprehensive family dental care. Education: Mississippi State University and University of Tennessee College of Dentistry BOARD CERTIFICATIONS: General Dentistry, Invisalign certification MEMBERSHIPS: American Academy of Cosmetic Dentistry, American Dental Association, Tennessee Dental Association, Memphis Dental Society, and Academy of General Dentistry

SPECIAL INTERESTS: Family dentistry, cosmetic dentistry, public health FELLOWSHIP: 2014-15 Joseph L. Henry Oral Fellow, Harvard University MEMBERSHIPS: American Dental Association, Tennessee Dental Association, Memphis Dental Society, 2017 Presidential Leadership Scholar

Dentistry – Cosmetic & General

GERMANTOWN COSMETIC AND FAMILY DENTISTRY 2026 Exeter Road, Suite 2, Germantown, TN 38138 901.347.3527 • http://www.gtownsmiles.com/

General Dentistry

PARADIGM DENTAL CENTER, LLC 4730 Riverdale Road, Suite 3, Memphis, TN 38141 901.758.2127 • www.paradigmdentalcenter.com J U N E 2 0 1 7 • M E M P H I S M A G A Z I N E . C O M • 83

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EMILY H. JONES, MD

HERBERT A. TAYLOR III, MD

SPECIAL INTERESTS: Medical dermatology; pediatric dermatology BOARD CERTIFICATIONS: American Board of Dermatology MEMBERSHIPS: American Academy of Dermatology; Pediatric Dermatology Society; Memphis Dermatology Society; Tennessee Dermatology Society

SPECIAL INTERESTS: Gynecology care, Duke University alumnus BOARD CERTIFICATIONS: American Board of Obstetrics & Gynecology, Clinical Teaching Facility Department of OB-GYN, University of Tennessee, Memphis ADDITIONAL INFORMATION: 40 years of clinical practice and senior partner with Mid-South OB-GYN. P.C. Named among the physicians rated highest by patients for overall experience of care, according to a national survey conducted by the U.S. Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality and endorsed by the National Quality Forum. Hobbies include: golf, reading and fine dining

Dermatology

UNIVERSITY CLINICAL HEALTH, UT DERMATOLOGY 930 Madison Avenue, Suite 801, Memphis, TN 38103 901.866.8805 • (f) 901.302.2790 • www.universityclinicalhealth.com 880 Madison Avenue, Suite 5C01, Memphis, TN 38103 901.545.6969 • www.universityclinicalhealth.com

Gynecology

MID-SOUTH OB/GYN 6215 Humphreys Blvd., Suite 100, Memphis, TN 38120 901.747.1200 • (f) 901.747.1221 • www.midsouthobgyn.com

THOMAS P. CHU, MD

WILLIAM C. CUSHMAN, MD

Dermatologic & Cosmetic Surgery

Hypertension

SPECIAL INTERESTS: Hair restoration, tumescent liposuction, laser surgery for sun freckles and tattoos featuring the PicoSure laser, laser surgery for fat reduction featuring the SculpSure laser, laser surgery for spider veins, facial aging and birthmarks. Physicianadministered botulinum toxins and fillers. BOARD CERTIFICATIONS: Internal Medicine and Dermatology FELLOWSHIP TRAINING: Cosmetic Surgery

SPECIAL INTERESTS: Hypertension, Cardiovascular Disease Prevention, Clinical Trials BOARD CERTIFICATIONS: Board Certified in Internal Medicine, American Society of Hypertension (ASH) Specialist in Clinical Hypertension MEMBERSHIPS: Am. Heart Assoc., Am. Society of Hypertension, Am. College of Physicians – Fellow in all three ADDITIONAL INFORMATION: Participated in formulating several national hypertension guidelines, leadership in many large clinical trials in hypertension and diabetes mellitus. Barnwell Award (2010) for outstanding achievement in clinical science; Inter-American Society of Hypertension Lifetime Achievement Award (2017).

520 Trinity Creek Cove, Cordova, TN 38018 901.755.2511 • (f) 901.758.1965 www.drthomaschu.com

JOHN W. WHITE, JR, MD

Family Medicine and Obesity Medicine SPECIAL INTERESTS: Medical Weight Loss, Age Management Medicine, Bio-Identical Hormone Replacement Therapy, and Testosterone Replacement Therapy BOARD CERTIFICATIONS: Family Medicine and Obesity Medicine ADDITIONAL INFORMATION: Additional Training in Age Management. Having undergone his own personal physical transformation, Dr. White is passionate about helping patients realize their own transformation by balancing hormones, nutrition, supplements, and exercise. HOBBIES: Weight training and fly-fishing

THE TRANSFORMATION DOCTOR 2150 West Poplar Avenue, Suite 102, Collierville, TN 38017 901.221.7212 • www.thetransformationdoctor.com

DEPARTMENT OF VETERANS AFFAIRS (VA) MEDICAL CENTER 1030 Jefferson Avenue, Memphis, TN 38104 901.523.8990 • www.memphis.va.gov

RANDY VILLANUEVA, MD Internal Medicine

SPECIAL INTERESTS: Adult Disease and Geriatric Care BOARD CERTIFICATION: Internal Medicine EDUCATION: University of Santo Tomas College of Medicine, Philippines. Residency at St John’s Episcopal Hospital, New York MEMBERSHIPS: American College of Physicians and American Medical Association, Student Brotherhood of Titans Fraternity, Consolidated Medical Practice of Memphis, Tennessee Medical Association ADDITIONAL INFORMATION: Traditional Internal Medicine/ Primary Care practice, both office and hospital base, visits several assisted living facilities and retirement homes. President of East Memphis Internal Medicine. Associate medical director of Compassus Hospice.

EAST MEMPHIS INTERNAL MEDICINE 6027 Walnut Grove, Suite 317, Memphis, TN 38120 901.818.3921

ULRIC DUNCAN, MD

STACY A. JOHNSON, MD

SPECIAL INTERESTS: Colonoscopy, Upper Endoscopy, Capsule Endoscopy, EGD, Fibro Scan, Rectal Manometry, Ultrasound, Hemorrhoid Treatment, Hepatitis C, Weight Management, ReShape BOARD CERTIFICATIONS: Board Certified in Internal Medicine, Board Certified in Gastroenterology MEMBERSHIPS: Am. Society for Gastrointestinal Endoscopy (ASGE), Am. Gastroenterology Assoc. (AGA), National Medical Assoc, Am. Medical Assoc, Am. College of Gastroenterology, Christian Medical & Dental Assoc, Am. College of Physicians

SPECIAL INTERESTS: Diabetic nephropathy BOARD CERTIFICATIONS: American Board of Internal Medicine in Internal Medicine and Nephrology FELLOWSHIPS: (Nephrology) Duke University, Durham, NC MEMBERSHIPS: American Society of Nephrology

Gastroenterology

DELTA GASTROENTEROLOGY-DELTA ENDOSCOPY CENTER — DELTA MEDICAL WEIGHT MANAGEMENT 9140 Highway 51 North, Southaven, MS 38671 400 Northwest Plaza, Senatobia, MS 38668 662.280.8222 • deltagastro.net

Nephrology

UNIVERSITY CLINICAL HEALTH, UT NEPHROLOGY 1325 Eastmoreland Avenue, Suite 365, Memphis, TN 38104 901.866.8810 • (f) 901.302.2445 • www.universityclinicalhealth.com 880 Madison Avenue, 5th floor Medicine B, Memphis, TN 38103 901.545.6969 • (f) 901.515.4748 • www.universityclinicalhealth.com

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2017MEDICALGUIDE

SONGUL ONDER, MD

JUDI CARNEY, MD

SPECIAL INTERESTS: Dialysis; kidney disease; kidney stones; kidney transplantation; hypertension; hereditary kidney disease; polycystic kidney disease; medical education BOARD CERTIFICATIONS: American Board of Nephrology, American Board of Internal Medicine, and Turkish Board of Internal Medicine FELLOWSHIPS: (Nephrology) West Virginia University, Morgantown, WV

SPECIAL INTEREST: General OB/GYN, Preconception Counseling and Recurrent Pregnancy Loss BOARD CERTIFICATIONS: American Board of Obstetrics & Gynecology ADDITIONAL INFORMATION: Medical School at the University of Virginia; Residency at UT Memphis: Assistant Residency Site Director at Baptist Memorial Hospital for Women: Former President of Medical Staff at Baptist Memorial Hospital for Women

Nephrology

UNIVERSITY CLINICAL HEALTH, UT NEPHROLOGY 1325 Eastmoreland Avenue, Suite 365, Memphis, TN 38104 901.866.8810 • (f) 901.302.2445 • www.universityclinicalhealth.com 6555 Quince Road, Memphis, TN 38119 901.515.3150 • (f) 901.515.3179 • www.universityclinicalhealth.com

Obstetrics & Gynecology

MID-SOUTH OB/GYN 6215 Humphreys Blvd., Suite 100, Memphis, TN 38120 901.747.1200 • (f) 901.747.1221 • www.midsouthobgyn.com

REHAN SHAFIQUE, MD, FASN

B. TODD CHAPPELL, MD

SPECIAL INTERESTS: Chronic Kidney Disease, Dialysis, Acute renal failure, Electrolyte and Acid Base disorders, and Kidney Transplant BOARD CERTIFICATIONS: Internal Medicine, Nephrology RESIDENCY AND FELLOWSHIPS: University of Tennessee Health Science Center (Internal Medicine, Nephrology, and Transplant Nephrology) MEMBERSHIPS: American Society of Nephrology, American College of Physicians

SPECIAL INTERESTS: General and high-risk obstetrics, minimally invasive procedures including robotic-assisted procedures as well as in office procedures. He now also specializes in Single-Site® “virtually Scarless” Robotic surgery BOARD CERTIFICATION: American Board of Obstetrics & Gynecology HOBBIES: Exercise, Golf, attending University of Memphis & Grizzlies games

Nephrology, Hypertension, & Transplant

KIDNEY CARE CONSULTANTS P.C. 3950 New Covington Pike, Suite 300, Memphis, TN 38128 290 S. Walnut Bend Rd Cordova,TN 38018 901.382.5256 (o) • 901.382.3731 (f) • kidneycarememphis.com

DOMINIQUE M. BUTAWAN-ALI, MD, FACOG Obstetrics & Gynecology

SPECIAL INTERESTS: Gynecologic & general OB Care, preconception health, contraception management including longacting reversible contraception, office & minimally invasive procedures & surgery EDUCATION: Univ. of Memphis, BS; Univ. of TN HSC, Coll. of Medicine, Memphis, MD & Residency training in the Dept. of Obstetrics & Gynecology BOARD CERTIFICATION: Fellow of the American Board of Obstetrics & Gynecology

MID-SOUTH OB/GYN 6215 Humphreys Blvd., Suite 100, Memphis, TN 38120 901.747.1200 • (f) 901.747.1221 • www.midsouthobgyn.com

Obstetrics & Gynecology

ADAMS PATTERSON GYNECOLOGY & OBSTETRICS Baptist Women’s Hospital 6215 Humphreys Blvd., Ste. 301, Memphis, TN 38120 Methodist Germantown Hospital 7705 Poplar Ave., Building B, Ste. 220, Germantown, TN 38138 adamspatterson.com • 901.767.3810

THOMAS D. GREENWELL, JR., MD Obstetrics & Gynecology

SPECIAL INTERESTS: Complete obstetrics & gynecology care for women of all ages BOARD CERTIFICATIONS: American Board of Obstetrics & Gynecology, diplomate; American College of Obstetrics & Gynecology, fellow ADDITIONAL INFORMATION: University of Tennessee Ob-Gyn Residency site director at BHW, 2001 to present; Physician Champion for Epic Baptist Memorial Healthcare; & managing partner of Mid South

MID-SOUTH OB/GYN 6215 Humphreys Blvd., Suite 100, Memphis, TN 38120 901.747.1200 • (f) 901.747.1221 • www.midsouthobgyn.com

SHARON A. BUTCHER, MD

REGINA G. HEALY, MD

SPECIAL INTERESTS: General obstetrics and gynecology, high-risk obstetrics, and minimally invasive treatments including laparoscopy, hysteroscopy and robotic-assisted procedures BOARD CERTIFICATION: American Board of Obstetrics & Gynecology HOBBIES: Running, cycling, cooking, and spending time with her family and friends

SPECIAL INTERESTS: Minimally invasive surgery including laparoscopy, hysteroscopy and robotic-assisted procedures, high-risk obstetrics, long-acting birth control, and vaginal revitalization with the MonaLisa Touch Laser BOARD CERTIFICATION: American Board of Obstetrics & Gynecology HOBBIES: Running, cooking, spending time with her husband and 3 children

Obstetrics & Gynecology

ADAMS PATTERSON GYNECOLOGY & OBSTETRICS Baptist Women’s Hospital 6215 Humphreys Blvd., Ste. 301, Memphis, TN 38120 Methodist Germantown Hospital 7705 Poplar Ave., Building B, Ste. 220, Germantown, TN 38138 adamspatterson.com • 901.767.3810

Obstetrics & Gynecology

ADAMS PATTERSON GYNECOLOGY & OBSTETRICS Baptist Women’s Hospital 6215 Humphreys Blvd., Ste. 301, Memphis, TN 38120 Methodist Germantown Hospital 7705 Poplar Ave., Building B, Ste. 220, Germantown, TN 38138 adamspatterson.com • 901.767.3810 J U N E 2 0 1 7 • M E M P H I S M A G A Z I N E . C O M • 85

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SPECIAL ADVERTISING SECTION

CANDACE HINOTE, MD, MPH, FACOG

PAUL NEBLETT, MD

SPECIAL INTERESTS: Obstetrical and high-risk pregnancy care, long-acting reversible contraceptive options, menopausal care, minimally invasive surgery, adolescent care and education RESIDENCY: University of Tennessee Health Science Center, Memphis MEMBERSHIPS: Diplomate of the American Board of Obstetrics & Gynecology, American Congress of Obstetricians & Gynecologists, American Institute of Ultrasonographic Medicine ADDITIONAL INFORMATION: Clinical faculty for UT Memphis, MPH in Epidemiology from New York Medical College, Award for Excellence from UTHSC in Reproductive Endocrinology 2011 HOSPITAL AFFILIATIONS: Methodist Germantown Hospital and Baptist Memorial Hospital for Women

SPECIAL INTERESTS: Obstetrical and Gynecologic care. Well care for women of all ages, preconception planning, contraceptive management, hospital and in-office surgery. EDUCATION: Fellow, American College of Obstetrics & Gynecologists; diploma from American Board of Obstetrics & Gynecology AWARDS: Recipient of the Baptist Memorial Hospital for Women Physicians Champion Award & the Louie C. Henry Excellence in Teaching Award. ADDITIONAL INFORMATION: University of Tennessee – Memphis Clinical Teaching Facility Department of OB/GYN

Obstetrics & Gynecology

MID-SOUTH OB/GYN 6215 Humphreys Blvd., Suite 100, Memphis, TN 38120 901.747.1200 • (f) 901.747.1221 • www.midsouthobgyn.com

Obstetrics & Gynecology

MID-SOUTH OB/GYN 6215 Humphreys Blvd., Suite 100, Memphis, TN 38120 901.747.1200 • (f) 901.747.1221 • www.midsouthobgyn.com

MARY KATHERINE JOHNSON, MD,FACOG

W. DAVID STINSON III, MD

SPECIAL INTERESTS: OB care for low & high risk pregnancies, contraception, gynecologic care & surgery, including office & minimally invasive procedures EDUCATION: Univ. of Memphis, BS; Univ. of TN HSC, Coll. of Medicine, Memphis, MD & Residency training in the Dept. of Obstetrics & Gynecology BOARD CERTIFICATION: Diplomate of the Am. Obstetrics & Gynecology MEMBERSHIPS: Alpha Omega Alpha Honor Medical Soc.; Am. Coll. of Obstetricians & Gynecologists; Am. Inst.of Ultrasound in Medicine; Am. Soc. for Colposcopy & Cervical Pathology HOSPITAL AFFILIATIONS: Methodist Germantown Hosp., Clinical Faulty Board Member, Baptist Memorial Hosp. for Women, Univ. of TN HSC

SPECIAL INTEREST: Robotic Hysterectomy, complete obstetrics and gynecology care, PCOS EDUCATION: Vanderbilt University, University of Memphis, UT Medical School, Stanford University, and Louisiana State University BOARD CERTIFICATION: American Board of Obstetrics and Gynecology HOSPITAL AFFILIATIONS: Baptist Memorial Hospital for Women; Methodist Germantown Hospital; St. Francis Hospital – Bartlett

Obstetrics & Gynecology

MID-SOUTH OB/GYN 6215 Humphreys Blvd., Suite 100, Memphis, TN 38120 901.747.1200 • (f) 901.747.1221 • www.midsouthobgyn.com

Obstetrics & Gynecology

315 South Walnut Bend Rd., Cordova, TN 38018 901.755.8880 • (f) 901.755.8366 • wdavidstinsonmd.com

M. LEIGH KEEGAN, MD

LEAH C. TONKIN, MD

SPECIAL INTERESTS: Menopause, vaginal and pelvic surgery, contraception, STD education, evaluation, and treatment, routine and high-risk obstetrics, and abnormal pap smears as well as staying up-todate on the latest advances in Obstetrics and Gynecology BOARD CERTIFICATION: American Board of Obstetrics & Gynecology HOBBIES: Reading, gardening, travel, riding horses, and raising animals. She also enjoys spending time with friends and family.

SPECIAL INTERESTS: General obstetrics and gynecology, adolescent gynecology, vaginal revitalization with the MonaLisa Touch Laser, high-risk obstetrics, and minimally invasive surgery including laparoscopy, hysteroscopy and robotic-assisted procedures BOARD CERTIFICATION: American Board of Obstetrics & Gynecology HOBBIES: Health and fitness, cooking, reading, and photography

Obstetrics & Gynecology

ADAMS PATTERSON GYNECOLOGY & OBSTETRICS Baptist Women’s Hospital 6215 Humphreys Blvd., Ste. 301, Memphis, TN 38120 Methodist Germantown Hospital 7705 Poplar Ave., Building B, Ste. 220, Germantown, TN 38138 adamspatterson.com • 901.767.3810

Obstetrics & Gynecology

ADAMS PATTERSON GYNECOLOGY & OBSTETRICS Baptist Women’s Hospital 6215 Humphreys Blvd., Ste. 301, Memphis, TN 38120 Methodist Germantown Hospital 7705 Poplar Ave., Building B, Ste. 220, Germantown, TN 38138 adamspatterson.com • 901.767.3810

T. FRANKLIN KING, MD

CARL E. FLINN, MD

SPECIAL INTERESTS: General & high-risk obstetrics, gynecology, & pelvic surgery, minimally invasive pelvic surgery including laparoscopy hysteroscopy, and vaginal revitalization with the MonaLisa Touch Laser BOARD CERTIFICATION: American Board of Obstetrics & Gynecology HOBBIES: Golf, reading, running, and attending Memphis Redbirds & Auburn football games ADDITIONAL INFORMATION: He has been named one of the Top Docs in Memphis Magazine 3 years in a row

SPECIAL INTERESTS: Pediatric Ophthalmology and Adult Strabismus EDUCATION: University of Tennessee/Memphis, M.D.; Georgia Tech, B.S.; residency: Medical College of Georgia, chief resident BOARD CERTIFICATION: Ophthalmologist FELLOWSHIP: Department of Pediatric Ophthalmology, Emory University, Atlanta, Georgia

Obstetrics & Gynecology

ADAMS PATTERSON GYNECOLOGY & OBSTETRICS Baptist Women’s Hospital 6215 Humphreys Blvd., Ste. 301, Memphis, TN 38120 Methodist Germantown Hospital 7705 Poplar Ave., Building B, Ste. 220, Germantown, TN 38138 adamspatterson.com • 901.767.3810

Ophthalmology — Pediatric

773 Estate Place, Memphis, TN 38120 901.681.4040

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2017MEDICALGUIDE

JEFFREY A. DLABACH, MD

UZOMA BEN GBUILE, MD, FACS

SPECIAL INTERESTS: Orthopaedic surgery, sports medicine, D1 Sports Training BOARD CERTIFICATIONS: American Board of Orthopaedic Surgery, CAQ Sports Medicine MEMBERSHIPS: American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons, Arthroscopy Association of North America, American Orthopaedic Society for Sports Medicine LICENSURES: TN, MS

SPECIAL INTERESTS: Body contouring surgery; butt lift; breast augmentation; reduction and reconstruction; cosmetic surgery; facial trauma reconstruction; flap reconstruction of complex wounds; head and neck reconstruction; microsurgery; skin cancer reconstruction BOARD CERTIFICATIONS: American Board of Surgery and American Board of Plastic Surgery FELLOWSHIPS: (Craniofacial surgery) UTHSC, Memphis and Hospital Necker-Enfants Malades, Paris, France MEMBERSHIPS: Fellow, American College of Surgeons; American Society of Plastic Surgeons (Candidate Member); AMA

Orthopaedics

ORTHO ONE 99 Market Center Drive, Collierville, TN 38017 • 901.861.9610 9085 E. Sandidge Center Cove, Suite 200, Olive Branch, MS 38654 • 662.890.2663 www.orthoone.org

Plastic Surgery

UNIVERSITY CLINICAL HEALTH, UT UNIVERSITY PLASTIC SURGEONS 1068 Cresthaven Road, Suite 500, Memphis, TN 38119 901.866.8525 • (f) 901.302.2525 • www.utuniversityplasticsurgeons.com

ROBERT M. PICKERING, MD

WILLIAM L. HICKERSON, MD, FACS

SPECIAL INTERESTS: Orthopaedic surgery, sports medicine, D1 Sports Training BOARD CERTIFICATIONS: American Board of Orthopaedic Surgery MEMBERSHIPS: American Medical Society, Arthroscopy Association of North America, Regional Mid-America Orthopaedic Association LICENSURES: TN, MS

SPECIAL INTERESTS: Burn surgery; critical care surgery; reconstructive surgery; trauma surgery; wound care surgery BOARD CERTIFICATIONS: American Board of Surgery and American Board of Plastic Surgery MEMBERSHIPS: American Burn Association; American Association of Plastic Surgeons; American College of Surgeons; American Medical Association; American Society of Maxillofacial Surgeons; American Society of Plastic Surgeons; American Trauma Society; Association of Academic Chairmen of Plastic Surgery; Harwell Wilson Surgical Society; Memphis & Shelby County Medical Society; Southern Medical Association; Southeastern Society of Plastic & Reconstructive Surgeons; Tennessee Medical Association; Wound Healing Society

Orthopaedics

ORTHO ONE 99 Market Center Drive, Collierville, TN 38017 • 901.861.9610 9085 E. Sandidge Center Cove, Suite 200, Olive Branch, MS 38654 • 662.890.2663 www.orthoone.org

ALLISON STILES, MD, FAAP, IBCLC

Pediatrics, Internal Medicine, Breastfeeding Medicine SPECIAL INTERESTS: Adolescents, obesity, breastfeeding BOARD CERTIFICATIONS: Pediatrics, Internal Medicine EDUCATION: B.S. Biochemical Engr., University of Missouri, Columbia. M.D. at University of Cincinnati, Ohio. Residency at University of Illinois, Chicago MEMBERSHIPS: Memphis Medical Society, Memphis Pediatric Society, American Academy of Pediatrics, American College of Physicians/ASIM, Consultant to TN Breastfeeding Hotline, and Chair of Shelby County Breastfeeding Coalition

MEMPHIS INTERNAL MEDICINE AND PEDIATRIC ASSOCIATES 1325 Eastmoreland, Suite 585, Memphis, TN 38104 901.276.0249 • (f) 901.276.0996

Plastic Surgery

UNIVERSITY CLINICAL HEALTH, UT UNIVERSITY PLASTIC SURGEONS 1068 Cresthaven Road, Suite 500, Memphis, TN 38119 901.866.8525 • (f) 901.302.2525 • www.utuniversityplasticsurgeons.com

XI LIN JING, MD Plastic Surgery

SPECIAL INTERESTS: Pediatric craniofacial surgery; pediatric and adult facial trauma FELLOWSHIPS: (Pediatric craniofacial surgery) University of Tennessee Health Science Center

UNIVERSITY CLINICAL HEALTH, UT UNIVERSITY PLASTIC SURGEONS 1068 Cresthaven Road, Suite 500, Memphis, TN 38119 901.866.8525 • (f) 901.302.2525 • www.utuniversityplasticsurgeons.com

SONIA M. ALVAREZ, MD

PETROS KONOFAOS, MD, PHD

SPECIAL INTERESTS: Aesthetic surgery; adult and pediatric reconstructive BOARD CERTIFICATIONS: American Board of Surgery and American Board of Plastic Surgery MEMBERSHIPS: American College of Surgeons; Association of Women Surgeons; American Medical Association

SPECIAL INTERESTS: Nerve microsurgery; migraine surgery; craniofacial surgery; maxillofacial surgery; pediatric plastic surgery; microvascular surgery; reconstructive surgery BOARD CERTIFICATIONS: Greek Boards of Plastic Surgery; European FELLOWSHIPS: (Microsurgery) UTHSC, Memphis, TN (Pediatric & Plastic Surgery & Craniofacial Surgery) UTHSC, Memphis, TN (Maxillofacial & Adult Craniofacial Surgery) UTHSC, Memphis, TN MEMBERSHIPS: Medical Association; Athens Medical Association; Hellenic Society of Plastic Reconstructive and Aesthetic Surgery; World Society for Reconstructive Microsurgery

Plastic Surgery

UNIVERSITY CLINICAL HEALTH, UT UNIVERSITY PLASTIC SURGEONS 1068 Cresthaven Road, Suite 500, Memphis, TN 38119 901.866.8525 • (f) 901.302.2525 • www.utuniversityplasticsurgeons.com

Plastic Surgery

UNIVERSITY CLINICAL HEALTH, UT UNIVERSITY PLASTIC SURGEONS 1068 Cresthaven Road, Suite 500, Memphis, TN 38119 901.866.8525 • (f) 901.302.2525 • www.utuniversityplasticsurgeons.com J U N E 2 0 1 7 • M E M P H I S M A G A Z I N E . C O M • 87

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ROBERTO D. LACHICA, MD

J. GARNETT MURPHY, MD, FACS

SPECIAL INTERESTS: Facial rejuvenation-facelift, blepharoplasty; breast augmentation, lift, reduction; “mommy makeover”— tummy tuck, breast lift augmentation; surgery after massive weight lossbuttock/thigh/arm lift; minimally invasive Thermi liposculpture; revision “re-do” breast/body surgery due to unsatisfactory results; mastectomy reconstruction-implant, tissue, microvascular techniques BOARD CERTIFICATIONS: American Board of Plastic Surgery MEMBERSHIPS: American Society for Aesthetic Plastic Surgeons; American Society of Maxillofacial Surgeons; American Society of Plastic Surgeons; Association of Academic Chairmen of Plastic Surgery; American College of Surgeons

SPECIAL INTERESTS: Facelifts, Blepharoplasty, Breast Augmentation, Breast Reconstruction, Abdominoplasty, Liposuction, Breast Reduction BOARD CERTIFICATIONS: American Board of Surgery, American Board of Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery, Past President of Tennessee Society of Plastic Surgeons, Life Member Southeastern Society of Plastic Surgeons

Plastic Surgery

UNIVERSITY CLINICAL HEALTH, UT UNIVERSITY PLASTIC SURGEONS 1068 Cresthaven Road, Suite 500, Memphis, TN 38119 901.866.8525 • (f) 901.302.2525 • www.utuniversityplasticsurgeons.com

Plastic & Reconstructive Surgery

CLINIC OF PLASTIC AND RECONSTRUCTIVE SURGERY 1000 Brookfield, Suite 100, Memphis, TN 38119 901.765.4700 • (f) 901.685.2717

EDWARD LUCE, MD

W. MURRAY BUTLER, DPM

SPECIAL INTERESTS: Cosmetic & reconstructive breast surgery; cosmetic surgery of the body and neck BOARD CERTIFICATIONS: Am. Board of Surgery with a subspecialty certification in Critical Care; Am. Board of Plastic Surgery FELLOWSHIP: (Oncology) Univ. of Tennessee Health Science Center MEMBERSHIPS: Alpha Omega Alpha National Med. Honor Soc.; Am. Assoc. for Surgery of Trauma; Assoc. of Plastic Surgeons; Am. Burn Assoc.; Cleft Palate Assoc.; Coll. of Surgeons; Am. Med. Assoc.; Am. Soc. of Plastic Surgeons, Past President; Am. Soc. of Maxillofacial Surgeons; Am. Surgical Assoc.; Intl Soc. of Surgery; Plastic Surgery Educational Foundation; Plastic Surgery Research Council; Soc. of Head & Neck Surgeons; Southeastern Soc. of Plastic & Reconstructive Surgeons; Southern Surgical Assoc.

