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Transformation Contemporary Works in Small Metals The Elizabeth R. Raphael Founder’s Prize Exhibition February 3 – June 30, 2012 Society for Contemporary Craft 2100 Smallman Street Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 15222 www.contemporarycraft.org 412.261.7003

Our mother’s passion for art influenced everything she did in her life. She was committed to bringing art to her community. She was particularly interested in supporting emerging artists. The Society for Contemporary Craft reflects this commitment. Our mother passed her interest and enthusiasm for the arts along to the three of us and impacted our life choices significantly. This award allows us to honor her andshare her legacy. Alexandra Raphael Cathy Raphael Margaret Raphael

Transformation 8: Contemporary Works in Small Metals, the 2011 Elizabeth R. Raphael Founder’s Prize, was made possible by Alexandra, Catherine and Margaret Raphael, the Elizabeth R. Raphael Fund of the Pittsburgh Foundation, the Allegheny Regional Asset District, The Fine Foundation, the Pennsylvania Council on the Arts and the Society of North American Goldsmiths.


Acknowledgements With this exhibition, Transformation 8: Contemporary Works in Jewelry and Small Metals, we present the 2011 edition of the Elizabeth R. Raphael Founder’s Prize series, which recognizes excellence in the field of contemporary craft. This series was inaugurated in 1997 in honor of Elizabeth Rockwell Raphael, founder of the Society for Contemporary Craft and a longtime figure on the national craft scene. We are deeply grateful to Elizabeth Raphael’s daughters — Alexandra, Cathy and Margaret — for suggesting and funding this important prize in honor of their mother. As with the previous shows, this exhibition continues the theme of Transformation, an appropriate focus for an exhibition honoring Elizabeth Raphael, a woman who believed passionately in the transformative power of art to change lives. This year’s exhibition is dedicated to the memory of Margaret, Elizabeth Raphael’s youngest daughter, who passed away on December 19, 2011. Margaret had an indomitable spirit, a “can do” attitude, and a deep desire to bring about positive change in the world. The arts were always an important part of Margaret’s life (she trained as an actress and also worked as a film producer) but she also had a deep and abiding passion for the environment and the welfare of animals. Margaret launched many ambitious enterprises over her lifetime, such as Ooh Mah Nee Farm, a sanctuary in Westmoreland County for abused, abandoned and neglected farm animals that she co-founded with her daughter in 1996. She also opened two vegan restaurants named Maggie’s Mercantile, one in Stahlstown, Pennsylvnia, and one in Pittsburgh, and later launched Maggie’s Organics, selling healthy food products from her organic farm. She truly lived her values and was always focused on trying to make the world a better place. Margaret Raphael Nov. 8, 1948 – Dec. 19, 2011

Along with her sisters, Margaret had served on every Raphael Prize jury since the inception of the prize 15 years ago, and had a hand in selecting this year’s finalists. Her lively engagement as a juror added richness to our discussions, something our guest jurors particularly enjoyed and often commented on. Margaret had a creative mind, a zany sense of humor, and a strong aesthetic influenced by growing up with Betty Raphael as her mother. We celebrate the good work, light and inspiration that Margaret brought to our organization, and to the world through her life. She will truly be missed. Transformation 8 features outstanding examples of contemporary small metals and jewelry created within the last year by 33 finalists selected by the six-member jury following an initial slide screening process. In choosing the prizewinners, the jurors were looking for innovative approaches by artists who are pushing the envelope with techniques and fresh experimentation with metal. In particular, they wanted pieces that would challenge or surprise viewers, moving them beyond their own frames of reference for small metals and jewelry. They were concerned with high quality execution that would help raise standards of excellence in the field, and with how the theme of transformation had been addressed. Additionally, this year’s guest jurors encouraged the panel to consider which artists they felt should be supported financially to encourage them to go forward with their work.

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Since the inaugural 1997 Raphael Prize was awarded to German glass artist Sibylle Peretti, international artists have maintained a strong presence among the Raphael Prize finalists. In 2001, Susan Rezac, a Czech Republic-born metalsmith currently living in Chicago, Illinois, won for her necklace, Opus Tessellatum, a technical tour-de-force in married metals. In this year’s edition, eight of the 33 finalists are international, providing an expanded look at some of the work being done in the metals field beyond the US, and reflecting the increasingly global perspective in the field. The $5,000 Raphael Prize was awarded to Meghan Patrice Riley for Interstitial, a necklace that juror Bruce Pepich described as “a line drawing in space that floats on the body.” The jurors also felt so strongly about the entry by Mari Ishikawa, a Japanese-born artist currently working in Germany, that they added a second-place $1,000 cash prize for her entry, Parallel World, a deeply expressive brooch in silver and Japanese kozo paper. Honorable mentions were awarded to seminal metals artist Bob Ebendorf and Daniel DiCaprio. An exhibition like this requires months of behind-the-scenes preparation and groundwork from the dedicated staff at Contemporary Craft and I gratefully acknowledge their countless contributions to this year’s show. I especially want to recognize Director of Exhibitions Kate Lydon for her leadership and dedicated professionalism in coordinating this exhibition and for her insightful participation as a member of the jury panel; our veteran Raphael Prize volunteer Suzie Scott, who once again flew back and forth between California and Pittsburgh to provide countless hours of support throughout all phases of the exhibition development; and Paul Schifino, for another beautifully designed book in our series of Raphael Prize publications. We acknowledge with thanks the additional support of the Allegheny Regional Asset District, the Pennsylvania Council on the Arts, The Fine Foundation, the Society for North American Goldsmiths and the many other foundations, corporations, and individuals whose belief in us, supported by their financial generosity, make it possible for us to carry out our mission of engaging the public in the creative experience through contemporary craft. We also thank the jurors for their commitment to selecting a show that provides an exciting look at current trends in the field — Alex Raphael, who joined us by Skype from London to participate in the final prize selection, Cathy Raphael, and guest jurors Bruce Pepich and Natalya Pinchuk, whose suggestion of a dialogue format rather than a traditional essay for the catalogue resulted in a thoughtprovoking and lively conversation in print. We hope you enjoy the show as much as we have enjoyed bringing it together.

Janet L. McCall Executive Director

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A conversation between the Elizabeth R. Raphael Founder’s Prize Competition Jurors Natalya Pinchuk and Bruce W. Pepich

Bruce W. Pepich: Natalya, in general what do you look for when you jury an artists’ competition? Natalya Pinchuk: I have to confess that I have very limited experience with jurying. But walking into the first round of jurying, I was both excited to get a fresh glimpse of the metals field and at the same time to choose diverse points of view within it. Pepich: I think it can sometimes be a challenge for a studio artist to serve as a juror. They are required to balance their personal commitment to their own aesthetic with widening their point of view when making selections, while not over-compensating in the process. As someone who teaches, you have a broad background in looking at different kinds of aesthetic statements within the medium and you brought this experience to the jurying. Pinchuk: I actually stopped teaching a year and a half ago. By the end of five years of full-time teaching I definitely learned to embrace and appreciate opinions and strategies other than my own. So, yes, I believe my teaching background has certainly contributed to an organic and balanced jurying process, despite having my own strong opinions and, I am sure, not failing to express them. Bruce, what do you look for when you jury an exhibition? You have considerably more experience than I do in this area. Pepich: As the two guest jurors, I think we made an interesting pair because we represent two different generations. I jury one or two shows a year and I have judged over 60 competitions, not just in metals but in most craft media, as well as works on paper. In selecting work, I look for diversity because there is no one style in any medium right now that is overwhelmingly the anointed method of expression. I’m seeking two things that are sometimes difficult for artists to deliver on: a unique voice that an artist is expressing in his/her work and consistency. If I am looking at five or six examples within one submission, I don’t want to see six different, unique ideas because it looks as if the artist has not settled on the statement he/she wishes to make. We both looked for this from different points of view. As we juried, I could see us tap-dancing back and forth with each other to where we could both find this same quality. We might have had different criteria in our minds, but there was a dialogue that took place and this was not a cold incommunicative voting process. Natalya, we have touched upon the first round of the jurying process. I am curious to know your thoughts about the final selection of the Raphael Prize finalists from the work that was submitted for the exhibition. Everyone on the jury panel gravitated to the works of the four finalists for the prize very quickly. Why do you think these four pieces stood out to everyone on the jury? Pinchuk: Obviously, there are individual qualities that make each piece delightful but all four finalists’ pieces felt complete and yet effortless. These two qualities are actually very difficult to achieve. At the end of the day, great work is not necessarily about the amount of labor exposed and paraded in a piece,

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but rather in the amount of visual delight and mental sparks it creates for the viewer. I think all four finalists achieved this. Bruce, why did these four pieces stand out for you? Pepich: As we were beginning the final jurying process, we spoke about some of the criteria for selecting the winner. This included seeking high quality work, a consideration of the concept of transformation, and acknowledging works that were fresh and had a sense of experimentation. You also spoke about us remembering to look for works that we really enjoyed — pieces that spoke to our heads and our hearts. I think each of these four works met these criteria for the six members of the panel. We came to a consensus on the four finalists very quickly. Natalya, what were the individual qualities of the finalists’ pieces that you found engaging? Pinchuk: Well, I thought that the necklace by Meghan Riley was refreshing. In the images, her necklace looked very simple but what a delight it was to look at it in person and hold it in my hands! It was both a lively and ever so slightly shifting drawing, a whimsical object and a piece of very wearable and approachable jewelry all at the same time. Mari Ishikawa’s brooch is the kind of work you can look at for hours and discover something new. She is able to create a really complex interplay of surfaces and organic forms that in a delicate way reference moments where beauty and decay coexist in nature. Bob Ebendorf continues to kick ass. So many people try to do this kind of work, transforming the value of found materials, but fail miserably. While all the elements in the brooch are found objects, everything comes together into an effortless composition and at no point do you question that they are meant to be together. Daniel DiCaprio’s necklace balances the classical role of a necklace with the quirky, mysterious, organic forms. The surface that he is able to create through the repetitive tiny silver dots in the wood is gratifying. Bruce, what stood out for you in the finalists’ pieces? Pepich: I admired the way that Ishikawa and DiCaprio both referenced elements of nature in their pieces, but in different ways. They are both organic works, but DiCaprio’s forms are more structured and constrained as if his “specimen” from nature were captured in a bell jar for examination. Ishikawa’s brooch is evolving in front of our eyes as if we have just come upon it during a walk outdoors. Ebendorf just keeps pulling something new out of his hat each time he comes out of the studio. This brooch talks about the nature of preciousness, beauty, and value on multiple levels. It is difficult to categorize this stage of his career, for some might consider this his “late” work. However, there is nothing late about Ebendorf’s work—it is totally current with conversations in the field and still leading some of them as in this piece. As for Riley’s neckpiece, I also looked at it as a three-dimensional drawing, at first. She has created a relatively large and, at the same time, delicate structure that constantly changes as you look at it, handle it and wear it. It is intellectually engaging, but also playful in a serious way. It’s like a jazz riff on the concept of a beaded necklace, as the small gold beads move in space along a thin wire.

