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CONSTRUCTION MANAGER | SEPTEMBER 2017 | WWW.CONSTRUCTIONMANAGERMAGAZINE.COM

SEPTEMBER 2017 For members of the CIOB

3D PRINTING

3D PRINTING AND THE RISE OF RAPID BUILDING

THE HOW, WHY, WHAT, WHERE AND WHEN

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CONSTRUCTION MANAGER | SEPTEMBER 2017 CONTENTS

09/17

Switchboard +44 (0)20 7490 5595 Editor Denise Chevin 0203 865 1032 07979 245800 Deputy editor James Kenny 0203 865 1031 Production editor Sarah Cutforth Art editor Heather Rugeley Community editor Nicky Roger Redesign art director Mark Bergin Advertising manager Dave Smith 0203 865 1029 Key account manager Tom Peardon 0203 865 1030 Credit control Eva Rugeley Managing director Stephen Quirke

In this issue

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Circulation Net average 30,699 Audit period: July 2016 to June 2017 Subscriptions To subscribe or for enquiries, please contact: Subscription team Tel: 020 7490 5595 Or go online at: https://constructionmanager.isubscribe.co.uk Or write to us at the address below: Construction Manager Published for the Chartered Institute of Building by Atom Publishing, 3 Waterhouse Square, 138 Holborn, London EC1N 2SW Tel: +44 (0)20 7490 5595 firstname@atompublishing.co.uk Editorial advisory board Mark Beard FCIOB, Ann Bentley, Ian Eggers, Peter Caplehorn, Harvey Francis, Professor Jacqui Glass FCIOB, Paul Morrell, James Pellatt, Nick Raynsford, Richard Saxon, Andy von Bradsky, Phil Wade Construction Manager is published monthly by Atom Publishing. The contents of this magazine are copyright. Reproduction in part or in full is forbidden without permission of the editor. The opinions expressed by writers of signed articles (even with pseudonyms) and letters appearing in the magazine are those of their respective authors, and neither the CIOB, Atom Publishing nor Construction Manager is responsible for these opinions or statements. The editor will give careful consideration to material submitted – articles, photographs, drawings and so on – but does not undertake responsibility for damage or their safe return. Printed by The Wyndeham Group. All rights in the magazine, including copyright, content and design, are owned by CIOB and/or Atom Publishing. ISSN 1360 3566

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Prelims 04 The LGBT rights champion 06 CMYA Ireland winner 10 Comment 12 Innovation at Murphy 14 Chris Blythe 16 Feedback

20 26 66

Experts 32 Setting up an LGBT network 33 Legal: moratorium rules 34 Networking successfully 36 Assad Maqbool 38 CPD: Late payment changes 44 CPD: External wall insulation

Insight • Onsite 3D printing in construction St Luke’s Church, Millwall The solution: Winkworth Arboretum boathouse

54 55 60

Community CIOB heritage skills scheme CIOB certificate awards Me and my project

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PRELIMS SEPTEMBER 2017 | CONSTRUCTION MANAGER

04-16

Prelims THE LATEST NEWS, PEOPLE AND COMMENT

06 07 10 12 14 16

Snapshot

Building a new life AFTER 20 SUCCESSFUL YEARS IN THE INDUSTRY, CHRISTINA RILEY CAME OUT AS A TRANSWOMAN. NOW SHE WORKS HARD TO MAKE SURE HER EXPERIENCE CAN BENEFIT OTHERS IN THE INDUSTRY. JAMES KENNY REPORTS

“Construction needs to build an environment where people can feel comfortable and express themselves as they would be able to in other sectors”

Travelling into London in March 2014 Christina Riley knew her life was about to change forever. She was on her way to attending the first meeting of the lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender (LGBT) network at Balfour Beatty, having finally made the decision she would come out as a transwoman. For 20 years she had been known as Chris, forging a successful career in construction, beginning as a trainee engineer and working on high-profile projects such

