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CONSTRUCTION MANAGER | MAY 2018 | WWW.CONSTRUCTIONMANAGERMAGAZINE.COM

MAY 2018 For members of the CIOB

HEATHROW THIRD RUNWAY

OFFSITE CLEARED FOR TAKE-OFF HEATHROW’S PHIL WILBRAHAM ON THE THIRD RUNWAY BUILD STRATEGY

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CONSTRUCTION MANAGER | MAY 2018 CONTENTS

05/18

Switchboard +44 (0)20 7490 5595 Editor Will Mann 020 3865 1032 will.m@atompublishing.co.uk Associate editor Neil Gerrard 020 3865 1031 neil@atompublishing.co.uk Production editor Sarah Cutforth Art editor Heather Rugeley Community editor Nicky Roger Redesign art director Mark Bergin Advertising manager Dave Smith 0203 865 1029 Key account manager Tom Peardon 0203 865 1030 Credit control Eva Rugeley Managing director Stephen Quirke Circulation Net average 30,699 Audit period: July 2016 to June 2017 Subscriptions To subscribe or for enquiries, please contact: Subscription team Tel: 020 7490 5595 Or go online at: https://constructionmanager.isubscribe.co.uk Or write to us at the address below: Construction Manager Published for the Chartered Institute of Building by Atom Publishing, 3 Waterhouse Square, 138 Holborn, London EC1N 2SW Tel: +44 (0)20 7490 5595

In this issue

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firstname@atompublishing.co.uk Editorial advisory board Mark Beard FCIOB, Ann Bentley, Ian Eggers, Peter Caplehorn, Harvey Francis, Professor Jacqui Glass FCIOB, Paul Morrell, James Pellatt, Nick Raynsford, Richard Saxon, Andy von Bradsky, Phil Wade Construction Manager is published monthly by Atom Publishing. The contents of this magazine are copyright. Reproduction in part or in full is forbidden without permission of the editor. The opinions expressed by writers of signed articles (even with pseudonyms) and letters appearing in the magazine are those of their respective authors, and neither the CIOB, Atom Publishing nor Construction Manager is responsible for these opinions or statements. The editor will give careful consideration to material submitted – articles, photographs, drawings and so on – but does not undertake responsibility for damage or their safe return. Printed by The Wyndeham Group. All rights in the magazine, including copyright, content and design, are owned by CIOB and/or Atom Publishing. ISSN 1360 3566

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Prelims 04 Closing the gender pay gap 06 £10m innovation fund 08 Tighter offsite standards 10 Housing Forum resi report 14 Chris Blythe 15 Feedback: Readers’ views

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Experts Introducing ISO 45001 Smart contracts Offsite and contract law Compensation time limits Project monitoring

52 59 62

Community Novus challenge winners CIOB Graduation Day Me and my project

Insight • Onsite Heathrow’s Phil Wilbraham Raising the roof of the Vyne Steel: Level 2 BIM adoption Steel: Reuse and recycling Steel: Rushden Lakes CPD: Heritage Morgan Sindall’s green school

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PRELIMS MAY 2018 | CONSTRUCTION MANAGER

04-15

Prelims THE LATEST NEWS, PEOPLE AND COMMENT

06 08 10 14 15

£10M INNOVATION FUND TIGHTER OFFSITE STANDARDS HOUSING FORUM RESI REPORT CHRIS BLYTHE FEEDBACK: READERS’ VIEWS

Analysis

Closing the gap THE GENDER PAY GAP DATA PUBLISHED BY CONSTRUCTION COMPANIES LAST MONTH PRESENTED A DAMNING PICTURE, SHOWING PAY INEQUALITY WORSE THAN IN ANY OTHER INDUSTRY. NEIL GERRARD LOOKS AT HOW FIRMS ARE TRYING TO ADDRESS THE PROBLEM

Confirmation of the yawning pay gap between men and women has exposed just how much more progress construction needs to make on gender equality. The government set a deadline of 4 April for companies with more than 250 employers to publicise their analysis of the disparity between men and women’s pay. The results have made for sobering reading. Among the UK’s top 10 contractors (by turnover), women are paid an average

of 30% less (on a median basis) than their male counterparts. Meanwhile, across all 349 construction employers who have made their figures publicly available, the median pay gap is reported to be 23.6%. The UK average median pay gap is 9.8%. So what can construction businesses do to improve the situation, and where do they start? For Lucy Homer, executive general manager design + technical at Lendlease Construction, the results were “very disappointing, but not

surprising” although she admits she wasn’t expecting the gap between men and women’s bonuses to be quite as marked. Nonetheless, she expects this to be a turning point. “I hope it results in positive action from every construction board of directors,” she says. “The pay gap data is a tool to use when talking about how to increase a company’s diversity.” Lendlease, which was one of the first construction firms to publicise its gender pay analysis and revealed women received

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CONSTRUCTION MANAGER | MAY 2018 PRELIMS

Views from the industry What do prominent women in construction think about the gender pay gap data?

For daily updates on the latest news, go to constructionmanagermagazine.com

median hourly pay 33% lower than that of men, has been working hard to put its own house in order. Staff who receive bonuses have targets to hit a certain percentage of female representation in the area of the business they are responsible for – or face missing out on the bonus reward at their performance review. The company has increased senior female representation across the board from 24% to 29% over the past 21 months and claims to be on target to hit 33% by 2020. It has already reached 50/50 recruitment at graduate levels, and at least one woman must be shortlisted for other roles, although the firm is finding the pool of talent for site-based and M&E roles smaller, Homer says. She advocates female recruitment quotas both for internal and external recruitment. “The aim should be to get to a certain level by a certain date because you need something to aim at,” Homer says. Willmott Dixon, where the median hourly rate for women is 43.5% lower than men’s, is also trying to address the problem. “The simple reason for our gender pay gap is that there are many more men working with us than women in senior positions across the business,” says Rick Willmott, group chief executive at Willmott Dixon. “Until our gender balance is improved across most of our pay grades, and especially at senior levels, then the gender pay gap will remain – it is as simple as that.”

Biggest contractors’ gender pay gap* Median hourly rate % lower than men 0

40

Balfour Beatty (Group) Morgan Sindall (Group) Interserve Construction Kier Laing O’Rourke *By turnover, figures as at 4 April 2018

Willmott Dixon has set a target of a 50/50 gender balance by 2030 and claims to be the only construction firm so far to have set a target to achieve gender parity. Its 2018 management trainee intake process is still ongoing but a spokesman indicated that the firm hoped for it to be 40-50% women. Last year it was 40%. But recruiting women to senior (and better paid) positions won’t be enough on its own – companies will also need to tackle the problem of how to recruit more women at site level. Julia Barrett, director of Willmott Dixon’s Re-Thinking team, says: “There is a plethora of reasons why we don’t see more women tradespeople. A lot of that is around aspirations at school, lack of role models, parents making assumptions that it is not a career for their daughters.” “One of the biggest opportunities we find is that for women coming into our industry they are more likely to join us if they know someone who has worked in the industry and can see the opportunities rather than the barriers.” Board-level support That’s a view echoed by Chrissi McCarthy, managing director of Constructing Equality, who wants to see more board-level support if businesses want to get past “cute PR-based initiatives” that have, in her view, failed to make inroads over the last 20 years of similar programmes. “We need to abandon the idea that this is simply an entry-level women’s problem,” she says. “The falling numbers of women in the sector despite the rise in initiatives to encourage school girls into industry demonstrates that. This is a complex problem that requires understanding of the strategic, cultural and personal dynamics at play within the sector. “We advise organisations to undertake an assessment of their current culture in line with fairness, inclusion and respect,” she adds. A positive approach is important in the eyes of Christine Gausden RD, senior lecturer

Rebecca Thompson, CIOB president “I am disappointed but not surprised by the results within the construction industry. We have a low representation of female leaders, although we have many qualified and capable women within the industry.” Christine Gausden RD, University of Greenwich “There remains a skills shortage and the most readily available resource [male workers] will negotiate what is most favourable to them. There is not necessarily a gender pay gap, but a gap which is relative to the timing of an appointment.” Chrissi McCarthy, Constructing Equality “Without serious strategic approval the topic of women in construction will never progress past cute PR-based initiatives that are likely to be as unsuccessful as the past 20 years of similar programmes.”

at the department of built environment, University of Greenwich. She questions whether hauling companies over the coals for the size of their gender pay gap is the best approach. Gausden says the industry “needs to overtly promote best practice and avoid the temptation to name and shame, as this simply seeks to reinforce the negative image of our industry”. The publication of so many companies’ gender pay gap analysis, and the extent of the problem that it has revealed, has certainly done little to enhance that image so far. Nonetheless, CIOB president Rebecca Thompson, who runs her own heritage consultancy, sees cause for hope. She says: “I feel optimistic that a few of the larger companies are leading with a reduced gender pay gap, and realising the potential of inviting and retaining women in this industry. It is not all about the financial reward, it is about the attitude towards staff and enabling a fair and rewarding place to work.” ● 5

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PRELIMS MAY 2018 | CONSTRUCTION MANAGER

£72m A pioneering £10m innovation fund designed to improve productivity in the construction sector attracted more than 60 entries in a little over a week when it launched at the end of March. Birmingham-based contractor Colmore Tang has put up £10m of its own money to launch the ConstrucTech programme with the help of Virgin StartUp, a not-for-profit offshoot of the Richard Branson empire – the first time the organisation has worked with a company outside the Virgin group. Ideas from startups that have applied for funding so far include: an internet of things (IoT) and machine learning company that helps equipment users make smart decisions about how to manage their fleet; platform technology to improve estimates with digital data collection and automation to autogenerate quotes; and autonomous software designed to work with construction and earthmoving equipment. Colmore Tang, which had a turnover of £49m in the year to May 2017, is looking for businesses that offer solutions in three key areas: people, data and smart materials. Virgin StartUp, which has supported 11,000 entrepreneurs across the UK with startup loans, mentorship and business advice, has a remit to encourage entries from its network of entrepreneurs and startups around the world. Jonathon Spanos, head of commercial and innovation at Virgin StartUp, said he hoped to see around 120 entries in total.

Entries roll in for £10m innovation fund COLMORE TANG AND VIRGIN’S STARTUP PROGRAMME SEEKS IDEAS TO IMPROVE CONSTRUCTION PRODUCTIVITY, REPORTS NEIL GERRARD

Jonathon Spanos of Virgin StartUp expects to see around 120 entries

He said: “There are always startups with great solutions that are ready to test their offering in market and looking to scale. “The construction industry hasn’t embraced this in the past – they haven’t looked to external organisations and allowed access to them, so it does require industry leaders like Colmore Tang to not only recognise the importance of partnering with external startups but also to provide the resourcing, both funding and in-house expertise, to help these great minds

The government has made £72m available for an innovation hub

access what has traditionally been a closed and slow-moving industry.” Meanwhile, Colmore Tang group chief executive Andy Robinson admitted that £10m is a major commitment but hoped that the ConstrucTech programme would unearth good ideas, good people, or both. He said: “We can then use our sites as live testing grounds for any ideas. It could be a material, it could be a process, it could be a piece of software, it could be all kinds of things. “We are prepared to invest in those new businesses to take that idea and bring it to market. It may be something that is marketable outside of our own organisation so it is not a completely altruistic process. We do hope that something commercial comes out of it at the end and therefore we are prepared to invest quite heavily to see if we can get there.” ● Applications close on 31 May. Startups can apply to be part of ConstrucTech at: virginstartup.org/constructech l The government has made £72m in funding available for construction as part of its Industrial Strategy Challenge fund. It will support collaboration between industry and academia to transform the construction sector. The funding is for UK-based research and technology organisations that already have existing facilities and expertise. Constructing Excellence and BRE have both confirmed they are bidding for the fund.

Where Colmore Tang sees construction tech opportunities The UK construction industry’s track record in innovation is poor, according to Colmore Tang group chief executive Andy Robinson (pictured). “There will always be a combination of reasons but the

industry is very traditional. A bricklayer today may have better mortar or tools but the way they lay bricks is essentially the same as it was 50-100 years ago,” he says. Robinson places the blame on the industry’s cycle of boom and bust and its reliance on self-employed tradespeople. “I kept reading about

proptech and fintech and how new technologies were disrupting other sectors,”Robinson says. “It made me think whether there were new technologies, new processes, new pieces of equipment or new materials that can help us improve both our productivity, quality and delivery to the client.”

Colmore Tang had already started working with the University of Birmingham in its quest to find new ideas when Robinson heard from a friend who had worked at the university and had since joined Virgin about the Virgin StartUp scheme, paving the way for the partnership and ConstrucTech’s launch.

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“ Day to day, it’s all about the fine balance. Which is handy, because it’s the same at weekends.” Bethany Wilde Building Inspector & Ice Skater

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PRELIMS MAY 2018 | CONSTRUCTION MANAGER

Heathrow confirms offsite procurement timetable LONGLIST OF 65 COMPETING FOR THIRD RUNWAY EXPANSION WORK

Tighter standards loom for offsite construction THE OFFSITE CONSTRUCTION SECTOR FACES THE PROSPECT OF TIGHTER STANDARDS AS TWO SIGNIFICANT PROJECTS EXAMINING ITS USE GET UNDERWAY. BY NEIL GERRARD

Mayor’s project: Mark Farmer and Nicky Gavron

The mayor of London, Sadiq Khan, has agreed to invest £50,000 in a project promoting the standardisation of “precision manufactured” homes. Meanwhile peers have begun investigating offsite manufacturing’s productivity potential, and the BSI is examining whether additional standards may be necessary for the sector. Khan’s project is to be led by residential consultancy Cast, headed by Mark Farmer, and architect Bryden Wood. It will be jointly funded in partnership with industry although Khan’s office did not give details of who was involved or the scale of their investment, saying it would be revealed “in due course”. Khan’s decision follows a recommendation b y t h e L o n d o n A ss e m b l y ’s p l a n n i n g committee, chaired by Nicky Gavron, in its report into the contribution of offsite manufactured homes to London’s housing crisis, called Designed, Sealed, Delivered, to produce a manufactured housing design code for London.

Work is due to start immediately and will be completed by the autumn. The committee will consider the potential benefits of offsite manufacture and any drawbacks and obstacles to its wider use. Key outputs of the project will include: research identifying what the greatest opportunities for standardisation of components are; development of design principles for precision manufactured components; and development of tools and designs to show how these principles can be applied in practice. Meanwhile, the House of Lords Science and Technology Committee will conduct an inquiry into offsite manufacturing, prompted by construction’s lagging productivity compared to other industries, and will examine how changes to public procurement might stimulate the sector. Ian Pannell, director of trade body Buildoffsite, said: “The need for additional standards for offsite runs across all construction markets – not just housing. Increased standardisation will engender greater confidence among clients and their design and construction teams, which in turn will support a step-change increase in demand.” He added that “BSI, with support from Buildoffsite, is currently looking at gaps in coverage and the need for additional standards”. Commenting on Khan’s announcement, Jaimie Johnston, director of Bryden Wood, said: “This project is an opportunity to bring together the needs of housing providers, designers and manufacturers to

The new runway is likely to complete in 2026 The director in charge of Heathrow’s expansion has revealed the timetable for procuring up to four offsite hubs around the UK that will be key to the delivery of the airport’s vast third runway project. The airport’s expansion programme director Phil Wilbraham is running the rule over a longlist of 65 candidates, selected from 121 applications. He aims to whittle them down to a shortlist of 10 “towards the end of the year”, ahead of selecting the hubs. “The plan is to announce the successful bidders in Q2 of next year. We are planning for four hubs, but there could be more,” Wilbraham said. Construction firms vying to be selected as offsite hubs include Balfour Beatty, Laing O’Rourke, Severfield and Tarmac. A consultation on Heathrow’s latest expansion plan closed at the end of March, ahead of a parliamentary vote in the summer. If MPs vote in favour, and the final masterplan receives planning approval, construction would commence in 2021, with the new runway likely to be finished by 2026. Phil Wilbraham interview, p16

create a common set of principles that work for all. This is a much-needed step.” In a tweet, Farmer also welcomed the mayor’s initiative, saying: “Sometimes tinkering with the rules of the game is not enough – you have to change the game.” Gavron said: “The piece of work that will follow will be delivered collaboratively with industry and will create a fantastic opportunity for London to take the lead in moving construction nearer to manufacturing.” ●

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D A E H HIS N’T WAS Y FULL ITE ON-S

How well is your health & wellbeing strategy working? Mental health conditions are a major issue in the construction industry with workers there in body, but not in mind. In fact the number of people in the industry who are suffering mental health issues is twice the national average.* Staff can be struggling with a range of issues including work pressures, deadlines, stress, anxiety and a lack of sleep and a recent report highlighted that a quarter of current workers are considering leaving the construction industry due to the high levels of stress and the poor work-life balance.** At Westfield Health we believe it’s time for change.