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Pinchuk: Outside of this exhibition, what types of work and statements do you specifically look for when curating an exhibition? Pepich: In art jewelry, I like to combine artists working in both precious and non-precious materials. I’m very interested in the dialogue about value and worth in jewelry, narration, and the idea of the body as the place on which the jewelry is sited. Curating a show is like organizing an intellectual dinner party or a panel for a symposium. You want artists who create different kinds of work and you want their works to engage in a conversation or dialogue with each other and with the viewer. When I curate, I get to pick the pool I’m selecting from and when you serve on a jury, you’re dealing with the entries as a closed set. Natalya, what kinds of work or statements do you find intriguing? Pinchuk: In the last couple of years, I find myself attracted to work that reflects and connects to contemporary life more than the insular dialogue that often happens within academic arts. So I am drawn to work that has authenticity and a relationship to concerns of everyday life, to what we listen to on the news, to what we see on the street, something that I can actually make sense of and connect to, but in a new and fresh way. Pepich: I think freshness or immediacy was something that we both sought throughout this process. Even when I was looking at some of the more “traditional” pieces, I was still looking for work with a fresh point of view. The competition and exhibition incorporate small-scale metal sculpture and this helps move the conversation outside the “adornment only” category. We saw bodies of work that pushed the medium beyond its usual association with adornment. However, the vast majority of the pieces we saw were wearable in some way or related to the wearable concept. Natalya, how did the entries coincide with your views of the issues that artists are currently addressing in the larger contemporary metals field? Pinchuk: I noticed that some trends were not reflected in the submissions. I didn’t think that, for example, the performative or installation work was expressed in the submissions at all. I expected to see more work dealing with computer technologies, as well as ethical sourcing of materials as a topic and trend in itself. What I did see reflected in the submissions was a split between those who value excellent, solid craftsmanship and skill above anything else and those who were more interested in expressive ways of working, whether that fulfills the traditional conception of craftsmanship or not. The large number of jewelry submissions definitely surprised me. If I were to judge the state of affairs of the metals field by these submissions alone, I would think that the small metal object today has gone out of style. Pepich: Someone could walk into the show and their initial comment might be, “Well, the judges obviously were more interested in jewelry than in sculptural work.” This could happen because I’m not picking it or because it wasn’t entered. If that kind of work was not represented by an entry, it cannot be included in the exhibition. Some of the ways of working you’ve mentioned would lend themselves beautifully to the concept of transformation, especially

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installation or performative works. However, one has to remember that jurors pick from what is submitted. I don’t want this to sound like we’re denigrating the entries in any way. It’s just interesting to look at submissions and to try to determine what this says about the metals field in general. The prominence of jewelry in this competition strikes me as being similar to the level of visibility it has in a lot of shows that incorporate art jewelry with other craft media. Part of the reason for this is that there is a lot of incredibly well-crafted jewelry being created right now in this country and internationally and there’s an audience for it. The market for art jewelry can also be somewhat recessionproof when compared to other media because of some of the emotional and symbolic ways we have come to use jewelry in our society. Pinchuk: What I find interesting is that the trend within art jewelry, for a while now, has been to move away from precious materials. More and more the value is put on the creative, artistic vision of the artist and his/her ability to manipulate materials, precious or not, into a unique expression —a special kind of object that allows us to see beauty that is somehow innate yet revealed to us by the artist. I find that fascinating in relation to what you just mentioned, about how jewelry is a recession-proof object. Increasingly, I find that experimental jewelry puts its bet on the art market and the mythology of the artist able to create something unique. And, as we saw in the submissions, a large number of small metals makers have moved beyond the metal itself as the primary focus of their work. Pepich: Yes, it ties in with what we’re seeing across the board in other media. Younger artists don’t necessarily want to be affiliated with a specific medium. They want to move from material to material, to work with any media that will allow them to execute their ideas. They don’t necessarily see themselves as metalsmiths, but as artists who make personal adornment or small-scale sculptures. I think these artists will bring new concepts to craft media. Then, the next generation will say, “I want to be a silversmith and fully explore this material.” This is how things change over time. I think that’s how a field advances — by those different points of view coming to the forefront and then moving on. I think this exhibition does reflect that, not just in what we selected, but in what was submitted, as well. Natalya, has the process of serving as a juror changed you in any way? Pinchuk: It was a wonderful experience during which I got to see new work by artists whom I know very well and fresh artwork, unknown to me, but at this point I am not yet aware of how it has changed me. Pepich: I find every jurying is a unique experience. You know the rules and how it’s going to function from a logistical standpoint, but each jurying has always been a surprise to me. You find something that you didn’t think of before you walked in the door. You’re exposed to work that takes your head off your shoulders and puts it back on in just a slightly different angle —it’s an educational experience. Plus you meet other jurors and share ideas during the process. All of this is part of how an artistic community connects on an intellectual and an emotional basis. I think both of those things are an important part of how a field develops.

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The Artists AL-DUJAILI

10

FARRAH

12

TALYA

14

MELISSA

16

DAVID

CHOI

18

CAPPY

COUNARD

20

KIM

22

LISA & SCOTT

24

DANIEL

BAHARAL CAMERON

CRIDLER CYLINDER

DICAPRIO

Honorable Mention 26

EBENDORF

ROBERT

Honorable Mention

ENTERLINE

28

SANDRA

30

DIANE

FALKENHAGEN

32

JULIA

HEINECCIUS

34

CAROLINA

36

HEEJIN

38

MARI

HORNAUER OLIVARES

HWANG

ISHIKAWA

Second Prize

KINDLER PRIEST

40

LINDA

42

CLAIRE

44

SEUNG-HEE

46

ROBERT

LONGYEAR

48

JILLIAN

MOORE

50

EMANUELLA DEYANOVA

52

MEGHAN PATRICE

LAVENDHOMME LEE

RAMJULY

RILEY

The Elizabeth R. Raphael Founder’s Prize Winner

RUDOLPH

54

DEBORAH

56

BIBA

58

VICKIE

60

SAMANTHA

62

ANIKA

64

LIN

66

AMY

68

ANDREA

70

STACEY LEE

72

LISA

74

STEPHEN

SCHUTZ SEDMAN SKELTON

SMULOVITZ

STANIONIS TAVERN WAGNER WEBBER

WILSON YUSKO 9


AL-DUJAILI FARRAH

Untitled For me, drawing is an intuitive and subconscious process. The pairing of forms in this brooch suggest the before and the after, balanced in a state of delicate tension, prior to the act of complete transformation. The quality of line conveys an organic rhythm, while negative space implies as much in gluttonous form, as the visible wire. I apply pencil, crayon and watercolor markings to the surface of the enamel paint, and use these color gradients to enhance the proposition of an inanimate form coming to life.

SOURCE:

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Concept sketch for Untitled


Untitled, 2010 Copper, enamel paint, watercolor, pencil, thread 3 1/8'' Ă— 4'' Ă— 3'' Photo: Farrah Al Dujaili

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BAHARAL TALYA

Aura #10 Shifting qualities of beauty transform the landscape that I make my own. I capture the light and the mystery of fleeting shadows; cropping the setting with the eye of a black-and-white photographer. Dodging and burning the grainy print; revealing the striations of the earth; pulling out the lens to expose the division of the land; zooming in to show the texture of the ground. Staking a claim to this patch of land. I evoke the qualities of that ethereal silver gelatin black-and-white print in metal. The bezel is my fence, containing and transforming this precious landscape, marking the boundaries and making it my “jewel.�

SOURCE:

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Concept sketch for Aura #10


Aura #10, 2010 Sterling silver, stainless steel, bronze 3 5/8'' Ă— 1 5/8'' Ă— 3/4'' Photo: Gene Gnida

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CAMERON MELISSA

Internalised This work highlights the decorative band that encircles this mid-20th century, Indonesian, silver plate. Aside from an aesthetic role, the rim of any plate functions to guard its contents. By altering the plate, the rim’s function changes from edge or border to focal point; drawing attention to the artistry and artisanship that gave rise to these iterations of familiar patterns. Envisioning the plate’s likely origins in Southeast Asia, one can contemplate transmission of pattern motif— like pomegranate and acanthus leaf — to distant lands far from the subject’s origins.

SOURCE:

Process photos for Internalised

Photos: Melissa Cameron

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Internalised, 2011 Silver, stainless steel 1'' Ă— 10 1/2'' Ă— 7'' Photo: Melissa Cameron

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CHOI DAVID

Untitled I create forms according to a particular material, format and function, and to the laws of structural economy. The basic surface of steel sheet when joined to others like it gives these structures their particular form; just as theoretically a mineral could take on an infinite number of forms while at the same time remaining recognizably itself, classifiable according to its particular kind. The nerve of a leaf, or the geometric elements of a mineral, quartz crystal or cubic pyrite, are the natural structures of matter. The work makes apparent that I am subconsciously drawn to geometry and its mathematical arrangement.

SOURCE:

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Concept sketch for Untitled


Untitled, 2010 Silver, aquamarine 2 1/2'' × 3 3/4'' × 3'' Photo: David Choi

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COUNARD CAPPY

Perceptions Life can only be viewed through a personal lens of experience. We make conclusions based upon our available knowledge. Often we assume our perspective is true, only to later learn something that completely shifts our perception. Perceptions offers a metaphor for these layers of knowledge and the constantly changing landscape of our interactions. When closed, interior elements are both partially revealed and partially obscured. This allows our imaginations to make assumptive connections about the unseen. Once the outer layer is removed, the true nature of the piece becomes clear. The pearl inside represents the sometimes surprising and elusive truth.

SOURCE:

Concept photo for Peceptions

Photo: Cappy Counard

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Peceptions, 2011 14k gold, sterling silver, meerschaum stone, pearl 1 1/4'' Ă— 2 1/4'' Ă— 2 1/4'' Photo: Robert Mullen

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CRIDLER KIM

Bittersweet I believe in the power of objects to record and extend our lives. My practice is concerned with the humanity that exists in acts of containment and collection, and in the generative potential of ornamentation. One of the ways in which I have framed these interests is through the vessel’s format. Urn and vase forms serve as icons of continuity; symbolizing collection as well as abundance and ceremony. Bittersweet uses structure, pattern and ornamentation to address the dynamic and endlessly transformative experience of living and dying.

SOURCE:

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Concept sketch for Bittersweet


Bittersweet, 2011 Steel, bronze, copper, silver, amber, howlite, beeswax 21'' Ă— 25'' Ă— 19'' Photo: Jim Escalante

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CYLINDER LISA & SCOTT

Trio Transposition, the changing of music from one key to another, has been the theme of our recent work. For Trio, we have taken this process one step further. Referencing Pablo Picasso’s painting, Three Musicians, we have constructed a three-dimensional interpretation. The individual players in Trio, each a unique brooch, were assembled with deconstructed musical instrument parts, chosen for their formal qualities of color, shape and form. The concept is circular: a two-dimensional painting re-imagined in threedimensional form. By presenting the brooches within a frame, we bring the work back to the wall where our inspiration began.

SOURCE:

Concept sketch for Trio

Photo: Scott Cylinder

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Trio, 2011 Mixed metals, plastics, woods 4 3/4” × 6” × 1 1/8'' Photo: Scott Cylinder

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D I CAPRIO DANIEL

Honorable Mention

Colony Necklace The pieces I make in wood and precious metals explore my interest in adaptation. The forms I work with stem from plant and animal anatomy and often combine different aspects from each. I use metal wire as a surface embellishment to reference hair. During my process of making, I often reflect on people’s roles in the living world. I think about how we evolved to the place we are in currently, and what other possible changes could happen in the future.

SOURCE:

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Concept photo for Colony Necklace


Colony Necklace, 2011 Ebony, silver 12'' × 8'' × 2'' Photo: Taylor Dabney

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EBENDORF ROBERT SOURCE:

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Honorable Mention

King of the Road The creativity of my work lies in the intellectual repositioning of familiar objects and the physical transformation of material that in the end astonishes the viewer. It is the profound incongruity between what these works were made from, and what they are now, that so engages the imagination. The medium of precious jewelry is now found to be one through which to explore contradictions and complexities of life from a contemporary perspective. Jewelry, more than most artifacts, raises issues of value. Value is measured by how an object fulfills a role and what it means to someone; one value often symbolizes another sort of value.

Artist’s studio workbench


King of the Road, 2011 Mixed media 2'' × 2 1/4'' × 3/4'' Photo: Tara Locklear

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ENTERLINE SANDRA

Diamond Window I grew up in Northwestern Pennsylvania; abandoned factories have long inspired me. They are like hulking industrial cathedrals. Gritty, mysterious, immense and dark, yet they are strangely fragile and delicate at the same time. This image was one that inspired me to start working with diamond sheets and dark oxidized silver. The diamonds are captured in crude settings, and are like delicate windows that punctuate each setting and capture light. The windows allow light to pass through each diamond, irregularly shaped and flawed with inclusions, streaks of grey, black and yellow. Ultimately, I am searching for the materials in the jewelry to be simultaneously harmonious and perplexing.

