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STD TEST

CONTENTS

BRUCE VANWYNGARDEN Editor SUSAN ELLIS Managing Editor JACKSON BAKER, MICHAEL FINGER Senior Editors TOBY SELLS Associate Editor CHRIS MCCOY Film and TV Editor ALEX GREENE Music Editor CHRIS DAVIS, MICHAEL DONAHUE MAYA SMITH, JOSHUA CANNON Staff Writers JESSE DAVIS Copy Editor JULIE RAY Calendar Editor

OUR 1482ND ISSUE 07.20.17 A reporter called my house the other night. He told me there had been a report that I had removed a tag from a new mattress I bought at Costco, one of those that says, “Do Not Remove Under Penalty of Law.” “No way,” I said. “I’ve never removed a mattress tag. Fake news!” “We have three reliable sources who claim you did.” “Well, I guess it’s possible my wife might have removed it. I have no idea.” “We have video of you in your blue pajama pants snipping it off using black-handled sewing scissors made in Hong Kong.” “Okay, I removed it, but everyone does that! This is a nothing burger! I would have been foolish not to!” That, my friends, is called a metaphor, and it pretty accurately represents a sequence of events that has played out over and over in the administration of President Donald Trump. First step, after a story breaks, adamant lying: e.g. “No one in our administration ever met with the Russians.” Second step, lying partial admission: “Three of us met with one Russian, but we didn’t collude or talk about the campaign at all.” Third step, admission and excuses: “Okay, a whole bunch of us met with a whole bunch of Russians and talked about the campaign, but that’s standard procedure for all politicians. Nothing to see here.” Fourth step, aggressive pivot: “We would have been idiots not to meet with the Russians. It would have been campaign malpractice.” Fifth step: “Hillary, Hillary, Hillary.” Repeat, ad nauseum. Look, if you have nothing to hide, you don’t lie. You don’t cover up. You don’t hire lawyers. And you don’t have to change your story, because you only have one story: the truth. Something is rotten here. There’s a dying whale on the beach. Now it’s “Made in America” week, which is ironic considering the president’s own businesses almost exclusively use foreign-made products, as do daughter Ivanka’s clothing lines. Further irony came in the form of the administration’s move on Monday to allow thousands more seasonal workers to enter the country — the folks who harvest our crops and, not so incidentally, work in Trump resorts and hotels as servers, maids, and lawn maintenance crews. “Made in America” week? Their own election wasn’t even made in America. More like “Hypocrisy in America” week, amirite? Meanwhile, Sean Hannity denounced the Republicans in Congress for not funding the border wall. Is it just me, or did Trump promise that was going to be paid for by Mexico? It’s hard to keep up. During the campaign, Trump also promised a health-care plan that would ensure “health care for everyone” with no cuts to Medicaid and at a lower cost. That promise has collapsed into a raging dumpster fire, with Republicans — who have the presidency and majorities in both houses of Congress — unable to pass anything resembling a plan that would do any of that. We are teetering forward from crisis to crisis, from outrage to outrage, from one impulsive tweet to another. Congress is dysfunctional, and the administration twitches reflexively, enduring one news story about Russia after another, while waiting to see N E WS & O P I N I O N what Special Prosecutor Bob Mueller NY TIMES CROSSWORD - 4 comes up with. Most informed observers THE FLY-BY - 5 believe it will not be good news for Trump POLITICS - 8 and his crew. Which will lead to more EDITORIAL - 10 crises and more dysfunction and more VIEWPOINT - 11 division. COVER — “KITCHEN Trump’s approval rating stands at hisCONFIDENTIAL” BY MICHAEL DONAHUE - 12 toric lows, as more and more Americans come to recognize the mess we’re in — a STE P P I N’ O UT mess wrought with the help of a hostile WE RECOMMEND - 16 MUSIC - 18 power intent on destroying our democAFTER DARK - 20 racy. Surely, we’re near the bottom now CALENDAR OF EVENTS - 22 (I hope), but Trump was right about one THEATER - 28 thing: Fighting our way back to some sort FOOD NEWS - 30 of competent, honest government is going SPIRITS - 33 to require draining the swamp. For real, FILM - 34 this time. C L AS S I F I E D S - 36 Bruce VanWyngarden LAST WORD - 39 brucev@memphisflyer.com

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For Release

The New York Times Syndication Sales Corporation 620 Eighth Avenue, New York, N.Y. 10018 For Information Call: 1-800-972-3550 For Release Saturday, February 25, 2017

Crossword

Edited by Will Shortz

est. 1977

103 40th Anniversary Rock

ACROSS 1 Popular playground pastime 9 Pacific demonstrations 15 News source with a “For the Record” feature 16 “Oh yeah!” 17 Remarkably rapid 18 Overall 19 Producer of boxing rings 20 City in Central Macedonia 22 Permanent marker 23 Violinist Kavafian 24 Looks down 25 Actress Campbell 26 “Dear ___” (“Double Fantasy” song) 28 Actress Thurman 29 Charles who starred in the 1938 drama “Algiers”

E P I T M A R I I N A N E N G R E T C H S A T S

BRET MICHAELS TORA TORA ROXY BLUE EVERY MOTHER’S NIGHTMARE UNDER THE RADAR

E X H A U S T F A N

H A I L S

E N T I C E

T O Y S O P S L I T S D E D E V I D L E E A C T R T A T S E P O N R O P O P R T A N S E E Z E S

30 Slightly

33 Prized game fish

54 Home to the Zapotec people

56 Politician’s 35 He played accessory Ant-Man in 2015’s “Ant-Man” 58 Letter closing 36 Place 59 Share confidences with 37 Come out on top

43 Prepare, as some Mexican food

60 He wrote “Lust’s passion will be served; it demands, it militates, it tyrannizes”

44 Movie-archiving org.

61 Warm, inviting facial feature

40 Betraying extreme embarrassment

46 Bulbous perennial

DOWN

1 Camp classic

48 Series finale

2 Words of understanding

3 They result in very fast response times

51 Downwind

52 What small cranes may produce

4 “Superhits of the Superstars” label

53 Tourist haven with the capital Denpasar

H O T E L R O O M

O U T R D R E A S I N C S A I T M A O N L N C H Y O U K S D E O P B P U P R R I G A S T A N E T T O R I O

5 Reaction from a tough crowd

6 Seller of TV and magazine spots, informally

A M E N C O R N E R

N O R T H S H O R E

K N E E

H I L L

T R E E S E S

T O W E D

2

3

4

5

6

7 Knocked senseless

8 Oration location 9 Partner of 50-Across

10 College just north of New York City 11 Squirt

12 “Nice going, jerk!”

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PUZZLE BY JAMES MULHERN

25 Common beach policy 27 Works of a lifetime 29 Imported wheels?

31 Xmas, for Jimmy Buffett 32 First name in infamy

34 It may be labeled “XXX”

37 Install, as software before shipping 38 Software event 39 Sorry 40 2013 World Series M.V.P., to fans 41 French motto part 42 Restaurant with a “playful” name 45 “How ya holdin’ up?”

48 United base

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52 Looped in, in a way 53 Midnight, e.g.

55 Seat of Missouri’s Douglas County 57 Appropriate answer for this clue

13 “Far less than that”

14 Longhorns’ rivals 21 Blocks, e.g.

ANSWER TO PREVIOUS PUZZLE

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Crossword 37 Loose, now ACROSS DOWN 1 One of the Great 40 Powerful D.C. 1 Vase style Lakes lobby 2 Compatriot o 5 Menacing cloud 41 Raiser of Mao awareness, for 10 Sony offering short 3 Noted father14 Saint’s home, for son singer 44 Not accidental short 4 Ancient New 45 In opposition 15 Place for a Mexican barbecue 46 Guru, maybe 5 Part of a crib 16 Rich finish? 47 Straightens 17 “Don’t give up” 6 Living ___ 49 Firm parts: Abbr. 19 Rather powerful 50 Hockey team, 7 Major Asian ANSWER TO PREVIOUS PUZZLE engine e.g. carrier 20 Brown 51 Words on a 8 Attire 21 Some plants jacket 9 Like melanch 23 Value 53 Risked a ticket musical keys 25 Spooky quality Online subscriptions: Today’s puzzle and more than 7,000 past 55 Construction puzzles, nytimes.com/crosswords ($39.95 a year). 10 The poor staples … onoreach puzzle: nytimes.com/wordplay. Read about and comment 28 Smoothie fruit Crosswords for young solvers: nytimes.com/studentcrosswords. a hint to this 11 Not go along 29 Popular cookie puzzle’s theme 12 Prefix with la 31 Taking things for 59 Famous Amos granted on April 13 Bedevil SOUTHERN AVENUE CHARTER 60 Rocker SteveSCHOOL Fools’ Day and Visit and Enroll now! 18 Girl’s name th others 61 “Don’t go!,” e.g. may precede 32 “Time ___ …” 62 Obnoxious one N ISTRATIO REGTrack, 33 inha sense 63 Subject of some 22 One may be t 9 July 2 starting in sp M codes 349A Not wait for Mr. M-12P Right, say 23 What’s shake 64 Scandinavian when you say capital 35 Huuuuuuuuge “Shake!”

24 Big letters in electronics

E P I C P O E M B R O W S E D E M O T A P E S H R E W S 25 Ones moving from home K E P T A T I T C Y C L I C OElementary D E School T S of S H U S A L M A 26 Fifth in a gro Academic Excellence of eight C &ECreative N AArts B O O Z E S I M P 901-743-7335 H E D P U D D I N G N E A 27 Saginaw-to-F Southern Avenue Charter School’s mission is to educate the whole child. All S I Z academically E S Qon UtheirOlevel, T whether E D it’s regular dir. students are challenged academics, gifted, or special education. The famous “Hyde Library” J A C U Z Z I Q U I X O T E 29 Bitisof beachw technology based with more than 99,000 volumes of books and computers for A L use. O Computer N Z Olabs andGcomputers U I Din the O classrooms are available. student ___ way At Southern Avenue Charter School all elementary students take30 Spanish. N A V A F F A I R E B F F All students are required to participate in one of the following Creative Arts Programs (Kaleidoscope): 33Group It may be add I K E A F STEM, U ZChorus, Z YDramatic W Arts, Y Digital L E Music, Piano, Photography, Ballet, Dance, Taekwondo, or a variety of sports, such toforalcohol T Soccer, AAvenue RBasketball, O S andRTrack. E Many B Artssupport C A students G E are Srequired as, are available At Southern Charter School’s Creative Program,programs to participate in parents and students: Before and after school care; free breakfast, lunch, fresh two of the following Kaleidoscope O Z A R K S T O M A T O E S 34 Pitiful fruit/vegetables, snack and supper; free uniforms for new students; etc. (Creative Arts) Classes: Foreign Language; Chorus; RSuzuki A Piano; G TGroup O Piano P or Violin; T WBallet; O Art; P Soccer; E NBasketball; C E Dramatic Arts; and / or Hit Arts the gas p Taekwondo. Southern Avenue SchoolRoad of Academic Excellence and35 Creative 901.743.7335 • 2221Charter Democrat Memphis, TN 38132 S M E A www.southernavecharterschools.org R Y E L M T R E E S hard

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Questions, Answers + Attitude Edited by Toby Sells

W E E K T H AT W A S By Flyer staff

Aquifer, Worker Grants, & Jobs Contamination tested, sanitation workers get help, Thomas & Betts expands. MLGW TESTS DRINKING WATER

By Chris Davis. Email him at davis@memphisflyer.com.

SANITATION WORKERS GET GRANTS The Memphis City Council voted last week in favor of giving $50,000 grants to the 14 surviving 1968 city sanitation workers. However, public works director Robert Knecht told the council that the number of surviving sanitation workers from 1968 might actually be more than 14 and could increase by six or seven people. If so, the council might have to approve another 50 percent of the original amount for the additional survivors. Additionally, the council approved a new retirement plan for current sanitation workers, in which the city, depending on length of employment, will contribute between 50 cents and $1.50 to the employee’s Social Security contributions and deferred compensation. The funds for both the grants, which equal $900,000, and the retirement plan, equaling $450,000, will come from the city’s reserves.

STORMWATER, SEWER FEES TO RISE There will be an increase on customers’ Memphis Light, Gas & Water (MLGW) bills beginning January 1st to fund improvements to the city’s stormwater and sewer systems. In January, stormwater fees will initially increase from $4.02 to $4.64 per unit, while the sewer fees will go from $2.27 to $2.87 per unit each month. The plan is to continue to raise the fees in several phases over the next five years, totaling an overall increase of 50 percent from the current costs. At the end of the five-year period, the council says on average a customer will spend about $9 more each month on stormwater and sewer fees. City council Chairman Berlin Boyd says although he and other council members realize the increase in fees will not be a “cost easily absorbed by every citizen,” these increased rates are necessary to fund the more than $150 million in stormwater projects and finance over $872 million for the sewer system.

m e m p h i s f l y e r. c o m

Memphis Light, Gas & Water (MLGW) is testing the drinking water from a well closest to where the Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA) found groundwater contaminated with arsenic, and the utility expects those results back this week. High levels of arsenic and other toxins were recently discovered in groundwater near TVA’s Allen Fossil Plant. That water is a little more than a quarter-mile from five recently drilled TVA wells that will provide cooling water for the agency’s soon-to-be-completed gas-fired power plant. Officials with TVA, the Tennessee Department of Environment and Conservation (TDEC), and MLGW said the polluted water likely won’t contaminate the Memphis Sand Aquifer, the source of the city’s drinking water. But the local Sierra Club contends that it could. MLGW said in a statement late Thursday that its Davis Water Pumping Station, from which the utility pumps drinking water, is two miles from the site where the TVA found the contaminated water.

90 JOBS COMING TO MEMPHIS An international company that manufactures electrical equipment is expanding to a new location in Memphis, investing upwards of $20 million and creating 90 new jobs here, the Tennessee Department of Economic and Community Development (TNECD) announced last week. Thomas & Betts designs, manufactures, and markets products used for the connection, distribution, transmission, and reliability of electricity. The company plans to expand its operations here, as well as its research and development department to East Memphis. 5 The move, though, is contingent on PILOT approval.

NEWS & OPINION

BROKE NEWS “Bottom Line With Boris,” doesn’t even sound like a real news segment. It sounds like something made up by the satirical Onion News Network for the sole purpose of making “moose and squirrel” jokes. But it’s real. And if the FCC approves Sinclair Broadcast Group’s rulebending acquisition of WREG, Boris Epshteyn, a former special assistant to President Donald Trump, will be popping up on Memphis TV screens several times a week. Media critic David Zurawik has described the spots as being, “as close to classic propaganda as I think I have seen in 30 years of covering local television or national television.” Memphis won’t be alone. When the Sinclair deal goes down, 72 percent of all Americans will live in a Sinclair market. That translates to four times the combined audience of the top three cable news stations — CNN, Fox News, and MSNBC. Should the deal be made, prepare yourself for heavily spun segments on everything from voter fraud to the reasons why the press doesn’t deserve televised White House press conferences. Maybe they’ll even repeat Epshteyn’s most ironically themed segment, “CNN Struggles with Impartiality.” Bonus news: “Bottom Line” Boris was the sixth person questioned by the House Intelligence Committee in its ongoing probe into Trump’s Russia problems.


Trials on Trial {

CITY REPORTER B y To b y S e l l s

Shelby County District Attorney General’s office again targeted for misconduct.