CMYA IRELAND WINNER MODULAR HOUSING MARK BEARD INNOVATION AT MURPHY CHRIS BLYTHE FEEDBACK as the Olympic Village and Wimbledon. And also married and had two daughters. “When I entered that meeting I just stayed silent and listened to everyone else speak, but it was a safe space and I was determined and had made up my mind, no matter what happened. Afterwards I spoke to the HR person there and announced my intention to come out at work.” With the help of Balfour Beatty, Riley was able to make a plan for the process of transitioning and, after speaking to her family and friends, she and her employers set a six-month date for her return to work as Christina. The Gender Identity Research and Education Society (GIRES) assisted with her transition. Riley says that by and large she’s been accepted in the industry – though life has been anything but plain sailing. Her marriage broke down and it took a while to rebuild a relationship with her two daughters. Some friends also turned their backs on her. But she says that being able to continue her career in such a male-dominated environment was a surprising relief: “The burden of carrying around the secret of being trans for so many years had a huge impact on my mental health. I would regularly suffer with severe panic attacks and felt like I couldn’t breathe,” she recalls. Since her transition, she has become co-chair of the LGBT network at Balfour Beatty, runs the LGBT Construct network on Twitter and is on the committee of the OffSite , interEngineering and #BuildingEquality industry networks. She has also done work with the Considerate Constructors Scheme’s Best Practice Hub, promoting diversity and inclusion in the sector

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CONSTRUCTION MANAGER | SEPTEMBER 2017 PRELIMS

For more information on how to set up an LGBT network at your business, see p32

Opposite: Christina Riley with Caitlyn Jenner at the LGBT Awards 2017 Left: Balfour Beatty’s LGBT group meets the BBC’s Evan Davis

– all on top of her day job as a senior planner. Her efforts were rewarded in May when she was named winner of Corporate Rising Star at the prestigious British LGBT Awards 2017. There’s clearly a great deal of work to be done. According to LGBT rights charity Stonewall and a survey conducted in 2016 with Construction News, Architects’ Journal and New Civil Engineer, more than 60% of LGBT employees working in the construction and property industry experienced homophobia/ biphobia/transphobia in the past year, a figure which rises to over 80% for those who work on site. Less than half said they trusted their line managers to handle sexual orientation issues, and just one in ten would recommend the industry to other LGBT colleagues. “Construction needs to build an environment where people can feel comfortable and express themselves as they would be able to in other employment sectors,” says Riley. Balfour Beatty is a Stonewall Diversity Champion, but it isn’t alone in trying to change

attitudes. Lendlease, Arup, JLL and a number of legal firms (such as Dentons, featured on p32) have been working hard, setting up networks and working with Stonewall. Clients are also helping drive the agenda. “Clients are more and more interested in diversity. At Balfour we are working with EDF Energy on Hinkley Point, who have their own LGBT network and have helped Thames Tideway launch their LGBT network,” she explains. “With the skills shortage and Brexit looming we now more than ever need to attract and retain staff. There is a whole untapped pool of talent in the LGBT community that could be used,” she says. “My main thing now is to see things link together. Separately, there are so many companies and organisations in construction doing lots of good work on behalf of the LGBT community. However, I think we now have to try and share resources. The message is we’re ready to change, but we need to work together to get where we need to be.” ●

CIOB backs new research into LGBT experience in the industry As part of the research supported by the CIOB’s Bowen Jenkins fund, the experiences of the lesbian, gay bisexual and transgender (LGBT) community in construction are being explored by Dr Sarah Barnard and Professor Andrew Dainty from Loughborough University. The project – LGBT in Construction: Exploring

experiences to inform inclusive practices – explores LGBT experiences in construction in order to inform developments in employment practices in the sector. The research will mobilise in-depth qualitative methods in order to develop an understanding of the range of experiences of LGBT

workers – giving them a way of exploring their career narratives and reflecting on how being in a minority group may have impacted on professional development. The data analysis will directly feed into recommendations to develop inclusive practices in the construction sector.