SOURCE:

Concept photo for Diamond Window

Photo: Sandra Enterline

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Diamond Window, 2011 Oxidized sterling, 18k palladium, 10k white gold, diamond slices 8 1/2'' Ă— 8 1/2'' Ă— 1/4'' Photo: Mark Johann

29


FALKENHAGEN DIANE

Gothic Revival Brooch (The Sublime & the Beautiful) I’ve always been captivated by gothic architecture and am especially drawn to the characteristic arches, uber-decorative ceilings and jewel-like details. The transcendent nature and sheer majesty associated with high gothic style adds an emotional element to the aesthetic experience. These feelings, coupled with my ongoing artistic practice of incorporating imagery into my jewelry, offered the perfect platform for exploring the theme of transformation. In Gothic Revival (The Sublime and the Beautiful), I have integrated two-dimensional pictorial imagery from Caspar David Friedrich’s 19th-century gothic revival painting, Cloister Cemetery in the Snow, into a three-dimensional sculptural form reminiscent of a gothic structure, replete with pointed arches and ribbed vaults.

SOURCE:

Cloister Cemetery in the Snow, 1819

Painting by Caspar David Friedrich

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Gothic Revival Brooch (The Sublime & the Beautiful), 2012 Metal, mixed media 2 1/2'' × 3 1/2'' × 1 5/8'' Photo: Bill Pogue

31


HEINECCIUS JULIA

Thirty 47.41.29 To understand the world around me, I simplify what is complicated and complicate what is simple. When I make things, I want them to be wondrous and yet grounded in an honest action. Not a trick, but a puzzle or an optical illusion — something you can figure out if you look long enough and allow your seeing to shift. Thirty 47.41.29 represents two states of action. The action of folding paper is now dormant, resting in silver, while the copper beads carry potential action. An arrangement of atoms becomes a necklace; a single flat surface becomes a convolution of form.

Concept photo, the Central Library of the Seattle Public Library, interior SOURCE:

Photo: Julia Heineccius

32


Thirty 47.41.29, 2011 Metal, mixed media 8 1/4'' Ă— 6'' Ă— 3/4'' Photo: Julia Heineccius

33


HORNAUER OLIVARES CAROLINA 34

From Ornament to Plain Nº8 During the Chilean earthquake of February 27, 2010, many of the old historical buildings suffered structurally. Much of the damage was superficial and these external injuries were repaired in very simplistic and poor ways. These buildings are an image of the rich past of the city of Valparaiso, which was influenced by English and German immigrants. Facades that look bruised and patched are what remains. A month after the earthquake, I traveled to the main damaged area. Respectfully, I gathered pieces of wood; all that remains of the modest houses the tsunami washed away. I have used these pieces just the way I found them, in their “raw state,” to create a series called From Ornament to Plain.

SOURCE:

Concept sketch for From Ornament to Plain Nº 8


From Ornament to Plain Nº 8, 2011 Wood, silver, copper, eggshell, paint 6 1/2'' × 3 1/2'' × 3/4'' Photo: Antonio Corcuera

35


HWANG HEEJIN

Just Imagine ‌ Heightened self-image, through improved appearance, has allowed people over the centuries to realize their potential as human beings in order to influence others, communicate better and gain power. Feeling beautiful has a powerful effect on attitudes and habits, but it also has to be in balance with reality. This necklace is based on how a line not only defines forms, but also creates gaps between them. Each unit wire construction shows the restrained and calm. The delicacy I achieve is through the illusory distance created by the unpredictable space between the wires. Emotions are the essence of the communication. By wearing this necklace, the wearer begins an emotional interaction with it.

SOURCE:

Concept wall texture for Just Imagine ‌

Photo: Heejin Hwang

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Just Imagine …, 2011 Steel wire, enamel, ground rock, gold leaf 28'' × 8'' × 2'' Photo: Jim Escalante

37


Parallel World Under the moonlight there is a gray world. When I take a picture of it, it shows me different pale colors, which I can’t see with my eyes. It is mysterious. I look into this vanishing parallel world and keep the memories.

MARI

ISHIKAWA

Second Prize

SOURCE:

Concept photo for Parallel World

Photo: Mari Ishikawa

38


Parallel World, 2011 Silver, Japanese kozo paper 3 1/2'' Ă— 3 5 /16'' Ă— 1 3/4'' Photo: Dirk Eisel

39


There is a wild life refuge near my house and in the spring, I see fussy little ducklings bopping up and down in the water. They have emerged from eggs and when their legs are steady, they waddle down to where they can live and eat. The little bird is about to plunge into the water that it needs for life. My wearable pieces express the cycle of life through the use of gems, minerals and images that are hammered into metal.

LINDA

KINDLER PRIEST

From Egg to Water

SOURCE:

40

Concept sketch for From Egg to Water


From Egg to Water, 2011 14k gold, pearl, diamonds, aquamarine crystal, oxidized silver 3'' Ă— 1 1/4'' Ă— 1/4'' Photo: Gordon Bernstein

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Transformation evokes a relationship. Beauty evokes a world. It is everyone’s story and therefore, my story too. The search for beauty allows for a questioning that does not require an unequivocal answer.

CLAIRE

LAVENDHOMME

Transformation

S O U R C E : Concept assemblage and sketch for Transformation

42


Transformation, 2011 Soapstone, silver, gold, paint 2'' Ă— 1 3/16'' Ă— 9/16'' Photo: Claire Lavendhomme

43


LEE SEUNG-HEA

Neck-Lace The multitude of shapes and forms I observe daily in nature inspire my works. I like to explore the interlinking and connective possibilities of different shapes. I like my chains to come alive on the wearer's body. For me, this movement and flexibility is performance art on the body.

S O U R C E : Concept photos: Pile of Bowls, Sonoma, CA; Stone texture, Marine Nation Park, Taiwan Photos: Seung-Hea Lee

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Neck-Lace, 2010 Oxidized silver, pearls 21'' × 7'' × 1/8'' Photo: Myung-Wook Huh

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LONGYEAR ROBERT

}}}}}}}i{{{{{{{ 11 The landscape we navigate is intrinsically fractured. Our center has weakened and we are looking for a new middle. Our manner of navigation is readjusting into a way of life built from the bottom up. It is tempered with reflection and inventiveness, curiosity and risk — a new heart in the middle of tribalism, urbanity, science and nature. There’s a metabolism to my making. My objects are meant to hold a charge conductive of a situation—as if I am stuffing mixed messages in bottles and dropping them in gutters, so when someone finds them they will be right where I was and maybe that will help.

S O U R C E : Concept photo for }}}}}}}i{{{{{{{ 11 Photo: Robert Longyear

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}}}}}}}i{{{{{{{ 11, 2011 Sterling, copper, steel, insulation 2'' Ă— 3 1/2'' Ă— 3 1/2'' Photo: Don Casper

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MOORE JILLIAN

Capsicia Our natural tendency to seek out patterns results in a sensitivity to the congruities in biological forms. Deliberate exploitation of these phenomena effects objects that are both ambiguous and evocative. Some are organs removed from the body in which they once belonged, revealing structures with unknown functions. Others are complete specimens tagged with labels. Signs of dissection, as well as taxonomy, provide evidence of attempts to demystify these new organisms. This approach, however, leaves many unanswered questions, and highlights the inherent ethical compromise in these methods of understanding.

SOURCE:

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Concept sketch for Capsicia


Capsicia, 2010 Fabricated & electroformed copper, polymer clay, resin, paint, ink 8'' Ă— 3 1/2'' Ă— 3 1/2'' Photo: Jillian Moore

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RAMJULY EMANUELLA DEYANOVA

How to Wear a Famous Painter Paintbrushes are the magic wands of imagination — tools of creation in the hands of visual virtuosos. After a lifetime of translating inspirations onto canvases, the paintbrush gets its own transformation. This ring could be called a masterstroke. It is the linchpin in a collection of jewelry that shines a light on preciousness and beauty, which are often overlooked in everyday objects. Each of its elements accent the transformation from tool to jewel. The branch represents the wooden handle of the paintbrush. Rolled and cast in silver, it carries the setting for some softer diamonds symbolizing the bristles. The full transformation happens in the moment when function is discovered. The tactile secret of the ring is revealed only to the wearer who dares discover it. Only then has the object truly become reborn.

SOURCE:

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Concept sketch for How to Wear a Famous Painter


How to Wear a Famous Painter, 2011 Natural hair, Koala hair, alumium, silver, 24k gold 2 3/4'' Ă— 1'' Ă— 1/2'' Photo: Emanuella Deyanova Ramjuly

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RILEY MEGHAN PATRICE

The Elizabeth R. Raphael Founder’s Prize Winner

Interstitial Interstitial refers to a place between moments. In this work I want to show the starts and stops by creating a circular neckpiece reflecting a cycle. Counterclockwise the bottom right starts with an arrow leading the viewer to the top where there is a tipping point, and then coming around to the bottom a crescendo of interconnected, volumetric Möbius strips that cycle back to the origin. The Möbius strips are non-orientable and therefore have one side, illustrating an additional layer to the cyclical aspect of the piece.

SOURCE:

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Concept sketch for Interstitial


Interstitial, 2011 Metal 12'' × 15'' × 1/4'' Photo: Toky Photography


RUDOLPH DEBORAH

Eins 5 I like the sensitive connection between humans and stones. I find it interesting that we can hang out in front of a stone for hours, just to look at it. I like the way we carry them around like treasures. I find it interesting that we trust in stones so much that we build our houses and walls with them. I like the stone collages that occur unwanted. I like the way we set stones in streets. I like how stones help us to remember, as memorials or gravestones. I like the freedom in stones and the danger, such as when someone tries to reach the top of a mountain. I like their roughness and their fragility.

SOURCE:

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Concept photo for Eins 5


Eins 5, 2011 Boulder, milky quartz, Kevlar, metal 11 1/4'' × 10'' × 1'' Photo: Deborah Rudolph

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SCHUTZ BIBA

Is it precious! This brooch is about the beauty of aging and imperfection. Like life, I am constructing (nurturing) and deconstructing (aging). Starting with perceived perfection, this work lapses into the past exploring life’s journeys, erosions and experiences. By manipulating materials, I jolt our expectations of space and form. Though this piece is behind glass and thus perceived to be precious and protected, it is meant to be investigated for new memories.

SOURCE:

Collections

Photo: Biba Schutz

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Is it precious!, 2011 Oxidized sterling silver, Herkimer diamond, blown glass, steel 3 3/4'' Ă— 3 1/4'' Ă— 1 1/4'' Photo: Ron Boszko

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SEDMAN VICKIE

Transfigure During the past 10 years, my work has been an investigation of the creative potential of new technologies and materials. In my exploration of these contemporary materials, including silicone rubber, I strive to enhance the materials’ unique and special qualities by revealing the aesthetic beauty of their characteristics. The flexibility and malleability inherent in silicone rubber has allowed me to design jewelry that is transformed by the wearer when placed on the human body.

SOURCE:

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Concept silhouette for Transfigure


Transfigure, 2011 Rubber, sterling silver, magnets 16'' Ă— 8'' Ă— 1'' Photo: Vickie Sedman

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My work speaks not specifically to the pieces of metal that it is made from, but to the volume, connection, separation, space and structure it evokes. Lenses play the part of space, shifting jewels in a twisted copper crown and constantly changing shape.

SAMANTHA

SKELTON

Elaborate Convolution

SOURCE:

Concept assemblages for Elaborate Convolution

Photos: Samantha Skelton

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Elaborate Convolution, 2011 Copper, magnifying lenses 20'' Ă— 26'' Ă— 18'' Photo: Jeff Sabo

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Is it possible to evoke the act of breathing in a static object through material choices? How might this tune the wearer into the power of their breath? This brooch explores these and other questions about the body in motion, and the intimate and personal interaction between the wearer and the object.

