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OHIO STATE SUPPLEMENT

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Vol. XV • No. 9

“The Nation’s Best Read Construction Newspaper‌ Founded in 1957.â€? Your Ohio Connection: Ed Bryden, Strongsville, OH • 1-800-810-7640

Clime Road Phase I Project Under Way, August Completion Expected

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CEG CORRESPONDENT

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$B MM

by Linda J. Hutchinson,

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Traffic snarls during road construction and reconstruction in a residential area can be every bit as daunting as travel delays caused during what seems to be the never-ending nationwide highway construction season. During the latter you most likely won’t receive a letter from the county engineer that begins with “Dear Neighbor� and includes a current detour map on the back, along with instructions regarding access to local business Sutherlands Lumber and Home Improvement Center. The $7.9 million Clime Road Phase I project, currently under way, includes culvert replacement, “reconstruction and widening of the roadway to accommodate east and westbound lanes, a center turn lane, and two bike lanes. It is also getting construction of storm sewers, curbing, gutters, driveway aprons, sidewalks, and a water line, and installation of new street lighting and traffic signage,� as foretold in one such letter to the neighborhood from Dean C. Ringle, Franklin County engineer. George J. Igel and Company, of Columbus Ohio, which celebrates its 100th year in business in 2010, is the contractor. The Franklin County Engineer’s Office is supervising the project. Work began in January 2009 and is scheduled for com-



(Dean C. Ringle, Franklin County engineer photo)

Work began in January 2009 and is scheduled for completion in August 2010.

(Dean C. Ringle, Franklin County engineer photo)

The $7.9 million Clime Road Phase I project, currently under way, includes culvert replacement, reconstruction and widening of the roadway to accommodate east and westbound lanes, a center turn lane, and two bike lanes.

pletion in August 2010. Phase I includes the portion of Clime Road running from Harrisburg Pike (U.S. Rt. 62) to just east of Demorest Road. It began with the demolition of vacant homes near the railroad tracks. “We got a lot of complaints about them,� said Greg Payne, public information officer for the Franklin County Engineer’s Office. Funding for Phase I “comes from the Federal Highway Administration and the Ohio Public Works Commission through the Mid-Ohio Regional Planning Commission,� said Ringle. According to its Web site, the Mid-Ohio Regional Planning Commission, or MOR-PC: “Mission: The MidOhio Regional Planning Commission (MORPC) will be the see CLIME page 4


Page 2 • May 1, 2010 • www.constructionequipmentguide.com • Ohio State Supplement • Construction Equipment Guide

Compact Graders Find a Special Niche for Road Crews In this challenging economic climate of declining tax revenue and increased costs, municipalities are searching for new opportunities to perform their tasks effectively and affordably. For municipal road maintenance crews, there are few options in choosing machinery to maintain unsurfaced roads and a grader is a must-have machine. Traditionally, they are used for routine surface smoothing, removing shoulder berms, removing washboarding, spreading new gravel, ditching and back sloping. However, rural counties that face little growth in funds for their road departments need to be innovative as they juggle costs to maintain their roads. So when Rick Young, the general service superintendent of the city of Dover, Ohio, set out to replace a Galion A-600 grader, he weighed his options carefully. “We were looking for something smaller to replace the one we had,” he said. That is why he chose a C86 C from Champion Motor Graders. The compact articulated all wheel drive grader weighs only 15,500 lbs. (7,030 kg) and is smaller than a full-sized machine. Size played an important factor in his decision since his department is responsible for maintaining

alleys and gravel roads in the region. “We need to get into 12 ft. wide alleys and with the other grader it was really tight sometimes,” said Young, adding that the optional all wheel drive feature will help. “It’s smaller and lighter but we needed all the traction that we can get to go uphill in the winter. It gives us more power to get into an alley and keep it straight because there is not a lot of room in there and we don’t want the machine sliding sideways,” he explained. Just Like a Big Grader, Only Smaller Before choosing the C86 C, Young said he did his homework to make sure it could deliver the power and performance that it required by visiting other municipalities to see what they were using. “We looked at another model from a different outfit, but the Champion machine looked a lot sturdier. I like that the frame was made from welded steel and not stamped parts. It is made like a big grader but it is smaller. The other machines we looked at didn’t seem to have the strength of the Champion and that was important because it won’t be just me operating it,” said Young. In addition to the standard 10-ft. (3 m)