Mace’s LGBT plan is central to wellbeing CONTRACTOR SETS UP NEW NETWORK AS PART OF WIDER FOCUS ON WORKFORCE HEALTH Contractor Mace is also stepping up its diversity and inclusion programme with the launch of its own LGBT network this month. It is being driven by Martin Coyd, Mace’s new head for health and safety, who has been recognised for his work as an ally, championing LGBT rights at Lendlease Europe, where he was regional head of environment, health and safety. Coyd, who joined the 4,000-plus strong firm towards the end of last year, says: “The launch of the LGBT network is something we're very proud of and also something that clients, customers and supply chain want. “In order to be the best company we have to attract the best people and that means a diverse workforce, where everyone thinks and acts differently, to challenge each other. It’s the only way we’ll improve.” Mace has also been working with business psychology firm Robertson Cooper to improve health and wellbeing. Coyd says: “We’ve been doing a big benchmarking exercise that will give us an idea as a whole company where we are in terms of health, mental health and working practices and this will give us a strong platform to build on and help with plans for the next few years.” The contractor has also bolstered its health and safety expertise, hiring Judith Grant from Royal Mail as associate director for health and wellbeing – responsible for strategic occupational health, occupational hygiene and wellbeing delivery. Looking ahead to the next few months, Coyd says: “Starting on world mental health day, 10 October, this will be our launchpoint for the rollout of new plans and strategy. We also have Mace Health Week on 17 November, and on 7 April World Health Day. “These are important beacons for us. We're setting out to improve our process, systems and standards and overall raise the bar.”

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PRELIMS SEPTEMBER 2017 | CONSTRUCTION MANAGER

Nick Oldfield, left, pictured with colleague Sean O'Hare, receives his award for the redevelopment of Belfast’s National Stadium

Oldfield scores Irish CMYA goal O’HARE & MCGOVERN MANAGER SCOOPS AWARD FOR STADIUM

Nick Oldfield from O’Hare & McGovern was named as Ireland’s Construction Manager of the Year (CMYA) 2017 at the awards reception in Dublin this summer. Oldfield, who is a contracts manager for the County Down-based firm, was awarded the top prize for his work on the £35m redevelopment of the National Stadium at Windsor Park, Belfast. The winning project involved the redevelopment of Northern Ireland’s national football stadium, which succeeded in boosting its capacity from 12,000 to 18,000. The company began work on the project in May 2014. Works involved the demolition of the south and east stands and erection of replacement structures as well as refurbishment and extension of the north stand. Floodlighting was replaced and new changing, training, hospitality, media, office and storage facilities were built. The completed stadium opened last October for Northern Ireland’s FIFA World Cup qualifier against San Marino. What made the project particularly challenging – and displayed Oldfield's skill – was the fact that the stadium remained operational on match days throughout the works. The project involved a pre-construction period of 10 weeks, a mobilisation period of two weeks and a construction period of 19 months, which included sequencing of work in order to make the facilities available for match fixtures.

Speaking about the winning entry and awards night, Ivan McCarthy FCIOB, trustee of the CIOB, said: “This year the judges whittled down the entries to 21 finalists in four categories. I have to admit, given the quality of construction management expertise that our finalists demonstrated, I didn’t envy the judges with the task of selecting the category medallists and the overall winner. McCarthy continued: “Oldfield managed to deliver a world-class facility in what was a very technically challenging and complex project. This included the management of a very diverse supply chain, while also managing the many trials and constraints of the site location. His professional management and leadership ability was a key factor in meeting the varied client demands, managing cost control and keeping to programme.” Unlike its UK counterpart, the Irish CMYA is only held once every two years. In the 2017 awards there were 21 finalists in four categories, with a Gold and Silver prize in each category and the overall winner chosen from the Gold recipients. The other Gold winners recognised in this year’s awards were Cathal Moran from John Sisk & Son for the Liffey Valley Western End extension and Noel Cronin from Walls Construction for the refurbishment of the Dublin Airport Authority Technical Adminstration Services Centre, as well as Tony Maher of Stewart Construction for Block 3, Waterside, Citywest. ●

“His professional management and leadership ability was a key factor in meeting the varied client demands, managing cost control and keeping to programme”

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CONSTRUCTION MANAGER | SEPTEMBER 2017 PRELIMS

NATHAN CHANDLER

BDP has completed a new flagship building for Manchester Science Partnerships (MSP). The 6,500sq m Bright Building is the new headquarters for CityVerve, Innovate UK’s Internet of Things city demonstrator, as well as the home to various tech businesses. The four-storey building incorporates offices, lab and social spaces among cuttingedge technologies such as hyperlocation services and environmental sensors, which were developed as part of the CityVerve project. Marcus Worthington & Co was the contractor for the shell and core.

