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GEORGIA STATE EDITION

Cornella 19

A Supplement to:

Rome 85 27

Athens 441

Atlanta

20

Madison Augusta

85

20

Griffin 1

129

Milledgeville

75

La Grange

Macon

301

185 19

16

Dublin

Swainsboro Oak Park

Columbus

Statesboro

341 441 16

Lyons Americus

May 14 2014

Dorchester

341

Cuthbert

75

Albany

84

Douglas Tifton

82

95

82

Blakely

Pearson

“The Nation’s Best Read Construction Newspaper… Founded in 1957.”

301

1

82

Vol. XVI • No. 10

Savannah

McRae Cordele

27

27 84

Moultrie

19 319

84

Bainbridge

Valdosta Thomasville

Waycross Brunswick 82

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Your Georgia Connection: Rich Olivier, Atlanta, GA • 1-800-409-1479

High-Profile Development Job Finally Back on Track By Cindy Riley CEG CORRESPONDENT

Despite a lengthy interruption and a change in ownership, a high-profile development project in Georgia’s capital city is finally back on track. Stretching half-a-dozen city blocks and renamed “Buckhead Atlanta,” the approximately $1 billion endeavor includes more than 800,000 sq. ft. (74,322 sq m) of upscale retail, restaurant, luxury office and high-rise residential space. “The original vision for ‘The Streets of Buckhead’ resulted in the assemblage of eight acres of prime real estate in the heart of the Buckhead Village,” said Hunter Richardson, managing director of development of OliverMcMillan. “The vision for a vibrant mixed-use district of luxury retail, restaurants, offices, residences and hotels unfortunately proved to be ahead of its time as the economy collapsed in the late 2000s. With Buckhead being one of the most prestigious communities in Atlanta, we saw its redevelopment as an opportunity to build on Buckhead Village’s history and significance as the heart of the community. We embarked on the redesign of the development and a pre-leasing campaign to attract first-to-market retailers and restaurants, as well as Schroder Public Relations photo

Despite a lengthy interruption and a change in ownership, a high-profile development project in Georgia’s capital city is finally back on track.

Schroder Public Relations photo

The building structures are primarily constructed of concrete and steel.

Class-A office tenants.” By 2012, when work got back under way, the commercial real estate market was returning from the recession and capital markets were coming back. Richardson knew it was the right time to complete construction on what will be the San Diego-based firm’s first development project in Atlanta. “From the beginning, our goal has been for Buckhead Atlanta to feel like it’s always been a part of the existing neighborhood,” said Richardson. “Buckhead Village has such a rich history that we wanted to create a place that pays tribute to the neighborhood’s organic variety of tenants and architectural styles. We consider Buckhead Atlanta to be less of a new project and more of a block-by-block redevelopment. When you operate from the mindset that you’re redeveloping an existing area, you pay greater attention to maintaining the character.” Pappageorge Haymes senior associate, Timothy Kent, said his Chicago-based architectural firm collaborated closely with other architects, designers and OliverMcMillan to see ATLANTA page 2


Page 2 • May 14, 2014 • www.constructionequipmentguide.com • Georgia State Supplement • Construction Equipment Guide

‘Buckhead Atlanta’ to Stretch Half-Dozen City Blocks OliverMcMillan photo

“Buckhead Atlanta,” the approximately $1 billion endeavor includes more than 800,000 sq. ft. (74,322 sq m) of upscale retail, restaurant, luxury office and high-rise residential space.