ANIKA

SMULOVITZ

body in motion: breathe 1

S O U R C E : Movement notes from journal for body in motion: breathe 1

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body in motion: breathe 1, 2011 Sterling silver, repurposed plastic bags 4'' Ă— 3 1/8'' Ă— 3/4'' Photo: Tom McInvaille

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I seek to convey the sublime in my work, to express the mystery and awe of existence, and to impart this in objects that are intimate and personal. I look for that point, plane or moment where psychic awareness occurs. This revealing moment is represented in this most recent work, through the suggestion of a disturbance or transfer of energy, such as that found in a wave, which exposes objects whose very existence conjures up questions of origin and the phenomena of the natural world.

LIN

STANIONIS

in illo tempore

Artist digging dinosaur fossil, Montana, 2011

SOURCE:

Photo: Alan Detrich

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in illo tempore, 2012 18k white gold, 18k & 24k yellow gold, Tanzanite, pearls, dinosaur bones (late Cretaceous period, Hell Creek Formation, MT) 3 1/2'' Ă— 3'' Ă— 1'' Photo: Jon Blumb

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TAVERN AMY

Bruised, Once Broken I am fortunate to have experienced transformation in my jewelry over the last three years through intense exploration and prolific creation of my craft. Additionally, a myriad of overwhelming events in 2011 caused a major shift in the way I think about my work and my life. Heartbreak and loss, accomplishment and success, transition and hope now inform my process in unexpected ways. This investigation has afforded me the opportunity to learn from my experiences in a positive manner. My current work is an autobiography, presenting events from my life in a sculptural, stylized narrative of line, shape and color.

SOURCE:

Concept paper maquette for Bruised, Once Broken

Photo: Amy Tavern

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Bruised, Once Broken, 2011 Sterling silver, spray paint 12'' Ă— 3 1/4'' Ă— 1'' Photo: Hank Drew

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WAGNER ANDREA

On Navigating the Intersection of Nuances This work is based on observations and personal experience from my background in three different cultures and on two different continents. Exposure to dissimilar cultural mindsets and situations, and active participation in each, evolves and transforms us. It alters our perspective, causing unexpected changes in attitude, thinking and communication, both verbal and nonverbal. Navigating different cultural meaning and expression can be as tricky and confusing, as it is exciting.

SOURCE:

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Concept sketch for On Navigating the Intersection of Nuances


On Navigating the Intersection of Nuances, 2011 Sterling silver, precious metal clay, bone china, paint, ceramic transfers, synthetic resin 2 1/4'' Ă— 2 5/16'' Ă— 1 1/2'' Photo: Joseph Leroux

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WEBBER STACEY LEE

God Bless America: Commemorative Ribbon The God Bless America Series turns the prideful objects — American flags, ribbons and lights — that typically adorn row after row of houses in my northeastern Philadelphia, blue-collar neighborhood into prominent monuments made from nostalgic copper coins. God Bless America Series: Commemorative Ribbon is modeled from an orange ribbon commemorating the tragic shooting of 21-year-old Billy Panas Jr., who was shot and killed by an off-duty police officer in the Port Richmond neighborhood of Philadelphia on November 21, 2009. An unjust act of police brutality caused his death and in 2012, orange ribbons still flank the houses of the northeast community in love, respect and support for their fallen son.

S O U R C E : Concept photo for God Bless America: Commemorative Ribbon Photo: Stacey Webber

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God Bless America: Commemorative Ribbon, 2011 Pennies 30'' × 12'' × 6'' Photo: Joseph Leroux

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WILSON LISA

Flourishing Vessel I am interested in patterns of organization and behaviors that emerge in groups of objects. Some behaviors are so pervasive that they are easily taken for granted, for example, the tendency of things like tree branches, vascular systems or population density overlays to split into smaller and smaller parts towards their extremities. Common patterns like these have become familiar to us on a fundamental level and inform our innate sense of aesthetics. In my copper sculptures, I borrow behaviors and transform them into new and abstract forms; sometimes juxtaposing them over another, already familiar form. In their new context, the strength of identity imbues the sculptures with a strange sense of familiarity and order.

S O U R C E : Concept rendering for Flourishing Vessel

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Flourishing Vessel, 2011 Copper, patina 15'' Ă— 7'' Ă— 9'' Photo: Lisa Wilson

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YUSKO STEPHEN

Blue Box Series: Beacon Using a variety of blacksmithing and metal-fabricating techniques, I design and make objects that explore form, line, surface and function with uncompromising craftsmanship. They are also the result of my deep appreciation and fascination with steel. I am drawn to the industrial history of steel and its working properties, structural shapes, methods of joinery and the way it patinas with age. I love that when it is heated in the forge, steel moves like clay; thereby allowing this tough material to be transformed into elegant and graceful shapes.

SOURCE:

Staffarda Abbey outbuildings, Saluzzo, Italy

Photo: Stephen Yusko

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Blue Box Series: Beacon, 2011 Forged, fabricated steel 7 1/2'' × 3 3/4'' × 3'' Photo: Dan Morgan

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Artist biographies FARRAH AL-DUJAILI Born: Birmingham, England, 1986 Lives: Kidderminster, England Education M.A., Jewellery, School of Jewellery, Birmingham City University, Birmingham, England, 2010 B.A., Jewellery and Silversmithing, School of Jewellery, Birmingham City University, Birmingham, England, 2009 Selected Exhibitions 2011 25 Years of Galerie Louise Smit, Galerie Louise Smit, Amsterdam, Netherlands Cominelli Foundation Award Exhibition, Fondazione Raffaele Cominelli, Palazzo Cominelli, Cisano di San Felice del Benaco, Italy

Selected Grants and Awards

DAVID CHOI

2011 Juror/Panelist, Sculpture and Crafts Fellowships, New York Foundation for the Arts, Brooklyn, NY

Born: Seoul, South Korea, 1984

Education

2006 Best of Show, Crafts at the Castle, Boston, MA

M.F.A., Metals, State University of New York, New Paltz, NY, 2011

2004 Best of Show, Jewelry, American Craft Council, San Francisco, CA 2004 Artist in Residence, Mid Atlantic Arts Foundation, Society for Contemporary Craft, Pittsburgh, PA

Fine Arts in Industrial Design, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, IL 2008 Selected Exhibitions

Baharal, Talya, and Marthe Le Van. 500 Silver Jewelry Designs: The Powerful Allure of a Precious Metal. Lark Books. New York: Sterling Publishing Co., Inc., 2011.

2011 15th Annual Lines into Shapes Art Competition, Art Center of Estes Park, Estes Park, CO

_____. “Review.” Metalsmith, 2009

Mediterraneo International Competition of Contemporary Jewellery, Museo di Storia Naturale del Mediterraneo, Livorno, Italy

MELISSA CAMERON

Piece Progressions, Online Exhibition, Crafthaus <crafthaus.ning.com>

Lives: Balaclava, VIC, Australia

Talente, International Trade Fair Centre, Munich, Germany

Education

A Journey and Harmony Within, Baum Gallery, Heyri Art Valley, South Korea Jewelers of the Hudson River Valley, Forbes Gallery, Forbes, NY

Born: Perth, WA, Australia, 1978

M.F.A., Jewellery and Metals, Monash University, Melbourne, VIC, Australia, 2009 Postgraduate Diploma of Jewellery Production, Curtin University, Perth, WA, Australia, 2006

Making Treasure, The School of Jewellery, Birmingham, England

B.A., Interior Architecture, Curtin University, Perth, WA, Australia, 2001

Table Manners, The School of Jewellery, Birmingham, England

Selected Exhibitions

2009 New Designers, Business Design Centre, London, England

B.F.A., Metals, University of Illinois at UrbanaChampaign, IL, 2009

Selected Publications

Inhorgenta, The School of Jewellery, International Trade Fair Centre, Munich, Germany

2010 Flux, Brilliantly Birmingham, mac (Midlands Art Centre), Cannon Hill Park, Birmingham, England

Lives: New Paltz, NY

2007 Fellowship in Crafts, New York Foundation for the Arts, Brooklyn, NY

2011 Itami International Craft Exhibition, Itami Museum of Arts and Crafts, Itami, Japan

MANUFRACTURED, Graduate Thesis Show, Samuel Dorsky Museum of Art, Allice and Horace Gallery, State University of New York, New Paltz, NY The Emerging Artist Series Exhibition, Sienna Gallery, Lenox, MA The Hunter Show, College Art Association Regional Exhibition, Time Square Gallery, NY The International Graduation Show, Galerie Marzee, Nijmegen, Netherlands The Opulent Project COSTUME COSTUME, Sienna Gallery, Lenox, MA 2010 20/20, Metal Alumni Exhibition, Link Gallery, School of Art and Design, University of Illinois, Champaign, IL 5th Annual Intercollegiate Metals Exhibition, Step Gallery, Arizona State University, Tempe, AZ

Selected Grants and Awards

Love Lace, International Lace Award, Powerhouse Museum, Sydney, NSW, Australia

Define Metal and Fiber, Online Exhibition, Crafthaus <crafthaus.ning.com/group/definemetalandfiber>

2010 Craftsmanship & Design Award, Goldsmiths’ Craft & Design Council, London, England

Recontextualizing the Found Object, Slippery Rock University, Slippery Rock, PA

2009 Postgraduate Student Bursary, The William Dudley Trust, Birmingham, England

Tinker Tailor Soldier Sailor: 100 Women 100 Brooches 100 Stories, Gallery Artisan, Brisbane, QLD, Australia

Metal Inclinations 2, Online Exhibition, Society of Midwest Metalsmiths <www.smmmetalinclinations.org>

Woollahra Small Sculpture Prize Exhibition, Redleaf Council Chambers, Sydney, NSW, Australia TALYA BAHARAL

Lives: Rifton, NY

2010 National Contemporary Jewellery Award Exhibition, Griffith Regional Art Gallery, Griffith, NSW, Australia

Education

Preziosa Young, Contemporary Jewellery, Leopoldine Cloister, Firenze, Italy (Traveling)

Born: Tel-Aviv, Israel, 1955

Self-taught, full-time studio jeweler and sculptor

Return: Five Artisans Return to Their Training Ground, Showcase Gallery, Central Institute of Technology, Northbridge, WA, Australia

No Boundaries, Juried Student Exhibition, Society of North American Goldsmiths’ Conference (SNAG), Houston, TX Redefined VI: Back to Basics, The Cole Art Center at the Old Opera House, Nacogdoches, TX 2009 Metal Evolution, Student Exhibition, Society of North American Goldsmiths’ Conference (SNAG), Philadelphia, PA

Selected Grants and Awards

2007 10.10.10 Broochless Metal Exhibition, National Ornamental Metal Museum, Memphis, TN

2011 Gold Prize, Cheongju International Craft Competition, Cheongju, Korea

BFA Metal Exhibition, Link Gallery, School of Art and Design, University of Illinois, Champaign, IL

2006 Solo Exhibition, Velvet da Vinci, San Francisco, CA

2011 Melbourne Arts Centre Prize, Buda Contemporary Australian Silver Exhibition, Castlemaine, VIC, Australia

Driven, Society of North American Goldsmiths’ Conference (SNAG), Memphis, TN

2005 Big Steel, Little Steel, Solo Exhibition, Society for Contemporary Craft, Pittsburgh, PA

2011 Visual Arts Board Grant, Australia Council for the Arts, NSW, Australia

Selected Solo Exhibitions 2010 Solo Exhibition, The Works Gallery, Philadelphia, PA 2008 Solo Exhibition, Jewelerswerk Galerie, Washington, DC

2002 Solo Exhibition, Obsidian Gallery, Tucson AZ

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Selected Grants and Awards 2011 1st Place in Jewelry, 15th Annual Lines into Shapes Art Competition, Art Center of Estes Park, Estes Park, CO 2010, 2007 Educational Endowment Scholarship, Society of North American Goldsmiths (SNAG), Philadelphia, PA