SPECIAL INTERESTS: Podiatry / Ankle and Foot Surgery BOARD CERTIFICATIONS: American College of Foot and Ankle Surgeons MEMBERSHIPS: Tennessee Podiatric Medical Association, American Podiatric Medical Association, American Podiatric Sports Medicine Association, Associate of American College of Foot and Ankle Surgeons ADDITIONAL INFORMATION: Dr. Butler is an avid runner and participates in triathlons locally

Plastic Surgery

UNIVERSITY CLINICAL HEALTH, UT UNIVERSITY PLASTIC SURGEONS 1068 Cresthaven Road, Suite 500, Memphis, TN 38119 901.866.8525 • (f) 901.302.2525 • www.utuniversityplasticsurgeons.com

Podiatry

ORTHO ONE 99 Market Center Drive, Collierville, TN 38017 • 901.861.9610 9085 E. Sandidge Center Cove, Suite 200, Olive Branch, MS 38654 • 662.890.2663 www.orthoone.org

SAI RAMAKRISHNA VELAMURI, MD

CARLA A. MARTIN, DPM

SPECIAL INTERESTS: Burn and reconstruction/critical care; lower extremity trauma/reconstruction wounds; laser resurfacing of burn scars/tissue expansion; craniofacial/hand trauma; breast surgery reconstruction; body contouring; aesthetic surgery FELLOWSHIPS: (Burn and reconstructive surgery) Johns Hopkins University

SPECIAL INTERESTS: Family Podiatry, Conservative and Surgical Correction of Foot Problems, Diabetic Foot Specialist, Diabetic Educator, Laser Treatment for Fungus Toe Nails and Plantar Wart Treatment EDUCATION: Temple School of Podiatric Medicine, Philadelphia, PA BOARD CERTIFICATIONS: American Board of Podiatric Multiple Specialists MEMBERSHIPS: American Board of Multiple Specialists of Podiatric Association, Mississippi Podiatric Medical Association, American Diabetic Association, American Podiatric Medical Association

Plastic Surgery

UNIVERSITY CLINICAL HEALTH, UT UNIVERSITY PLASTIC SURGEONS 1068 Cresthaven Road, Suite 500, Memphis, TN 38119 901.866.8525 • (f) 901.302.2525 • www.utuniversityplasticsurgeons.com

Podiatry

DESOTO FOOT CARE & PEDI-SPA 9065 E. Sandidge Cove, Suite C, Olive Branch, MS 38654 662.893.0533

ROBERT D. WALLACE, MD

FRANK A. OGNIBENE, DPM

SPECIAL INTERESTS: Cosmetic surgery of the face and body; breast cosmetic and reconstructive surgery; craniofacial surgery; cleft lip and palate surgery; Mohs surgery – skin cancer reconstruction; skin rejuvenation (Thermi) BOARD CERTIFICATIONS: American Board of Otolaryngology and American Board of Plastic Surgery FELLOWSHIPS: (Craniofacial surgery) Paris, France MEMBERSHIPS: American Association of Plastic Surgeons; American Society of Maxillofacial Surgeons; American Society of Plastic Surgeons; Association of Academic Chairmen of Plastic Surgery; Southeastern Society of Plastic Surgeons; Tennessee Society of Plastic Surgeons

MEDICAL SCHOOL: Ohio College of Podiatric Medicine EDUCATION: Long Island University, B.S. RESIDENCY: Memphis Eye and Ear Hospital BOARD CERTIFICATIONS: Diplomate, American Board of Podiatric Surgery; board certified in foot and ankle surgery MEMBERSHIPS: Fellow, American College of Foot and Ankle Surgeons HOSPITAL AFFILIATIONS: Baptist Memorial Hospital, Methodist Hospital, St. Francis Hospital, Delta Medical

Plastic Surgery

UNIVERSITY CLINICAL HEALTH, UT UNIVERSITY PLASTIC SURGEONS 1068 Cresthaven Road, Suite 500, Memphis, TN 38119 901.866.8525 • (f) 901.302.2525 • www.utuniversityplasticsurgeons.com

Podiatry

2120 Exeter Rd., Suite 220, Germantown, TN 38138 901.757.0045 • (f) 901.756.4413

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2017MEDICALGUIDE

SPECIAL ADVERTISING SECTION

DARRYL S. WEIMAN, MD, JD Surgery

SPECIAL INTERESTS: Meeting the mission at the VA by providing the best possible care to our patients BOARD CERTIFICATIONS: Surgery and Thoracic Surgery MEMBERSHIPS: American Association for Thoracic Surgery; Society of Thoracic Surgeons; American College of Surgeons ADDITIONAL INFORMATION: Legal Education from the Cecil C. Humphreys School of Law; licensed to practice law in Tennessee; Chief of Surgery at the Memphis VA Medical Center; Professor of Surgery, University of Tennessee Health Science Center

DEPARTMENT OF VETERANS AFFAIRS (VA) MEDICAL CENTER 1030 Jefferson Avenue, Memphis, TN 38104 901.523.8990 • www.memphis.va.gov

S. GREGORY PORTERA, M.D., FACOG

Urogynecology and Obstetrics & Gynecology SPECIAL INTERESTS: Urogynecology, Female Pelvic Medicine & Reconstructive Surgery BOARD CERTIFICATIONS: Fellow of the American College of Obstetrics and Gynecology (FACOG) FELLOWSHIP: Urogynecology & Reconstructive Pelvic Surgery University of Tennessee Health Science Center, Memphis, TN CLINICAL FACULTY POSITION: Urogynecology & Gynecology University of Tennessee Health Science Center, Memphis, TN HOSPITAL AFFILIATIONS: Baptist Memorial Hospital for Women, Methodist Le Bonheur Germantown Hospital MEMBERSHIPS: American Urogynecologic Society, SGS, Memphis Medical Society

CENTER FOR URINARY AND PELVIC DISORDERS 6215 Humphreys Blvd., Suite 110, Memphis, TN 38120 901.227.9610 • www.cupdms.com

The 2017

To advertise in the 2018 Medical Guide please contact Raquel Hinson at: 901.521.9000 or rhinson@memphismagazine.com.

Now Accepting Nominations

B

usiness is pushed forward by change and evolution, and it is those in the forefront of that evolution — the tinkerers, the questioners, the visionaries — who keep the machine of commerce oiled. But who are these people? We want to know. Send us your best and brightest nominations for our fifth annual Innovation Awards issue coming in October. Please include any pertinent biographical or business information, and why the person, business, or organization should be recognized as a leader among innovators. Email your nomination to sparks@insidememphisbusiness.com. Deadline for nominations is July 14, 2017.

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GREAT MEMPHIS HOMES

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MAGNIFICAT! This South Front Street home is a loving family affair for three outstanding women.

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his is the story of three Renaissance (and related!) women who together have created a wonderful downtown home on South Front Street. Cheryle Jackson, the absentee owner of the house, was raised in Memphis but has been based in Chicago for a number of years, where she is president of AAR Africa Global Services. Fortunately, her mother, Earnestine Robinson, and her sister, Michelle McKissack, who both live in Memphis, have helped tremendously with planning and implementing the home’s interior design. Jackson had not really intended to buy a house in Memphis — in fact it was the farthest thing from her mind — until two years ago, when during a family visit, she happened upon this charming, upscale zerolot house in The Ivy at the South End. She loved the energy and feel of downtown and all its amenities and especially this particular location so near the Farmers Market. Before she knew it, she was in escrow for a three bedroom, three-and-a-half-bath house.

left: The dining area of the open-plan living room is resplendent with its glittering chandelier, Ethan Allen dining table, and chairs courtesy of At Home.

right: The charming façade of Jackson’s zero-lot home located in downtown’s The Ivy at the South End.

by a n n e cu n n ingh a m o ’ n eill | photography by c hip pa n k ey

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It was decided that Jackson’s mother would live in the home and look after the place, which was the perfect solution, as one of her sons, Todd Robinson, lives six doors down in the same complex. Her mother’s other daughter, Michelle McKissack, lives in Harbor Town and is “the almost neighbor” on the other side of Downtown. With this beautiful place awaiting her, Jackson tries to get home to Memphis as often as her extensive African travels to Johannesburg, Kigali, Nairobi, Abuja, and Lagos (among others) will allow. I am calling these ladies “Renaissance women,” first of all because they have great taste and style, as you can quickly discern from the home’s photographs. All three attended Northwestern University (although Mother Robinson began her education at Fisk in Nashville) and have out st a n d i ng p r ofe s sio n a l résumés. A senior executive for the leading provider of aircraft maintenance and supply chain solutions worldwide, Jackson also found the time and wherewithal to run in the 2010 Democratic Primary in Chicago to take over Barack Obama’s vacated senate seat. Amazing! An Emmy award-winning journalist with an extensive background in broadcast me-

The décor of Jackson’s contemporary home is New Orleans French style. This Restoration Hardware mirror was a trial to move in, but it was so worth it.

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This handsome, streamlined kitchen is set off by a beautiful, modern light fixture, one of many selected to decorate Jackson’s new home.

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Earnestine Robinson is an award-winning composer of oratorios which have been performed at Carnegie Hall and other venues. 94 • M E M P H I S M A G A Z I N E . C O M • J U N E 2 0 1 7

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dia, McKissack just happens to be my esteemed Contemporary Media colleague, serving as editor of Memphis Parent magazine, our “sister” publication. Robinson is an award-winning composer of oratorios which have been performed at Carnegie Hall and other places, who tells me that she can “hear music inside me,” though amazingly had no formal musical training.

left: The stylish living room is a mixture of old and new pieces and is enriched by metallic objects and the silver sheen of the drapery.

top: One of Robinson’s fabulous original compositions, Magnificat, framed in gold takes pride of place on the living room wall.

In addition, McKissack and Robinson are both the devoted mothers of large families — Robinson has five children and McKissack has four. At the outset, it was decided that the décor of Jackson’s contemporary home would be New Orleans French style. Every piece that went into the house was agreed upon “by committee,” as the ladies like to say, which

above: An amazing trio of talented women: Robinson in the center with daughters Jackson at left and McKissack at right.

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A sophisticated mix of high/low furniture, gold and silver metallic objects, African artifacts, and vintage family pieces gives the home its charm. meant that when one of the three would find something she liked, it would be run by the others by text or FaceTime — often in the wee small hours of the night — for a thumbs up or down. The result is a sophisticated mixture of high/ low furniture, gold and silver metallic objects, African artifacts, and vintage family furniture that has been tastefully reupholstered. Upstairs carpeting was pulled up and hardwood f loors were installed. Local stores where

treasures were found include Decadent Avenue, Palladio, La Maison, Worlds Away, Turkoyz Home, Ethan Allen, and At Home, and for flowers Jackson likes Garden District. A few dramas happened along the way. The tremendous Restoration Hardware floor-length mirror ordered for the living room at first seemed just too big for the house. But after waiting two months for it, defeat was not an option, despite the deliv-

top: The luxe master bedroom is simply fit for a queen with its soft grey walls, mirrored surfaces, crystal chandelier, and that amazing bed!

bottom: The guest room is a peaceful oasis with its monochromatic grey color scheme and with yet another elegant chandelier.

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ery men saying, “Ladies, it’s not gonna fit.” Obviously they didn’t know this group! The problem was solved when the baseboard molding was cut so it would indeed fit … though just barely. Robinson likes to say that as a carpenter’s daughter, this was her idea! Oh, and there was even more excitement when the bed purchased for the master bedroom was too large to get upstairs. McKissack took the problem to her engineer husband, John, to figure out a solution. As a result, a crane minus a driver was rented to hoist it over the balcony and into the room. Simple, right? If you are wondering who successfully operated the crane, this hair-raising job fell to brother Todd Robinson, a doctor by profession, and now crane-operator extraordinaire. In fact, I got to talk to Robinson when he dropped by as we were photographing the house. He laughingly characterized the area as a Memphis version of television’s famous Mayberry. The neighbors are all a close-knit group, and he told me that Jackson’s house often becomes a three-ring circus full of family and friends. The cry routinely goes out, “Cheryle’s in town, come one, come all” and immediately Gus’s Fried Chicken is ordered! It so happens too that the previous owners of the house, Sophie and Bryan Duffel, just moved down the block and

since have become good friends. Fortunately there is a huge third-f loor media room with an oversize black leather couch where Earnestine Robinson’s nine grandchildren, aged 2 to 20, can play, sleep, and just hang out. On the upstairs landing sits the family piano, and believe it or not, there have been recitals held there — with seating! Everyone also loves to sit outside on the patio the ladies describe as “le petit jardin” at the side of the house, which is attractively furnished with French-style bistro tables and chairs. These three accomplished Renaissance women, sisters Cheryle Jackson and Michelle McKissack, along with their mother Earnestine Robinson, are beautiful people in every way with an inspiring devotion to family. I loved being in their warm company, and the good news is they have kindly invited us back for a party to celebrate the publication of this article. Thank you and I accept with pleasure!

top left: The third-floor “grand cave” is a comfortable paradise for Robinson’s lucky grandchildren. center: Jackson likes to call the

powder room her “homage to Africa.” above: Le petit jardin, as the ladies call it, at the side of the house has a definite New Orleans feel.

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on the town

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WHERE: 20Twelve WHEN: April 25, 2017

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uests were introduced to “Armarium” at a VIP party held April 25th at 20Twelve on Broad Avenue. Armarium is a New York-based business that rents designer ready-to-wear and accessories. “You’ve got an event or wedding or black-tie event, you get on their website, and find Carolina Herrera, Oscar de la Renta, brands like that,” said Chantal Johnson, owner of 20Twelve. “You choose a dress, see if they have your size, get in touch with them, and, essentially, you rent it for your event.” Some of these gowns could sell for anywhere from $2,000 to $8,000 but people can now rent them for a fraction of the cost. Trisha Gregory, Armarium co-owner with Alexandra Lind Rose, attended the VIP party. The purpose was “to invite VIP clients to shop Armarium,” Johnson said. In addition to the party, the Armarium gowns were featured at the store the day before and the day after the party. The event was “very successful,” Johnson said. “We sold out of a lot of items. What we found was somebody would come in and say, ‘I need a gown or dress for a cocktail event,’ and pick up a pair of jeans or a top for something else. We were able to complement the look for the weekend.” “We were super pleased and Chantal is so gracious and warm,” Gregory said. Hosting the event with Gregory and Johnson were Susannah Whitehead and Scout Guide editor Muffy Turley.

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1 Muffy Turley and Stacie Waddell 2 Tammy Davis and Beverly Sharpe 3 Marcia Hughes and Cara Morrissey 4 Bridgette Speake, Karen Johnston, and Dina Martin. 5 Tiffany Bishop 6 Karina

Benziger, Abby Phillips, and Ruthie Bowlin 7 Palmer Smith and Trisha Gregory 8 Doug Windham and Karen Carlisle 9 Lindsay Lewis and Liz Smith 10 Leslie Ridgeway 11 Cary Whitehead, Lindsay

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Lewis, Patsy Gregory, and Russell Whitehead 12 Ellen Horn, Nancy Smith, and Sarah Wakins 13 Sarah Thompson and Alison Henneberger 14 Chantal Johnson, Susannah Whitehead, Trisha Gregory, and Muffy Turley

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ILLUSTRATION AND PHOTOGRAPHS BY DREAMSTIME

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Sketches D I D A B A B Y C I R C U S E L E P H A N T E S C A P E T H E WAY A Y O U N G G I R L R E M E M B E R E D ?

✒ by h a n na h h e at h joh ns on

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aybe if Mabel hadn’t looped the artsy necklace with the little pill bottle on it around Amelia’s neck and said, “This is perfect for an artist like you,” the girl wouldn’t have gone home and sketched the baby elephant, and then Mabel wouldn’t be trying to create some cockamamie story about a circus escape. But that’s exactly what she’d done. “This is perfect for an artist like you,” she’d said after handing five dollars across the counter and sliding the brown leather cord around Amelia’s neck. She turned it so the pill bottle fell at the center, a tiny glass jar, maybe an inch or two tall, with a cork in the top. Pretty wires wound around the jar, twisting upwards in a knotted pattern. Mabel thought they were nice. It was for sale in the artsy little café where they’d eaten lunch (so maybe it was Becky’s fault — she’d picked the restaurant) and Mabel had decided, as soon as she saw it, to buy it for Amelia. The whole purpose of the lunch had been to cheer Amelia up. Amelia had been in some trouble. That’s all Becky, Mabel’s daughter, told her — in some trouble. So Becky had checked Amelia out of school and the three of them were huddled in a corner booth eating fancy salads as if it were perfectly normal for a 15-year-old to be out for a mid-day lunch with her grandmother and great-grandmother. Mabel had never cared for a fancy salad. She knew Becky had only invited her along because she was trying to cheer Mabel up, too. Becky had been hovering about for the last two days, since Mabel got the call that her sister, Virgie, was dying. Amelia was wearing a solid black shirt and black jeans, with little black flats. There were tips of blue in the bottom of her brown hair, a pretty, sky blue that Mabel didn’t object to. Amelia had a friend named Skye — a tall, loud girl, who drove her own car and was a year or two older than Amelia — but Becky had told Mabel, repeatedly, that they were not to mention Skye. Amelia is no longer friends with Skye. Skye is bad news. So Mabel didn’t

comment on the girl’s hair for fear she would say sky, accidently, though it turned out Skye wasn’t the only conversation topic to be avoided. Mabel could feel her daughter dancing around something as she chatted with Amelia, and Mabel felt sorry for them both. It still struck Mabel as extremely strange, at times, that her daughter had a granddaughter. This was not new information, of course, but it could still surprise her. Becky did not approve of how her own daughter, Amelia’s mother, parented. She was a single mom, a lawyer at one of the biggest firms in Memphis, and she worked long hours. Amelia had too much unsupervised time, according to Becky. I told her this would happen, Becky told Mabel, when she mentioned Amelia’s “troubles.” “How’s school?” Becky asked Amelia. “It’s fine.” Amelia looked directly at Becky when she answered and smiled, a half smile. She’d always had good manners, which was one reason it was hard to believe all the fuss over her being in trouble. She was a beautiful girl, even with the blue hair. Her real hair was the same reddish brown that Mabel’s had

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Hannah Heath Johnson

is the winner of the 2017 Memphis magazine Fiction Contest for her story, “Sketches.” Johnson lives in Heber Springs, Arkansas, where she is an English instructor at the Heber Springs campus of Arkansas State University-Beebe. She grew up in Wynne, Arkansas, where she first developed a fascination with writing about relationships that simmer over decades. She holds an M.F.A. in creative writing from the University of Memphis and, after spending nearly 10 years in the Memphis area, she and her husband are raising their two children with a healthy love for the Grizzlies. Johnson’s work has been recognized by Glimmer Train and Narrative magazines, and has appeared in Windhover and The Front Porch. Judges for this year’s contest were Marilyn Sadler, former senior editor of Memphis magazine and a longtime judge and coordinator of the fiction contest, and Richard Alley, book editor for Memphis magazine and the Memphis Flyer. We are grateful for the support of Burke’s Book Store, who served as the sponsor of this year’s contest. been when she was younger. Amelia wore it cut at a slant, with long bangs hanging across her face. “Lots of homework?” Becky asked. “Not really.” Listening, Mabel felt vaguely angry with Becky. Amelia was mostly quiet, but if she said anything remotely witty (she was actually a witty girl), Becky laughed much too loudly, and the girl’s expression changed. There was a circle of water on the table, where her glass had been sitting, and Amelia traced her finger around the water, circle after circle, in a way that made Mabel feel tender toward her. In the strange silence that settled over their table, Becky took to reading advertisements posted around the restaurant. “Oh, the circus is coming to town! How interesting!” she said, gesturing toward a sign that was too far away for Mabel to read. “It’s actually the state fair,” said Amelia. Becky nodded, conceding this. Amelia had excellent eyesight. But it was too late — with any mention of the circus came talk

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of the elephant. “Oh, Mother,” Becky said, turning toward Mabel, her eyes hopeful. “You have to tell your circus story.”

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hat happened was this: When Mabel was eight years old, the circus came to town. Mabel and her sister walked two miles to the fairgrounds where it was set up, with Mabel carrying both of their tickets since she was the oldest. They each had a hot dog and they shared a bottle of Coke and then, after they watched a unicyclist and two acrobats who flew so high that Mabel felt a distinct dread in her stomach, the girls headed back home. Virgie saw the elephant first. She always saw everything first. She shrieked and suddenly Mabel saw it, right there, in the middle of that familiar road: a baby elephant walking slowly down the dirt path, with its backside to them, as if it walked that path every day. Mabel had stopped, stunned, and then she’d gotten the giggles. (She still giggled when anything surprised her. It was a bad habit. She had, in fact, made a noise that sounded like a laugh when her niece called yesterday to say that Virgie had taken a turn and would most certainly die. It wasn’t a laugh, though — it was unrecognizable to Mabel and had come from a faraway place). As soon as she saw the elephant, Virgie turned and ran back to the circus. She was only seven years old, a year younger than Mabel, and Mabel imagined her rushing to the gate, yelling for help. Mabel was still giggling when a storm of people ran past her and then stopped, suddenly. A man and a woman pulled away from the group and approached the elephant slowly. The man was carrying a long silver pole with a metal circle at the end, and Mabel watched from behind as he slid the circle over the elephant’s head and then slowly, carefully, guided the animal around. The woman stood alongside the elephant and they walked him, facing Mabel and her sister, back toward the circus. His ears were laid back flat against his head. Mabel felt sure the elephant saw her, that the eye closest to her was looking right at her, and she felt an unexpected surge of emotion. The elephant was nearly as tall as Mabel herself, and its grey skin looked old and wrinkly. (That was the question Mabel and Virgie kept returning to in the days after — why did it look so old?) Mabel felt the urge to touch the elephant, or at least talk to him, and she was sad that she’d just stood, frozen, and stared at him while Virgie went to get help. The elephant’s trunk, which was longer than Mabel would’ve thought, for a baby, was held out in front, weaving up and down, like it was searching for something. The woman walking beside the elephant sang to him and stroked him slowly on the side. She

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had a pretty voice, very kind-sounding, and her voice had returned to Mabel at strange times over the years, as she was rocking her own children and grandchildren or when she was lying awake, alone in dark. She would find herself humming the tune or picture the woman’s hand resting steadily against the elephant’s side. Mabel wished, so badly, that she had reached out and touched him herself, that she’d felt the folds of his skin and the rise and fall of his breath.