Shelby County District Attorney General (SCDAG) Amy Weirich came under fire twice last week: first in a new report that ranked her office first in Tennessee for misconduct and second, according to sources, for a new state investigation into her conduct during a 2005 trial. The Fair Punishment Project, a joint initiative of Harvard Law School’s Charles Hamilton Houston Institute for Race & Justice and its Criminal Justice Institute, issued the report last week. In Weirich’s office from 2010 to 2015, the study cited more than a dozen instances of misconduct and found the most overturned convictions in Tennessee. The report said that (adjusted for population) 89 percent of Tennessee counties had fewer findings of misconduct than Shelby County. Also, 94 percent of Tennessee had fewer misconduct-related conviction reversals than Shelby. Weirich called the report “grossly inaccurate” and one that paints an “incomplete account of these cases.” But Josh Spickler, executive director of Just City, said the report was enough to call Weirich “one of the most problematic prosecutors in the entire country.” “Leaders set the tone for an organization, and a look into Amy Weirich’s own record of misconduct illustrates why Memphis cannot shake its misconduct problem,” the report reads. But Weirich said the study looks at the cases through the “eyes of a defense advocacy group.” “I became a prosecutor to hold the guilty account-

able and to protect the innocent in every case, and that is what I have tried to do throughout my career,” Weirich said. “I will never apologize for trying to seek justice for victims of crime.” Spickler said the findings show “a pattern of misconduct, ethical violations, and inappropriate behavior.” “Our criminal justice system has experienced significant delays and has spent millions of dollars as a result of this conduct,” he said. “Victims and their families have been denied justice, and the accused have spent years awaiting a fair determination of their guilt.” Sources connected to Vern Braswell, who was convicted for the murder of his wife in 2005, said the Tennessee Board of Professional Responsibility (TBPR), the arm of the Tennessee Supreme Court that oversees attorney conduct in the state, has launched a new investigation into Weirich and her office on allegations of misconduct in his 2005 trial. Braswell’s family filed a complaint with the TBPR in May and the new investigation was opened by the TBPR last month, those sources said. An official with the TBPR could not confirm whether an investigation had been initiated or give any other details. The complaint notes that the TBPR got involved in the cases of Noura Jackson and Michael Rimmer, both of whom are white. Braswell is African American. “We hope and pray that Vern’s skin color does not stand as a bar to these matters being fully investigated from an unbiased perspective,” reads the complaint.

At the center of the new complaint is a sealed, manila envelope with a sticky note attached that read something close to “do not show to the defense” and Weirich’s initials, according to court testimony. Hiding evidence that could help a defendant’s case in court is illegal. However, Criminal Court Judge Paula Skahan said (in a 2016 note denying a new trial for Braswell) that the envelope did not hinder Braswell’s attorneys from presenting a defense. Also, Skahan said the state was not obligated to hand over the documents in the first place because they would have hurt Braswell’s case, not helped it.

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POLITICS By Jackson Baker

Unusual Circumstances A shot for Democrats in the governor’s race? Dog-and-pony show at the County Commission. In this week’s Viewpoint (p. 11), Tom Humphrey, retired from the Knoxville News Sentinel, where he earned a reputation as the dean of Tennessee political writers, and now my colleague as a contributing editor of The Tennessee Journal, contributes some informed — and likely definitive — thoughts on the Republican candidates who will be vying in a 2018 gubernatorial contest which is about to get started in earnest. As Humphrey points out, Tennessee is now about as deep-dyed red in its political sentiments as can be, and the GOP has a built-in advantage. But he also had some things to say about the two Democrats who have eyes on the Governor’s chair. For purely space reasons, these have been siphoned off from the Viewpoint and are presented here: Said Humphrey: “On the Democratic side, the minority party has a credible candidate in former Nashville Mayor Karl Dean, and his credentials were enhanced by taking in $1.2 million in contributions during four months of campaigning. He paid $36,000 for a poll out of his own pocket and donated $7,000, but the rest came from others. Though he’s declared a willingness

to self-fund with big bucks, it’s doubtful he could match the financial endowments of Republicans Diane Black, Randy Boyd, or Bill Lee in a general election. “State House Minority Leader Craig Fitzhugh, D-Ripley, who is quite popular and respected among those who know him, is still toying with a run against Dean in the primary. And some Democrats are unhappy with Dean’s support of charter schools as mayor. But Fitzhugh is not well known outside the legislative arena, is not rich enough for major self-financing, and probably cannot raise a lot of money. (Just $12,076 in his House campaign account July 1st.)

Tennessee is now about as deep-dyed red in its political sentiments as can be, and the GOP has a built-in advantage. “So Dean will likely be facing one of the Republicans in November 2018. Democrats, of course, are wishing and hoping that President Trump will have become unpopular enough by then to change the current GOP inclinations of Tennessee voters. But it doesn’t look that way today.” Friend Tom (whose track record in making

True Story:

predictions is impeccable) could be right, though Dean, who spent two days in Memphis last week reinforcing old connections and making new ones, would obviously disagree. As the ex-Nashville mayor, a self-described “moderate” who sees health care as next year’s dominant issue, noted to the Flyer, there has been a gubernatorial pendulum swing, back and forth between Democrats and Republicans at eight-year (two-term) intervals, since the 1970s. On that calendar, it’s time again for a Democrat, and, like Dean, the last two elected governors — Democrat Phil Bredesen of Nashville and Republican Bill Haslam of Knoxville — had previously been mayors. Humphrey points out in his Viewpoint that West Tennessee was left without a native-son gubernatorial hopeful, following last week’s presidential nomination to a federal judgeship of state Senate Majority Leader Mark Norris of Collierville, who had long been a potential GOP candidate. That would seem to open the way to a race by Democrat Fitzhugh, a Ripley banker and an able and experienced legislative leader who, if he could get by Dean in a primary, has a combination of down-home likability and Main Street smarts that could possibly reawaken some residual Democratic sentiment in this part of the state, which until very recently produced the small-town

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1256 Union Avenue, Suite 200 Memphis, TN 38104 901-252-3434

NEWS & OPINION

• It was almost like a scripted TV show, with some of the lines improvised around agreed-upon themes but with the resolution of the drama known in advance. This was the strangely harmonious meeting, Monday, of the Shelby County Commission, coming in the wake of a disputatious seven-hour marathon session a week ago, followed by a committee meeting two days later which appeared to further unravel whatever consensus had seemed to exist on the matters of a budget and a tax rate for fiscal 2017-18. Instead of the hotly argued either/ or positions of last week’s amorphous scramble, the commission Monday meeting followed a neatly Aristotelian formula of beginning-middle-end, starting with a proposal by Republican member Terry Roland of Millington to modestly amend the county budget and establish a $4.11 tax rate that would translate into a two-cent decrease for county taxpayers. The provisional budget previously cobbled together by the commission had called for county employees to get a pay raise of two percent. Roland’s scenario envisioned an additional one-percent raise. As formally presented later by Democrat Willie Brooks, that would add $2.6 million in expenditures, the rough equivalent of a cent’s worth on the tax rate. The commission’s GOP members had been vociferous last week on behalf of a $4.10 tax rate, and, though Republican David Reaves of Bartlett made a brief argument for that rate on Monday, he would soon enough join his party mates in acceptance of the $4.11 rate. Democrat Eddie Jones, who with other Democrats had voted last Wednesday for a $4.13 tax rate, now announced that he had discovered from talking to “constituents” that they, too, would appreciate a tax cut. With the sole exception of Walter Bailey, who, invoking the need for “services” to combat poverty, held out for $4.13, the other Democrats — including Justin Ford, a frequent fellow traveler with the GOP who had been absent last week — quickly fell in line, and that was that. As commission vice chair Heidi Shafer said, in gaveling a quick adjournment to the meeting, “I appreciate a commission that knows what it wants to do.” Shafer didn’t wink, but it seemed clear enough that the body’s members — either through alchemy or advance understanding — had indeed known what they wanted to do, possibly even to the point of allowing a pro forma disagreement from Bailey. For procedural reasons, one more vote will have to be taken on the tax rate at a special called meeting on Wednesday. But, as Shafer also cautioned her colleagues, “Get here early. I don’t think that meeting will last very long.”

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E D ITO R IAL

Leonard Gill There is a sense in which the larger community of letters is a polity of sorts, or at the very least a spiritual institution that transcends particular parochial venues. So it is then that the unexpected passing of former Flyer writer and editor Leonard Gill this week is being mourned everywhere in Memphis and its environs that people are familiar with the work and the wide-ranging humanitarian concerns and the pure delight in language that were part and parcel of Leonard. In paying tribute to him, as we do here, leaning heavily below on words composed by his colleague Michael Finger, we are paying tribute to the best human traditions. Born in Memphis on June 18, 1953, Leonard graduated from Christian Brothers High School and then Rhodes College, where he was a member of Phi Beta Kappa, and earned a master’s degree from Harvard University. During the summers, he studied at the University of Virginia and the University of Arizona. He remained in Boston for several years after college, but returned home to teach art history at the Memphis College of Art and work at the old Round Table bookstore. A lover of books and the written word, Leonard was best known as a longtime writer, copy editor, and book reviewer for The Memphis Flyer and Memphis magazine. It’s impossible to imagine him without books tucked under his arm, and in one of many tributes, a colleague remembered, “He could capture the feel of a book and its author like no other.” Another said, “Talking books with him was

a reminder of how language is something to be loved.” He could read people pretty well, too, and for the various literary sections published by the Flyer each year, which required guest reviews, Leonard had a special knack for perfectly matching books with the interests of the staff and freelancers he recruited. News of his death spread quickly through the Memphis literary and journalism community, and reaction to the sad news carried a common thread. Friends and colleagues recalled him in this way: “the sweetest man,” “I loved Leonard, as I think everybody did,” “Leonard lifted those near him,” “always a gentleman,” “what a great guy and a great teacher,” “one of the best people,” “kind, witty, and insightful,” and “one of the most brilliant people I ever met.” If Leonard were reading this, in his self-effacing way, he would no doubt comment, “Oh, surely they are talking about somebody else.” With his quiet, bashful demeanor, it’s not unkind to say that Leonard didn’t always stand out in a crowd. He wouldn’t have wanted to. But anyone who spoke with him, even briefly, soon learned this was a person they wanted — and needed — to know better. And for those lucky enough to call Leonard Gill a friend, they were better because of it.

July 20-26, 2017

C O M M E N TA R Y b y G r e g C r a v e n s

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T:4.575”

V I E W P O I N T B y To m H u m p h r e y

GOP Hopefuls A veteran political reporter assesses the potential Republican candidates for Tennessee governor.

Bill Lee, a multi-millionaire Franklin businessman and cattle farmer, is generally regarded as an extreme underdog in making his first run for political office, despite almost matching Boyd in money matters with about $1.4 million collected from friends and a matching amount loaned to his campaign. Lacking an established political base, Lee has been making a pitch to evangelical Christians and presents himself as to the right of Boyd, though not nearly as much in that direction as Beavers — so far. His candidacy threatens to drain some votes from others, but probably not enough to do more than gain experience for another run somewhere down the road. President Trump’s move to put Senate Majority Leader Mark Norris on the U.S. District Court bench, rather than leave him to follow through with talk of running for governor, means no major candidate from West Tennessee to enjoy that geographic loyalty Boyd seems to be developing in the eastern part of the state. So Boyd enters the western arena on equally unknown footing with the others, all from Middle Tennessee, and maybe benefits a bit. Arguably, Harwell does, too, since the two legislators run in the same legislative political circles. Tom Humphrey, formerly with the Knoxville News Sentinel, is a contributing editor of the Tennessee Journal. See Politics, p. 8, for his musings on Democratic gubernatorial candidates.

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m e m p h i s f l y e r. c o m

The process of giving elective birth to Tennessee’s 50th governor got underway this week.

SATURDAY, JULY 22 & 29

NEWS & OPINION

ready earned a note in state political history by becoming the first woman elected to lead a chamber of the General Assembly. She touted two decades of political experience in announcing her candidacy, having toyed with the idea since at least 2009. That experience, though, has brought negatives as well as positives as Harwell — usually rather reluctantly while striving for some middle-ground stance — chose sides in GOP super-majority squabbling. In January, she came within 10 votes of losing reelection as speaker, and another roll of the dice at that table would be risky. To the gubernatorial table, she brings about $1 million in seed money available in existing accounts, some self-funding capability, and a long list of potential donors — enough for a respectable run to wind up a political career one way or the other.

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The process of giving elective birth to Tennessee’s 50th governor got underway this week, with the first filings of campaign financial disclosures. At this embryonic stage of the race, Randy Boyd, Knoxville multi-millionaire businessman and former commissioner of the state Department of Economic and Community Development (ECD), shapes up as the gubernatorial frontrunner among Republicans — which means frontrunner generally, in our red state. Governor Bill Haslam is a Boyd buddy and appointed him to the ECD, providing a statewide stage to perform to the general applause from the state’s politically astute business leaders. Boyd has hired veteran political operative Chip Saltsman to run the campaign, has lined up public support from a bunch of mayors and a few legislators (mostly East Tennesseans), is working hard and can self-finance — putting in $2 million in direct funding rather than the traditional loan — while collecting another $2.3 million from other donors. The lame duck governor, of course, isn’t publicly endorsing anyone in the primary, but many of his best political friends see the election of Boyd, who’s already facing attacks from arch conservatives, as the next best thing to a third term for the mildmannered and moderate incumbent.   At the other end of the spectrum, politically and financially, is Republican state Senator Mae Beavers of Mount Juliet, who has the strongest right-wing credentials in the field and a small corps of devout followers. Theoretically, if she can maintain that status, Beavers might have at least a long shot at winning the nomination. But she’s not known statewide and reported just $56,721 raised in her first disclosure, including $20,000 transferred from her state Senate fund. U.S. Representative Diane Black of Gallatin, the House Budget Committee chair, has told a lot of folks she wants to run but is hesitant while serving as moderator in federal funding fights among Washington GOP factions. The delay in a campaign kickoff has already hurt her prospects, and a budget blowup could hurt more — or help, if everything falls into place. She and her husband, David, are multi-millionaires and reportedly ready to spend whatever it takes in playing hard-ball catchup. Black is a formidable campaigner who has a past that includes surviving bitter political clashes and overcoming personal problems. Her overall prospects in a governor’s race are something of a mystery at this point. House Speaker Beth Harwell has al-

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Cover Story By MICHAEL DONAHUE Photographs By JUSTIN FOX BURKS

D

avid Krog looked up to the chefs when he was a busboy. “They were so proficient at their craft, a craft that I knew nothing about but definitely wanted to,” he says. “I wanted to be a part of that pirate group of bad boys.” Ten years later, Krog was a chef at highprofile restaurants. He prepared intricate dishes such as foie gras torchon — even though he’d already drunk six beers and a pint of Jack Daniel’s. “You know what kept me alive in those kitchens all those years? Just straight muscle memory,” he says. “My brain wasn’t firing correctly.” His career peaks included being chosen by actor Morgan Freeman to open the old Madidi restaurant in 1999 in Clarksdale, Mississippi. His lows included having seizures in the kitchen because he hadn’t had a drink for three hours. Krog, 43, who is three-and-a-half years sober, now creates French-inspired Southern cuisine as executive chef of Interim Restaurant. He will be a participating chef in the Memphis Food & Wine Festival October 14th at Memphis Botanic Garden. “We were very excited to add him to the roster,” says Nancy Kistler, the festival’s event planner, director, and one of the founders. “I think he brings a lot of talent. The dish that he’s going to prepare for the festival is going to be crazy good.”

