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THE NEW ENGLAND EDITION

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Your New England States Connection • Rachel Slavid 1-800-225-8448 • Kent Hogeboom 1-800-988-1203

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In most instances, the construction was already under way, or multiple houses were being worked on at the same time, so the Bike and Build members were divided into smaller groups and paired up with a member of the construction crew, so they could complete as much of the work as needed in the time they had.

riding to work and class occasionally,” said Biggs. “After I was accepted as a rider, I began training last December [2009]. Riders commit themselves to ride at least 500 miles before the Brandon Biggs is pedaling non-stop on a statrip leaves and at least one ride of 65 miles or tionary bike, preparing to bike across the United longer. States to help build homes for the poor and less “I am now completely hooked on cycling fortunate. and I ride as often as I possibly can, even if it Biggs, 23, a Louisiana native and a Cocoa, means on a stationary bike in my living room Fla., resident is a first-year law student at Roger through this New England winter,” he said. Williams University in Bristol, R.I. He is train“Some [riders] are absolutely head over ing for 80-mi.-per-day rides in order to do “sweat equity” with a local affordable housing Brandon Biggs will heels for affordable housing and that is the drivgroup, so that in spring he can help contractors spend 10 weeks ing force of biking. For me, and many others, it and construction work crews put up homes for traveling the coun- was the adventure of riding that really made me try by bicycle and want to do this. The fact that it was for a great the homeless in a half dozen states. building houses. cause was an added bonus.” Away from studying the law, Biggs has Bike, Then Build Biggs is one of dozens of young people, aged 18 to 25, learned all about “sweat equity.” “I think one of the main reasons that B&B has riders do who have joined Bike & Build, a national organization that has raised $2.78 million over eight years to help various sweat equity is not only to gain experience in building, but it housing groups build homes. Its expansive national footprint causes you to fall in love with the cause. I will never forget allows it to promote the need of affordable housing in 47 the satisfaction and pride I shared with the young lady I was states, one province and hundreds of communities nation- working with in St. Augustine, Fla., last year as we wrapped her shed in weatherproofing, and she was called into what wide. Biggs first heard about B&B from a friend during his would soon be her kitchen to pick out the color for her countertops. It was such a simple thing as color, but she glowed undergrad years at Flagler College. “I fell in love with the idea of seeing the country at the knowing that she and her kids would soon have a home and pace of a bicycle. At that time, my experience with bikes was I was elated to be able to share in the last day of her sweat limited to owning a mountain bike I bought at Wal-Mart, and see BUILDING page 6


Page 2 • February 2, 2011 • www.constructionequipmentguide.com • New England States Supplement • Construction Equipment Guide

THE W.I. CLARK COMPANY Brookfield, CT • Wallingford, CT • Plainfield, CT Call Mark Doty @ 203-823-2316

2005 Deere 710G

IR 375XP 3000 hours, Deere Engine, Fully Serviced, Good Rubber

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CRAWLER LOADER 2000 LIEBHERR LR622 LITRONIC, S/N 2272, C/AIR, 2.0 YD PIN ON BUCKET, LIEBHERR ENG, 20" PADS, NEWER CHAINS AND SPROCKETS, STK# 19580 ..........................$45,000 DOZER – CRAWLER 1986 CAT D6H, C/AIR, 22” PADS, U/C @50%, GOOD RUNNER, READY FOR WORK, STK# 19765..............................................................................................................SOLD $50,000 1988 DEERE 450G, ROPS, LEVER STEER, DIRECT DRIVE, FULLY SERVICED, STK# 20224.. ..................................................................................................................................$18,500 2000 DEERE 650H LT, C/AIR, NEW U/C, FULL 2000 HR SVC DONE, BLADE UPDATE, ONLY 2000 HRS, ONE OWNER, STK# 19656 ....................................................................$62,750 2007 DEERE 650J, XLT, C/AIR, 105" BLADE, RADIO, STK# 19537 ..........................$86,500 2003 DEERE 700H, XLT PACKAGE, C/AIR, BLADE RESKINNED, NEW EDGE, STK# 19451 .... ..................................................................................................................................$65,000 2005 DEERE 750J, S/N TO750JX110563, C/AIR, PAT BLADE, RECENT SERVICE, CLEAN MACHINE, STK# 19345 ..........................................................................................$131,500 1987 DRESSER TD8E, IH ENGINE, 6 WAY BLADE, 2000 HR SERVICE COMPLETED, STK# 20040........................................................................................................................$13,500