Schroder Public Relations photo

Pappageorge Haymes used randomness as a key attribute for the facade. ATLANTA from page 1

create a neighborhood with a true sense of place. “We placed a high value on timeless design, with careful attention to the kinds of details that make pedestrians feel comfortable. Buckhead Village is quite diverse, and comprised of an eclectic mix of building types and scales. The design team focused on making the new neighborhood compact, walkable and inviting at the sidewalk level, with a variety of architectural expressions that reflected the character of the surrounding area. “We worked very hard to get the size and character of the space between the buildings just right — things like street widths, sidewalk dimensions, the spacing of trees, paving materials — and then looked at creating architectural variations that felt compatible within that environment. Those variations feel more natural and interesting than having just one type of architecture, which can make a place feel more like a shopping mall than a city street.” The design focuses on the relationship between the structures, visitors, vehicles and walkways. “The character and success of an urban environment is very dependent on the elements that pedestrians interact with directly,” said Kent. “These include trees and landscaping, street furnishings, signage, paving materials and so forth. Mixtures of stone pavers were blended with specially treated concrete to create a look that felt substantial and of high quality. The planting of several large, mature trees in key locations was a special focus of the team, which will bring a critical ambiance to the neighborhood on its first day.” The space avoids a “cookie cutter”

appearance by having different contributors involved. “The development has progressed and evolved since construction first started, with some of the original vision being retained, as well as with the introduction of many new elements,” said Kent. “Just that history and process alone was beneficial in ensuring the project would develop in a unique way. There was also a collective focus on achieving the highest quality possible within the budget and to avoid designs that were considered too trendy. By having multiple designers contributing and sharing different attitudes and concepts, we were able to avoid the trap of having a single dominant look to the project or too much of any one idea.” Kent pointed out the blending of traditional and contemporary architectural elements was key, as the design process got under way. “OliverMcMillan thought it was important to achieve a careful balance of different architectural vocabularies throughout the development. Historically, the best urban districts have been created by many people over a long period of time, with different styles of buildings adjacent to one another. The key is having a unifying sense of scale to tie everything together. “A lush and sophisticated palette of landscaping was seen as a crucial ingredient to the success of the project,” said Kent. “The ‘hardscaping’ was seen as equally important, blending stone, masonry and specially-finished concrete in creative ways. Together, these elements, along with customized signage and lighting, create a unique ambiance that pedestrians will notice and appreciate.” Offering customizable spaces to potential tenants was important, although not an easy task to carry out.

“Accommodating the dimensional needs of each tenant is always a challenge, and it is virtually impossible to design a building that will anticipate the exact location of tenant demising walls ahead of time,” said Kent. “Traditional architecture is based on predictable rhythms and rigorous order, a balance that can be lost when the final tenant plans are configured. We tried to outsmart this problem by designing one building, which used randomness as a key attribute of its facade. The columns were of different sizes, as were the spaces between them. If a tenant wished to relocate or eliminate a column to better suit their needs, the overall look of the building would not be affected.” Each building has been designed to comply with the most current energy codes. As an urban project with a variety of uses, the design encourages people to walk, avoiding the need to drive from place to place. When completed, the project will mark a sense of accomplishment for the architectural team. “It’s really been fascinating on a lot of levels,” said Kent. “With so much complexity and the involvement of so many people, it’s like designing a whole city in miniature.” Michael Skowlund of Chicago’s Hoerr Schaudt Landscape Architects said his firm wanted to infuse the street level of Buckhead with the energy and vibrancy found in a thriving urban environment. “We focused on making the landscape distinctive and welcoming, with mature trees to give shade, beautiful plantings that celebrate the seasons and quality materials that identify Buckhead as a special place. “Oliver McMillan believes good streetscape design is as important as architecture to place-making. Our strategy in design is to prioritize ‘green over grey,’ which means to give people in urban envi-