July 20-26, 2017

Krog was born in Tampa, Florida, and says he was “pretty wild” as a kid. He

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KITCHEN

CONFIDENTIAL

Chef David Krog’s long road to success — and sobriety.


hated school and loved the outdoors and skateboarding. “I had a lot going on in my head,” he says. “I just couldn’t sit very well. I still don’t sit well, which is a good thing.” He fell in love with the kitchen while pouring water at an Italian restaurant. “I took a pay cut from water boy to become a dishwasher. And from doing the dishes, they let you cut onions. And on and on.” In 1992, Krog moved to Memphis, where most of his family lived. He worked at a couple of restaurants before enrolling at the Memphis Culinary Academy. After he graduated, Krog landed a job at the legendary La Tourelle restaurant, where he worked for two-and-a-half years. Then, in 1999, Freeman, who often ate at La Tourelle, called Krog and asked if he wanted to help open Madidi. “It was a life-changing money offer,” Krog remembers, “and it was a life-changing career opportunity.” Before taking the job, Krog talked to Bill Luckett, Freeman’s business partner at Madidi, on the phone. “I told him that I had 26 hours of tattoo work. My ears were stretched 9/16ths, and I had nine piercings. I didn’t think that I wanted to drive an hour and 15 minutes for him to look at me and tell me that this was not going to happen.”

Krog got the job. “I was way over my head.” But, he adds, “I was too ignorant to be scared.” Krog began experimenting with drugs when he lived in Clarksdale. “That was the beginning,” he says. “That was where I had no guidance. I was the executive chef of this restaurant. I’ve got everyone in the world telling me I’m this badass and all of this, and I was just drinking heavily.” Krog just drank beer at that point. He drank a lot of it, but he continued to excel at his craft. “I was pulling it off,” he remembers. “I was getting great reviews.” Then, after a hernia operation, he became hooked on painkillers. “They were Lortabs,” he says. “I could afford them, and the source was there.” Krog never worried about getting in trouble for his substance abuse. “I used to always say, ‘When you’re talented, people always afford your habits.’” He eventually went into rehab, but his drinking and his opioid abuse continued. “I was drinking back then from the time I woke up until the time I went to bed.” Then Krog began making management mistakes. “Not that any 27-year-old makes the best decisions anyway,” he says. “But you couple in all the booze and my ego and it was destined to come crumbling down.” He ended up quitting his job at Madidi in 2003: “I left because my ego and my addiction were all wrapped up into this bad thing, which didn’t get any better.” Says Luckett: “David was the most talented, pure chef we ever had.” Krog then worked at restaurants in Oxford, Mississippi, before returning to Memphis in 2005, where he got a job working for chef/owner Jason Severs at Bari Ristorante. Then, during a party at a friend’s house, Krog tried heroin for the first time. After that, he says, “I just drank and did drugs — low dosage — all day long.” His habits didn’t stop him from cooking

and creating dishes. “I was on heroin,” he says. “If the dosage was right, I was at my creative peak. Or at least I thought I was. But it just was not going to work. My lifestyle was not going to work for [Severs].” Krog went to a psychiatrist because of his opioid abuse. “I ended up on suboxone, which is a drug they give you to come off of heroin,” he says. He then landed a job as executive chef at The Tennessean, a Collierville restaurant housed in train cars, but his troubles followed him. “I had some ups and downs there. I drank too much on a couple of occasions.” When that restaurant went out of business, Krog took a job at a country club. He drank six beers before work, a 32-ounce beer on his way to work, and whatever he could sneak during work. “I drank at work. I had to,” he says. “If I didn’t, I would have seizures.” The seizures, which happened if he didn’t have a drink every three hours, often left him unconscious on the floor with his tongue and lip bloody. Then, in 2010, Krog got a phone call from Erling Jensen, chef/owner of Erling Jensen: The Restaurant. He said, ‘You don’t work where you work anymore.’” Krog met with Jensen. “He said, ‘How is your drugs?’ And I said, ‘I’ve been clean since ’09.’ Which was the truth. And he said, ‘How is your booze?’ And I said, ‘On my own time.’ Which was a complete lie.”

Jensen knew he was lying, Krog says. “You can’t hide it. But he hired me.” Working in Jensen’s kitchen was hard work. “It sucks when you’re drunk, halfdrunk, and everything. But I was able to maintain some level with him because I really wanted to be there. I was a fan of his food. I felt that the food that he put out was honest. Even drunk, I was smart enough to pay attention to what this man was doing because I wanted to get this from him. So, I think of Erling’s as a finishing school for me on a lot of levels.” And Krog says, “He saw something in me that I had lost a long time ago. He would call me out for stinking like booze. And I would blame it on the night before, knowing that I drank three beers before I got to work. And he would sometimes bust me drinking kitchen wine.” But Jensen kept Krog. “He kept letting me get higher in the ranks,” Krog says. “I think part of his thinking was the more responsibility that he gave me, the better I would be. But I could only do that for a little while.” Krog didn’t get better. “I was so sick and physically addicted to alcohol that I had seizures at Erling’s.” But, he says, “I was also tough as nails. And I think Erling liked that about me. I was not afraid to go to work. I was on time.” continued on page 15

COVER STORY m e m p h i s f l y e r. c o m

More than just muscle memory — Chef David Krog keeps his cool and serves up “pretty food” as the executive chef at Interim Restaurant.

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Over the next three years, Jensen whispered in his ear, “He’d say, ‘You need to do some soul searching,’” Krog remembers. “Or he’d pull me aside and tell me to straighten up: ‘You’ve got to watch your drinking. Your lifestyle.’” By this time, Krog was drinking 18 beers and two pints of Jack Daniel’s a day. “It took so much work for me to stay level. I’d get up to pee, and I’d have to take a shot of Jack Daniel’s to go back to sleep.” Everything came to a head at the restaurant. “Erling fired me after a shift for drinking on the job. He was more pissed at me than I’ve ever seen in any man.” Jensen told Krog to get out. “I was so angry with him. I rolled up my knives, and I didn’t say anything. I didn’t leave with a bang. I went straight to the beer store.” Krog hit rock bottom. Krog had met his future wife, Amanda, at a bar. She was also an alcoholic. He had a violent seizure while they were driving to Thanksgiving dinner at his mother’s house. “We had to have booze delivered to the car.” Amanda went to a treatment center. Krog got a job at an after-hours bar. “Inside of me, I really wanted to get sober, but I didn’t know how.” After her treatment, Amanda “came out and she’s fresh. She’s beautiful. She looks better than ever. And I’m like, ‘I want that. I want that right there. I don’t know how to get that, but I want that.’” Amanda drove Krog to a detox center. “They medically detoxed me,” he says. “They give you medicine so you don’t have seizures.” He was free to leave, but he stayed to finish the treatment. “I wanted to be better. I wanted my craft back. I wanted the respect.” Krog hasn’t had a drink since March 9, 2014. His last drink was “the last shot of Burnett’s blue top vodka in the parking lot on my way to detox. I’m an alcoholic. True alcoholic. It’s a chemical thing. And if I’m not, I will not try to test that.” Chef Mac Edwards asked Krog to work sauté at his Farmer restaurant. Krog told him, “I don’t want to be around the kitchen. I’ll drink. I’ll do drugs. That’s what I do. That’s what that place does to me.” Edwards said, “You’ll be here at 2 Saturday.” “He had all the faith in me that I would be able to step right in there and be okay,” Krog remembers. But he was terrified: “All that drunken muscle memory was gone. I couldn’t do what I had done for 20 years. I was re-learning how to hold my knife.” After six months, Krog’s friend, chef Duncan Aiken, told him he should call Jason Dallas, who was executive chef at Interim. “He said, ‘You guys would get along. You both have similar styles. You both put out pretty food.’ “Well, I hadn’t put out pretty food in a long time. In my head I could do these things. But I could not execute them.” Krog met with Dallas. “I said, ‘I am an alcoholic. I don’t drink. And I don’t do

drugs. And I have only not drank and not done drugs for six months.’” Dallas hired him. “When I first got here, I looked like I was scared to death,” Krog says. “This kitchen can be intimidating.” But Dallas let him grow “as fast as I wanted to.” Amanda and David lost their first child, who died at 28 weeks old. “We lost a baby in sobriety, and we’re together. We just got stronger and stronger and stronger.” Krog saw Jensen for the first time at the baby’s funeral. “He said, ‘You should be damn proud of yourself.’” A little over a year ago, Krog became Interim’s executive chef. He hires as many

young line cooks as he can, “teaching lifestyle, integrity — being the same person here as you are out there. And trying to get them before they get to a point where booze and drugs look really good.” Last September, he and Amanda were married. In May, they had a baby girl, Doris Marie. “At a year sober, I went and had my physical,” Krog says. “My liver count came back perfect. Kidney function perfect. Blood sugar perfect.” He bought a home in East Memphis. “I don’t want to go to another city. My wife is here. My family is here.” He says he wants to be part of the upswing of the Memphis culinary scene.

“David was always a joy to work with in the kitchen,” says Dallas, now sous chef at Cru, a French restaurant in Moreland Hills, Ohio. “I look back at some of the great times in the kitchen together. It’s been incredible to watch him grow.” Jensen recommended Krog for the Memphis Wine & Food Festival. He admires Krog’s “intensity in the kitchen” and his “attention to details.” And, Jensen says, “I value his his friendship a whole, whole lot. He’s a straight-up guy. Honest. Hard working. I’m very proud of him.” “The future is bright,” Krog says. “But it’s contingent upon me doing what it takes not to drink. Because if I drink, as they say, my entire life could fit in a shot glass.”

COVER STORY m e m p h i s f l y e r. c o m

continued from page 13

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steppin’ out

We Recommend: Culture, News + Reviews

Show of Hands

Cory Branan

By Chris Davis

There was a time when Memphians could catch a Cory Branan show pretty much any night of the week. You could see solo shows at defunct venues like the Map Room or the Daily Planet, then catch a bigger show at the Hi-Tone with Lucero as his backing band. Then, a dozen years ago, he said goodbye to his hometown and chased his dream to Nashville. Branan’s said a lot of goodbyes, and he’s been saying even more lately. His latest collection of songs is called Adios, and he’s called it a “death record.” But the vaguer title is sufficient, as Branan, a peripatetic, genre-defying artist, takes listeners on a bright, relatively upbeat tour of dark places and sad farewells. As death records go, it’s lively, crawling with self-criticism and social awareness. On Adios, Branan marries pop hooks to stories of relationships gone south, parents gone to heaven, and gun-happy cops turning routine traffic stops into “Another American Nightmare.” Electric guitars jangle, while groovy organ riffs suggest you can take the boy out of Memphis but not the converse. Local fans who’ve missed Branan’s quirky, humor-laden oeuvre can say hello and hear songs both new and old when he comes to town this week to play a benefit brunch for Hands of Mothers at the High Cotton Brewery, Sunday, July 23rd, at 11 a.m. Hands of Mothers is a not-for-profit organization that provides “skills training, business mentoring, microloans, and market linkage support to vulnerable women and young adults” in places like Honduras and South Africa. The Bloody Mary brunch will help fund and sustain business opportunities for women in Rwanda.

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It’s ice cream, stir fry-style, at the 901 Scoop. Food News, p. 30

Victory Blues: a new play with an old soul. Theater, p. 28

July 20-26, 2017

FRIDAY July 21

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Memphis Zine Fest story booth, 4-7 p.m. All-ages annual fest, with zines by locals for sale and browsing.

Grease The Orpheum, 7 p.m., $8 A good girl falls for a bad boy and vice versa to song.

Wine Down Dixon Gallery & Gardens, 6-8 p.m., $40 An evening of South American wines with tapas.

“By the Book: A Tribute to Dolph Smith” Memphis Brooks Museum of Art, 10 a.m.-4 p.m. Exhibit focusing on Dolph Smith’s artist notebooks, featuring six on display. Also includes the work of 11 artists who have worked with Smith.

Kill the Case Joe’s Wine and Liquor, 4-7 p.m. A tasting of Memphis Made’s IPA Hop Swap brewed in honor of Stax and Goner Records. Memphis Made’s Andy Ashby will be on hand to talk beer. A Funny Thing Happened on the Way to the Forum Harrell Performing Arts Theatre 7 p.m., $12-$20 Comedy in which a slave, in exchange for his freedom, endeavors to win the love a woman for his master’s son.

Jaws CTI 3D Giant Theater, 7 p.m. A 2D screening of the first-ever summer blockbuster. Encore screening Saturday at 7 p.m. The Music Man Landers Center, 7 p.m. A traveling con man falls in love with the local librarian. Presented by DeSoto Family Theatre.


Comedy Squared

Squaresville

By Chris Davis

J U LY 2 8

Flashback: In the Spring of 1997, intrepid Memphis Flyer reporter Phil Campbell was less than optimistic about the state of comedy in the Bluff City. “At times the humor is better than the beer, but it’s hard not to be cynical,” he wrote. “Memphis drives away stand-up comedy clubs as often as it does professional sports teams. The Pharaohs and the Laugh Factory. The Mad Dogs and Sir Laffs-A-Lot. The AA Chicks and the Comedy Zone. Easy come, easy go.” Well, maybe not so easy. Twenty years after this grim assessment, Memphis is a pro-sports town, and the local comedy scene, having survived uncertain times, has proven to be more adaptable than a cockroach. Now some of the leading players in that scene are bringing comedy back home to a place where it hasn’t existed since the Comedy Zone closed at the turn of the last century — Overton Square. What happens when you turn a bunch of comedians loose in a movie theater? That’s the question Comedy Squared will answer Thursday, July 20th, when a slate of regional stand-up talent pairs with seasoned improv performers at Malco’s Studio on the Square for a show hosted by the one-and-only Joey Hack. “This first show will be mostly standup,” Hack says, dashing any immediate hopes for a local answer to Mystery Science Theater 3000. “I do anticipate that sort of thing coming once we get a better grip on the technical issues,” he adds. “Malco wanted to try something different,” Hack says. “It’s a fun opportunity to bring comedy back to Overton Square, and it’s an early show. And at Studio on the Square, you have access to everything from popcorn to Chardonnay at the concession stand.” The lineup includes Memphis comics Katrina Coleman, Benny Elbows, Josh McLane, and Brandon Sams. With the Modern Interest, and Michael Brown from Little Rock. COMEDY SQUARED: THE PREMIER AT MALCO’S STUDIO ON THE SQUARE, JULY 20TH, AT 7:30 P.M. $10

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J U LY 2 0

JOHN NEMETH 9PM J U LY 2 1

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SEEING RED 10PM J U LY 2 3

TUESDAY July 25

Sinbad Gold Strike Casino, 8 p.m., $30-$55 An evening of comedy from this affable comedian/actor, known for his roles in Jingle All the Way and Houseguest.

Friendship Popsicle Day Epiphany Community Garden (corner of Bray Station and Wolf River in Collierville), 7-8 p.m. Featuring ice cream from Paws Ice Cream Truck, with donations being accepted for the Collierville Food Pantry.

Blues on the Bluff Metal Museum, 6-11 p.m., $25 Annual fund-raiser concert for WEVL with music by the MDs, Ghost Town Blues Band, and Marcella & Her Lovers. Plus, food from Central BBQ and beer.

Vine to Wine Memphis Botanic Garden, 6-8 p.m., $30-$45 Tonight’s theme is “It’s Wine-Thirty Somewhere,” with wines from the hottest vacation spots.

Hustle Crosstown Arts, 6-8 p.m. Ongoing professional development series for artists. Tonight’s event features a panel with Tootsie Bell, Terry Lynn, Micah Dempsey, and Darin Throndson. Sunflowers Agricenter International, daylight hours Almost 80,000 seeds were planted on site and are now in full bloom. Along Walnut Grove and Germantown Parkway.

SCOTT & VANESSA SUDBURY 7PM J U LY 2 5

JOHNNY MAC & THE HEART ATTACKS 8PM J U LY 2 6

BRANDON TAYLOR & RADIO GHOST 8PM 2 1 1 9 M A D I S O N AV E N U E MEMPHIS, TN 38104

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SATURDAY July 22

J U LY 2 4

m e m p h i s f l y e r. c o m

JOHN ANGOTTI 8PM

War for the Planet of the Apes is a smart blockbuster. Film, p. 34

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M U S I C F E AT U R E B y A l e x G r e e n e

The Masqueraders America’s Got Talent gives a veteran Memphis group new life.