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hat was the story, the way it really happened. Mabel and Virgie had rushed home in a glow, talking so fast their parents could hardly understand them. When she did understand, finally, Mabel’s mother had praised the girls for not approaching the animal. It could’ve killed you, her mother said. Even a baby elephant could weigh 500 pounds. Mabel imagined, sometimes, that the elephant had turned around and charged at Virgie, knocking her over and stomping her. And then she would’ve died all those years ago, instead of dying now, slowly, disappearing into nothing. “Any day now,” Virgie’s daughter said when she called. Any day. Becky was making plans to take Mabel to North Carolina for Virgie’s funeral, once it happened. “I have no interest in seeing her after it happens,” Mabel had told her daughter. Becky didn’t ask the follow-up question, which seemed obvious to Mabel. Do you want to go before? Yes. She did. Ever since Virgie had stopped making sense, since her words became fewer and finally stopped, Becky didn’t understand that Mabel still needed to see her. Mabel allowed herself to carry hard feelings toward her daughter, sometimes, but then Becky would make a gesture so very familiar — a quick tilt of her head when she asked Mabel to tell the circus story — that the anger dissolved, immediately, and Mabel felt ashamed. Mabel could not be sure when the elephant story had changed and turned into something different, something it never was. Had she lied intentionally? It must’ve been more than fifty years since she first told Becky, so who knew? Had her kids or grandkids misunderstood? Did it matter? Mabel never remembered choosing to lie about the elephant, but the story had evolved, and now she always told the story she was expected to tell, the story everyone wanted. In this story, Mabel found the baby elephant hiding in the pampas grass that lined her parents’ back yard, snuggled amidst the overgrown green stalks that stood five feet tall, with airy white feathers reaching upwards. This much was true: Mabel’s father had indeed lined the back edge of their yard with pampas grass that for years stood taller than Mabel. (Later, when bamboo fences became

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fashionable, Mabel decided her father had been ahead of his time.) She’d found a number of things hiding in the pampas grass — mostly rabbits and snakes but, once, an intoxicated man hiding from the police. Still, it didn’t make sense that something as large as an elephant could hide there. An elephant, for heaven’s sake, not a rabbit. Not to mention that the tall grass was bristly and sharp. Every time Mabel reached her hand in to feel 30 minutes from Downtown Memphis around for a lost ball or a missing toy, she’d pull it out streaked with cuts and scratches, and she would itch for days. The pampas grass would have been a terrible place for the elephant to hide. But, in the new story, that’s exactly where he was. Mabel had gone out to burn the Lot 45-D Horseshoe Circle 11569 Horseshoe Circle 1007 Bream Road trash — that part, too, could’ve been true. 11569 HORSESHOE CIRCLE 1007 BREAM ROAD LOT 45-D HORSESHOE CIRCLE Mabel and Virgie took turns throwing the 4,000 sq. ft. custom home, 240’ lake 100’ lakefront lot on the highly 1 acre level lot on the Canal with direct family’s trash in the fire. On three separate frontage, on 3.5 acres, 5 bedrooms, desired Bream Road. access into Horseshoe Lake. A nice lot occasions, when it was her turn, Mabel had 11569 Horseshoe Circle to build your vacation cabin on. fireplace & more. $192,000 1007 Bream Road accidentally thrown the trash barrel in, $45,900 $675,000 Lot 45-D Horseshoe Circle right along with the trash, and burned it up. SOLD 2791 Horseshoechild’s Circle This head is in the clouds her mother 747 Bream Road 190 Pecan Circle Circle 11569 Horseshoe had said, so many times that Mabel still heard the phrase in her mind on occasion. 1007 Bream Road (In fact, when that absent look darkened Amelia’s eyes and made her seem very far 747 Bream Road Mabel remembered how she used to SOLDaway, 2791 Horseshoe Circle 190 Pecan Circle Horseshoe Circle 190 PECAN CIRCLE 747 BREAM ROAD 2791 HORSESHOE CIRCLE SOLD 2773daydream. She’d suggested to Becky that 3 or 4 bedrooms, 2.5 baths, 3 piers, 2 111’ lakefront lot priced 3 bedroom, 2 bath, 200 Pecan Circle perhaps Amelia’s head was just in the clouds car garage, fireplace, extra lot available. under market value. 61’ lake frontage, pier. 11569 The Lake Place 190 Pecan Circle $275,000 $191,500 and she was kind of dreamy-like, like Mabel 747 Bream Road had always been, but Becky looked at her, hard, and said, “That is not the problem.”) LOGO Maybe one night, as Mabel watched the SOLD 2773 Horseshoe Circle 200 Pecan Circle trash burn and the white, feathery wisps of the pampas grass wave in the moonlight, 11569 The Lake Place she had imagined that the baby elephant 200 Pecan Circle 11569 The Lake Place was with her. That she turned and saw him, crouched beneath the sprawling green grass 11569 THE LAKE PLACE 200 PECAN CIRCLE 10588 HORSESHOE CIRCLE Several water front lots to choose from, 2 BR, 2 BA cottage near lake, private New 2 Bedroom 2LOGO Bath 50’ with his ears pressed back and his eyes watchsoon to be gated community, call today. community, access to 2 piers and Lakefront Screened porch. ing her. This time, she had gone over to him covered boat slip. Prices $115,000 and up. $189,000 and knelt beside him and touched his face. $95,000 Additional lots available She sat beside him for a long time and sang to him, the same song the lady sang to him MORE PROPERTIES FOR SALE on the road, the song that drifted through Contact: Joey Burch 501-454-1782 or Pat Burch 901-490-4841 her dreams. And the elephant lay still and www.outdoorproperties.com watched her, and she had watched him and petted him and talked to him quietly, until Virgie came out and saw the elephant and ran for help. By the time Virgie found her, Mabel was curled next to the elephant, lying beside him, she, too, hidden in the grass. It was quite likely that Mabel saw all of this one night as she watched the trash burn, as her thoughts drifted in the darkness. That might’ve been how the story was born, this U.S. & World Coins story she told Amelia.

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melia became very animated while Mabel told her tale, and Becky looked happy. There was no harm in telling the story one more time, Mabel decided. It had been helpful, in fact. The awkwardness was gone and they were laughing with

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Amelia. Wasn’t that the point of their lunch? Mabel began to feel lighthearted and stayed so until, just before they rose to leave, she heard Becky chiding Amelia to eat more. (Mabel herself had noticed that Amelia was entirely too thin — but if Becky was so worried about it, why had she picked a salad place?) Amelia gave another little half-smile and Mabel was feeling sorry for her when she noticed the artsy little pill-bottle necklace at the checkout. The artist bit had come to her immediately. Amelia was indeed artistic, that much was true, always painting on the walls of her bedroom and whatnot — currently, she’d painted a city skyline on one of her walls, which was not to Becky’s liking. What the girl needed was an identity, Mabel decided, something to hold on to. There were worse things than being an artist, for crying out loud. This, Mabel had said to Becky several times. She thought she was doing Amelia a kindness, giving her a way of thinking about herself. This will be perfect for an artist like you. And maybe she was right — Amelia had gone home TEMPLATEFILE and sketched the elephant, straightaway.

I

n the twenty-one days before Becky called to say Amelia’s drawing had won first prize at the state fair, Mabel had maintained a running calculation of exactly how many times she could’ve been to North Carolina and back. Twenty-one days meant she could’ve flown to North Carolina and back ten times, driven five times. Virgie was hanging on. She hadn’t improved — wouldn’t improve, the doctors had assured — but the end hadn’t come as quickly as they’d predicted. Every morning, when Mabel called her niece to check, she said those words exactly: “She’s still hanging on.” Becky had offered, half-heartedly, that they could goTEMPLATEFILE — But we’d just have to turn around and go right back. And there’s no guarantee we’d make it. To Becky’s credit, Mabel hadn’t told her that she wanted to go, that she needed to see Virgie before they went for the funeral. But shouldn’t Becky know? Shouldn’t anyone? Mabel thought about this each time she talked to Becky. The travel calculations required her full concentration, so she was only halfway listening when Becky called, talking rapidly about the juried — this detail was evidently important — competition: a juried competition. “Troubled teenagers do not enter artwork in the state fair,” Mabel said. “Mother,” Becky paused. “Her teacher entered it.” “Troubled teenagers do not allow their art work to be entered into the state fair,” Mabel said. She was quite sure of this. Becky was quiet. “But I’m glad for her,” Mabel added. “It was a nice little sketch.” Amelia had brought the sketch over to

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Mabel’s house for her to see it, sitting shyly on Mabel’s sofa and twirling the necklace Mabel had given her between her fingers as she waited for Mabel’s reaction. She had taken to wearing the necklace every day. (I’m not sure a pill bottle was the most appropriate choice,” Becky had whispered.) Mabel stared at the sketch, stunned. Amelia was a good listener (“At-risk kids are not good listeners,” she reminded Becky) and she had captured the details Mabel described perfectly. The pampas grass at the back of the yard looked exactly as Mabel remembered, as if Amelia had seen it herself. The only thing Amelia didn’t get right was the girl’s face. She looked like Virgie, not Mabel. Mabel understood the mistake. There was a framed sketch in Mabel’s hallway of her and Virgie when they were girls, a sketch her mother had done years ago. Amelia had been imitating that sketch, apparently — hers had the same lines and shading, the same tilt of Virgie’s head. Maybe Amelia had gotten the two girls mixed up or maybe Virgie’s face had stood out more vividly in her mind — Virgie’s was more memorable, with her wide, dark eyes and sharp chin and the smattering of freckles that Amelia captured, just exactly, in the sketch. It was unusual, apparently, for a sophomore to win first place at the fair. Amelia’s whole school was up in arms over her and now, Becky told Mabel, so was the local news. “They already interviewed her,” Becky said. And Mabel was listening fully now because she was happy for Amelia, glad to think of her getting so much attention. Maybe it would be good for her. “The pretty girl,” Becky continued. “The brunette who’s on in the morning. She interviewed Amelia last night. She wants to interview you, too.” Mabel knew exactly which reporter Becky was talking about. “Me? Why?” she asked, though she was afraid she knew. “About the elephant. Amelia told them the whole story, how she got the idea. They want to talk to you. What do you think?” Becky said. Mabel could hear a car honking. Becky always called her when she was driving, never when she was home. Mabel was quiet. “I’m too old to be on TV,” she said, after a moment. “That’s silly. Amelia would love it. Won’t you do it?” “I guess I don’t have a good reason not to,” Mabel heard herself saying, but her voice was unfamiliar. Becky would call her later with the details, come help her pick out an outfit. They would probably need to go shopping for something new. Mabel hung up and stared out her front window to the street outside. It was a big contin u ed on page 128

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ROAD TRIP

STATION

STATION

It’s a story that starts in 1914 in Hibbing, Minnesota, when the Greyhound Line was born, then immediately leaps forward in time to 1934 when the rapidly expanding coach service — with a pinch of Hollywood glitter — became an American institution. Claudette Colbert’s famous bus ride with Clark Gable in It Happened One Night, the pre-code cinema classic, brought a whole new set of Depression-era customers to the bus station looking for a lift, and that’s not all. Frank Capra’s screwball romance famously caused a steep decline in undershirt sales when Gable appeared bare-chested. The comic tale of a spoiled socialite’s adventures on the road with a down-at-heel reporter also brought down the curtain on a century of train travel. More and more people were packing their Samsonite luggage into the family station wagon or letting Greyhound take the wheel. One year after the release of It Happened One Night, rubber tire travel finally eclipsed rail travel, and everything changed. Sleek, efficiently crafted new stations, like the one in Dyersburg, came online overnight, at the dawn of Burma-Shave, before there were Pilot stations, Exxons, and Travel America markets conveniently located at every exit on the freeway. This was back when the long and winding American roadside was transforming into a quirky souvenir trail, and a blank canvas for advertising. Every barn could be a billboard, and even today, if you know how to read the landscape, the incredible promise and grave disappointments of the twentieth

AMERICANA AND BRISKET ARE SERVED IN EQUAL PORTIONS AT THE BUS STOP RESTAURANT IN DYERSBURG, TENNESSEE.

^6

by chris davis

Highway 51 runs right by my baby’s door, Highway 51 runs right by my baby’s door, If I don’t get the girl I’m loving, Won’t go down to Highway 51 no more.

I

— “highway 51 blues” by curtis jones

t’s often said, by folks more humanist than evangelical, that the journey is the destination. That’s probably true of this meandering story that you’re about to read, as it is as much about lost time and the spirit of travel as it is about the smell of fresh-brewed coffee, satisfying sandwiches, and a nifty road-trip-inspired diner called the Bus Stop, situated off the beaten path in downtown Dyersburg, Tennessee, a faded lumber capital that’s seen better days. PHOTOGR APHS BY CHRIS DAVIS

It’s impossible to miss the art-deco design of the Bus Stop restaurant in Dyersburg.

century are easily observed along our highways in the form of sprawling used car lots, endless junkyards, and the rotten or recycled husks of novelty restaurants built to look like UFOs and rockets to the moon. America’s travel paradigm shifted once again in the mid-1950s with interstate expansion and the mainstreaming of air transit. Small-scale family attractions began to disappear but never died out completely. In its own unassuming way, the Bus Stop is a tastefully apt attempt to bring back a classic roadside attraction and make it upscale. It’s simple — only a gourmet coffee and sand-

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wich shop. But it’s built on quality, wrapped in genuine Americana, and packed tic-tight into Dyer County’s abandoned, but beautifully preserved, Art-Deco Greyhound terminal. The Bus Stop’s melt-in-your-mouth coffee rubbed brisket sandwich is a tasty enough excuse for travel, especially with a perfect bowl of tomato bisque. But the building’s just as powerful a draw. Every lovingly converted inch of this 1930s-era waiting room reminds diners of another time, and the wild drivethru wonderland that once existed out in the vast expanse we now call Flyover America.

though it certainly looks like you could walk right up to the counter, past shelves of fluffy pastry and fat-top muffins, and order a oneway ticket down Route 66 all the way to the Pacific Coast. “We’re just trying to do something different,” says Eric Moore, executive chef for the Bus Stop. Moore, a Connecticut native who grew up in Germantown, is a peripatetic spir-

M

emphis may be the home of Sputnik Monroe, and Satellite records, but even in a place that helped define the modern profile, it’s relatively hard to find reminders of a recent past built to look like the space-age future. Unless, of course, you motor north on Danny Thomas past the juke joints, honky tonks, and an epic fireworks stand at the edge of town and into the countryside, where progress is either a dream or a dirty word. Highway 51 takes you by the pointy A-frame ruins of a What-A-Burger stand and yards full of kitschy, bargain-priced outdoor art guaranteed to mortify the neighbors. It’s a straight shot through Millington, Munford, Atoka, Ripley, and points beyond, where traces of classic roadside America are evident in the sleek, futuristic design of Covington’s Rose Construction, and in the life-sized giraffe statues luring travelers to tour a car-friendly Safari Park in Alamo, Tennessee. You’ll know you’ve arrived in Dyersburg when you see a sign for the Affordable (Storage) Space Center. It’s hard to miss an enormous red, white, and blue missile shooting flames from its tail fins. Rockets have yet to catch on as a means of travel in West Tennessee, but perched on the Forked Deer River, Dyersburg was once a major steamboat port. It grew into a hub for the Illinois Central Railroad and, as the Art-Deco station on Court Street suggests, it evolved into a busy transportation hub serving northwest Tennessee. Sadly, you can no longer buy a bus ticket to Memphis at this gleaming blue-and-white-tiled terminal,

“My most complicated recipe has only six ingredients,” says executive chef Eric Moore.

it who took an appropriately winding path to his tiny kitchen in Dyersburg. Moore studied film and video production at the University of Memphis and worked behind the scenes for years in local TV news. But he didn’t like it a bit. So he bounced around from job to job looking for something that fit. “I found myself working in restaurants,” he says. “And I thought, ‘Hey, I kind of like this.’” So Moore enrolled in L’École Culinaire, and started his professional life all over again. “People think when you get out of culinary school you’re a chef, but you’re really not,” he says. “You’re just an educated cook that’s $60,000 in debt. It takes a little while to figure out how things really work.” To learn the finer points of his trade, the newly minted cook packed two suitcases into a “piece of crap” Camaro and headed north to New York, and then took a succession of planes, trains, and automobiles to explore more exotic locations like Essex and Iceland. “I guess it was a pretty roundabout way to get back to West Tennessee,” he says. “But I wouldn’t change any of it, honestly.”

Y

ou can still catch a bus ride from Dyersburg’s West End Market, but the British-owned, Dallas-based Greyhound company abandoned its Dyersburg station in 1980; today, the Bus Stop restaurant isn’t affiliated in any way. After Greyhound left, a variety of tenants occupied the building, including a Domino’s Pizza. Nothing stuck. The property owners, John and Martha Lannom, were

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ROAD TRIP

S TAT ION T O S TAT ION determined to preserve the building and use its special history to lure people downtown. But what kind of business would fit in an old bus station? A frozen yogurt stand? A bakery? A coffee shop? “The original idea was we’d sell yogurt, but we wound up being a restaurant and coffee shop,” Moore recalls. “The goal was to make

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The Bus Stop’s dessert menu includes cakes, muffins, and an assortment of pastries.

the Bus Stop a part of the community, not just a place to eat. So when you think of Dyersburg you think of the Bus Stop, and when you think of the Bus Stop you think of Dyersburg.” The walls of the Bus Stop are decorated with colorful vintage advertisements from the early days of Greyhound and mass travel by motor coach. Some advertise the service as an affordable way for farmers to get out of town and see the world. Others tout the convenience of being able to relax and leave the stress of driving to somebody else. Moore has internalized all these ideas, and plugged them into the concept. “People are shifting from fast food,” he says. “Places like Chili’s and Friday’s are great, and there are really good reasons why they’re so successful. But I also think people want to experience things differently now, and that extends to how they want their food. That’s what Greyhound was always advertising, isn’t it? Why stress out? Let us do that for you.” Keeping up with a menu where 98 percent of everything available is prepared in-house can certainly be stressful. “We’re doing things this kitchen was never meant to do,” Moore says. His tiny 18-inch oven is only big enough to fit a single turkey, and that can take between four and five hours to cook. The Bus Stop has sold a metric ton of turkey since opening its doors in 2015, one five-pound bird at a time. The brisket also takes five hours to prepare, and the pork belly — ultimately served with fermented garlic, herbs, and a ginger maple aioli — spends 24 hours in the sous vide. “To do all of this in a space the size of ours takes a lot of planning, and I don’t get a lot of down time,” Moore says, laughing off his cramped circumstances. Having maxed out

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his workspace, the chef looked for other ways to streamline his process. “My most complicated recipe has six ingredients,” he says, “because you don’t need 20 things in one recipe to make it a decent meal.” The minimalist approach means every ingredient matters, and the Bus Stop menu has all kinds of special touches. Mushroom confit is a perfect match for slow-cooked brisket with cumin and brown sugar aioli. The sharp, tart flavor of pickled red onions sets off the burn of smoked chicken and turkey. “I worried that Dyersburg might not be ready for some of this stuff, but they’ve really embraced what we’re doing here,” Moore says. In addition to sandwiches ranging in variety from the classic BLT to pork loin with bernaise, the Bus Stop also serves specialty salads like spinach with slow-rendered bacon lardons, and fresh tomatoes with mozzarella and basil. The dessert menu is limited to pastries, which pair nicely with the Bus Stop’s 30 specialty coffee drinks. Chef Moore’s menu changes seasonally, and during summer months when farmers markets open up, most of the restaurant’s

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produce is locally sourced. lthough the Bus Stop’s menu was developed with locals in mind, it’s already attracting tourists. “We get lots of people who travel around looking at old bus stations,” Moore says. “We also have people who are 80 years old that come in and tell me how they used to catch the bus here. They love it — that they can hang out in the old place.” People also still call regularly hoping to

A

The Greyhound depot in Jackson, Tennessee, still serves as a working passenger station.

purchase a ticket to somewhere, only to be disappointed. For the perfect old-school bus travel experience you’ve got to drive 48 miles southeast of Dyersburg to the Greyhound station in Jackson, Tennessee, where

the food choices are limited to snack cakes, potato chips, and other items you can purchase from a vending machine. In Jackson, travelers stare at their phones while waiting in an austere room that doesn’t look like it’s changed much since the station was built in 1938. Literature made available for phoneless passengers is limited to colorful religious pamphlets warning against the sinful perils of broadmindedness. Framed maps on the wall are made from paper and pigment, not interactive pixels. Although it has clearly seen better days, Jackson’s Greyhound station is still worth a visit, even if you’ve got nowhere to go. Vintage floor tiles are old and scuffed, and the depressing battleship gray walls have rotted away in places, but the nearly 80-year-old stop (just across the street from the Ned Ray McWherter Cultural Arts Center and right next door to a rocket-themed small engine shop) is a diamond in the rough. If Dyersburg’s Bus Stop is a good example of all the smaller Greyhound stations built in the wake of It Happened One Night, Jackson’s larger terminal is a sterling example of Greyhound’s Streamline Moderne look, with an emphasis

5/18/17 11:15 AM


ROAD TRIP

S TAT ION T O S TAT ION on sexy curves, and long horizontal lines. This was Art-Deco architecture and design at its most purely scientific — stripped of decorative elements, relying instead on aerodynamic forms to evoke a giddy sense of motion and speed. But for all of its fading beauty, there are at least two, possibly related, things completely wrong with the picture in Jackson: There aren’t many passengers waiting for a

Although the Bus Stop’s menu was designed for locals, it’s attracting plenty of tourists.

ride, and you can’t get a decent cup of coffee. Eric Moore, back in Dyersburg, sees an opportunity. “I would love to franchise this idea out,” he says, imagining what it might be like to open similar restaurants in either abandoned or possibly even functioning bus stops. “People like to take old stuff and turn it into something new and hip. The only thing we did to the outside of this building was pressure wash it and put up the sign. There’s a building like just this one in Humboldt. There are buildings like it all over the country.” In 2002, a historical marker was hung on the Jackson station’s increasingly dilapidated exterior. It names the construction company that built it, and notes, “Many a person has boarded the bus at this location in search of a dream, or gotten off the bus returning home. Memories are made here every day.” The plaque is low on information, appealing instead to sentiment as effectively as pictures of old dogs and sad clowns. In very few sentences it turns the promise of the American landscape into pure, unfiltered kitsch — all gauzy recollections and quaint fantasy. By way of comparison, a vintage Greyhound advertisement, originally published in 1940, now hanging on the wall of Dyersburg’s Bus Stop, has more to say about journeys and destinations. Using only a dozen letters, the ad’s headline announces Greyhound’s newest fleet of modern, air-conditioned motor coaches and says everything you need to know about getting out, seeing, smelling, and tasting America: “Cool’s the Word.” Indeed, it is.   Bus Stop, 304 West Court St., Dyersburg, TN 38024, (731)334-5205 bustopdyersburg.com 114 • M E M P H I S M A G A Z I N E . C O M • J U N E 2 0 1 7

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MEMPHIS TOP DOCTORS 2017 contin u ed from page 62 THOMAS B. SHELTON, MD

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PHOTOGRAPH BY LARRY KUZNIEWSKI

LOC A L TR E A SU R ES

A Life in Three Acts

At 95, Lester Gingold has found the secret to aging: Have a daily purpose in life.

An avid reader, Lester Gingold is always surrounded by the many newspapers and magazines that keep him up-to-date on national events.

by jane schneider

EDI TOR’S NO T E: “Local Treasures” is an occasional series within the pages of this magazine that will celebrate our city’s senior celebrities, people whose impact over the past decades have helped make Memphis a better place.

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he U.S. Administration on Aging, a government agency that advocates for older Americans, has proclaimed “Age Out Loud” as its motto for 2017, offering a way to reflect on how seniors are living lives with confidence and passion while serving as an inspiration to people of all ages. Lester Gingold certainly qualifies as just such an inspiration. This former advertising executive and marketing specialist, who turned 95 on January 1st, has long been a newsmaker in Memphis. If you recognize his name, it might be because for many years, he was the owner and publisher of The Best Times, a monthly newsmagazine tailored to senior living in Memphis for which he still writes. Born in Birmingham, Alabama, Gingold served in the U.S. Army during World War II as a combat engineer. In 1945, while stationed in Germany, he says he borrowed a Brownie camera and wound up snapping pictures of the fateful car crash that claimed the life of General George S. Patton in Mannheim. Those historic photos are now housed at the Patton Memorial Museum in California. J U N E 2 0 1 7 • M E M P H I S M A G A Z I N E . C O M • 117

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PHOTOGRAPH COURTESY LESTER GINGOLD

Once home, he signed on with Sears as an advertising director and moved to Memphis in the 1950s. During his 34-year career with the department store giant, he rose to become the region’s general merchandising manager. In his down time, Gingold took up motivational speaking, at times sharing the stage with speakers like Norman Vincent Peale, and enjoyed a rich civic life that included serving on numerous nonprofit boards and as president of Cotton Carnival and the Better Business Bureau.

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oday, though his mobility has become limited, his mind has not. Gingold’s bright blue eyes still widen with delight when topics arise that stir his passion. Surrounded in his East Memphis home by books and artwork and piles of newspapers (some conveniently tucked into the cushion of his reading chair for ready access), Gingold remains conversant on national and world events. “I’m probably the only person on my block who receives four newspapers: The New York Times, USA Today, The Wall Street Journal, and The Commercial Appeal,” he notes with a hint of pride. His wife Joyce, 92, remains his constant companion, frequently joining him on forays around the city. His deep interests are not all that surprising if you consider Lester Gingold worked in the publishing world for more than a quarter century — an industry he became involved in for the first time at age 60. After taking early retirement from Sears, he started his second career as a sales consultant for The Commercial Appeal. “I thought it sounded exciting,” he says with a smile. His role quickly morphed into advertising director of the local daily, and he

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PHOTOGRAPHS COURTESY LESTER GINGOLD

LOC A L TR E A SU R ES

President Harry Truman, clad in a bathrobe, was going out to his yard for the morning paper. There stood Gingold, hand outstretched. He introduced himself and asked the president (a former clothing store owner) for his advice on selling.

top left: Lester Gingold shakes hands with President Lyndon B. Johnson in 1967, when Gingold was director of the Cotton Carnival. Just to Lester’s left is Amelia Russell Shannon, also from Memphis. top right: Lester Gingold gets an autograph from Muhammad Ali. above: Lester Gingold appeared in Los Angeles with Roy Rogers for a March of Dimes fundraising campaign.

oversaw a sales staff there until he was in his early seventies. Did he consider retirement after that 15-year gig? Not a chance. Once he left the CA, he began his third act, partnering in his mid-70s with the Memphis Business Journal to purchase Active Times, a newspaper for seniors published by MIFA (Metropolitan Inter-Faith Association). Several years later, he acquired the publication outright, changing its name to The Best Times and publishing it monthly for another 15 years before selling to James K. Grubbs. As publisher emeritus, Gingold continues to write a regular column that keeps him abreast of the latest issues on aging.

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ention the word retirement and Gingold still scoffs. “The idea of retiring at age 65 is ridiculous,” he says. “I thought I was no less effective in what I was doing in my 60s, 70s, even into my 80s. It was only in my 90s that I deter-

mined I had to make a change in lifestyle.” And even then, the observer senses, he did it begrudgingly. He acknowledges that as we age, eyesight dims and hearing fades but the mind can still remain sharp for many. “We [as a society] need a greater consciousness to recognize that while older people may have physical limitations, they can still have a viable life.” Gingold quotes part of the Elder Creed written by Zalman Shalomi-Schacter: “An elder is a person who is still growing, still a learner, still with potential and whose life continues to have within it promise for, and connections to, the future.” By way of example, he points to his wife Joyce, who taught art at St. Mary’s Episcopal School for 40 years, but mounted her first major art exhibition at David Lusk Gallery at age 80. “She didn’t take her work seriously until 10 years ago,” he says. Their daughter Joy Bateman was lucky enough to inherit both of her parents’ tal-

ents; she is a highly acclaimed cookbook illustrator and author, as well as a long-serving, successful sales executive for Memphis magazine. (Yes, that’s this one.) But we all know age does rob us of some activities we hold dear. For Lester Gingold, it was having to give up driving. He found himself unprepared for the “psychological devastation” he experienced this past year in losing his mobility. But what he did next reflects his approach to life: He took the state to task in an opinion piece for The Commercial Appeal. At age 95, his Tennessee driver’s license would have been automatically renewed. Gingold could have legally remained behind the wheel of a car through age 103 — without so much as a driver’s test or eye exam. The state’s lack of restriction struck him as foolhardy. So he called for reviewing license requirements and creating more accessible and affordable transportation for seniors.