When you begin to truly believe in the physical and emotional wellbeing of your staff it can completely transform the face of your business, improve productivity, reduce health and safety risks and create a positive working environment, helping you retain staff and making you a desirable place for prospective employees to work. Find out how we can support you on your health and wellbeing journey, visit westfieldhealth.com/construction

*Source: Mind Matters Survey, 2017 **Source: Randstad Survey, 2017

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PRELIMS MAY 2018 | CONSTRUCTION MANAGER

“True collaboration, between client, design team and contractor, as early as possible, provides the very best outcome” Andy Tookey, Baily Garner

describes two-stage procurement, on an openbook basis, as “a better way of identifying potential savings”, rather than a single-stage competitive tender that might incentivise main contractors to find the cheapest way to discharge contractual obligations.

The study was commissioned after the Grenfell fire

Housing Forum urges two-stage regen tenders REPORT ON BUILDING FAILURES URGES COLLABORATIVE APPROACH TO PROCUREMENT OF RESIDENTIAL PROJECTS A key report by the Housing Forum, commissioned after last year’s Grenfell fire, has urged earlier involvement for designers and contractors, including two-stage tenders, to address the “significant minority” of residential projects which have serious defects. Authored by a working group led by Andy Tookey, managing partner at consultant Baily Garner, and Nigel Ostime, delivery director at Hawkins Brown Architects, the publication

Scoping and specifying The study also criticises the “use it or lose it” nature of local authority funding, and instead recommends increasing the time and money that clients expend on scoping and specifying a project, including earlier involvement of the contractors. “True collaboration, between client, design team and contractor, as early as possible, provides the very best outcome,” Tookey said. “To achieve this, we need to focus on the way projects are procured. A form of cost-led or two-stage open book procurement process offers a better chance of enabling better collaboration and more successful projects.” The report also recommends greater use of digital and factory-based construction processes to address quality and productivity issues. Ostime said: “We’ve identified that improvements in quality and productivity can be significantly enhanced through both digital technologies and offsite manufacture. “Working this way requires an integrated project team approach with client, designers, specialist consultants and contractors engaged at an early stage in the project

process. This early engagement requires forms of procurement that enable this to happen, which single-stage design-and-build does not.” “We also need to cement the fragmented nature of many projects. Where the design team changes during the life of the project we must form a ‘chain of custody’, ensuring key information is passed from one stage to the next without loss of fidelity.” Assad Maqbool, a partner at law firm Trowers & Hamlins who sits on the forum, said that clients should expect to have some risk on regeneration schemes. “The procurement of the main contractor should not amount to a ‘design-and-dump’ risk allocation,” he said. “To gain the best results, clients must retain some risk in, and therefore control over, the specification process.” Links to wider quality findings Michael Cleaver, director at the Housing Forum, said the study “links closely” with the findings of the Chartered Institute of Building “call for evidence” on quality across the wider construction industry, which highlighted concerns around areas including workmanship, supervision and sign-off. The report – Stopping Building Failures: How a Collaborative Approach can Improve Quality and Workmanship – will be launched later this month and sent to the Ministry of Housing, Communities and Local Government plus procuring authorities. ●

Cladding fire safety ‘desktop studies’ face ban The government could ban “desktop studies” as a way of assessing the fire performance of external cladding, as part of what it claims are tough new rules to strengthen fire testing for the systems. Housing secretary Sajid Javid published the proposed

regulations for residential buildings last month, ahead of a consultation on the plans. The revisions came after recommendations made by Dame Judith Hackitt in her interim report from the review into Building Regulations and fire safety published last year in the wake of

the Grenfell Tower disaster. The consultation, which ends on 25 May, also seeks views on whether desktop studies – assessments in lieu of a fire test – should be used at all and whether or not they are appropriate for construction products, wall systems, or for any other purpose.

If such studies are deemed appropriate, the proposed changes include improving transparency of assessments, enabling proper scrutiny of results, and ensuring that the studies can only be carried out by properly accredited bodies that have the relevant expertise.

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PRELIMS MAY 2018 | CONSTRUCTION MANAGER

Chris Blythe

Chief executive CIOB

From the end of May, a new term will enter the construction lexicon: a “Hackitt building” – a high-rise or complex building which falls under the scope of the Independent Review of Building Regulations and Fire Safety being led by Dame Judith Hackitt. It is not difficult to understand what a highrise building is – but it is a bit more difficult to be clear about the definition of complex. It might refer to where people live or sleep, it might also refer to the potential for a large loss of life in an incident. It might also refer to the characteristics of the occupants. Or it could be all three. Does a structure have to be high-rise to be complex? I don’t think so. A complex building could be a two-storey dependency nursing or care home. A fire at night would be a difficult and challenging prospect. The recent fire at a shopping centre in Russia with over 60 fatalities might also lean toward thinking that this type of building might also be considered complex.

Comment

Hackitt raises some complex questions THE INDUSTRY IS WAITING TO SEE HOW FAR-REACHING THE HACKITT REVIEW WILL BE – BUT THE END DECISION MAY BE A POLITICAL ONE, WRITES CHRIS BLYTHE

Behind the front door In residential, the variable is the occupant. There is no accounting for what goes on behind the front door – as people who have carried our residential refurbs will testify. A couple of years ago while attending a company’s building division annual conference, it was explained by one region that on a council block refurbishment the

workers came across someone keeping a horse in a sixth floor flat. Mixed occupancy is another factor which adds complexity. A combination of tenants, shared ownership and outright ownership in one building is difficult to manage compared to a 100%-owned block. Whether there is a future for mixed occupancy post-Hackitt, with the prospect of some enhanced supervision, intrusion or intervention – depending on your perspective – is a bit early to say. But the issue of who pays for things like cladding replacement has raised some interesting questions, especially for those who acquired their flats through Right To Buy. Potentially complex buildings Other potentially complex buildings could include hotels: people sleep there, there is a high turnover of them – and who really reads the evacuation instructions on the back of the door? The more you think about it, the more the list of Hackitt buildings could expand, and it will be interesting to see what the definition of complex becomes. In matters such as this, the final decision invariably ends up being political – for better or for worse. The persistent refrain from the industry is usually “the government must…”. Well, it might just be that this time the government will. The question is: whether the industry can hack it? ●

Chartered Environmentalist status available to CIOB members Fellows or members of the CIOB who are working on sustainability projects could be eligible for the Chartered Environmentalist (CEnv) registration. The CIOB is one of 24 professional bodies that is licensed to award the registration. For CIOB members, the CEnv qualification establishes a commitment to, and expertise in,

sustainable development, as it applies to construction. There are five criteria potential Chartered Environmentalists must meet to be eligible, which include education to masters degree level or equivalent level of knowledge, and at least four years’ experience. The CEnv status also provides the opportunity to network with

more than 7,000 professionals who have gained the qualification from the Society for the Environment, at research conferences, social events and prize-giving ceremonies. For more information, go to www.ciob.org/charteredenvironmentalist or socenv.org.uk l Nominations are open for the Environmental Professional of the

Year 2018 Award. The accolade, organised by the Society for the Environment, can be won by a Chartered Environmentalist (CEnv) or Registered Environmental Technician (REnvTech) from any sector or discipline. Nominations can be made through the Society’s website: socenv.org.uk/SocEnvAwards18.

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CONSTRUCTION MANAGER | MAY 2018 INSIGHT• ONSITE

How will ISO 45001 change health and safety in construction?, p44

Feedback A selection of readers’ comments about news and issues in the industry from www.constructionmanagermagazine.com CM 04/04 Low cost culture Ian Heptinstall

The headline (“Lowest cost culture blocking BIM Level 2 adoption, says Bew”) misses a subtle, but important, detail. Wanting low costs shouldn’t be a problem. BIM should be able to help projects deliver great value and low cost projects. If the focus is on total, final cost. In a desire for “cost certainty” and minimised commercial risk at a work package level, we use commercial approaches that do not help achieve this. A project manager who believes that they get the lowest total cost project by letting a lot of separate fixed-price contracts for each work package is actually increasing the overall cost. This makes for fragmented project teams. And since each contractor understandably looks after their own interests, they are incentivised not to support holistic methods that help the overall project succeed – like BIM. Until projects realise that the commercial model is what is holding us back, and that changing it is the most reliable way to reduce total project cost, great ideas like BIM will remain frustrated and underperforming.

CM 22/03 £20m PwC bill Len Arnold

£1.4m per week for 112 staff. Isn’t that £12,500 per member of staff per week? That is some salary. Any chance I can have a job with PwC to run the contracts? After all, I have 30 years in the industry and a bit more experience than some accountant. Looks as though someone is getting ripped off somewhere along the line. But don’t worry, I’m sure the taxpayer will pick up the tab.

D Wisbey

In come the accountants – to bayonet the wounded. What a disgrace.

Tony Callaghan

Sadly, another example of decline in the modern UK. Companies that have to produce or manufacture must do so against competitors on tight timescales and, let’s face it, “cut each other’s throats” to obtain work – which they then struggle to complete on time and to any decent quality standard, due to years of neglect in training operatives to anything like a decent standard. Much better profit in service and support industry.

CM 13/03 Payment Bill receives industry backing Paul Fitzpatrick

As a construction director, I agree. Everyone needs more protection, but let’s not stop here. Why not review the entire payment process for all parties and make it fairer for all – for main contractors, subcontractors and consultants? Why do we have a system that allows clients to fund their projects through others?

Sean Morgan

In my experience, retention money has to be claimed by the subcontractor rather than be paid automatically in a lot of cases. There is an argument for withholding retention in that getting snagging done is more likely to be less problematic when retention is held. Therefore, I cannot imagine the retention scenario changing.

Adam Arnold

Although I welcome the reforms in retention I don’t understand why no one is looking at the 120-day payment terms that Carillion were imposing on their subcontractors. The loss from having not being paid for up to 150 days of work

would have been much more than the retention. Payment terms need further reform and the UK should adopt a system similar to the Security of Payments legislation in Australia, which gives maximum payment terms of 15 days for head contracts and 30 days for subcontracts. This ensures that the main contractor is in positive cash flow while providing reasonable terms to the subcontractors.

John Porter

This bill, whilst welcome in improving the situation, does not address the root cause, which is the imposition of cash retentions in the first place. Also retentions are ultimately a cost to the client in that the cost of money is reflected in the contractor’s overhead. Our industry, I believe, is alone in having retentions imposed upon it. Can you imagine holding 10% when you buy a new house or car?

CM 22/03 Gender pay gap C Betts

This state of affairs is shocking and cannot continue. The industry has always been experienceled, therefore your experience denotes the value of your pay packet and not your gender. I would not be able to forgive myself if I paid a woman less for completing the same task as a man. I would gladly accept more women on site as I am fed up with the testosterone-fuelled environment in which I am currently forced to work. Women on the whole can bring balance and harmony to the workplace, something decidedly lacking in our industry today.

For more comments and updates on issues and events in the industry, updated daily with the latest news, go to

www.constructionmanagermagazine.com

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Insight • onsite

PHOTOGRAPHY: TIMOTHY FOSTER

TAKING AN IN-DEPTH LOOK AT CURRENT ISSUES AND PROJECTS

OFFSITE CLEARED FOR TAKE-OFF AT HEATHROW THE £14.3BN HEATHROW EXPANSION PROGRAMME WILL BE DELIVERED USING OFFSITE MANUFACTURING AS WIDELY AS POSSIBLE. THE AIRPORT’S DIRECTOR DRIVING THIS STRATEGY, PHIL WILBRAHAM, EXPLAINS HIS THINKING TO WILL MANN

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RAISING THE ROOF OF THE VYNE STEEL: LEVEL 2 BIM ADOPTION STEEL: REUSE AND RECYCLING STEEL: RUSHDEN LAKES CPD: HERITAGE CONSERVATION

With an estimated work pipeline of more than £14bn, Heathrow’s expansion programme director Phil Wilbraham could effect significant change in the construction supply chain. And that certainly seems likely. Different procurement models, extensive use of offsite manufacturing and BIM are all part of the build strategy for the UK’s biggest airport, as it gears up to deliver the vast third runway project (see box on p17 for latest proposals). This is all being overseen by Wilbraham, who has been at Heathrow since 2003, and worked on the delivery of both Terminal 2 and 5. Wilbraham’s plan is to spread the construction workload around the UK, using offsite manufacturing as widely as possible. He is currently running the rule over a longlist of 65 offsite hubs, selected from 121 applications, of which probably four will be selected as focal points for the assembly of major components of the airport’s expansion. “We are visiting all of them, and we have been to 15 so far,” explains Wilbraham. “Over the next two to three months we will visit the others. We’re tying this in with business summits around regions, which involve our tier 1 suppliers.” The plan is to go down to a short list of about 10 “towards the end of the year”, Wilbraham explains. “We will also issue a PQQ before then, as so far we

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CONSTRUCTION MANAGER | MAY 2018 INSIGHT• ONSITE

Moving the M25 – Heathrow’s current expansion proposal Revised plans shortlist three runway options and move the orbital motorway

“We want to select them early so that the hubs, and the supply chains which feed into them, can influence design” Phil Wilbraham, Heathrow Airport

have asked for limited information. And then announce the successful bidders in Q2 of next year. We are planning for four hubs, but there could be more. “We want to select them early so that the hubs, and the supply chains which feed into them, can influence design.” Heathrow has committed to spreading the hubs around the UK, and estimates that 60% of procurement spend will be outside London. There will be a consolidation hub – or “super hub” – at Heathrow, where some products will be taken through security so they can be assembled “air side”, Wilbraham explains. At least one hub will be in Scotland. “We realise we will struggle for skills in the south east, so moving work away to the regions makes sense,” he says. Road transport limits the size of products that can be offsite manufactured, which Wilbraham is well aware of, and says he is considering whether “flying factories” are suitable for some elements of the work. “Skanska has done exactly that on the 750m-long A14 River Ouse viaduct, effectively precasting the new viaduct alongside the site,” he says. Wilbraham says the larger precast civil engineering elements, which may be harder to transport, are likely to be constructed at Heathrow. He is monitoring US trials of precast taxiways, both for the expansion programme and the airport’s regular work.

“Rebuilding in situ can take time, so if we can drop in premade sections, it would speed up the programme considerably,” he says. “These sections would be around 10m by 4m in size, so much bigger than could fit on the back of a truck, and would need to be cast in ‘flying factories’.” The firms vying to be selected as offsite hubs include several construction industry big hitters, among them Balfour Beatty, Laing O’Rourke, which has a long track record at Heathrow, Severfield and Tarmac. Wilbraham describes Laing O’Rourke’s Explore Industrial Park in Derbyshire as “a great factory”. But he adds that he sees it as “a precast factory, which would supply a hub, not a hub in itself”. “The idea of the hubs is that they will have a supply chain around them,” he elaborates. “These factories could make precast concrete, fence posts, parapets – a multitude of components. The hub brings all this together and potentially assembles and consolidates these components into loads which are taken to Heathrow on a just-in-time basis. So they also have to be near good rail and road connections.” Wilbraham says he wants the hubs and their supply chains “to grow with Heathrow” and also wants “other programmes to join us”. Does that mean projects such as HS2 and Hinkley could make use of the hubs? “We are talking to eight other infrastructure programmes, including both of those,” he answers, and then adds, intriguingly, “we’re also talking to manufacturing. We think they could make use of the hubs. And generally, there’s a lot construction can learn from what other industries are doing as standard.” An example of that is “off take” agreements with suppliers, common in manufacturing, where a client commits to taking a certain percentage of a

The lowered M25 will pass in a tunnel under the new runway A consultation on Heathrow’s latest expansion plan closed at the end of March, and the airport’s proposal – in the form of the Airports National Policy Statement – now goes forward to a parliamentary vote in the summer. The revised plans have cut the cost of the scheme by £2.5bn, from £16.8bn to £14.3bn, the airport says. Three options were shortlisted for the new north-west runway, with length varying from between 3.2 and 3.5km. Wilbraham says the exact length is still to be decided but he expects it will be “about 3.5km, give or take 50m to 100m”. The M25 will be realigned as part of the plan, moving approximately 150m to the west, and lowered by 5m to 7m, where it will pass through a tunnel under the runway.