CAPPY COUNARD

Selected Collections

Born: Oshkosh, WI, 1970

The Arkansas Art Center Decorative Museum of Art, Little Rock, AR

Lives: Edinboro, PA

Chazen Museum of Art, Madison, WI

Sculpture Objects & Functional Art (SOFA), Santa Fe Convention Center, Santa Fe, NM Sparkle Plenty 7, Quirk Gallery, Richmond, VA 2010 ITAMI International Craft Exhibition, Museum of Arts & Crafts—ITAMI, Itami, Japan

Education

Museum of Fine Arts, Houston, TX

M.F.A., Metals, Southern Illinois University, Carbondale, Illinois, 1999

Scottsdale Contemporary Museum of Art, Scottsdale, AZ

B.S., Art, University of Wisconsin, Madison, Wisconsin, 1992

LISA CYLINDER

Selected Exhibitions

Born: Ft. Chaffee, AR, 1963

2012 The Art of Influence, Wellington B. Gray Gallery, East Carolina University, Greenville, NC

Lives: Oley, PA Education

Selected Grants and Awards

2011 Torch Song, Nazareth College Arts Center Gallery, Rochester, NY

B.F.A., Jewelry & Metalsmithing, Tyler School of Art, Temple University, Philadelphia, PA, 1985

2008 Society of North American Goldsmiths (SNAG) “Emerging Artist” guest lecturer, Sculpture Objects & Functional Art (SOFA), Chicago, IL

JOYA: Barcelona Contemporary Jewellery Week, Convent dels Angels, Barcelona, Spain Lucca Preziosa Young, Villa Bottini, Florence, Italy Miami International Art Fair, Seafair, Miami Beach, FL

2010–12 Metal Inclinations 2, Online Exhibition, Society of Midwest Metalsmiths <www.smm-metalinclinations.org> 2010 Art of the State, The State Museum of Pennsylvania, Harrisburg, PA Contain: Vessels and the Art of Containment, Luke & Eloy Gallery, Pittsburgh, PA Seeking/Holding, Two-Person Exhibition, One Bausch & Lomb, Rochester, NY The Things We Hold, Solo Exhibition, Ronald E. Holstein Gallery, Erie Art Museum, Erie, PA Topography of Metal, Tap Studios/Gallery M, Cleveland, OH 2006 Challenging the Châtelaine!, DesignMuseo, Helsinki, Finland (Traveling, catalogue) Metalisms: Signature Works in Jewelry & Metalsmithing, Center for Visual Art, Metropolitan State College, Denver, CO Reinterpreting the Vessel, Perimeter Gallery, Chicago, IL Selected Grants and Awards 2007, 2003 Individual Artist Fellowship, Pennsylvania Council on the Arts, Harrisburg, PA

SCOTT CYLINDER Born: Allentown, PA, 1964

Sculpture Objects & Functional Art (SOFA), Navy Pier, Chicago, IL

Selected Publications

Lives: Oley, PA

Amber, Jeannine. “Alicia In Love.” Essence June 2011: pp 124, 129, 2011

Education

Dynna, Christer. “Kjøpe eller Løpe?” Kunsthåndverk Issue 112 2.2009: pp 18-26, 2009

M.F.A., State University of New York, College at New Paltz, New Paltz, NY, 1988

ROBERT EBENDORF

B.F.A., Jewelry & Metalsmithing, Tyler School of Art, Temple University, Philadelphia, PA, 1985

Born: Topeka, KS, 1938 Lives: Greenville, NC

Selected Exhibitions 2011 From Minimal to Bling: Survey of Contemporary Studio Jewelry, Society of Arts & Crafts, Boston, MA

Education

Sculptural Objects, Functional Art (SOFA), Snyderman/The Works Gallery, Navy Pier, Chicago, IL

M.F.A., University of Kansas, Lawrence, Kansas, 1962

2010 Lisa and Scott Cylinder: Transpositions, Velvet da Vinci Gallery, San Francisco, CA 2009 From Minimal to Bling: Survey of Contemporary Studio Jewelry, Society of Arts & Crafts, Boston, MA 2007 Sculptural Objects, Functional Art (SOFA), Snyderman/The Works Gallery, Park Avenue Armory, New York, NY

State School for Applied Arts and Crafts, Oslo, Norway, 1963-64

B.F.A., University of Kansas, Lawrence, Kansas, 1960 Selected Exhibitions 2011 CrossOver: Symbiosis of Craft Design and Environment, Taipei World Design Expo, American Pavilion, Taipei City, Taiwan La Noche del Broche Exhibition, Equinox Gallery, San Antonio, TX Open Mind: History and the New Material, International Contemporary Metal Craft, Sungkok Museum, Seoul, Korea

The Art of Tools, Society of Arts & Crafts, Boston, MA KIM CRIDLER Born: Grand Rapids, MI, 1968 Lives: Rockford, MI Education M.F.A., Metals, State University of New York, New Paltz, NY, 1993 B.F.A., Fine Arts, University of Michigan School of Art, Ann Arbor, MI, 1989 Selected Exhibitions 2011 Kim Cridler: My Wisconsin Home, Racine Art Museum, Racine, WI 2004 Iron Work: Kim Cridler & Cyril Colnik, Northwestern Mutual Gallery, Cardinal Stritch University, Milwaukee, WI 2001 Kim Cridler: Persistence & Impossibility, John Michael Kohler Arts Center, Sheboygan, WI

2005 The Forest for the Trees, Two-Person Exhibition, Snyderman/The Works Gallery, Philadelphia, PA Transformation 5: Contemporary Works in Found Materials, The Elizabeth R. Raphael Founder’s Prize Exhibition, Society for Contemporary Craft, Pittsburgh, PA

2009 International Enamels Society Presenters, Blain Gallery, Arrowmont School of Arts and Crafts, Gatlinburg, TN

Trashformations East, Fuller Craft Museum, Brockton, MA

2008 International Quartet, Studio Fusion, London, England

Selected Grants and Awards 2007, 2005 Individual Artist Fellowship, Pennsylvania Council on the Arts, Harrisburgh, PA Selected Collections Racine Art Museum, Racine, WI

DANIEL DI CAPRIO

Selected Grants and Awards

Born: Albany, NY, 1984 Lives: Richmond, VA

2004 Visual Arts Fellowship, Wisconsin Arts Board, Madison, WI 1999 Visual Arts Fellowship, Arizona Commission on the Arts, Phoenix, AZ 1992 Educational Endowment Scholarship, Society of North American Goldsmiths, Philadelphia, PA

2007 Contemporary Print in Enamel Exhibition, Center for Fine Print Research, University of West England, Bristol, England (Traveling) 2004 The Jewelry of Robert Ebendorf, A Retrospective of Forty Years, Racine Art Museum, Racine, WI

Museum of Arts and Design, New York, NY The Gregg Museum of Art & Design, North Carolina State University, Raleigh, NC

2010 Commission, University of Wisconsin, New Academic Building, Oshkosh, WI 2010 Vilas Associates Award, The Graduate School, University of Wisconsin, Madison, WI

2010 Signs of Life 2010, Facèré Jewelery Art Gallery, Seattle, WA (Catalogue)

Selected Grants and Awards 2010 North Carolina Award, North Carolina Department of Cultural Resources, Raleigh, NC 1999 Carol Grotes Belk Distinguished Professor, East Carolina Universirt School of Art and Design, Greenville, NC 1995 College of Fellows, American Craft Council, Minneapolis, MN

Education M.F.A., Metal Design, East Carolina University. Greenville, NC, 2009 B.S., Art Education, Nazareth College, Rochester, NY, 2006

Selected Collections Le Musee des Arts Decoratifs de Montreal, Québec, Canada Metropolitan Museum, New York, NY Mint Museum of Craft Design, Charlotte, NC

Selected Exhibitions 2011 Sculpture Objects & Functional Art (SOFA), Park Avenue Armory, New York, NY

Museum of Arts and Design New York, NY Schmuck Museum, Pforzheim, Germany The Victoria and Albert Museum, London, England

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SANDRA ENTERLINE Born: Oil City, PA, 1960 Lives: San Francisco, CA Education B.F.A., Jewelry and Metalsmithing, Rhode Island School of Design, Providence, RI, 1983 Associate Degree, Jewelry and Metalsmithing, Rochester Institute of Technology, School for American Craftsmen, Rochester, NY, 1980 Selected Exhibitions 2011 Pretty Crude, Solo Exhibition, Velvet da Vinci, San Francisco, CA 2010 Brooching the Subject: One of a Kind, The Ogden Museum of Southern Art, University of New Orleans, LA

2005 Juncture: Physical and Conceptual Connections in Contemporary Jewelry, Houston Center for Contemporary Craft, Houston, TX

Selected Exhibitions 2012 Joyaviva: Live Jewellery from Across the Pacific, RMIT Gallery, Melbourne, Australia

2002 Diane Falkenhagen, Poetic Portrayals, Solo Exhibition, Susan Cummins Gallery, Mill Valley, CA

2011 ABC DISEÑO, Centro Cultural Gabriela Mistral, Santiago, Chile

2001 Solo Exhibition, Sybaris Gallery, Royal Oak, MI

QUILTRO, New Chilean Jewelery, Centro Cultural Palacio de la Moneda, Santiago, Chile Think Twice, Bellevue Arts Museum, Bellevue, WA

2000 Attitude and Action! North American Figurative Jewelry, Birmingham City University, Birmingham, England (Traveling)

2010 Think Again, Museum of Arts and Design, New York, NY

Selected Grants and Awards

Walking the Gray Area, Galería Emilia Cohen, México City, México

2000 Career Development Grant, Alaska State Council on the Arts, Anchorage, AK Selected Collections

2009 Carles Codina and Three Students of Escola Massana, Galería Ceppi, Santiago, Chile

Dorothy Mackenzie Collection of Jewelry & Metalwork, Bowling Green State University, Bowling Green, OH

2008 New Traditional Jewellery Award Exhibition, Museum CODA, Apeldoorn, Netherlands (Traveling)

Interiors Revealed, Solo Exhibition, Patina Gallery, Santa Fe, NM

JULIA HEINECCIUS

2007 Anti-War Medals, Thomas Mann Gallery I/O, New Orleans, LA (Traveling)

Sparkle Plenty 5, Quirk Gallery, Richmond, VA

Born: Seattle, WA 1982

2009 Body/Image, Richmond Center for Visual Arts, Western Michigan University, Kalamazoo, MI

2007 Challenging the Châtelaine!, DesignMuseo, Helsinki, Finland (Traveling, catalogue) Glasswear-Glass in Contemporary Jewelry, Glass Pavilion, Toledo Museum of Art, Toledo, OH (Traveling, catalogue) 2006 Kiff Slemmons Re:Pair & Imperfection, Chicago Cultural Center, Chicago, IL (Traveling, catalogue)

Lives: Bloomfield Hills, MI Education M.F.A., Metalsmithing, Cranbrook Academy of Art, Bloomfield Hills, MI, 2012 B.F.A., Metals, University of Washington, Seattle, WA, 2006

2006 Annual Marzee Graduation Show, Marzee Gallery, Nijmegen, Netherlands 2004 Obra y Proceso, Centro de Artesanía de Cataluña, Cataluña, Spain

HEEJIN HWANG

Selected Exhibitions

Born: Geochang, Korea, 1979 Lives: Madison, WI

Selected Grants and Awards

2011 Conspicuous, Monday Spaces, San Francisco, CA

1992, 1988 Visual Artists Fellowship, National Endowment for The Arts, Washington, DC

Convergent Currents, Forum Gallery, Cranbrook Art Museum, Bloomfield Hills, MI

Education

Selected Collections Museum of Arts and Design, New York, NY Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York, NY Museum of Fine Arts, Boston, MA Racine Art Museum, Racine, WI Renwick Gallery, National Museum of American Art at the Smithsonian Institution, Washington, DC Victoria & Albert Museum, Seymour Rabinovich Collection, London, UK