July 20-26, 2017

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hings were not looking positive for the Masqueraders a year ago. A vocal trio in the vein of the Impressions, who had put out records through most of the 1960s and ’70s, their last hurrah had been on Isaac Hayes’ Hot Buttered Soul label. When that business went under, so did their career. After a final album on Bang Records in 1980 failed to chart, the Masqueraders went back to their day jobs, and though they did the occasional session in the 1990s and began to sing on Beale Street by the early 2000s, they had not performed together for some time when 2016 rolled around. Then a friend heard one member of the group, Harold Thomas, singing at a Christmas party. That led to a gospel producer inquiring about back-up harmonies for an artist he worked with, so Harold called fellow band mates Robert “Tex” Wrightsil and Sam Hutchins, and soon they were back in the studio — as a favor. The producer offered them their own deal, but the group was not satisfied with the recordings. Nonetheless, they were up and running again. Tex heard that America’s Got Talent (AGT) was holding auditions at the Cook Convention Center, and, as they were well-rehearsed anyway, they thought they’d give it a shot. On audition day, the wait was so long they almost went home, but Thomas rallied his comrades. Finally, their name was called. They had chosen Sam Cooke’s classic “A Change Is Gonna Come,” a song deep in their musical DNA, to which they applied their trademark sheen of fluid harmonies. The producers were floored. By the time the group taped their performance, AGT had added strings to their minimal backing track, making for a swelling, emotional performance. Singing for the audition audience reminded Thomas of playing a massive soul revue in Philadelphia during their late ’60s heyday, but that was nothing compared to the audience they

reached when their moment was broadcast and posted to YouTube. To date, the clip has been viewed over a million times. As Thomas recalls, “My daughter said, ‘Dad, I think y’all have gone viral!’” Even more important, the judges — clearly gobsmacked — loved them. As we go to press, the Masqueraders’ second performance for AGT, “Bring It on Home to Me,” will be airing on Tuesday’s “Judge Cut” episode, and the judges’ verdicts will then determine if they go on to perform live in the competition rounds. That will be when fans around the world can vote for them in real time and propel them into the finals. It’s been a long, meandering road to this point. The group left Dallas, their hometown, for Detroit in the mid-1960s and auditioned for Motown. When Hitsville passed, the Masqueraders headed over to La Beat records, which released several sides of theirs. But Detroit winters were too much for them, and soon they showed up in Memphis with two-dozen songs they had written for themselves. Stopping first at American Sound Studio on a whim, they ended up working there for years. Not only did they release their own material, including their biggest hit, “I Ain’t Got to Love Nobody Else,” in 1968, they added their harmonious blend to other artists’ records. That’s the Masqueraders you hear on Arthur Conley’s “Sweet

Soul Music,” on Wilson Pickett’s “I’m in Love,” and on several tracks from the Box Tops’ album, Cry Like a Baby. Many years later, when the group was playing Blues City Cafe regularly, singing the usual batch of tourist-friendly covers, they were surprised to meet British fans who said their early work, and the ’70s material they cut for Willie Mitchell and Isaac Hayes, was popular in the “Northern Soul” scene. This ultimately led to three trips to Europe in recent years, for which they had to scramble to re-learn all their own songs. But such appreciation in the U.K. was too sporadic to support them, leading to the long spell of inactivity that preceded their AGT audition. Thomas is convinced that this most recent success grew from their initial generosity in helping that gospel producer for free: God has seen fit to reward them. Even if they go no further, the notoriety thus far could lead to a lot more work. “We got calls from Canada, New Jersey — even my man over in Spain,” says Thomas, “but we can’t do nothing right now while we’re still involved in AGT.” That’s fine with Thomas. He’s looking to heaven when he says, “Lord, it’s up to you. Whoever you want to win gonna win. I won’t be mad. I’ll just be happy that we got as far as we got.” The Masqueraders


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AIR SUPPLY HORSESHOE CASINO’S BLUESVILLE SATURDAY, JULY 22ND

CIRCA SURVIVE GROWLERS SATURDAY, JULY 22ND

GHOST TOWN BLUES BAND WEVL BLUES ON THE BLUFF THE METAL MUSEUM GROUNDS SATURDAY, JULY 22ND

After Dark: Live Music Schedule July 20 - 26 Alfred’s 197 BEALE 525-3711

Gary Hardy & Memphis 2 Thursdays-Saturdays, 6-9 p.m.; Karaoke Thursdays, TuesdaysWednesdays, 9 p.m.-1 a.m., and Sundays-Mondays, 10 p.m.2 a.m.; Mandi Thomas Fridays, Saturdays, 6-9 p.m.; The 901 Heavy Hitters Fridays, Saturdays, 10 p.m.-2 a.m.; Flyin’ Ryan Fridays, Saturdays, 2:30 a.m.; Memphis Jazz Orchestra Sundays, 6-9 p.m.

B.B. King’s Blues Club 143 BEALE 524-KING

The King Beez Thursdays, 5:30 p.m.; B.B. King’s All Stars Thursdays, Fridays, 8 p.m.; Will Tucker Band Fridays, Saturdays, 5 p.m.; Lisa G and Flic’s Pic’s Band Saturdays, Sundays, 12:30 p.m.; Blind Mississippi Morris Sundays, 5 p.m.; Memphis Jones Sundays, Wednesdays 5:30 p.m.; Doc Fangaz and the Remedy Tuesdays, 5:30 p.m.

Blue Note Bar & Grill 341-345 BEALE 577-1089

Queen Ann and the Memphis Blues Masters Fridays, Saturdays, 8 p.m.-midnight.

Blues City Cafe 138 BEALE 526-3637

King’s Palace Cafe Patio 162 BEALE 521-1851

Rum Boogie Cafe Blues Hall

King’s Palace Cafe Tap Room

Memphis Bluesmasters Thursdays, Sundays, 8 p.m.-midnight; Vince Johnson and the Plantation Allstars Fridays, Saturdays, 4-8 p.m., and Sundays, 3-7 p.m.; Juke Joint Allstar Friday, July 21, 9 p.m.-1 a.m., and Monday, July 24, 9 p.m.-1 a.m.; Delta Project Saturday, July 22, 9 p.m.1 a.m.; Brian Hawkins Blues Party Mondays, 8 p.m.-midnight; Chris McDaniel Tuesdays, Wednesdays, 8 p.m.-midnight.

Live Music Wednesdays-Sundays, 7-11 p.m.; Live DJ WednesdaysSundays, 11 p.m.; Third Floor: DJ Tubbz Fridays, Saturdays, 10 p.m.

Handy Bar 200 BEALE 527-2687

The Amazing Rhythmatics Tuesdays, Thursdays-Sundays, 7 p.m.-1 a.m.

Hard Rock Cafe 126 BEALE 529-0007

Laramie Thursday, July 20, 8-11 p.m.; School of Rock Friday, July 21, 6-7 p.m.; Brad Birkedahl Trio Friday, July 21, 8-11 p.m.; Carlos Ecos Band Saturday, July 22, 8-11 p.m.; Vinnie Hines Sunday, July 23, 9-11 p.m.

Itta Bena 145 BEALE 578-3031

Susan Marshall Thursday, July 20, 6-9 p.m., Friday, July 21, 6-9 p.m., Saturday, July 22, 6-9 p.m., and Wednesday, July 26, 6-8 p.m.; Nat “King” Kerr Fridays, Saturdays, 9-10 p.m.; Kayla Walker Tuesday, July 25, 6-8 p.m.

King Jerry Lawler’s Hall of Fame Bar & Grille 159 BEALE

Chris Gales Solo Acoustic Show Mondays-Saturdays, noon-4 p.m.; Eric Hughes Thursdays, 5-8 p.m.; Karaoke Mondays-Thursdays, Sundays, 8 p.m.; Live Bands Fridays, Saturdays, 8 p.m.

King’s Palace Cafe 162 BEALE 521-1851

David Bowen Thursdays, 5:30-9:30 p.m., Fridays, Saturdays, 6:30-10:30 p.m., and Sundays, 5:30-9:30 p.m.

Sonny Mack Mondays-Fridays, 2-6 p.m.; Cowboy Neil Mondays, Thursdays, 7-11 p.m., and Saturdays, Sundays, 2-6 p.m.; Sensation Band Tuesdays, Fridays, 7-11 p.m.; Fuzzy and the Kings of Memphis Saturdays, 7-11 p.m.; Chic Jones and the Blues Express Sundays, 7-11 p.m.; North and South Band Wednesdays, 7-11 p.m.

182 BEALE 528-0150

168 BEALE 576-2220

Big Don Valentine’s Three Piece Chicken and a Biscuit Blues Band Thursdays, Tuesdays, 8 p.m.-midnight; Cowboy Neil Band Friday, July 21, 9 p.m.1 a.m.; Soul Connection Saturday, July 22, 9 p.m.-1 a.m.

183 BEALE 522-9596

Dueling Pianos Thursdays, Wednesdays, 9 p.m.-1 a.m., Fridays, Saturdays, 9 p.m.-3 a.m., and Sundays, Tuesdays, 8 p.m.midnight.

330 BEALE 525-8981

Rum Boogie Cafe 182 BEALE 528-0150

Young Petty Thieves Thursdays, 8 p.m.-midnight; Pam and Terry Friday, July 21, 5:30-8:30 p.m.; Preston Shannon Friday, July 21, 9 p.m.-1 a.m., and Saturday, July 22, 9 p.m.-1 a.m.; Jeff Crosslin Saturday, July 22, 5:30-8:30 p.m.; Sensation Band Sunday, July 23, 8 p.m.-midnight; Eric Hughes Band Mondays, 8 p.m.-midnight; Gracie Curran Tuesdays, 8 p.m.midnight; Plantation Allstars Wednesdays, 8 p.m.-midnight.

Hands of Mothers Benefit Brunch featuring Cory Branan Sunday, July 23, 11 a.m.-1 p.m.

Flying Saucer Draught Emporium 130 PEABODY PLACE 523-8536

Songwriters with Roland and Friends Mondays, 7-10 p.m.

Huey’s Downtown

MEMPHIS COOK CONVENTION CENTER, 255 N. MAIN TICKETS, 525-1515

RIVER INN, 50 HARBOR TOWN SQUARE 260-3300

Live Pianist Thursdays, 5:30-8:30 p.m., Fridays and Saturdays, 5:309 p.m., Sundays, 11 a.m.2 p.m., and Mondays-Wednesdays, 5:30-8 p.m. 140 LT. GEORGE W. LEE 577-1139

DJ Dance Music MondaysSundays, 10 p.m.

531 S. MAIN 523-9754

LYFE Kitchen Live Music on the Patio Thursdays, 6-8 p.m.

Old Dominick Distillery 305 S. FRONT

Live Music Friday, July 21, 7-9 p.m.

South Main Sounds 550 S. MAIN 494-6543

An Evening with Joe Leathers and Friends Friday, July 21, 7-9 p.m.

Rumba Room 303 S. MAIN 523-0020

Salsa Night Saturdays, 8:30 p.m.-3 a.m.

The Silly Goose

855 KENTUCKY

Amber Rae Dunn Hosts: Earnestine & Hazel’s Open Mic Wednesdays, 8-11 p.m.

Loflin Yard 7 W. CAROLINA

272 S. MAIN 526-0254

Dirty Crow Inn

Earnestine & Hazel’s

827 S. MAIN 278-0087

Bobbie & Tasha Saturday, July 22, 6-8 p.m.; Sunday Evening Slowdown with Mick Danger Parrish Sunday, July 23, 57:30 p.m.

Paulette’s

Hulk Logan Sunday, July 23, 8:30 p.m.-midnight.

Disney: The Lion King Jr. Thursday, July 20, 7-9 p.m.

Nancy Apple Thursdays, 8 p.m.; Po Boys Friday, July 21, 8 p.m.; Bobbie & Tasha Wednesdays, 8-11 p.m.

Ghost River Brewing

The Rusty Pieces Friday, July 21, 10 p.m.-1 a.m.; Electric Church Sundays, 2-4 p.m.

Purple Haze Nightclub Cannon Center for the Performing Arts

South Main

77 S. SECOND 527-2700

Silky O’Sullivan’s

New Daisy Theatre George Porter Jr. Thursday, July 20, 8 p.m.; DJ Shadow Monday, July 24, 8 p.m.

Edge Arts 600 MONROE 262-6674

100 PEABODY PLACE 435-6915

DJ Cody Fridays, Saturdays, 10 p.m.

The Peabody Hotel 149 UNION 529-4000

The Unlikely Candidate Thursday, July 20, 6-11 p.m.

Bar DKDC 964 S. COOPER 272-0830

Marcella & Her Lovers Friday, July 21; All The Colors of the Dark Saturday, July 22.

Boscos 2120 MADISON 432-2222

Sunday Brunch with Joyce Cobb Sundays, 11:30 a.m.2:30 p.m.

July 20-26, 2017

Blind Mississippi Morris Fridays, 5 p.m., and Saturdays, 5:30 p.m.; Brad Birkedahl Band Thursdays, Wednesdays, 8 p.m.; Earl “The Pearl” Banks Saturdays, 12:30 p.m., and Tuesdays, 7 p.m.; Brandon Cunning Trio Sundays, 6 p.m., and Mondays, 7 p.m.; FreeWorld Sundays, 9:30 p.m.

Club 152 152 BEALE 544-7011

20

JAMES TAYLOR SATURDAY, AUGUST 5

ELVIS: THE WONDER OF YOU WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 16

R. KELLY SUNDAY, AUGUST 27

WWE RAW MONDAY, AUGUST 28

Rock and Roll Hall of Famer, and five-time Grammy Award winner is performing, with special guest Bonnie Raitt. Tickets available!

The critically-acclaimed concert event celebrating the life and music of Elvis Presley during the 40th anniversary. Tickets available!

Returning to FedExForum for a night of R&B, with speacials guests Tyrese and Monica. Tickets available!

The superstars of WWE return to action in Memphis for the last time in 2017. Tickets available!

Get tickets at FedExForum Box Office | Ticketmaster locations | 1.800.745.3000 | ticketmaster.com | fedexforum.com


After Dark: Live Music Schedule July 20 - 26 Canvas

Minglewood Hall

Mortimer’s

1737 MADISON 443-5232

1555 MADISON 866-609-1744

590 N. PERKINS 761-9321

Celtic Crossing’s Patio Sessions: Spencer Stewart Friday, July 21, 6-9 p.m.; Jeremy Stanfill and Joshua Cosby Sundays, 6-9 p.m.; Candy Company Mondays.

The Cove

Murphy’s 1589 MADISON 726-4193

Death Cums Thursday, July 20; Bluff City Barnacles Friday, July 21; Diva’s Night Out Saturday, July 22; Kid Trails with China Gate Sunday, July 23; Ex-Cult Wednesday, July 26.

2559 BROAD 730-0719

Ed Finney and the U of M Jazz Quartet Thursdays, 8 p.m.; Petty Gene Saturday, July 22, 10 p.m.; Don and Wayde Tuesdays, 7-10 p.m.; Karaoke Wednesdays, 9 p.m.

Van Duren Solo Thursdays, 6:30-8:30 p.m.

University of Memphis

Poplar/I-240

The Bluff

East Tapas and Drinks

535 S. HIGHLAND

DJ Ben Murray Thursdays, 10 p.m. and Saturday, July 22, 10 p.m.; Dude Called Rob’s Birthday Bash Thursday, July 20, 10 p.m.; Haggard Collins Trio Friday, July 21, 10 p.m.; Bluegrass Brunch with the River Bluff Clan Sundays, 11 a.m.

6069 PARK 767-6002

Eddie Harris Thursdays, Fridays, 6:30-9:30 p.m.; Elizabeth Wise Tuesdays, 7-9 p.m.; Van Duren Solo Tuesdays, 7-9 p.m.

