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UPDATE Commerce:

THE DAILY HOME, Talladega and St. Clair counties, Ala., Sunday, February 13, 2011

Pell City, Riverside & St. Clair County


Pell city Commerce

2 — THE DAILY HOME, Talladega and St. Clair counties, Ala., Sunday, February 13, 2011

Chamber promotes working together the party begins. Organizers say it is a family-style event, providing music, food and entertainment for people of all ages. On the second Thursday in December, people line the streets in the historic downtown district for the annual Greater Pell City Chamber of Commerce Christmas Parade. Participants compete in different categories, showing off their creative and imaginary Christmas floats for prizes and awards. And, of course, the parade would not be complete without Santa Claus, who normally boards one of the city’s bright red fire trucks.

By DAVID ATCHISON Home staff writer

The Greater Pell City Chamber of Commerce works as an unofficial public relations firm for the city and local businesses, said Lynn Batemon, the chamber’s executive director. “We try to promote people working together to make their community a better place to live and work,” Batemon said. The chamber office at 1618 Cogswell Ave. is in the heart of the historic downtown district of Pell City. “We help people get answers to all kinds of questions,” Batemon said. “We try to promote and advance the interests of the city.” The chamber has spearheaded new efforts this year to promote the city, working with a local company to develop a multimedia packet to promote Pell City and help the chamber communicate more effectively with its members. Batemon said the chamber’s new website, up and running since last fall, has a list of all the members, a calendar of events and links to various government offices and local organizations. “You can access a lot of information from the chamber’s website,” Batemon said. The chamber is now e-mailing its newsletter, allowing it to distribute information to chamber members almost immediately. She said the e-letter provides information about upcoming events

David Atchison/The Daily Home

The Greater Pell City Chamber of Commerce office is at 1618 Cogswell Ave.

and chamber news. The chamber is also working on a mail-out brochure to help promote Pell City and a new magazine to be distributed to visitors. Batemon said she expects the chamber magazine to tell the story of Pell City. She said the chamber hosts many events throughout the year to help bring chamber members and local businesses together. These event includes chamber coffees and after-hours events. “We also hold events for the general public, which David Atchison/The Daily Home help bring in people from other areas,” Batemon Lynn Batemon is executive director of the Greater Pell City Chamber of said. Commerce. One of the biggest events that brings people Hometown Block Party, June each year. roads around the St. Clair to Pell City is the annual held the first Friday in The city blocks off County Courthouse and

Batemon said the chamber also holds its Celebration Banquet in early May, presenting the Citizen of the Year and the Business and Industry of the Year awards. On the third Tuesday of each month, 9-11 a.m., the chamber hosts Jacksonville State University Small Business Counseling sessions. Batemon said participants must call the chamber office at 205-338-3377 to make an appointment to attend. A representative from JSU helps and advises new businesses about how to get started or advise an older business about how to make effective changes in operations, she said. “It’s a free service we offer every month,” Batemon said. For more information about the chamber, visit pellcitychamber.com. Contact David Atchison at datchison@dailyhome. com.

Service comes with a smile at BJ’s Produce By GARY HANNER Home staff writer

Those who believe the days of the mom-and-pop store are over need to talk to Bill Hopkins. While many of the small, locally owned stores of yesteryear have dissolved, Hopkins’ BJ’s Produce in Pell City continues to serve its customers after 23 years in business. Since 1988, BJ’s Produce has provided service with a smile and has offered quality products at reasonable prices. Hopkins and his wife, Jewell, started BJ’s Produce in November 1988. Their daughter, Kay Covey, moved to Pell City in 1992 and has worked in the store for the past 14 years. Hopkins worked for Phillips Petroleum in Texas 35 years and took an early retirement. He and his family moved back to the St. Clair County area, and that’s when he decided to

‘We are truly blessed. Our top priority is customer service. We want to make sure everyone finds what they are looking for and that they are happy with what they have purchased.’