Monomater, Cranbrook Academy of Art, Department of Metalsmithing, Special Exhibition at Sculpture Objects & Functional Art (SOFA), Navy Pier, Chicago, IL PIN Anonimum, Associação Portuguesa de Joalharia Contemporânea, Lisbon, Portugal Our House, Galerie Louise Smit, Amsterdam, Netherlands 2009 4+1, Pacini Lubel Gallery, Seattle, WA

M.F.A., Art Metals, University of Wisconsin, Madison, WI, 2012 M.A., Art Metals, University of Wisconsin, Madison, WI, 2011 M.F.A., Metalwork & Jewelry, Seoul National University, Seoul, Korea, 2007 B.F.A., Jewelry & Metalsmithing, KonKuk University, Seoul, Korea, 2004 Selected Exhibitions

Selected Grants and Awards

2012 Design MMoCA, Madison Museum of Contemporary Art, Madison, WI

2010 Scholarship, Manufacturing Jewelers & Suppliers of America Education Foundation, Attleboro Falls, MA

2011 CONNECT: Metals Exhibition, Georgetown Art & Cultural Center, Seattle, WA

Lives: Galveston, TX

2010 Sharon Boardway Seattle Metals Guild Matriculated Student Scholarship, Seattle, WA

Counterflux: Defensive Ornament, G. Gibson Gallery, Seattle, WA

Education

2010 Merit Scholarship, Cranbrook Academy of Art, Bloomfield Hills, MI

Exhibition in Motion: Object Performed, Bellevue Arts Museum, Bellevue, WA

2009 Art Bridge Fellowship, Pratt Fine Arts Center, Seattle, WA

Jewelry + Objects, Midland Center for the Arts, Midland, MI

2006 Marilyn Werby Rabinovitch Grant, University of Washington, Seattle, WA

Magnetic Ornament: MA Exhibition, 7Th Floor Gallery, Madison, WI

2006 Book Award, Metals Department, University of Washington, Seattle, WA

Wisconsin Artists Biennial 2011, Anderson Arts Center, Kenosha, WI

CAROLINA HORNAER OLIVARES

2010 Refined VI: Back to Basics, The Cole Art Center at The Old Opera House, Nacogdoches, TX

DIANE FALKENHAGEN Born: Galveston, TX, 1955

M.F.A., Jewelry/Metalsmithing, University of Houston, Houston, TX, 1981 B.F.A., Jewelry/Metalsmithing, University of North Texas, Denton, TX, 1977 Selected Exhibitions 2009 Signs of Life, Facèré Jewelery Art Gallery, Seattle, WA 2008 Content in Contemporary Jewelry Design and Metalsmithing, Landmark Gallery, Texas Tech University School of Art, Lubbock, TX Framing: The Art of Jewelry, Museum of Contemporary Craft, Portland, OR (Traveling) Metal Inclinations, Online Exhibition, Society of Midwest Metalsmiths <www.smmmetalinclinations.org> 2006 Metalisms: Signature Works in Jewelry and Metalsmithing, Center for Visual Art, Metropolitan State College of Denver, CO Representations: A Decade of Work by Diane Falkenhagen, Solo Exhibition, National Ornamental Metal Museum, Memphis, TN

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Born: Viña del Mar, Chile, 1977 Lives: Viña del Mar, Chile Education Superior Degree, Artistic Jewellery, Escola Massana, Barcelona, Spain, 2006 B.A., Architecture, Universidad Católica de Valparaíso, Valparaíso, Chile, 2003

2009 Talking Hands-Spectrum of Contemporary Metal Works, Museum of Art, Seoul, Korea 2007 15th Silver Triennale, Deutsches Goldschmiedehaus, Hanau, Germany Selected Grants and Awards 2011 The Hoover and Strong Scholarship, The Society of North American Goldsmiths, Eugene, OR 2010 LEAP Award, Finalist, Society for Contemporary Craft, Pittsburgh, PA


MARI ISHIKAWA Born: Kyoto, Japan, 1964 Lives: Munich, Germany Education Diplome, Academy of Fine Arts, Munich, Germany, 2001 Masterstudent, Academy of Fine Arts, Munich, Germany, 1999 Studied Jewellery Munich-Academy of Fine Art, Munich, Germany, 2000 Master Degree of Art, Nara University of Education, Nara, Japan, 1986

2005 Magnificent Extravagance, Artist & Opulance, Racine Art Museum, Racine, WI 2001 Solo Exhibition, Botolph Club, Boston, MA Selected Grants and Awards 2010 Excellence in Jewelry Award, CraftBoston, Seaport World Trade Center, Boston, MA 2010 Excellence Award, American Craft Council Show, Baltimore Convention Center, Baltimore, MD 2008 Excellence in Jewelry Award, Smithsonian Craft Show, Smithsonian Institution, Washington, DC Selected Publications

Selected Exhibitions 2011 4th European Triennial for Contemporary Jewellery, WCC-BF, Anciens Abattoirs, Mons, Belgium Parallel Worlds, Solo Exhibition, Duetsches Goldschmiedehaus, Hanau, Germany (Traveling) 2010 Jueri no ima, Bluecoat Display Centre, Liverpool, England 2009 Moon Light Shadow, Solo Exhibition, Villa Bengel, Idar-Oberstein, Germany (Traveling)

Markovitz, Yvonne. Artful Adornments, Jewelry from the Museum of Fine Arts, Boston. Boston, MA: MFA Publications, 2011. Corwin, Nancy Megan. Chasing and Repousse. Brunswick, ME: Brynmorgan Press, 2009. Le Van, Marthe and Ray Hemachandra. Masters: Gold: Major Works by Leading Artists. Lark Books. New York: Sterling Publishing, Co., Inc., 2009.

2007 Timetales—Lucca Preziosa, Museu Textil i d’indumentària, Barcelona, Spain Selected Awards and Grants

Born: Kinshasha, Congo, 1959

2000 Herbert-Hofmann-Prize, International Craft Fair, Munich, Germany 2000 Böhmler Art Award, Munich, Germany

Hiko Mizuno Collection, Tokyo, Japan Museo degli Argenti, Palazzo Pitti, Florence, Italy Museum of Arts and Design, New York, NY Schmuckmuseum, Pforzheim, Germany

LINDA KINDLER PRIEST Born: Lynn, MA Lives: Bedford, MA Education Graduated with honors from The School of the Museum of Fine Arts, Boston, MA Selected Exhibitions 2011 Buds, Blooms & Berries: Plants in Science, Culture & Art, Everhart Museum, Scranton, PA

2008 Framing—The Art of Jewelry, Museum of Contemporary Craft, Portland OR 2007 Winter Flora, Solo Exhibition, Loupe Gallery, Montclair, NJ 2006 100 Necklaces, Velvet da Vinci Gallery, San Francisco, CA 2005 Metals Exhibition, Xen Gallery, St. Louis, MO

2004 West goes East, Yaw Gallery, Birmingham, MI

Education Contemporary Jewellery at the Academy of Fine Arts, Arlon, Belgium, 2003

RISD Faculty Biennial, Rhode Island School of Design, Museum of Art, Providence RI,

Graduate Degree, The French Community of Belgium, Brussels, Belgium Jewellery at the Institute of Applied Arts and Crafts, Brussels, Belgium, 2002

Selected Grants and Awards 2010 The William F. Kayhoe Memorial Award, Traditional Craft Materials, Richmond, VA

Selected Exhibitions

2010 Carol Duke Awards of Excellence, Bellevue Arts Museum Craft Show, Bellevue, WA

2011 European Triennial of Contemporary Jewellery, Anciens Abattoirs, WCC•BF, Mons, Belgium

2009 The Hoover & Strong Award for Designs in Precious Metals, the Richmond Craft Show, Richmond, VA

2010 International Biennal of Design, Liège, Belgium

Selected Collections Helen W. Drutt Collection, Philadelphia, PA

Origin, Somerset House, London, England 2009 Stimulus, Sienna Gallery, Lenox, MA

2003 One & Only: Gift Made by Hand, John Michael Kohler Art Center, Sheboygan, WI

2010 Bavarian State Award, Munich, Germany 2009 Advancement Award for Applied Arts, Munich, Germany

2010 Seung-Hea Lee & Barbara Siednath, Two-Person Exhibition, Alloy Gallery, Newport, RI

Artful Jewelry, Hand and Mind Gallery, Seoul, Korea CLAIRE LAVENDHOMME

Lives: Brussels, Belgium 2008 Des Wahnsinns Fette Beute, Pinakothek der Moderne, Munich, Germany

Selected Exhibitions 2011 Mathematical Purity, Shaw Gallery, Northeast Harbor, ME

2009 European Prize for Applied Arts, Anciens Abattoirs, Mons, Belgium Internationale Handwerksmesse, New Munich Trade Fair Centre, Munich, Germany 2008 0,0203929 tons of steel, Wasserschloss Klaffenbach, Chemnitz/ Deutsches, Klingenmuseum Solingen / Deutsches Goldschmiedehaus Hanau, Germany European Triennial of Contemporary Jewellery, Anciens Abattoirs, WCC•BF, Mons, Belgium

2001 The 2nd Cheongju International Craft Competition, Cheongju, Korea Selected Publications Le Van, Marthe. 21st Century Jewelry: The Best of 500 Series. Lark Books. New York: Sterling Publishing Co., Inc., 2011. Le Van, Marthe and Ray Hemachandra, Masters: Gold: Major Works by Leading Artists. Lark Books. New York: Sterling Publishing Co., Inc., 2009.

ROBERT LONGYEAR Born: Emporia, KS, 1977 Lives: St. Louis, MO

2007 F.Schmetz, C.Lavendhomme, Two-Person Exhibition, Cultural Centre of Marchin, Belgium Les Sens au Féminin, Musee Charlier, Brussels, Belgium

Education M.F.A., Southern Illinois University, Edwardsville, IL, 2009 B.F.A., University of Kansas, Lawrence, KS, 2000

2005 European Triennial of Contemporary Jewellery, Anciens Abattoirs, WCC•BF, Mons, Belgium

Selected Exhibitions 2012 Suspended, Schmuck 2012, Studio Gabi Green, Munich, Germany

2010 Chased and Repoussee, Velvet Da Vinci Gallery, San Francisco, CA

2004 The Contemporary Jewel in the French Community of Belgium, ISELP, Brussels, Belgium

2009 One and Only, John Michael Kohler Art Center, Sheboygan, WI,

SEUNG-HEA LEE

2011 A Dubliner Affect, Artists Residency/Installation, Blue Drum, Dublin, Ireland

Born: Seoul, Korea, 1969

Fresh: Exhibition in Print, Metalsmith Magazine, National Ornamental Metal Museum, Memphis, TN

2008 Together Apart, Aaron Faber Gallery, New York, NY

Lives: Providence, RI

Us, in Flux, Lawrimore Project, Seattle, WA

500 Pendants and Lockets, Velvet Da Vinci Gallery, San Francisco, CA

Education

2010 DIY: A Revolution in Handicrafts, Society for Contemporary Craft, Pittsburgh, PA

2007 Pins for Men, Facèré Jewelry Art Gallery, Seattle, WA Shades of Green, Aaron Faber Gallery, New York, NY 2006 Signs of Life, Facèré Jewelry Art Gallery, Seattle, WA

Collegiate Certificate, Sheridan Center for Teaching and Learning, Brown University, Providence, RI, 2007 M.F.A., Rhode Island School of Design, Providence, RI, 1998 B.F.A., California College of Arts and Crafts, San Francisco, CA, 1996

Objectified: The Domestication of the Industrial, Honfleur Gallery, Washington, DC Urban Evolution, Solo Exhibition, Pulitzer Foundation for the Arts, St. Louis, MO Urbania, Luke and Elloy, Pittsburgh, PA

Good Bird/Bad Bird, Contemporary Craft Museum, Portland, OR

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2009 A Revisionist’s Draft, Solo Exhibition, Craft Alliance, St. Louis, MO

2010 Cadavers Exquisits, Artesania Catalunya, Barcelona, Spain

DEBORAH RUDOLPH

Sharing Skin, Hoffman LaChance Contemporary, St. Louis, MO

Enjoia’t, Setmana de la Joieria, Foment de les Arts i del Disseny (FAD), Barcelona, Spain