UP TO 75% OFF!*

Hi-Tone 412-414 N. CLEVELAND 278-TONE

Birthday Club, Sleepy Derek Thursday, July 20, 8 p.m.; Thomas Wynn & the Believers Thursday, July 20, 9 p.m.; Jay Daskreet,Chinese Connection Dub Embassy, Trifecta Friday, July 21, 7 p.m.; Young Valley Friday, July 21, 9 p.m.; Benefit for A Step Ahead Foundation Saturday, July 22, 6 p.m.; On and Ohn, Risky Whispers Saturday, July 22, 9 p.m.; Institute, Hash Redactor, DJ Neutral Flex Sunday, July 23, 8 p.m.; Las Piñas Monday, July 24, 8 p.m.; School of Rock AllStars Tuesday, July 25, 6:30 p.m.; Avantist, Glorious Abhor Wednesday, July 26, 8 p.m.; Raven Black Wednesday, July 26, 9 p.m.

Babcock Gifts

Libro (opening August ‘17!)

Baer's Den

Mona Esthetics

Blu D'or Interiors

Novel (opening August ‘17!)

Chico's

Orvis

Cotton Tails

Panera Bread

Dinstuhl's Candies

Pavo Salon.spa

Fleet Feet Sports

Q4Fitness

Frost Bake Shop

Rafferty's Restaurant & Bar

The Grove Grill

Sachi

Hot Yoga Plus IBERIABANK

Huey’s Midtown

J. Jill

1927 MADISON 726-4372

Eric Harpe and the Delta Swingers Sunday, July 23, 4-7 p.m.; The Royal Blues Band Sunday, July 23, 8:30 p.m.-midnight.

Sissy's Log Cabin Talbots & Talbots Petites

J McLaughlin Joseph King Furs & Fine Jewelry

Lafayette’s Music Room

Turkoyz Turkoyz @ Home *at participating stores.

Laurelwood Shopping Center - Poplar at Grove Park

2119 MADISON 207-5097

“The Happening” Open Songwriter Showcase Tuesdays, 6:30-9:30 p.m.

Live in Studio A at Stax Museum Tuesday, July 25, 2-4 p.m.; Gee Whiz! Wednesday Workshops Wednesday, July 26, 10 a.m.-noon.

JULY 21-22, 2017 10AM-6PM

Crockett Hall Tuesdays with the Midtown Rhythm Section Tuesdays, 9 p.m.

394 N. WATKINS 443-0502

926 E. MCLEMORE 946-2535

SUMMER SIDEWALK SALE

Growlers

Midtown Crossing Grill

Stax Museum of American Soul Music

laurelwoodmemphis.com

Otherlands Coffee Bar 641 S. COOPER 278-4994

Mara Daniele, Jack Moran Saturday, July 22, 8-11 p.m.

P&H Cafe 1532 MADISON 726-0906

Rock Starkaraoke Fridays; Lately David Saturday, July 22; Open Mic Music with Tiffany Harmon Mondays, 9 p.m.-midnight; Evan Bartels Tuesday, July 25, 9 p.m.; Hot Bed Wednesday, July 26.

Wild Bill’s 1580 VOLLINTINE 207-3975

The Wild Bill’s Band Fridays, Saturdays, 11 p.m.-3 a.m.

Young Avenue Deli 2119 YOUNG 278-0034

Avon Dale Saturday, July 22, 10 p.m.

East Memphis Folk’s Folly Prime Steak House 551 S. MENDENHALL 762-8200

Intimate Piano Lounge featuring Charlotte Hurt MondaysThursdays, 5-9:30 p.m.; Larry Cunningham Fridays, Saturdays, 6-10 p.m.

Huey’s Poplar 4872 POPLAR 682-7729

Pamela K. Ward Sunday, July 23, 8:30 p.m.-midnight.

Memphis Hilton 939 RIDGE LAKE 684-6664

Neo Soul Jazz Thursday, July 20, 9 p.m.-1 a.m.

Memphis Nites Club 3297 KIRBY 797-8599

Chick Rogers Sundays, 5 p.m.-3 a.m.

7729 BENJESTOWN 876-5770

Tony Butler Fridays, 6-8 p.m.; Robert Hull Sundays, 12:30-3:30 p.m.

Collierville Huey’s Collierville 2130 W. POPLAR 854-4455

Down 2 Five Sunday, July 23, 8:30-11:30 p.m.

Cordova

1911 POPLAR 244-7904

Jana Jana Thursday, July 20, 6 p.m.; John Nemeth Thursday, July 20, 9 p.m.; John Paul Keith & Co. Friday, July 21, 6:30 p.m.; The Carlos Ecos Band Friday, July 21, 10 p.m.; Loveland Duren Trio Saturday, July 22, 11:30 a.m.; Pam & Terry Saturday, July 22, 3 p.m.; The Michael Brothers Saturday, July 22, 6:30 p.m.; Seeing Red Saturday, July 22, 10 p.m.; Joe Restivo 4 Sunday, July 23, 11 a.m.; Memphis Ukulele Band Sunday, July 23, 4 p.m.; John Angotti Sunday, July 23, 8 p.m.; Scott & Vanessa Sudbury Monday, July 24, 7 p.m.; Boss Trio Tuesday, July 25, 5:30 p.m.; Johnny Mac & the Heart Attacks Tuesday, July 25, 8 p.m.; Breeze Cayolle & New Orleans Wednesday, July 26, 5:30 p.m.; Brandon Taylor & Radio Ghost Wednesday, July 26, 8 p.m.

South Memphis

The Chaulkies Sunday, July 23, 8:30 p.m.-midnight.

T.J. Mulligan’s Cordova 8071 TRINITY 756-4480

The Southern Edition Band Tuesdays.

Frayser/Millington Harpo’s Hogpin 4212 HWY 51 N. 530-0414

Live Music Saturdays, 9 p.m.

Germantown Bobby Lanier Farm Park 7901 POPLAR PIKE

Zazerac Thursday, July 20, 5-7:30 p.m.

Huey’s Southwind 7825 WINCHESTER 624-8911

Memphis All Stars Sunday, July 23, 8:30 p.m.-midnight.

Huey’s Germantown 7677 FARMINGTON 318-3034

Young Petty Thieves Sunday, July 23, 8-11:30 p.m.

North Mississippi/ Tunica Hollywood Casino 1150 CASINO STRIP RESORT, TUNICA, MS 662-357-7700

Live Entertainment Fridays, Saturdays, 9 p.m.-1 a.m.

Horseshoe Casino & Hotel AT CASINO CENTER, SOUTH OF MEMPHIS, NEAR TUNICA, MS 1-800-303-SHOE

Neil’s Music Room 5727 QUINCE 682-2300

Jack Rowell’s Celebrity Jam Thursdays, 8 p.m.; Eddie Smith Fridays, 8 p.m.; Band of Brothers Friday, July 21, 8:30 p.m.; Memphis Soul Remedy Saturday, July 22, 8 p.m.; Mo Boogie Sunday, July 23, 6-10 p.m.; Eddie Harrison Mondays, 6-10 p.m.; Debbie Jamison & Friends Tuesdays, 6-10 p.m.; Elmo and the Shades Wednesdays, 8 p.m.-midnight.

Live Music Thursdays, Wednesdays, 7-10 p.m.; Karaoke and Dance Music with DJ Funn Fridays, 9 p.m.

Owen Brennan’s

Bartlett

THE REGALIA, 6150 POPLAR 761-0990

Hadley’s Pub

Lannie McMillan Jazz Trio Sundays, 10 a.m.-2 p.m.

Huey’s Cordova 1771 N. GERMANTOWN PKWY. 754-3885

Arlington/Eads/ Oakland/Lakeland Rizzi’s/Paradiso Pub 6230 GREENLEE 592-0344

2779 WHITTEN 266-5006

Twin Soul Friday, July 21, 9 p.m. and Saturday, July 22, 9 p.m.; Red Letter Day Wednesday, July 26, 8 p.m.

Air Supply Saturday, July 22.

Huey’s Southaven 7090 MALCO, SOUTHAVEN, MS 662-349-7097

Soul Shockers Sunday, July 23, 8 p.m.-midnight; Karaoke Night Mondays, 9-11 p.m.

Tunica Roadhouse 1107 CASINO CENTER, TUNICA, MS 662-363-4900

Live Music Fridays, Saturdays.

Raleigh Stage Stop 2951 CELA 382-1576

Blues Jam hosted by Brad Webb Thursdays, 7-11 p.m.; Open Mic Night and Steak Night Tuesdays, 6 p.m.-midnight.

m e m p h i s f l y e r. c o m

Celtic Crossing 903 S. COOPER 274-5151

Rob Bell: The Bible Belt Tour Thursday, July 20, 7 p.m.; Secret Service, James and the Ultrasounds Friday, July 21, 9 p.m.

ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT

Karaoke Thursdays, 9:30 p.m.; Kyle Pruzina Live Mondays, 10 p.m.-midnight.

Shelby Forest General Store

21


SEE IT AT THE CALENDAR of EVENTS:

M 3D OV IE

PINK PALACE

July 20 - 26

TH EAT E R

Cannon Center for the Performing Arts

Disney: The Lion King Jr., Young Actors Guild Theatre and Dance Company was founded 25 years ago by Memphian Chrysti Chandler. (690-2377), www.yagmemphis.com. $19.50 in advance. Thurs., July 20, 7-9 p.m. MEMPHIS COOK CONVENTION CENTER, 255 N. MAIN (TICKETS, 525-1515).

June 24 - November 17, 2017

Landers Center (DeSoto Civic Center)

The Music Man, fast-talking traveling salesman cons the people of a small town into buying instruments and uniforms. His plans to skip town with the cash are foiled when he falls for Marian the librarian. www.dftonline.org. $18-$30. Fridays-Sundays. Through July 30. 4560 VENTURE, SOUTHAVEN, MS (662-280-9120).

The Evergreen Theatre

Guilt, Lies, & Lust … Nowhere to Hide, the final chapter of Kingston Blackmon, full of sex appeal and deception. Chicago’s underworld takes center stage where the rules are kill or be killed. (652-5761), www.innercitysouth.com. $25. Fri., 7-9 p.m., Sat., 3-5 & 7-9 p.m., and Sun., 3-5 p.m. Through July 23. 1705 POPLAR (274-7139).

Harrell Performing Arts Theatre

A Funny Thing Happened on the Way to the Forum, comedy in which Pseudolus, a crafty slave, struggles to win the hand of a beautiful but slow-witted courtesan named Philia for his young master, Hero, in exchange for freedom. www. colliervilleartscouncil.org. $12-$20. Sun., 2:30 p.m., and Fri., Sat., 7 p.m. Through July 23. 440 POWELL, COLLIERVILLE (853-3228). R

A Boeing Company

3050 Central Ave / Memphis 38111

July 20-26, 2017

P!NK PALACE MUSEUM

Hernando High School Performing Arts Center

The Orpheum

The Little Mermaid, in a magical kingdom beneath the sea, the beautiful young mermaid Ariel longs to leave her ocean home to live in the world above. www.orpheum-memphis.com. $25-$125. July 25-30. 203 S. MAIN (525-3000).

Theatre Memphis

Summer Showcase: Three Memphis Tenors … and a Baritone, evening that will unite the best and brightest voices for the perfect summer offering. www.thearememphis. org. $30. Fri., Sat., 8 p.m., Sun., 2 p.m., and Thurs., 7:30 p.m. Through July 23. 630 PERKINS EXT. (682-8323).

TheatreWorks

Victory Blues, after WWII, Jerry Greisinger has returned to a world that has little to do with the one he left. Follow Jerry, his wife, and friends as they adjust. Winner of the 2015 NewWorks@TheWorks Playwriting Competition. www. playhouseonthesquare.org. $25-$40. Fridays, Saturdays, 8 p.m., and Sundays, 2 p.m. Through July 30. 2085 MONROE (274-7139).

Universal Parenting Place

PlayBack Memphis, bringing stories to life in a safe space to unlock healing, transformation, and joy. Families welcome. (207-3694). Free. Third Thursday of every month, 4:30-6 p.m. LEMOYNE-OWEN COLLEGE, 990 COLLEGE PARK.

Send the date, time, place, cost, info, phone number, a brief description, and photos — two weeks in advance — to calendar@memphisflyer. com or P.O. Box 1738, Memphis, TN 38101. DUE TO SPACE LIMITATIONS, ONGOING WEEKLY EVENTS WILL APPEAR IN THE FLYER’S ONLINE CALENDAR ONLY.

OT H E R A R T HAPPE N I NGS

Call to Artists for MCA Holiday Bazaar & Fund-raiser

Open call, any local artist may submit, no cost to apply. See website for more information and submission form. Through Oct. 2. WWW.MCA.EDU.

Carpenter Art Garden 5th Anniversary Exhibition Artwork for sale by the kids from Binghampton and the local artists who have taught them benefiting the Carpenter Art Garden. Tour properties and witness the impact of community arts. Fri., July 21, 5-8 p.m. CARPENTER ART GARDEN, 301 CARPENTER (319-981-0380), WWWW.CARPENTERARTGARDEN.COM.

Casting Demonstration Saturdays, Sundays, 3 p.m.

METAL MUSEUM, 374 METAL MUSEUM DR. (774-6380), WWW.METALMUSEUM.ORG.

Community Day

Join us on the Brooks plaza for this community day celebrating the museum’s summer exhibitions, artmaking activities, musical performance, live-painting performance, and a digital installation. Fri., July 21, 4-8 p.m. MEMPHIS BROOKS MUSEUM OF ART, 1934 POPLAR (544-6209), WWW.BROOKSMUSEUM.ORG.

Crosstown Arts Digital Lab A R T I ST R E C E PT I O N S

Metal Museum

Opening reception & gallery talk for “With Love, From Brent,” exhibition of over 200 pieces of jewelry created over the course of his life as gifts for his wife, mother, daughter, and sister-in-law. www.metalmuseum. org. Sun., July 23, 12-2 p.m.

Six-station computer lab providing artists and musicians full access to industry standard art- and musicmaking technology. TuesdaysThursdays, 10 a.m.-9 p.m., and Fridays, Saturdays, 10 a.m.-6 p.m. CROSSTOWN ARTS, 430 N. CLEVELAND (507-8030), WWW.CROSSTOWNARTS.ORG.

Cu in Summer: Inspirations Reception + Sale After completing an intensive six-week summer program, local students, ages 14-17, will design and install an exhibition of their completed projects. Proceeds go directly to the students. Thurs., July 20, 5-7 p.m. METAL MUSEUM, 374 METAL MUSEUM DR. (774-6380), WWW.METALMUSEUM.ORG.

Quilting Lecture and Trunk Show by Maria Shell Alaskan artist features natureinspired improvisational quilts at regular meeting. Workshop on Thursday, “Abstraction Through Color, Pattern, and Repetition” and Saturday, “Making Circles and Curves with Prints and Solids.” For more information or to register, email madknitter38018@yahoo. com. Free-$75. Tues., July 25. GERMANTOWN UNITED METHODIST CHURCH, 2331 GERMANTOWN ROAD (754-7216), WWW.MARIASHELL.COM.

O N G O I N G ART

Belz Museum of Asian and Judaic Art

“Chinese Symbols in Art,” ancient Chinese pottery and bronze. www. belzmuseum.org. Ongoing. 119 S. MAIN, IN THE PEMBROKE SQUARE BUILDING (523-ARTS).

Bingham and Broad

“My Kin Is Not Like Yours,” exhibition of works by Debra Edge. Ongoing. 2563 BROAD (323-3008).

The Calliope

“Transmissions,” exhibition of new abstract works by Amy Hutcheson. www.amyhutcheson.com. Through Aug. 26. 456 TENNESSEE ST.