— BJ’s Producer owner Bill Hopkins

open the business. “When I was a 12-yearold kid, I went to work for the old Farmer’s Market in Birmingham,” Hopkins said. “I started out working for my brother-inlaw.” Hopkins’ in-laws were in the produce business at Cahaba Heights years ago. “When we were looking for a place to live, we were deciding on here in Pell City or Talladega County,” Hopkins said. “Where we decided to live would determine where we would put the market. We bought a house here on this side of the river. I found this property and

I tried to buy it, but the man would not sell it and I’m still renting. I’m still here on the original site where we first built.” Hopkins said he knew early on that he wanted to add to the original building but said he did not think it would happen as quickly as it did. “We opened in November 1988 and had planned on adding on a couple of years down the road,” he said. “I got a deal to add on that I couldn’t turn down, and we renovated by December 1988. At BJ’s Produce, besides fresh fruits and vegetables, customers will find fresh eggs, peanut brittle,

Gary Hanner/The Daily Home

BJ’s Produce owner Bill Hopkins discusses a product with customer Wendy Veazey.

snacks, candy, jams, jelly, preserves, vine-ripe tomatoes year-round, Vidalia salad dressing and onion barbecue sauce, chowchow, boiled peanuts, local honey, shelled nuts

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pell city commerce

THE DAILY HOME, Talladega and St. Clair counties, Ala., Sunday, February 13, 2011 — 3

BJ’s Produce has been in Pell City since 1988.

Advertising Speciality & Promotional Products Screen Printing & Embroidery Signs Offset Printing Computer Forms & Checks Graphic Design

Mike Fricker - General Manager Cell 205-369-3352 Customer Dana Merryman buys some of Mrs. Renfro’s Hot Tomato Relish from Kay Covey while at BJ’s Produce recently.

BJ’s From Page 2

“Nine out of 10 times, our prices are cheaper than the grocery stores and we buy local from the local farmers when available,” Covey said. “I think we have a good product at a cheaper price.” Hopkins and Covey are proud that their store helps keep Pell City school children healthy. The store

supplies produce to all the schools in Pell City and also Head Start. “We furnish fresh vegetables to each school every week,” Hopkins said. “It’s something we have been doing the past 18 years.” Through the years, Hopkins said the business has been fair, and they have experienced ups and downs. “Winter time is slow,

and in the summer we are good,” Covey said. “We are truly blessed. Our top priority is customer service. We want to make sure everyone finds what they are looking for and that they are happy with what they have purchased.” Contact Gary Hanner at ghanner@thestclairtimes. com.

Photos by Gary Hanner

The Greater Pell City Area Chamber of Commerce The Greater Pell City Chamber of Commerce rolls out the carpet for its members, acting as their public relations firm to help them market their products and services. We turn challenges into opportunities with “meet and greet” coffees held each month to spotlight businesses and provide a venue for networking with other businesses. Each year, Pell City’s population swells with thousands turning out from near and far for our Hometown Block Party, an outdoor music festival extravaganza held on the first Friday in June. At Christmastime, you won’t want to miss St. Nick or our Christmas Parade, which has become one of the largest in the region, held on the second Thursday in December.

BJ’s Produce carries fresh fruits and vegetables year-round.

We are continually striving for ways to better serve our businesses and our community. 277564

On the cover: Top, fresh fruit at BJ’s Produce in Pell City. Middle left, salon owner Holly Joiner styles Jean Davis’ hair at Hair Designs by Holly in Pell City. Middle right, ownrer Marsha Jones stirs up a pot of something good at Aunt Aggie’s Back Porch in Pell city. Bottom, students at Brentwood Childcare in Riverside use the IBM KidSmart computer.

Lynn Batemon

Executive Director

1618 Cogswell Ave. Pell City, AL (205) 338-3377 pellcitychamber@centurytel.net

277612

1665 Dry Creek Road, Cropwell, AL Office: 205-525-4029 Email: precisiongroup@centurytel.net


pell city commerce

4 — THE DAILY HOME, Talladega and St. Clair counties, Ala., Sunday, February 13, 2011