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PROMISE IS A PROMISE As we proceed through life, there are promises made, and promises kept. And a few steps in between.

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hose of us who have been around awhile know that it’s one thing to make a promise. It’s something else to keep it. In the end, the best we can hope for is that the people we’re dealing with will actually do what they say they’re going to do. At Retirement Companies of America, we’ve been making promises about the future for more than 30 years. Kirby Pines was our first senior living community in Memphis. It’s a non-profit community that has been voted the best senior living community in the mid-south for ten consecutive years. And now we’re growing with The Farms at Bailey Station in Collierville. It too will be a state-of-the-art, non-profit senior living community, offering the lifestyle, services, amenities, and LifeCare approach to health care that people in and around Memphis want and deserve.

So as you consider your retirement living options, and in whom you’d like to place your trust for the future, just remember we’ve been keeping our promises right here in Memphis for a long, long time.

To learn more about Kirby Pines, call (901) 369-7340. For the Farms at Bailey Station, call (901) 297-4918.

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ingold has always been an idea person, someone unafraid of being bold. Perhaps that trait runs in the family. He tells of meeting Franklin Delano Roosevelt, then the governor of New York, when his mother spotted the governor’s limousine while waiting for a ferry. Rushing up to the car, she rapped briskly on the window. FDR eventually peered out in time to be introduced to 7-year-old Lester. “I wanted my son to meet a future president,” his mother told Mr. Roosevelt proudly. Gingold summoned the same moxie to meet other notable figures during the course of his life, including seven presidents. While in Kansas City on a speaking engagement, he tells of driving to Independence, Missouri, in hopes of meeting former President Harry S. Truman. Never mind that it was six in the morning and that Truman, clad in a bathrobe, was going out to his front yard for the morning paper. There stood Gingold, hand outstretched. He quickly

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What’s an obvious reality people overlook about aging? The importance of caregiving. Sooner or later, you’ll become a caregiver or you will need a caregiver. Thirty years ago, Rosalyn Carter launched the Rosalyn Carter Institute for Caregiving which focuses on helping people manage this most important task. Perhaps this is also a step towards kindness, the desire to make life easier and gentler for someone else. When someone steps into a situation to provide a nicety for another, it can make them feel good, too.

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PHOTOGRAPH COURTESY LESTER GINGOLD

introduced himself and asked the President (a former clothing store owner) for his advice on selling. “Be sincere and be honest,” came the reply. “And I’d invite you in, but Margaret is still sleeping.” Although Gingold sold Best Times three years ago, he still writes a monthly column. He pulls out a two-page list of topic ideas he’s compiled that includes ageism, finances, and senior abuse. He’s also amassed 350 books on gerontology that he hopes to pass along to the next crusader hungry to help the public understand the challenges of aging.

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Is our nation properly planning for the wave of Baby Boomers now marching into retirement? The White House Conference on Aging, formed during Kennedy’s administration, existed “to focus on the issues facing Americans as they plan for retirement, care for older loved ones, and work to improve our quality of life as we age.” This three-day conference, which has taken place once a decade, brings together people from around the country to discuss issues facing the elderly and make policy recommendations to the President and Congress regarding life for aging Americans. I attended this conference 12 years ago. It was exciting and through that experience, I made important contacts with people I continued to call on as a publisher after our meeting. But last year, the White House decided they wouldn’t do a three-day event, shrinking it instead to one day. Delegates were asked to meet in their own cities and bring ideas to Washington. As far as I know, this never happened. Today, the website has a note across the top that reads, “This historical material is ‘frozen in time.’ The website is no longer updated and links to external websites and some internal pages may not work.” Currently, it is unclear what President Trump has in store for the conference and aging Americans. But one thing is certain: If we want to be ready for the longevity revolution, we must plan for it. Younger people think once the senior years arrive, you can’t make a difference. Your thoughts? Even at my age, an individual can still be active and do things that make life worth living. One only need look at people like former president Jimmy Carter to be reminded of the meaningful contributions retirees can make. But here’s a more local example. In my reading, I learned that Memphis has the fifth highest pedestrian death rate nationally. That means it’s dangerous for many of our residents to walk or bike on city streets. We must do more to make our streets safer. In my neighborhood, drivers routinely speed down my street, using it as a neighborhood cut-through. I wrote a letter to the mayor outlining my concerns and then formed a campaign. I needed 75 percent of neighbors

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family and friends and get out socially to community events. I often attend concerts at the Germantown Performing Arts Center, but on a recent visit, I was surprised to see fewer people there on walkers. At the last IRIS show I attended, I was the only senior using a walker and I was disturbed by that fact. It made me wonder, did those other people not attend because they didn’t have transportation? Or because they’d become too ill? It worries me because social contacts are so important to healthy living.

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One thing is certain: If we want to be ready for the longevity revolution, we must plan for it. PHOTOGRAPH COURTESY LESTER GINGOLD

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To keep his muscles limber, both Lester Gingold and his wife, Joyce, take spins on their exercise bike almost every day of the week.

to sign a petition saying they wanted speed bumps added to our street. I got 100 percent buy-in. We’re now on the city’s list to get this, which will force drivers to slow down. I know my neighbors will be excited because it will be safer for them to walk up and down our street.

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Are there any issues that pertain to senior living that get overlooked? Yes, I think we need to provide more end-oflife choices that would give individuals compassionate dignity in dying. Particularly when people have limited time left and are dealing with chronic pain. Palliative or terminal sedation is being used in some states. According to an article in The New York Times, “Doctors who perform it say it is based on carefully thought-out ethical principles in which the goal is never to end someone’s life, but only to make the patient more comfortable.” While there are accepted protocols for treating common illnesses like diabetes or asthma, it is not the case for managing the final days and hours of life. A handful of states — California, Colorado, the District of Columbia, Oregon, and Vermont — have Death with Dignity statutes, but these assist the terminally ill. Bills at our state house haven’t seen much movement but considering how to better manage end-of-life questions would be a progressive thing for the state of Tennessee to do.

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ASK VANCE

Tommy O’Brien Our trivia expert solves local questions of who, what, when, where, why, and why not. Well, sometimes.

by vance lauderdale DEAR VANCE: I remember going to the Memphis Zoo in the 1960s and being highly entertained by a family who presented a circus of trained animals. What happened to them? — r.y., memphis.

top right: Ringmaster Tommy O’Brien with his trained goats, Whitey and Brownie. below: Wife Marguerite and children Myra, David, and Manci all joined the show.

shelves of the Lauderdale Mansion are proof of my family’s talents at bowling, roller-skating, and oboe recitals, I have to admit we never gained fame for wild animal shows. Not since that incident with Uncle Lance and the anaconda. We don’t discuss these things. But the Tommy O’Brien family — for this is the act you mean, R.Y. — showed considerably more skill (and common sense) than the Lauderdales, and they entertained visitors to the Overton Park Zoo for decades with their well-trained monkeys, dogs, horses, ponies, elephants, camels, and even goats. O’Brien was born outside Forrest City, Arkansas, in 1906. As a young boy, he astonished friends and neighbors by lashing two horses together and riding them over hill and dale while standing upright on their backs, holding onto nothing but the reins. It was only a matter of time before he decided that the farming life didn’t hold much allure, so he did what every kid in those days dreamed: At the age of 14, he skipped school one day and ran off and joined the circus that was traveling through town. Among other acts, he was soon featured as “The World’s Youngest Roman Rider.” During the

winters, he would come to Memphis, where he worked as a meat cutter in the A&P market his father owned. But the sawdust and spotlights always beckoned, so he would regularly disappear, working whenever he could at various carnivals and circuses, and even appearing on the vaudeville circuit as a dancer and contortionist. The young man, it seems, could do just about anything. With his skill with horses, it was only natural that he gravitated to other four-legged critters, and soon developed a trained-animal performance, which allowed him to tour the country with the Dailey Brothers Circus, then Ringling Brothers, then Barnum & Bailey. The highlight of that act — and this must have been something to see — was O’Brien, starring in a Wild West show, riding a white Arabian stallion. His life seems like something out of a movie. He caught the eye of a lovely trapeze artist, and soon his new wife, Marguerite, became part of his show. In 1949, they had just signed a new contract with the circus that would have taken them across the United States and throughout Canada and Mexico, when they learned that Marguerite was expecting a child. So, just for the time being, they thought, they took a job with the Overton Park Zoo, presenting their trained-animal act once a day to Memphians. As more children came along, they also joined the family act, and within a few years, the Memphis Press-Scimitar told its readers about the Overton Park Zoo Circus, which featured all five O’Briens: Tommy served as ringmaster, and Marguerite rode the large animals, which by this time included horses, camels, and even elephants. Son David performed as a clown, oldest daughter Myra led the trained dogs through their paces, and younger daughters Manci and Anita

PHOTOGRAPHS COURTESY SPECIAL COLLECTIONS, UNIVERSIT Y OF MEMPHIS LIBRARIES

DEAR R.Y.: Although the trophies gathering dust on the

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“will dress up the whole show.” If you’re wondering, all always-popular Children’s Barnyard. “But I’ve worked with bears, and they are mean. Bears are so unpredictthe kids still attended school — the girls at Messick, the able that they will eat you in a minute and not think a son at Memphis State — when they weren’t performing. thing about it.” So where did O’Brien find all these talented creaAnother critter that people always think is “cute” is tures? Well, obviously the larger beasts — the elephants and camels — belonged to the zoo. But he acquired a monkey, but O’Brien knew better. “I’ve really been some of his top-performing dogs from an chewed up by monkeys,” he told the unlikely source: the local dog pound. In Press-Scimitar. “They are mean and they As a young boy, fact, Memphis Press-Scimitar “Strolling” colare intelligent. Maybe too intelligent. Tommy O’Brien umnist Eldon Roark told readers about Any monkey will bite you — especially the morning that O’Brien showed up at the chimpanzees.” astonished friends the pound to add a few new dogs to his Even so, most of his worst accidents and neighbors by menagerie. Four mutts — named Ring, came from falls while riding his trick lashing two horses Rusty, Rocky, and Tony — had been horses. “I was a little too sure of myself,” picked up by the dog-catcher and were he admitted. “I didn’t take the precautogether and riding probably doomed. But O’Brien “looked tions I should have.” them over hill and the four dogs over, studied them a few O’Brien and his wife separated, and his minutes, and spoke to them. Then he children grew up and went on to other dale while standing pointed and said, ‘I’ll take that one, and professions, out of the spotlight. Late in upright on their life, O’Brien worked as a zookeeper, but that one, and that one, and that one.’ And still lured by the world of performers, he that meant a brighter day for Ring, Rusty, backs, holding onto Rocky, and Tony.” nothing but the reins. sold tickets at the Mid-South Coliseum. O’Brien told Roark that he selected In 1977, he met with Press-Scimitar reportthese four dogs “because he liked their er William Thomas to share his boxes of photos and press clippings. looks and they seemed to be intelligent. So it went from gloom to glamor for them.” Although he enjoyed his days with the Overton Park In the mid-1950s, the Overton Park Zoo Circus even Zoo, “it was never like the circus,” he admitted. “Nothing is. Circus people say they don’t work for glory, but featured a pair of performing goats. Roark told his they do — they do it for the thrills and applause and readers, “This is the first time goats have been used, but Tommy is training them — Brownie and Whitey — to the glory of performing. We went through floods, fires, jump hurdles, walk across pipes, and ride and roll barand storms. We lost three tents in one year to tornadoes. rels.” Admitting that this may not seem like much to see, We were wet, cold, and hungry — but I never got tired he wrote, “There’s something funny about a billygoat, of it. In fact, I’d do every day of it again if I could.”  no matter what he does.” This is so true. Training wild animals took hours of patience — and Got a question for vance? caution. “I’ve worked with everything but big cats,” EMAIL: askvance@memphismagazine.com O’Brien told a newspaper reporter in 1976, when he MAIL: Vance Lauderdale, Memphis magazine, 460 Tennessee Street #200, Memphis, TN 38103 had retired his circus act at Overton Park and had taken over the Mid-South Fair petting zoo and the ONLINE: memphismagazine.com/ask-vance

below: The O’Briens put their dogs through their paces. Tommy found some of his best dogs from an unlikely source — the Memphis dog pound.

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Sketches c on t in u e d from page 1 0 8

Love a little die a little and break the law. Trey Milligan did all three in the summer before his 14th birthday.

From Sartoris Literary Group, the debut novel by Frank Murtaugh. Pre-order eBook ($8.95) now at Amazon.com. Paperback ($19.95) available June 15th.

picture window and Mabel kept the blinds open to watch the traffic. School had just dismissed for the day, so a steady flow of cars streamed down the street. How could Mabel go on television and tell the world she’d found an elephant in her own back yard, that she’d played with him and petted him in the moonlight? It was absurd; anyone could see that. Maybe if she could’ve called Virgie and they could’ve laughed together at how the story had changed as stories do, then she might’ve done it. Virgie might’ve helped her figure out what to say, how to explain how the elephant had gotten into their back yard and how they’d gotten him back to the circus. Virgie would’ve come up with a good story, one that was believable. She would’ve made it funny. It might not have mattered that the story wasn’t true if Mabel and Virgie could’ve laughed. It had been their story, together, in the beginning. Mabel watched school kids unloading from the bus a few houses down, and she saw Virgie, as a girl, running back to the circus for help, two braids f lying behind her. She saw Virgie’s face in Amelia’s sketch, staring at the elephant with wide eyes, her hand on his forehead as she knelt in front of him. She saw Virgie now, a shell of herself, in an unfamiliar hospital room. Mabel felt something shift inside of her. There was a Greyhound station downtown. Mabel didn’t drive anymore, hadn’t in years, but she started her car each week and let the motor run for a few minutes. She had never mentioned this to Becky. She would drive herself to the bus station in downtown Memphis and she would buy a ticket. It might be nice to ride across the country, to watch the land change. She would call her niece from the bus station in North Carolina. Or maybe she would take a cab from the bus station straight to the hospital. Mabel felt the beginnings of guilt as she thought about Amelia, but the girl would understand. Mabel thought she would. She hadn’t traveled much over the last few years, and Mabel couldn’t remember where her suitcase was stored, but she wouldn’t take time to look for it. She felt an urgency, now, that made her breath come more quickly. Mabel picked up her purse, walked outside, and started her car. Her hands trembled as she drove, but only slightly.

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Cancer care close to home

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Get Better. 5/12/17 10:21 AM


G A R D E N VA R I E T Y Dixon horticulturists Suzy Askew ((left) left and Kim Rucker enjoy the big fragrance of a Southern Peach rose.

A helpful guide to local flowers that smell as wonderful as they look.

by christine arpe gang

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flower first captures our curiosity with its beauty — a visual symphony of color, texture, shape, and indescribable uniqueness. But magic truly happens when we inhale deeply to find our heads filled with a scent sweet enough to elicit swoons.

Alas, that magic is never a sure thing. Too many flowers are like pretty girls who lack the deep inner beauty that turns infatuation into love. This may come as a surprise, but most f lowers are naturally devoid of desirable fragrance. Others, like many modern roses, have lost their fragrance through modern hybridization practices that aim for disease resistance, abundant petals, and long stems over scent. Because the gene for fragrance is recessive, both plant parents must carry it to produce a sweet-smelling “child,” but even then, it can be elusive. Nevertheless, you can bet on a wide selection of reliably fragrant, easy-to-grow plants that thrive in the Mid-South. Because flowers release their scents most intensely on hot and humid evenings, our climate is ideally suited to fragrant gardens. Perhaps we should all use our noses as well as our eyes to sniff out new plants. This year horticulturists at The Dixon Gallery and Gardens added lots of aromatic plants including two dozen rose varieties in conjunction with the current gallery exhibit, “Scent and Symbolism: Perfumed Objects and Images,“ on display through July 2nd. The list includes several heirloom rose varieties such as Cecile Brunner, Duchesse de Brabant, and Madame Alfred Carriere. One expects these oldies to bring their perfume to the garden, but numerous new hybrids are included too, such as Belinda’s Dream, a medium-size disease-resistant shrub rose with “very double” pink blooms introduced in 1992, and several charming “cabbage” style roses from English hybridizer David Austin. You’ll find these, and more, in the central bed of the cutting garden at the Dixon, which is now also adorned with an iron gazebo shaped like a perfume bottle, a nod to the importance of roses in perfume-making as well as the gallery exhibit.

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n my mind, you can’t have a fragrance garden without lavender’s clean fresh scent wafting through the air. The Mediterranean plant can be a challenge to grow because it needs super-well-drained sandy soil and will rot in our soggy clay. If you plant it in a garden bed, place limestone pebbles around the base of the plant instead of bark mulches that hold too much fungi-inducing water at the vulnerable center of the plant. Lavender also does well in containers filled with a light mix of soil and sand topped with limestone pebbles. Those pebbles reflect light and heat into the center of plant, warding off the development of fungal diseases. As with any container-grown plant, be sure to provide adequate water during long, hot dry spells. The best lavender varieties for us seem to be Grosso, which is also used in perfumery, or Phenomenal, a new variety that is resistant to diseases, tolerant of extreme heat and humidity, and hardy through the winter. With an indescribable fresh, clean scent, lavender’s essence seems almost virginal — the Edgeworthia’s yellow flowers are doubly delightful because they are sweet-scented and they bloom as early as February.

complete opposite of the tuberose, an intensely fragrant powerhouse that has been described as sexy, narcotic, carnal, and the “harlot of perfumery.” It earned that description because Victorians feared young girls might have spontaneous orgasms if they inhaled it. About 20 percent of modern-day perfumes contain the costly essential oil of tuberoses. Tuberoses, which grow from bulbs, produce white waxy flowers on long stems in mid to late summer. For our climate, the variety

with single flowers is more reliable than Pearl, which has more striking double flowers. Plant them about two inches deep in May for flowers in August. To lengthen the bloom time. plant half in May and the other half in late June. The perfume released from just one or two cut stems in a vase will linger indoors for several days. Tuberoses, which are native to Mexico, usually don’t make it through our winters so many gardeners dig, lift, and store the bulbs in mesh bags for the winter.

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emphians can have fragrance in their garden for all seasons with these plants recommend by Suzy Askew, gardens education and volunteer coordinator at the Dixon: ◗ Trees with scented flowers include magnolias like the gigantic Southern magnolia and its smaller cousins Little Gem, Teddy Bear, and Baby Grand; sweet bay magnolias that produce lemBecause it is fragrant, Ayesha is a rarity among mophead hydrangeas.

on-kissed flowers on small to medium-sized trees; and the American yellowwood, whose pendulous fragrant flowers resemble white wisteria. ◗ Numerous shrubs bear scented flowers, including the winter bloomers such as witchhazel and edgeworthia, a shrub with fragrant yellow and white flowers that light up the winter woodland garden at the Dixon. ◗ Camellias, which will bloom from late fall to early spring depending on the variety, have by and large lost their fragrance through hybridization. But it has been restored in some new cultivars like the pink Scentsation.

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ecause the heady fragrance of gardenias evokes memories of young love for the not-so-young of us, we may linger outdoors to savor it even on the sultriest Southern nights when its scent is most intense. My two August Beauty gardenia bushes were given to me a dozen or so years ago by Dorothy Anderson, an indefatigable 89-year-old who still digs and installs plants in her Southaven garden. Anderson likes to pamper her gardenias with annual applications of fertilizer, judicious pruning, and spraying of the whiteflies that suck the green out of their leaves. Mine, which have been surviving mostly on

PHOTOGRAPHS BY CHRISTINE ARPE GANG

Making Scents

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as.

Happily Ever After Begins at Acre

their own, produce plenty of flowers, typically in May and then again in August, but I think I’ll give them a little boost with fertilizer this year. Fragrance evokes memories and that’s why my moth-

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Molineux, a yellow rose in the cutting garden at The Dixon Gallery and Gardens, releases its fragrance most intensely in the evening.

er-in-law always gets a small nosegay of the first gardenias that bloom in my garden. One sniff and she’s transported back to her youth and the corsages her dates presented to her. We don’t expect fragrance in tulips, but Ballerina, a late-season bloomer with bright tangerine lily-like flowers, is one a few dozen varieties that defy the norm. Daffodils are more likely to be scented and I would say some, such as paperwhite narcissi, are downright stinky but others actually enjoy it. Popular fragrant daffodils include some you may already be growing, like Tahiti, Carlton, Ice Follies, Thalia, and Baby Moon. Sniffing hydrangeas is generally not productive either but the summer blooming panicle varieties like Limelight and Little Lime have a sweet fragrance. Not so with oak leaf types or the vast majority of blue or pink mopheads and lacecaps. Ayesha, my favorite mophead, not only delights gardeners with its distinctively cupped waxy florets, and I’ve read it also smells good. I confess I never noticed, but when it blooms this summer I’ll definitely give it a sniff. I’ve been growing culinary herbs since the mid-1980s but only recently learned exactly how important their scent is to flavor, and you can, too. Try this. Snip a leaf of lemon balm, mint, basil, or other tasty herb. Pinch your nostrils closed and chew on the herb. You will not detect its flavor at all. As soon as you remove your fingers, though, the taste explodes in your mouth. Aroma, it’s been said, is 90 percent of perceived f lavor. No wonder food is tasteless when our noses are stuffed from a cold. So sometime soon, find a good smelling plant, cup a flower in your hand or gently crush a fragrant leaf. Inhale and exhale deeply until the scent is stored in your memory.  

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Memphis Magazine’s

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Christine Arpe Gang has been writing about gardening in Memphis for more than 30 years, primarily for the commercial appeal. She seeks out the best plants and growing techniques to share with her readers and use in her own garden. J U N E 2 0 1 7 • M E M P H I S M A G A Z I N E . C O M • 131

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Go Green DINING OUT

A trio of casual restaurants in Midtown and East Memphis puts a healthy and flavorful spin on fast food.

by lesley young and pamela denney | photographs by justin fox burks

Mama Gaia

Updated vegetarian food in the heart of Crosstown Concourse. he rain fell hard and fast and just as effortlessly dismissed itself like a man tipping his hat when my friend Clare and I pulled in to park at one of Memphis’ grand success stories of late — Crosstown Concourse in Midtown. Therefore, we had the good fortune of sitting outside on the cityblock-long deck of the former Sears Crosstown building to try out the menu at Mama Gaia, an eatery that opened in late March.

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Mama Gaia’s unique breakfast menu includes tofu-and-veggie stuffed pitas, along with smoothies and vegan parfaits. Owners Cru and Philipp von Holtzendorff-Fehling

I don’t know if the breeze made the food taste more scrumptious or if it would have been just as perfect sitting at the large community table inside. Either way, Mama Gaia means “Mother Earth” in Greek, and the menu at this eatery is 100 percent vegetarian and 100 percent organic — the only one in Memphis that can stake such a claim. The owners, Cru and Philipp von Holtzendorff-Fehling, a German couple who moved to Memphis five years ago after living in Seattle and Europe, start with a base menu such as the Diva — some antipasti of zucchini, eggplant, and bell peppers; the Gaia — made with falafel, feta, and tzatziki sauce; or the Cena — a mushroom-based dish. Customers go from there, ordering the dishes as a pita, a pizza, a quinoa bowl, or a salad with varying herbs and other ingredients. I dove into the Diva Salad, a bowl of all my favorite things served on arugula (which I could eat every day), mozzarella, Parmesan, and basil and topped with balsamic vinaigrette. Clare ordered the Copia Bowl — quinoa served with oven-roasted zucchini, eggplant, bell peppers, onion, and leek and topped with olive-basil sauce, Parmesan, and basil. She gave up a fork or two for me to try, and I would have been just

as happy with her order. Philipp, of course, knows the menu by heart and eats an Asia Pita pretty much every day, and I can see why. It comes with sesame-crusted tofu, Asian slaw, Mama Gaia Sauce, and cilantro. I didn’t ask for a bite as I’ve only known him for a short time, but put money on the fact that the Asia Pita will be my next dish to try. Philipp and Cru opened Mama Gaia with the intention of offering healthy food that

Cheese, tomato sauce, antipasti, eggplant, zucchini, and bell peppers top the Diva Petitzza. MAMA GAIA 1350 Concourse Ave., Suite 137, (901) 203-3838 OPEN: Monday-Friday, 7 a.m. to 7

Customers place orders at the window and choose a seat, either inside or out. tastes good and is served quickly. After Cru was diagnosed with Lyme disease, she became vegan and ate only organic, non-GMO foods. Eventually, the couple decided to create a healthy restaurant themselves without compromising taste, and Cru was the one to do it. She worked for a Michelin fivestar chef in Germany. “I look for each ingredient to be part of a composition and for each to be just what it is,” she says. — Lesley Young

p.m. and Saturday-Sunday, 10:30 a.m. to 7 p.m. ATMOSPHERE: Clean, modern, and casual. EXTRAS: Outdoor seating on a repurposed loading dock, sound-muffling rooms for meetings or a quiet meal, and weekday breakfast offering cinnamon oatmeal, berry parfaits, and a hearty morning pita. PRICES: Entrees ($7.50-$12); sides and soup ($3.50-$7); kids’ menu ($4-$5); desserts ($3-$4). THREE TO TRY: Asia pita (I can’t wait to eat this); hand-cut baked fries (no dish is ever fried at Mama Gaia); organic agave soda (look for the organic soda machine loaded with drinks).

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House-made sauces brighten up veggie-centric bowls featuring add-ons like herbed chicken, poké beets, or sushi-grade tuna.

Zaka Bowl

A scoop of this and a scoop of that to feed and fuel every day. or me, eating dinner from a 32-ounce Zaka Bowl is a lot like eating Oreo cookies. In other words, technique matters. As with a bite of chocolate cookie, separated from its vanilla cream, I start with the bowl’s singular ingredients: a mini falafel cake; a spicy roasted chickpea; a forkful of black bean salad.