What Next?

Modular nHouse design stands out from the crowd THE FIRST HOUSE MANUFACTURER TO USE CROWDFUNDING HAS SEEN REACTION TO ITS LAUNCH GO THROUGH THE ROOF

Modular home company nHouse has become the first house manufacturer to make use of crowdfunding and has smashed the ceiling of its fundraising goal just a few weeks after the launch. More than £830,000 had been raised on fundraising website Crowdcube to finish the prototype of the house at the time of going to press – almost doubling the £495,000 target that was set when launched on 21 July. nHouse is a three-bedroom home that can be built either as a standalone property, in a pair as a semi-detached house, or in a terrace. Designed by awardwinning architect Richard Hywel Evans, it is constructed from cross-laminated timber and can be assembled in three days. Kitchens, bathrooms and all plasterwork are completed off site. The money raised will be used to finish the prototype, and will also secure its global intellectual

property rights and fund a launch to the public in 2018. The nHouse concept aims to offer Grand Designs styling at an affordable price, responding to preconceptions that prefabricated homes are often not the most aesthetically appealing. nHouses are designed to be more spacious than modern new builds, provide higher ceilings and come equipped with eco features.

The firm hopes to form part of the solution to the UK’s housing problem and says it is in talks with major developers to supply thousands of homes over the next five years. nHouse will generate revenue by selling to developers, housing associations and other landowners as well as direct to the public.The company aims to sell 100 houses in 2018.

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PRELIMS SEPTEMBER 2017 | CONSTRUCTION MANAGER

Mark Beard Beard Construction

Over the last 18 months, the quality of the final product produced by our industry has been under the spotlight to a greater extent than since the 1960s and the Ronan Point tower collapse. The Scottish schools’ facade failures and Grenfell Tower fire disaster have given the construction industry many negative headlines and a mixed bag of reactions, coloured in large part by how the critic sees the world. Much has been written about the inadequacy of building regulations, product testing and supervision of works on site, but little about the culture within our industry – which in my view is central to all we do. Only by radically changing our personal expectations of what is acceptable will we make real progress in improving the quality of what we deliver for our customers. As the way we live evolves, it is absolutely right that we look at the regulations that govern construction – not only bringing them up to date, but also finding new means of communicating key messages, in ways that individuals at all levels and all age groups can easily access and understand. Adding regulations is no solution My concern is that there are many, within our industry and wider society, who want to make the regulations governing the sector more detailed and complex – something which, if we are not careful, will make it harder to deliver the quality product our customers deserve. If people start to believe that simply complying with regulations is sufficient to deliver a quality product, we are heading down a very slippery slope. To draw similarities between the situation construction faces and the banking crisis of the late 2000s is a gross oversimplification. However, one lesson we can draw from society’s reaction to the banking crisis is that simply adding more and more layers of regulations failed to solve the key underlying problems the banking industry faced. The real answer lay in strengthening the organisational and personal moral code of every institution and individual offering banking services.