374 METAL MUSEUM DR. (774-6380).

Mary Poppins, www.kudzuplayers. com. July 21-30. 805 DILWORTH LANE, HERNANDO, MS.

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C A L E N D A R : J U LY 2 0 - 2 6

continued from page 22 David Lusk Gallery

“The Retirement Party,” exhibition of graphic, large-scaled mixed-media works by Tyler Hildebrand. www.davidluskgallery.com. Through July 29. 97 TILLMAN (767-3800).

The Dixon Gallery & Gardens

“Edward Giobbi: An Artist Comes to Memphis,” exhibition of works influenced by Italian Renaissance masterpieces by one of the founding trustees of the Hugo Dixon Foundation (which formed the Dixon Gallery and Gardens). Through Sept. 24. “Power and Piety: Spanish Colonial Art,” exhibition of paintings, sculptures, religious objects, and decorative art from the 17th through 19th centuries influenced by Spanish Colonial Caribbean. Through Sept. 24. “Jason Miller: objets de mémoire,” exhibition of photographs using everyday objects that have meaning and memories in the artist’s life. Through July 23. “Made in Dixon,” exhibition showcasing the colorful and joy-filled artwork created by artists of all ages in the Dixon’s educational programs. www.dixon.org. Ongoing. 4339 PARK (761-5250).

July 20-26, 2017

Eclectic Eye

24

We Saw You.

with michael donahue

“Destination Memphis,” exhibition of a visual journey of Memphis music by Ron Olson. www.eclectic-eye.com. Through July 26. 242 S. COOPER (276-3937).

FireHouse Community Arts Center

Mosal Morszart, exhibition of works by Black Arts Alliance artist. www.memphisblackartsalliance.org. Ongoing. 985 S. BELLEVUE (948-9522).

Fratelli’s

“Memphis Series,” exhibition of pen-and-ink works by David Tankersley. www.memphisbotanicgarden.com. Through Aug. 28. 750 CHERRY (766-9900).

Horseshoe Lake Sprint Triathalon, Saturday, July 22nd Jay Etkin Gallery

“Side by Side,” exhibition of African tribal and Peruvian folk art. www.jayetkingallery. com. Through Aug. 1. 942 COOPER (550-0064).

L Ross Gallery

Summer Group Exhibition, www.lrossgallery.com. Through July 29. 5040 SANDERLIN (767-2200).

Marshall Arts Gallery

“Love of Art” and “Memphis,” exhibition of work by Nikki Gardner and Debra Edge by appointment only. (647-9242), Ongoing. 639 MARSHALL (679-6837).

Memphis Botanic Garden

“Magic,” exhibition of works by Michael Moffit. www. memphisbotanicgaren.com. Through July 31. 750 CHERRY (636-4100).

Memphis Brooks Museum of Art

“A Feast for the Eyes: 200 Years of American Still-Life Painting from the Hevrdejs Collection,” exhibition of rarely seen still-life paintings by major American artists including James Peale, John F. Peto, Thomas Hart Benton, Georgia O’Keeffe, and Andrew Wyeth. Through July 30. Rotunda Projects: Nnenna Okore, exhibition of works with burlap to fashion abstract objects inspired by textures, colors, and landscapes. Through Sept. 10. “Unwrapped! 100 Gifts for 100 Years,” exhibition of more than 100 works of art gifted to the museum ranging from ancient coins to contemporary glass and paintings to quilts. www. brooksmuseum.org. Through Aug. 27. “About Face,” exhibition located in the Education Gallery highlighting the different ways artists interpret the connection between emotion and expression. Ongoing. “Drawing Memory: Essence of Memphis,” exhibition of works inspired by nsibidi, a sacred

means of communication among male secret societies in southeastern Nigeria by Victor Ekpuk. www.brooksmuseum. org. Ongoing. 1934 POPLAR (544-6209).

Memphis College of Art “Disappointed,” exhibition of photography and digital collage by Joshua Strydom. www. mca.edu. Through July 30. 1930 POPLAR (272-5100).

Metal Museum

“Metal in Motion,” exhibition and group show of work involving moving parts including hand-operated or run on a motor. Through Aug. 27. “Implements of Grandeur,” exhibition of handmade tools throughout the United States including Jack Brubaker, David Court, Dennis Dusek, Jeffrey Funk, Seth Gould, Tom Latané, Timothy Miller, and others. Through July 30. “With Love, From Brent,” exhibition of nearly 200 pieces of jewelry created over the course of his life as gifts for his wife, mother, daughter, and sister-inlaw alongside cards and letters drawn and written by L. Brent Kington. www.metalmuseum. org. July 23-Oct. 15. 374 METAL MUSEUM DR. (774-6380).

Playhouse on the Square

“Home > House,” exhibition of works by Kevin Mitchell. www. mca.edu. Through July 30. 66 S. COOPER (726-4656).

Slavehaven Underground Railroad Museum

“Images of Africa Before & After the Middle Passage,” exhibition of photography by Jeff and Shaakira Edison. Ongoing. 826 N. SECOND (527-3427).

St. George’s Episcopal Church

“Sun, Fun, and the Arts,” exhibition of work in oils, acrylic, watercolor, and photography by Artists Group of Memphis. (754-7282), www.stgeorgesgermantown.org. Free. Through July 30. 2425 SOUTH GERMANTOWN (7547282).


C A L E N D A R : J U LY 2 0 - 2 6 Talbot Heirs

C O N F E R E N C E S/ C O N VE N T I O N S

TO U R S

99 S. SECOND (527-9772).

Groove Phi Groove Social Fellowship Inc. Conclave

Calvary Episcopal Church Tours

Debra Edge Art. Ongoing.

TOPS Gallery

“Drawings and Song,” exhibition of drawings on paper by Henry Speller, a drawing on board by Coy Love, and limited lathe-cut record documenting a 1978 home performance by Love, Speller, and his wife Georgie Speller. www.topsgallery.com. Through July 22. 400 S. FRONT.

Tops Gallery: Madison Avenue Park

“Cease To Exist, Give In to Good Vibes,” exhibition of six new paintings by Dale McNeil. www.topsgallery.com. Through July 25. 151 MADISON (340-0134).

Village Frame & Art

Gallery Artists, exhibition of work by Charlie Ivey, Virginia Schoenster, Lou Ann Dattilo, and Matthew Hasty. Ongoing.

Scholarship luncheon on Friday. Some events at the Doubletree Hotel and Saturdays’s Youth Empowerment Summit at Lemoyne-Owen College. Call for more information and schedule of events. Through July 22, 9 a.m.-6 p.m. MEMPHIS HILTON, 939 RIDGE LAKE (215-684-9842).

Docent-led tours discuss stained glass windows, architecture, and symbols in Christian art. Free. Saturdays, Sundays, 11 a.m.-1 p.m.

UNION VALLEY BAPTIST CHURCH, 1051 EAST MCLEMORE (774-6248).

Gun & Knife Show

$12. Sat., July 22, 9 a.m.-5 p.m., and Sun., July 23, 10 a.m.-4 p.m.

CALVARY EPISCOPAL CHURCH, 102 N. SECOND (525-6602), WWW.CALVARYMEMPHIS.ORG.

AGRICENTER INTERNATIONAL, 7777 WALNUT GROVE (757-7777), WWW.RKSHOWS.COM.

E X PO S/ SA L E S

F EST IVA LS

Career Fair

Bring 10-15 resumes and dress business professional. Thurs., July 20, 9 a.m.-12:30 p.m. DOUBLETREE HOTEL, 5069 SANDERLIN, WWW.HIRELIVE.COM.

Citizens For Better Service Job Fair

The guest employer will be Durham School Services. Call for more information. Sat., July 22, 11 a.m.-1 p.m.

29th Annual WEVL Blues on the Bluff

Featuring beer, barbecue, auction, and music by the MD’s (formerly Maitre D’s), Ghost Town Blues Band, and Marcella & Her Lovers. $25. Sat., July 22, 6:30 p.m.

continued on page 26

540 S. MENDENHALL (767-8882).

WKNO Studio

“Becky Zee’s 366 Days,” exhibition of 366 clay creatures, one for each day of the 2016 leap year, by Becky Zee. www.wkno.org. Through July 28. 7151 CHERRY FARMS (458-2521).

DAN C E

Brooks Milongas

Members of the Argentine Tango Society give lessons and tango demonstrations in the rotunda. Included with museum admission. Third Wednesday, Thursday of every month, 6:30 p.m. MEMPHIS BROOKS MUSEUM OF ART, 1934 POPLAR (544-6209).

Rhythm Nation

Choreography class celebrating videos from the early MTV days. Costumes and a willingness to not take yourself seriously encouraged. Hosted by Project: Motion, taught by Kenneth Johnson. Thursdays, 7 p.m. Through July 30. MCLEAN BAPTIST CHURCH, 815 N. MCLEAN (274-3766), WWW.PROJECTMOTIONDANCE.ORG.

C O M E DY

Gold Strike Casino

Sinbad, actor and comedian performs his storytelling style of comedy that is profound without being profane. (1-888-747-7711), goldstrike. com. $30-$55. Sat., July 22, 8-9:30 p.m. 1010 CASINO CENTER IN TUNICA, MS (1-888-245-7829).

Malco Studio on the Square

Comedy Squared, featuring Katrina Coleman, Benny Elbows, Josh McLane, Brandon Sams, the Modern Interest, and the Wiseguys. Hosted by Joey Hack. $10. Thurs., July 20, 7:30 p.m.

Memphis Made Brewing Company

Drafts and Laughs XV, craft beer and craft comedy. Free. Thurs., July 20, 8-9:45 p.m. 768 S. COOPER (207-5343).

B O O KS I G N I N G S

Booksigning by Robert J. Krog and Herika R. Raymer

Authors discus and sign Explain the Unexplainable Using Fiction. Sat., July 22, 11 a.m.-1 p.m.

m e m p h i s f l y e r. c o m

2105 COURT (725-7151).

L ECT U R E /S P EAK E R

Monthly Botany Talks: A Casual Discussion of Plant Families

Participate in group discussions on a particular plant family. Supplemental pages and refreshments provided. July 20: Mint Family (Lamiaceae). Free admission. Third Thursday of every month, 5-6 p.m. Through Sept. 21. THE DIXON GALLERY & GARDENS, 4339 PARK (761-5250), WWW.DIXON.ORG.

Summer of Faith: Loving Our Enemy Rev. Beth Lefever, Minister, Neshoba Unitarian Universalist Church, speaks on topic. Free. Sun., July 23, 11 a.m. CHURCH OF THE RIVER, 292 VIRGINIA (526-8631), WWW.CHURCHOFTHERIVER.ORG.

ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT

SOUTH MAIN BOOK JUGGLER, 548 S. MAIN (249-5370).

25


C A L E N D A R : J U LY 2 0 - 2 6 continued from page 25

KIDS

METAL MUSEUM, 374 METAL MUSEUM DR. (774-6380), WWW.WEVL.ORG.

Camp Venture Summer Program

Day camp for ages 3-14 with autism and special needs. For more information, visit website. Mondays-Fridays, 8 a.m.-2 p.m. Through July 28.

“The Jump Off” Fun Bouncer Carnival $15. Sat.-Sun., July 22-23, 11 a.m.-8 p.m.

ABA DEVELOPMENT, 7953 STAGE HILLS (634-8005), WWW.ABADEVELOPMENT.ORG.

AGRICENTER INTERNATIONAL, 7777 WALNUT GROVE (757-7777), WWW.AGRICENTER.COM.

Gee Whiz! Wednesday Workshops

FIREHOUSE COMMUNITY ARTS CENTER, 985 S. BELLEVUE (948-9522), WWW.MEMPHISBLACKARTSALLIANCE.ORG.

Gee Whiz! Wednesday Workshops at the Stax Museum provide youth and young children the opportunity to express themselves through structured activities. Drop-in programs feature music, arts, and hands-on fun. Go to www.staxmuseum.com for more details. Free for participants. Wed., July 26, 10 a.m.-noon.

Horseshoe Lake Sprint Triathlon

STAX MUSEUM OF AMERICAN SOUL MUSIC, 926 E. MCLEMORE (942-7685).

S PO RTS / F IT N ES S

Get Right 4 the Night

Get fit and have fun with Kellye Crawford. $10. Tuesdays, 6:45 p.m.

Held on the grounds of the historic Snowden House, 1527 Bream in Hughes, Arkansas featuring 1/3 mile swim, 14-mile bike ride, and 3-mile run. Sat., July 22, 7 a.m.

Grizzlies Code Camp

HORSESHOE LAKE, ARKANSAS, WWW.PR-EVENTMANAGEMENT.NET.

Memphis Redbirds Home Games

For more information, visit website. Through July 28. AUTOZONE PARK, THIRD AND UNION (721-6000), WWW.MEMPHISREDBIRDS.COM.

RiverPlay Bootcamp

For all fitness levels age 18+. No RSVP required. Meet at the Gear Shack at RiverPlay (Riverside between Court and Jefferson). Free. Wednesdays, 6 p.m. Through Aug. 2. RIVERPLAY, RIVERSIDE AND JEFFERSON (636-6669), WWW.THEFOURTHBLUFF.COM.

Saturday Morning Unwind Session

Meditation teacher Greg Graber will lead a talk on mindfulness in the Church Health Chapel. RSVP on Facebook link. Free. Every other Saturday, 9:30 a.m. Through Aug. 19.

July 20-26, 2017

CROSSTOWN CONCOURSE (FORMERLY SEARS CROSSTOWN), N. CLEVELAND AT NORTH PARKWAY, WWW.CHURCHHEALTH.ORG.

26

Kill the Case Hop Swap presented by Memphis Made at Joe’s Wine and Liquor, Friday, July 21st at 4 p.m. Stretch for Runners

Protect your joints and muscles as you train. Greg M. Price, IFPA, flexibility specialist, will guide you on stretching techniques specific for runners. $20. Sat., July 22, 2-3:30 p.m. ENVISION MEMPHIS, 149 MONROE (521-8117), WWW.ENVISIONMEMPHIS.COM.

M E ETI NGS

The Dixon Book Club

Learn about gardens, the arts, Memphis, and France through reading fiction and non-fiction. July 20:The Secret of Scent. To request a copy of a book to bor-

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row, email lschmidt@dixon.org. Free with admission. Third Thursday of every month, 6-7:30 p.m. THE DIXON GALLERY & GARDENS, 4339 PARK (761-5250), WWW.DIXON.ORG.

Memphis Agricultural Club

Meet in the C Wing of the Expo Building. Lunch provided for $10. Fourth Monday of every month, noon. AGRICENTER INTERNATIONAL, 7777 WALNUT GROVE (757-7777), WWW.AGRICENTER.ORG.

Morning Buzz

Be part of the Memphis creative community and AIGA Memphis. Third Thursday of every month, 7:30 a.m. CAFE ECLECTIC, 603 N. MCLEAN (725-1718), WWW.AIGA.MEMPHIS.ORG.

Provides opportunities for youth to learn computer programming concepts. For six weeks, students will learn beginner level design and programming of mobile applications using MIT’s AppInventor. $10. Mon., Wed., Fri., 9-11 a.m. Through July 21. LESTER COMMUNITY CENTER, 317 TILLMAN (229-1720), WWW.CODE-CREW.ORG.

I Dig Dinos! Dino Days

Summer program all about dinos. See real fossils, prepare a dino dinner, walk like a dinosaur, and see just how big a T-rex really was. Thursdays, Fridays, noon. Through July 31. MEMPHIS PINK PALACE MUSEUM, 3050 CENTRAL (636-2362), WWW.MEMPHISMUSEUMS.ORG.