Lives: Offenbach, Germany

How to Wear a Famous Painter, Brussels, Belgium

Education

Juwelen in het Amstel, Amstel Hotel, Amsterdam, Netherlands

Gemstone and Jewelry Design, University of Applied Sciences, Trier, Germany, 2010

Object, Rotterdam, Las Palmas Cultural Building, Rotterdam, Netherlands

Technical College for Design of Jewelry and Objects, Pforzheim, Germany, 2003

Selected Grants and Awards 2011 United States Artists Fellowship Nomination, United States Artists <www.unitedstatesartists.org> 2008 Educational Endowment Award, Society for North American Goldsmiths, Philadelphia, PA

JILLIAN MOORE Born: Quincy, IL 1981 Lives: Iowa City, IA Education M.F.A., Jewelry and Metal Arts Program, School of Art and Art History, University of Iowa, Iowa City, IA, 2008 B.F.A., Metalsmithing and Jewelry Program, College of Fine Art and Communications, Western Illinois University, Macomb, IL, 2005 Selected Exhibitions 2012 The Art of Seduction, Howard Community College Art Gallery, Columbia, MD 2011 Nomen Dubium, Solo Exhibition, Appalachian Center for Craft, Smithville, TN Radical Alchemy, Courthouse Galleries of the Portsmouth Museums, Portsmouth, VA, SP7: Organ/ism, Quirk Gallery, Richmond, VA Feature, Snyderman-Works Gallery, Philadelphia, PA 2010 Play, Quad City Arts, Rock Island, IL underwaterlove, Schmuckfrage, Berlin, Germany 2009 Tributaries IV: Jillian Moore, Solo Exhibition, National Ornamental Metal Museum, Memphis, TN

Steinbeisser, Lisbon, Portugal Wrapped Roots, Sieraad Art Fair, Westergasfabriek, Amsterdam, Netherlands (Traveling) 2007, 2006 Group Exhibition, Massana Group, Design Centre, Barcelona, Spain 2005 Catwalk Formentor, Albercux, Formentor, Palma de Mallorca, Spain

Selected Grants and Awards

Sculpture Objects & Functional Art Exposition (SOFA), Charon Kranson, Park Avenue Armory, New York, NY

2010 Best Jewellery, N’joyat, Barcelona, Spain 2010 Best Design Stand, Woonbeurs, Amsterdam, Netherlands

MEGHAN PATRICE RILEY Born: Anaheim, CA, 1980

B.A., Economics, University of California, Berkeley, CA, 2002 Practique Plastique (Fine Art), Toulouse II Le Mirail, Toulouse, France, 2001

2008 Award of Merit, Metal Inclinations, Online Exhibition, Society of Midwest Metalsmiths <www.smm-metalinclinations.org>

Craftforms, Wayne Art Center, Wayne, PA

Selected Exhibitions 2011 Cominelli Foundation Award Exhibition, Fondazione Raffaele Cominelli, Palazzo Cominelli, Cisano di San Felice del Benaco, Italy i Box!!, iii Gallery, Brussels, Belgium Picture This, Zee Zand & Zilver Gallery, The Hague, Netherlands Vernissage, Wesel Art Gallery, Brussels, Belgium White, Putti Gallery, Riga, Latvia

Es Lässt Mich Nicht Los, Solo Exhibition, IdarOberstein, Germany Graduate Show, Galerie Marzee, Nijmegen Netherlands

2011 Talente Award, Internationale Handwerksmesse, Munich, Germany 2010 Graduate Prize, Galerie Marzee, Nijmegen, Netherlands 2010 Zonta Prize for the Best Diploma in Design, University of Applied Sciences, Trier, Germany

BIBA SCHUTZ

In Line/In Metal, Aaron Faber Gallery, New York, NY LES Runway Show, Grand Opening, New York, NY MoVEMENT, 724 Studio, San Francisco, CA 2010 Capacity, Solo Exhibition, Lireille Gallery, Oakland, CA

Born: Brooklyn, NY Lives: New York, NY Education B.A., Design, American University, Washington, DC Printmaking, Pratt Graphics Center, New York, NY Fiber, Instituto De Allende, San Miguel De Allende, Mexico

Nexus, Lireille Gallery, Oakland, CA Retro-Futurism, Society of North American Goldsmiths’ Conference (SNAG), Houston Community College, Houston, TX

Education

School of Plastic and Decorative Art, Metal Shapes and Design, Sofia, Bulgaria, 1998

Sculpture Objects & Functional Art Exposition (SOFA), Charon Kranson, Santa Fe Convention Center, Santa Fe, NM

Selected Grants and Awards Education

2011 Conspicuous, Monday Spaces, San Francisco, CA

National Academy of Plastic and Fine Arts, Glass & Ceramic, Sofia, Bulgaria, 2001

UtraMarine, Noblessner Foundry, Tallinn, Estonia

Lives: New York, NY

2010 LEAP Award Finalist, Society for Contemporary Craft, Pittsburgh, PA

Design School Massana, Jewelry design, Barcelona, Spain, 2006

Talente, International Trade Fair Centre, Munich, Germany

2010 Inhorgenta, The School of Jewellery, International Trade Fair Centre, Munich, Germany

Selected Exhibitions

Lives: Amsterdam, Netherlands

Schmuck Wander, Gallery Medium Bratislava, Slovakia (Traveling)

2000 Sky Voices, Museum of International Art, Sofia, Bulgaria

2011 Special Jurors’ Prize, South Seas, Friends of Carlotta, Zurich, Switzerland

Born: Sofia, Bulgaria, 1979

Masala, Eckegalerie, Augsburg, Germany

The Spirit of Stone, South-Karelia Museum, Lappeenranta, Finland

Selected Grants and Awards

EMANUELA DEYANOVA RAMJULY

Selected Exhibitions 2011 Geography, Society of North American Goldsmiths’ Conference (SNAG), Seattle, WA

2004 III Biennale of Contemporary Art, Shipka 6 Gallery, Union of Bulgarian Artists, Sofia, Bulgaria

Economie, Toulouse Sciences Politique, Toulouse, France, 2001

2008 Juror’s Silver Award, Craftforms 2007, Wayne Art Center, Wayne, PA

Born: Halle/Saale, Germany, 1980

2009 Urban Rennaissance, ACCI Gallery, Berkeley, CA Selected Grants and Awards 2011 Second Prize in Mixed Media Jewelry, Designer Jewelry Showcase, Santa Barbara, CA 2011 Semi-finalist, Ecco Domani Fashion Foundation, Healdsburg, CA Selected Publications Baharal, Talya, and, Marthe Le Van. 500 Silver Jewelry Designs: The Powerful Allure of a Precious Metal. Lark Books. New York: Sterling Publications Co., Inc., 2011.

Selected Exhibitions 2011 Crossing Lines—Many Faces of Fiber, Courtyard Gallery, World Financial Center, New York, NY 2010 Brooching the Subject: One of the Kind, Ogden Museum of Southern Art, New Orleans, LA 2007 Jewelry From Painting And Architecture, Mobilia Gallery, Cambridge, MA Solo Exhibition, Loupe Gallery, Montclair, NJ 2006 Friends Across The Ocean, Studio Fusion, London, England 2005 Collectors Ireland, National Craft Gallery, Kilkenny, Ireland 2003 Adornments, Columbus Museum of Art, Columbus, OH Planting, Potting and Pruning: Artists and the Cultivated Landscape, Racine Art Museum, Racine, WI

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2001 Gift In A Box, Art Center-The Korean Culture & Arts Foundation, Seoul, Korea 2000 New Talent In Craft, The Wustum Museum, Racine, WI

SAMANTHA SKELTON Born: Edinboro, PA, 1987 Lives: Oxford, OH

2005 Cheongju International Craft Biennale 2005, Cheongju Art Center, National Cheongju Museum, Cheongju, Korea

Education

Selected Grants and Awards

Organic Structures, Sienna Gallery, Lenox, MA

M.F.A., Metalsmithing, Miami University, Oxford, OH, 2012

2011 Fellowship, Idaho Commission on the Arts, Boise, ID

Selected Grants and Awards

B.F.A., Metalsmithing, Edinboro University of Pennsylvania, Edinboro, PA, 2009

2011 Contemporary Northwest Art Awards Nomination, Portland Art Museum, Portland, OR

Selected Exhibitions

2010 Grant, The Peter S. Reed Foundation, Inc., New York, NY

2011 Best of 2011, Ohio Designer Craftsmen, Ohio Craft Museum, Columbus, OH (Traveling)

The Jewish Museum, New York, NY

2009 Award of Excellence in Jewelry, Smithsonian Craft Show, Smithsonian Institution, Washington, DC 2007 The Adrianne Farelli Prize, Philadelphia Museum Art Craft Show, Pennsylvania Convention Center, Philadelphia, PA Selected Collections Racine Art Museum, Racine, WI Renwick Gallery, National Museum of American Art at the Smithsonian Institution, Washington, DC

Radical Alchemy, Courthouse Galleries of the Portsmouth Museum, Portsmouth, VA State of Flux—SNAG, Jurors Award, Society for North American Goldsmiths, Seattle, WA

Selected Collections

Selected Publications _____. "Anika Smulovitz", Metalsmith, Juried Exhibition in Print 2006: Breaking the Code, vol. 26, no.4, 42.

Rotasa Foundation, Mill Valley, CA

2010 Emerging Artists: Ohio Connections, Ohio Craft Museum, Columbus, OH

_____. "PORTFOLIO: ANIKA SMULOVITZ", American Craft, vol. 65 no. 3, June/July 2005, 57.

VICKIE SEDMAN

Magnitude Seven, Manifest Drawing and Creative Research Center, Cincinnati, OH

Le Van, Marthe. 21st Century Jewelry: The Best of 500 Series. Lark Books. New York: Sterling Publishing Co., Inc., 2011.

Born: Detroit, MI, 1949 Lives: Jenkintown, PA Education M.F.A., Jewelry and Metalsmithing, University of Wisconsin, Madison, WI, 1974 B.F.A., Jewelry and Metalsmithing, Wayne State University, Detroit, MI, 1971 Selected Exhibitions 2011 Naples International Contemporary Crafts Exhibition, Longstreth Goldberg Art Gallery, Naples, FL 2009 Arms and Armaments, Philadelphia Museum of Art, Philadelphia, PA Neoteric Matter 2: New Studio Jewelry, Wexler Gallery, Philadelphia, PA 2008 Art / Industry Exhibition, Pinnacle Gallery, Savannah College of Art and Design, Savannah, GA 2006 Metalsmiths and Mentors, Chazen Museum of Art, Madison, WI 2005 Best of Jewelry with Purpose, Velvet da Vinci, San Francisco, CA 1999 Solo Exhibition, Janice Epstein Museum Gallery, West Bloomfield, MI 1998 EyeCon, John Waldron Arts Center Galleries, Bloomington, IN

MFA Work, Continuum Gallery, Fort Wayne, IN 2009 4th Annual Intercollegiate Metals Exhibition, Arizona State University, Tempe, AZ Metalsmithing Invitational, Leeds Gallery, Earlham College, Richmond, IN

LIN STANIONIS

Pandora’s Box, Target Gallery, Torpedo Factory Art Center, Alexandria, VA

Born: Long Island, NY, 1954

The Art of Jewelry, Thomas More College, Crestview Hills, KY 2008 Chimera Exhibition, Erie Art Museum, Erie, PA

MetalSpeaks: The Unexpected, San Francisco Craft Museum, San Francisco, CA 1993 Contemporary American Metal Working—Sculptural Concerns, Fort Wayne Museum of Art, Fort Wayne IN (Traveling) Selected Grants and Awards 2007, 2003, 1997, 1993 Summer Research Fellowship, Temple University, Philadelphia, PA 1988 Fellowship Award, Pennsylvania Council on the Arts, Harrisburg, PA Selected Collections Helen Drutt Collection, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania Philadelphia Museum of Art, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania University of Wisconsin, Madison, Wisconsin

Lives: Lawrence, KS Education M.F.A., Indiana University, Bloomington, IN, 1981 B.F.A., Iowa State University, Ames, IA, 1976

Selected Publications

Selected Exhibitions

_____. Chimera: A Journal of Art and Literature. Edinboro University. Edinboro, PA, 2008

2010 Transmutations: Material Reborn, Houston Center for Contemporary Craft, Houston, TX

Mornu, Nathalie. 500 Felt Objects: Creative Explorations of a Remarkable Material. Lark Books. New York: Sterling Publications, Co., Inc., 2011

ANIKA SMULOVITZ Born: Phoenix, AZ, 1974 Lives: Boise, ID Education M.F.A., Studio Art, University of Wisconsin, Madison, WI, 2003 M.A., Studio Art, University of Wisconsin, Madison, WI, 2001 B.F.A., Studio Art, University of Oregon, Eugene, OR, 1997 Selected Exhibitions

1997 Formulations: A Metals Invitational, Carroll Reece Museum, East Tennessee State University, Johnson City, TN

Le Van, Marthe. 500 Necklaces: Contemporary Interpretations of a Timeless Form. Lark Books. Sterling Publishing Co., Inc., 2006.