Comment

We need to focus on quality, not regulations RECENT CONSTRUCTION FAILURES MAKE IT CLEARER THAN EVER THAT THE INDUSTRY NEEDS A NEW DRIVE TO RAISE STANDARDS, AND THE CIOB MUST BE AT ITS FOREFRONT

“No CIOB member should be party to handing over any building unless they have carried out or overseen checks to satisfy themselves of the building quality”

My view is that we will only make long-term, sustainable improvement to the quality of the buildings we deliver by changing our culture, with each individual taking much greater personal responsibility for what they produce. Much of what we construct is delivered by individual craftsmen or teams. We clearly need to do more to help such people understand the importance of quality, how to achieve it and, crucially, put them in a winning position from the day they arrive on site. A clean, safe,

well-organised site with a well-thought-out project plan and clear working drawings is a base level we should provide. At Beard, we are often criticised for the higher than average cost of our site preliminaries. However, spending a little more providing a welcoming working environment for our co-contractors and craftsmen is one of the reasons we attract and retain some of the most committed people in our industry. Building a stronger quality culture Acting as a pivot between project design, planning and procurement and our craftsmen is the site/project manager, a role often performed by CIOB members. The training we all undertake is well respected within the industry and by many of our customers. However, preliminary findings on recent building failures suggest that a stronger quality culture would have minimised the risk of failure. In my view, part of being accepted as a member of the Chartered Institute of Building is an absolute commitment to quality. No CIOB member should be party to handing over any building unless they have personally carried out or overseen sufficient checks to satisfy themselves of the building quality. To achieve such an outcome will require many years of hard work during training and on site and, yes, in my opinion, the CIOB setting a higher threshold for becoming a member of the institute. A long haul, maybe five or ten years, but eventually we’ll see a construction industry delivering a much higher percentage of projects to customers’ desired quality standards, with CIOB members increasingly respected as the key players in delivering quality building projects. In conclusion, the consistent delivery of highquality building projects cannot be achieved solely through learned debates in oak-panelled Whitehall committee rooms, but will come from individuals and teams taking responsibility for their work; we as CIOB members must be at the forefront of this drive to improve quality. ● Mark Beard is executive chairman of Beard Construction.

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PRELIMS SEPTEMBER 2017 | CONSTRUCTION MANAGER

1913 John James Murphy born in County Kerry, emigrating to London in the 1930s

1951

1960s

J Murphy & Sons established and begins rebuilding the country’s electrical infrastructure

Expands into roads, water services and cable installation during the 1960s

Artificial intelligence, virtual reality and big data haven’t traditionally been associated with infrastructure and utility contracting. But things are changing – at least at Murphy, which is the latest high-profile building firm to appoint a head of innovation. Will Reddaway joined in March as part of its stated aim of becoming a Tier 1 contractor and more than doubling in size from over £648m in 2015 to £2bn by 2025. Reddaway made the move from Crossrail, where he spent four years as innovation programme manager and was involved with the £24bn rail project’s Innovate18 and Infrastructure Industry Innovation Programme (I3P). Europe’s biggest infrastructure project became a hotbed of new technology, developing the use of smart helmets and drones and adapting everyday technology such as GoPro cameras and Pico mini projectors for construction. It is this willingness to push the boundaries that he is keen to bring to Murphy. “Sensors and advanced AI algorithms allowing for better predictive modelling, exploring non-penetrative testing for ground surveys, and using wearable technologies to enhance operative safety are some of the areas we want to explore,” he says. Overall the firm aims to focus on the core infrastructure sectors of rail, power, water and natural resources. Reddaway believes the firm can make a positive contribution towards advancing the use of technology in utilities, with the aim of reducing service strikes, bringing disruption on excavations to a minimum and cutting the

1970s

Plays a pivotal role in the introduction of natural gas in Britain and Ireland

2000

2009

2012

2016

Commences construction of the Channel Tunnel Rail Link in JV with Hochtief

On 7 May, John Murphy passes away at the age of 95

Secures involvement in Crossrail, with a role in the £250m tunnelling section in south London

Sets out ten-year growth plan focusing on rail, water, power and natural resources