ronments as much access to horticulture as possible. “In Buckhead, the streets are carefully designed to make walking and being outside a delightful experience,” said Skowlund. “The 140 specimen trees we specified are much larger than what was required by the city. They were selected to create shade from day one. Lush plantings beneath the trees and by the sidewalk create a soft and beautiful buffer between people strolling along the sidewalk and cars driving into the neighborhood. “One of the most exciting home design trends of the decade is how much more people want to live outdoors, whenever they can. The roof deck between the towers gives residents expanded space to entertain, dine, play, exercise and relax. The style of the roof terrace relates to the formal, mansion-styled clubhouse on the deck. Two zones, a pool area and a formal garden area offer a very wide range of activity options. Trellises planted with vines and cabanas offer shade near the pool. In the formal garden, four shelters screen sun from alfresco dining areas.” Four huge oak trees will be one signature of Buckhead’s landscape. “Each of them provides about 25 feet of shade canopy,” said Skowlund. “Hardscape surfacing throughout the sidewalks are a combination of granite, basalt and concrete. We used exposed aggregate concrete that utilizes top-cast applications and had it integrally colored instead of surface colored for longer durability and greater consistency. For vehicular pavement surfacing, we also use concrete unit pavers that originate at the site’s central plaza space and continue uninterrupted through a curbless intersection and see ATLANTA page 4


Construction Equipment Guide • Georgia State Supplement • www.constructionequipmentguide.com • May 14, 2014 • Page 3

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Page 4 • May 14, 2014 • www.constructionequipmentguide.com • Georgia State Supplement • Construction Equipment Guide

More Than 800 Workers On Site Daily for ‘Buckhead Atlanta’ ATLANTA from page 2

up one block of public roadway. “The soils throughout the project are specially designed to support tree and plant growth. Sand-based structural soil can be compacted for construction, yet still support the root systems of trees, which was critical in a streetscape with so many mature trees.” Balfour Beatty is the general contractor for the massive project which includes 300,000 sq. ft. (27,870 sq m) of upscale retail, restaurants and cafes, more than 100,000 sq. ft. (9,290 sq m) of luxury office and approximately 400,000 (37,161 sq m) of high-rise residential, which is split between two residential towers. Construction activities are underway at parcels A, B, and C, which together comprise the current phase of Buckhead Atlanta. Parcel C is the largest of the three and contains part of what was formerly known as the Streets of Buckhead project. It will be home to French high-fashion house Hermes and the two apartment towers. “This project originally broke ground in 2007 and was being developed by Atlantabased Ben Carter Properties, with Balfour Beatty serving as the general contractor,” said Mike Macon, vice president and business unit leader of Balfour Beatty, Georgia division. “Demolition activities initially began across six city blocks in the area known as Buckhead Village. Two surface parking lots were constructed to provide temporary parking for the nearby Aaron and Capital office buildings whose parking decks were demolished to make way for the new mixed-use development.” The project was anchored by luxury retail at the street level and included two condominium towers, two hotel towers with residences and more than 2,000 parking spaces. It stopped in February 2009 due to the owner’s inability to secure permanent financing, and left one large hole in the ground at parcel A due to incomplete subterranean parking deck structures. At Parcel C, the concrete podium structure, which would ultimately support two residential towers, was stopped at the seventh floor, according to Macon. A number of one, two and three-story structures were on the property before the work began. Buckhead Village was a vibrant bar scene that was popular among many young professionals in Atlanta. Early work activities began in August 2012 with selective demolition and transfer beam modifications as necessary to support the new program in the re-tooled development. Construction fully resumed in May 2013 with concrete structure activities building atop the existing structure that was left incomplete in 2009. At parcel A, the plaza level structure atop the four-level subter-

ranean parking deck has been completed, as well as the above-grade retail and office structures. Façade construction is under way, and several buildings at parcel A have been turned over for tenant construction. Initial hardscape and landscape installation is under way, but the bulk of the work will occur over the next few months. At parcel A, the exterior façade installation will continue for the next several months. At parcel C, the residential unit interior finishes and the amenity deck construction remains. Tenant construction is underway and will continue through the summer. Resuming construction on Buckhead Atlanta has not been easy, said Macon. “The restart has been the most challeng-

OliverMcMillan photo

A total of six tower cranes have been used to construct the project according to Mike Macon, vice president and business unit leader of Balfour Beatty, Georgia division.