The exact location of the runway may also change by 50m to 100m in either direction, Wilbraham adds, though it needs to “tie in with the M4/M25 junction”. “The road must be moved but still integrate with the existing network, the runway must tie in with taxiways, and rivers need to be diverted to go under the runway.” Heathrow is also proposing expanding the existing terminal infrastructure. Assuming the parliamentary vote approves the plans, a national planning application will go forward later in the year, with a final planning proposal going to the Planning Inspectorate in 2020, and then the transport secretary. Construction work would commence in 2021, and the new runway is likely to be completed by 2026.

supplier’s products for a fixed period. “We could decide to procure all of our fencing products, for example, from one factory, for say five years, so we are effectively reserving capacity in that factory,” says Wilbraham. Another example is transportation of products. “Construction is used to having suppliers deliver to site,” he says. “But when we started having conversations with the 17

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INSIGHT• ONSITE MAY 2018 | CONSTRUCTION MANAGER

Summer 2018 Parliamentary vote on national policy statement

2019

2020-21

2021

2026

Consultation on preferred masterplan

Final planning proposal goes to Planning Inspectorate, then transport secretary

Construction begins

First flights from new third runway

Heathrow third runway timeline

manufacturing industry, they said, ‘we collect – it’s far more reliable’. So we may look at collecting the products and bringing them to site, rather than having suppliers deliver them.” Once at site, most of the construction work at Heathrow will be what Wilbraham describes as “assembling”. “We would like the ‘nirvana’ of no hot works or wet works on site,” he says. “These are skills for the factory, and on the site is about assembly. Steel frame contractors have been used to that for years, and precast the same,” he says. “It’s about being organised and planning the crane hook time.” If onsite work becomes mainly about ‘assembly”, does that mean that the role of main contractors is bypassed? In reply, Wilbraham says he envisages packaging up construction work on Heathrow’s expansion programme into four different types of contract. “For earthworks, we expect to contract typically with ‘second tier’ suppliers, who own their own diggers and dumpers, Blackwell, for example,” he says. (Interestingly, Balfour Beatty recently invested in its own earthworks capability, buying 22 specialist machines.) Utilities work, Wilbraham says, would be carried out by “specialists from that sector, using their own supply chains”. With buildings, he continues, “we will look for an assembler, who might also be an ‘integrator’. That company might be a main contractor, or it could be traditional second tier contractor who steps up. Toureen, for instance, is traditionally a frame contractor but they are acting as principal contractor for a hotel project here at Heathrow.” Main contractors, Wilbraham sees tackling major projects where there are significant logistical challenges. “So, moving the M25 would be handled by a

main contractor; they have the organisational capability to handle that really well,” he says. “We would still want to see as much work precast or assembled offsite as possible, but the rest will be traditional construction processes which main contractors are good at managing.” However, Wilbraham does envisage a changing role for main contractors – less about managing and more about executing. “There is room for vertically integrated contractors,” he says, “which employ large numbers of people, operate their own equipment, and own factories. Efficiencies come in when a business is set up like that – and at Heathrow we are looking for improvements in productivity. “We think the government’s 2025 Construction Strategy takes the right approach on targets. Next year we will start setting targets, on cost, programme, quality. ”

“We would like the nirvana of no hot works or wet works on site. These are skills for the factory” Phil Wilbraham, Heathrow Airport

A common BIM model will be “at the heart” of the Heathrow expansion, Wilbraham says. “We are in the process of creating that now,” he reveals. “A BIM model is currently being used for the masterplanning, and after the national policy statement has gone through parliament in the summer, we will get to a single masterplan in the autumn. This will be the model we will build off, and it will include design, costing and programme. “We will work in a common data environment, where all the data is owned by the client, and then ask the supply chain to take sections out, work on them, and put them back into model.” Could digital tech also have a role in construction execution, through use of robots and automated plant? “It will certainly be worth considering for the repetitive tasks, that have to be repeated 1000s of times – Crossrail has used a robotic drilling rig, for instance,” replies Wilbraham. “I can also see the potential with some site machines – the mining sector has autonomous trucks.” As the Heathrow’s proposals slowly taxi towards clearance, Wilbraham is busy gathering other ideas for innovation – partly from his visits to the hubs, and also from his role as co-chair of Constructing Excellence. He has just come from a meeting with the other co-chairs – Mark Farmer of Cast, David Whysall of Turner & Townsend – and describes the organisation as a “great place for sharing ideas, which brings all levels of the supply chain together”. “Constructing Excellence is also very good at benchmarking,” he says. “Once we’ve got our targets set for the Heathrow expansion programme, we may use the organisation to collect the data and measure it. “It’s all about building more productivity into what we do.” ●

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INSIGHT• ONSITE MAY 2018 | CONSTRUCTION MANAGER

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NATIONAL TRUST IMAGES/ KAREN LEGG

The freestanding structure surrounding The Vyne uses 339 tonnes of scaffolding

RAISING A TUDOR ROOF OVER 150,000 VISITORS TO A TUDOR MANSION IN HAMPSHIRE WERE ABLE TO SEE ROOF CONSERVATION WORKS FROM ATOP A GIANT SCAFFOLD, AS CONTRACTORS BELOW TACKLED WONKY CHIMNEYS, ROTTEN TIMBERS AND A COLONY OF OBSTINATE BATS. STEPHEN COUSINS REPORTS

A freestanding scaffold with an upper-level public walkway encloses the building during work on the roof

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CONSTRUCTION MANAGER | MAY 2018 INSIGHT• ONSITE

A scaffold with a view

NATIONAL TRUST IMAGES/ARNHEL DE SERRA/MIKE CALNAN DRONE FOOTAGE

Project The Vyne reroofing Value £5.4m

It’s hard to know what Henry VIII would have made of the spectacle surrounding The Vyne, a sprawling red-bricked Tudor mansion near Basingstoke in Hampshire, which over the past 15 months has been the subject of a £5.4m reroofing project. The fearsome monarch and his ill-fated wife Anne Boleyn once stayed at the property in 1535, but since February last year it has been encased in a giant weatherproof shell, comprising over 339 tonnes of scaffolding, designed to protect the mansion as specialist craftsmen carry out vital repairs. The freestanding scaffold supports a raised walkway from which over 150,000 visitors watched work as it progressed on the pitches and valleys below. It was one of several challenges faced by the construction team, led by Bristolbased Ken Biggs Contractors and client the National Trust. Around 71,000 roof tiles will be removed and replaced during the 18-month project, chimneys are being reconstructed and the whole programme has been dictated by the roosting and hibernation patterns of a bat colony. The Vyne, at Sherborne St John, has a long and intriguing history. It began life as a cluster of medieval buildings, but was expanded to create a grand Tudor palace for William Sandys, who became Lord Chamberlain to Henry VIII in 1526. Ownership passed from the Sandys to the Chute family in the 17th century, before the Vyne was eventually bequeathed to the National Trust in 1956. The mansion today is roughly a third of its original size. The 1,600 sq m roof has been extended and repaired over the centuries to become a higgledy patchwork of red tiling, off-kilter chimneys and roof pitches coming together at odd angles. The National Trust had a maintenance programme in place, but the situation

Client National Trust Main contractor Ken Biggs Contractors

Programme January 2017 to July 2018

“Ad hoc repairs were not going to cut it any longer; we had to urgently intervene and bring forward a wholesale replacement project, originally planned for 10-15 years’ time” Andrew Harris, National Trust

worsened in 2013 when severe storms over the Christmas period left the roof battered and leaking. Andrew Harris, project manager at the National Trust, explains: “Our fiveyear inspections had flagged up the need to programme in more renewal work, but the bad storms caused lots of issues with water ingress in different parts of the mansion. A particular concern was a chimney in the central valley that was leaning badly with a horizontal crack at the base – a support cage had to be installed around it as a temporary measure. “Ad hoc repairs were not going to cut it any longer; we had to urgently intervene and bring forward a wholesale replacement project, originally planned for 10-15 years’ time.” There was little documentation related to the roof structure and the alterations over time, so an extensive

Scaffolding is used to hold unstable chimneys in place

A public walkway gave visitors a closer look at the roof conservation work A giant freestanding scaffold, with enough metal pipe to stretch 41 miles, shrouded The Vyne for the duration of the conservation project. The structure provided access for contractors and materials and included an upper-level walkway with a separate lift from which visitors got a bird’s-eye view of roof conservation work (pictured opposite). The National Trust receives no government funding, so this “conservation in action” feature was considered critical to help the building raise additional funds. Andrew Harris, project manager at the National Trust, says: “A scaffolding designer was appointed to develop a design configured to provide the best views of conservation work. Tendering contractors could easily see what we were trying to achieve and price the work based on the same information.” Over 100 volunteers were trained to operate the visitor lift, understand health and safety and evacuation procedures and explain the construction and roof to visitors. The scaffolding shell took over five months to erect, starting in October 2016. The public walkway extends around the building perimeter on the north and parts of the east and west elevations. One section extends across the centre of the mansion roof in a single span. “The structure spans between vertical scaffold towers at either end and required lots of RSJ beams and beefed up scaffolding to transfer loads down to ground level,” says Harris. All the walkways were preassembled on the ground and lifted into position by tower crane in a single day, followed by the giant roof trusses the next day. Construction materials and workers accessed the site via a second lowerlevel walkway via a loading bay in a separate contractors’ compound on the south side of the building. Public access to the walkways ended in March. The scaffold itself will take several weeks to dismantle ahead of the project’s completion.

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NATIONAL TRUST IMAGES/VIRGINIA LANGER/GARY MARSHALL

Conservation CPD, p36-42

feasibility study was launched in 2015 to assess the repair work required. “Although we had a basic understanding of the structure and how it had evolved, it was only derived from what we could see from the inside. Removing areas of tiles and coverings enabled us to take a good look at everything,” says Harris. Mortar samples were extracted and sent for analysis, which formed the basis of the specification for the lime mortar used to rebuild the chimneys and other brickwork. Fragments of the original Bath oolitic limestone that had fallen from the building were analysed to find a close geological match used to repair coping on castellated sections, including merlons and embrasures. Just 15-20% of the clay tiles across the entire roof were considered salvageable, and most of those were in such poor condition the decision was made during consultation to remove all the tiles and replace them with new ones. Six types of tile from different manufacturers were shortlisted. The product specified is a traditional handmade clay tile, formed in a mould and bearing the handprint of the maker on the reverse. The brick chimneys were leaning at such precarious angles they were considered structurally unsound. New straight chimneys were built using bricks handmade to the same dimensions by the only remaining manufacturer in the country that still uses a woodfired kiln. “Wood firing creates various nuances and different colours depending on the location in the kiln and firing temperatures,” says Harris. A project archaeologist had a watching brief to inspect and record all roof timbers and structures. It was considered remarkable that, given the deterioration of the tiling, the wood below was in such good condition with

Top: Restored chimneys are revealed Above: Samples are taken from the Oak Gallery for dendro testing

limited rot. The anticipated £200,000 of timber repairs was cut by over a half to around £90,000. However, not knowing the extent of the rot in joists and rafters before the exterior tiles, felt and battens – and centuries of bat and bird droppings – had been removed added time constraints. Ken Biggs contract manager Kevin Brooks says: “The oldest timbers could not be removed and had to be repaired in situ. It took time to assess the damage, develop the design for modification and structural repairs and then wait to get the engineer’s approval.” Dendrochronology (tree-ring dating) revealed that some timbers over the chapel roof were original and from trees felled in 1524. Others, over the oak gallery, at the western end of the mansion, were dated to 1526. Chisel marks in some of the wood gave clues to the original method of

construction. Carpenters had inscribed roman numerals when jointing the timbers at ground level so they could be lifted into position in the correct order. Arguably the biggest obstacle to the work was nocturnal. The National Trust always presumes that its properties are frequented by bats, but surveys carried out during the feasibility stage revealed the creatures inhabited most of the mansion roof. Bats go through a cycle of hibernation in the winter and nesting in the spring, so there were specific times when work had to be put on hold in certain areas. For example, the discovery of a maternity roost over the chapel forced trades to down tools until the young had left. Bats can change their sleeping location, so the programme could be disrupted at any time, says Brooks: “As soon as we found any bats when stripping off the roof, we had to stop work and call the ecologist, who was not always available to immediately come to site.” The new roof incorporates special features so the bats can continue to roost in the building, including bat tiles, bat access points, and bat ladders (small tunnels the creatures can crawl through to enter attic spaces). Animals from the 16th century also made their mark on the project. Tiles removed from the roof had the footprints of dogs, cats and sheep on the reverse. It is thought the animals walked over them when they were newly made and laid out in the yard to dry in the sun. The project is now nearing its July completion date. The National Trust faces the herculean task of unpacking The Vyne’s collection of over 3,000 historic objects, boxed up before contractors arrived on site, and returning them to the mansion. ●

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The UK's best read digital construction resource.

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Exclusive news, views, interviews, debate and case studies on all the latest digital technologies from 3D printing and robotics to off-site manufacturing and virtual reality. How digital technologies are creating efficiencies and productivity for firms across the supply chain from designers to contractors and product manufacturers. A site for anyone working in digital construction from beginners through to experienced practitioners. Every part of the BIM journey provided by industry experts, software developers and industry bodies. Project stories and case studies to guide you through BIM adoption.

www.bimplus.co.uk

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INSIGHT• ONSITE/STEEL MAY 2018 | CONSTRUCTION MANAGER

80-90% Matthew Pearce of Mott MacDonald estimates that 80-90% of the projects he works on are BIM Level 2 or above

If there’s one corner of construction where the uptake of BIM ought to be higher than anywhere else, then it’s the structural steelwork sector. Construction industry adoption of BIM Level 2 is still sluggish, as this year’s CM BIM survey showed (April 2018 issue), despite the government mandate for its use on public projects kicking in two years ago. But steel has had a head start. 3D modelling has been common for at least the last 20 years because steelwork firms were early users of CAD technology for designing and fabricating. So does that mean the sector is now leading the way on BIM level 2 uptake? Simon Bingham, chairman of Nottingham-based structural steelwork contractor Caunton Engineering, says his firm is well versed in the use of BIM. “We were doing 3D modelling, which essentially is what they now call BIM, with steel back in 1986,” he says. “But then it wasn’t until 1999 when we did our first job where we engaged in interoperability, where we were collating other people’s data into a model to make sure it all worked.” The advantages to using BIM Level 2 and above are clear to Bingham, albeit difficult to quantify. “Putting numbers on it would be very difficult but BIM Level 2 would allow us to make both programme and cost savings,” he says. Unfortunately, though, there is one problem. “We can work to BIM Level 2, if we had anyone to work with us,” Bingham says. He says Caunton has worked on very few projects that can be truly labelled as meeting the Level 2 standard. Bingham sees main contractors often starting off using standardised forms of contract on BIM projects but changing them “to their own ends”.

STEEL AND BIM – LEADING THE WAY? STRUCTURAL STEEL HAS USED DIGITAL TECHNOLOGY AND 3D MODELLING FAR LONGER THAN MOST PARTS OF THE CONSTRUCTION SUPPLY CHAIN – SO DOES THAT MEAN IT’S AHEAD OF THE GAME WITH BIM LEVEL 2 ADOPTION? NEIL GERRARD INVESTIGATES

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CONSTRUCTION MANAGER | MAY 2018 INSIGHT• ONSITE/STEEL

Detail of steel construction joint in BIM

“What we should have is a standard approach. We have got naming conventions, we have got standards to work to, we have a digital code of works. But it is largely just being cherrypicked and the difficult bits ignored,” Bingham says. “Coordination at the front end of the job is hard work. It requires dedication, collaboration, and skilled people. A lot of contractors have a look at it, but fall over because it looks like hard work because their own procurement models are bust, and they don’t have the right people in place at the right time to make it work. “So they call in a third party to come and digitise it once it has been built and then claim it was built to BIM Level 2,” Bingham adds. That’s not a way of working that Dr David Moore, director of engineering at the British Constructional Steelwork Association (BCSA), recognises. “I haven’t come across that. They should be doing it properly if they are doing it at all,” he says. According to Moore, there is considerable interest in BIM from the BCSA’s members. He has recently held eight courses in Level 2 BIM, training up a total of around 160 people. Further savings to be made Because steelwork contractors already generally use 3D modelling, Moore says the savings his members can make through BIM Level 2 aren’t necessarily as great as for other parts of the construction supply chain. But there are savings to be made, he adds, particularly in terms of not having to key in the 3D model itself, instead accepting one from the consultant or the main contractor. The BCSA has set up the Steel Construction BIM Charter, which enables companies to be certified against the requirements of PAS 91: 2013

(the standard relating to construction pre-qualification questionnaires) and PAS 1192-2:2013 (which provides the framework for collaborative working and information management in a BIM Level 2 environment). “By signing up to the BIM charter, you are demonstrating to the client and main contractor that you are BIM Level 2 compliant and that avoids some of the issues associated with prequalification,” Moore explains. So far, 25% of the BCSA’s membership is signed up – including many of the bigger contractors, meaning a larger share of the steelwork market is signed up than the figure suggests. Nonetheless, Moore recognises that there are obstacles to adopting BIM. One of the main ones is the issue of liability. He explains: “A lot of my members ask if they should trust the model they get from the main contractor. “Most consultants I speak to say they guarantee that when the model leaves them it is correct, which it might well be, but it goes through a number of software iterations before it reaches the steelwork contractor. That’s why we say to our members that before they start a project they should do a trial run.” The other potential obstacle, Moore finds, is that some contractors struggle to understand how a model works

Using VR and AR with steel

“We were doing 3D modelling, which essentially is what they now call BIM, with steel back in 1986” Simon Bingham, Caunton Engineering

BIM helped speed Mott MacDonald’s work on the Jakarta velodrome, where the roof made use of a steel frame

Construction is increasingly turning to virtual reality and augmented reality (VR and AR) to help bring BIM to life. Positioning specialist Trimble Solutions is using Microsoft’s lightweight HoloLens headset for this purpose, and has recently combined the headset with a hard hat to allow it to be used on construction sites. Using Trimble Connect software, 3D models in most formats can be loaded into the mobile computer’s headset display. The models can be rotated and zoomed in on using hand gestures, to gain a detailed and accurate feel for a building’s design. The software also has an immersive mode that allows users to walk around a structure aligned to its 3D model. “If you were stood inside a steel frame, you could see where the columns and braces need to go,” Trimble’s technical manager Steve Jackson explains. There’s even a chatroom function that allows other people to join at the same time so that they can all view the model remotely. Jackson sees BIM combined with VR and AR offering advantages in the construction stage and also for facilities management once buildings are complete and operational.