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Zaka’s baked falafels, made with chickpeas, parsley, and macadamia nuts, top jasmine brown rice and agave Brussels sprouts.

The beet poke bowl is served over sushi rice with edamame, pickled red onion, avocado, and pineapple pico

Next, I dig down to its hearty core — garlic and olive oil quinoa or maybe a mound of sushi rice — until I mix it all together with a squirt or two of sweet curry sauce. Almost magically, the flavors transform, like an Oreo when it finally gets dunked into a glass of cold milk. A new concept for Memphis, veggie-centric meals-in-abowl are hugely popular in other cities, and for good reason. Zaka — a Sanskrit word for vegetable and a Hebrew name meaning pure — sums up the restaurant’s mantra: Serve healthy food with chef-driven flavors that are bright and satisfying. Here’s how the concept works. Decide on a salad bowl, a Zaka bowl, or a poké bowl. (Poké is a Hawaiian version of tuna tartare.) Select a premade bowl from a menu or build your own with a base of grains, chopped spinach, or zucchini noodles; warm and cold vegetables like agave Brussels sprouts or apple jicama slaw; and premium add-ons such as herbed chicken or roasted tofu. Bowl ingredients are freshly prepared and ready to scoop up to order by a knowledgeable staff that can help mix and match. Open since October, Zaka Bowl is the second restaurant for Ed and Brittany Cabigao, the duo behind South of Beale, downtown’s popular gastropub

South of Beale. The two restaurants — one full-service with a bar, the other quickserve with house-blended juices — couldn’t be any more different, a turn prompted by Ed’s lifestyle changes. “I went vegetarian for health and ethical reasons, and in a year-and-a-half, went from 220 pounds to 160,” he says. “I became passionate about this kind of eating.” Passionate, for Cabigao, however, doesn’t mean Owner Ed Cabigao

Friendly staffers at Zaka Bowl are happy to suggest bowl combinations. ZAKA BOWL 575 Erin Drive, (901) 509-3105 HOURS: Monday-Sunday, 11 a.m.

to 9 p.m. ATMOSPHERE: Take out or

preachy. Salt and pepper shakers line up on the condiment counter next to handy squirt bottles filled with housemade sauces like Sriracha BBQ and avocado vinaigrette. The restaurant also has a friendly and unpretentious vibe, along with friendly and informed servers. “Some of our customers have never tasted a beet or don’t know what quinoa is,” Cabigao says. “We are happy to explain.” — Pamela Denney

dine in. Either way, be sure to appreciate Zaka’s 3-D garden patch graphics and purple and aqua color scheme designed by Memphis-based Loaded for Bear. EXTRAS: Don’t mention the V-word to meat-loving friends, but except for the chicken and tuna, Zaka Bowl is vegan and gluten-free. PRICES: Salad bowls ($8); Zaka and poké bowls (start at $9); premium add-ons ($2-$4); freshly made juices ($7 a glass/ $18 a gallon). THREE TO TRY: Herbed chicken in an Italian-inspired marinade adds heft to any bowl; poké turns sushi-grade tuna into an island vacation; a pint of Zaka sauce to-go cranks up the flavor for bowls made at home.

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City Silo Table and Pantry

Reimagined comfort food with wholesome and creative ingredients. ffering healthful options that keep your taste buds happy is nothing new to Scott Tashie, the virtuoso behind Cosmic Coconut and the I Love Juice Bar. What he has done now with City Silo Table and Pantry in the old Cosmic Coconut space is expand this idea. “My goal with City Silo was to create a whole menu and a place that is all-inclusive and creative,” Tashie says. “It is comfort food that is good-tasting, filling, and enjoyable.”

O The Green Micro Machine Salad, the Silo Burger, and the Foxy BBQ, make for healthy vegetarian dishes for dinner or lunch. City Silo Owner Scott Tashie (right) with head Chef Will Byrd

For Tashie, eating clean and healthy has been a fire in his belly for a number of years now. The former pro golfer, who tore his ACL twice, even nurtured a burgeoning wheatgrass operation in his brother’s back yard for a while. When he noticed a lack of nutritional options in Memphis — something that is transforming before our very eyes — he decided to put his money where his mouth is. Tashie had long planned on expanding his smoothie and juice spot on Sanderlin, and the space next to Cosmic Coconut became available last year, as did some partnerships from his I Love Juice Bar operation on Cooper in Midtown. “I thought if you’re going to do it, now’s the time,” he says. Now customers can buildtheir-own veggie burgers at City Silo with options such as the Beet Walnut Burger, a Marinated Portabella Burger, or the top-selling Silo Burger, as well as a menu of breads and cheeses — traditional and gluten-free and vegan. The menu also offers Smoothie Bowls, or bowls of fruits mixed with superfoods, excellent salads (I am a salad connoisseur), and Hearty Bowls — more root-based dishes with heavier sauces executed in such a way that the flavor of each ingredient shines independently while dancing lithely with the other players.

I keep going back for the smoothies, though, and I let the chef, Will Byrd, know that he now has an addict on his hands. The restaurant also offers Wellness Lattes, which are coconut cream/almond cream drinks with turmeric or Siberian chaga mushrooms as the lead mixed with cacao, carob, pink salt, cinnamon, vanilla — you CITY SILO TABLE AND PANTRY 5101 Sanderlin Center, (901-729-7687) HOURS: Monday-Thursday, 7 a.m.

A “Becky with the Good Hair” wellness latte. get the idea. Hint: Order an extra-large. With City Silo Table and Pantry, Tashie has added more options to his menu, including chicken and egg as add-ons, wine and beer (and Benefizz kefir drink on tap), and a pantry, a small market for patrons to take healthy options home with them. “A lot of the items I stock are not easily found here,” Tashie says. “I hope to evolve and get more and more in.” — Lesley Young

to 8 p.m. and Friday-Saturday, 7 a.m. to 9 p.m. ATMOSPHERE: Rustic contemporary with greenery and wood accents. EXTRAS: A market offers unique grocery items like local microgreens, exotic chocolates, and gluten-free goods to-go. PRICES: Smoothies ($8.50-$12); small plates and salads ($7-$11); Build-Your-Own Veggie Burger ($9 with cheese and toppings for $1 each); sandwiches ($7-$9); Hearty Bowls ($9). THREE TO TRY: Foxy BBQ, named after Memphis food photographer and local cookbook author Justin Fox Burks, tosses roasted spaghetti squash with barbecue sauce; Chocolate Almond Daze smoothie tastes like a milkshake but treats you like a rock star; Becky with the Good Hair Wellness Latte is a pick-me-up without the milk or the coffee.

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PHOTOGRAPHS BY JUSTIN FOX BURKS

CITY DINING OUR IN-DEPTH GUIDE TO MEMPHIS-AREA RESTAURANTS clockwise from bottom right: Chef Jimmy Sinh, who started the Sushi Jimmi food truck two years ago, now operates a restaurant in the former Wendy’s location on Poplar serving such dishes as the Jimmy Sinh roll and kimchi fries.

TIDBITS

Sushi Jimmi

by pamela denney

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ike most memorable cuisines, Jimmy Sinh’s fusion cooking grew out of necessity, time, and place. His mother Mui Thong cooked for a family of eight, and Sinh worked alongside. As a youngster in Los Angeles, he also absorbed cooking cultures from his own Chinese and Vietnamese heritage and from the city’s sprawling ethnic communities. “We grew up really poor, so we used whatever we had, and everything we ate was fusion,” Sinh recalls. “If I asked my mom, what dish is this, she would say, I don’t know. It’s free-style.” In the mid-1990s, Sinh’s family moved to Memphis for better paying warehouse jobs. Sinh worked, too, at Benihana, Nagasaki, and Kublai Khan in Southaven. By the time he was 19, he was making sushi at Wasabi, where he

built a loyal following with fusion-style sushi like the Jimmy Sinh roll, a warm and wonderful combination of spicy crawfish, baked scallops, and avocado topped with crabstick, green onion, and tobiko, the bright red roe from flying fish. Two years ago, Sinh struck out on his own. He launched Sushi Jimmi from a trailer at the Mid-South Food Truck Fest with help from his brother, David Sinh, who now manages the new restaurant, located on Poplar just west of the main library. Sinh remembers the prep and fervor well (38 hours with no sleep) and how they showed up with packed coolers, but no set menu. “I made up the menu in like five minutes,” he says. Newcomers to Jimmi’s sushi party should come hungry and start with kimchi fries, a

We celebrate our city’s community table and the people who grow, cook, and eat the best Memphis food at

signature dish topped with a sunny-side-up egg. Break the yolk and let the flavor mingle with its international friends: seasoned fries and crumbled ground beef (American), spicy mayo (Japanese), Sriracha sauce (Thai), and kimchi (Korean). Similar global riffs inspire the menu’s sushi burritos — oversized and imminently satisfying — and the recently introduced Seoul Dog, a jumbo hot dog topped with kimchi, spicy mayo, and pico de gallo. “Chicago has the Chicago Dog. Now Memphis has its own dog, too,” Sinh says. “And when you pronounce the name, it refers to both Seoul, Korea, and to Memphis soul food.” 2895 Poplar Ave. (901-729-6985) $-$$. Follow @SushiJimmi for food truck locations and look for David Sinh’s new truck, D’s Banh Mi, featuring fusion Vietnamese subs.

MEMPHISMAGAZINE.COM/FOOD-DINING

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M

CIT Y DINING LIST

emphis magazine offers this restaurant listing as a service to its readers. The directory is not intended as a recommendation of the establishments included, nor does it list every restaurant in town. It does, however, include most of the city’s finer restaurants, many specialty restaurants, and a representative sampling of other Bluff City eating establishments. No fast-food facilities or cafeterias are listed, nor have we included establishments that rely heavily on take-out business. Restaurants are included regardless of whether they advertise in Memphis magazine. The guide is updated regularly, but we recommend that you call ahead to check on hours, prices, and other details. Suggestions from readers are welcome; please contact us. Email dining@memphismagazine.com. 148 NORTH—French cuisine meets Southern comfort food here

with menu items such as chicken and waffles, duck confit, and JKE’s Knuckle Sandwich, made with lobster knuckle and puff pastry. 148 N. Main (Collierville). 569-0761. L, D, WB, X, $-$$ 901 GRILLE & MARKET—Neighborhood market and eatery serves burgers, gyros, falafel pitas, hot wings, and more. 711 E. Parkway S. 512-6171. B, L, D, $ ABUELO’S MEXICAN FOOD EMBASSY—Mejores de la casa — beef and stuffed shrimp — is a specialty here, along with tilapia Veracruz, quesadillas, chili rellenos, and chicken medallions. 8274 Highway 64 (Bartlett). 672-0769. L, D, X, $-$$ ABYSSINIA RESTAURANT—Ethiopian/Mediterranean menu includes beef, chicken, lamb, fish entrees, and vegetarian dishes; also a lunch buffet. 2600 Poplar. 321-0082. L, D, X, $-$$ ACRE—Features seasonal modern American cuisine in a stylish setting using locally sourced products; also small-plates/bar. Closed for lunch Sat. and all day Sun. 690 S. Perkins. 818-2273. L, D, X, $$-$$$ AGAVE MARIA—Menu items at this Mexican eatery include short rib stuffed poblanos, shrimp and crab enchiladas, and grilled lamb chops. 83 Union. 341-2096. L, D, X, $-$$ AGAVOS COCINA & TEQUILA—Camaron de Tequila, tamales, kabobs, and burgers made with a blend of beef and chorizo are among the offerings at this tequila-centric restaurant and bar. 2924 Walnut Grove. 433-9345. L, D, X, $-$$ ALCHEMY—Southern fusion, locally grown cuisine features small and large plates; among the offerings are pan-seared hanger steak, quail, and lamb chops; also handcrafted cocktails and local craft beers. 940 S. Cooper. 726-4444. D, SB, X, $-$$ ALDO’S PIZZA PIES—Serving gourmet pizzas — including Mr. T Rex — salads, and more. Also 30 beers, bottled or on tap. 100 S. Main. 577-7743; 752 S. Cooper. 725-7437. L, D, X, $-$$ AMERIGO—Traditional and contemporary Italian cuisine includes pasta, wood-fired pizza, steaks, and cedarwood-roasted fish. 1239 Ridgeway, Park Place Mall. 761-4000. L, D, SB, X, MRA, $-$$$ ANDREW MICHAEL ITALIAN KITCHEN—Traditional Italian cuisine with a menu that changes seasonally with such entrees as Maw Maw’s ravioli. Closed Sun.-Mon. 712 W. Brookhaven Cl. 347-3569. D, X, MRA, $$-$$$ ANOTHER BROKEN EGG CAFE—Offering several varieties of eggs benedict, waffles, omelets, pancakes, beignets, and other breakfast fare; also burgers,sandwiches, and salads. 6063 Park Ave. 729-7020; 65 S. Highland. 623-7122. B, L, WB, X, $ THE ARCADE—Possibly Memphis’ oldest cafe. Specialties include sweet potato pancakes, a fried peanut butter and banana sandwich, and breakfast served all day. 540 S. Main. 526-5757. B, L, D (Thurs.Sat.), X, MRA, $ ASIAN PALACE—Chinese eatery serves seafood, vegetarian items, dim sum, and more. 5266 Summer Ave. 766-0831. L, D, X, $-$$ A-TAN—Serves Chinese and Japanese hibachi cuisine, complete with sushi bar. A specialty is Four Treasures with garlic sauce. 3445 Poplar, Suite 17, University Center. 452-4477. L, D, X, $-$$$ AUTOMATIC SLIM’S—Longtime downtown favorite specializes in contemporary American cuisine emphasizing local ingredients; also extensive martini list. 83 S. Second. 525-7948. L, D, WB, X, MRA, $-$$$ BABALU TACOS & TAPAS—This Overton Square eatery dishes up Spanish-style tapas with Southern flair; also taco and enchilada of the day; specials change daily. 2115 Madison. 274-0100; 6450 Poplar, 410-8909. L, D, SB, X, $-$$ BAHAMA BREEZE—Baby back ribs, Jamaican chicken wings, and coconut shrimp are among the entrees at this Caribbean-fusion restaurant. 2830 N. Germantown Pkwy. (Cordova). 385-8744. L, D, X, MRA, $-$$ BANGKOK ALLEY—Thai fusion cuisine includes noodle and curry dishes, chef-specialty sushi rolls, coconut soup, and duck and seafood entrees. Closed for lunch Sat. and all day Sun. at Brookhaven location; call for hours. 121 Union Ave. 522-2010; 2150 W. Poplar at Houston Levee (Collierville). 854-8748; 715 W. Brookhaven Cl. 590-2585. L, D, X, MRA, $-$$ BAR DKDC—Features an ever-changing menu of international “street food,” from Thai to Mexican, Israeli to Indian, along with specialty cocktails. 964 S. Cooper. 272-0830. D, X, $

BONNE TERRE—This inn’s cafe features American cuisine with a

Southern flair, and a seasonal menu that changes monthly. Offers Angus steaks, duck, pasta, and seafood. Closed Sun.-Wed. 4715 Church Rd. W. (Nesbit, MS). 662-781-5100. D, X, $-$$$ BOSCOS—Tennessee’s first craft brewery serves a variety of freshly brewed beers as well as wood-fired oven pizzas, pasta, seafood, steaks, and sandwiches. 2120 Madison. 432-2222. L, D, SB (with live jazz), X, MRA, $-$$ BOUNTY ON BROAD—Offering family-style dining, Bounty serves small plates and family-sized platters, with such specialties as chicken fried quail and braised pork shank. 2519 Broad. 410-8131. L (Sat. and Sun.), D (Mon.-Sat.), SB, X, $-$$$ BOZO’S HOT PIT BAR-B-Q—Barbecue, burgers, sandwiches, and subs. 342 Hwy 70, Mason, TN. 901-294-3400. L, D, $-$$ BRASS DOOR IRISH PUB—Irish and New-American cuisine BAR LOUIE—Serves small plates, flatbreads, sandwiches, burgers, includes such entrees as fish and chips burgers, sandwiches, salads, and salads, and such large plate entrees as blackened fish tacos and baked daily specials. 152 Madison. 572-1813. L, D, SB, MRA, $ mac-and-cheese. 2125 Madison. 207-1436. L, D, WB, X, $-$$ BROADWAY PIZZA—Serving a variety of pizzas,including the BAR-B-Q SHOP—Dishes up barbecued ribs, spaghetti, bologna; Broadway Special, as well as sandwiches, salads, wings, and “soul-food also pulled pork shoulder, Texas toast barbecue sandwich, chicken specials.” 2581 Broad. 454-7930; 627 S. Mendenhall. 207-1546. L, sandwich, and salads. Closed Sun. 1782 Madison. 272-1277. L, D, X, D, X, $-$$ MRA, $-$$ BROOKLYN BRIDGE ITALIAN RESTAURANT— BARDOG TAVERN—Classic American grill with Italian influence, Specializing in such homemade entrees as spinach lasagna and lobster Bardog offers pasta specialties such as Grandma’s NJ Meatballs, as well as ravioli; a seafood specialty is horseradish-crusted salmon. Closed salads, sliders, sandwiches, and daily specials. 73 Monroe. 275-8752. B Sun. 1779 Kirby Pkwy. 755-7413. D, X, MRA, $-$$$ (Mon.-Fri.), L, D, WB, X, $-$$ BROOKS PHARM2FORK—Serving fresh vegetables and meats BARI RISTORANTE ENOTECA—Authentic Southeastern responsibly grown by area farmers. Entrees include Marmilu Farms Pork Italian cuisine (Puglia) emphasizes lighter entrees. Serves fresh fish and Triangle Steak, Old School Salmon Patties, and beef dishes and a homemade soup of the Pan Seared Lake’s Catfish. 120 Mulberry. day. 22 S. Cooper. 722-2244. D, SB, X, DINING SYMBOLS (Collierville). 853-7511. D, X, $-$$ MRA, $-$$$ BROTHER JUNIPER’S—Breakfast is the BARKSDALE RESTAURANT— B — breakfast focus here, with specialty omelets, including Old-school diner serving breakfast and L — lunch the open-faced San Diegan omelet; also daily Southern plate lunches. 237 Cooper. D — dinner specials, and homemade breads and pastries. 722-2193. B, L, D, X, MRA, $ Closed Mon. 3519 Walker. 324-0144. B, X, SB — Sunday brunch BAYOU BAR & GRILL—New MRA, $ Orleans fare at this Overton Square eatery WB — weekend brunch BRYANT’S BREAKFAST—Three-egg includes jambalaya, gumbo, catfish X — wheelchair accessible omelets, pancakes, and The Sampler Platter are Acadian, shrimp dishes, red beans and MRA — member, Memphis among the popular entrees here. Closed Mon. rice, and muffalettas. 2094 Madison. and Tues. 3965 Summer. 324-7494. B, L, X, Restaurant Association 278-8626. L, D, WB, X, MRA, $-$$ $ BEAUTY SHOP—Modern American $ — under $15 per person without BUCKLEY’S FINE FILET GRILL— cuisine with international flair served in a drinks or desserts Specializes in steaks, seafood, and pasta. former beauty shop. Serves steaks salads, $$ — under $25 (Lunchbox serves entree salads, burgers, and pasta, and seafood, including pecan$$$ — $26-$50 more.) 5355 Poplar. 683-4538; 919 S. Yates crusted golden sea bass. Closed for dinner (Buckley’s Lunchbox), 682-0570. L (Yates Sunday. 966 S. Cooper. 272-7111. L, D, $$$$ — over $50 only, M-F), D, X, MRA, $-$$ SB, X, $-$$$ SHADED — new listing BUNTYN CORNER CAFE—Serving BEDROCK EATS & SWEETS— favorites from Buntyn Restaurant, including Memphis’ only Paleo-centric restaurant chicken and dressing, cobbler, and yeast rolls. 5050 Poplar, Suite 107. offering such dishes as pot roast, waffles, enchiladas, chicken salad, 424-3286. B, L, X, $ omelets, and more. Closed for dinner Sun. 327 S. Main. 409-6433. B, THE BUTCHER SHOP—Serves steaks ranging from 8-oz. fillets L, D, X, $-$$ to a 20-oz. porterhouse; also chicken, pork chops, fresh seafood. 107 BELLE: A SOUTHERN BISTRO—Brisket in a bourbon brown S. Germantown Rd. (Cordova). 757-4244. L (Fri. and Sun.), D, X, sugar glaze, and chicken with basmati rice are among the specialties; MRA, $$-$$$ also seafood entrees and such vegetables as blackened green tomatoes. CAFE 1912—French/American bistro serving such seafood entrees as Closed for dinner Sun. and all day Mon. 117 Union Ave. 433-9851. L grouper and steamed mussels: also crepes, salads, and French onion soup. (Sat. and Sun.), D, WB, X, $-$$$ 243 S. Cooper. 722-2700. D, SB, X, MRA, $-$$ BENIHANA—This Japanese steakhouse serves beef, chicken, and CAFE 7/24—Specialties at this Southern eatery include Mr. Charles’s seafood grilled at the table; some menu items change monthly; sushi bar Fried Catfish and slow smoked barbecue ribs. Closed Sun. 94 S. Front. also featured. 912 Ridge Lake. 767-8980. L, D, X, $$-$$$ 590-3360. L, D, X, $ BHAN THAI—Authentic Thai cuisine includes curries, pad Thai CAFE BROOKS BY PARADOX—Serving grab-and-go pastries, noodles, and vegetarian dishes, as well as seafood, pork, and duck as well as lunch items. Menu includes soups, salads, and sandwiches, such entrees. Closed for lunch Sat.-Sun. and all day Mon. 1324 Peabody. as the Modern Reuben and Grown Up Grilled Cheese. 1934 Poplar 272-1538. L, D, X, MRA, $-$$ (Memphis Brooks Museum of Art). 544-6200. B, L, X, $ BLEU—This eclectic restaurant features American food with global CAFE ECLECTIC—Omelets and chicken and waffles are among influences and local ingredients. Among the specialties are a 14-oz. menu items, along with quesadillas, sandwiches, wraps, and burgers. bone-in rib-eye and several seafood dishes. 221 S. Third, in the Menu varies by location. 603 N. McLean. 725-1718; 111 Harbor Town Westin Memphis Beale St. Hotel. 334-5950. B, L, D, WB, X, $$-$$$ Square. 590-4645; 510 S. Highland. 410-0765. B, L, D, SB, X, BLUE NILE ETHIOPIAN—Kabobs, flavorful chicken and lamb MRA, $ stew, and injera (flatbread) are traditional items on the menu, along CAFE KEOUGH—European-style cafe serving quiche, paninis, with vegetarian options. 1788 Madison. 474-7214. L, D, X, $-$$ salads, and more. 12 S. Main. 509-2469. B, L, D, X, $ BLUEFIN RESTAURANT & SUSHI LOUNGE—Serves CAFE OLE—This eatery specializes in authentic Mexican cuisine; one Japanese fusion cuisine featuring seafood and steak, with seasonally specialty is the build-your-own quesadilla. 959 S. Cooper. 343-0103. changing menu; also, a sushi bar and flatbread pizza. 135 S. Main. L, D, SB, X, MRA, $-$$ 528-1010. L, D, X, MRA, $-$$ CAFE PALLADIO—Serves gourmet salads, soups, sandwiches, THE BLUFF—New Orleans-inspired menu includes alligator bites, and desserts in a tea room inside the antiques shop. Closed Sun. 2169 nachos topped with crawfish and andouille, gumbo, po’boys, and fried Central. 278-0129. L, X, $ seafood platters. 535 S. Highland. 454-7771. L, D, X, $-$$ CAFE PIAZZA BY PAT LUCCHESI—Specializes in gourmet BOMBAY HOUSE—Indian fare includes lamb korma and chicken pizzas (including create-your-own), panini sandwiches, and pasta. tikka; also, a daily luncheon buffet. 1727 N. Germantown Pkwy. Closed Sun. 139 S. Rowlett St. (Collierville). 861-1999. L, D, X, $-$$ (Cordova). 755-4114. L, D, X, $-$$ CAFE PONTOTOC—Serves a variety of internationally inspired BONEFISH GRILL—Serves wood-grilled fish,as well as steaks, small plates, as well as salads and sandwiches. Closed for dinner chicken and pork entrees. 1250 N. Germantown Pkwy. (Cordova). 753-2220; 4680 Merchants Park Circle, Carriage Crossing Sun. 314 S. Main. 249-7955. L, D, WB, X, $-$$ (Collierville). 854-5822. L (Fri.-Sun.), D, SB, X, MRA, $-$$$ CAFE SOCIETY—With Belgian and classic French influences, serves Wagyu beef, chicken, and seafood dishes, including bacon-

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CIT Y DINING LIST CLUBS/PUBS/SPORTS BARS

From Beale Street night spots to neighborhood bars/grills, these places dish out a variety of food. Many offer live entertainment, and patrons can’t miss the large-screen TVs.