blade, Young also opted for a front dozer blade scarifier and air conditioning in the enclosed cab, pointing out that once inside it doesn’t feel a whole lot different from a fullsized grader. “It feels roomy enough inside the cab, just like a regular grader. The glass goes right down to the floor so we can see the blade. The visibility in the cab is really nice,” he said, adding that the adjustable steering wheel and controls contribute to the operator’s comfort. “I got big guys and skinny guys who need to get in there and they are both happy,” he said with a chuckle. Getting to and from the job site is much easier with the Champion C86 C, not only because it is small enough to easily load onto a trailer, but because it is small enough to maneuver on roadways, helped along by the hydrostatic power providing variable control through the entire range of ground speeds, according to Young. “In grading mode, it’s in low-gear but in town we drive it to the job site instead of loading it on a trailer. We only have an average of three to four miles to sites and the road-gear gets us up to 20 miles per hour,” he said.

Municipalities are turning to the C86 C to perform road maintenance tasks over full sized graders.

Right Fit For Municipalities The city of Dover purchased the C86 C from Southeastern Equipment in North Canton, Ohio. Ryan Haney, a sales representative of Southeastern Equipment, said the grader was the first one that Champion has sold in Ohio in about 20 years. “The Champion graders are a great fit for our product line. We service the municipal customer and this compact grader is a really good fit,” he said, adding that the model that Young and his road crew are using is perfectly suited for the tight alleys they need to access. “It’s all about the size because what they are finding is the amount of dirt roads they are maintaining is decreasing, so the need for having that monster grader that can go out and rip up three miles of road and grade in a day just isn’t there. Being this is all wheel drive and it’s small, but the C86 C has the power to do the light ripping, grading and ditching because of the all wheel drive.” Haney said the Champion machine has all the amenities of a full size grader, including the wheel lean, blade tilt, below-grade cutting, side-shift on the blade, steering angle, articulating frame, as well as the optional enclosed cab with heater and air conditioning on top of the fuel efficient Cummins Tier III engines. “Those all play a factor in what they need to do; they have the need for a big grader but don’t have the room and the money for it. This has all the same features as a full size grader and it’s very well put together,” he said. “And it’s about half the price.” Champion bundles its machines with a warranty program that Haney said is a great advantage to dealers that sell to municipalities. It comes with a two year transferable machine warranty, with another additional year for parts, plus a lifetime frame breakage warranty for first owners that is provided as a standard. “Nobody else can touch that and when you are in a bid situation the warranty alone can make or break you,” said Haney. “Everybody else offers a one year full machine and that’s it. When you tell customers they get a lifetime warranty on anything you have their attention and they will listen to you.” The South Carolina Department of Transportation also has purchased Champion graders, picking up five of the company’s C80 C models, and Knott County in Kentucky is another municipality taking advantage of the unique features offered by Champion machines. Les Miller, the road foreman for Knott County said he opted for a C80 C motorgrader purchased from Rudd Equipment Company in see GRADERS page 3


Construction Equipment Guide • Ohio State Supplement • www.constructionequipmentguide.com • May 1, 2010 • Page 3

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Louisville. This articulated tandem drive model weighs 500 lbs. (227 kg) less than the grader being used in Dover City and comes with a Tier III 110 hp (82 kW) engine. Miller said the county purchased the Champion grader to replace the machine it had been using. “It was a little bit too big for cemetery roads so we downsized. We are using the new grader just for the cemetery roads. It’s smaller so it can get in these tight areas and move around a little better,” he said adding that Knott County has approximately 120 mi. of cemetery roads to maintain. The options he chose on the C80 C include a relief valve on the blade and air conditioning in the cab, but the one feature he likes the most is the hydrostatic drive that give operators greater control at any working speed. “The other one we used had direct drive. At first they were still trying to mash the brake, but after a few hours on it, they liked it better than direct drive.” Like Young, Miller agreed that the