unless they have keyed it in themselves, although younger generations tend to be able to get to grips with 3D modelling from the start, he says. Finally, language can be a problem. Moore says: “When we start talking about BIM it contains its own definitions and a language all of its own. “Terms like ‘levels of maturity’ and ‘federated models’ aren’t words that engineers use in their everyday lives.” 27

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“If everyone is on board with it then use of BIM saves time. But it is only as good as its weakest team member” Matthew Pearce, Mott MacDonald

One consulting engineer who is familiar with these terms is Matthew Pearce, principal structural engineer at Mott MacDonald. Part of the London structures team, Pearce has experience of BIM in the UK and overseas, and estimates that 80-90% of the projects he works on are BIM Level 2 or above. Uptake has increased gradually over the past few years, he believes. “The real benefits are when everyone is using it, from the architect to the MEP engineer,” Pearce says. “If they aren’t using it then it can really hinder the process, but if they are then it really helps with coordination.” He cites the example of how BIM sped up the design and construction of the Jakarta International Velodrome in Indonesia, an enclosed arena where the roof was constructed using a steel frame. Pearce says: “I worked on the London Velodrome and that took about 12-18

MX3D, Autodesk Heijmans and Joris Laarman are working on a 3D-printed stainless steel bridge to be installed in Amsterdam this year

months to do the design. On Jakarta we only had half the time, so because it was design and build we were working directly with the contractor to build the model, almost at concept stage, and then add more detail as we went. “It took about six months to do it from start to finish. If everyone is on board with it then use of BIM saves time. But it is only as good as its weakest team member.” Pearce thinks that BIM adoption may be lower in the UK than in some other areas of the world and says having buy-in from the principal contractor is key. Nonetheless, he has seen the use of 4D and 5D BIM in the UK, notably in the case of the £77m Casement Park stadium in Belfast, now going through planning. “We used 4D to show the construction planning because it is quite a constrained site, and then we used 5D because our cost team did the costing for the project, so we were able to integrate the cost information into the Revit model and then that was used to produce the bill of quantities,” he explains. Pearce sees the main obstacle to BIM adoption as accessibility – with clients and non-technical design team members not necessarily familiar with the specialist software required. “I think one way to improve it, and it’s the way it’s going, is for it to become more web-based,” Pearce says. “If you can interact with models using a web browser, spin it around and even start to modify it, then that definitely helps with accessibility.” Bingham, despite his scepticism about BIM adoption so far, is hopeful that technology can provide the answer. “Construction has been focused on putting information into these models,” he says. “You start out with a skeleton and you enrich the dataset as the project

progresses. But there is technology now such as point cloud 3D laser scanning that can create data automatically.” Moore sees the potential for technologies like augmented reality (see box), although he says the industry still needs to understand how best to exploit it. Some BCSA members are beginning to use robotics in their workshops, he says – and he believes applications for 3D printing are on the horizon. He is excited about plans to 3D print a stainless steel bridge in Amsterdam, a project involving Dutch robotics startup MX3D with Autodesk, construction firm Heijmans and designer Joris Laarman. It is to be installed in late 2018 over the Oudezijds Achterburgwal canal. “These technologies are changing rapidly and we need to see how we can use them in everyday steelwork construction,” Moore says. ●

Tata introduces BIM product data tool Tata Steel has launched a BIM and product data tool for all its European construction brand products, which it hopes will allow architects, specifiers and facility managers to retrieve the exact level of BIM data they require in the format they need. The company’s web-based DNA Profiler provides access to BIM data on over 6,100 of its products in software formats including Autodesk Revit, ARCHICAD, Tekla, Allplan and Trimble SketchUp. Alex Small, Tata Steel BIM and digital platforms manager, says: “If BIM is to be properly adopted, the industry needs to support small and medium-sized enterprises (SMEs). Our DNA Profiler provides the design community with the tools it needs and acts as a standard setter for product manufacturers.”

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650 It may be because of its strength and durability that steel doesn’t seem at first glance to be all that “green” a material. The steel sector is keen to promote how reusable and recyclable the product is. An estimated 650 tonnes is recycled annually, making it the world’s most recycled industrial material. Some 93% of structural steel gets melted down and recycled, with 7% reused, according to a European Steel Association survey. Michael Sansom, a chartered environmentalist who heads up the Steel Construction Institute’s (SCI) sustainability division, thinks that reuse of steel in construction (taking steel sections from old structures and placing them in new ones) could be more widespread – and says the industry is working hard to address this. “Reuse does happen but there are challenges,” he explains. “The current structural steel supply chain is very slick and fast with just-in-time deliveries, and increasingly workshops are automated so putting old sections and stiffeners through them with holes in and cleats and stiffeners welded on to them is a problem.” The SCI recognises that there are significant barriers to reuse and recently completed two national research projects with the University of Cambridge to identify solutions. Chief among these barriers is the availability of reclaimed sections in the desired size, volume, and in the right place at the right time. Then there are issues relating to quality, traceability and certification, as well as additional cost, a lack of supply chain integration, the additional time requirement, a lack of skills and experience among construction firms in reclaiming and reusing steel, and

Part of a portal framed building manufactured by Severfield but never constructed was reused by Cleveland Steel and Tubes for a new warehouse for National Tube Stockholders in Thirsk

HOW GREEN IS STEEL? THE STEELWORK SECTOR IS KEEN TO PROMOTE THE MATERIAL’S SUSTAINABILITY CREDENTIALS, CHIEFLY ITS POTENTIAL FOR REUSE OR RECYCLING, BUT THERE ARE BARRIERS TO OVERCOME. NEIL GERRARD EXPLAINS

How sustainable is steel construction? Sections Light Cladding Decking Other Sections

Recycled 80% Reused

83%

78%

65% 85%

19% 17% 21% 15% 5%

Landfilled 1% 0% 1% 20% 10% Source: SCI/NFDC survey of UK demolition contractors (% of steel demolition arisings)

An estimated 650 tonnes of steel is recycled annually

a perception that reclaimed steel is somehow inferior. Simply not knowing where the steel needed to complete a job is located is a particular challenge, says Simon Bingham, chairman of structural steelwork contractor Caunton Engineering. “We need to know where all the steel that is potentially reusable is located, so an asset base of steel structures with all the data in it would be a good start,” he explains. “That’s relatively doable when you consider that most steel structures in the UK now come out of BIM models.” The SCI is developing a portal that contains a database of BIM models of UK steel-framed buildings, which allows demolition contractors to assess how much steel is in a building and where, and lets designers design new buildings with the knowledge of what is available. The site currently only exists in prototype form but Sansom hopes to develop and commercialise it. Meanwhile, the EU projects Reduce” and “Progress” are developing non-destructive testing techniques and demountable shear connectors to aid reuse from composite floors in multi-storey buildings. Another area Sansom and his colleagues are looking at is extendable, reusable connections for steel beams. Finally, there is increasing interest in reusing entire structures. For, example, RG Carter and steelwork contractor AC Bacon constructed an aviation academy at Norwich International Airport using a refurbished steel-framed hangar. The 1930s steel lattice truss roof structure and columns were restored while the external envelope was refitted. The project was completed last year. In a more unusual example, Cleveland Steel and Tubes (CST) bought part of a portal framed building which had been

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Steel is the original offsite construction product The government is currently pushing for increased use of offsite manufacturing in construction – but the steel sector has long been using factory processes to deliver efficiency gains, says Sarah McCann-Bartlett manufactured at Severfield’s Thirsk facility but never built after the order was cancelled in 2008. CST used the steelwork to erect a new warehouse for National Tube Stockholders (NTS) at its neighbouring site in Thirsk in 2017. The economic case for reusing steel is strong. In March, steel contractor Billington reported that the price of constructional steel had risen 40% in the last two years. Meanwhile, the value of scrap steel remains low. The University of Cambridge and SCI study revealed that the price difference between new sections and scrap sections averaged £313 per tonne between 2000 and 2016. Sansom says: “Reuse today has its challenges – but we can make things easier by using BIM and by designing systems that are inherently demountable.” ●

“An asset base of steel structures with all the data in it would be a good start” Simon Bingham, Caunton Engineering

The case for weathering steel

So-called “weathering steel” is sustainable in the sense that it requires no painting or maintenance throughout its lifetime. It is more commonly found on bridges, but architect Eric Parry found a different use for it at London’s Pancras Square. Four Pancras Square is an 11-storey commercial

building that uses two different framing solutions. While essentially concreteframed, the building employs a huge storey-high Vierendeel truss that encircles the building at first floor level and allows the creation of a 27m-long, column-free facade along the building’s main entrance elevation. Steelwork contractor Severfield fabricated the truss and brought it to the site in 18 sections, with the heaviest weighing 72 tonnes. Not only will the weathering steel not require any maintenance, it recalls the look of the Victorian gasholders once found on the site.

The government and the Construction Leadership Council have earmarked offsite manufacturing as a route to increase industry productivity and reduce costs. Steel framing is the original offsite product and has long been delivering advantages to clients. Today, fabrication of individual steel pieces takes place under controlled, highly regulated and safe factory conditions, where the use of digital design and leading-edge fabrication systems deliver precision-engineered components with minimum waste. Steel components can be further pre-assembled or fabricated into modules, either in the factory or at the site. Structures are often prototyped or “trial built” offsite to ensure a perfect fit when the modules undergo final assembly on site. Constructional steelwork firms also work closely with other specialists in the supply chain, notably building services, to allow other elements of the build to take place off site. For example, steel contractors working on motorway gantries receive designs from Highways England that have the M&E incorporated into the BIM model. The steelwork firm fabricates the gantry in its factory, and then in the same manufacturing facility the M&E contractor incorporates the electrical and communications cabling and junction boxes on the gantry bodies. The steelwork contractor transports these gantries to site where each one is typically installed in just 30 minutes. Signage and lights are fitted once the gantries are erected.

“The benefits delivered by steel’s offsite processes are aligned with government ambitions for the wider construction sector”

On the north core of the Leadenhall Building in London, steel specialist Severfield prefabricated ‘table’ units incorporating building services components and precast floors. The steelwork contractor fabricated the units, which were then moved to another factory and fitted with the M&E components and precast floors before being brought to site. Three “tables” were installed per level, and the passenger and goods lifts structures were hung off the units on either side. The same firm prefabricated 1,200 steel cassettes for the London Bridge Station redevelopment, each one a bespoke unit due to the changing rooftop geometry. These 9m deep by 3m wide cassettes were assembled at Severfield’s Bolton factory, then the project’s M&E contractor installed the services and the cladding contractor formed each cassette’s canopy roof. Each 2.5 tonne unit was lifted into place by tower crane. The benefits delivered by steel’s offsite processes are aligned with the government’s ambitions for the wider construction sector. In a post-Brexit economy, they also mitigate key risks. A faster onsite programme means government construction targets can be met more easily, as the work is less affected by adverse weather, while a shorter onsite programme is more cost effective. Fewer people are required on site which helps to mitigate issues around skills shortages. Onsite safety is improved as the need to work at height is reduced. The controlled offsite environment ensures consistency and reliable quality. Additionally, the adoption of automation – and now robotics – plus digital design for manufacture and assembly, including full Level 2 BIM uptake by steel fabricators, has created new skills in the sector. The stable long-term nature of jobs in a steel fabrication factory assists in training a specialist workforce, while manufacturing employment brings stability and growth to communities that might not benefit directly from investment in construction or infrastructure projects. Sarah McCann-Bartlett is director general of the British Constructional Steelwork Association.

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4,600

A total of 4,600 tonnes of structural steel have been used over the two phases

The steel frame of Terrace A was completed in just four weeks during phase one

UNDER THE BOARDWALK SOME 4,600 TONNES OF STEEL PROVIDE THE STRUCTURE FOR A £76M WATERSIDE RETAIL PARK IN NORTHAMPTONSHIRE WHERE WINVIC IS WORKING WITH FABRICATOR CAUNTON

Rushden Lakes is unusual among shopping centres in that it has its own nature reserve. The new retail park in Northamptonshire, which lies within a Site of Special Scientific Interest and features a Wildlife Trust visitor centre, has been designed to integrate into its natural setting, and includes a waterfront boardwalk for visitors. For this development, steel was chosen as the framing material, providing flexibility to meet the demands of the numerous retail and leisure tenants, plus the unusual curved geometry of the lakeside boardwalk. Main contractor for the scheme is Winvic. The firm has made its name as an industrial “mega shed” specialist, where it chiefly erects steel-framed buildings, and that expertise has been put to good use at Rushden Lakes. The contractor was appointed to deliver the development in two phases.

The first, valued at £46m, involved construction of six separate steel portal and box frame buildings over a 63-week construction programme, completing last July. The second phase, which got under way in February, is valued at £30.5m, and features a 28m-high cinema structure and another retail building. Winvic is working with steel fabricator Caunton Engineering for both phases of the project, which involve some 4,600 tonnes of structural steel in total. All structures are founded on piled foundations, with a combination of pre-cast concrete driven piles, vibro piles and steel driven tubular piles. “The challenges with the steel erection at Rushden Lakes have been less to do with the frame itself and associated more with the programming and sequencing,” says Richard Black, Winvic’s project manager on Rushden Lakes for both phases.

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Project Rushden Lakes Client LXB Retail Properties Main contractor Winvic Construction

“The construction had to be broken down into many elements that harmonised with upcoming phases and to allow following trades to progress on schedule. It has been fundamental to the project’s success to think in reverse, prioritising the build sequence in line with the overall contract programme to facilitate sectional completions and tenant handovers.” Black praises Caunton’s “impeccable steel design and build work, which allowed this complex process to be achieved”. The fabricator used Tekla software to model the project in BIM, collaborating with the architect and structural engineer, he adds. Winvic had to manage over 400 variations during phase one but was still able to hand over on schedule. These, along with tenants’ diverse layout requirements and working with 35 different fit-out contractors, were among the contractor’s biggest challenges. “Changes included removal of columns, fitting of plant decks, creation of openings within structures, installation of additional support steel for signage and modifications to allow for diverse glazing specifications,” says Black. The phase one steel erection ran for 26 weeks out of the total 63-week build, and was programmed by Winvic to accommodate the requirements of the retail tenants. For instance, the

Architect HPW Architecture Structural engineer BE Design

frame of Terrace A was completed in just four weeks as fit-out access was needed in week 37 of the programme. For the majority of the development, Winvic has opted to use portal frame structures, with one braced box (see box). Flexibility and futureproofing has been built into the steelwork design. “In Terrace A, the 21 individual retail units – each bay is 7.5m wide – were erected as a single-storey structure but are designed to accept mezzanines,” says Black. Terrace B is the only building to use a braced box structure, set out on a 9m x 9m grid pattern at two-storey areas, and at 8m x 15m and 9m x 18m on the singlestorey sections. “The columns and beams, with roof-level bracing, work in union with the concrete floor,” explains Black. The mezzanine in Terrace B has been designed for the highest tolerance to level and flatness (SR1), Black adds.

Steelwork contractor Caunton Engineering Value (phase one) £46m Value (phase two) £30.5m

Programme (phase one) 63 weeks (completed July 2017) Programme (phase two) 77 weeks (to complete summer 2019)

PHASE ONE 2,400 tonnes of steel

The curved boardwalk uses a galvanised steel subframe and FSC timber deck

Terrace A, a single-storey portal frame structure, with mezzanine, providing 4,650 sq m of space and a 930 sq m mezzanine. Terrace B, featuring a two-storey braced-box structure, occupied by a Marks & Spencer store, with an adjoining single storey Boots, plus a two-storey Primark store and three small single-storey retail units. The terrace provides 7, 500 sq m of space and a 3,700 sq m mezzanine. Terrace C, comprising a two-storey portal frame structure with a House of Fraser store occupying approximately one-third of the terrace, plus five small single-storey retail units forming the other two-thirds. Three single-storey restaurant buildings, each built as portal frames, providing 1,860 sq m of space in total.

“The challenges with the steel erection at Rushden Lakes have been less to do with the frame itself and associated more with the programming and sequencing” Richard Black, Winvic

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66 PHASE TWO 2,200 tonnes of steel Cinema and Leisure Terrace, a portal frame structure, set over eight different levels and 28m high, comprising 14,500 sq m of leisure facilities, cinema and restaurants. East Terrace, a portal frame structure comprising five single-storey retail units, one with a mezzanine, totalling 3,250 sq m.