OliverMcMillan photo

Described as a landmark destination, Buckhead Atlanta is located at the intersection of Peachtree and East Paces Ferry roads and will total around 1.5 million sq. ft. (139,354 sq m).

ing that many on our team have faced during our careers. There’s a unique challenge in starting a project that, on your first day, you find yourself midway through a major construction project. Another challenge was the complexity involved with the fact that what we are building today is in many ways very different from what was being constructed from 2007 to 2009. The re-tooled development required a lot of selective demolition and structure modifications necessary to support the new program.” Initial tenants will be open for business starting in July and will continue to open through spring of 2015. The residential towers will be completed late this year. “We have been averaging just over 800 workers on site each day the past few months,” Macon said. “A total of six tower cranes have been used to construct the project. At parcel C, one tower crane was needed at each residential tower. A third crane was used to construct the low-rise structure at the retail podium. At parcel A, a total of three tower cranes were used. Two of those were used to build the massive four-level

subterranean parking deck and the abovegrade structures that sit atop the parking deck. A third crane is being used to build the above-grade retail and office structure to the south of the property. Equipment on the job includes 17 to 20 ft. (5 to 6 m) scissor lifts, Genie Z-45 4WD articulating manlifts, Genie Z-60 4WD articulating manlifts, rough terrain scissor lifts, single manlifts, air compressors 185CFM, concrete power trowels, concrete cuttings saws, concrete drills, diamond chain saws, masonry saws, concrete Georgia buggies, backhoes, dozers, excavators, skid steer loaders, boom rough terrain forklifts and generators. The tower cranes include three SK 415s and one SK 400. The building structures are primarily constructed of concrete and steel. The residential tower exterior façade is a mix of glass window wall, stucco and exposed concrete. The street level retail is clad using architectural precast concrete, natural stone, lightweight cast stone and several special veneer materials. For Richardson, recrafting the program-

ming and design of The Streets of Buckhead into Buckhead Atlanta was no small order, as the firm needed to build on the significant infrastructure that was already in place while interjecting its own vision of placemaking. “We pride ourselves on making special places happen, and it was important to us to mold the development into our vision for creating a walkable urban environment,” said Richardson. “This was a very meticulous design effort that involved over a year of initial design with three highly creative architects plus a renowned landscape architect to articulate this vision before we commenced construction. This vision has evolved as we added an additional floor of office to house Spanx’s corporate headquarters after the development already was fully designed and permitted. “Teamwork has been vital, especially since we have had all components of Buckhead Atlanta under construction simultaneously. Balfour Beatty and our long list of subcontractors have been consummate professionals and have worked tirelessly to keep construction on schedule.” Described as a landmark destination, Buckhead Atlanta is located at the intersection of Peachtree and East Paces Ferry roads and will total around 1.5 million sq. ft. (139,354 sq m). For Richardson, it marks a new beginning for the area. “As the economy recovered and Buckhead Atlanta came back to life, the redevelopment has become a signal that the health and vitality of commercial real estate in Atlanta has returned,” said Richardson. “In addition, we have seen an influx of new tenants to the Village that will be a great complement to Buckhead Atlanta.” (This story also can be found on Construction Equipment Guide’s Web site at www.constructionequipmentguide.com.) CEG


Construction Equipment Guide • Georgia State Supplement • www.constructionequipmentguide.com • May 14, 2014 • Page 5

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Construction Equipment Guide • Georgia State Supplement • www.constructionequipmentguide.com • May 14, 2014 • Page 7


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Construction Equipment Guide • Georgia State Supplement • www.constructionequipmentguide.com • May 14, 2014 • Page 7


Page 8 • May 14, 2014 • www.constructionequipmentguide.com • Georgia State Supplement • Construction Equipment Guide