Everybody’s welcome at Hair Designs by Holly By GARY HANNER Home staff writer

Holly Joiner has loved the thought of fixing hair since she was 12 years old. She started cutting her mother’s hair, and then it spilled over to cutting hair for other family members. On March 14, 2004, she opened a salon in Pell City and named it Hair Designs by Holly. She is about to celebrate seven years in business. “I trained myself,” Joiner said. “I did not go to college but have been to some continuing education classes since I’ve been doing hair.” Joiner said what makes her business stand out is, first of all, the Christian environment. “We are not an upto-do salon,” Joiner said. “One can come in and be themselves. They do not have to pretend to be someone they are not. I want my customers to be comfortable here.” Another positive for Joiner is that she and her staff provide excellent customer service. “The clientele I have established through the years are wonderful people, and I appreciate their business,” Joiner said. “We take pride in providing our customers with the best service possible. We want them to leave here happy and wanting to come back the next time they need something done to their hair.” At Hair Designs by Holly, there are four stylists and two shampoo technicians. Joiner said January and June are the two slowest months of the year for her business. “January is right after Christmas and no one has any money,” she said. “Then in June, the kids are out of school and everyone is taking vacations. The busiest times of the year for me are holidays,

especially Thanksgiving and Christmas.” Joiner said she is also available to do hair for wedding parties, men and women. She said her clientele is about evenly divided between men and women. “We welcome anybody here to our shop,” Joiner said. “Walk-ins are welcome, and we do take appointments if anyone out there is on a schedule. We offer anything a person can think of when it comes to hair and hair products — waxing, hair coloring, etc. We do not do facials or nails or anything like that.” Joiner said what makes her business a success is that she loves people and loves interacting with them. “I think that helps me with my clientele as far as myself,” Joiner said. Hair Designs by Holly also offers six lines of retail hair products, including Bosley hair restoration for men and women. Joiner also provides products from Paul See Welcome, Page 5

Sheena Thomas, who has worked at Hair Designs by Holly the past five years, checks out some of the products available at the shop.

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Stylist Katie Tolbert cuts Sycea Carter’s hair at Hair Designs by Holly.

Holly Joiner, owner of Hair Designs by Holly, cuts Jean Davis’ hair.


pell city commerce

THE DAILY HOME, Talladega and St. Clair counties, Ala., Sunday, February 13, 2011 — 5

‘One can come in and be themselves. They do not have to pretend to be someone they are not. I want my customers to be comfortable here.’

— Holly Joiner, owner

Welcome From Page 4

Mitchell, Frames and the Matrix line. She is a certified L’Oreal carrier. The salon is open Tuesday through Saturday. The hours on Tuesday, Thursday and Friday are 9 a.m.-7 p.m. On Wednesday and Saturday, the shop is open 9 a.m.-2 p.m. Seven years ago when it first opened, Joiner’s shop was next to K-Mart on U.S. 231 South. For the past two plus years, Hair Designs by Holly has been across from WFHK Radio on U.S. 78 in Eden next to Joiner Plumbing Services. Joiner can be reached at 205-338-1848. Contact Gary Hanner at ghanner@thestclairtimes. com.

Photos by Gary Hanner Sheena Thomas is a shampoo tech and receptionist at Hair Designs by Holly.

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pell city commerce

6 — THE DAILY HOME, Talladega and St. Clair counties, Ala., Sunday, February 13, 2011

Bob Crisp/The Daily Home

Brentwood Childcare in Riverside celebrates 15 years in business this month.

Bob Crisp/The Daily Home

Bob Crisp/The Daily Home

Brentwood students get help from their teacher as they color.

Students use the KidSmart computer donated by IBM and United Way of Central Alabama.

Brentwood: Place of ‘love, sound instruction’ By KENNY FARMER Home staff writer

February marks the 15-year anniversary of Brentwood Childcare in Riverside. Janet Muller, owner and director, said she began the center because she and her husband recognized a need for child care in the Riverside area. Muller said there was nothing else in the area when they began. A former schoolteacher, Muller helped start the daycare program at United Methodist Church in Pell City before beginning Brentwood in 1996.

IBM and the United Way of Central Alabama recently donated a KidSmart computer to the center’s Success By 6 program. KidSmart computers are equipped with software to assist children in learning math, science and language skills. Brentwood was one of only eight childcare centers in the state to receive one. Brentwood parents sell donuts to raise money for annual events, including the center’s fall festival and Thanksgiving family dinner. The money raised goes toward entertainment for the children.