Memphis Magazine’s

THE 2017

FACE OF

COFFEE

ARTISAN COFFEES

SCRATCH BAKERY - SODA FOUNTAIN

BREAKFAST - LUNCH - DINNER cafeeclectic.net Harbortown - Midtown - Highland

ALEX’S TAVERN—1445 Jackson. 278-9086. ALFRED’S—197 Beale. 525-3711. MRA. B.B. KING’S BLUES CLUB—143 Beale. 524-5464. MRA. BEALE STREET TAP ROOM—168 Beale. 576-2220. BELMONT GRILL—4970 Poplar. 767-0305; 9102 Poplar Pike (Germantown). 624-6001. MRA. BLIND BEAR SPEAKEASY—119 S. Main, Pembroke Square. 417-8435. MRA. BLUE MONKEY—2012 Madison. 272-2583; 513 S. Front. 5276665. BLUES CITY CAFE—138 Beale. 526-3637. MRA. BROOKHAVEN PUB & GRILL—695 W. Brookhaven Circle. 680-8118. MRA. BUFFALO WILD WINGS—3770 Hacks Cross Rd. 737-9463; 7188 Airways (Southaven). 662-349-7776; 8385 Highway 64. 3809294. EARNESTINE & HAZEL’S—531 S. Main. 523-9754. MRA. EAST END GRILL—7547 Highway 64. 937-1392; 7956 Winchester Rd. 432-4256. MRA. FLYING SAUCER DRAUGHT EMPORIUM—130 Peabody Place. 523-7468; 1400 Germantown Pkwy. 755-5530. MRA. FOX AND HOUND ENGLISH PUB & GRILL—847 Exocet Dr. 624-9060; 5101 Sanderlin Ave. 763-2013; 6565 Towne Center Crossing (Southaven). 662-536-2200. GREEN BEETLE—325 S. Main. 527-7337. MRA. HADLEY’S PUB—2779 Whitten Rd. 266-5006. HARD ROCK CAFE—126 Beale. 529-0007. HICKORY TAVERN—4600 Merchants Park Cir. 861-0196. HIGH POINT PUB—477 High Point Terrace. 452-9203. HUEY’S—1927 Madison. 726-4372; 1771 N. Germantown Pkwy. (Cordova). 754-3885; 77 S. Second. 527-2700; 2130 W. Poplar (Collierville). 854-4455; 7090 Malco Blvd. (Southaven). 662-3497097; 7825 Winchester. 624-8911; 4872 Poplar. 682-7729; 7677 Farmington Blvd. (Germantown). 318-3030; 8570 Highway 51 N. (Millington). 873-5025. MRA. JERRY LEE LEWIS’ CAFE & HONKY TONK—310 Beale. 654-5171. KING JERRY LAWLER’S HALL OF FAME BAR & GRILLE—159 Beale. 523-1940. KING’S PALACE CAFE—162 Beale. 521-1851. MRA. MAX’S SPORTS BAR—115 G.E. Patterson. 528-8367. MRA. MEMPHIS SPORTS PUB—5012 Park Ave. 767-8632. MIDTOWN CROSSING GRILLE—394 N. Watkins. 443-0502. MURPHY’S—1589 Madison. 726-4193. MRA. NEIL’S MUSIC ROOM—5727 Quince Rd. 682-2300. NEWBY’S—539 S. Highland. 730-0520. OLD ZINNIE’S—1688 Madison. 726-5004. PATRICK’S—4972 Park Ave. 682-2852. MRA. P & H CAFE—1532 Madison. 726-0906. PIG ON BEALE—167 Beale. 529-1544 ROCKHOUSELIVE—2586 Poplar. 324-6300. 5709 Raleigh LaGrange. 386-7222. R.P. TRACKS—3547 Walker. 327-1471. MRA. RUM BOOGIE CAFE—182 Beale. 528-0150. SAMMY HAGAR’S RED ROCKER BAR & GRILL— Southland Park, 1550 North Ingram Blvd. (West Memphis). 872-7353670. SILKY O’SULLIVAN’S—183 Beale. 522-9596. MRA. THE SILLY GOOSE—100 Peabody Place. 435-6915. THE SLIDER INN—2117 Peabody. 725-1155. SOUTH OF BEALE—361 S. Main. 526-0388. T J MULLIGAN’S—8071 Trinity Rd. (Cordova). 756-4480; 1817 Kirby Pkwy. (Germantown). 755-2481; 2821 N. Houston Levee Rd. 377-9997. UBEE’S—521 S. Highland. 323-0900. WESTY’S—346 N. Main. 543-3278. MRA. THE WINDJAMMER—786 E. Brookhaven Cl. 683-9044. MRA.

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CIT Y DINING LIST wrapped shrimp, along with daily specials and vegetarian entrees. Closed for lunch Sat.-Sun. 212 N. Evergreen. 722-2177. L, D, X, MRA, $-$$$ CANVAS—An “interactive art bar” serving salads, sandwiches, and flatbreads.  1737 Madison. 619-5303. D, $ CAPITAL GRILLE—Known for its dry-aged, hand-carved steaks; among the specialties are bone-in sirloin, and porcini-rubbed Delmonico; also seafood entrees and seasonal lunch plates. Closed for lunch Sat.-Sun.  Crescent Center, 6065 Poplar. 683-9291. L, D, X, $$$-$$$$ CAPRICCIO GRILL ITALIAN STEAKHOUSE—Offers prime steaks, fresh seafood (lobster tails, grouper, mahi mahi), pasta, and several northern Italian specialties. 149 Union, The Peabody. 529-4199. B, L, D, SB, X, MRA, $-$$$$ CARRABBA’S ITALIAN GRILL—Serves chicken Bryan, calamari, various pastas, and other “old-world” Italian entrees. 4600 Merchants Park Cl., Carriage Crossing (Collierville). 854-0200; 5110 Poplar. 685-9900. L (Sat.-Sun.), D, X, $-$$$ CASABLANCA—Lamb shawarma is one of the fresh, homemade specialties served at this Mediterranean/Moroccan restaurant; fish entrees and vegetarian options also available. 1707 Madison. 4216949; 5030 Poplar. 725-8557. L, D, X, MRA, $-$$ CATFISH BLUES—Serving Delta-raised catfish and Cajun- and Southern-inspired dishes, including gumbo and fried green tomatoes. 210 E. Commerce (Hernando). 662-298-3814. L, D, $ CATHERINE & MARY’S—A variety of pastas, grilled quail, pâté, razor clams, and monkfish are among the dishes served at this Italian restaurant in the Chisca. 2 72 S. Main. 254-8600. D, X, $-$$$ CELTIC CROSSING—Specializes in Irish and American pub fare. Entrees include shepherd’s pie, shrimp and sausage coddle, and fish and chips. 903 S. Cooper. 274-5151. L, D, WB, X, MRA, $-$$ CENTRAL BBQ—Serves ribs, smoked hot wings, pulled pork sandwiches, chicken, turkey, nachos, and portobello sandwiches. Offers both pork and beef barbecue. 2249 Central Ave. 272-9377; 4375 Summer Ave. 767-4672; 147 E. Butler. 672-7760. L, D, X, MRA, $-$$ CHAR—Specializing in modern Southern cuisine, this eatery offers homestyle sides, char-broiled steaks, and fresh seafood. 431 S. Highland, #120. 249-3533. L, D, WB, X, $-$$$ CHEF TAM’S UNDERGROUND CAFE—Serves Southern staples with a Cajun twist. Menu items include “totchos,” jerk wings, fried chicken, and “muddy” mac and cheese. Closed Sun. and Mon. 2299 Young. 207-6182. L, D, $ CHEZ PHILIPPE—Classical/contemporary French cuisine presented in a luxurious atmosphere with a seasonal menu focused on local/ regional cuisine. Afternoon tea served Wed.-Sat., 1-3:30 p.m. (reservations required). Closed Sun.-Tues. T he Peabody, 149 Union. 529-4188. D, X, MRA, $$$$ CIAO BABY—Specializing in Neapolitan-style pizza made in a wood-fired oven. Also serves house-made mozzarella, pasta, appetizers, and salads. 890 W. Poplar, Suite 1. 457-7457. L, D, X, $ CIAO BELLA—Among the Italian and Greek specialties are lasagna, seafood pasta, gourmet pizzas, and vegetarian options. Closed for lunch Sat.-Sun. 565 Erin Dr., Erin Way Shopping Center. 205-2500. L, D, X, MRA, $-$$$ CITY GROCERY—Southern eclectic cuisine; shrimp and grits is a specialty. Closed for dinner Sunday. 152 Courthouse Square (Oxford, MS). 662-232-8080. L, D, SB, X, $$-$$$ CITY SILO TABLE + PANTRY—With a focus on clean eating, this establishment offers fresh juices, as well as comfort foods reimagined with wholesome ingredients. 5101 Sanderlin. 729-7687. B, L, D, X, $ COLETTA’S—Longtime eatery serves such specialties as homemade ravioli, lasagna, and pizza with barbecue or traditional toppings. 2850 Appling Rd. (Bartlett). 383-1122; 1063 S. Parkway E. 948-7652. L, D, X, MRA, $-$$ CORKY’S—Popular barbecue emporium offers both wet and dry ribs, plus a full menu of other barbecue entrees. Wed. lunch buffets, Cordova and Collierville. 5259 Poplar. 685-9744; 1740 N. Germantown Pkwy. (Cordova). 737-1911; 743 W. Poplar (Collierville). 405-4999; 6434 Goodman Rd., Olive Branch. 662-893-3663. L, D, X, MRA, $-$$ COZY CORNER—Serving up ribs, pork sandwiches, chicken, spaghetti, and more; also homemade banana pudding. Closed Sun.Mon. 7 35 N. Parkway. 527-9158. L, D, $ THE CRAZY NOODLE—Korean noodle dishes range from bibam beef noodle with cabbage, carrots, and other vegetables, to curry chicken noodle; also rice cakes served in a flavorful sauce. Closed for lunch Sat.-Sun. 2015 Madison. 272-0928. L, D, X, $ CURRY BOWL— Specializes in Southern Indian cuisine, serving Tandoori chicken, biryani, tikka masala, and more. Weekend buffet. 4 141 Hacks Cross. 207-6051. L, D, $ DEJAVU—Serves Creole, soul, and vegetarian cuisine, including po-boys, jambalaya, and shrimp and grits. 51 S. Main. 505-0212. L, D, X, MRA, $-$$ DELTA’S KITCHEN—The premier restaurant at The Guest House at Graceland serves Elvis-inspired dishes — like Nutella and Peanut

CASUAL DINING

These establishments offer American cuisine in a relaxed atmosphere. While some serve ethnic entrees, the emphasis is on steaks, salads, sandwiches, pasta, fish and seafood. Also some soul-food and homestyle cooking.

COMO STEAKHOUSE—203 Main St. Como, MS. 662-526-9529. THE COVE—2559 Broad Ave. 730-0719. THE CUPBOARD—1400 Union. 276-8015. MRA. ELWOOD’S SHACK—4523 Summer. 761-9898. MRA. HUEY’S—1927 Madison. 726-4372; J. ALEXANDER’S—2670 N. German1771 N. Germantown Pkwy. (Cordova). town Pkwy. (Cordova). 381-9670. 754-3885; 77 S. Second. 527-2700; 2130 AJAX DINER—118 Courthouse Sq., W. Poplar (Collierville). 854-4455; 7090 Oxford, MS. 662-232-8880. Malco Blvd. (Southaven). 662-349BELLY ACRES—2102 Trimble Pl, 5297097; 7825 Winchester. 624-8911; 4872 7017. Poplar. 682-7729; 7677 Farmington Blvd. BLUE AND WHITE (Germantown). 318-3030; 8570 Highway 51 RESTAURANT—1355 U.S. 61 N., Tunica, N. (Millington). 873-5025. MRA. MS. 662-363-1371. KEM’S RESTAURANT—2751 New BLUE PLATE CAFE—5469 Poplar. Brunswick Rd., Holiday Inn & Suites. 266761-9696; 113 S. Court. 523-2050. 1952. CAJUN CATFISH COMPANY—336 LOGAN’S ROADHOUSE—2710 N. New Byhalia Rd. Collierville. 861-0122. Germantown Parkway. 381-5254; 5901 MRA. Poplar. 684-2272; 7755 Winchester Rd. CHEDDAR’S—2147 N. Germantown 759-1430; 6685 Airways Blvd. (Southaven). Pkwy. 380-1119. 662-772-5015. THE CHEESECAKE O’CHARLEY’S—6045 Stage Rd., #74 FACTORY—2760 N. Germantown (Bartlett). 373-5602; 1040 N. Germantown Pkwy., Suite 193 (Wolfchase). 937-1613. Pkw. 754-6201; 656 W. Poplar (Collierville). CHILI’S—7810 Poplar (Germantown). 861-5811. 756-5203; 4609 Poplar. 685-2257; THE OLIVE GARDEN—7778 8100 Giacosa Pl. 372-3132; 237 Market Winchester. 624-2003; 8405 Highway 64, Blvd. (Collierville). 853-7520; 1260 N. Wolfchase Galleria. 377-3437; 6615 Airways Germantown Pkwy. (Cordova). 756-7771; (Southaven). 662-536-3350; 5679 Poplar, COLTON’S STEAKHOUSE—8030 #1. 761-5711. Highway 64 (Bartlett). 383-8445; 8051 OUTBACK STEAKHOUSE— Goodman Rd. (Olive Branch). 662-890-4142. 1110 N. Germantown Parkway. 751-9800; Butter Crepes for breakfast — and upscale Southern cuisine — including lamb chops and shrimp and grits — for dinner. 3 600 Elvis Presley Blvd. 443-3000. B, D, X, $-$$$ DERAE RESTAURANT—Ethiopian and Mediterranean fare includes fuul, or fava beans in spices and yogurt, goat meat and rice, and garlic chicken over basmati rice with cilantro chutney; also salmon and tilapia. Closed Monday. 9 23 S. Highland. 552-3992. B, L, D, $-$$ DIRTY CROW INN—Serving elevated bar food, including poutine fries, fried catfish, and the Chicken Debris, a sandwich with smoked chicken, melted cheddar, and gravy. 855 Kentucky. 207-5111. L, D, $ DWJ KOREAN BARBECUE—This authentic Korean eatery serves kimbap, barbecued beef short ribs, rice and noodles dishes, and hot pots and stews. 3 750 Hacks Cross, Suite 101. 746-8057; 2156 Young. 207-6204. L, D, $-$$ ECCO—Mediterranean-inspired specialties range from rib-eye steak to seared scallops to housemade pastas and a grilled vegetable plate; also a Saturday brunch. Closed Sun.-Mon.  1585 Overton Park. 410-8200. L, D, X, $-$$ EIGHTY3—Contemporary menu of steaks and seafood offers a variety of eclectic specialties; also weekly specials, small plates, appetizers, and patio dining. 83 Madison Ave. 333-1224. B, L, D, WB, X, MRA, $-$$$ EL MEZCAL—Serves burritos, chimichangas, fajitas, and other Mexican cuisine, as well as shrimp dinners and steak. 402 Perkins Extd. 761-7710; 694 N. Germantown Pkwy. (Cordova). 755-1447; 1492 Union. 274-4264; 11615 Airline Rd. (Arlington). 867-1883; 9045 Highway 64 (Lakeland). 383-4219; 7164 Hacks Cross Rd. (Olive Branch). 662-890-3337; 8834 Hwy. 51 N. (Millington). 872-3220; 7424 Highway 64 (Bartlett). 417-6026; 9947 Wolf River (Collierville) 853-7922. L, D, X, $ EL PORTON—Fajitas, quesadillas, and steak ranchero are just a few of the menu items. 2095 Merchants Row (Germantown). 754-4268; 8361 Highway 64. 380-7877; 3448 Poplar, Poplar Plaza. 452-7330; 1805 N. Germantown Parkway (Cordova). 624-9358; 1016 W. Poplar (Collierville). 854-5770. L, D, X, MRA, $-$$ EMERALD THAI RESTAURANT—Spicy shrimp, pad khing, lemon grass chicken, and several noodle, rice, and vegetarian dishes are offered at this family restaurant. Closed Sunday.  8950 Highway 64 (Lakeland). 384-0540. L, D X, $-$$ ERLING JENSEN—Presents “globally inspired” cuisine: specialties are rack of lamb, big game entrees,and fresh fish dishes.  1044 S. Yates. 763-3700. D, X, MRA, $$-$$$ EVELYN & OLIVE—Jamaican/Southern fusion cuisine includes such dishes as Kingston stew fish, Rasta Pasta, and jerk rib-eye. Closed for lunch Sat. and all day Sun.-Mon. 630 Madison. 748-5422. L, D, X, $

2255 Union Ave. 728-5100; 125 W. Goodman Rd. (Southaven). 662-349-7488. MRA. RAFFERTY’S—4542 Poplar. 374-0096; 505 N. Germantown Pkwy. 755-4799. RIKO’S KICKIN’ CHICKEN—1329 Madison. 726-5347. RUBY TUESDAY—1653 Sycamore View. 382-9280. SIDECAR CAFE—2194 Whitten. 388-0285. MRA. SIDE STREET GRILL—31 Florence. 274-8955. MRA. SILVER CABOOSE—132 E. Mulberry (Collierville). 853-0010. SKIMO’S—1166 N. Houston Levee, #107 (Cordova). 756-5055. MRA. SOUL FISH CAFE—862 S. Cooper. 725-0722; 3160 Village Shops Dr. (Germantown). 755-6988; 4720 Poplar. 590-0323. MRA. SPAGHETTI WAREHOUSE—40 W. Huling. 521-0907. STONEY RIVER—7515 Poplar. 2071100. T.G.I. FRIDAY’S—185 Union, Double Tree Hotel. 523-8500; 176 E. Goodman Rd. (Southaven). 662-349-4223; 7733 Winchester Rd. 752-1369; 8325 Highway 64. 372-2539. TUG’S—River Inn, 51 Harbor Town Square. 260-3344. MRA. VINEGAR JIM’S—12062 Forrest (Arlington). 867-7568. WOLF RIVER CAFE—460 U.S. 194 (Rossville). 853-2586.

EXLINES’ BEST PIZZA—Serves pizza, Italian dinners,

sandwiches, and salads.  2935 Austin Peay. 388-4711; 6250 Stage Rd. (Bartlett). 382-3433; 2801 Kirby Parkway. 754-0202; 7730 Wolf River Blvd. (Germantown). 753-4545; 531 W. Stateline Rd. 662342-4544 (check online for additional locations). L, D, X, MRA, $ THE FARMER—Serving upscale Southern cuisine, with a focus on locally grown ingredients. Among the specialties are smoked beef tenderloin and shrimp and grits. Closed for dinner Sun.-Mon. 3092 Poplar #11. 324-2221. L, D, X, $-$$ FELICIA SUZANNE’S—Southern cuisine with low-country, Creole, and Delta influences, using regional fresh seafood, local beef, and locally grown foods. Entrees include shrimp and grits. Closed Sun. and Mon. Brinkley Plaza, 80 Monroe, Suite L1. 523-0877. L (Fri. only), D, X, MRA, $$-$$$ FERRARO’S PIZZERIA & PUB—Rigatoni and tortellini are among the pasta entrees here, along with pizzas (whole or by the slice), with a variety of toppings. 111 Jackson. 522-2033. L, D, X, $ FIREBIRDS—Specialties are hand-cut steaks, slow-roasted prime rib, and wood-grilled salmon and other seafood, as well as seasonal entrees. 8470 Highway 64 (Bartlett). 379-1300; 4600 Merchants Circle, Carriage Crossing (Collierville). 850-1637. L, D, X, $-$$$ THE FIVE SPOT—Tucked behind Earnestine & Hazel’s, this popular eatery features innovative bar food by chef Kelly English. Closed Mon.Tues.  531 S. Main. 523-9754. D, SB, X, $-$$ FLEMING’S PRIME STEAKHOUSE—Serves wet-aged and dry-aged steaks, prime beef, chops, and seafood, including salmon, Australian lobster tails, and a catch of the day. 6245 Poplar. 761-6200. D, X, MRA, $$$-$$$$ FLIGHT RESTAURANT & WINE BAR—Serves steaks and seafood, along with such specialties as bison ribeye and Muscovy duck, all matched with appropriate wines. 3 9 S. Main. 521-8005. D, SB, X, MRA, $-$$$ FLYING FISH—Serves up fried and grilled versions of shrimp, crab, oysters, fish tacos, and catfish; also chicken and burgers.  105 S. Second. 522-8228. L, D, X, MRA, $-$$ FOLK’S FOLLY ORIGINAL PRIME STEAK HOUSE— Specializes in prime steaks, as well as lobster, grilled Scottish salmon, Alaskan king crab legs, rack of lamb, and weekly specials. 551 S. Mendenhall. 762-8200. D, X, MRA, $$$-$$$$ FORMOSA—Offers Mandarin cuisine, including broccoli beef, hotand-sour soup, and spring rolls. Closed Monday. 6685 Quince. 7539898. L, D, X, $-$$ THE FOUR WAY—Legendary soul-food establishment dishing up such entrees as fried and baked catfish, chicken, and turkey and dressing, along with a host of vegetables and desserts. Closed

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CIT Y DINING LIST Monday.  998 Mississippi Blvd. 507-1519. L, D (call to check hours.), $ FOX RIDGE PIZZA—Pizzas, calzones, subs, burgers, and meat-and-two plate lunches are among the dishes served at this eatery. 1769 N. Germantown Pkwy. 758-6500. L, D, X, $ FRATELLI’S—Serves hot and cold sandwiches, salads, soups, and desserts, all with an Italian/Mediterranean flair. Closed Sunday.  750 Cherry Rd., Memphis Botanic Garden. 7669900. L, X, $ FRIDA’S—Mexican cuisine and Tex-Mex standards, including chimichangas, enchiladas, and fajitas; seafood includes shrimp and tilapia.  1718 Madison. 244-6196. L, D, X, $-$$ FUEL CAFE—Focus is on natural dishes with such specialties as bison burgers, quinoa chili, and tacos; also vegan and glutenfree options. Closed Sun.-Mon. 1761 Madison. 725-9025. L, D, X, $-$$ GERMANTOWN COMMISSARY—Serves barbecue sandwiches, sliders, ribs, shrimp, and nachos, as well as smoked barbecued bologna sandwiches; Mon.-night all-you-can-eat ribs. 2290 S. Germantown Rd. S. (Germantown). 754-5540. L, D, X, MRA, $-$$ GOLDEN INDIA—Northern Indian specialties include tandoori chicken as well as lamb, beef, shrimp, and vegetarian dishes. 2097 Madison. 728-5111. L, D, X, $-$$ GREEN BAMBOO—Pineapple tilapia, pork vermicelli, and the soft egg noodle combo are Vietnamese specialties here.  990 N. Germantown Parkway, #104 (Cordova). 753-5488. L, D, $-$$ GRIDLEY’S—Offers barbecued ribs, shrimp, pork plate, chicken, and hot tamales; also daily lunch specials. Closed Tues. 6842 Stage Rd. (Bartlett). 377-8055. L, D, X, $-$$ FRANK GRISANTI’S ITALIAN RESTAURANT— Northern Italian favorites include pasta with jumbo shrimp and mushrooms; also seafood, fillet mignon, and daily lunch specials. Closed for lunch Sunday. Embassy Suites Hotel, 1022 S. Shady Grove. 761-9462. L, D, X, MRA, $-$$$

RONNIE GRISANTI’S ITALIAN RESTAURANT—This Memphis institution serves some family

classics such as Elfo’s Special and chicken ravioli, along with lighter fare and changing daily chef selection. Closed Sun.  Sheffield Antiques Mall, 684 W. Poplar (Collierville). 850-0191. L (Mon.-Sat.), D (Thurs.-Sat.), X, $-$$$ THE GROVE GRILL—Offers steaks, chops, seafood, and other American cuisine with Southern and global influences; entrees include crab cakes, and shrimp and grits, also dinner specials. 4550 Poplar. 818-9951. L, D, SB, X, MRA, $$-$$$ GROWLERS—Sports bar and eatery serves standard bar fare in addition to a pasta, tacos, chicken and waffles, and light options. 1911 Poplar. 244-7904. L, D, X, $-$$ GUS’S WORLD FAMOUS FRIED CHICKEN— Serves chicken with signature spicy batter, along with homemade beans, slaw, and pies. 310 S. Front. 527-4877; 215 S. Center St. (Collierville). 853-6005; 2965 N. Germantown Pkwy. (Cordova). 373-9111; 730 S. Mendenhall. 767-2323; 505 Highway 70 W., Mason, TN. 901-294-2028. L, D, X, MRA, $ HALF SHELL—Specializes in seafood, such as King crab legs; also serves steaks, chicken, pastas, salads, sandwiches, a ”voodoo menu”; oyster bar at Winchester location. 688 S. Mendenhall. 682-3966; 7825 Winchester. 737-6755. L, D, WB, X, MRA, $-$$$ HAPPY MEXICAN—Serves quesadillas, burritos, chimichangas, vegetable and seafood dishes, and more. 385 S. Second. 529-9991; 6080 Primacy Pkwy. 683-0000; 7935 Winchester. 751-5353. L, D, X, $ HAVANA’S PILON—Tiny eatery serving Cuban cuisine, including fried plantains in a pilon topped with shrimp, ropa vieja (shredded beef in tomato sauce), roasted pork, and a Cuban sandwich.  143 Madison. 527-2878; 3135 Kirby-Whitten, Suite 108 (Bartlett). 512-6359. L, D, X, $ HERITAGE TAVERN & KITCHEN—Featuring classic cuisine from the country’s five regions, including lobster rolls, fried chicken, smoked tamales, Green Goddess shrimp, and more.  6150 Poplar, Regalia. 761-8855.L, D, WB, X, $-$$$ HIGH POINT PIZZA—Serves variety of pizzas, subs, salads, and sides. Closed Monday.  477 High Point Terrace. 452-3339. L, D, X, $ $ $ HM DESSERT LOUNGE—Serving cake, pie, and other desserts, as well as a selection of savory dishes, including meatloaf and mashed potato “cupcakes.” Closed Monday. 1 586 Madison. 290-2099. L, D, X, $ HOG & HOMINY—The casual sister to Andrew Michael Italian Kitchen serves brick-oven-baked pizzas, including the Red-Eye with pork belly, and small plates with everything from meatballs to beef and cheddar hot dogs; and local veggies. Closed for lunch Mon. 707 W. Brookhaven Cl. 207-7396. L, D, SB, X, $-$$$