GUCA Holds Scholarship Foundation Sporting Clay Event The GUCA Scholarship Foundation held its 2014 American Cast Iron Pipe Company, Anderson Grading & Smith, Currie & Hancock LLP, Southeast Culvert Inc., Scholarship Foundation Sporting Clay event at the Cherokee Pipeline LLC, Archer Western Construction LLC, BB&T — Southeastern Site Dev. Inc., Strack Inc., STS/Utiliquest, Rose in Griffin, Ga., on April 11. Reese Insurance, Bituminous Insurance Co., Blount Total Site Containment, URETEK-CRSI Inc. and Yancey One hundred twelve participants from 31 companies Construction Co. Inc., Brent Scarbrough & Company Inc., Bros. Co. enjoyed the sunny weather for this annual event, which Brown, Nelms & Co., PC, Central Atlanta Tractor Sales, The money raised from this tournament will go toward the included teams from the following participants: GUCA Scholarship Foundation. American Heritage Gun Range & Training “The utility contractors have given so much Center, Ashley Sling Inc., Brent Scarbrough & to the association” said Vikki Consiglio, Company, Callaway Grading Inc., Christopher GUCA executive director, “it is time we give Grading Inc., Consolidated Pipe & Supply Co. back.” Inc., Crawford Grading & Pipeline, DeKalb The foundation has given 62 scholarships Pipeline Company, Dennis Taylor and Co. Inc., EJ within the past nine years. USA Inc., Envirogreen Services LLC, Ferguson The Georgia Utility Contractors Association Waterworks, Flint Equipment, Fortiline Inc., Inc. Scholarship Foundation, founded in 2003, Georgia Hydrant Services Inc., Loggins CPA, is a 501(c)3 foundation and has made the McCoy Grading, Newnan Utilities Water dream of a scholarship program for its memDepartment, Newton County Water & Sewerage bers become a reality. Scholarship Foundation Authority, Oldcastle Precast East Inc., RDJE Inc., awards are chosen based on scholastic Ritchie Bros. Auctioneers, Ronny D. Jones achievement, extra-curricular activities, comEnterprises Inc., Ruby-Collins Inc., Smith, Welch, munity service, career goals and completion of Webb & White LLC, Southeastern Site Dev. Inc., an essay. High school graduates can apply for STS/Utiliquest, Total Site Containment and $1,000 scholarships to any college of their Yancey Bros. Co. choice and $2,000 for industry degrees. The Crawford Grading & Pipeline Inc. team, Foundation board members for 2014 which included Rocky Brooks, Jeff Brewer, Stuart include Matt McCormack, Archer Western Stokes and Andy Harvill took third place with a Construction LLC, chairman; David Westrick, team score of 325. American Heritage Gun Christopher Grading Inc. takes home the first place trophy at the sporting Ruby-Collins Inc., vice-chairman; Gina Range, included John Harris, Tommy Moseley, clay event. Shelnutt, Anderson Grading & Pipeline LLC, Ben Shurling and Mike Wasielewski took second secretary/treasurer; Roxann Criswell, DeKalb place with a team score of 333. Christopher Grading, Inc., Crain Oil Company Inc., D&G Boring, Inc., Data Pipeline Company; Ricky Harp, Civil Site Services Inc.; which included Joe Christopher, Walter Thompson, Matt Integration, E.R. Snell Contractor Inc., EJ USA Inc., Foley Charles Lance, Peed Bros. Inc.; Lynda Murren, Total Site Neely and Billy Christopher took first-place honors with a Products Company, Granite Mountain Machinery, Hayes Containment; Brent Scarbrough, Brent Scarbrough & team score of 343. Jeff Brewer, Crawford Grading & Pipe & Supply Inc., Isco Industries, Loggins CPA, McWane Company Inc.; Joseph Webb, RDJE Inc.; and Vikki Pipeline Inc. won best individual shooter with an individual Pipe Co., Oldcastle Precast East, Inc., Peed Bros. Inc., Consiglio, GUCA, ex-officio. score of 96. PentaRisk Associates of Georgia, LLC, Piedmont Paving (This story also can be found on Construction The following organizations contributed to the event with Inc., Precision Blasting, Quadex Inc., Ritchie Bros. Equipment Guide’s Web site at www.constructionequipsponsorships and donations: Auctioneers, Ruby-Collins Inc., Sheppard Trucking Inc., mentguide.com.) CEG