Natural History, go to the the best one in town,” she Contact Kenny Farmer at circus and have time to said. kfarmer@dailyhome.com. play at places such as the Pell City Center and Kid’s Castle. Brentwood has a security camera system that monitors all classrooms. www.moodyrealtyal.com It records one week at a “Serving all your real estate needs for time, and the tapes are buyers and sellers throughout St. Clair kept for one month. It County and surrounding areas.” allows parents to come in and watch their children Cell 205-365-9612 without disturbing the child or classroom. Paula Krafft, Realtor Brentwood periodically Paula Krafft paula@moodyrealtyal.com offers an after-hours holi2007-2008 day baby-sitting service, Club of Excellence Homes - Land - New Construction so that parents may have a REMEMBER, night out. They will keep children until 10:30 p.m. WE BUY during these times. These LAND AND are scheduled in advance.

Older preschool children go on several field trips throughout the year. These students visit the Anniston Museum of

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The Thanksgiving family dinner, always held the Thursday before Thanksgiving, gives parents the opportunity to spend quality time with daycare employees, Muller said. Much of the time, parents are in a hurry when they drop off and pick up their children, limiting the time they have to get to know the staff at Brentwood. Muller said 100-120 people attend the dinner each year. Other special events at the center include hot dog suppers, magic shows and a visit from Santa Claus.

The Tumble Bus is a special treat for the children at Brentwood. It is a refurbished school bus that comes to the center once a week. The outside is painted, and inside are many fun things for the children, including swings, mats and minitrampolines. It is intended for children 18 months to preschool-age. During summer months, school-age children go on field trips to Cheaha State Park, Birmingham Barons baseball games, movies and more. The children also go swimming every Tuesday and Thursday in June and July.

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Lana Watts, assistant director at Brentwood, was director of the daycare at United Methodist. “She’s my saving grace,” Muller said. “This place couldn’t run without her.” Brentwood has 16 staff members, all trained in childcare, CPR and first aid through Child Care Central of St. Clair County. They also have been through a background check and have been fingerprinted. Employees meet all standards set by the state. Muller said her staff is dedicated to enriching the lives of each child through “love and sound instruction.” She said Brentwood offers an environment and curriculum that encourages each child to explore, discover and develop in all areas, and this is done through activities that are developmentally appropriate for the child. She said every classroom has a daily plan the teacher follows. The older children

use Early Start curriculum, while the younger children learn basic skills for social development. “Our 4-year-old class works with the Success By 6 program out of Birmingham,” Muller said. “This program’s goal is to ensure that the children develop the skills they need to enter school ready to learn.”


pell city commerce

THE DAILY HOME, Talladega and St. Clair counties, Ala., Sunday, February 13, 2011 — 7

TherapySouth family physical therapy center By DAVID ATCHISON Home staff writer

If you have a joint or muscle problem, TherapySouth is there to treat you. “We’re sort of a family physical therapy center,” said Doug Cole, clinic director for TherapySouth in Pell City and Talladega and a licensed physical therapist. “We treat people from 2 to 92 years old with all types of problems, from spinal cord injuries to strokes,” he said. “We see a little bit of everything.” Cole said most of their referrals are from orthopedists for patients who have had knee or shoulder surgery or back and neck pains. “We’re fortunate,” he said. “We have a good relationship with a lot of doctors.” TherapySouth opened in Pell City about four years ago, but recently moved into its new office at 85 Plaza Drive, Pell City. Cole said TherapySouth built the new facility during the summer and moved into the new location in October. The office is staffed with six people: two office workers, two physical therapy assistants and two physical therapists. “In the state of Alabama, we can only operate under a physician’s prescription,” Cole said. He said many of their referrals are from local primary care doctors and specialists from the