Terrace C, beside the lake, is the largest building, occupied by six retailers including Rushden Lakes’ largest tenant, the two-storey House of Fraser. The portal framed structure also features one of the most striking design features, a bullnose rounded elevation. “The steelwork has been faceted around a 66m radius to form the bullnose feature,” says Black. The lakeside restaurant units are founded on 150 piles, driven following construction of a sheet piled retaining wall at the water’s edge. The curved boardwalk uses a galvanised steel subframe, with 1.5m high columns in an 8m x 8m grid pattern, and extends to 6,000 sq m. The deck itself is FSC timber and is lined with 800m of bespoke stainless steel handrail. Phase two’s steel erection is scheduled for a 23-week programme out of a 77-week total build, and includes the complex Leisure Terrace which at one end comprises eight levels to accommodate the IMAX cinema’s multiple floors. “The portal frame must also accommodate the sequential fitting of 113 sets of precast staircases, fitted in line with the steel erection,” says Black. “Acoustic transference has been incorporated into the design of the steel frame to avoid transfer of noise between screens.” Nine further single-storey restaurant units stretch out towards the

boardwalk. The steel erection for this phase began on 9 January. The more straightforward portal frame of the East Terrace is made up of five retail spaces which have a canopy structure that is independent of the main steelwork. Erected after the cladding is fitted, and attached via stubs that extend out through the facades, it is supported by columns in the public realm space. Only one of the five single-storey retail units has a mezzanine but the flexibility has been built in for all. “The steel frame and pile design for all units facilitates future mezzanine installation,” says Black. The steel erection programme for the East Terrace is just five weeks out of a 40-week total build programme, with fit-outs scheduled to commence in June. Across both phases, the buildings have required secondary and tertiary steelwork and subframing to allow the

Steel erection on the Leisure Terrace, which rises to eight levels at one end

Steelwork is faceted around a 66m radius to form the bullnose feature of the House of Fraser store

facade finishes, says Black. These include stone cladding rainscreen, composite cladding, curtain walls and glazing. Winvic has used mobile cranes with 80-100 tonne capacity for the majority of the steel erection. “Smaller city cranes were used for erection inside the structures for mezzanines, enhanced tenant fit-out requirements and other changes post frame erection,” says Black. “The steel erection to the boardwalk was installed using a combination of mobile cranes and telehandlers due to the proximity to the water’s edge and the associated ground conditions.” Shops in the East Terrace will open from summer 2018. Restaurants in the Leisure Terrace will be fitted out from September, ready for Christmas 2018, while the cinema starts its six-month fit-out from January 2019, ahead of the grand opening the following summer. ●

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Hardwick Hall’s exposed position has left the stone at risk of damage from wind and rain

CPD Heritage work

Conservation – understanding the significance CONSTRUCTION PROFESSIONALS WORKING ON CONSERVATION PROJECTS FACE DIFFERENT CHALLENGES TO THE WIDER INDUSTRY. CM LOOKS AT THE HERITAGE SECTOR’S KEY REQUIREMENTS AND BEST PRACTICE, IN CONSULTATION WITH THE NATIONAL TRUST’S PAUL WANKIEWICZ

With over six million traditional buildings and more than 500,000 buildings or structures in the UK, there is considerable demand for construction professionals who understand the nature and practicalities of conservation projects. The work often provides unique challenges and should always demand high standards, and appreciating the significance of the building – which could be social, historical, cultural, economic or environmental – is key on any heritage project.

As Chartered Institute of Building president Rebecca Thompson, who runs her own heritage consultancy, puts it: “Recognising the history of a building is central to a healthy working relationship with heritage clients.” There a re s e ve ral re co gnis e d be s t practice guides for work in the heritage sector. Foremost among these are BSI’s BS 7913 standard Guide to the Conservation of Historic Buildings, the National Trust’s Conservation Principles and the

International Council on Monuments and Sites (ICOMOS) charter Principles for the Analysis, Conservation and Structural Restoration of Architectural Heritage. These principles, which incorporate such issues as taking an integrated approach, accountability and working with change, lie at the heart of how construction heritage specialists need to approach conservation projects, says National Trust senior building surveyor Paul Wankiewicz.

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Hardwick Hall Gatehouse, Derbyshire Restoration of the gatehouse tackled the damage done by over 400 years of weathering

“BS 7913 could be regarded as the key document for construction professionals working on conservation projects. It should be the first point of reference for anyone starting out” Paul Wankiewicz, National Trust

“Not all the principles can be adopted on every project, but they can be used to form an understanding of the significance of the building,” he says. “From there, a judgement can be made on what work needs to be done to the building. “A considerable amount of work on any conservation project will be done in advance – using the principles to inform decision-making. In some respects, doing the work on site is the easy bit.” The principles of ICOMOS and the National Trust are incorporated into the BS 7913 standard. “It integrates them in one concise usable document,” says Wankiewicz. “BS 7913 could be regarded as the key document for construction professionals working on conservation projects. It should be the first point of reference for anyone starting out in conservation.” BS 7913 is intended for owners and managers of historic buildings, for the conservation project team’s contractors and other advisers. It includes key terms and definitions, and explains heritage values and the concept of “significance” – which is central to the standard’s recommendations for conservation projects. “Heritage has cultural, social, economic and environmental values. The attributes that combine to define the significance of a historic building can relate to its physical properties or to its context,” the standard explains. “Significance could represent a public interest, the planning system, and the policy and legislation which support it. Research and appraisal into the heritage values and

Hardwick Hall in Derbyshire, built in the 1590s, requires ongoing maintenance and restoration work. An example of the Elizabethan Prodigy House style, the hall is situated on an exposed escarpment, and the wind and rain have taken their toll on the building and other structures on site. The repair challenges led the owner, the National Trust, to put a 10-year maintenance plan into place. “The Hardwick stone is coal measure sandstone, which is soft and therefore easily worked, but this means it has a short lifespan,” explains Paul Wankiewicz, who worked as a project manager and building surveyor at Hardwick. “The problem is exacerbated as the remaining stone in the quarry is of poor quality.” Masons have been continuously carrying out maintenance work on the hall and gardens over its history. Wankiewicz describes the cyclical work programme as “a necessary way of life” and commissioned the 10-year plan which the property currently uses to help programme and budget for repairs. “The repair philosophy is only to replace stone that is no longer structurally sound or will last less than 30 years,” he explains. “At high level, mortar repairs only take place if they will last for 30 years or

more. A less rigid approach is considered justifiable at low level where access is easier and less costly.” Hardwick’s gatehouse (pictured below), which uses the same stone as the hall, was identified as requiring urgent repairs, structural work and conservation. “A range of stonework repairs was needed, including repointing of open and vulnerable joints, descaling stonework, pinning, shelter pointing, replacement of ashlar, structural repairs and providing lateral restrain to the building,” Wankiewicz explains. “We also wanted to look at the gatehouse’s structural stability, where the lateral restraint has been compromised by movement and shrinkage of principal roof timbers, and the stability of the stone cresting.” Wankiewicz engaged a conservation specialist structural engineer and surveyed the proposed repairs with the Hall’s master mason, Trevor Hardy, who has over 35 years of experience on the site. “Once we were confident our repair philosophy was in accordance with the ‘Hardwick Hall Statement of Significance and Spirit of Place’, an outline specification was prepared,” he explains. “As the works were classed as repairs, listed building

consent was not required. Even so, the documents and drawings were logged with the local authority as a record of the repairs.” The gatehouse work included installation of a scaffold and temporary roof. “This gave better access to the structure and the repairs were reassessed,” Wankiewicz says. “The structural engineer recommended the principal beams of the gatehouse’s flat roof structure should be tied back to the stone. “We had observed movement from ground level, but this turned out to be old non-progressive movement,” he continues. “We therefore decided not to provide the lateral restraint, as this would have required significant intervention in the building fabric. Instead, we opted to regularly monitor the area for any movement, and this monitoring has been included in the property’s cyclical maintenance plan.” The Hall repairs project was completed, following the agreed philosophy of work at Hardwick, and all repairs were recorded and will act as the base line for future surveys and monitoring. “The building will now fall back in to the cyclical maintenance regime at Hardwick,” says Wankiewicz.

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500,000 The UK has over 500,000 listed buildings or structures

Detail from Hardwick Hall Gatehouse renovation plan

Key: Cut out and piece in/replace with new stone and stainless steel pin

Carry out conservation repairs to the sundial on south wall of archway above roof by carefully consolidating and grouting loose/hollow laminations

Grout and stainless steel pin ashlar to main wall behind

Stainless steel pin all finials to plinths

Consolidation

Descale masonry faces and carry out mortar repairs Replace loose masonry details, replace using stainless steel dowels and repoint

Grout, pin and weather

To wall behind

Secure loose finial by wedging and point base

Grout edges

Stainless steel pin fractures and point Rake out loose mortar from open joints and repoint Replace cast iron cramps with stainless steel and repoint Grout and stainless steel pin laminating stone

significance of the historic building should be carried out to ensure that decisions resulting in change are informed by a thorough understanding of them.” The document also expresses the need for conservation, repair and maintenance of historic buildings to be managed and undertaken by competent persons who will understand the nature of the materials and the skills required to use them, as these are very different to the application of modern techniques. The key difference between traditional (pre-1919) buildings and those built after is the permeable nature of the materials used in older buildings. “Producing the correct specification, understanding traditional building techniques and materials and communicating this via the specification and site visits is essential to achieving the correct results,” says Wankiewicz. Conservation projects should start with an initial desktop scoping exercise, using historic environment records and other resources to identify archaeological sites, “designated

“Where possible existing materials should be investigated and tested so that good performance and aesthetic matches can be achieved” Paul Wankiewicz, National Trust

heritage assets” and other available data. These can be often be found in local archives such as county records offices, or further afield in national archives such as the wealth of information on databases held by Historic England. It is critical that the significance of a place is understood in order to mitigate the risk of losing or compromising components of the site which have values – whatever these might be. Heritage impact assessments (HIAs) should also be used to understand the effect of development and

changes on the historic asset, and how the impact of change might be mitigated. Condition surveys and inspections should involve reference to a site plan to reference locations, areas and components, as the BSI standard explains, and they may include photographs and drawings. The process involves inspection with recording of a narrative, sometimes with detailed analysis and identification of defects. Surveys and inspections can conclude with the need for more detailed assessment, focusing on areas such as architectural paint and plaster analysis, timber decay assessment, structural movement monitoring and environmental monitoring for dampness and humidity. Asset management plans are employed by many larger historic buildings, which undertake planned surveys and inspections. An example is Hardwick Hall in Derbyshire (see box, p37). The BSI standard recommended best practice is for planned surveys every four or five years, a system which is adopted by most larger

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INSIGHT• ONSITE/CPD MAY 2018 | CONSTRUCTION MANAGER

Gothic Ruin, Belton Estate, Lincolnshire An 18th century stone folly on an artificial island proved a challenging consolidation project conservation organisations such as the National Trust and English Heritage. Significance should inform the framework used for managing buildings and as part of operational care and other interventions – the methodology should be proportionate to the nature and history of the building, its ownership, use, need for repairs and any proposed works. A section in BS 7913 is devoted to advice on the creation of strategic plans and conservation management plans in particular, which includes guidance on stakeholder involvement, the positions aimed for at the end of the plan period, resources and materials, and key performance indicators to measure the effectiveness of plans. The standard stresses that understanding is key prior to any alteration to the building fabric. It follows a principle of “minimum intervention” set out back in 1877 in the manifesto of the Society for the Protection of Ancient Buildings. In line with this ethos, it advises: “The level of intervention should be the minimum necessary to stabilise and conserve the historic building, ensure its long-term survival and meet the requirements of any foreseeable new use.” In some instances, it may be desirable to “consolidate” a building in its present condition rather than “restore” it completely, as this could involve a considerable degree of conjecture. An example of this is the Gothic Ruin on Belton Estate in Lincolnshire (see box opposite), where it was decided that a full restoration would have altered its character in the context of its setting. “The building was constructed to represent a ruin and the purpose of the works was to stabilise the structure,” says Wankiewicz. The principal objective of any repair work on a conservation project is to retain the performance of the existing fabric, best achieved by matching materials and using traditional repair techniques. There are instances where modern methods might be appropriate – the use of synthetic resins for timber repairs is cited by the BSI standard – but they need to be thoroughly researched before they are specified, as irreversible damage can be caused.

The Gothic Ruin in the garden of Belton House in Lincolnshire is a Grade II-listed structure, and was recently subject of a heritage project carried out by the property’s owner, the National Trust. “It is an early example of the fashionable 18th century ‘Gothic’ style and appears to have been built around 1742 by the Viscount Tyrconnel,” explains Paul Wankiewicz,who worked as a building surveyor on the project. The ruin is located on an artificial island and stands either side of a cascade. The walls are constructed from local Ancaster stone combined with narrow bands of coursed rubble walling, all bedded in a lime mortar. “The structure needed to be consolidated, rather than fully restored, and still give the impression of being a ruin – which is a delicate balance,” explains Wankiewicz. “A full restoration of the ruin would have altered its character in the context of its setting.” An archaeological historic building survey was commissioned to understand the structure and its significance. This involved a full measured survey of the buildings, including plans, elevations – using a laser scanner – and a photographic survey. “A structural engineer’s report on the structure recommended underpinning, replacing missing

The Gothic Ruin was identified as close to partial collapse with a substantial lean

stones, providing a protective lime mortar cap, isolating stone replacement and removal of any organic growth,” says Wankiewicz. Pre-planning application advice was sought from the conservation officer for local authority South Kesteven District Council, and listed building consent was required owing to the proposed underpinning. Ahead of the tender, Wankiewicz produced a health and safety plan which identified that scaffolding over the River Witham and around the Gothic Ruin would be required for access. “There was no easy access to the site, and as the park was open to the public and Grade I-listed, this made the works challenging from a safety viewpoint,” says Wankiewicz. “After consulting with the property to understand their business operations, we decided to limit the size of the site compound and store materials off site. This would increase the programme for the works but would reduce the impact on the park.” Before work started on the masonry, ivy which covered the structure was cut back and allowed to die, following consultation with the National Trust’s ecologist. “The weight of the ivy and its roots had loosened the stones in places and made some of the larger stones unstable,” says Wankiewicz. “The wall was close to partial collapse, with a substantial lean. Movement cracks were evident.” The masonry works involved minimal intervention, in line with the “consolidation” approach of the project. “The weathered mortar caps have been kept to a low profile but are sufficient to discharge the water from the structure,” he explains. “Mortar samples were provided and agreed in advance of the works. Replacement stone was selected and dressed, with the pointing set well back from the stone but with enough weathering not to trap water.” Ahead of the proposed underpinning works, trial holes were dug by the estate masons. “Unexpectedly, these exposed large existing foundations,” states Wankiewicz. “This information was communicated to the structural engineer who decided that underpinning was unnecessary.” The Gothic Ruin is one of several structures in the gardens of Belton House which are in a state of disrepair – including fallen decorative arches and blocked waterways. Wankiewicz hopes to secure funding for surveys and subsequent repair work to consolidate these structures, following a similar approach to that taken with the Gothic Ruin.

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The Future of the Construction Manager The lives of construction managers across the UK are rapidly changing as technology transforms how buildings and infrastructure are designed and built. We call this the Era of Connection. Find out how the trends will affect you in a new video made in conjunction with CIOB, and discover how you can stay ahead of the curve. Watch the video at www.autodesk.co.uk/campaigns/eoc-video-study

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INSIGHT• ONSITE/CPD MAY 2018 | CONSTRUCTION MANAGER

Hardwick Hall’s sandstone exterior requires ongoing maintenance

Alterations should be carried out only if there is no suitable alternative, and should be designed to minimise their impact on the significance of the historic building, and avoid losing features that contribute to that significance. New insertions – such as sub-dividing walls – should be contoured around original features and mouldings so they can be removed in the future, leaving the original fabric intact. In the case of materials, BS 7913 states: “Where possible, existing materials should be investigated and tested so that good performance and aesthetic matches can be achieved. In cases where the existing material source is not available, re-use of suitable materials from salvage might give better results than newly formed materials.” Water and moisture ingress is a common problem in historic buildings and should be thoroughly investigated to establish the cause so that the appropriate solution can be identified. The root cause of the ingress should be prevented or diverted prior to repair – this could take the form of a defective gutter, for example. Other common problems found in historic buildings include fungal or insect attack and metal corrosion. “These may require specialist targeted investigations,” says Wankiewicz. The emerging field of “building pathology” has a broader focus than the decay of materials, and encompasses the way components interact and how spaces are used. It can be useful in understanding ventilation in historic buildings,

where chimney flues, sub-floor vents and cupolas contribute to a passively managed environment. Project management and supervision is a key element in any conservation work, as there is a far higher risk of defective work where there is no robust project supervision from a competent person. BS 7913 states that: “A contractor’s site or works supervisor should be responsible for ensuring specifications are compiled in accordance with the required quality standards. The contractor should prepare a project execution plan that describes how this is to be achieved and how this is to be inspected and tested. This form of quality management should be based upon risk assessment of specification non-compliance. Inspection and supervision should be carried out at appropriate stages, for example during the repointing of masonry.” Project records, including as-built drawings, descriptions and photographs, should also be kept for all conservation work, as they form a record for the works. “They should also record the decision-making process,” says Wankiewicz. BS 7913 also includes a section on maintenance. Although this is the responsibility of historic building owners and managers, the standard describes maintenance as “the most common and important activity in conservation and preservation” – yet it is frequently neglected, causing costly repairs down the line. “This could be described as the ‘little and often approach’,” says Wankiewicz. ●

CIOB Academy conservation course The CIOB Academy has developed its own heritage course for construction professionals, covering conservation for residential and commercial property, plus historic monuments. The two-day course, Understanding Building Conservation, follows the ICOMOS training and education guidelines and BS 7913. It introduces the philosophy behind conservation before going into detail regarding the technical analysis of buildings, ensembles and sites, diagnosing issues, identifying the best

building conservation solutions, working with the stakeholders, and ultimately providing advice regarding best practice. Those who pass the course will be eligible for further recognition through the new CIOB Building Conservation Certification Scheme. The course is open to any construction professionals who work with traditional buildings. It is intended as an ideal grounding for anyone new to conservation work. For further details see www.ciobacademy.org

CPD: Heritage Take our online test to check your knowledge of the best practice needed for conservation projects 1. What is the most important word attributed to conservation principles? a) Significance b) Understanding c) Heritage d) Refurbishment 2. When is listed building consent not required for a historic building? a) For external work only b) If the work constitutes repair rather than renewal c) For any material change d) For simple alterations such as insertion of a partition wall 3. Which of the following is the key BSI standard relating to the conservation of historic buildings? a) BS 5970 b) BS 7913 c) ISO 26262 d) BS 5839-1

3. What is the principal objective of any repair work on a conservation project? a) Retain the performance of the existing fabric b) Bring the building up to modern building regulations standards c) Minimise cost d) Use modern construction methods to achieve a longer lasting outcome 4.When should alterations to a historic building be carried out? a) When there is no suitable alternative option b) When some features of the building are considered redundant c) When the building’s use changes d) When it will increase the value of the property

Visit www.constructionmanagermagazine. com/cpd-articles to test yourself on the questions above and see past CPD articles.