loader, c/air, new 20” pads, 2 yd bucket

Cummins Eng, OMNI 1A 8’-13’ Screed Diesel Heat, Front Wheel Assist

stk# 20128 ..........................$42,500

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PAVER 1999 BLAW-KNOX 2181, CUMMINS ENGINE, OMNI 1 SCREED 8’-13’, FRONT WHEEL ASSIST, STK# 20128 ................................................................................................$42,500 EXCAVATOR – CRAWLER 2006 CAT 330DL, S/N B6H00233, 1,190 HRS, C/AIR, HYD COUPLER, H/HYDS, 54" BUCKET, PATTERN CHANGE VALVE, U/C 80%, SERVICED, STK# 19584 ........................$225,000 1998 DEERE 450 LC, C/AIR, H/HYDS, 54" BUCKET, 70% U/C, GOOD CONDITION, STK# 19296..............................................................................................................SOLD $98,500 2005 DEERE 450C LC, 54" BUCKET, JRB CPLR, H/HYDS, A/C, CAB SCREENS, VERY GOOD CONDITION, STK# 19142........................................................................................$196,000 2000 HITACHI EX330-5, C/AIR, JRB HYD COUPLER, H/HYDS, 54" BUCKET, NEW PAINT, U/C @ 50%, STK# 19326..........................................................................................$62,500 2004 VOLVO EC210BLC, C/AIR, HYDS, HYD COUPLER, 42” BKT..................SOLD $45,000 BACKHOE DEERE 310D, 1600 HRS, 4WD, STD HOE, EXCELLENT CONDITION, STK# 20189 .............. ........................................................................................................................SOLD $32,500 2005 DEERE 710G, C/AIR, STD HOE, AUX HYDS, 24” BUCKET, 2WD, RUNS GREAT, STK# 20267........................................................................................................................$45,000

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Construction Equipment Guide • New England States Supplement • www.constructionequipmentguide.com • February 2, 2011 • Page 3

**STUMP GRIDER BLOW OUT PRICES – CONTACT TOM TYLER 203.509.0967** 2007 Hamm HD 110 VHV

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Page 4 • February 2, 2011 • www.constructionequipmentguide.com • New England States Supplement • Construction Equipment Guide

Waterbury Looking to Deconstruct, Recycle Old Factories By Penelope Overton REPUBLICAN-AMERICAN OF WATERBURY

WATERBURY, Conn. (AP) As an aging, down-on-itsluck industrial city, Waterbury is littered with dozens of dilapidated, abandoned factories. In the past, whenever it could scrape together funding, Waterbury would pay to demolish such buildings with a bulldozer or wrecking ball and haul the debris off to a landfill. But this spring, Waterbury is trying something unusual. It is going to deconstruct two old factories, dismantling the buildings from top to bottom, and recycle them. State officials believe Waterbury will be the first city in Connecticut to dismantle and reuse or recycle the parts of a commercial or industrial building. Through deconstruction, the city expects to reuse and recycle up to 80 percent of the buildings, from the shingles on the roof to the wood planks in the floors. This labor-intensive process will create jobs, keep the construction debris from filling up local landfills, and make Waterbury a big draw for environmental grant dollars. “In Waterbury, with all its empty factories, we know the consequences of unsustainable practices firsthand,” said Project Manager Kevin Taylor. “We wanted to do better.” It has been done in other places, especially out West, and places closer to home, such as Richmond, Va., New York City and Worcester, Mass., but not here. The deconstruction of homes and barns is not new. It was done by the settlers to save time and resources, and preser-

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vationists do it now to save historic homes. “The residential market is already here,” said Joseph D. DeRisi of Urbanminers LLC, of Hamden. “Everyone wants a unique door, that claw foot tub, the stained glass window.” For a price, he will deconstruct your house, church or barn. He also runs a reuse center, where he sells the parts, from doors to cabinets, sinks to flooring. It is so popular, and Department of Environmental Protection is so eager to encourage it, that environmental officials, deconstructionists, historians and educators have taken the idea to the schools. This spring, Naugatuck Valley Community College will offer a class, “The Reuse Solution.” In May, Yale University and DEP will host a national deconstruction conference. Because it is smaller, the industrial market is national. But even that is growing as more and more federal grants require applicants to reduce their waste stream. “That’s going to be the next wave,” DeRisi said. “I do this for philosophical reasons, but a house here, a house there, it’s just a start. Now industrial, that’s real volume.” For Waterbury Development Corp., the development arm of the city, the drive to deconstruct rather than raze is both altruistic and pragmatic. Removing the old Matthews and Willard Co. complex in the city’s North Square will allow for the expansion of an adjacent Bender Plumbing Supply. The city also is planning to deconstruct several buildings on Division Street, including two biker clubs, later this year to make way for the new Police Activity League ball fields.