most attractive feature of the Champion Motor Grader machine is its compact size. “The cemetery roads we work on are little off-roads and one lane roads that curve and wind around. We can get a big grader in there but we have a hard time maneuvering it. The smaller grader can get around a lot better,” he said. With its compact length, 50 degree wheel turn and a tight turning radius, the versatile machine can operate in confined areas while finishing close into tight curves. “It feels just like a regular grader but you have a better view of the blade from inside the cab. For road maintenance, it’s excellent and if you use it to its fullest capabilities, it’s just as good as a full-size grader,” said Miller. “We looked at other graders from different manufacturers and after operating every single one of them, we decided this one just felt better,” he said. “From a cost and productivity standpoint, it was the right grader for us.” For more information visit, www.championmotorgraders.us. (L-R) are Rick Holmes, Rick Young, Jed Miller, Bill Ball and Bill Able.


Page 4 • May 1, 2010 • www.constructionequipmentguide.com • Ohio State Supplement • Construction Equipment Guide

Vacant Home Demolition Precedes Clime Road Work CLIME from page 1

regional voice and a catalyst for sustainability and economic prosperity in order to secure a competitive advantage for central Ohio. MORPC is the place where visions and ideas about our growing region are created, designed, discussed, and embraced. We are a voluntary association of local governments serving central Ohio. A catalyst for regional change, evidence of our work is seen everyday through planning, programming and public policy in the areas of economic development, energy, environment, housing, transportation and land use.” Following the demolition of vacant homes the road was closed for 40 days while crews built a culvert over a tributary to Big Run, located east of Fall Brook Road. During the next 280 days crews kept a single eastbound lane open for local traffic only. Reconstruction of the south side of Clime Road between Harrisburg Pike an Schilling Lane was closed at the railroad tracks while RailAmerica Inc. rebuilt its railroad crossing in accordance with the road project. According to a local news source and identified only as Cook, “Living on the

street, you’re not looking forward to the construction, but you’re looking forward to the end of it.” Phase II of the Clime Road project will reconstruct the roadway from Demorest Road to Georgesville Road, including bridge replacement west of Clime Road North, and will go out for bid in early summer 2010. The “start date would be later this summer, after the first of July,” said Ringle. Phase II also will include a center turn lane, two bike lanes, storm sewers, curbing, gutters, driveway aprons, sidewalks, new street lighting, traffic signage, and signals, according to a “Dear Neighbor” notice sent out by Ringle. Work on Phase II is scheduled for completion in fall 2012. For more information about the Franklin County Engineer’s office, including a call for students interested in civil engineering: www.franklincountyengineer.org. For more information about MOR-PC: www.morpc.org/ (This story also can be found on (Dean C. Ringle, Franklin County engineer photo) Construction Equipment Guide’s Web site at Reconstruction of the south side of Clime Road between Harrisburg Pike and www.constructionequipmentguide.com.) Schilling Lane was closed at the railroad tracks while RailAmerica Inc. rebuilt their CEG

railroad crossing in accordance with the road project.

(Dean C. Ringle, Franklin County engineer photo)

Igel Co.’s dozer’s GPS antennae ensures accurate cut elevations.


Construction Equipment Guide • Ohio State Supplement • www.constructionequipmentguide.com • May 1, 2010 • Page 5

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Page 6 • May 1, 2010 • www.constructionequipmentguide.com • Ohio State Supplement • Construction Equipment Guide

Wood • Hamilton • Stark • Henry • Greene • Knox • Franklin • Clermont • Crawford • Union • Cuyahoga • Brown • Licking • Medina •Ohio... Williams • Harrison • Adams • Mercer • Butler • Clark • Ashtabula • Sandusky • Portage • Athens • Logan • Lake • Erie • Wyandot • Warren • Fairfield • Miami • Paulding • Darke • Muskingum • Ottawa • Holmes • Jefferson • Trumbull • Summit • Washington • Van Vert • Licking • Wood • Hamilton • Stark • Henry • Greene • Knox • Franklin • Clermont • Crawford • Union • Cuyahoga • Brown • Licking • Medina • Williams • Harrison • Adams • Mercer • Butler • Clark • Ashtabula • Sandusky • Portage • Athens • Logan • Lake