2010 Contemporary Judaica, Solo Exhibition, Visual Arts Center, Gallery One, Boise State University, Boise, ID Realizing the Neo-Palatial, National Ornamental Metal Museum, Memphis, TN Refined VI: Back to Basics, The Cole Art Center at the Old Opera House, Nacogdoches, TX The Plastic Show, Velvet da Vinci Gallery, San Francisco, CA 2009 From Minimal to Bling: Contemporary Studio Jewelry, The Society of Arts and Crafts, Boston, MA RE/ACTION(S), Craft Alliance, St. Louis, MO Reinventing Ritual: Contemporary Art and Design for Jewish Life, The Jewish Museum, New York, NY (Traveling) 2008 Craft USA ’08, Silvermine Guild Arts Center, New Canaan, CT 2007 2007 Idaho Triennial, Boise Art Museum, Boise, ID (Traveling) 2006 The Edges of Grace: Provocative, Uncommon Craft, Fuller Craft Museum, Brockton, MA

2009 Decorative Resurgence, Rowan University Art Gallery, Rowan University, Glassboro, NJ 2007 New Traditional Jewellery: Symbols of Faith, CODA Museum, Apelldorn, Netherlands 2006 The Edges of Grace: Provocative Uncommon Craft, Fuller Craft Museum, Brockton, MA 2005 Flatware: Function + Fantasy, Sculptural Objects, Functional Art (SOFA), Chicago, IL 2002 Bridge 7: Xenobia Bailey, Lin Stanionis, Dana Záme niková, Society for Contemporary Craft, Pittsburgh, PA 2001 OBJECTS FOR USE: Handmade by Design, American Craft Museum, New York, NY 1996 American Revelations: A Survey of Contemporary North American Jewelry, Shipley Art Gallery, Gateshead, England (Traveling) Selected Grants and Awards 1998 Individual Artist Fellowship, Kansas Arts Commission, Topeka, KS 1993 Individual Artist Fellowship, Mid-America Arts Alliance/NEA Fellowship, Baltimore, MD Selected Collections Indiana University Fine Arts Museum, Bloomington, IN Selected Publications Le Van, Marthe. 21st Century Jewelry: The Best of the 500 Series. Lark Books. New York: Sterling Publishing, 2011.

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AMY TAVERN

STACEY WEBBER

Born: Cooperstown, NY, 1974

Born: Indianapolis, IN, 1982

Lives: Penland, NC

Lives: Philadelphia, PA

Education

Education

B.F.A. Metal Design, Post Baccalaureate, University of Washington, Seattle, WA, 2002

M.F.A., Metals, University of Wisconsin, Madison, WI, 2008

B.A. Arts Administration, State University of New York, Fredonia, NY, 1996

B.F.A., Metals, Ball State University, Muncie, IN, 2005 Selected Exhibitions

Selected Exhibitions 2011 Fresh: Exhibition in Print, Metalsmith Magazine, National Ornamental Metal Museum, Memphis, TN In Line/In Metal, Aaron Faber Gallery, New York, NY This is How I Remember It, Solo Exhibition, Velvet da Vinci, San Francisco, CA 2010 Metal Inclinations 2, Online Exhibition, Society of Midwest Metalsmiths <www.smmmetalinclinations.org> 2009 The Stimulus Project, Sienna Gallery, Lenox, MA Selected Grants and Awards 2011 United States Artists Fellowship, United States Artists <unitedstatesartists.org> 2009 American Craft Council Searchlight Artist 2009-2012 Resident Artist, Penland School of Crafts, Penland, NC Selected Publications Baharal, Talya, and Marthe Le Van. 500 Silver Jewelry Designs: The Powerful Allure of a Precious Metal. Lark Books. New York: Sterling Publishing Co., Inc., 2011. Kasson Sloan, Susan, and Marthe Le Van. 500 Plastic Jewelry Designs: A Groundbreaking Survey of A Modern Material. Lark Books. New York: Sterling Publishing Co., Inc., 2009 Snyder, Jeffrey B. Art Jewelry Today 3. Atglen, PA: Schiffer Publishing, Ltd., 2011

ANDREA WAGNER Born: Freiburg, Germany Lives: Amsterdam, Netherlands

2012 40 Under 40: Craft Futures, Renwick Gallery, National Museum of American Art at the Smithsonian Institution, Washington, DC 2011 Cheongju International Craft Biennale, Cheongju Art Center, National Cheongju Museum, Cheongju City, Korea

Selected Grants and Awards 2011 NICHE Awards Winner, Niche Magazine, The Rosen Group and The Philadelphia Buyers Market of American Craft, Baltimore, MD 2010 Artist Residency, Houston Center for Contemporary Craft, Houston, TX 2010 Ruth Arden Memorial Award for Excellence in Fine Craft, Ohio Designer Craftsmen, Columbus, OH 2009 Pamela Morris Thomford Award for Excellence in Metals, Ohio Designer Craftsmen, Columbus, OH 2006 The Alma R. Eikerman Scholarship for Outstanding Achievement in Metalsmithing and Jewelry Design, Indiana University, Bloomington, IN 2006 Women’s Jewelry Association Scholarship, Women’s Jewelry Association, Chicago Ridge, IL

Tributaries: Stacey Lee Webber, National Ornamental Metal Museum, Memphis, TN

STEPHEN YUSKO

2010 Craftforms 2010, Wayne Art Center, Wayne, PA Dollars and Sense, Annex Gallery, University of Wisconsin, Annex Gallery, Oshkosh, WI 2009 American Craft Council Show, Baltimore Convention Center, Baltimore, MD Introductions 5, Irvine Contemporary, Washington, DC

Born: Dover, DE, 1965 Lives: Cleveland, OH Education M.F.A., Metalsmithing, Southern Illinois University, Carbondale, IL, 1999 B.F.A., Sculpture, Minors in Metalsmithing and Art History, University of Akron, Akron, OH, 1990

Stacey Lee Webber, Lillstreet Art Center, Chicago, IL Selected Recent Exhibitions Selected Publications Donohoe, Victoria. “Art, Many Small Masterpieces.” The Philadelphia Inquirer 17 Dec. 2010. Warren, Ellen. “Art In Chicago, Coin Flip Goes Hip.” Chicago Tribune Apr. 2009: p. 7. _____. “Jewelry Artist, Doer’s Profile.” Lapidary Journal Nov. 2009: p. 80.

2011–2012 Cast, Cut, Forged and Crushed: Selections in Metal from the John and Robyn Horn Collection, Arkansas Arts Center, Little Rock, AR 2011 Re-new, Solo Exhibition, William Busta Gallery, Cleveland, OH

Gans, Jennifer Cross. “Coining Art: Taking Creative Stock of Currency.” Metalsmith Vol. 29 No. 3. 2009: 18–19.

2010–2011 Craft Forms 2010, Wayne Art Center, Wayne, PA

Smilie, Eric. “Music, Made on Earth: Stylish Change.” Make 15. 2008: 22.

2010–2012 Iron: 2010, National Ornamental Metal Museum, Memphis, TN (Traveling)

“Shaping the Future of Craft: 2006 National Leadership Conference”, American Craft Council. 2007, edited transcripts, 124.

Iron: Forged Tempered Quenched, Houston Center for Contemporary Craft, Houston, TX Modes of Making: Contemporary Studio Furniture, Society of Arts and Crafts, Boston, MA

LISA WILSON Born: Columbus, OH, 1985

Selected Exhibitions

Lives: Bloomington, IN

2011 Subset Synergism—Tales of Migration, Gallery Loupe, Montclair, NJ

Education

2010 The Architect Who Faced His ‘Jardin Interieur, Gallery Noel Guyomarc'h, Montreal, Quebec, Canada

B.F.A., Metalsmithing and Jewelry Design; Theater and Drama, Indiana University, Bloomington, IN, 2007

2007 The Architect Who Faced His ‘Jardin Interieur, Galeria Reverso, Lisbon, Portugal

Pandora’s Box, Torpedo Factory Art Center, Alexandria, PA

Philadelphia Museum of Art Craft Show, Pennsylvania Convention Center, Philadelphia, PA

Education Diploma Gerrit Rietveld Academy Amsterdam, Netherlands, 1997

2009 Backyard, Manifest Creative Research Gallery and Drawing Center, Cincinnati, OH

M.F.A., Metalsmithing, Miami University, Oxford, OH, 2010

2007 Crossover: Combining Traditions, Emily Davis Gallery, University of Akron, Akron, OH 2006 27th Annual Contemporary Crafts Exhibition, Mesa Contemporary Arts, Mesa, AZ 2001 Ancient Futures: The Art of the Blacksmith at the 3rd Millennium, Nova Scotia Centre for Craft + Design, Halifax, NS, Canada

Selected Exhibitions 2011 42nd Mid-States Craft Competition, Evansville Museum of Arts, History & Science, Evansville, IN

Selected Publications

Best of 2011, Ohio Craft Museum, Columbus, OH (Traveling)

Snyder, Jeffery B. Ironwork Today 3, Inside Out. Atglen, PA: Schiffer Publishing, Ltd., 2011. McCreight, Tim. The Metalsmith’s Book of Boxes and Lockets. Madison, WI:GUILD Publishing, 2011.

In Residence 2011, Houston Center for Contemporary Craft, Houston, TX

Selected Awards/Honors

2011, 2007, 2002, 1998 Financial Support, Mondriaan Foundation, Amsterdam, Netherlands

2010 Best of 2010, Ohio Craft Museum, Columbus, OH (Traveling)

2011 Creative Workforce Fellowship, Community Partnership for Arts and Culture, Cuyahoga County, OH

Selected Collections

Form, Fabricate, Forge, Southern Illinois University Museum, Carbondale, IL

2011 Finalist, NICHE Awards, Niche Magazine, The Rosen Group and the Philadelphia Market of American Craft, Baltimore, MD

Selected Grants and Awards 2009 Artist in Residence, Jakob Bengel Foundation, Idar-Oberstein, Germany 2009, 2002, 2000, 1998 Artist Grant, The Netherlands Foundation for Visual Arts, Amsterdam, Netherlands

Amber Museum, Gdansko, Poland Museum of Fine Arts, Boston, MA Museum of Arts and Design, New York, NY Montreal Museum of Fine Arts, Montreal, Canada Museum of Fine Arts, Houston, TX Textile Museum, Tilburg, Netherlands

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Magnitude Seven, Manifest Drawing and Creative Research Center, Cincinnati, OH Refined VI: Back to Basics, The Cole Art Center at The Old Opera House, Nacogdoches, TX

2005 Best of Show, Resources: Coal, Steel, Rubber and Salt

Transformation 8  

Contemporary Works in Small Metals

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