Jurassic Journeys on Land, Sea, and Air

Featuring animated dinosaurs and other animals from Kokoro. Featuring some new and old friends. Through Sept. 10. MEMPHIS PINK PALACE MUSEUM, 3050 CENTRAL (636-2362), WWW.MEMPHISMUSEUMS.ORG.


C A L E N D A R : J U LY 2 0 - 2 6 Nike Baseball Camp

Intensive camp teaches campers how to take their baseball game to the next level. Children will be grouped by ages 10-15 and ages 6-9. $165-$225. Mon.-Fri., July 24-28, 9 a.m.-3 p.m. EVANGELICAL CHRISTIAN SCHOOL, 7600 MACON (1-800-645-3226), WWW.ECSEAGLES.COM.

Summer Night Lights and Twilight Basketball

Community centers offer fun and basketball in a safe place to play. For more information including locations and schedule of events, visit website. Fridays, Saturdays. Through July 31.

Hands of Mothers Benefit Brunch featuring Cory Branan

Featuring eats, Bloody Marys, and performance benefiting Hands of Mothers, creating economic opportunities for vulnerable women in Rwanda. $30. Sun., July 23, 11 a.m.-1 p.m. EDGE ARTS, 600 MONROE (262-6674), WWW.HANDSOFMOTHERS.ORG.

Kill the Case Hop Swap IPA Tasting

WWW.MEMPHISGUNDOWN.ORG.

Memphis Made co-founder Andy Ashby will be at Joe’s with samples of Hop Swap, an IPA brewed for Goner Records and Stax Museum of American Soul Music. Stop by for giveaways. Free. Fri., July 21, 4-7 p.m.

Teen Prose Writing Workshop

JOE’S WINE AND LIQUOR, 1681 POPLAR AVENUE (7254252).

Jonathan May will introduce the art of writing fiction and essays. For ages 12-18. Register online. Fri., July 21, 3-4 p.m.

Grease

FI LM

The 15 Film Series

Films in the series will engage with three themes: Memphis history, art, and spatial justice. Free. Thursdays, 6 p.m. Through Sept. 30. CLAYBORN TEMPLE, 294 HERNANDO, WWW.ONLOCATIONMEMPHIS.ORG.

Aircraft Carrier Guardians of the Sea

Find yourself aboard a carrier in the midst of a giant war simulation. Through Nov. 17. CTI 3D GIANT THEATER, IN THE MEMPHIS PINK PALACE MUSEUM, 3050 CENTRAL (636-2362), WWW.MEMPHISMUSEUMS.ORG.

Good-girl Sandy and greaser Danny fell in love over the summer. When they unexpectedly discover they’re now in the same high school, will they be able to rekindle their romance? Rated PG-13. $8. Fri., July 21, 7 p.m. THE ORPHEUM, 203 S. MAIN (525-3000), WWW.ORPHEUM-MEMPHIS.COM.

Studio Ghibli Fest: Kiki’s Delivery Service Mon., July 24, 7 p.m.

MALCO PARADISO CINEMA, 584 S. MENDENHALL (6821754), WWW.MALCO.COM.

Twilight Tuesday

Archival Revival: Jaws

Fri., July 21, 7 p.m., and Sat., July 22, 7 p.m. MEMPHIS PINK PALACE MUSEUM, 3050 CENTRAL (636-2362), WWW.MEMPHISMUSEUMS.ORG.

Family-friendly movies on the roof of BSL. Free. Tues., 8:30 p.m. Through July 25. BEALE STREET LANDING, BEALE AND RIVERSIDE, WWW. MEMPHISRIVERFRONT.COM.

COLLIERVILLE PUBLIC LIBRARY, 501 POPLAR VIEW PARKWAY (853-2333), COLLIERVILLELIBRARY.ORG.

Tennessee Shakespeare Company Playshop for Teens

Saturday, August 19

For ages 12-18. Register online. Tues., July 25, 4-5 p.m. COLLIERVILLE PUBLIC LIBRARY, 501 POPLAR VIEW PARKWAY (853-2333), COLLIERVILLELIBRARY.ORG.

S P E C IAL EVE N TS

BBBS Sports Ball

Featuring food, games, auctions, and more benefiting the children of Big Brothers Big Sisters. $125. Sat., July 22, 7 p.m.

Great Hall • 8PM

MINGLEWOOD HALL, 1555 MADISON (866-609-1744), WWW.MSMENTOR.ORG/.

Black Friday in July

All-black or mostly black pets, $20 adoption fee. $20. Fridays. Through July 31.

Tickets start at $40

MEMPHIS ANIMAL SERVICES, 2350 APPLING CITY CV (901) 636-1416), WWW.MEMPHISANIMALSERVICES.COM.

Available at the Fitz Gift Shop or call Ticketmaster at 800-745-3000 or visit Ticketmaster.com

Cigars & Sundresses

Networking event for business professionals in Memphis and cigar enthusiasts. Cigars available for purchase, passed hors d’oeuvres, and live DJ. $35$40. Thurs., July 20, 9 p.m.

$219 Hotel Package

HARD ROCK CAFE, 126 BEALE (529-0007).

Includes a deluxe room and two reserved tickets. Call 1-662-363LUCK (5825) AND MENTION CODE: CPMG19

Grant for Senior Citizen Pet Owners

Spay/neuter cost for senior citizen pet owners, aged 60 years and above, is lowered to $20 per pet. Pet owners must show proof of age to qualify. Call for an appointment. Through Aug. 31. MID-SOUTH SPAY & NEUTER SERVICES, 854 GOODMAN (324-3202), WWW.SPAYMEMPHIS.ORG.

Peabody Rooftop Party

CASINO PROMOTIONS

Meet on the roof for music and fun. $10$15. Thursdays, 6-10 p.m. Through Aug. 17. THE PEABODY HOTEL, 149 UNION (529-4000), WWW.PEABODYHOTEL.COM.

FO O D & D R I N K EVE N TS Fresh Market stores partner with local food banks for a charitable giving campaign focused on stocking the pantry for those in need. Guests can help by making a donation of $1, $3, or $5. Through July 31. WWW.THEFRESHMARKET.COM.

Connecting Crosstown: Tour & Taste with Church Health Thurs., July 20, 10-11 a.m.

CROSSTOWN CONCOURSE (FORMERLY SEARS CROSSTOWN), N. CLEVELAND AT NORTH PARKWAY, WWW. CROSSTOWNARTS.ORG.

Cooper-Young Edition of the Neely Agency Mixer (NAM): Networking for a Cause Enjoy food and drink specials, and 15 percent of the proceeds will benefit Ballet on Wheels Dance School & Company. Thurs., July 20, 6-8 p.m.

THURSDAY, AUGUST 3, 17 & 31 • 3PM Earn only 50 points or earn 100 points and play twice!

BAR DKDC, 964 S. COOPER (272-0830), WWW.BALLETONWHEELS.ORG.

Friendship Popsicle Day

Enjoy a cool treat from the Paws Ice Cream Truck at Epiphany Community Garden, Home Place at the corner of Bray Station and Wolf River. Donations accepted for the Collierville Food Pantry. Free. Tues., July 25, 7-8 p.m. EPIPHANY LUTHERAN CHURCH, 7887 POPLAR (861-6227), WWW.EPIPHANYLU.ORG.

FitzgeraldsTunica.com • 1-662-363-LUCK (5825) • Must be 21 and a Key Rewards member. See Cashier•Players Club for rules. Tax and resort fee not included in listed price. Advance hotel reservations required and subject to availability. $50 credit or debit card is required upon hotel check-in. Arrivals after 6pm must be guaranteed with a credit card. Management reserves the right to cancel, change and modify the event or promotion. Gaming restricted patrons prohibited. Gambling Problem? Call 1-800-522-4700.

ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT

m e m p h i s f l y e r. c o m

1-3-5 Food Drive

27


Jus’ Blues Music Awards Week

Presents

THE BIGGEST, THE BADDEST, THE BLUESIEST STAR STUDDED EVENT OF THE SUMMER 2017 JUS’ BLUES MUSIC AWARDS

NIGHT OF THE LIVING LEGENDS BLUESVILLE - HORSESHOE CASINO HOTEL - AUGUST 3, 2017

TUNICA, MISSISSIPPI HOSTED BY

BEV JOHNSON & WILLIE CLAYTON

4 DAYS IF NOTHING BUT THE BLUES • OVER 20 PERFORMANCES FRI AUG 4 FRI AUG 4 FRI AUG 5

BLUES GOT A SOUL HISTORIC CONFERENCE HISTORICAL PHOTO PRESENTATION BY: LEGENDARY PHOTOGRAPHER JIM ALEXANDER JUKE JOINT FRIDAY NIGHT FISH PARTY AT THE JUS’ BLUES JUKE JOINT CAFE A BLUES JUKE JOINT PARTY DOWN IN THE “DELTA BABY”

TUNICA, MISSISSIPPI

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July 20-26, 2017

MIDTOWN 725-PIES (7437)

DELIVERS DOWNTOWN 5-777-PIE (743)

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T H E AT E R B y C h r i s D a v i s

Winners & Losers Victory Blues is a new play with an old soul.

W

hy did Jerry get fired? Was he a bad shoe salesman? Do people just not like him? Was he saying the wrong stuff ? Reading the wrong things? Is he just paranoid? Or are his friends out to get him? There’s a lot going on in Alan Brody’s NewWorks@TheWorks-winning play Victory Blues, but what’s it all about? I’m going out on a limb and guessing that Brody’s read a little Arthur Miller. Victory Blues plays out like a workingclass sequel to Miller’s WW2-aftermath drama All My Sons. It tells the story of three young couples — old friends living in the same apartment building, adjusting to life after wartime in the most prosperous country the world has ever known. Only one friend isn’t prospering. While his buddies enjoy the fruits of winning, poor shoe salesman Jerry Greisinger just barely gets by. Jerry saw combat, and he’s still struggling with that. His friends didn’t, and they don’t get why their old pal’s worried about other people’s problems when he could be out there getting his big, fat slice of winner cake. They don’t get why America’s Red Scare bothers him so much, since he’s not a commie. (Or is he?) They don’t get why he won’t forgive a friend’s terrible betrayal. Jerry’s wife Barbara doesn’t get it either. Her friend May, who’s going to college against her husband Lenny’s wishes, does. Test patterns fill the TV screen. Casseroles occupy the shelf like noodly metaphors. Tension builds. A friend who saw Victory Blues in its second weekend described the new script as a 60-year-old classic lost in time and went on to suggest that it might have won the Pulitzer had it been produced in 1957 rather than 2017. That seems unlikely since that was Eugene O’Neill’s year to win for Long Day’s Journey Into Night, but the show does have something to say and a relentlessly classic vibe. In fact, everything about Victory Blues reminded me of All My Sons. More specifically, it reminded me of the monologue where the character Chris Keller describes the horror of combat and the shock of coming home: “I went to work with Dad, and that rat‐race again. I felt … what you said …

ashamed somehow. Because nobody was changed at all. It seemed to make suckers out of a lot of guys. I felt wrong to be alive, to open the bank‐book, to drive the new car, to see the new refrigerator. I mean you can take those things out of a war, but when you drive that car you’ve got to know that it came out of the love a man can have for a man, and you’ve got to be a little better because of that. Otherwise what you have is really loot, and there’s blood on it.” That’s the heart of Victory Blues. It’s not that Jerry doesn’t want to work in his friend Howie’s appliance store. Like Miller’s combat-tested protagonist, who couldn’t look at the refrigerator without obligations, he simply can’t. Meaty stuff. As Jerry, Jacob Wingfield does a fantastic job communicating his sense of disorientation and displacement. He’s strongly supported by Jeff Posson and Kinon Keplinger as his old friends Howie and Lenny. The former’s an anti-union Truman Democrat, so reflexively anti-Communist you just know he’ll vote Reagan in middle age. Lenny wants things to go back to being the way they were and struggles to adapt. Victory Blues is centered around male relationships, but some of the evening’s finest performances belong to the women: Nichol Pritchard, Lena WalVictory lace Black, and Renee Blues Davis Brame. Black is particularly good as Lenny’s wife May, whose intellectual awakening creates conflict at home. For May, the world’s no longer a black-and-white place filled with winners and losers. That makes her the only person Jerry can talk to and a threat to everybody else. Director Jaclyn Suffel and her ensemble do a fantastic job setting everything up in act one. They do even more heroic work after the break, carrying the script like a wounded soldier when things get repetitive and the device used to demonstrate Jerry’s isolation winks at self-parody. So the last act could stand some trimming and focus. There’s lots of fine acting collected here. And a terrific soundtrack that lifts things in all the right places. Victory Blues at TheatreWorks through July 30th. $25-$40. Playhouseonthesquare.org

BILL SIMMERS

Jus’ Blues Music Foundation


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F O O D N E W S B y L e s l e y Yo u n g

Oh, Fudge

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oodworking, gardening, horses. Everybody has a passion. For Beatrice

Bryant, it’s fudge. Thankfully for this self-appointed fudgeologist, her passion is also her career, and she has the opportunity to share this love of butter and cream and sugar with people from all over the globe. Right on Beale Street. With the help of Beale Street Management general manager Jeff “Goose” Goss, Bryant opened Beale Sweets Sugar Shack at 156 Beale earlier this summer. “Goose came in Bass Pro, where I was the team leader of the General Store, and he saw all the fudge, and within five seconds he said, ‘We need to talk,’” Bryant says. She was already planning to go on

medical leave for a knee replacement, so it was an easy transition from working as a manager at the Pyramid to running a candy store on Beale. You can’t leave the shop without escaping her enthusiasm. Her newest favorite is Tiger Butter, a basic vanilla fudge in glorious Tiger blue. Previously, she was pushing her caramel fudge, which she nicknamed God’s Gift to Fudge — a sort of pralines and cream that comes with the verbal instructions to “shut up and suck.” “You let the fudge melt in your mouth along with the caramel,” she says. “Enjoy it, and take your time. It’s candy, right?” Of course, there’s more than just fudge in the wood-lined sugary playground. All sorts of old favorites are shelved and stacked and barrelled, including everyone’s old favorite — candy cigarettes.

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“Everybody asks for those,” Bryant says. (I asked about the gum cigarettes. They have the powdered sugar you can blow out like smoke. No, I did not leave with a pack. They were out.) She has gummy pizzas and gummy sushi and five-pound Rice Krispies Treats and even chicken-and-waffle taffy. The alcoholic candy is a big seller, and she plans on expanding her line of fudge to include a cinnamon-roll flavor with Fireball. There are no limits to her fudgemaking genius.

Watermelon, Blue Suede Shoes for Elvis Week (peanut butter and banana sandwich, in case you didn’t guess), cotton candy (with chunks of cotton candy mixed in the vanilla fudge, which quite literally melts in your mouth). “Fudge has turned into a huge new life for me,” she says. “You can do anything with fudge.” Beale Sweets Sugar Shack, 156 Beale, 528-1055. Hours Mon.-Thurs., 11 a.m. to 8 p.m., Fri. and Sat., 11 a.m. to 10 p.m., and Sun., 11 a.m. to 8 p.m. Say what you will, but Memphis

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OH, FUDGE doesn’t stray too far behind what the Yuccies are doing, and the latest in foodie-dom that’s sweeping the nation’s hip is Thai rolled ice cream. Originating from street vendors in countries such as Thailand, Cambodia, and the Philippines, the frozen treat is akin to homemade ice cream meets stir fry. “It’s the same style as hibachi,” says Bahji Hakimi, who just opened his own Thai rolled ice cream shop, The 901 Scoop, in the heart of the University of Memphis area. “I call it stir-fried ice cream.”