‘Buckeye State’ Highway Lettings

The Ohio State Department of Transportation received bids for transportation-related improvement projects. The following is a list of some of the projects let. Project No: 090515 Type: Bridge repair. Location: POR-SR-82-16.98 (bridge over Eagle Creek). State Estimate: $1,340,000. Contractors and Bid Amounts: • Bog Construction Inc., Berlin Center, Ohio — $1,296,777. • Terrace Construction Co. Inc., Cleveland, Ohio — $1,309,254. • Wolf Creek Engineering and Contracting Inc., Akron, Ohio — $1,332,214. • J.D. Williamson Construction Co. Inc., Tallmadge, Ohio — $1,470,613. • Dot Construction Corp., Canfield, Ohio — $1,562,004. • Union Industrial Contractors Inc., Ashtabula, Ohio — $1,642,144. • Perk Company Inc., Cleveland, Ohio — $1,784,074. Completion Date: Oct. 1, 2010. Project No: 090523. Type: Two lane resurfacing. Location: ERI-SR-101-3.17. State Estimate: $954,000. Contractors and Bid Amounts: • Erie Blacktop Inc., Sandusky, Ohio — $1,025,890. • Gerken Paving Inc., Napoleon, Ohio — $1,040,076. Completion Date: Aug. 31, 2010. Project No: 090524. Type: Two lane resurfacing. Location: FUL-US-20A/4-24.92/1.71. State Estimate: $1,950,000. Contractors and Bid Amounts: • Gerken Paving Inc., Napoleon, Ohio — $1,725,085. • Shelly Company, Thornville, Ohio — $1,760,564. • Crestline Paving & Excavating Co. Inc., Toledo, Ohio — $2,078,759. Completion Date: Oct. 15, 2010. Project No: 090526. Type: Two lane resurfacing. Location: HOL-US-62-9.91. State Estimate: $1,825,000. Contractors and Bid Amounts: • Melway Paving Co. Inc., Holmesville, Ohio — $1,585,025. • Shelly Company, Thornville, Ohio — $1,802,594. • Superior Paving & Materials Inc., North Canton, Ohio — $1,894,041. • Kokosing Construction Co. Inc., Columbus, Ohio — $1,901,099. • Shelly & Sands Inc., Zanesville, Ohio — $2,086,524. Completion Date: July 31, 2010. Project No: 090529.

Type: Bridge repair. Location: POI-IR-76-(6.14)(11.13). State Estimate: $2,005,000. Contractors and Bid Amounts: • Ruhlin Company, Sharon Center, Ohio — $1,751,696. • Wolf Creek Engineering and Contracting Inc., Akron, Ohio — $1,770,083. • A.P. O’Horo Company,Youngstown, Ohio — $1,821,000. • J.D. Williamson Construction Co. Inc., Tallmadge, Ohio — $1,948,860. • Kenmore Construction Co. Inc., Akron, Ohio — $1,972,883. • Beaver Excavating Co., Canton, Ohio — $1,996,147. • Shelly & Sands Inc., Zanesville, Ohio — $2,068,130. • Cuyahoga Bridge & Road Inc., Sevelle, Ohio — $2,108,476. • Perk Company Inc., Cleveland, Ohio — $2,122,752. • Dot Construction Corp., Canfield, Ohio — $2,187,937. • Velotta Co., Sharon Center, Ohio — $2,484,644. • Marous Brothers Construction, Willoughby, Ohio — $2,524,144. Completion Date: Oct. 31, 2010. Project No: 100028. Type: Bridge replacement (1 bridge). Location: WAR-SR-741-(2.24)(4.50). State Estimate: $1,628,000. Contractors and Bid Amounts: • Complete General Construction Co., Columbus, Ohio — $1,460,739.