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EXPERTS MAY 2018 | CONSTRUCTION MANAGER

44-50

Experts KEEPING YOU IN THE KNOW ON LEGAL, TECHNICAL AND PROFESSIONAL ISSUES

46 OFFSITE AND CONTRACT LAW 48 COMPENSATION TIME LIMITS 50 PROJECT MONITORING

Health and safety

How will ISO 45001 change health and safety?

Construction health and safety has been regulated by a plethora of schemes and standards which, while doing a decent job, can cause some confusion for companies unsure which one they should be using. While organisations know there is one globally recognised standard for quality management – ISO 9001 – the lack of an occupational health and safety (OH&S) equivalent has created something of a vacuum in the industry. The recent publication of ISO 45001 will change that.

ILLUSTRATION: MARCIN WOLSKI

ISO 45001 IS THE NEW GLOBALLY RECOGNISED STANDARD FOR OCCUPATIONAL HEALTH AND SAFETY – AND ITS PRINCIPLES MEAN IT IS TAILORMADE FOR CONSTRUCTION, SAY SALLY SWINGEWOOD AND ANT BURD

ISO 45001 could have been tailor-made for the construction industry. This new standard, which replaces OHSAS 18001, not only aligns in structure and core requirements with ISO 9001:2015 (which will make implementation simpler and holistic management more effective), it mirrors many aspects of the Construction (Design and Management) Regulations 2015 (CDM 2015). The 2015 regulations place considerable emphasis on the OH&S responsibilities of

the principal designer and client, but there is concern that this has not been taken on by those at the top, who often choose to use consultants to deal with safety instead. If ISO 45001 becomes a standard expected and required of construction companies it will undoubtedly help to address this – with strong emphasis on the requirements and responsibilities of the highest-level decision-makers. “Context” is also at the heart of ISO 45001. This means that the standard is scalable and

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CONSTRUCTION MANAGER | MAY 2018 EXPERTS

Should the industry be thinking smarter?

Sally Swingewood BSI

Ant Burd BSI

“Organisations have a responsibility to coordinate the relevant parts of the OH&S management system to all parties on site” covers the many permutations of multiple contractors on single sites. It applies equally to large-scale organisations and SMEs. Major improvements in OH&S performance in all parts of the supply chain can be achieved if the primary contractor takes on the two-way responsibility with its subcontractors. Throughout the standard it is emphasised that workers of all types – subcontractors as well as direct employees – need to be involved in OH&S decisions which affect them and form an integral part of hazard identification and management of OH&S risks. The standard recognises that the primary contractor can’t always control everything a subcontractor does, but that doesn’t mean the primary contractor is let off the hook, either. There is a responsibility to consider and reduce hazards which can arise that are beyond the organisation’s control, such as hazards arising from subcontractors’ activities. Organisations have a responsibility to coordinate the relevant parts of the OH&S management system to all parties on site, and ensure that OH&S consideration is an integral part of the procurement process. ISO 45001 will also be an effective tool in managing health – particularly psychosocial health, such as stress – where the construction sector has room for improvement. Much like the wider economy, the construction sector is changing: as new techniques and materials are introduced, skilled workers can find that they no longer have the necessary skills – or are deployed in a way that makes no sense. Job insecurity and other factors

are often contributing factors in an epidemic of stress-related conditions in the sector that urgently need to be better managed. ISO 45001 requires organisations to manage the psychosocial health of their employees with the same diligence as safety hazards. According to the Health & Safety Executive, around 2.9% of workers in the construction sector in Great Britain are injured at work each year. This proportion is statistically significantly higher than the rate for workers across all industries (1.9%). To achieve conformity to ISO 45001, organisations must undergo an independent assessment including a rigorous onsite audit covering all the requirements of the standard. Those requirements include demonstrating leadership around health and safety – top management need to develop, lead and promote a culture that supports the provision of a safe and healthy workplace. This includes riskbased thinking, as well as participation and consultation of decision-makers and workers. This third-party verification will help businesses to provide a safe and healthy workplace for workers and other people, reduce work-related injury and ill-health as well as demonstrate to customers and stakeholders that they are continually improving OH&S performance and enhancing organisational resilience. Use of this new standard will make a difference to OH&S performance for organisations of all shapes and sizes. ● Sally Swingewood is lead programme manager for OH&S and Ant Burd is head of built environment at BSI.

Following last month’s column on electronic signatures and digital contracts, Sarah Fox examines the potential of smart contracts As noted in April’s CM, the reform programme launched by the Law Commission in December 2017 includes two reviews which could help the UK’s construction industry: electronic signatures and digital contracts, which were examined last month, and “smart” contracts. A smart contract is essentially a computerised protocol that negotiates, verifies and automates the performance of a contract. Advocates say they will increase trust and certainty – but there are a few barriers to overcome before construction can contemplate them. These include: l The prevalence of implied terms and case law – as a common law country, all contracts are subject to terms implied by custom, cases and laws. These have to be explicitly written and coded into a smart contract. l The inherent jurisdiction of the court to correct, substitute and overturn contract terms that are unclear, ambiguous or unlawful – the courts will not condone smart contracts which cannot be reviewed or monitored and which are therefore outside their jurisdiction. l The lack of objective measures in quality – a computer cannot interpret “reasonable skill and care” or “best industry practice”. l A variety of standard form contracts, none of which are digital – even electronic versions are viewed with suspicion in some quarters. However, although construction has been a slow digital adopter, the advantages include: l Faster negotiation and completion times – reducing the need for letters of intent or projects started without a contract in place. l Self-executing contracts may resolve disputes by automating processes relating to variations, extensions of time, payment, change and risk management. l Reduced need for independent monitoring as the contract is peer-to-peer controlled. l A faster, more secure method of exchanging data for the project team. The technology would track materials, designs, BIM models, documents, contracts and payments. Greater transparency could rebuild trust across the supply chain – which could have speeded up the process of reviewing the causes of and learning from incidents such as the Grenfell Tower fire and demise of Carillion. Technology is coming and will eventually replace the wet-signed paper-based contracts that everyone loathes. Sarah Fox is a lawyer and founder of contracts business 500 Words.

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EXPERTS MAY 2018 | CONSTRUCTION MANAGER

Angus Dawson Macfarlanes

Growing adoption of offsite manufacturing could change the traditional model of construction. But what are the legal implications of this shift in focus – away from onsite labour and subcontractors and towards production of products and components? The majority of construction contracts are drafted with “traditional” construction practices in mind, where the building is mostly constructed on site. Existing payment provisions for goods and products stored off site can be extended to cover offsite manufactured elements – but if a significant proportion of the building’s components are being made in a factory, then different contractual arrangement may be required. Options could include procuring infrastructure works, the building core and centralised M&E elements as a building contract, with the offsite elements procured as a supply or supply-and-installation contract. Who owns the offsite items? There is a question over “ownership of items” which have been manufactured off site, for example bathroom pods. Ownership should transfer to the client when it pays the contractor, which should, wherever possible, provide the client with a vesting certificate confirming this. This should be relatively easy when payment is for finished items. However, it will be more difficult to “vest” component parts which have yet to be assembled, such as tiles and furniture in the bathroom pod. Also, vesting of component parts which have yet to be assembled may be of limited value to the client if a replacement contractor or manufacturer would be unlikely to use those components. Structuring advance or deposit payments can mitigate these risks. For instance, the client could make an interim payment for five complete bathroom pods, with ownership transferring to the developer on payment, instead of a partial payment for 10 incomplete pods, where ownership may not pass until

Legal

What are offsite’s contractual implications? THE GROWING USE OF OFFSITE MANUFACTURING HAS IMPLICATIONS FOR CONTRACT LAW – WHICH GENERALLY RELATES TO ‘TRADITIONAL’ CONSTRUCTION PROCESS. ANGUS DAWSON EXPLAINS

several weeks later, which would leave the client without security for the payment it has made until the items are finished. Risk generally passes along with ownership and, as ownership generally transfers on payment, risk may pass to a client when it has no control over the quality of the items. In instances where the client may have paid in full for offsite-manufactured components, which are stored by the supplier prior to installation on site, the vesting certificate should make it

clear that the subcontractor agrees to store the panels safely, be responsible for any damage and put in place appropriate insurances. Additionally, these components should be stored separately and clearly marked to identify that they are the client’s property and allocated to a particular project. The client’s team should be given rights to inspect the items and, provided ownership has passed to the client, remove items if needed. Protecting against insolvency Insolvency risk should also be considered where offsite specialists are part of a project’s supply chain. Carrying out thorough due diligence, including requesting management accounts and carrying out other financial checks, remains the best way of understanding and deciding how to tackle insolvency risk. If an offsite manufacturing firm becomes insolvent, components may be treated by the insolvency practitioner as that company’s assets rather than the client’s – and may not be released even if intended for the client’s project. This risk can be minimised with clarity about ownership and storage requirements in the contract and a robust inspection regime. This should allow the client to recover the components if a supplier of offsitemanufactured products becomes insolvent. In such situations, although replacing an insolvent supplier has lost-time and programme implications, having a bond can provide an element of financial protection. Such bonds are generally available on demand and can be used by the client if offsite-manufactured components are not delivered when required or when the supplier becomes insolvent. As offsite manufacturing is likely to take an increasingly prominent role in the industry, it is important to understand the legal and practical implications of procuring projects this way. Clients need to give careful consideration to contractual relationships to ensure they are properly protected. ● Angus Dawson is a partner at Macfarlanes.

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EXPERTS MAY 2018 | CONSTRUCTION MANAGER

Karen Kirkham Bircham Dyson Bell

Defects disputes can be complex, often involving multiple parties: consultants, main contractors and specialists. Claims have to be pursued within six or 12 years from accrual of the claim depending upon whether the contract is under hand or executed as a deed. Where multiple parties are involved, a claimant may choose to sue multiple defendants. If he does not, a defendant may make a claim for a contribution against a third party under the Civil Liability Contribution Act 1978 within two years of the court order, arbitral award or agreement under which it is liable to the original claimant. If expiry of this limitation period in relation to the third party is looming a defendant has the choice between making a “protective claim” before it expires, or seeking a “standstill agreement” with the other party giving it a chance to have the claim against it settled or determined before it turns its attention to the third party. This is what happened in the case of RG Carter Building v Kier Business Services. The limitation period for contribution claims is governed by section 10 of the Limitation Act 1980, with section 10(4) covering agreement of the payment date. In the Technology and Construction Court on 5 April, Mr Edward Pepperall QC decided a preliminary issue in relation to a claim by RG Carter Building (the contractor) against Kier Business Services (formerly Mouchel, the designer) for a contribution in relation to a defect which had caused water ingress at a new science block in a Lincolnshire school. RG Carter had reached a settlement over arbitration proceedings by the local education authority, Lincolnshire County Council, under which RG Carter agreed to carry out remedial works at its own expense. On 28 April 2015, RG Carter entered into a standstill agreement with Kier which was intended to keep RG Carter’s claim against Kier alive beyond the two-year period under section 10 of the Limitation Act. Having quantified what the settlement with Lincolnshire County Council had cost them, in September 2017, RG Carter made a contribution

Legal

RG Carter v Kier: time is of the essence? A RULING ON RG CARTER V KIER BUSINESS SERVICES, WHICH SEES THE LATTER FACING A £206,000 PAYOUT ON A SCHOOL PROJECT, HIGHLIGHTS THE DIFFICULTY OF DECIDING IF A COMPENSATION CLAIM HAS BEEN MADE IN TIME. KAREN KIRKHAM EXPLAINS

“Kier argued that the claim was already statute barred under the Act before the standstill agreement was ever entered into”

claim against Kier. In response, Kier argued that the claim was already statute barred under the act before the standstill agreement was ever entered into. The case turned on the date when, for the purposes of section 10(4) of the Limitation Act, RG Carter agreed to make payment to Lincolnshire County Council. Kier argued that this was when RG Carter reached heads of terms with the council between 27 March 2015 and 16 April 2015, agreeing in principle to carry out remedial work. Any other matters under discussion were merely details. The court rejected Kier’s argument on the basis that these earlier dates reflected without prejudice meetings and correspondence between RG Carter and the council, and that the full scope of work, and therefore the amount of the associated costs, were not fully agreed until 25 June 2015 following the opening up of a section of wall two days earlier. In giving judgement for RG Carter, the judge stated: “Even if a non-binding agreement is sufficient to make time run, there was not... agreement as to the “payment” to be made until after 28 April 2015. In a payment in kind case, the “amount to be paid” means the scope of the remedial works. Accordingly, agreement as to the scope of works is required.” Absence of settlement agreement Points to note include the absence of a formal executed settlement agreement between Lincolnshire County Council and RG Carter, which might have made matters clearer, and that the council’s claim against RG Carter was in arbitration. Arbitration is not the best forum for multiparty disputes. Unless there are suitable joinder provisions, separate claims against different parties responsible for a defect have to be conducted, potentially giving inconsistent results. Lincolnshire County Council appears to have decided to proceed against RG Carter alone, leaving them to settle up with Kier. ● Karen Kirkham is a partner and head of construction at Bircham Dyson Bell.

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EXPERTS MAY 2018 | CONSTRUCTION MANAGER

Theresa Mohammed Trowers & Hamlins

Beth McManus Trowers & Hamlins

Legal

Lloyds Bank v McBains Cooper: Project monitoring and blame A PARTIALLY SUCCESSFUL APPEAL BY CONSULTANT MCBAINS COOPER AGAINST LLOYDS BANK – THE LATEST TWIST IN A LEGAL DISPUTE DATING BACK A DECADE – HIGHLIGHTS THE PERILS OF POORLY MANAGED PROJECT MONITOR RELATIONSHIPS. THERESA MOHAMMED AND BETH MCMANUS EXPLAIN

The role of the project monitor has been previously highlighted by the case involving Lloyds Bank v McBains Cooper Consulting. Now there is another twist in the saga. Following application to the Court of Appeal, project monitor McBains has partially succeeded in relation to a dispute concerning the respective duties of project monitors and funders. To briefly set out the facts: in May 2007 Lloyds Bank agreed to provide a loan facility of £2.6m to a special purpose vehicle to develop a church building. Lloyds appointed McBains Cooper Consulting as project monitor to ensure provision of the loan was properly overseen. By 2009, with substantial work still required to complete the development, it transpired that the loan facility was almost fully paid out. In response, Lloyds decided to enforce its security and ended up with a loss of £1.4m, following which it brought a claim in the Technology and Construction Court (TCC) against McBains. The judge at first instance found that McBains had committed two breaches of duty: l Breach of a duty to inform the bank that

the cost of completing the development was greater than the amount of the facility; l Breach of a duty not to recommend payment from the facility of sums due to the builders in respect of works outside the scope of the contract. Damages were awarded to Lloyds on the basis that, if the bank had been properly informed, “it would have taken the decision to terminate the facility and call on the security”. However, damages were reduced by one-third because the court also made a finding of contributory negligence on the part of Lloyds. This finding was made on the grounds that: l Lloyds should never have provided the loan facility in the first place, since it was aware from the beginning that the cost of the development was greater than the facility; and l It was not the job of a project monitor to arrange the funding of the development: that was a matter between the lender and the borrower”. In essence, the TCC criticised Lloyds for failing to follow basic banking procedures, but these failures subsequently came under much closer scrutiny in the Court of Appeal.

McBains had six grounds of appeal, including: l McBains was in the business of giving information not advice; it should only be liable for the consequences of the information it gave being wrong (ground 1); l It was not within the scope of McBains’ duty to be responsible for sums advanced from Progress Report 14 onwards (ground 2); l The bank’s losses would have been incurred in any event because the project was always a loss-making project (ground 3a). Two-thirds responsible Lord Justice Longmore dismissed McBains’ argument that it was in the business of giving information not advice, on the basis that the two are “neither distinct nor mutually exclusive categories”. Further, he agreed with the TCC that McBains had negligently failed to draw the bank’s attention to the fact that it was being asked to pay for work done outside the building contract and thus outside the terms of the facility. Despite this negligence, it appears the bank’s part in its own losses had been strangely downplayed in the TCC. The bank had made a loan that should never have been made, since it knew from inception that the cost of the project exceeded the amount of the loan. It then failed to provide key information to McBains, not even providing a copy of the facility letter. The bank also made no arrangement with the borrower for the payment of the extra costs. Given this “formidable catalogue of irresponsibility”, Lord Justice Longmore found that the bank was two-thirds responsible for its own losses, thus reversing the apportionment of responsibility. Overall, this is a cautionary tale about a poorly managed relationship between a bank and its project monitor. Improved communication between the parties would have gone a long way towards reducing the losses incurred. ● Theresa Mohammed is a partner and Beth McManus is an associate at Trowers & Hamlins.