Smart thinking is just the start WILL REDDAWAY TELLS JAMES KENNY HOW HIS APPOINTMENT AS HEAD OF INNOVATION AT MURPHY IS PART OF A WIDER GROWTH STRATEGY BASED ON ADVANCING TECHNOLOGY USE

number of people having to work in trenches. This in turn will improve health and safety. Fostering a more collaborative culture is key: “The first practical step is setting up an internal online portal where all employees can share ideas and they can be developed further.” Further down the line he hopes to reach out to academics and apply for funding from InnovateUK and other government catapults. “This is a long-term plan – it’s not only about technology but also about people. But who knows? In the future there could be a Murphy Labs for testing new ideas and tech. Why not?” Reddaway is the latest in a raft of hires by Murphy. The 4,000 strong firm recently appointed ex-Lendlease man Kevin Moriarty as investment director. Other big names include former Serco finance boss David Burke as its chief financial officer, ex-Laing O’Rourke director Russell Kellett as group operations director and Capita’s Alastair Smyth and Chris Green as engineering director and commercial director. In 2016 Alex Jones joined as head of BIM and digital transformation, a key part of future plans. “We are investing heavily in upskilling our workforce and reinforcing our technology to develop best-in-class digital engineering. It will become an integral part of our management system,” says Reddaway. “We want to move Murphy up to a Tier 1 contractor. Part of that is making the company an early adopter of innovation, ways of working and technology. Its a long-term plan but something everyone is getting on board with.” ●

News in numbers

£2.1bn £13m £1bn

A digest from www.constructionmanagermagazine.com

August saw the mega merger of two global engineering giants when Jacobs bought CH2M for £2.1bn to a create a company with 74,000 employees.

The value of fines collected from construction for health and safety law breaches has doubled in a year to almost £13m, according to research from global law firm Clyde & Co.

Laing O’Rourke signed a £500m contract with Manchester Airports Group for the first stage of its £1bn development programme to increase annual capacity to 45 million passengers.

£10m Interserve is derisking its construction business to focus on projects under £10m as it announced it was back in the black. Its 2017 first-half pretax profit was £24.9m.

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PRELIMS SEPTEMBER 2017 | CONSTRUCTION MANAGER

Chris Blythe

Chief executive CIOB

Comment

Giving housing a new lease of life A CLOSER FOCUS ON THE ISSUES OF LEASEHOLD HOMES AND THE RIGHTS OF VULNERABLE WORKERS BRINGS WIDER BENEFITS

CMYA finalists line up for Gold

BOOK NOW FOR THIS YEAR’S AWARDS CEREMONY

It was welcome news that the government intends to crack down on leaseholds and, in particular, the sale of new leasehold homes. The challenge will of course be in trying to unpick the more recent transactions. Taylor Wimpey has made a provision of £130m to cover rectifying the leasehold problem. It’s a nice headline but will likely prove a hollow gesture in practice, notably where the freeholds have moved out of the control of the initial builder/developer. Sorting out leaseholds will go some way to tackling the broken housing market. Something else that might also help could be to try and actually make it a market. Developers tend to have local monopolies and in truth there is not much competition; shopping around is not a viable option. If you want to live in place A and don’t like builder X’s products you are stuck. If you want something different you might need to go to another part of the region, well away from where you might want to live or work. I wonder whether it is not time for the Competition and Markets Authority (CMA) to carry out an in-depth investigation into the housing market, focusing on the levels of competition, the profits being made and whether the homebuyer is getting a fair deal. If the current non-market is delivering net profit margins of 30% or more, you have to be asking questions as to how this is being achieved and whether it represents a good deal and for whom. When you put this alongside the declining levels of homebuyer satisfaction, it does look as though quality is being sacrificed for Eighty-five construction managers in nine categories will compete to become the 2017 Construction Manager of the Year, to be announced on 27 September. Three female construction managers are among the finalists. This year the finalists’ categories have been split into specific building types rather than being defined by value. The categories are: residential developments; residential;