Birmingham, Anniston and Gadsden areas. “We’re a private practice owned and operated by physical therapists, which is somewhat unique in our business,” Cole said. “We have positioned ourselves in the surrounding areas of Birmingham. He said TherapySouth has 11 clinics as far east as Talladega, north to Fultondale, south to Pelham and as far west as McCalla. “We also have clinics in Hoover, Vestavia and Mountain Brook,” Cole said from the Pell City clinic. “This is my neck of the woods.” Cole said he’s worked in the Pell City area for more than six years and he works in Talladega as well. He said the Pell City location is convenient for clients. “It’s hard for some people to drive 45 minutes to Birmingham,” Cole said. “There are not too many people in the area offering our services. We’re in the service industry, so we try to provide as many services as we can.” He said TherapySouth also works with local industry, helping rehabilitate workers who are injured on the job. Cole said TherapySouth also assists manufacturing plants with safety training. “We stay busy,” he said. He said they have a heated indoor pool in Talladega for therapy sessions.

David Atchison/The Daily Home

Doug Cole, clinic director for TherapySouth in Pell City, shows Stephanie Rea, a physical therapy intern from the University of Alabama Birmingham, proper exercise techniques with the clinic’s functional trainer.

“It’s a great thing to be able to offer, especially for seniors who have a hard time with physical therapy programs on land,” Cole said. “We try to send them

over there, if they don’t mind the 20-25 minute drive.”

with their patients. “We get to know them, and they get to know us,” Cole said. For more information about TherapySouth visit

He said physical therapists spend a lot of time

their website at www.therapysouth.com. Contact David Atchison at datchison@dailyhome. com.

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8 — THE DAILY HOME, Talladega and St. Clair counties, Ala., Sunday, February 13, 2011

PELL CITY COMMERCE

The personal service keeps ’em coming back By ELSIE HODNETT Home staff writer

John and Cindy Broome turned a hobby into a successful business that prides itself on doing “the little extra things” that keep customers coming back. “People keep coming back to us because of the personal service,” said John Broome, who owns Backyard Lawn & Garden with his wife, Cindy. The Broomes opened Backyard Lawn & Garden in Riverside in March 2010. “We have been open almost a full year, and things are going well,” Cindy Broome said. She said the couple moved to Riverside three years ago to be closer to family. “I’m an accountant, self-employed, and I still do that,” she said. “John retired from Procter & Gamble, and he had always done this as a hobby — fixing all kinds of motors and small engines.” Cindy Broome said her husband’s hobby turned into the perfect business opportunity. “Business has been good,” she said. “It has been slow during the winter, but that’s expected because it’s seasonal.” Cindy Broome said Riverside is a perfect location, close to Interstate 20 and with plenty of room for parking and delivery. “The community has been real supportive, which has been nice,” she said. “Everyone has been welcoming — happy we are here and happy to do business with us.” Backyard Lawn & Garden offers repairs on any brand in the smallengine field, such as lawnmowers, go-carts, ATVs, handheld two-cycle lawn equipment and more, she said. “We sell Snapper and Snapper Pro brand lawnmowers,” she said. The company also sells Echo equipment, which is handheld residential string trimmers, hedge trimmers, chainsaws, blowers and more, and Shindaiwa equipment, which includes commercial handheld garden tools, typically highergrade equipment for land-

scapers and lawn professionals. “We have expanded and branched out as well,” she said. They now carry Interstate batteries, tires, oil for lawnmowers and mixing oil for handheld equipment and more. The company also is an authorized service center and dealer for Briggs & Stratton engines and parts, and, she said, “We sell Briggs & Stratton generators, too, as well as repair any type of generator.” They also carry a full line of do-it-yourself parts for people who make their own repairs, she said. “We have … pretty much everything you need to maintain a yard,” she said. This includes supplies for both homeowners and professional landscapers. “We do a lot of work with professional landscapers,” she said. “During peak season, equipment repairs for professional landscapers are a priority, so they can get back to work. Of course, our turnaround on residential repairs is fast, too.” Cindy Broome said that in response to strong customer demand, they expanded their building over the winter to turn an office into a showroom for handheld equipment. “Customers want to come in and buy the piece of equipment, then take it home with them,” she said. “And you can try out any of our equipment before you buy it to make sure it fits your needs. We have demo models they can try at the store.” The Broomes also can order equipment as needed. “Our customers can also shop on the Echo and Shindaiwa websites and have the equipment delivered to our store for pickup to save shipping costs,” she said. Backyard Lawn & Garden offers free delivery and pickup. “We are here to back up the product,” she said. “When we sell a new product, it is registered (for warranty) before the customer leaves the store. That way if there is a problem, they can just bring it back, and