LOCALITY GUIDE BARTLETT

Huey’s J. Alexander’s Abuelo’s Jerry Lawler’s BBQ Applebee’s Jim N Nick’s Bar-B-Q Cajun Catfish Company Joe’s Crab Shack Coletta’s Logan’s Roadhouse Colton’s Steakhouse Moe’s Southwest Grill Dixie Cafe T.J. Mulligan’s El Porton O’Charley’s Exlines’ Best Pizza Olive Garden Firebirds On the Border Gridley’s Osaka Japanese Hadley’s Pub Outback Steakhouse La Playita Mexicana Pei Wei Asian Diner O’Charley’s The Presentation Room Ruby Tuesday Pyro’s Fire Fresh Pizza Sekisui Rafferty’s Side Car Cafe Red Lobster Side Porch Steakhouse Romano’s Macaroni Grill Tops Bar-B-Q CHICKASAW GARDENS/ Sekisui Shogun UNIV. OF MEMPHIS Skimo’s Another Broken Egg Cafe Tannoor Grill A-Tan DOWNTOWN The Bluff Agave Maria Brother Juniper’s Aldo’s Pizza Pies Camy’s Alfred’s Char The Arcade Cheffie’s Automatic Slim’s Derae Bangkok Alley El Porton Bardog Tavern The Farmer B.B. King’s Blues Club La Baguette Bedrock Eats & Sweets Los Compadres Belle — A Southern Bistro Lost Pizza Bleu Medallion Blind Bear Speakeasy Newby’s Blue Monkey Newk’s Bluefin Osaka Japanese Blues City Cafe Pete & Sam’s Brass Door Irish Pub Rock’n Dough Pizza Cafe 7/24 R.P. Tracks Cafe Eclectic Sushi Jimmi Cafe Keough Sweet Potato Baby Cafe Cafe Pontotoc Woman’s Exchange COLLIERVILLE/WEST TN. Capriccio Catherine & Mary’s (ARLINGTON, COVINGTON, Central BBQ MILLINGTON, OAKLAND) Chez Philippe 148 North City Market Bangkok Alley Cozy Corner Bonefish Grill DeJaVu Bozo’s Hot Pit Bar-B-Q Dirty Crow Inn Brooks Pharm2Fork Double J Smokehouse & Saloon Cafe Piazza Earnestine & Hazel’s Cajun Catfish Company Eighty3 Carrabba’s Italian Grill Felicia Suzanne’s Chili’s Ferraro’s Pizzeria Ciao Baby Five Spot Corky’s Flight Crepe Maker Flying Fish El Mezcal Flying Saucer El Porton T.G.I. Friday’s Emerald Thai Green Beetle Firebirds Ronnie Grisanti’s Italian Restaurant Gus’s Happy Mexican Gus’s Fried Chicken Hard Rock Cafe Hickory Tavern Havana’s Pilon Huey’s Huey’s Jim’s Place Grille Itta Bena Long Road Cider Co. Jerry Lee Lewis’ Cafe & Honky Tonk Manila Filipino King’s Palace Cafe Mulan Kooky Canuck Osaka Japanese Lisa’s Lunchbox Memphis Pizza Cafe Little Tea Shop Pig-N-Whistle Local The Sear Shack Loflin Yard Sekisui Lookout at the Pyramid Silver Caboose Luna Restaurant & Lounge Stix LYFE Kitchen Vinegar Jim’s Maciel’s Tortas & Tacos Wolf River Cafe Max’s Sports Bar CORDOVA McEwen’s on Monroe Bahama Breeze The Majestic Bombay House Mesquite Chop House Bonefish Grill Mollie Fontaine Lounge Butcher Shop The Office@Uptown Cheddar’s Paulette’s Chili’s Pearl’s Oyster House Corky’s Pig on Beale Crazy Italians Rendezvous, Charles Vergos’ East End Grill Rizzo’s Diner El Mezcal Rum Boogie Cafe El Porton Silky O’Sullivan’s T.G.I. Friday’s South of Beale Flying Saucer South Main Sushi & Grill Fox Ridge Pizza Spaghetti Warehouse Green Bamboo Spindini Gus’s The Terrace Happy Mexican Texas de Brazil Hunan Palace Tug’s

Tuscany Italian Eatery Twilight Sky Terrace Uncle Buck’s Fishbowl & Grill The Vault Westy’s

Evelyn & Olive Sabor Caribe Sabrosura Tops Bar-B-Q Trolley Stop Market

Acre Agavos Cocina & Tequila Andrew Michael Italian Kitchen Asian Palace Babalu Bangkok Alley Belmont Grill Blue Plate Cafe Broadway Pizza Brookhaven Pub & Grill Buckley’s Fine Filet Grill Buntyn Corner Cafe Carrabba’s Italian Grill Casablanca Central B B Q Chili’s Ciao Bella City East Corky’s Dixie Cafe El Mezcal El Porton Fino’s from the Hill Folk’s Folly Fox & Hound Fratelli’s The Grove Grill Half Shell Hog & Hominy Houston’s Huey’s Interim Erling Jensen Jim’s Place The Kitchen Bistro Las Delicias Las Tortugas Lisa’s Lunchbox LYFE Kitchen Lynchburg Legends Marciano Mayuri Indian Cuisine Dan McGuinness Pub Mellow Mushroom Memphis Pizza Cafe Mempops Mortimer’s Mosa Asian Bistro Napa Cafe Neil’s New Hunan Old Venice One & Only BBQ Park + Cherry Patrick’s Pimento’s Pizza Rev Porcellino’s Craft Butcher Rafferty’s The Sear Shack Sekisui Pacific Rim Soul Fish Cafe Staks Taziki’s Mediterranean Cafe Three Little Pigs Wasabi Whole Foods Market Zaka Bowl

901 Grille & Market Abyssinia Alchemy Aldo’s Pizza Pies Alex’s Applebee’s Babalu Tacos and Tapas Bar DKDC Bar Louie Bar-B-Q Shop Bari Barksdale Restaurant Bayou Bar & Grill Beauty Shop Belly Acres Bhan Thai Blue Nile Ethiopian Boscos Bounty on Broad Broadway Pizza House Cafe 1912 Cafe Brooks by Paradox Cafe Eclectic Cafe Ole Cafe Palladio Cafe Society Canvas Casablanca Celtic Crossing Central B B Q Chef Tam’s Underground Cafe The Cove Cozy Corner The Crazy Noodle The Cupboard Dino’s DWJ Korean Barbecue Ecco El Mezcal Fino’s from the Hill Frida’s Fuel Cafe Golden India Growlers HM Dessert Lounge Huey’s I Love Juice Bar Imagine Vegan Cafe India Palace Jasmine Thai Java Cabana Lafayette’s Music Room LBOE Little Italy Local Mama Gaia Mardi Gras Memphis Maximo’s on Broad Memphis Pizza Cafe Midtown Crossing Grille Molly’s La Casita Mulan Chinese Bistro Murphy’s Old Zinnie’s Onix Otherlands Outback Steakhouse P & H Cafe Peabody Point Cafe Pei Wei Asian Diner Pho Binh Pho Saigon Restaurant Iris Riko’s Kickin’ Chicken Robata Ramen & Yakitori Bar The Second Line Sekisui Side Street Grill The Slider Inn Soul Fish Cafe Stanley Bar-B-Que Stone Soup Strano Sicilian Kitchen Sweet Grass Tart Tsunami Young Avenue Deli

EAST MEMPHIS

GERMANTOWN

Belmont Grill The Cheesecake Factory Chili’s City East El Porton Exlines’ Best Pizza Germantown Comm. Huey’s Mellow Mushroom Memphis Pizza Cafe Mesquite Chop House New Asia The Pasta Maker Petra Cafe Rock’n Dough Pizza Royal Panda Russo’s New York Pizzeria & Wine Bar Sakura Soul Fish Cafe Southern Social Stoney River Steakhouse and Grill West Street Diner

MEDICAL CENTER The Cupboard

MIDTOWN

NORTH MISSISSIPPI Ajax Diner Applebee’s Blue and White Bonne Terre Catfish Blues Chili’s

City Grocery Colton’s Steakhouse Como Steakhouse Corky’s Fox & Hound Huey’s Lee’s Family Restaurant Logan’s Roadhouse Lost Pizza McEwen’s Dan McGuinness Pub Memphis Barbecue Company Memphis Pizza Cafe Mesquite Chop House Nagoya O’Charley’s Olive Garden Osaka Japanese Cuisine Outback Steakhouse Ravine STEAK by Melissa

PARKWAY VILLAGE/ FOX MEADOWS Blue Shoe Bar & Grill Leonard’s Jack Pirtle’s Chicken Three Little Pigs Bar-B-Q

POPLAR/I-240

Amerigo Benihana Blue Plate Cafe Brooklyn Bridge Capital Grille, The City Silo Table + Pantry P.F. Chang’s Chipotle Exlines’ Best Pizza Fleming’s Frank Grisanti’s Happy Mexican Heritage Tavern & Kitchen Julles Posh Food Co. Mister B’s Olive Garden One & Only BBQ Owen Brennan’s Pyro’s Fire-Fresh Pizza Red Koi River Oaks Ruth’s Chris Salsa Seasons 52 Sekisui Wang’s Mandarin House

RALEIGH

Exline’s Best Pizza

SOUTH MEMPHIS Coletta’s The Four Way Interstate Bar-B-Q Jack Pirtle’s Chicken

SUMMER/BERCLAIR Bryant’s The Cottage Elwood’s Shack High Point Pizza La Taqueria Guadalupana Lotus Nagasaki Inn Pancho’s Panda Garden Queen of Sheba Tops Bar-B-Q

WEST MEMPHIS/ EASTERN ARK.

The Cupboard Pancho’s Sammy Hagar’s Red Rocker Bar & Grill

WHITEHAVEN Delta’s Kitchen Hong Kong Marlowe’s

WINCHESTER

Curry Bowl DWJ Korean Barbecue East End Grill Formosa Half Shell Happy Mexican Huey’s Logan’s Roadhouse Olive Garden Red Lobster Ruby Tuesday T.G.I. Friday’s Tops Bar-B-Q Tycoon

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CIT Y DINING LIST HONG KONG—Cantonese and Mandarin standards are sweet-and-

sour chicken, and pepper beef. Closed Sunday. 3966 Elvis Presley. 396-0801. L, D, X, $ HOUSTON’S—Serves steaks, seafood, pork chops, chicken dishes, sandwiches, salads, and Chicago-style spinach dip.  5000 Poplar. 683-0915. L, D, X $-$$$  HUEY’S—This family friendly restaurant offers 13 different burgers, a variety of sandwiches, and delicious soups and salads. 1927 Madison. 726-4372; 1771 N. Germantown Pkwy. (Cordova). 754-3885; 77 S. Second. 527-2700; 2130 W. Poplar (Collierville). 854-4455; 7090 Malco Blvd. (Southaven). 662-349-7097; 7825 Winchester. 6248911; 4872 Poplar. 682-7729; 7677 Farmington Blvd. (Germantown). 318-3030; 8570 Highway 51 N. (Millington). 873-5025. L, D, X, MRA, $ I LOVE JUICE BAR—Serving an extensive line of juices and grab-and-go lunch items. Closed Sun. 5 53 S. Cooper. 612-2720. L, D, X, $ IMAGINE VEGAN CAFE—Dishes at this fully vegan restaurant range from salads and sandwiches to full dinners, including eggplant parmesan and “beef” tips and rice; breakfast all day Sat. and Sun. 2 158 Young. 654-3455. L, D, SB, X, $ INDIA PALACE—Tandoori chicken, lamb shish kabobs, chicken tikka masala are among the entrees; also, vegetarian options and a daily lunch buffet. 1720 Poplar. 278-1199. L, D, X, $-$$ INTERIM—Offers American-seasonal cuisine with emphasis on local foods and fresh fish; macaroni and cheese is a house specialty. Closed for lunch Sat. 5040 Sanderlin, Suite 105. 818-0821. L, D, SB, X, MRA, $-$$$ INTERSTATE BAR-B-Q—Specialties include chopped porkshoulder sandwiches, ribs, hot wings, spaghetti, chicken, and turkey. 2265 S. Third. 775-2304; 150 W. Stateline Rd. (Southaven). 662393-5699. L, D, X, MRA, $-$$ ITTA BENA—Southern and Cajun-American cuisine served here; specialties are duck and waffles and shrimp and grits, along with steaks, chops, seafood, and pasta. 145 Beale St. 578-3031. D,X, MRA, $$-$$$


Broadway Pizza House Legendary Pizza Since 1977

2581 Broad Avenue (901) 454-7930

629 South Mendenhall (901) 207-1546

Memphis Magazine’s

THE 2017

FACE OF

PIZZA

JASMINE THAI AND VEGETARIAN RESTAURANT—Entrees include panang chicken, green curry

shrimp,and pad thai (noodles, shrimp, and peanuts); also vegetarian dishes. Closed Mon.-Tues. 916 S. Cooper. 725-0223. L, D, X, $ JIM ’N NICK’S BAR-B-Q—Serves barbecued pork, ribs, chicken, brisket, and fish, along with other homemade Southern specialties. 2 359 N. Germantown Pkwy. 388-0998. L, D, X, $-$$ JIM’S PLACE/JIM’S PLACE GRILLE—Features American, Greek, and Continental cuisine with such entrees as pork tenderloin, several seafood specialties, and hand-cut charcoal-grilled steaks. Closed for lunch Sat. and all day Sun. 518 Perkins Extd. 766-2030; 3660 Houston Levee (Collierville). 861-5000. L (Collierville only), D, X, MRA, $-$$$ JOE’S CRAB SHACK—Serves a variety of seafood, along with chicken, steak, and pasta. 7990 Horizon Center Blvd. 384-7478. L, D, X, $-$$$ JULLES POSH FOOD CO.—The changing menu features seasonal “cooking light” dishes; also cold-pressed juices, to-go meals, and desserts.  6300 Poplar. 509-8675. B, L, D, X, $-$$ KING JERRY LAWLER’S MEMPHIS BBQ CO.—Offers a variety of barbecue dishes, including brisket, ribs, nachos topped with smoked pork, and a selection of barbecue “Slamwiches.”  465 N. Germantown Pkwy., #116 (Cordova). 509-2360. L, D, X, $ THE KITCHEN BISTRO—Tomato soup, pan-roasted ribeye, sticky toffee pudding, and dishes made using in-season fruits and veggies are served at this establishment at Shelby Farms Park.  415 Great View Drive E., Suite 101. 729-9009. L, D, X, $-$$ KOOKY CANUCK—Offers prime rib, catfish, and burgers, including the 4-lb. “Kookamonga”; also late-night menu. 87 S. Second. 578-9800; 1250 N. Germantown Pkwy. 1-800-2453. L, D, X, MRA, $-$$$ LA BAGUETTE—An almond croissant and chicken salad are among specialties at this French-style bistro. Closed for dinner Sun. 3088 Poplar. 458-0900. B, L, D (closes at 7), X, MRA, $ LA PLAYITA MEXICANA—Specializes in seafood and Mexican entrees, including red snapper, oysters, chimichangas, tostadas, and taco salad. 6 194 Macon (Bartlett). 377-2282. L, D, X, $-$$ LA TAQUERIA GUADALUPANA—Fajitas and quesadillas are just a few of the authentic Mexican entrees offered here. 4 818 Summer. 685-6857; 5848 Winchester. 365-4992. L, D, $ LAFAYETTE’S MUSIC ROOM—Serves such Southern cuisine as po boys and shrimp and grits, and wood-fired pizzas. 2119 Madison. 207-5097. L, D, WB, X, MRA, $-$$ LAS DELICIAS—Popular for its guacamole, house-made tortilla chips, and margaritas, this restaurant draws diners with its chicken enchiladas, meat-stuffed flautas, and Cuban torta with spicy pork. Closed Sunday. 4 002 Park Ave. 458-9264; 5689 Quince. 800-2873. L, D, X, $ LAS TORTUGAS DELI MEXICANA—Authentic Mexican food prepared from local food sources; specializes in tortugas — grilled bread scooped out to hold such fillings as brisket, pork, and shrimp; also

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CIT Y DINING LIST tingas tostados and such sides as steamed corn. Closed Sunday. 1215 S. Germantown Rd. 751-1200; 6300 Poplar. 623-3882. L, D, X, $-$$ LBOE—Gourmet burger joint serves locally sourced ground beef burgers, with options like the Mac-N-Cheese Burger and Caprese. Black bean and turkey patties available. 2 021 Madison. 725-0770. L, D, X, $ LEONARD’S—Serves wet and dry ribs, barbecue sandwiches, spaghetti, catfish, homemade onion rings, and lemon icebox pie; also a lunch buffet. 5465 Fox Plaza. 360-1963. L, X, MRA, $-$$
Lisa’s Lunchbox—Serving bagels, sandwiches, salads, and wraps.  5030

Poplar, 761-4044; 5885 Ridgeway Center Pkwy., Suite 101. 7676465; 2659 Thousand Oaks Blvd., Suite 1200; 2525 Central (Children’s Museum); 166 S. Front. 729-7277. B, L, $ LITTLE ITALY—Serving New York-style pizza as well as subs and

pasta dishes.  1495 Union. 725-0280, L, D, X, $-$$ THE LITTLE TEA SHOP—Downtown institution serves up Southern comfort cooking, including meatloaf and such veggies as turnip greens, yams, okra, and tomatoes. Closed Sat.-Sun.  69 Monroe. 525-6000, L, X, $ LOCAL GASTROPUB—Entrees with a focus on locally grown products include truffle mac-and-cheese and braised brisket tacos. 95 S. Main. 473-9573; 2126 Madison. 725-1845. L, D, WB, X, MRA, $-$$ LOFLIN YARD—Beer garden and restaurant serves vegetarian fare and smoked-meat dishes, including beef brisket and pork tenderloin, cooked on a custom-made grill. Closed Mon.-Tues. 7 W. Carolina. 2493046. L (Sat. and Sun.), D, $-$$ LONG ROAD CIDER CO.—Specializes in hard apple ciders made with traditional methods. Cafe-style entrees include black eye peas with cornbread and greens, chicken Gorgonzola pockets, cider-steamed sausage, and housemade ice creams. Closed Sun.-Wed. 9053 Barret Road. (Barretville, TN). 352-0962. D, X, $ THE LOOKOUT AT THE PYRAMID—Serves seafood and Southern fare, including cornmeal fried oysters, sweet tea brined chicken, and elk chops. 1 Bass Pro Dr. 620-4600/291-8200. L, D, X $-$$$ LOS COMPADRES—Serves enchiladas, burritos, tamales, tacos, and vegetarian dishes; also Cuban entrees. 3295 Poplar. 458-5731. L, D, X, $-$$ LOST PIZZA—Offering pizzas (with dough made from scratch), pasta, salads, sandwiches, tamales, and more. 2855 Poplar. 572-1803; 5960 Getwell (Southaven). 662-892-8684. L, D, X, $-$$ LOTUS—Authentic Vietnamese-Asian fare, including lemon-grass chicken and shrimp, egg rolls, Pho soup, and spicy Vietnamese vermicelli. 4970 Summer. 682-1151. D, X, $ LUNA RESTAURANT & LOUNGE—Serving a limited menu of breakfast and lunch items. Dinner entrees include Citrus Glaze Salmon and Cajun Stuffed Chicken. 179 Madison (Hotel Napoleon). 5260002. B, D (Mon.-Sat.), X, $-$$$ LYFE KITCHEN—Serving healthy, affordable wraps, bowls, sandwiches, and more; entrees include herb roasted salmon and parmesan crusted chicken. 6201 Poplar. 684-5333; 272 S. Main. 526-0254. B, L, D, WB, X, $ LYNCHBURG LEGENDS—This restaurant with a Jack Daniels’ theme and Southern cuisine serves such entrees as Bourbon Street salmon, buttermilk-fried chicken, and grilled steak and wild mushroom salad. DoubleTree Hotel, 5069 Sanderlin. 969-7777. B, L, D, X, MRA, $- $$$ MACIEL’S TORTAS & TACOS—Entrees include tortas, hefty Mexican sandwiches filled with choice of chicken, pork, or steak. Also serving fried taco plates, quesadillas, chorizo and pastor soft tacos, salads, and more. Closed Sun. 4 5 S. Main. 526-0037. L, D, X, $ THE MAJESTIC GRILLE—Housed in a former silent-picture house, features aged steaks, fresh seafood, and such specialties as roasted chicken and grilled pork tenderloin; offers a pre-theatre menu and classic cocktails. 145 S. Main. 522-8555. L, D, WB, X, MRA, $-$$$ MAMA GAIA—Greek-inspired dishes at this vegetarian eatery include pitas, “petitzzas,” and quinoa bowls. 1350 Concourse Avenue, Suite 137. 203-3838. B, L, D, X, $-$$ MANILA FILIPINO RESTAURANT—Entrees include pork belly cutlet with lechon sauce, and shrimp and vegetables in tamarind broth; also daily combos, rice dishes, and chef specials. Closed Sun.Mon. 7849 Rockford (Millington). 209-8525. L, D, X, $

MARCIANO MEDITERRANEAN AND ITALIAN CUISINE—Veal Saltimbocca with angel hair pasta and white wine

sauce is among the entrees; also steaks, seafood, and gourmet pizza. Closed Sun. 780 Brookhaven Cl. 682-1660. D, X, $-$$
 MARDI GRAS MEMPHIS—Serving Cajun fare, including an etouffee-stuffed po’boy. Closed Mon. 496 Watkins. 530-6767. L, D, X, $-$$ MARLOWE’S—In addition to its signature barbecue and ribs, Marlowe’s serves Southern-style steaks, chops, lasagne, and more.  4381 Elvis Presley Blvd. 332-4159. D, X, MRA, $-$$ MAXIMO’S ON BROAD—Serving a tapas menu that features creative fusion cuisine ; entrees include veggie paella and fish of the day Closed Mon.  2617 Broad Ave. 452-1111. D, SB, X, $-$$ MAYURI INDIAN CUISINE—Serves tandoori chicken, masala dosa, tikka masala, as well as lamb and shrimp entrees; also a daily

T UNICA TA BLES CHICAGO STEAKHOUSE AT THE GOLDSTRIKE—1010 Casino Center Dr., Robinsonville, MS, 1-888-24KSTAY /662-357-1225. FAIRBANKS AT THE HOLLYWOOD—1150 Casino Strip Blvd., Robinsonville, MS, 1-800-871-0711. JACK BINION’S STEAK HOUSE AT HORSESHOE—1021 Casino Center Drive, Robinsonville, MS, 1-800-303-SHOE. LUCKY 8 ASIAN BISTRO AT HORSESHOE—1021 Casino Center Drive, Robinsonville, MS, 1-800-303-SHOE. THE STEAKHOUSE AT THE FITZ —711 Lucky Ln., Robinsonville, MS, 1-888-766-LUCK, ext 8213. lunch buffet, and dinner buffet on Fri.-Sat. 6524 Quince Rd. 7538755. L, D, X, $-$$ MCEWEN’S ON MONROE—Southern/American cuisine with international flavors; specialties include steak and seafood, sweet potato-crusted catfish with macaroni and cheese, and more. Closed Sun., Monroe location.  120 Monroe. 527-7085; 1110 Van Buren (Oxford). 662-234-7003. L, D, SB (Oxford only), X, MRA, $$-$$$ DAN MCGUINNESS PUB—Serves fish and chips, shepherd’s pie, burgers, and other Irish and American fare; also lunch and dinner specials. 4694 Spottswood. 761-3711; 3964 Goodman Rd. 662890-7611. L, D, X, $ MEDALLION—Offers steaks, seafood, chicken, and pasta entrees. Closed for dinner Sunday. 3 700 Central, Holiday Inn (Kemmons Wilson School of Hospitality). 678-1030. B, L (Sun. only), D, SB, X, MRA, $-$$$ MELLOW MUSHROOM—Large menu includes assortment of pizzas, salads, calzones, hoagies, vegetarian options, and 50 beers on tap.  9155 Poplar, Shops of Forest Hill (Germantown). 907-0243; 5138 Park Ave. 562-1211. L, D, X, $-$$ MEMPHIS BARBECUE COMPANY—Offers spare ribs, baby backs, and pulled pork and brisket, along with such sides as mac and cheese, grits, and red beans.  709 Desoto Cove (Horn Lake, MS). 662536-3762. L, D, X, $-$$ MEMPHIS PIZZA CAFE—Homemade pizzas are specialties; also serves sandwiches, calzones, and salads. 2087 Madison. 726-5343; 5061 Park Ave. 684-1306; 7604 W. Farmington (Germantown). 7532218; 797 W. Poplar (Collierville). 861-7800; 5627 Getwell (Southaven). 662-536-1364. L, D, X, MRA, $-$$ MEMPOPS—Specializes in handcrafted popsicles. Cream and fruit pop flavors include Mexican Chocolate and Hibiscus Lemonade; menu changes. 1243 Ridgeway. 421-5985. L, D, X, $ MESQUITE CHOP HOUSE—The focus here is on steaks, including prime fillet, rib eyes, and prime-aged New York strip; also, some seafood options. 5 960 Getwell (Southaven). 662-890-2467; 88 Union. 527-5337; 3165 Forest Hill-Irene (Germantown). 2495661. D, SB (Germantown), X, $$-$$$ MISTER B’S—Features New Orleans-style seafood and steaks. Closed for lunch Sat. and all day Sun. and Mon. 6655 Poplar, #107. 751-5262. L, D, X, MRA, $-$$$ MOLLIE FONTAINE LOUNGE—Specializes in tapas (small plates) featuring global cuisine. Closed Sun.-Tues. 679 Adams Ave. 524-1886. D, X, $ MOLLY’S LA CASITA—Homemade tamales, fish tacos, a vegetarian combo, and bacon-wrapped shrimp are a few of the specialties. 2006 Madison. 726-1873. L, D, X, MRA, $-$$ MORTIMER’S—Contemporary American entrees include trout almondine, several chicken dishes, and hand-cut steaks; also sandwiches, salads, and daily/nightly specials. Closed for lunch Sat.Sun. 590 N. Perkins. 761-9321. L, D, X, $-$$ MOSA ASIAN BISTRO—Specialties include sesame chicken, Thai calamari, rainbow panang curry with grouper fish, and other Pan Asian/fusion entrees. Closed Mon.  850 S. White Station Rd. 6838889. L, D, X, MRA, $ MULAN—Hunan Chicken, tofu dishes, and orange beef served here; some sushi, too. 2059 Houston Levee (Collierville). 850-5288; 2149 Young. 347-3965. L, D, X, $-$$ NAGASAKI INN—Chicken, steak, and lobster are among the main courses; meal is cooked at your table. 3951 Summer. 454-0320. D, X, $$ NAGOYA—Offers traditional Japanese cuisine and sushi bar; specialties are teriyaki and tempura dishes. 7075 Malco Blvd., Suite 101 (Southaven). 662-349-8788. L, D, X, $-$$$
 NAM KING—Offers luncheon and dinner buffets, dim sum, and such specialties as fried dumplings, pepper steak, and orange chicken.  4594 Yale. 373-4411. L, D, X, $
 NAPA CAFE—Among the specialties is miso-marinated salmon over black rice with garlic spinach and shiitake mushrooms. Closed Sun. 5101 Sanderlin, Suite 122. 683-0441. L, D, X, MRA, $$-$$$