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JUNE 2017 For members of the CIOB

CONSTRUCTION MANAGER | SEPTEMBER 2017 | WWW.CONSTRUCTIONMANAGERMAGAZINE.COM

CONSTRUCTION MANAGER | JULY/AUGUST 2017 | WWW.CONSTRUCTIONMANAGERMAGAZINE.COM

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MAY 2017 For members of the CIOB

JULY/AUGUST 2017 For members of the CIOB

SEPTEMBER 2017 For members of the CIOB

3D PRINTING

WOMEN IN CONSTRUCTION

BUXTON CRESCENT

ONSITE AT LORD’S NEW WARNER STAND

WHAT WOMEN WANT

ON SITE AT VINCI’S £50M SPA REFURB

LOUGHBOROUGH UNIVERSITY ALUMNI TALK CANDIDLY ABOUT CONSTRUCTION

3D PRINTING AND THE RISE OF RAPID BUILDING

COUNCILS BEGIN TO BUILD AGAIN

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REDISCOVERING BUXTON’S GEORGIAN GLORY

NEW HOPES FOR HOUSING

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JANUARY 2018 For members of the CIOB

HERITAGE

OFFSITE MANUFACTURING

CMYA 2017

RESTORING GOVERNMENT INSIDE PARLIAMENT’S VAST RENOVATION PROGRAMME

CELEBRATING THE INDUSTRY AT ITS BEST

COAL DROPS YARD KING’S CROSS

CONSTRUCTION MANAGER | NOVEMBER/DECEMBER 2017 | WWW.CONSTRUCTIONMANAGERMAGAZINE.COM

CONSTRUCTION MANAGER | OCTOBER 2017 | WWW.CONSTRUCTIONMANAGERMAGAZINE.COM

OCTOBER 2017 For members of the CIOB

16/05/2017 11:26

THE HOW, WHY, WHAT, WHERE AND WHEN

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FEBRUARY 2018 For members of the CIOB

KISSING AT KING’S CROSS BAM BRINGS HEATHERWICK’S DESIGN TO LIFE

11-PAGE CONSTRUCTION MANAGER OF THE YEAR AWARDS SPECIAL

FACTORY SETTINGS

HAS OFFSITE’S TIME FINALLY COME?

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20/03/2018 14:55


COMMUNITY MAY 2018 | CONSTRUCTION MANAGER

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Community WHAT’S HAPPENING IN YOUR PROFESSIONAL BODY

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Novus student challenge

Morgan Sindall helps students put their knowledge into practice UNIVERSITY TEAMS GO HEAD TO HEAD IN ANNUAL COMPETITION A team of Liverpool students have been named winners of the Novus Student Challenge 2018 Northern and offered a work placement with Morgan Sindall, after impressing judges with their vision to design a new building in the city’s Knowledge Quarter. Alex Dawes, Jack Heaney, Kyle Dougan and Ben Tregear, all final year students on the Liverpool John Moores University BSc (Hons) Construction Management programme, beat rival Construction

Management university students from Manchester, Liverpool and Preston in the 2018 CIOB competition. The teams were tasked with designing a temporary multi-functional ‘knowledge hub’ facility within Liverpool’s £1bn Paddington Village development, which is being delivered by Morgan Sindall. The structure will be used by the local community for education, training and digital technology skills sessions. The CIOB competition brought

Above: The winning students with Morgan Sindall bid manager and Preston Hub chair, Owen Ashton

CIOB AGM/EGM VERIFIERS NEEDED GRADUATION ME AND MY PROJECT MEMBER BENEFITS together students from across the North West to demonstrate their creativity, teamwork and industry knowledge. During the task, the students were given time to research and develop their proposal before presenting to a panel of expert judges, including Morgan Sindall bid manager, Owen Ashton. Owen, who is also chairman of CIOB’s Preston hub, said: “The quality of this year’s competition was exceptional and we received some outstanding proposals from students. We were looking for standout proposals that demonstrated a cost-effective solution to deliver a safe and positive experience for the local community around the Paddington Village site. We were extremely impressed with the work from all of the teams that took part in the challenge and it’s encouraging to see this talent pool of students entering the industry.”  The winners saw off stiff competition from teams from University of Manchester, University of Salford, University Centre Blackburn College and University of Central Lancashire. Barry Roberts, area director at Morgan Sindall, said: “Competitions such as this act as a great opportunity for us to engage with students and to see first-hand their enthusiasm for the industry. It’s a fantastic achievement for the winners and we’re looking forward to welcoming them on-site with us later this year.” ● 

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CONSTRUCTION MANAGER | MAY 2018 COMMUNITY

Novus

Community is edited by Nicky Roger nicky@atompublishing.co.uk

Bristol Novus helps students get hands on MEMBERS SUPPORT UNIQUE COLLEGE INITIATIVE

Awards

Winners celebrate at Yorkshire annual awards CCIHWY HONOUR EXCELLENCE Representatives from housing providers and construction firms across Yorkshire came together in March to celebrate the Committed to Construction in Humber & West Yorkshire Awards. The awards, held at the New Dock Hall, Leeds, were endorsed by the Chartered Institute of Building working in collaboration with Little Spark. The awards reflected the dynamic nature of the construction industry and highlighted the broad spectrum of construction excellence delivered by businesses working in the area. CIOB Leeds Hub Chair, David Pearce said " “These awards celebrate the region’s commitment to building communities and highlight the broad spectrum of construction excellence delivered by businesses working in the area. They demonstrate

w h a t ca n b e a c h i e ve d t h ro u g h strong partnerships, a clear vision and delivery through high quality implementation. We were overwhelmed at quality of the entries we received. The winners are all very deserving of their awards and we look forward to seeing them again next year and finding out more about their ongoing and future programmes of work.” A key note speech was delivered by CIOB President, Rebecca Thompson who also presented the inaugural A n d r e w P l a t t e n Aw a r d : ( f o r ) Engagement with the Construction Community to the winner, Mark Groom. Hosted by Mark Dolanw the 10 CCIHWY winners were presented with their awards by representatives from the category sponsors. The Awards will be held again next year in Spring 2019. ●

Winners celebrate at awards

Members of the Bristol Novus Hub have been supporting second year Higher National Certificate (HNC) in Construction students from Gloucester College (Gloscol) with a 'real-life' project scenario as part of their end of year assessment process. For a number of years Gloscol have been purchasing properties in need of refurbishment for students from various courses to use as a true to life project, the first College in the UK to do so. This year, through Gloscol lecturer in construction Craig Bloxsome MCIOB, the Bristol Novus Hub was approached and asked to offer their own professional experience and guidance to the students along the way. Hub chair Tom Lee-Fox and Vice chair Leon Boardman attended a project launch at the property in February. The theme of the project this year is sustainability so Tom, Leon and Bristol committee member Vance Babbage were able to offer their thoughts and expertise to the students, and lecturers, on how they would approach the project. Later in the year the Hub members will also be on hand to judge the best project presentations across various categories, and have also offered prizes for the best presentations in each category. Tom Lee-Fox commented: “To me, this is what being a Novus member is all about. What Gloscol are doing giving students the opportunity to have a real building to use as a blank canvass for their end of year projects is fantastic, and not something I’ve seen or heard of before."

Award Sponsor Winner Achiever of the Year Award CIOB Novus Thomas Coleman – A-one+ BIM Initiative of the Year Award Class Of Your Own Interserve Construction Collaborative Working Award CIOB Leeds Hub Interserve Construction Innovation Award LSS Waste NG Bailey Social Value Award Soar Build Henry Boot Construction Ltd – The Glass Works Phase 1 Yorkshire Builders Federation Henry Boot Construction Ltd – Rudding Park Spa Team of the Year Award Training Award Leeds College of Building Esh Construction Trainee of the Year Award Third Thursday Club Tom Brady – Henry Boot Construction Project of the Year Under £5M Morgan Sindall A-one+ A63 South Cave 6000T Project Project of the Year Over £5M MRK Electric ISG – Temple Learning Academy, Leeds

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16/04/2018 16:19


COMMUNITY MAY 2018 | CONSTRUCTION MANAGER

Notices Notice of meeting

CIOB Extraordinary General Meeting

Toronto Harbour Canada will play host to the CIOB AGM

Notice of meeting

By order of the Board of Trustees Samantha Teague, Institute Secretary, May 2018

Agenda 1. Notice convening the meeting. 2. Apologies for absence. 3. To confirm the minutes of the Annual General Meeting held on 19 June 2017. 4. To consider the Annual Report of The Chartered Institute of Building including Audited Financial Statements for the year ended 31 December 2017. 5. To appoint the auditors of the Institute and to authorise the Board of Trustees to agree their remuneration. 6. To consider the composition of the Board of Trustees for 2018/2019: 6.1 Installation of the new President. 6.2 Declaration of the election by the Board of Trustees of Officers & co-opted members. 6.3 Confirmation of the Board of Trustees following election and selection. 6.4 Vote of thanks from the Incoming President. 7. Any other business. 8. Date of next meeting - June 2019

Note: All classes of members are welcome to attend the meeting and, with the permission of the Chair, to speak. Only Corporate Members personally present are entitled to vote upon any Resolution. Voting shall be by a show of hands, unless a poll is demanded in accordance with Bye-Law 49.

Note 1: Copies of the minutes of the previous Annual General Meeting held on 19 June 2017 will be available at the Annual General Meeting on 9 July 2018. Any member who requires copies prior to the meeting should apply to the Institute Secretary at CIOB, 1 Arlington Square, Bracknell, Berkshire RG12 1WA, UK. ●

CIOB Annual General Meeting Notice is hereby given that the one hundred and eighty-seventh ANNUAL GENERAL MEETING and the thirtyseventh of The Chartered Institute of Building will be held at the Westin Habour Castle Hotel, Toronto Canada on Monday 9 July 2018 at 0910hrs, or immediately following the Institute Extraordinary General Meeting.

Notice is hereby given that an EXTRAORDINARY GENERAL MEETING of The Chartered Institute of Building will be held at Westin Harbour Castle Hotel, Toronto Canada on 9 July 2018 at 0900hrs, when the Resolution given below will be considered and, if thought fit, passed. By order of the Board of Trustees Samantha Teague, Institute Secretary, May 2018 Note: The Board of Trustees has decided under the powers given in Bye-Law 56 to permit members of all classes to receive this notice, to attend the meeting and, with the permission of the Chair, to speak. Only Fellows and Members personally present are entitled to vote upon the Resolution. Agenda 1. Notice convening the meeting. 2. Apologies for absence. 3. To consider and, if thought fit, pass the following resolution (see commentary below). THAT in accordance with the provisions of ByeLaw 21 the annual subscription when paid in pounds sterling, in respect of each class of membership from and including 1 January 2018 shall be as set out here under.

Commentary: 1. The reason for this Resolution is that ByeLaw 21(c) requires the Board of Trustees to seek confirmation of annual subscriptions if there are three successive increases in annual subscriptions of 15% or less fixed by the Board. 2. The Board of Trustees has authorised that the subscription levels for 2018 shall be determined based on established principles and using the current economic indicators. 3. The approval of this Resolution requires a simple majority of Fellows and Members present at the meeting and voting.

Class of Member Fellow £325 Member £278 Associate / Incorporated

£239

Applicant £239 Student – non studying

£239

Student – full time

FREE

Student – part time

£36

Retired £65

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16/04/2018 16:20


CONSTRUCTION MANAGER | MAY 2018 COMMUNITY

Opportunity

Verifiers needed for the PR Review panel NEW VACANCY ON REVIEW PANEL OPENS UP

CIOB Benevolent Fund is calling an EGM

Notice of meeting

CIOB Extraordinary General Meeting Benevolent Fund

Notice is hereby given that an EXTRAORDINARY GENERAL MEETING of The Chartered Institute of Building Benevolent Fund Limited will be held at CIOB Bracknell Office, 1 Arlington Square, Downshire Way, Bracknell RG12 1WA, at 11.00 hours on Tuesday 26 June 2018, when the Special Resolution given below will be considered and, if thought fit, passed. By order of The Board, Frank MacDonald , Benevolent Fund Secretary , May 2018 Note: The Board of Trustees has decided that the provisions of the Memorandum & Articles of Association, should be amended Agenda 1. Notice convening the meeting. 2. Apologies for absence. 3. To consider and, if thought fit, pass the following resolution THAT, the Memorandum & Articles of Association of the company be modified as follows: A) By the implementation of the new attached Articles of Association Note 1 Article 3, has been altered by way of modernization and to align terminology more closely with the Chartered Institute of Building Royal Charter and Byelaws. The objects of the CIOB Benevolent Fund contained therein remain unchanged.

Article 4.20 contains express power for the Trustees to pay for indemnity insurance for all the Trustees. Articles 10.4 and 10.5. contain fuller consideration than previously as regards managing conflicts of interest. Note 2 Article 17 which regulates the application of the CIOB Benevolent Fund’s property upon dissolution, has been re-drafted to accommodate the requirements of the Office of the Scottish Charity Regulator. Definitions at Article 18 have been revisited and the first time use of a term is indicated by use of bold lettering. Note 3 By virtue of the Companies Act 2006, the Articles of Association now comprise one document containing all of the material that was previously contained within the Memorandum and the Articles of Association combined. Commentary: 1. Under the Articles of Association, any Corporate, Non corporate or Qualifying Member who has made a ‘suggested contribution’ to the Funds of the Association in the current Financial Year is a member of the Association and is entitled to attend and vote at the Meeting. Other CIOB Members, who have not contributed as outlined above, may attend the Meeting at the discretion of Members of the Association but may not vote. 2. Complete details of the proposed changes to the Memorandum & Articles of Association will be made available on the CIOB Benevolent Fund website at least 21 days prior to the meeting. ● www.ciobbenevolentfund.org.uk

GIVE YOURSELF A KNOWLEDGE BOOST If you’re not already tapping into the rich resource of Designing Buildings Wiki then head online and access a wealth of information and interesting content. Supported by the CIOB Designing Buildings Wiki is the only industry-wide, crossdiscipline forum for finding and sharing information. Anyone can create articles about subjects they know and anyone can find articles about subjects they don’t. With 3.7m users a year and 6,500 articles it’s a valuable source of content on almost every conceivable area of the industry. www.designing buildings.co.uk/ wiki/Home

The Professional Review Membership Panel (PRMP) is responsible for monitoring the assessment process for the Professional Review and changes to the structure have resulted in the panel looking for new members. The PRMP is looking to recruit external verifiers for a new role within the assessment process and panel. The role will include: l Sample 25% of all applications. l Produce an external verifier's report liaising with assessors and IVs. l Highlight good practice among assessors. Identify assessors needing feedback. l Report to the PRMP emphasising trends and observations. All sampling will be done remotely and there will also be a requirement to attend the panel meeting four times a year. Not all EVs will be required to attend meetings although there is a requirement for a chief external verifier to represent the group. This role is similar to that of an external examiner within universities and we would welcome applicants with experience of this role. The panel would also like industry practitioners to be part of this process and would welcome applicants from industry that have knowledge of competence based assessments. This is an exciting new role and you will be contributing to shaping the Professional Review of the future. There is a small remuneration for this role and training will be provided. If you are interested please email why you would like to apply for the role and a copy of your CV . Mandy Mills, assessment and standards manager, education t: + 44 (0)1344 630716   e: mmills@ciob.org.uk    

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Margaret Conway: Constructed a brand new 100,000 sq ft turnkey city centre office for Belfast City Council within tight space and budget constraints.

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Meet Margaret Conway. CMYA Winner 2017. Created a brighter future for the whole of Belfast.

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19/03/2018 18:10 15/03/2018 13:25:06


COMMUNITY MAY 2018 | CONSTRUCTION MANAGER

Reciprocity centres put 'waste' to good use in local communities

Community

One man’s waste is another man’s treasure

Community Soul Cafe A Christian and community project run by a team of trained barista volunteers. The Eden Garden and Ice Cream Shack came about as a direct result of engagement with ReciproCity and its willingness to help promote a sense of “community spirit” in Wallasey.