“When house sales and profits were low, customers were happier with their homes – reflecting that when housebuyers had a choice, builders had to try harder” profit. If you look back to the darker days of the recession, when house sales and profits were low, customers were generally happier with the quality of their homes – reflecting that when housebuyers had a choice, builders had to try harder. It leads to the conclusion that when there is a more competitive market, builders’ behaviour is different from when there is not. So whichever way you look at it, a referral to the CMA is probably well overdue. The only factor holding it back is the political will to do so. On the brighter side, the transformation of the Gangmasters Licensing Authority into the Gangmasters and Labour Abuse Authority means the construction industry now falls within its broader remit around the exploitation of vulnerable and exploited workers. The GLAA can investigate human rights abuses across the whole of British industry and commerce. As ever, legitimate companies have nothing to fear although by the very nature of the supply chain even legitimate companies might be unwitting accomplices to trafficking and exploitation. ●

primary schools; secondary schools; higher education; offices; refurb/fitout; public, infrastructure & health care; leisure & retail. The overall winner is chosen from the Gold medallists for the different categories. The awards evening will take place at the Marriott Grosvenor House Hotel in London’s Park Lane. A list of finalists and details of how to book your space can be  found on pages 62-3.

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PRELIMS SEPTEMBER 2017 | CONSTRUCTION MANAGER

Women’s issues: are things changing for female members of the team?

Feedback A selection of readers’ comments about news and issues in the industry from www.constructionmanagermagazine.com CM 6/07 What construction’s women want Natalie Rebeiz

As a design manager, with a four-year-old and a seven-month-old, the lack of flexibility is a key factor in my decision on whether to stay in the industry. After I returned to work following my first child I was able to work three days a week but my chances of promotion were very limited. When we relocated I found it very difficult to secure a position doing four days a week and ended up contracting. While this was more flexible, it also offers uncertainty at a time when you need the most stability. Now I’m starting to think about returning to work in October following the birth of my second child, but with my older son starting school and a baby also requiring childcare I really don’t want to be in the position of leaving them both for over 10 hours a day. I see the importance of being on site every day to ensure things are moving along but it would be much better for me if I could work from 7am-2pm in order to collect my children. The construction industry is extremely inflexible in parttime working. I have over 10

years’ experience of working in construction but it seems a huge waste of my skills for me to leave the industry just because I need to work part time to balance my family commitments.

Sue Fullard

If you think life in construction for women is difficult, you should have tried it when I joined the industry in 1973! It’s a picnic now by comparison, but the same problems still exist, except in terms of welfare – you no longer have to carry a loo roll, and check out the garages, supermarkets and pubs for toilet facilities. Having worked in the industry for 40-plus years, I have seen a lot of changes in attitude and facilities, and have to say that the only way you earn the respect of your colleagues and clients is to be better than the man, be authoritative, and dedicated. There is no room for chancers, male or female, in any industry and construction is no different.

CM 26/06 BIM: when collaboration is the hardest word

CM 19/06 Grenfell Tower Stephen Parker

In my 40 years working in maintenance and repairs of buildings I have never experienced anything such as this terrible, tragic and yet in my view avoidable incident. Since the 2009 Lakanal House fire incident, lessons were surely already learned. Any fire risk assessment can only be effective from the time of the assessment. This is because failure to implement proper controls of subsequent activity have failed due to inadequate site supervision resources. The “policing” of construction works by the local authority has been affected due to budget constraint and outsourcing initiatives under the banner of cost savings. No doubt fellow professionals may have seen work of contractors forming openings for replacement of ducts, services, various cable installations and so on, with penetrations of walls/floor slabs never properly sealed with intumescent materials, negating proper fire-stopping and compartmentation. We must understand where and why legislative controls regarding building design, safety and buildability have failed.

Ian Heptinstall

In response to the great piece from Anne Kemp (above) on BIM and collaboration – while BIM enhances collaboration among teams that use it, it also needs a collaborative environment in place to use it in the first place. And without the right contracting approach implementation will be as tricky, costly and slow as we have seen over recent years. You said: “The industry needs to find ways to make it easier for a building owner to insist on collaboration.” I think the easier ways are already there. Clients just need to use them. If you want a low cost and fast project, a collaborative project alliance is the way to go!

Rand

Really interesting article. I am studying BIM at the University of Salford and I have just started my dissertation on the social aspect of BIM and its impact on collaborative

behaviours between people in construction. People's attitudes are the most challenging in the BIM journey. This area needs a collective effort from everyone working with BIM to add something to build the right collaborative behaviour that can harvest the full BIM potential.