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Construction Equipment Guide Northeast Edition (ISSN 1081-7034) is published bi-weekly by Construction Equipment Guide Ltd. Advertising and Editorial Offices are located at 470 Maryland Dr., Ft. Washington, PA 19034. Toll Free 800/523-2200 or Fax 215/885-2910. Annual Subscription Rate $65.00. Call for Canadian and foreign rates. Periodicals postage paid at Ft. Washington, PA and at additional mailing offices. POSTMASTER: Send address changes to Construction Equipment Guide Northeast Edition, 470 Maryland Dr, Ft. Washington, PA 19034. Contents Copyrighted ©2009, by Construction Equipment Guide, which is a Registered Trademark, registered in the U.S. Patent Office. Registration number 0957323. All rights reserved, nothing may be reprinted or reproduced(including framing) in whole or part without written permission from the publisher. All editorial material, photographs, drawings, letters, and other material will be treated as unconditionally assigned for publication and copyright purposes and are subject to Construction Equipment Guide's unrestricted right to edit and comment editorially. Contributor articles do not necessarily reflect the policy or opinions of this publication. Call or write for advertising rates, publication schedule and media kit. The Construction Equipment Guide is not responsible for clerical or printer's errors, every care is taken to avoid mistakes. Photographs of equipment used in advertisements are not necessarily actual photographs of the specific machine. Similar photographs are used occasionally and every effort is taken to depict the actual equipment advertised. The right is reserved to reject any advertising.

Its efforts to clean up its industrial properties, many of which are tainted by environmental problems, have turned Waterbury into a state leader of urban reclamation. But it also has helped Waterbury stand out in a crowd of cash-strapped cities vying for competitive environment grants, Taylor said. Deconstruction is the next logical step. “It gives us a lot of brownie points with the people who are handing out grants,” Taylor said. “The people handing out these grants don’t want us filling up landfills.” Without such grants, the Cherry Street project wouldn’t be happening. The agency is using about $550,000 of a state development grant to deconstruct the buildings. There is a debate about whether it costs more to take a building apart than it does to demolish it. The demolition industry said it does; environmentalists said it doesn’t. Supporters said the sale of building materials to reuse centers, sustainable contractors or, if necessary, the scrapyard for eventual recycling will offset high labor costs. It also cuts down on project disposal costs, especially for projects, like Cherry Street, that include asbestos and leadtainted debris, which cost even more to landfill. And then there is the incalculable environmental cost. In 2003, Connecticut produced about 855,000 tons of demolition waste, most of which was carted at significant cost to out-of-state landfills, many of which are unlined. “It takes a huge environmental toll,” said DEP analyst Sherill Baldwin. “Our landfills are almost full. Trucking that waste around is bad. And it drains our natural resources.” And it also costs us a lot of money, Baldwin said. The state wants to reduce its waste production by 58 percent by the year 2054. Reducing demolition waste will be a key part of achieving that goal, she said. There is little debate about which process takes more time. A building can be knocked over in a few days, at the most, but deconstruction requires working by hand. Demolition contractors can often raze a building, then sort through the debris for metals to be sold for scrap, but it’s hard to pull wood and windows from a bulldozed heap. And if the building is contaminated, as Cherry Street is, salvaging items from a debris heap means every brick, tile and piece of wood will have to be cleaned. In Waterbury, the city-hired contractor, C&D Services of Wolcott, will tunnel into the structurally unsound building from the side to remove lead and asbestos first. Then the building will be taken down, piece by piece, with items being sorted and cleaned on site before being matched up and sold to buyers across the nation. Waterbury hired DeRisi as a consultant for the Cherry Street project. He helped them determine how much of it could be reused or recycled, and if it was worth it. He ticks off a list of what can be “repurposed” — the slate roof, brick walls, the limestone steps and windowsills, steel window frames and wooden beams and floors. “And that’s just the tip of the iceberg,” DeRisi said. The project engineer, GeoDesign Inc. of Middlebury, calculated Waterbury will mine about 33,000 sq. ft. of salvageable bricks alone. Once cleaned, that brick will end up in new buildings across the nation. WDC’s Kevin Taylor hopes some little piece of the old factory will end up in the Bender Plumbing Supply building when it is expanded. “It would be a good reminder to us all,” Taylor said.