NEW ASIA—Specializing in authentic Chinese food, including roast Peking duck. 2075 Exeter, Suite 90. 758-8388. L, D, X, $ NEW HUNAN—Chinese eatery with more than 80 entrees; also lunch/dinner buffets. 5052 Park. 766-1622. L, D, X, $ THE OFFICE@UPTOWN—Offering sandwiches, wraps, pizza, soups, salads, and several vegetarian options. Closed Sat.-Sun. 594 N. Second St. 522-1905. B, L, X, $ OLD VENICE PIZZA CO.—Specializes in “eclectic Italian,” from pastas, including the “Godfather,” to hand-tossed pizzas, including the “John Wayne”; choose from 60 toppings. 368 Perkins Ext. 767-6872. L, D, SB, X, MRA, $-$$ ON THE BORDER—Dishes out such Tex-Mex specialties as fajitas and Southwest chicken tacos; also fresh grilled seafood specials. 8101 Giacosa Pl. (Cordova).881-0808; 6572 Airways (Southaven). 662-6554750. L, D, WB, X, MRA, $ ONE & ONLY BBQ—On the menu are pork barbecue sandwiches, platters, wet and dry ribs, smoked chicken and turkey platters, a smoked meat salad, barbecue quesadillas, and more. 1779 Kirby Pkwy. 7513615; 567 Perkins Extd. 249-4227. L, D, X, MRA, $ ONIX RESTAURANT—Serves seafood dishes, including barbecued shrimp and pecan-crusted trout, and a variety of salads and sandwiches. Closed Sun. 1680 Madison. 552-4609. L, D, X, $-$$ OSAKA JAPANESE CUISINE—Featuring an extensive sushi menu as well as traditional Japanese and hibachi dining. Hours vary for lunch; call.  3670 Houston Levee (Collierville). 861-4309; 3402 Poplar. 249-4690; 7164 Hacks Cross (Olive Branch). 662-890-9312; 2200 N. Germantown Pkwy. 425-4901. L, D, X, $-$$$   OWEN BRENNAN’S—New Orleans-style menu of beef, chicken, pasta, and seafood; jambalaya, shrimp and grits, and crawfish etouffee are specialties. Closed for dinner Sunday. The Regalia, 6150 Poplar. 761-0990. L, D, SB, X, MRA, $-$$$ PANCHO’S—Serves up a variety of Mexican standards, including tacos, enchiladas, and mix-and-match platters; also lunch specials. 3600 E. Broadway (West Memphis). 870-735-6466. 717 N. White Station. 685-5404. L, D, X, MRA, $ PANDA GARDEN—Sesame chicken and broccoli beef are among the Mandarin and Cantonese entrees; also seafood specials and fried rice. Closed for lunch Saturday. 3735 Summer. 323-4819. L, D, X, $-$$ PARK + CHERRY—Partnering with chefs Wally Joe and Andrew Adams of Acre Restaurant, the Dixon offers casual dining within the museum. Menu features sandwiches, like truffled pimento cheese, as well as salads, snacks, and sweets. Closed for breakfast Sun. and all day Mon. 4339 Park (Dixon Gallery). 761-5250. L, X, $ THE PASTA MAKER—This Italian eatery specializes in artisanal pasta. Entrees include Spaghetti allo scoglio, Penne Boscaiola, and Fusilli Primavera. Gluten-free options available. Restaurant closed Sun.-Mon. (cooking classes by reservation Sun.). 2095 Exeter, Suite 30 (Germantown). 779-3928. L (Thurs. only), D, X, $-$$ PAULETTE’S—Presents fine dining with a Continental flair, including such entrees as filet Paulette with butter cream sauce and crabmeat and spinach crepes; also changing daily specials. R iver Inn. 50 Harbor Town Square. 260-3300. B, L, D, WB, X, MRA, $-$$$ PEABODY POINT CAFE—Serves dinner salads, paninis, and pasta. Entrees include lasagna and build-your-own pasta dishes with choice of noodles and sauce. Closed Mon.-Tues. 243 Cooper. 722-2700. D, X, $ PEARL’S OYSTER HOUSE—Downtown eatery serving seafood, including oysters, crawfish, and stuffed butterfly shrimp, as well as beef, chicken, and pasta dishes. 299 S. Main. 522-9070. L, D, SB, X, MRA, $-$$$ PEI WEI ASIAN DINER—Serves a variety of Pan-Asian cuisine, including Japanese, Vietnamese, Korean, and Thai. Noodle and rice bowls are specialties; a small plates menu also offered. 1680 Union Ave., #109. 722-3780; 2257 N. Germantown Pkwy. 382-1822. L, D, X, $-$$
 PETE & SAM’S—Serving Memphis for 60-plus years; offers steaks, seafood, and traditional Italian dishes, including homemade ravioli, lasagna, and chicken marsala. 3886 Park. 458-0694. D, X, $-$$$ PETRA CAFÉ—Serves Greek, Italian, and Middle Eastern sandwiches, gyros, and entrees. Hours vary; call. 6 641 Poplar (Germantown). 754-4440. L, D, X, $-$$ PF CHANG’S CHINA BISTRO—Specialties are orange peel shrimp, Mongolian beef, and chicken in lettuce wraps; also vegetarian dishes, including spicy eggplant. 1181 Ridgeway Rd., Park Place Centre. 818-3889. L, D, X, MRA, $-$$ PHO BINH—Vietnamese, vegetarian, and Cantonese specialties include lemon tofu and spring rolls. Closed Sunday. 1 615 Madison. 276-0006. L, D, $ PHO SAIGON—Vietnamese fare includes beef teriyaki, roasted quail, curry ginger chicken, vegetarian options, and a variety of soups. 2946 Poplar. 458-1644. L, D, $ PIG-N-WHISTLE—Offers pork shoulder sandwiches, wet and dry ribs, catfish, nachos, and stuffed barbecue potatoes.  6084 KerrRosemark Rd. (Millington). 872-2455. L, D, X, $ PIZZA REV—Specializes in build-your-own, personal-sized artisanal pizza. Choose from homemade dough options, all-natural

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CIT Y DINING LIST sauces, Italian cheeses, and more than 30 toppings.  6450 Poplar. 379-8188. L, D, X, $ PORCELLINO’S CRAFT BUTCHER—Small plates, charcuterie selections, specialty steaks, house-made pastries, and innovative teas and coffees are offered at this combination butcher shop and restaurant featuring locally sourced menu items.  711 W. Brookhaven Cl. 762-6656. B, L, D, X $-$$ PRESENTATION ROOM, THE—American bistro run by the students of L’Ecole Culinaire. Menu changes regularly; specialties may include such items as a filet with truffle mushroom ragu. Service times vary; call for details. Closed Fri.-Sun. 1 245 N. Germantown Pkwy. (Cordova). 754-7115. L, D, X, MRA, $-$$ PYRO’S FIRE-FRESH PIZZA—Serving gourmet pizzas cooked in an open-fire oven; wide choice of toppings; large local and craft beer selection. 1 199 Ridgeway. 379-8294; 2035 Union Ave. 208-8857; 2286 N. Germantown Pkwy. (Cordova). 207-1198; 3592 S. Houston Levee (Collierville). 221-8109. L, D, X, MRA, $ QUEEN OF SHEBA—Featuring Middle Eastern favorites and Yemeni dishes such as lamb haneeth and saltah. 4 792 Summer. 2074174. L, D, $ RAVINE—Serves contemporary Southern cuisine with an emphasis on fresh, locally grown foods and a menu that changes weekly. Closed Mon.-Tues. 53 Pea Ridge/County Rd. 321 (Oxford, MS). 662-2344555. D, SB, X, $$-$$$ RED KOI—Classic Japanese cuisine offered at this family-run restaurant; hibachi steaks, sushi, seafood, chicken, and vegetables.  5847 Poplar. 767-3456. L, D, X $-$$ RED LOBSTER—Specializes in crab legs, lobster, and shrimp dishes; also pastas, salads, steaks, and chicken. 8161 Highway 64 (Cordova). 387-0056; 6535 Airways (Southaven). 662-536-1960; 7750 Winchester. 759-9045. L, D, X, $-$$ RENDEZVOUS, CHARLES VERGOS’—Menu items include barbecued ribs, cheese plates, skillet shrimp, red beans and rice, and Greek salads. Closed Sun.-Mon. 52 S. Second. 523-2746. L (Fri.-Sat.), D, X, MRA, $-$$ RESTAURANT IRIS—French Creole cuisine includes shrimp and delta-grind grits, and New York strip stuffed with fried oysters and blue cheese. Closed Sun. 2 146 Monroe. 590-2828. D, X, MRA, $$-$$$ RIVER OAKS—A French-style bistro serving seafood and steaks, with an emphasis on fresh local ingredients. Closed for lunch Sat. and all day Sun. 5871 Poplar Ave. 683-9305. L, D, X, MRA, $$$ RIVERFRONT BAR & GRILL—Beale Street Landing eatery serves a limited menu of sandwiches and salads. Closed Monday.  251 Riverside Dr. 524-0817. L, X, $ RIZZO’S DINER—Chorizo meatloaf, lobster pronto puff, and lamb belly tacos are menu items at this upscale diner.  492 S. Main. 3046985. L (Fri.-Sat.), D, SB, X, MRA, $-$$ ROBATA RAMEN & YAKITORI BAR—Serves ramen noodle bowls and Yakitori skewers as well as rice and noodle dishes.  2116 Madison. 410-8290. L, D, X, $ ROCK’N DOUGH PIZZA CO.—Specialty and custom pizzas made from fresh ingredients; wide variety of toppings. 3 445 Poplar Ave., Ste. 1. 512-6760; 7850 Poplar, #6 (Germantown). 779-2008. L, D, SB, X, $$ ROMANO’S MACARONI GRILL—Serves MediterraneanItalian cuisine, including hand-crafted pasta Milano and penne rustica, and create-your-own pasta; also steaks, seafood, and salads. 2859 N. Germantown Pkwy. (Cordova). 266-4565. L, D, X, $-$$ ROYAL PANDA—Hunan fish, Peking duck, Royal Panda chicken and shrimp, and a seafood combo are among the specialties.  3120 Village Shops Dr. (Germantown). 756-9697. L, D, X, $-$$ RUSSO’S NEW YORK PIZZERIA AND WINE BAR— Serves gourmet pizzas, calzones, and pasta, including lasagna, fettuccine Alfredo, scampi, and more. 9087 Poplar, Suite 111. 755-0092. L, D, WB, X, MRA, $-$$ RUTH’S CHRIS STEAK HOUSE—Offers prime steaks cut and aged in-house, as well as lamb, chicken, and fresh seafood, including lobster.  6120 Poplar. 761-0055. D, X, MRA, $$$-$$$$ SABOR CARIBE—Serving up “Caribbean flavors” with dishes from Colombia, Venezuela, Puerto Rico, and Cuba. Closed Sunday. 662 Madison. 949-8100. L, D, X, $ SABROSURA—Serves Mexican and Cuban fare, including arroz tapada de pollo and steak Mexican. Closed Sun.  782 Washington. 421-8180. L, D, X, $-$$ SAKURA—Sushi, tempura, and teriyaki are Japanese specialties here. 2060 West St. (Germantown). 758-8181; 4840 Poplar. 572-1002. L, D, X, $-$$ SALSA—Mexican-Southern California specialties include carnitas, enchiladas verde, and fajitas; also Southwestern seafood dishes such as snapper verde. Closed Sun. Regalia Shopping Center, 6150 Poplar, Suite 129. 683-6325. L, D, X, $-$$ THE SEAR SHACK BURGERS & FRIES—Serving Angus burgers, fries, and hand-spun milkshakes. Closed Mon. 8 75 W. Poplar, Suite 6 (Collierville). 861-4100; 5101 Sanderlin, Suite 103. 5674909. L, D, X, $

F A S T- C A S U A L

Fresh cuisine prepared while you wait and served in an upscale setting. Not your typical fast-food restaurants, most serve beer, wine, and liquor. CHIPOTLE MEXICAN GRILL—5865 Poplar, Ridgeway Trace, #104. 416-1944; 2760 N. Germantown Pkwy. 620-0469. CRAZY ITALIANS—1250 N. Germantown Pkwy., #105 (Cordova). 347-2449. CREPE MAKER—4630 Merchants Park Cir., #731 (Collierville). 861-1981. GENGHIS GRILL—2362 N. Germantown Parkway. 584-0412; 7706 Winchester. 522-5048; 5849 Poplar, #117, Ridgeway Trace. 308-4040. MRA. HUMDINGERS—6300 Poplar. 260-8292; 1134 N. Germantown Pkwy. (Cordova). 271-2912. MOE’S SOUTHWEST GRILL— 465 N. Germantown Pkwy. (Cordova). 737-5058. 6300 Poplar Ave., #108. 685-5685; 3660 S. Houston Levee (Collierville). 457-7227; 3546 Walker. 590-0192. THE PASTA KITCHEN—875 W. Poplar (Collierville). 316-5119. SWANKY’S TACO SHOP—6641 Poplar (Germantown). 737-2088; 4770 Poplar. 730-0763; 711 Southcrest Pkwy, #101 (Southaven). 662-655-0662. MRA. TAZIKI’S MEDITERRANEAN CAFE— 540 S. Mendenhall. 290-1091.

SEASONS 52—This elegant fresh grill and wine bar offers a seasonally changing menu using fresh ingredients, wood-fire grilling, and brick-oven cooking; also a large international wine list and nightly piano bar. C rescent Center, 6085 Poplar. 682-9952. L, D, X, $$-$$$ THE SECOND LINE—Kelly English brings “relaxed Creole cuisine” to his new eatery; serves a variety of po-boys and such specialties as barbecue shrimp, and andouille, shrimp, and pimento cheese fries.  2144 Monroe. 590-2829. L, D, WB, X, $-$$ SEKISUI—Japanese fusion cuisine, fresh sushi bar, grilled meats and seafood, California rolls, and vegetarian entrees. Poplar/Perkins location’s emphasis is on Pacific Rim cuisine. Menu and hours vary at each location. 2 5 Belvedere. 725-0005; 1884 N. Germantown Pkwy. (Cordova). 309-8800; 4724 Poplar (between Perkins & Colonial). 767-7770; 2130 W. Poplar (Collierville). 854-0622; 2990 KirbyWhitten (Bartlett). 377-2727; 6696 Poplar. 747-0001. L, D, X, MRA, $-$$$ SHOGUN JAPANESE RESTAURANT—Entrees include tempura, teriyaki, and sushi, as well as grilled fish and chicken entrees. 2324 N. Germantown Pkwy. (Cordova). 384-4122. L, D, X, $-$$ SIDE PORCH STEAK HOUSE—In addition to steak, the menu includes chicken, pork chops, and fish entrees; homemade rolls are a specialty. Closed Sun.-Mon. 5689 Stage Rd. (Bartlett). 377-2484. D, X, $-$$ SOUTHERN SOCIAL—Shrimp and grits, stuffed quail, and Aunt Thelma’s Fried Chicken are among the dishes served at this upscale Southern establishment. 2285 S. Germantown Rd. (Germantown). 754-5555. D, SB, X, $-$$$ SOUTH MAIN SUSHI & GRILL—Serving sushi, nigiri, and more.  520 S. Main. 249-2194. L, D, X, $ SPINDINI—Italian fusion cuisine with such entrees as wood-fired pizzas, gorgonzola stuffed filet, and fresh seafood; large domestic whiskey selection.  383 S. Main. 578-2767. D, X, $$-$$$ STAKS— Offering pancakes, including Birthday Cake and lemon ricotta. Menu includes other breakfast items such as beignets and French toast, as well as soups and sandwiches for lunch. 4615 Poplar. 5092367. B, L, WB, X, $ STANLEY BAR-B-QUE—Serving a variety of barbecue dishes and smoked meats, as well as burgers, sauerkraut balls, and pretzels with beer cheese. 2110 Madison. 347-3060. L, D, WB, X, MRA, $-$$ STEAK BY MELISSA—Aged, choice-grade, hand-cut steaks are a specialty here. Also serving fresh seafood dishes, plate lunches, burgers, and sandwiches. 4975 Pepper Chase Dr. (Southaven). 662342-0602. L, D, X, $-$$$ STIX—Hibachi steakhouse with Asian cuisine features steak, chicken, and a fillet and lobster combination, also sushi. A specialty is Dynamite Chicken with fried rice.  4680 Merchants Park Circle, Avenue Carriage Crossing (Collierville). 854-3399. L, D, X, $-$$ STONE SOUP CAFE—Cooper-Young eatery serving soups, salads, quiche, meat-and-two specials; and daily specials such as Italian roast beef. Closed Monday. 993 S. Cooper. 922-5314. B, L, SB, X, $

STRANO SICILIAN KITCHEN & BAR—Presenting a

Sicilian/Mediterranean mix of Arab, Spanish, Greek, and North African fare, Strano serves small plates, wood-grilled fish, and hand-tossed pizzas such as the King Alaska, with salmon and chevre. Closed Mon.  948 S. Cooper. 275-8986. L, D, WB, X, $$-$$$ SUSHI JIMMI—This food truck turned restaurant serves a variety of sushi rolls, fusion dishes — such as kimchi fries — and sushi burritos. Closed for lunch Sat. and all day Mon. 2895 Poplar. 729-6985. L, D, X, $ SWEET GRASS—Low-country coastal cuisine includes such specialties as shrimp and grits. Closed Mon. The restaurant’s “sister,” Sweet Grass Next Door, open nightly, serves lunch Sat.-Sun. 937 S. Cooper. 278-0278. D, SB, X, MRA, $-$$$ SWEET POTATO BABY CAFE—The eggplant Parmesan panini and mac-and-cheese hushpuppies are among popular dishes offered. Menu includes a variety of desserts, including Sweet Potato Baby Cake. Closed Sat.-Sun. 1005 Tillman. 608-1742. L, D, X, $ TANNOOR GRILL—Brazilian-style steakhouse with skewers served tableside, along with Middle Eastern specialties; vegetarian options also available.  830 N. Germantown Pkwy. 443-5222. L, D, X, $-$$$ TART—Combination patisserie, coffeehouse, and restaurant serving rustic French specialties, including baked eggs in brioche, topped with Gruyere, and french breads and pastries.  820 S. Cooper. 725-0091. B, L, WB, X, $-$$ TERRACE—Creative American and Continental cuisine includes such dishes as filet mignon, beef or lamb sliders, chicken satay, and mushroom pizzetta. Rooftop, River Inn of Harbor Town, 50 Harbor Town Square. 260-3366. D, X, $$ TEXAS DE BRAZIL—Serves beef, pork, lamb, and chicken dishes, and Brazilian sausage; also a salad bar with extensive toppings. 150 Peabody Place, Suite 103. 526-7600. L (Wed.-Fri.), D, SB, X, $$-$$$ THREE LITTLE PIGS—Pork-shoulder-style barbecue with tangy mild or hot sauce, freshly made coleslaw, and baked beans.  5145 Quince Rd. 685-7094. B, L, D, X, MRA, $ TOPS BAR-B-Q—Specializes in pork barbecue sandwiches and sandwich plates with beans and slaw; also serves ribs, beef brisket, and burgers. 1286 Union. 725-7527. 4183 Summer. 324-4325; 5391 Winchester. 794-7936; 3970 Rhodes. 323-9865; 6130 Macon. 371-0580. For more locations, go online. L, D, X, MRA, $ TROLLEY STOP MARKET—Serves plate lunches/dinners as well as pizzas, salads, and vegan/vegetarian entrees; a specialty is the locally raised beef burger. Also sells fresh produce and goods from local farmers; delivery available. Saturday brunch; closed Sunday.   704 Madison. 526-1361. L, D, X, $ TSUNAMI—Features Pacific Rim cuisine (Asia, Australia, South Pacific, etc.); also a changing “small plate” menu. Specialties include Asian nachos and roasted sea bass. Closed Sunday.  928 S. Cooper. 274-2556. D, X, MRA, $$-$$$ TUSCANY ITALIAN EATERY—Menu includes paninis, deli subs and wraps, soups, and desserts. Closed Sat.-Sun. 200 Jefferson, #100. 505-2291. B, L, X, $ TWILIGHT SKY TERRACE—Offers small plates of tostados, nachos, flatbreads, paninis; also hand-crafted cocktails and sweeping rooftop views of the downtown Memphis skyline. Open, weather permitting.  The Madison Hotel, 79 Madison. 333-1224. D, WB, X, $ TYCOON—Among the Asian entrees are spicy garlic shrimp, Thai gumbo, and special house noodle soup. 3307 Kirby Parkway. 3628788. L, D, X, $ UNCLE BUCK’S FISHBOWL & GRILL—Burgers, pizza, fish dishes, sandwiches, and more served in a unique “underwater” setting.  Bass Pro, Bass Pro Drive, 291-8200. B, L, D, X, $-$$ THE VAULT—Shrimp beignets, stuffed cornish hen, and baconwrapped chicken roulade are among the dishes offered at this Creole/ Italian fusion eatery.  124 G.E. Patterson. 591-8000. L, D, X, $-$$ WANG’S MANDARIN HOUSE—Offers Mandarin, Cantonese, Szechuan, and spicy Hunan entrees, including the golden-sesame chicken; next door is East Tapas, serving small plates with an Asian twist.  6065 Park Ave, Park Place Mall. 763-0676. L, D, X, MRA, $-$$ WASABI—Serving traditional Japanese offerings, hibachi, sashimi, and sushi. The Sweet Heart roll, wrapped — in the shape of a heart — with tuna and filled with spicy salmon, yellowtail, and avocado, is a specialty.  5101 Sanderlin Road, Suite 105. 421-6399. L, D, X, $-$$ WEST STREET DINER—This home-style eatery offers breakfast, burgers, po’boys, and more. 2076 West St. (Germantown). 757-2191. B, L, D (Mon.-Fri.), X, MRA, $ WOMAN’S EXCHANGE TEA ROOM—Chicken-salad plate, beef tenderloin, soups-and-sandwiches, and vegetable plates are specialties; meal includes drink and dessert. Closed Sat.Sun. 88 Racine. 327-5681. L, X, $ ZAKA BOWL—This vegan-friendly restaurant serves build-yourown vegetable bowls featuring ingredients such as agave Brussels sprouts and roasted beets. Also serves tuna poke and herbed chicken bowls. 575 Erin. 509-3105. L, D, $

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LAST STAND

“Uncle Tim” An appreciation of a Bluff City sports legend.

by frank murtaugh

M

y father enjoyed sharing three celebrity tales from his youth in Memphis. The first involved a chance encounter with St. Louis Cardinals legend Stan Musial at Russwood Park in 1953 (when Dad was 11 years old). The second was a brief visit with Elvis Presley at Katz Drug Store in 1956.

And the third story he’d tell regularly was an account of the football game he played — for Central High School — against local legend Tim McCarver (and Christian Brothers) in 1958. The fact that football was merely McCarver’s second sport somehow inflated the legend of a fellow Memphian who went on to fame and fortune, first as a catcher for the Cardinals, then as a Hall of Fame broadcaster. My dad was an only child, so I came to view McCarver as the equivalent of a displaced, very famous relative: “Uncle Tim.” This is a big year for McCarver’s legacy as a baseball player. It’s the 50th anniversary of the 1967 world champion Cardinals, known to history as “El Birdos,” primarily because of the impact Orlando Cepeda (a Puerto Rican native) made on the team upon being acquired the year before from the San Francisco Giants. Cepeda earned National League MVP honors that year after leading the circuit with 111 RBIs. Who finished second in the 1967 MVP voting? Tim McCarver. In late April, McCarver was elected to the Cardinals Hall of

Fame. He’ll be inducted in August along with steroid-stained slugger Mark McGwire and one of the key members of the Gas House Gang from the 1930s, Pepper Martin. And McCarver’s induction is a bit overdue. He wore the tools of ignorance

for three pennant winners and two world champions in St. Louis. Only Adam Wainwright and Yadier Molina have started more games as a battery for the Cardinals than did Hall of Famer Bob Gibson and McCarver. McCarver spent most of the

1970s in Philadelphia where he part for the cerebral approach that became the personal catcher for worked so well in the Mets’ booth another Hall of Fame-bound hurlwith Kiner. There are fans who feel er, Steve Carlton (a man he first McCarver aims to speak above his caught in St. Louis). audience, never setIn late April, Carlton and Mctling for a two-syllable Carver were so closely word when four will McCarver was linked that speculation do. (He called his 1998 elected to the grew the pair would book Baseball for Brain Cardinals Hall eventually be buried Surgeons and Other Fans. sixty feet, six inches Awkward title, but it’s of Fame. apart. When McCarva terrific read.) McCarver hasn’t forgotten his er played six games for the Phillies in 1980, he became the rare man to hometown. During his accephave played major-league baseball tance speech at the 2012 National in four different decades. Baseball Hall of Fame induction McCarver’s view ceremony — he received the from behind the Ford C. Frick Award for broadplate helped him casting excellence — McCarver transition rather announced a donation to build smoothly into the a baseball complex for kids in broadcast booth, Memphis. “I learned the game first with the Philin Memphis, Tennessee, on longlies, then for many ago fields . . . . The hope is that years with the New some of these African-American York Mets’ cable kids will become major-league station, WWOR. baseball players.” This month, the McCarver’s scholAutoZone Liberty Bowl presents arly style competed McCarver with its Distinguished for attention with Citizen Award, an honor previhis play-by-play ously bestowed upon the likes partner, Ralph Kiof Elvis Presley, Danny Thomas, and Fred Smith. ner, who became known as much for “Uncle Tim” is now 75 years old. Though he’s no longer in his malaprops in the booth for the World Series, the booth as for the 369 homers he hit in you can hear him now and then ten seasons, most on the Cardinals’ regional Fox of them with the broadcasts. It’s been a long time Pittsburgh Pirates. since his football team beat my (“On Father’s Day, dad’s (7-0) on the gridiron. Long we again wish you enough for some perspective on all happy birthday.”) the size and weight of Tim McCarHis skills as an analyst took ver’s impact since he left Memphis McCarver back to the World Semore than half a century ago. He’s ries, where he called the 1985 Fall a member of a few halls of fame Classic as a late replacement for now. When we finally get around Howard Cosell. He went on to call to an organized, formal Mem23 more World Series, the most for phis Sports Hall of Fame, you can any broadcaster in history. And he count on Tim McCarver being a gained his share of critics, in large charter member.  

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5/19/17 2:11 PM


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5/15/17 1:51 PM

Memphis magazine, June 2017  

This month: Our annual Top Doctors issue, in which we tell you who's who in the Memphis medical community. Also: the rebirth of Clayborn Tem...

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