Adams Addresses Project Activity in Macon/Bibb County Area Members and guests packed the private room at The Back Burner Restaurant for the Georgia Utility Contractors Association (GUCA) central Georgia Industry Luncheon on April 2. More than 30 members and guests filled the back room of this dining spot in Macon, Ga., to hear time sensitive information, network and enjoy lunch. This was an open invitation event for GUCA members, prospective members, municipalities and government officials in the area and throughout the state. The keynote speaker for this meeting was Steve Adams, Macon/Bibb County industrial authority. Steve delivered a presentation on Project Activity in Macon/Bibb County Area and Region and highlighted current projects and their successes. He spoke about the economic development trends, source of project’s recruitment, site location factors and,

available labor supply and mission of authority. He introduced the local vendor program and encouraged those from the Macon area to join. He said this program is an effort to ensure new and expanding companies in Macon/Bibb county are aware of local contractors and their capabilities. GUCA Membership Committee Chairman Ed Shipley, RDJE Inc., welcomed everyone to the meeting and thanked Bituminous Insurance Co., Foley Products Company and Sterling Risk Advisors for their generous sponsorships. Shipley also encouraged members to stay active and participate in future GUCA functions. The importance of generating new membership was emphasized and he strongly encouraged promoting membership and recruiting in the area to strengthen GUCA’s Central Georgia membership.

GUCA Executive Director Vikki Consiglio also updated those in attendance about upcoming events, safety classes and industry and legislative issues. She introduced representatives who highlighted the GUCA affinity programs including the Georgia Health Plan Trust, 401k savings plan and Bituminous Safety Dividend Program — GUCA’s newest affinity addition. This meeting was a success because of the hard work and dedication of GUCA Membership Committee Chairmen Ed Shipley, RDJE Inc., and Jason Ray, Archer Western Construction LLC, GUCA membership committee. For more information visit www.guca.com. (This story also can be found on Construction Equipment Guide’s Web site at www.constructionequipmentguide.com.) CEG

Keynote speaker Steve Adams, Macon/Bibb County industrial authority, addresses GUCA members and guests about project activity in the Macon/Bibb County area.


Construction Equipment Guide • Georgia State Supplement • www.constructionequipmentguide.com • May 14, 2014 • Page 9

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Page 10 • May 14, 2014 • www.constructionequipmentguide.com • Georgia State Supplement • Construction Equipment Guide

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‘Peach State’ Highway Project Bids