Construction Equipment Guide • New England States Supplement • www.constructionequipmentguide.com • February 2, 2011 • Page 5

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Page 6 • February 2, 2011 • www.constructionequipmentguide.com • New England States Supplement • Construction Equipment Guide

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2001 John Deere 550, Only 1440 Hrs! EROPS, AC........................$39,000

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Bike & Build Program Helps American Families in Need BUILDING from page 1

equity.” As a part of B&B, riders research different aspects of the affordable housing issue and present them to their fellow riders every week. “As stewards of this movement, it is important to us that we be informed young adults so that we might inform others of what we are doing. We are all young adults, and one thing we strive for is inspiring other young people to be aware of social issues and strive to make a difference in our community,” said Biggs. Working With Contractors Biggs’ 2010 group worked with Habitat for Humanity affiliates in Jacksonville, Fla, Mobile, Ala, Dallas, Texas, Baton Rouge, La., and Yuba City, Calif. Each of these habitats had their own contractors who instructed riders how to do the task at hand. “We have a unique opportunity, since we were only with each group for usually one to two days, but we arrive with 33 people to complete a lot of work in a short amount of time. In most instances, the construction was already under way, or multiple houses were being worked on at the same time, so, often, we were divided into smaller groups and paired up with a member of the construction crew, so that we could complete as much of the work they needed in the time we had,” said Biggs. “It was a huge advantage to have site managers, contractors and building crews on hand to manage us as volunteers.” “You can’t help being inspired by the work and team spirit of the Bike and Build riders,” said Glen Williamson, site supervisor at Yuba/Sutter Area Habitat for Humanity in the Marysville, Calif., area. “They roll into our community near the end of a 3,000-mile trip, not exhausted or worn out, but in high spirits and a sense of purpose that elevates the whole project. “It’s not work, but a mission to improve the circumstances of families that were fortunate to be part of the riders’ visit to our town,” Williamson said. In New Orleans, Biggs’ group worked with EDOLA, the Episcopal Diocese of Louisiana. In Farmington, N.M., he had the opportunity to build with an organization called ECHO, a private affordable housing program. “I would say that if I had to try and describe it, boy, 24 hours of absolute insanity followed by an incredible amount of work that got done at the end of the day. That would be my description of what Bike and

Most of the full-time builders, managers and contractors for Habitat affiliates are retired building professionals.

Build did,” said Russ Allen, construction supervisor, ECHO. “I have always been in awe about the conditioning of what it would take to bike across country and then to work for a day. The projects we were able to give them to build, and paint, and move, it was incredible. They not only got everything done we asked of them but had fun and loved doing it. It is a great organization.” “ECHO did an absolutely stellar job. At the end of the day, we felt as though we had gotten a huge amount of work done. This was not unique to Farmington, but all of the Habitat affiliates we worked with did a great job of accommodating the large influx of volunteers to their advantage,” added Biggs. “The worst feeling as a volunteer is having too many hands and not enough work. “The other thing Habitat did very well was that they taught us an incredible amount. Most of the full-time builders, managers and contractors for Habitat affiliates are retired building professionals, and they really seem to get a lot of joy out of teaching young people not only how to do a task, but how to do it well and with a great sense of pride,” he said. “I have to say thanks to all of those people who did this because it really made our days so much better when you learn how to properly level the frame of the house, however frustrating it might be at times, rather see BUILDING page 10


Construction Equipment Guide • New England States Supplement • www.constructionequipmentguide.com • February 2, 2011 • Page 7

NATIONAL BOOM TRUCKS IN STOCK Ready For Immediate Delivery!!! National Model 8100D, New & Used - 23 Ton National Model 9103A, New & Used - 26 Ton National Model 9105H, New & Used - 27 Ton

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We’ve become attached to your machines. b

Sandvik (Rammer) E-Series hydraulic impact hammers

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Where can you go to get high performance boom-mounted attachments? Allied Construction Products, LLC