if it is still under warranty it can be fixed at no cost to the customer.” She said this saves customers the hassle of filling out and sending in warranty information themselves, or forgetting to register the warranty and having to pay for something that would have been covered. “The customer doesn’t have to fill out the paperwork or wait to be reimbursed,” she said. John Broome said services like showing a customer how to use his new lawnmower are important. “When I drop off a new lawnmower, I take the time to show the customer how to operate it,” he said. “When you buy it, we make sure it is working at the store, but when we deliver it, we want to make

Bob Crisp/The Daily Home

Backyard Lawn & Garden sells a selection of Snapper and Snapper Pro lawnmowers, and repairs any brand motors and engines.

sure it is still working at your home.” John Broome said they also fill all the equipment with gas, so it can be used right away. “Of all the mowers I’ve sold, I think only one person wasn’t cutting

their grass with their new mower when I left — and that’s because he had to get to work,” he said. “We do the little things, like making sure the equipment is filled with gas, that makes everyone feel better and keeps them coming back.”

Backyard Lawn & Garden is open 7 a.m.6 p.m. Monday-Saturday and can be reached at 205338-1303 or at www.backyardlawnandgarden.com. Contact Elsie Hodnett at ehodnett@dailyhome.com

Bob Crisp/The Daily Home

Backyard Lawn & Garden expanded over the winter to turn an office into a handheld-equipment showroom.

‘The community has been real supportive, which has been nice. Everyone has been welcoming — happy we are here and happy to do business with us.’

— Cindy Broome

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Pell city commerce

THE DAILY HOME, Talladega and St. Clair counties, Ala., Sunday, February 13, 2011 — 9

Co-op has all your growing season needs By WILL HEATH Home staff writer

Employees at the St. Clair Farmers Cooperative in Pell City say they have plenty of customers interested in growing flowers and vegetables. Those customers, however, typically do not have the time to constantly tend to their plants. “Everybody wants something they don’t have to take care of,” said Vince Champion, horticulturist. “Something (that) is drought-tolerant, no water, no fuss.” Champion is the fulltime horticulturist on staff at the co-op. The store just expanded its plant selection, with the addition of greenhouses and on-site growing. “A lot more ornamental plants, and we’re carrying sod you can buy by the pieces. Zoysia and Bermuda we keep in stock,” said manager Matthew Kay. “This will be our first year with greenhouses, so we’ll be growing bedding plants, and we’re going to try to grow about a couple of thousand heirloom tomato plants, a whole bunch of different varieties.” Champion said many of the plants are just what customers are looking for. “We’ll be growing some perennials, some annuals,” he said. “I call them ‘freeway plants,’ because they’ll grow on the freeway.” In addition, the co-op continues to sell raisedbed gardening kits, as well as fertilizer. Kay said the economic downturn has inspired a number of people to garden for themselves. “We’ve definitely seen it across the state — all the co-ops we talk to,” Kay said. “Supplies purchases, seeds, fertilizers, that sort of thing. I think that’s not going to change, especially as fuel continues to go up.” The technique essentially involves building a

bed for vegetable-growing off the ground. Kay said it is the easiest way to garden. “We’ve got (the kits) down there, and we’ve got the fertilizer for them,” he said. “We can make a blend for them. We encourage people — that’s the easiest way to garden, if they don’t have a green thumb. If they’ll just keep it wet. The co-op sells bedding plants from Bonnie Plant Farms in Union Springs. Last year it outsold all other Alabama co-ops, Kay said. “In the co-op system, out of like 60 stores, we sold the most Bonnie plants out of any store in the state (in 2010). We were No. 1 out of the coop system. So we sell a lot of vegetable plants.” Champion said they will also carry fruit trees and vines along with what he called “old-fashioned plants” this spring. “We’ll have Encore Azaleas, and I’m going to try to see if I can’t get some of the old-fashioned plants, like Grancy graybeard,” he said. “And sweetshrub, that’s a good one. “And, of course, we’ll have our typical landscape plants, like hollies, crape myrtles … and herbs. We have a good selection of herbs.” The co-op also continues to carry other essentials beyond plants. “We sell a lot of wheat straw for dog beds, pine shavings, that kind of thing,” Kay said. “And a lot of feed, when it’s cold because the animals go through a lot more feed trying to stay warm.” The St. Clair County Farmers Cooperative is just off U.S. 78 in Pell City, on Hardwick Road. For more information From landscapcall 205-338-2821, or eing plants to mail pellcitycoop@coo- plants to housebedding plants, sahs.net. the St. Clair Farmers Cooperative has them Contact Will Heath at all. wheath@thestclairtimes. com.