David Benson

Good article, Anne. Ian is absolutely right, though, that BIM “needs a collaborative environment in place to use it in the first place”. This really isn’t as difficult as people seem to think, though you need to be very careful in the procurement process to attract the right players. The public sector especially needs to look at its procurement strategies. The right team mentality has to begin at procurement stage with the client, but it also has to be supported and championed by both the contractor and the design team consultants. What is it that they find so difficult?

For more comments and updates on Grenfell Tower and the investigations following it, go to

www.constructionmanagermagazine.com

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INSIGHT• ONSITE SEPTEMBER 2017 | CONSTRUCTION MANAGER

20-29

Insight • onsite TAKING AN IN-DEPTH LOOK AT CURRENT ISSUES AND PROJECTS For the past 10 years 3D printing has been threatening to revolutionise the construction industry, and over the last two years it seems to have been constantly in the press. Successive headlines have announced the achievement of numerous world’s firsts as the technology edges ever closer to the mainstream. News from Madrid earlier this year of the world’s first 3D-printed bridge was followed by the world’s first house 3D printed on site in Russia. Dubai has been leading the charge. In 2016 it completed what was claimed to be the first 3D-printed office – understood to have been created by Winsun Global, the international division of China’s 3D printing pioneer Winsun, in partnership with global architecture firm Gensler among others – and announced plans for the world’s first 3D-printed skyscraper. Currently it is building a research hub for drone and 3D printing technologies (see box, p23).

At the opening of the office, ruler of Dubai Sheikh Mohammed bin Rashid Al Maktoum announced plans to print 25% of its buildings by 2030. With so much hype and, as yet, so little real-life impact on the industry, it may be easy to ignore 3D printing as a fun gimmick that will quickly be forgotten. But what if it really is set to be a game-changer for construction? For those who have not yet come across the term, 3D printing is the process of creating a three-dimensional object by laying down layers of a material in succession. On the scale of a building, the process has the potential to create extremely accurate houses, faster than traditional techniques, while producing very little waste. On a smaller scale, it is a valuable tool for rapid prototyping and can create elements that cannot be made any other way. The technology has been adopted in many industries, including aviation,

20 3D PRINTING IN CONSTRUCTION 26 ST LUKE’S CHURCH, MILLWALL

Eighty per cent of Foster + Partners’ models use 3D-printed components

and practical applications are now being explored for the built environment, with opportunities appearing for contractors and architects to take advantage of the digital innovation. “3D printing is opening up new techniques and manufacturing methods that were not previously possible,” says Simon Hart, senior innovation leader for smart infrastructure at Innovate UK. “Contractors should be looking to identify the potential to use 3D printing within their businesses,” he continues. “If they are not, they can be sure that their competitors are.” But how are those in the built environment actually using 3D printing? One area where it is already heavily used is in modelmaking and form finding – and this is providing a perfect test bed for architects to learn the technology. Foster + Partners is one practice that is leading research into the process. “Our first 3D-printed model was made in

PRINT PREVIEW THESE DAYS BREAKTHROUGHS IN 3D PRINTING ARE NEVER FAR FROM THE HEADLINES, BUT IT STILL HAS A LONG WAY TO GO TO REACH ITS FULL POTENTIAL. TOM RAVENSCROFT LOOKS AT WHAT IT OFFERS IN TERMS OF ONSITE INNOVATION 20

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ILLUSTRATION: WAYNE MILLS

CONSTRUCTION MANAGER | SEPTEMBER INSIGHT• ONSITE

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CONSTRUCTION MANAGER | SEPTEMBER 2017 | WWW.CONSTRUCTIONMANAGERMAGAZINE.COM

SEPTEMBER 2017 For members of the CIOB

3D PRINTING

3D PRINTING AND THE RISE OF RAPID BUILDING

THE HOW, WHY, WHAT, WHERE AND WHEN

constructionmanagermagazine.com 01.Cover.CMSept.17.final.indd 1

15/08/2017 13:18

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Construction Manager September 2017  

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Construction Manager September 2017  

CIOB Build Construction

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