For over 65 years, we’ve developed many attachments that are legendary in the construction and demolition industries that demand high performance. Names like Ho-Ram, Hy-Ram®, Rammer, Ho-Pac® and Pedestal Breaker System™ are names that equal: Ê UÊSimple, proven design (Our attachments have high resale or trade-in value) Reliable performance (If you purchased you’re probably AR Series™ an Allied attachment, U Reliable performance (If you purchased an Allied attachment, you’re probably still using it) hydraulic impact hammers still using it) U Superior productivity (Compare AEM– formerly CIMA– ratings, our attachments get the job done faster) attachments get the job done faster) And, now Allied adds to that great family background with the Sandvik (Rammer) and AR Series™ hammers. Allied’s attachments don’t take a back seat to any competitor. In particular, our Sandvik (Rammer) product features a long-stroke design, all oil operation and ProControl. All of our high performance boom-mounted attachments are supported by the most respected parts and service organization in North America. Customer satisfaction is job one at Allied. Great products supported by people who know the industry and its customers. To put a high performance Allied attachment on your machine, call the Tyler Equipment Corporation office nearest you. We’ve become attached to your machines.

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Page 8 • February 2, 2011 • www.constructionequipmentguide.com • New England States Supplement • Construction Equipment Guide

Being small enough to fit into lessthan-roomy spaces is great. So is a tremendous amount of power. But if that’s all an excavator has to offer, it will never be a Doosan. Our new smaller, but still powerful, DX140LCR is a workhorse machine built to minimize both downtime and operating costs. It’s easy to maintain with centralized grease points, convenient hose routing

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Construction Equipment Guide • New England States Supplement • www.constructionequipmentguide.com • February 2, 2011 • Page 9

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R.I. Roads Chief Says More, Smaller Projects in 2011 PROVIDENCE, R.I. (AP) The head of Rhode Island’s Department of Transportation said the agency will have a different approach as it moves into the new year: thinking smaller. The shift comes with the near completion of the agency’s biggest job — a $623 million project to move Route 195 out of downtown Providence. Department chief Michael Lewis said now the agency can spend money on more and smaller projects, such as fixing smaller bridges and secondary and local roads. For instance, the department said nine bridges either closed or posted with weight limits were under construction in 2010, and it plans to advertise another 17 bridges for bid in 2011. Lewis warned, though, that there will be traffic disruptions because projects will be spread more broadly across the state.

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Page 10 • February 2, 2011 • www.constructionequipmentguide.com • New England States Supplement • Construction Equipment Guide

ADVERTISER INDEX

Bicyclists Provide Sweat Equity for Affordable Homes

ACR EQUIPMENT ..............................................................9

BUILDING from page 6

ARGUS INDUSTRIAL COMPANY ......................................1

than accepting it as any less than perfect and moving on, or fixing it after the volunteers go home.”

ASTRO CRANE ..................................................................9 BARRY EQUIPMENT CO ..................................................8 C N WOOD CO INC ........................................................12 CHADWICK BAROSS MA ..................................................8 CLASSIFIEDS ....................................................................9 CONTRACTOR’S CORNER ..............................................9 FOLEY MARINE & INDUSTRIAL ENGINE ........................1 GORILLA HAMMERS ........................................................1 J R VINAGRO CORPORATION ........................................1 KRAFT POWER CORP ......................................................1 LOU GIZA EQUIPMENT ....................................................1 MID CITY STEEL CO..........................................................9 MILTON CAT ......................................................................9 MULTI MACHINE INC ........................................................1 ROGERS BROTHERS......................................................11 SHAWMUT EQUIPMENT CO INC......................................7 THE N.I.C.E. COMPANY ..................................................6 TST HYDRAULICS INC ....................................................9 TYLER EQUIPMENT CO ................................................3,7 W I CLARK CO ..................................................................2 WOODS CRW OF NH CORP ............................................5 The Advertisers Index is printed as a free editorial service to our advertisers and readership. Construction Equipment Guide is not responsible for errors or omissions.