The Georgia State Department of Transportation received bids for transportation-related improvement projects. Following is a list of some of the projects let. County: Barlow Contract ID: B14701-13-000-0 Location: On SR 61 beginning west of Leake St. (CS 830) and extending to East Felton Road. (E). Project: 2.720 mi. of milling and plant mix resurfacing. Contractors and Bid Amounts: • Bartow Paving Company Inc. $934,511 • C. W. Matthews Contracting Company Inc. — $937,887 • Baldwin Paving Company Inc. — $942,740 • Northwest Georgia Paving, Inc. — $985,045 County: Bibb Contract ID: B14703-13-000-0 Location: On U.S. 80/SR 22 at Holley Road (CR 33). (E). Project: Construction of a roundabout. Contractors and Bid Amounts: • C. W. Matthews Contracting Company Inc. — $1,683,471 • Georgia Asphalt Inc. — $1,941,965 • Pittman Construction Company — $2,072,691 • Reeves Construction Company — $2,266,534 • G.P.’s Enterprises Inc. — $2,507,699 County: Bulloch Contract ID: B14704-13-000-0 Location: On SR 67 Bypass at Pulaski Road (CR 142). (E). Project: Intersection improvements. Contractors and Bid Amounts: • McLendon Enterprises Inc. — $1,041,268 • Ellis Wood Contracting Inc. — $1,074,842 • East Coast Asphalt LLC — $1,095,430 • Reeves Construction Company — $1,110,436 County: Chatham Contract ID: B14714-13-000-0 Location: On SR 204 (Abercorn Street) beginning east of Veterans Parkway (CR 975) and extending east of Rio Road (CS 1201). (E). Project: 1.278 mi. of widening and reconstruction. Contractors and Bid Amounts: • Oldcastle Southern Group Inc. d/b/a Apac Southeast Inc. — $4,054,494 • Reeves Construction Company — $4,103,329 • Plant Improvement Company Inc. — $5,169,524 • G.P.’s Enterprises Inc. — $5,523,301 County: Cobb Contract ID: B14715-13-000-0 Location: On I-285/SR 407 over Rottenwood Creek. (E). Project: Bridge rehabilitation. Contractors and Bid Amounts: • Comanche Construction Inc. — $1,283,121 • Southern Road & Bridge LLC — $1,398,571 • Massana Construction Inc. — $1,603,344 • Olympus Painting Contractors Inc. — $1,739,473 • The L. C. Whitford Company Inc. — $1,987,887

• M & J Construction Company of Pinellas County Inc. — $2,203,229 County: Coweta Contract ID: B14713-13-000-0 Location: On I-85/SR 403 over the Transcontinental Pipeline. (E). Project: Bridge rehabilitation. Contractors and Bid Amounts: • Massana Construction Inc. — $3,293,920 • Olympus Painting Contractors Inc. — $3,322,818 • The L. C. Whitford Company Inc. — $3,887,887 • McCarthy Improvement Company — $7,134,006 County: Crawford Contract ID: B14708-13-000-0 Location: Various locations in Crawford County. (E). Project: Pedestrian and school zone safety improvements. Contractors and Bid Amounts: • JHC Corporation Inc. — $376,280 • R. J. Haynie & Associates Inc. — $406,387 Counties: Dooly and Houston Contract ID: B14710-13-000-0 Location: On SR 7 beginning north of I-75/SR 401 and extending south of SR 124/SR 244. (E). Project: 15.180 mi. of milling, inlay, plant mix resurfacing and single surface treatment paving. Contractors and Bid Amounts: • Reeves Construction Company — $2,871,083 • Georgia Asphalt Inc. — $2,937,601 • C. W. Matthews Contracting Company Inc. — $2,946,040

County: Forsyth Contract ID: B14718-13-000-0 Location: Various locations in Forsyth County. (E). Project: Pedestrian and school zone safety improvements. Contractors and Bid Amounts: • Ohmshiv Construction LLC — $837,667 • JHC Corporation Inc. — $975,062 • G.P.’s Enterprises Inc. — $998,688 County: Forsyth Contract ID: B14696-13-000-0 Location: On SR 9 beginning north of SR 20 and extending north of SR 369. (E). Project: 5.833 mi. of milling, inlay and plant mix resurfacing. Contractors and Bid Amounts: • C. W. Matthews Contracting Company Inc. — $1,227,709 • Baldwin Paving Company Inc. — $1,334,487 • Stewart Bros. Inc. — $1,757,081 County: Fulton Contract ID: B14717-13-000-0 Location: Various locations in Fulton County. (E). Project: Pedestrian and school zone safety improvements. Contractors and Bid Amounts: • Lewallen Construction Company Inc. — $499,490 • JHC Corporation Inc. — $561,135 • Baldwin Paving Company Inc. — $577,324 • Tople Construction & Engineering Inc. $587,594 • Pittman Construction Company — $656,811 • Southeastern Site Development Inc. — $697,598 • R. J. Haynie & Associates Inc. — $728,109


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