• Baker Concrete Construction Co., Monroe, Ohio — $1,685,134. • R.B. Jergens Contractors Inc., Vandalia, Ohio — $1,840,703. • Eagle Bridge Co., Sidney, Ohio — $1,893,872. Completion Date: July 31, 2010. Project No: 101000. Type: Major widening. Location: DEF-SR-66-7.37 Part 1; DEF-66-7.68 Part 2. State Estimate: $11,600,000. Contractors and Bid Amounts: • Mosser Construction Inc., Fremont, Ohio — $11,648,312. • Posen Construction Inc., Shelby Township, Mich. — $12,104,558. • Miller Bros. Construction Inc., Archbold, Ohio — $12,588,245. • Crestline Paving & Excavating Co. Inc., Toledo, Ohio — $12,734,629. • Shelly & Sands Inc., Zanesville, Ohio — $13,248,503. Completion Date: Oct. 31, 2010. Project No: 100031. Type: Preventive maintenance. Location: PIC-VA-PPM-FY2009B. State Estimate: $3,075,000. Contractors and Bid Amounts: • Shelly Company, Thornville, Ohio — $2,773,300. • Kokosing Construction Co. Inc., Columbus, Ohio — $3,248,489. Completion Date: July 31, 2010.


Construction Equipment Guide • Ohio State Supplement • www.constructionequipmentguide.com • May 1, 2010 • Page 7

Ohio Not on the Hook If State Opts Out of Rail Project By Matt Leingang ASSOCIATED PRESS WRITER

COLUMBUS, Ohio (AP) Ohio wouldn’t have to repay $25 million in stimulus money if the state decides to scrap plans for passenger train service between Cleveland and Cincinnati, the Federal Rail Administration said March 24. The answer was in response to Senate President Bill Harris, a Republican whose support of the project is needed to release the first part of a $400 million federal grant awarded to Ohio in January. Harris had questioned whether the $25 million, which is needed to complete engineering and design work, would have to be repaid if the state later backs out of purchasing trains and finishing the project. Mark Paustenbach, a spokesman with the Federal Rail Administration, said that’s not the case, though any engineering studies paid for with the money would have to be completed. Ohio has until Sept. 30, 2017, to spend the entire $400 million or forfeit the balance, he said. “Our intent, obviously, is to see the project through to construction and operation,” Paustenbach said. Harris said that while he is pleased to know no strings are attached on this portion of the project, he remains uncomfortable in giving the OK. He continued to question whether the rail service would draw enough riders. Early estimates, based on an Amtrak study last fall, predict 478,000 riders in the first year of operations. The analysis was conducted by AECOM, a Los Angeles-based engineering firm that is helping London develop a master plan for the 2012 Olympic Park. If Republicans derail the plan, it would be one of the most dramatic refusals of federal stimulus money in the nation. The money is part of $8 billion in stimulus grants that President Barack Obama set aside for passenger rail projects.

2010 Construction Season Set to Top Former State Mark COLUMBUS, Ohio (AP) Ohio transportation officials said 2010 will be the biggest construction season in state history. Helped by federal stimulus money, Ohio will award about $2 billion in transportation construction projects — outnumbering past years by more than 30 percent. The Ohio Department of Transportation said April 7 that the agency and its local partners will have more than 1,600 projects under construction this year. Projects include $450 million to replace the Interstate 90 Innerbelt Bridge in Cleveland. Design and engineering work will begin this summer, with construction slated for 2011. Other major projects this year include $57.6 million for work on Interstate 75 in Dayton, $11 million to widen a bridge on I-270 near Columbus and $23 million for a 5 mi. major upgrade of Interstate 70 in Belmont County.

Ohio’s plan calls for a startup, 79-mph service connecting Cleveland, Columbus, Dayton and Cincinnati. It would lay the foundation for a faster, higher-speed service with branches connecting to Chicago and the East Coast. Gov. Ted Strickland, a Democrat, has called it a significant economic development project. Forest City Enterprises Inc., a real estate company based in Cleveland, already is working on a plan for a new commercial district around a proposed train station in Riverside, an intermediate stop on the route near Dayton. State law requires at least a 5-2 vote of the Controlling Board to release the stimulus money, including the first $25

million. The law also requires that one of two Senate Republicans on the panel vote yes. “We recognize and respect the fact that we cannot proceed further with this project until we have Controlling Board approval,” said Jolene Molitoris, director of the Ohio Department of Transportation. About 6 million people live along the 255-mi. Ohio train route, making it one of the most heavily populated corridors without rail service in the Midwest. Amtrak said the corridor has the demographics needed for successful operations, including population density and a concentration of colleges and universities.


Page 8 • May 1, 2010 • www.constructionequipmentguide.com • Ohio State Supplement • Construction Equipment Guide


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