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pell city commerce

10 — THE DAILY HOME, Talladega and St. Clair counties, Ala., Sunday, February 13, 2011

Will Heath/The Daily Home

Aunt Aggie’s Back Porch restaurant on Hardwick Road opened in September after a four-month renovation.

Aunt Aggie’s: New twist on tradition Home staff writer

Nearly everything at Aunt Aggie’s Back Porch is a new twist on tradition. “We cook everything fresh,” said owner Marsha Jones. “Everything’s homemade. I don’t use anything that’s pre-packaged or premade.” Even the location is still relatively new: Jones moved into the current facility, on Hardwick Road in Pell City, in September after four months of refurbishing. “I don’t know that I can say we have a specialty, because I think everything we do is special,” Jones said. “We put a lot of effort and love into all of it, and it shows.” Jones, who learned to cook from her grandmother — “Aunt Aggie” to the West End community — operated two other restaurants before moving to Pell City to work in the construction industry. In 2009, another restaurant opportunity opened up. “Linda Graham came to me (in 2009) and said, ‘I always heard, if I wanted to get rid of my restaurant, you’re the person I’d want to talk to,’” Jones said. “I don’t know how that happened; I’m a little unclear. But that’s kind of how that ball got rolling, and I ended up over there, because she was tired of being in the restaurant business.” After a year on Old Coal City Road and four months of work on the new facility, Jones opened her restaurant on Hardwick Road. The response, she said, was overwhelming. “I guess people had been going by for months watching us under construction,” she said. “And I’ll tell you, the first week, I worked 20 hours out of 24 hours for seven days. That’ll tell you how crazy it was. We couldn’t keep up.” With new facilities and more room to operate, Jones and her kitchen staff are afforded more creativity. The result — an expanded menu that is constantly evolving. “We hand-cut our steaks and trim them, and we use Hereford, that’s a good quality of beef and it’s got a lower fat con-

tent,” she said. “We have pasta dishes — we make our pasta sauce every day, and we’re fixing to add a shrimp and pasta dish. “We have a great sandwich menu that’s got a very diverse sandwich type on it. … Josh Erwin is one of my chefs, and he’s always coming up with some kind of new dish. He makes his own sauces, and he does a chicken dish on a bed of garlic mashed potatoes, with sauce and grilled vegetables on the side. It’s really good. We make all our soups; his lobster bisque is outstanding.” The restaurant’s moniker comes from Jones’ grandmother, who taught her to cook from a very early age. “She (Aggie) could walk in a pantry … and she could pull stuff out,” Jones said. “And the meal that she would turn out was like, ‘Wow … you got that out of this?’ She just had that knack. “She was a very good cook and taught me everything I know. And most of it’s common sense, just like any other thing that you do. “It’s a tribute to a person who had the wherewithal and the patience to deal with somebody sitting on what she called a stool while she was at the stove, and that’s how I learned to cook. That’s how she taught me.” Jones already has some special events planned for the spring, including an antique car show and a crawfish boil. She said she believes all restaurants will start to see more business once the weather changes. “This (economy) is historic,” she said. “If you were to go to any restaurant owner right now, they would tell you that it’s been slow. The holidays are slow, and Januarys are slow because everybody’s getting over Christmas. “We’re starting to see now a build, so when the weather breaks, it’ll be blowing and going.” Aunt Aggie’s Back Porch is on U.S. 78 near Hardwick Road. For more information about the restaurant, call 205-3384914. Contact Will Heath at wheath@thestclairtimes. com.