Building Up the Disenfranchised Some of his building experiences were heart wrenching. Outside of Dallas, Biggs was able to have dinner at the home of the director of the local Habit for Humanity. She invited many of the homeowners over so Biggs had the chance to talk to those who had been helped in the past and those whose homes were being built currently. “It was great to see first-hand who you are building for and why you are doing this,” he said. “Some of our riders [in New Orleans] went out and got gifts for one of the homeowners because he and his children would be moving back into their home in a week. That particular gentleman and his family had moved out of the 9th Ward only a week before [Hurricane Katrina] because a stray bullet killed one of his sons. Because they had not been in the house 30 days, insurance refused to support their claim. “I was working in Tremme [Louisiana] with a woman who was literally evacuated from her house at gunpoint during the storm and had suffered severe distress as a result. By the time we left, everything was in place so that she could move in as soon as the plumber hooked up the pipes to the sink and cabinets we had built for her, and she would be able to pass inspection.” Seeing the Country by Pedal The scenic vistas of Biggs’s thousands of pedaled miles were no less memorable. “Some of my favorite experiences in riding were crossing through the part of the country I thought I would hate most. Being as far south as we were, I thought Texas, New Mexico, Arizona and Nevada would be hot and miserable. It was hot, but it was some of the most surprisingly beautiful country I have ever seen. Every day, traveling just 80 or 90 miles, you got to your next host and you didn't feel like you were in a new city, but rather a new country. I couldn't believe how drastically the terrain could change in so few miles. Every day was completely different from the last,” said Biggs. “We climbed the eastern Sierra Nevadas and descended down into Lake Tahoe, and seeing that beautiful huge lake in the middle of a mountain, after climbing a very steep mountain for the last 20 miles of our 100-

mile-day was one of the most incredible things I have ever seen. It looks like the water is about to spill out of the mountain at any second,” he added. “Most of us also hit our top speeds of the trip coming down the other side of the mountain the next day. I never thought I would go over 50 miles an hour on a bicycle.” 47 States and a Province Bike & Build runs eight national routes, with roughly 32 riders on each trip annually (256 riders a year). The program started with only two routes. Riders travel through 47 states on these routes and the northern-most route actually leaves the country and travels into British Columbia on the last day of their trip. Each route is roughly 10 weeks long. “On my last trip from Jacksonville, Fla., to San Francisco, we rode approximately 4,000 miles. This summer will be roughly about the same. We average about 70 miles a day on the bike, and our longest day is about 110 miles, which, last year, was on U.S. 50 through Nevada, which is the loneliest road in America,” said Biggs. With contractor, builder, volunteer and rider help, Biggs said, “I think it is safe to say, the number of families we have helped is well into the thousands. I know we have donated more than 50,000 man-hours on build sites over the last eight years.” This year, Biggs’s group will be building in Kansas City, Mo., Charlottesville, Va., Cincinnati, Ohio, St. Louis, Mo., Boulder, Co., Steamboat Springs, Co., Idaho Falls, Idaho, and Portland, Ore., either with Habitat for Humanity rebuilding or new construction. 2011 will be Biggs’s last year of the trip. As a law student, next summer he will have to take a more traditional job and work at a law firm getting experience in his field. But the road does not end there. Every year over the winter holiday, B&B has an alumni ride in Florida for a week and it builds for two days. The nearly $3 million raised by Bike & Build includes more than $490,000 donated from the summer of 2010. That also is its goal this year. Bike & Build also supports local affordable housing organizations along each route through on the road donations. For more information on Bike and Build, visit Bikeandbuild.org. To see Biggs’s personal page, visit http://bikeandbuild.org/rider/4656.


Construction Equipment Guide • New England States Supplement • www.constructionequipmentguide.com • February 2, 2011 • Page 11

Tyler Equipment

C.N. Wood Co., Inc.

Joseph Equipment Company

251 Shaker Road East Longmeadow, MA 01028 (413) 525-6351 (800) 292-6351

200 Merrimac St. Woburn, MA 01801 (781) 935-1919

300 Gay Street Manchester, NH 03103 603-641-8608 www.josephequipment.com

Avon, MA (508) 584-8484 1980 Berlin Turnpike Berlin, CT 06037 (860) 356-0840 (800) 352-4473 Parts: (860) 356-0848 www.tylerequipment.com

Johnston, RI (401) 942-9191


Page 12 • February 2, 2011 • www.constructionequipmentguide.com • New England States Supplement • Construction Equipment Guide

200 Merrimac Street Woburn, MA 781-935-1919

60 Shun Pike Johnston, RI 401-942-9191

102 State Road Whately, MA 413-665-7009

140 Wales Avenue Avon, MA 508-584-8484

New England #3, 2011  

New England #3, 2011