REUSE SCHEME HELPS CONSTRUCT COMMUNITY PROJECTS

Community spaces benefit from the scheme

East of England

BIM takes flight in Norwich

NORWICH HUB HOSTS BIM EVENT

Wickes and CIOB partner Recipro have formed a valuable partnership, redirecting ‘waste’ product by finding a home that needs it. Recipro is a company working across the construction industry to reduce waste. Recipro runs ReciproCity centres, which accept donations of surplus stock which are sold into local communities, families and charities for a fraction of their original cost. In 2017, Wickes diverted 225 tonnes of waste to Recipro’s two reuse centres, located in Wirral and Swansea. Deleted and returned products from across the whole range offered by the company were redirected into this scheme, including: kitchen carcasses and doors; baths, sinks and toilets; doors; bathroom cabinets ; fixtures and fittings; lighting; adhesive; and paint accessories The waste resulted in benefiting hundreds of individuals, families and charities. Around 80 people visited the Norwich Aviation Academy in March, the venue for a Norwich Hub event on BIM. Guests made full use of the two flight simulators before listening to talks from Nick Calton, Norwich Hub chair; Andy Boutle, Kier head of BIM/ BIM Regions East chair; Bryn Mainwaring, BIM Regions East Norfolk sub-division; and

“We had come to Recpiro for paint and spotted the kitchen units. It has helped us score a high four on food standards inspection” Everyone's Café volunteer

Friends of Birkenhead Park: Everyone’s Café A community café run by volunteers from the Friends of Birkenhead Park charity. One explains: “We had come to Recipro for paint for our park benches and the kitchen and spotted the kitchen units. As we needed to update our kitchen and bring it up to a standard to serve the public we decided to buy them and fit them. They worked very well and has also helped us score a very high four on our food standards agency inspection. Recipro in Wallasey have been very good to us.” Talycoppa School Swansea The local school wanted to create an arts and crafts room for the children, and used Earthstone sinks, decor end panels and various base units to create a space the teachers and pupils could be proud of! ●

Catherine Guelbert-Thick, Norfolk Construction Excellence chair. The event’s two main speakers were Karl Thurston from Graphisoft/BIM Regions East, with Jerry Brand and Rebecca Dunn from Kier who discussed how BIM was implemented on the ARM project in Cambridge – the £48m contract with global technology company ARM to expand its HQ in Cambridge.

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16/04/2018 16:27


CONSTRUCTION MANAGER | MAY 2018 COMMUNITY

Rachel Toor

Meet a member

Below: Proud recipients of new membership status gather at Clothworkers' Hall in London

Tell us about your construction career so far? Why did you choose construction? I started out as a plumbing and gas engineer, worked in a college and for the local authority in between then came to Shaylor Group as a trainee site manager. I have been in the industry for just under 10 years. I chose construction because it was something completely different. I didn’t want to do the norm as I was pushed to do! I was 'advised' to do something my community would normally do….doctor solicitor etc. For me turning a vacant plot into something spectacular was so appealing and interesting. I never was one for sitting behind the desk.

Conferrment

CIOB Graduation Day CONGRATULATIONS TO RECIPIENTS OF MCIOB AND FCIOB On 23rd March three newly appointed Fellows, 69 Members, and their guests attended a Graduation Day Ceremony at the Clothworkers’ Hall in London. The CIOB Past President Colin Harding FCIOB and CIOB Chief Executive Chris Blythe OBE presented the certificates. Many Congratulation to all recipients on their achievements. ● New Fellows: Pat Edwards, Garry Fannon, Jeromy Hodson New Members: Mark Arch, Denis Barry, Robert Berner, Luke Birkett, Matthew Brandon, Gary Brown, Anojkumar Canagasundaram, Michael Cullen, Mostafa Darwish, Bradley Davis, Valerie Dawes, Tristan Dever, Stephen Donelon, Stuart Drake, Ken Edgar, Mark Elliott, Peter Ellis, Chris Elsayed, Charles Goodwin, Leslie Gosling, Donal Hartigan, Brendan Hickey, Thomas Hothersall Lamb, Layton Howard, Simon Jeffreys, Phillip Jessop, Philip James Keogh, Toni Kirilov, Alex Knight, Connor Lambourne, Armands Lescinskis, Paul Ley, Lee Loughnane, Kudzai Makuku, Carl Mannion, Andrew Mason, Conor McClelland, Paul McGowan, Alan McKenzie, Rowland Meek, Oma Megbele, Georgel Marius Moisa, Paul Morling, Pierre Morrod, John Paul Murray, Bhekimpi Ncube, Hugh O’Hara, Pranav Patel, Catherine Payne, Martyn Phillips, Laura Reynolds, Adam Schapiro, Keith Shackleton, Sulman Shah, Marcus Smith, Nicholas Smith, Henadeera Arachchige Sudath Shiranika Perera, Stuart Sweeney, Regina Szmajda, Lee Tapper, Paul Thomas, Igor Tovpinec, Ivailo Vasilev, Marcus Sebastian Veleanu, Stuart Vicary, Ben Walker, Darren White, Leigh Wilkinson, Heidi Wood

Rachel Toor, trainee site manager, Shaylor Group, working towards MCIOB via PDP

Obituary

Mark Scarth MCIOB Mark Scarth, 53, commercial manager at VolkerFitzpatrick passed away suddenly at his home on 28 February. Mark joined VolkerFitzpatrick 20 years ago and and became a respected commercial manager within the business. However, Mark’s real true passion was in supporting and mentoring the next generation within the industry. Six years ago, Mark launched the ITP and graduate programmes for VolkerFitzpatrick. He frequently visited his almer mater Nottingham Trent University, recruiting ITPs for VolkerFitzpatrick, but also showcasing careers in construction.

Amrit Sagoo, head of construction management and quantity surveying at Nottingham Trent University paid tribute to Mark. “Mark was a wonderful person to work with and he was very passionate in making a difference in training tomorrow’s landscapers and shaping the future of construction at NTU." Joe Pritchett, who was an ITP last year said: “Mark was the nicest and most driven man I have ever met and I owe everything to where I am as a young professional, to him. The work he did for all young quantity surveyors was truly remarkable and the passion he showed was overwhelming.”

What sets you apart from your peers? I went to Bahrain in November to present my degree dissertation findings on ethnic minorities in construction. It was a fantastic opportunity to speak on a subject that I am so passionate about. My hope is to continue to drive that forward and change the face of the construction industry in the future. If you could change one thing about the industry what would it be and why? Red tape. I know we need health and safety but sometimes it goes so far that it can worry you. I find myself overthinking certain aspects because you genuinely want to ensure that site and those on it are safe and go home to their families each day. How have you found your experience as a female site manager? Most of the people I come across have a lot of respect for what I do. Operatives on site are usually fine with me being there although I have come across individuals who feel the need to undermine me, talk over me or repeat what I’ve said because apparently it wasn’t correct when I said it! I have found that with both men and women. Overall, respect is earned and gender shouldn’t even come into it.   

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20/02/2018 09:42


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20/02/2018 09:42


COMMUNITY MAY 2018 | CONSTRUCTION MANAGER

The school's new sports hall with its eight-metre high climbing wall

Me and my project

Back to school MCCARRICK CONSTRUCTION’S NEW £2.5 MILLION SPORTS HALL AT FRAMWELLGATE SCHOOL IN COUNTY DURHAM WAS AN EDUCATION IN ITSELF FOR EX-STUDENT GARY SINGLETON

When I left Framwellgate School in Durham in 1996 to start my joinery apprenticeship with McCarrick Construction, I didn’t think I would be returning to the school decades later to coordinate a project like this. The old sports hall had seen better days and it was our brief to create a modern building equipped to handle the varied sporting curriculum on offer today. It was certainly a challenge but I was keen take the project on and build something special for future students to enjoy. The building was scheduled to be completed within the grounds of the academy, within a live school environment, which presented both safety concerns and logistical challenges for me and the team. On top of this, the existing sports hall was still being used daily by the school throughout the construction phase of the new build, right up to the week of handover.

The sports hall has an eight metre high climbing wall, is equipped for basketball, netball, volley ball, badminton, indoor football, hockey and archery and spans 1000m2 of space for the students to play and learn in. The new space was set to be four times larger than the previous facility so we had a huge project on our hands with the potential to transform the school and the community. The new sports hall also houses a gym and two teaching suites for the new PE courses. But projects of this size are rarely straightforward. Once we were established on site, we then discovered a pumped foul main drain from the school running right through the proposed new build (not identified on any drawings). Our task was to divert it without closing the school and to allow construction to begin. So there were lots of tankers and nose pegs on standby! As with all projects, we had to ensure no disruption to the school timetable. A few changes in design created a challenging programme notably the addition of a huge MUGA (multi use games area) adjacent the sports hall. With the programme stretched we found ourselves in the middle of the exam period and forced to juggle noisy works and client requirements for silence to ensure the pupils were

“Exam delays, newts, unidentified sewer mains and a live school environment proved to be quite a challenge” unaffected. And that wasn’t all. Prior to us starting construction on site the school campus had been identified by ecologists as a hibernation ground for Great Crested Newts. We worked alongside the ecologists throughout the project as they carried out weekly inspections around the newt barriers installed alongside the site boundary to prevent the newts being harmed by site activities. It all worked out in the end but with exam delays, newts, unidentified sewer mains, a live school environment and a lot of tight deliveries it proved to be quite a challenge. I found myself back to school in more ways than one; I have grown professionally as a result. I am using my experience as part of my professional review in the hope of being recognised as MCIOB by the end of the year. ●

Creating new sporting facilities at the school

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CONSTRUCTION MANAGER | MAY 2018 COMMUNITY

Membership affiliations Membership of the CIOB brings with it many benefits, including exclusive access to discounts and special deals on products and services that could enhance your professional development, help your business or boost your earning power.

EXCLUSIVE DISCOUNT AVAILABLE FOR CIOB MEMBERS “The industry produces 109m tonnes of construction waste each year and our members want to reduce the impact of that on the environment. Our partnership with Recipro will introduce our members to new ways of recycling and resource sharing, moving the industry towards a more sustainable way of working and generating cost savings.” Chris Blythe OBE, Chief Executive of CIOB. l Recipro can help your organisation SAVE MONEY, REDUCE WASTE & HELP COMMUNITIES. l Recipro help organisations REUSE surplus, unwanted materials – keeping them out of the waste stream, therefore reducing costs. l 14% of materials ordered each year end up as waste – Recipro can help find a home for this material, and ensure it gets used for its original purpose. l We offer services to all levels of the construction industry, from sole traders to nationwide contractors. Plus CIOB Members get an EXCLUSIVE DISCOUNT on our Resource Sharing Tool! Visit our website or contact us to find out more. www.recipro-uk.com/news/ciob-and-recipro

l Your phone has a cracked screen The Construction-grade phone screen is toughened. Tried and tested. l Your phone will break when dropped on to concrete. This one will take a 6 foot fall - face down, no problem l Your smartphone won’t survive getting soaked. This one can hold its breath for half an hour l Your phone can break or get a cracked screen - which costs you money. l Your phone can fail and you’ll miss the call with the extra work or job l This phone is a construction-grade smartphone and will keep working. l This phone is made and supplied direct to you by Conker, the UK’s leading manufacturer of Rugged Smartphones. The CIOB chooses Conker as its official partner. You choose Conker because you get a three year warranty, an in-car charging cradle, a wall charger and the confidence to go on site and still be in touch. Confidence because you chose Conker. At £295+vat you’d be bonkers to take your fragile and expensive smartphone on site. Go Conker instead. Go to https://goo.gl/ wpQfhp and get yours now.

The Construction Information Service is an online product giving access to current guidance, standards and news for the construction industry. Updated daily, it contains 26,000+ documents from over 500 publishers, including full text British Standards and CIOB documents. For a free trial email CustomerCare@ ihsmarkit.com or call 01344 328 300

Elecosoft develops construction management software that’s relied on by many CIOB members. We can help identify the best solutions for your projects. View this recording of a recent webinar: https:// tinyurl.com/y7h4u5bd which demonstrates ways to plan your projects better. Email info@ elecosoft.com, or call +44 (0) 1884 261700. www.elecosoft.com

As a long established insurance partner to the CIOB, we’ll take the time to understand your business requirements to ensure that you, your employees, contractors, your site and the equipment you use is protected against the unexpected, whatever job you do. Contact 0330 102 6158 or visit www. premierbusinesscare. co.uk/CIOB

Free2Move lease services offer multi-marque solutions, flexible rental periods and mileage up to 150 000 miles. You can select models combining low CO2 emissions, taxation and innovative equipment; reduce fuel consumption and ease daily life for your drivers www.peugeot-contracthire.co.uk/index.php/ciob

Chase de Vere, independent financial advisers, has a deep understanding of the financial needs of busy professionals, whatever the stage of their lives or careers. Established for almost 50 years, they are highly rated for client service, and completely impartial. They will provide help, guidance and advice to CIOB individual and company members www.chasedevere.co.uk/ building-futurestogether.aspx

CIOB and ITN Productions are producing a programme exploring the role of the construction manager and the impact buildings have on lives today. ‘Building a Legacy’ will form part of an extensive communications campaign featuring CIOB members, industry partners, government partners, and relevant journalists, writers and bloggers. Contact Nathan Wilson at ITN Productions Nathan. Wilson@itn.co.uk or on 020 7430 4052.

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THE BOTTOM  LINE  IS:   IT’S  NOT  FOR  EVERYONE. IS  IT  FOR  YOU?         Quantity Surveyors – All levels Competitive Salaries • Nationwide When you’re a Murphy Quantity Surveyor, there’s no hiding. You have to stand up and be counted. We aim to recruit and develop the best talent. So we’re not just looking for skills, we’re looking for the drive and determination to make yourself – and us – better. Under the direction of our Group Commercial Director, Chris Green, we’ve challenged ourselves to be the professional face of the construction industry, building trust with customers for a winwin relationship. Our goal is a world where all our Quantity Surveyors have a degree and are professionally qualified, or working towards it. And for the right people, we’ll make it happen. The right people are those who share our core values: working as one team, always delivering, never harming, striving to innovate and to act with professionalism and integrity at all times. They’re people who can see the bigger commercial picture, throw themselves into fresh challenges and find hidden depths. Because at Murphy, it’s what’s underneath that counts. For more information and to apply please visit www.murphy-isitforyou.co.uk

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INSIGHT• ONSITE MAY 2018 | CONSTRUCTION MANAGER

Preparing the central atrium space for the recycled timber gym flooring cladding

MORGAN SINDALL SCORES TOP MARKS FOR SUSTAINABILITY WITH 99.97% OF WASTE DIVERTED FROM LANDFILL, A MORGAN SINDALL SCHOOL SCHEME IN SOUTH WALES HAS PUT CIRCULAR ECONOMY PRINCIPLES INTO PRACTICE A Morgan Sindall school refurbishment in south Wales is setting new standards for sustainability. A remarkable 99.97% of waste has been diverted from landfill at Pentrehafod School, which falls under the Welsh Assembly’s £1.4bn 21st Century Schools and Education Programme. The client is City and County of Swansea Council. The construction work, which began in November 2016 and will run until October 2018, is taking place on a live school site, meaning

“It’s about not looking at anything as waste, but always thinking about how we can reuse and recycle” Ross Williams, project manager, Morgan Sindall

Morgan Sindall has to plan its programme around the activities of 1,000 students. But the green credentials of the scheme are what stand out most. Despite the significant scale of the works, the project cost for the refurbishment is £16m, compared with the £24m estimated for an equivalent new-build. With a target of zero waste to landfill, the circular economy model has underpinned the delivery of the project. It is one of Constructing Excellence Wales’ exemplar demonstration projects, and David Cheshire, author of Building Revolutions: Applying the Circular Economy to the Built Environment and regional director and sustainability lead at Aecom, has been consulted on the scheme. Ross Williams, project manager at Morgan Sindall, says: “The school as it stood simply wasn’t suitable for 21st century teaching. There were design quirks that proved disruptive – such as classrooms doubling as thoroughfares.” The refurb addresses these issues and eliminates the limitations of the existing fabric. For

example, the two main school buildings are now connected with a double-height central atrium, which will form a focal point. But what makes it really noteworthy is the attention to detail over reuse and recycling. “We’ve aimed to reuse and recycle the materials we have found while retaining the existing structure wherever possible,” he says. “For example, the old gymnasium flooring – which retains all its court line markings – has been repurposed as cladding for the staff pod, and showcases the heritage of the school. "Existing furniture has been collected, remanufactured and resupplied through our subcontractor, Ministry of Furniture.” Morgan Sindall has also made use of the materials arising from demolition. “Walls and floors which were demolished were collected by local recycling firm Derwen who then returned it to site as processed aggregate, which is a good example of just how well a closed loop within the circular economy can work,” says Williams. He adds that key to circular economy principles is ensuring that all new construction is carried out with one eye on how unnecessary waste can be prevented in future. The project is achieving this through careful selection of materials and structures. “Loose-lay” flooring can be rolled up and sent for recycling, while internal walls of lightweight stud partitions with surface-mounted services allow the building to be easily adapted. In addition, refurbishing rather than rebuilding has significantly lowered the carbon footprint. The main savings have arisen from retaining the foundations, floor structure and building envelope, which typically account for around 50% of a building’s embodied carbon. Williams says: “It’s about not looking at anything as waste, but always thinking about how we can reuse and recycle, and – just as importantly – leave a sustainable legacy that will facilitate similar endeavours in the future. We’re not just lowering the carbon footprint of this building now. We’re ensuring it can be kept low in the future.” ●

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JUNE 2017 For members of the CIOB

ONSITE AT LORD’S NEW WARNER STAND

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COUNCILS BEGIN TO BUILD AGAIN

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