Says Bahji Hakimi, who just opened … The 901 Scoop, “I call it stir-fried ice cream.” Hakimi stands over a frozen griddle, which he keeps at -18 degrees Celsius, and pours over the homemade milk base — a combination of heavy cream, whole milk, dry milk, sugar, and a dash of vanilla, which Hakimi makes fresh every morning. While it freezes, he adds the flavor — buyer’s choice of all kinds of toppings, such as candy bars, cookies, fruits, etc., and begins chopping. He then spreads the

chopped mixture flat over the griddle, letting it freeze to the right consistency so he can then scrape and roll it into quarter-size rolls, enough to fit in a 20-ounce bowl, to which he then adds more toppings. The 901 Scoop has a regular menu of five choices of flavors such as Cookie Monster, with cookie dough, Love Ya Latte, with coffee, as well as a build-your-own option and a weekly special. Last week he had Figgy Fresh on the board, a recipe of homemade fig preserves, lemon zest, cinnamon, honey, and pistachios. For the less adventurous, or those in a hurry — it takes about four minutes to make the rolled stuff — he has the scooped stuff and shaved ice as well as a Candy Bar Taco, which includes a homemade waffle cone, vanilla bean ice cream, and topped with Butterfinger, Snickers, and Reese’s, finished with chocolate or caramel sauce. Things are going so well, he’s had to order a second griddle. “I knew there was a need for it here. I knew there was a market for it,” Hakimi says. The 901 Scoop, 3536 Walker, 421-5519. Open 11 a.m. to 11 p.m. every day.

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S P I R ITS By Andria Lisle

Drinks With Ace Ace Atkins talks bourbon, beer, and books.

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Your newest novel, The Fallen, was released this week. It’s one of your “Quinn Colson” books — about an Army Ranger-turned-North Mississippi sheriff. What does a character like Colson like to drink? Quinn Colson drinks bourbon and beer. I wouldn’t call him a real connoisseur — he’s the kind of guy who might have a cold beer, like Coors or Budweiser, with dinner. Is the fictional Tibbehah County, where most Ace of your contemporary Atkins novels take place, a dry county? For a long time, it had been a county where you couldn’t drink at all, but now you can get a liquor license there. There’s a bar called the Southern Star in my Quinn Colson books that’s modeled on a great place called the White Star, which is in Water Valley, Mississippi. Since 2012, you’ve been writing the Spenser series of detective novels, begun by the late, great mystery writer Robert B. Parker. What does the Boston private eye drink? Spenser used to be a bourbon guy, but in the later books, Parker had him moving to Scotch. I do not like Scotch. I’m a Southerner, and I like bourbon. When I was hired to continue the series, I moved Spenser back to bourbon. Your online biography states that you’re “friend to several bartenders.” I’ve been in Oxford so long that many

of them have retired! Justin Burnett and John Spreafico at City Grocery, Will Griffith at Proud Larry’s. Several years ago, there was a writer in town who was a real a-hole to many of the local bartenders. As Randy Yates at Ajax said, “What kind of writer is rude to a bartender?” And in Memphis? I love going down to Earnestine & Hazel’s. I used to go to the Lamplighter, which was a lot of fun. Miss Shirley [Williams] was there for years, and she always remembered me. That’s the kind of bar I like: a place that looks lived in, with characters and stories and a really good jukebox. A place where you can feel welcome, with a bartender who can hold a real conversation. What’s your current drink of choice? While I’m writing, I’m usually drinking coffee. But I do really like bourbon, and that’s my go-to, my reward, post-writing. I’ll drink a Woodford on the rocks, or an old fashioned with Luxardo cherries and Bulleit rye. As far as beer goes, I lean toward Yalobusha Brewing Company out of Water Valley and Ghost River or Wiseacre if I’m in Memphis. How much of a role does liquor play in Wicked City, your novel about the circa-1950s organized crime element in Phenix City, Alabama? In that era, in the Bible Belt where extreme drinking was frowned upon, you’d go to Phenix City to get boozed up. Drinking was a big part of the culture there. Around that same time, my grandfather was a bootlegger in Lamar County, Alabama. He was on the distribution side, not the production side. My dad played football and went to college, but my uncles all drove for him, like something out of the Robert Mitchum movie Thunder Road. How about White Shadow, your fictionalized account of Tampa mob boss Charlie Wall’s murder in 1955? Wall was responsible for bringing a lot of rum through Cuba, and I do like rum. My favorite is Zaya, a dark rum that is very addictive. Got a cocktail recipe to go with that? If I’m gonna drink a liquor, I drink it neat. I’m not going to screw it up. That’s a cardinal sin.

ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT

A

ce Atkins, the Oxford, Mississippi-based novelist, specializes in gritty, hardboiled characters who know their way around a liquor cabinet. The opening scene in Atkins’ first book, 1998’s Crossroad Blues, takes place in a fictional French Quarter watering hole called JoJo’s Blues Bar. Some 20-odd titles later, the thread continues with page-turning plot elements that center around bootlegging, rum running, and, on occasion, the love of a cold Busch beer. I caught up with Atkins at the end of a workday, just before he enjoyed a well-earned glass of Bulleit bourbon.

33


FILM REVIEW By Chris McCoy

Serious Monkey Business

LIVE ENTERTAINMENT War for the Planet of the Apes is the summer’s smartest blockbuster. 9PM –1AM

ROXI LOVE AUGUST 4 & 5

DR. ZARR’S

Amazing Funk Monster AUGUST 11

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BILLY AVERY & The Uptown Band

July 20-26, 2017

AUGUST 18 & 19

AFTER DARK BAND AUGUST 25 & 26

www.ballystunica.com 34

Bally’s Tunica and RIH Acquisitions MS II, LLC have no affiliation with Caesars License Company, LLC and its affiliates other than a license to the Bally’s name. Must be 21 or older. Gambling Problem? Call 1-888-777-9696.

H

ave you ever dreamed of a world where you could see The Bridge Over the River Kwai, Star Wars, Apocalypse Now, The Great Escape, and The Ten Commandments remade with gorillas, monkeys, and orangutans? Sure, there’s a lot of horrible stuff going on right now, but at least we finally live in that world. Not since 1973, when Alejandro Jodorowsky recreated the Spanish conquest of the Aztecs with frogs, toads, and chameleons in The Holy Mountain, have we seen such epic animal action as we see in War for the Planet of the Apes. Of course, I’m being facetious. That lede popped into my head during the closing moments of director Matt Reeves’ film, and it was just too juicy to pass up. I also thought it would be good to open with a joke, because this final installment of the rebooted Planet of the Apes series is as deadly serious as anything you’ll see in theaters this year. One of the many great things about the original 1968 film is that viewers are disarmed by the ludicrousness of the premise. Charlton Heston battling talking monkeys? Sounds like the setup for a comedy. But Twilight Zone creator Rod Serling, who adapted the film’s screenplay from a French sci-fi novel, was an expert at smuggling social commentary in innocuous-looking packages. Over the course of five films and a TV series, Apes commented on

colonialism, the Vietnam War, human morality, nuclear weapons, and the civil rights movement. That it all looked like stupid popcorn fare from the outside was a feature, not a bug. The current simian film cycle took as its jumping off point 1972’s Conquest of the Planet of the Apes. In that film, which was a prequel before the term even existed, humans created superintelligent apes to be their slaves. The inevitable primate uprising was led by Caesar, played by Roddy McDowall, who faces hard choices as his war of liberation teeters on the edge of vengeful slaughter. Beginning with 2011’s Rise of the Planet of the Apes, Caesar’s perfunctory story arc became the focus of a new film trilogy. Caesar, now played by Andy Serkis and a team of digital motion-capture artists, was raised in a research facility, the infant of a mother called Bright Eyes who gained intelligence after being given

an experimental anti-Alzheimer’s drug. In 2014’s Dawn of the Planet of the Apes, Caesar’s band of primates, who communicate mostly with sign language, hid out in the woods of Northern California while the human population of the world was devastated by the Simian Flu, a disease unleashed by the same research that elevated the apes’ smarts. Caesar’s struggles to do what is best for his charges while shunning the brutality of the humans who pursue them made him this century’s most compelling and complex onscreen leader. War opens with a squad of soldiers searching for Caesar’s deep woods redoubt. The troopers are under the command of the Colonel (Woody Harrelson), a fanatical human species-ist determined to wipe out the intelligent apes. Meanwhile, Caesar’s scouts have found a new place for the apes to live, seemingly safe from the


FILM REVIEW By Chris McCoy greatly diminished human population. But before he can lead the simian exodus, the apes are again attacked by the Colonel, and Caesar must choose between personal revenge and the needs of his … people. Reeves’ direction is sure, expanding on the strengths of Dawn while pushing into new territory. Harrelson’s mission is to reconstruct Marlon Brando’s performance as Colonel Kurtz in Apocalypse Now. Unlike Brando, he appears to have actually read the script. Caesar’s face is a masterpiece of CGI, capturing the nuances of Serkis’ motion-captured expressions. The other simians, notably Steve Zahn’s comic relief Bad Ape and Karin Konoval’s wise orangutan Maurice, make for a more sympathetic band of unlikely heroes this side of Guardians

of the Galaxy. Reeves spins riffs off the films I mentioned above, but the overall mood is of a Kurosawa samurai epic, with stoic heroes on snowy battlefields torn between good and evil. My only real objection to War is Caesar’s evolution — or perhaps devolution — from principled leader to more conventional Hollywood action hero. Forsaking his duty in favor of an ape-to-man showdown with the Colonel is a very un-Caesar move, but at least Reeves seems to understand the transgression. In the end, the greatest of apes can only watch as his people cross over into the promised land. War for the Planet of the Apes Now playing Multiple locations

Dunkirk PG13 Maudie PG13 Spider-Man: Homecoming PG13 The Big Sick R

Girls Trip R (Giant Screen) Valerian and the City of a Thousand Planets PG13 War for the Planet of the Apes PG13 Wish Upon PG13

The Big Sick R Spider-Man: Homecoming PG13 Despicable Me 3 PG Baby Driver R

Girls Trip R Dunkirk PG13 Valerian and the City of a Thousand Planets PG13 War for the Planet of the Apes PG13 Wish Upon PG13 Spider-Man: Homecoming PG13 Despicable Me 3 PG

SPECIAL EVENTS:

Kiki’s Delivery Service – Studio Ghibli Fest 2017 Mon. 7/24-7:00pm @ Paradiso

Artist’s Den Presents Lady Antebellum Tue. 7/25 - 7:30pm @ Paradiso

The Ancient Magus Bride Wed. 7/26 – 7:00pm @ Paradiso Angels in America Part 2: Perestroika Thur. 7/27 – 7:00pm @ Paradiso

The House R Transformers: The Last Knight PG13 It Comes at Night R Wonder Woman PG13

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COMEDY SQUARED Feat. Local Comedians Thur.7/20 – 7:30pm $10 adm.

35


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THE LAST WORD by Randy Haspel

Next of Con

m e m p h i s f l y e r. c o m

Kushner. Any fan of the classic sitcom Seinfeld should know how to pronounce the name “Kushner” — the same way Jerry used to say, “Hello, Newman.” The Trump administration’s Golden Boy has had his luster tarnished in the past few weeks. The Justice Department has declared him a “person of interest” in the probe of the Trump campaign. He failed to note $1 billion dollars in loans from 20 different creditors on his financial disclosure form. The portion of Kushner’s initial security clearance form that requested the names of all foreign contacts was left blank and had to be re-filed three times, ultimately adding the names of 100 foreigners he’d forgotten meeting. Yet he still failed to report his foolish secret meeting with Don Jr. and Russian operatives offering campaign dirt on Hillary Clinton. The McClatchy news group reported that the Justice Department is looking into Kushner’s digital operation during the campaign, which allegedly helped the Russians target specific voters and helped spread fake news about Clinton. And special counsel Robert Mueller is looking into Kushner’s finances and business dealings. I’d venture a guess that Jared Kushner is sorry he left his cush life as a New York real estate mogul for Jared Kushner this mess. I sometimes wonder whether Trump supporters knew they were voting for a 36-year-old son-in-law of the president with no governmental experience to become a shadow Secretary of State, flying around the world, screwing up traditional alliances, and defending Trump’s most grievous offenses. Kushner’s official title is senior advisor to the president, but he has been tasked with the most ambitious agenda since the New Deal. Jared’s assigned duties include resolving the conflict in the Middle East, modernizing the workings of government, re-inventing the office of veterans’ affairs, solving the opioid crisis, overseeing criminal justice reform, and coming up with an infrastructure plan to repair the country’s decaying roads and bridges. He’s also the liaison to Mexico and China, and showed up unexpectedly in Iraq looking silly in coat, tie, and flak jacket. I never thought I’d see an African-American president in my lifetime, but I am flabbergasted that there’d be a Jewish president this soon. Kushner is the type of Orthodox Jew who is observant until it conflicts with his schedule. Jared and Ivanka are shomer Shabbos, which anyone who saw The Big Lebowski knows means not doing any sort of labor from sundown Friday to sundown Saturday. The Kushners are said to turn off their cell phones, walk instead of drive, and keep a Kosher kitchen in their home. Jared makes exceptions for governmental business or when the family is off skiing in Aspen, and the Kushners have stated that they have received special permission from an “unnamed” rabbi to travel and ride around to parties in a limousine. As for keeping kosher, it was reported that the couple dined on shrimp scampi while in Rome, a no-no for non-eaters of shellfish. Kushner’s diplomatic skills have so far come a cropper. His disastrous trip to the Middle East was complicated by his longstanding relationship with Bibi Netanyahu and his family’s millions of dollars in contributions to Israel. Palestinian president Mahmoud Abbas was left infuriated after his meeting with Kushner, saying the American envoy was merely acting as a shill for Netanyahu’s hard-line policies. There was speculation among White House insiders that Trump might pull out of any Mid-East peace talks, stalled since April 2014, because he was angry about the Abbas-Kushner rift. Kushner sits right in the middle of the probe of Russian interference during the 2016 election campaign. His failure to report a secret meeting with a Russian governmental attorney, along with the Morgan & Morgan lookalike Donny Jr., and then-campaign chairman Paul Manafort puts Jared in the most serious legal jeopardy, since he is the only one with an office in the West Wing who still sits in during security briefings. Thirteen years ago, then-prosecutor Chris Christie sent Charles Kushner, Jared’s dad, to prison for 16 counts of criminal tax evasion, witness tampering, and lying to the Federal Election Commission. Jared Kushner is living proof that the con doesn’t fall far from the convict. Randy Haspel writes the Recycled Hippies blog.

THE LAST WORD

REUTERS | JONATHAN ERNST

Trump son-in-law Jared Kushner is in a world of trouble.

39


MINGLEWOOD HALL

ON SALE FRIDAY: Julien Baker [12/1]

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Est. 1942 JUST ANNOUNCED: Sat - Oct 21 - Yngwie Malmsteen Tickets on sale this Friday UPCOMING Wed July 19- Daisyland w/ Zomboy Thu July 20 - George Porter Jr. Mon Jul 24 - DJ Shadow Sun Aug 6 - HELLYEAH Tues Aug 8 - Lalah Hathaway Wed Aug 9- Jidenna Thu Aug 24 - Flow Tribe w/ Zigadoo Moneyclips Fri Aug 25 - Daisyland w/ Ganja White Night Sun Aug 27 - A Drag Salute to Divas Tue Sept 12 - Nothing More Thu Sept 14 - Toadies w/ Local H Fri Sept 15 - Daisyland w/ Valentino Khan Sun Sept 17 - Will Hoge Sat Sept 23 - Andy Mineo w/ Social Club Misfits, Wordsplayed Sun Sept 24 - Tank Tues Sept 26 - ZZ Ward Wed Oct 4 - Blue October NEW DAISY THEATRE | 330 Beale St Memphis 901.525.8981 • Advance Tickets available at NewDaisy.com and Box Office

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Memphis Flyer 7.20.17  

This week: Chef David Krog's long road to success and sobriety. Also: Beale Sweets Sugar Shake, America's Got Talent gives the Masqueraders...