Will Heath/The Daily Home

Marsha Jones is the owner of Aunt Aggie’s Back Porch.

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pell city commerce

12 — THE DAILY HOME, Talladega and St. Clair counties, Ala., Sunday, February 13, 2011

Sisters third generation owners of flower shop By ELSIE HODNETT Home staff writer

Two sisters are following a family tradition — they are the third generation to own and operate Pell City Flower & Gift Shop. “Our grandparents, Fred and Mildred Adkins, opened the shop in 1945,” said Cindy Luby, who owns Pell City Flower & Gift Shop with her sister, Karen Steed. “It was one of the first florist shops in the county. Our parents, Bob and Jeri Hollis, owned it after them. And now we own it.” Luby said Pell City Flower & Gift Shop is a full-service florist. “We do weddings and other occasions, funerals and proms,” she said. “Valentine’s Day is really big. It is such a happy occasion because everyone is happy to receive flowers. We want to remind everyone to send their sweetheart flowers — hint, hint.” Luby said Pell City Flower & Gift Shop has a wide variety of flowers, both fresh and silk. The flowers can be paired with an assortment of items to create the perfect gift. “We have stuffed animals and fluffy teddy bears, balloons, plants, candles, angel figurines, all sorts of

vases and much more,” she said. “We have Auburn and Alabama metal buckets — ice buckets, plant buckets, peanut buckets — that you can use in arrangements. Those are very popular.” Steed said other cute gift ideas include decorative accent pillows with different sayings and patterns, Carson Statesmetal aluminum alloy platters and goblets that have a pewter look, and David Foote hand-carved wood carvings that are signed. “We like to support our local artists (such as Foote),” Luby said. “We also have local author R. Kyle Hannah’s book ‘To Aid and Protect.’” The sisters pioneered a service that Luby said is generating a lot of interest: the Sips ’n’ Stems classes they offer once a month. Steed said the idea behind Sips ’n’ Stems came from a simple question. “Cindy was on Facebook and asked if anyone wanted to learn to make a flower arrangement,” she said. “When a lot of people said yes, we played with the idea and it grew from there. We enjoyed making flower arrangements so much, we thought other people might too.” Luby said the Sips ’n’ Stems class fee covers the cost of flowers and materi-

Bob Crisp/The Daily Home

Sisters Cindy Luby and Karen Steed are the third-generation owners of Pell City Flower & Gift Shop. Their grandparents opened the shop in 1945.

als. Participants may bring wine or tea or the beverage of their choice with them. Participants are provided with a “recipe” for the flower arrangement they will make that evening. “The recipe is the same, but the arrangements look different,” Luby said. “Each participant picks out their own flowers, so they can choose different color combinations and end up with a different-looking arrangement.” Luby and Steed provide step-by-step instruction and tips as the class participants create their masterpieces, which can last a week or two if taken care of properly. “You can also book a Sips ’n’ Stems class for a girls’ night out or another occasion,” Luby said. “It makes for a great office

Bob Crisp/The Daily Home

Pell City Flower & Gift Shop is a full-service florist.

party.” Luby said Sips ’n’ Stems classes can accommodate

up to 20 participants. “It’s the most fun you will have on a weeknight,”

she said. Contact Elsie Hodnett at ehodnett@dailyhome.com.

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UPDATE Commerce

THE DAILY HOME, Talladega and St. Clair counties, Ala., Sunday, February 13, 2011

Talladega, Lincoln & Munford


talladega commerce

2 — THE DAILY HOME, Talladega and St. Clair counties, Ala., Sunday, February 13, 2011

Bob Crisp/The Daily Home

The Greater Talladega Area Chamber of Commerce functions as an aide to local businesses and a recruiter of new onews.

Talladega Chamber has big plans By CHRIS NORWOOD

Home staff writer

The Greater Talladega Area Chamber of Commerce has a lot planned for this year, Executive Director Mack Ferguson said. Perhaps the biggest project on the table is opening a Creek Indian History Museum somewhere on the square. “We’ve acquired a model Creek village from a museum in Birmingham, and we’re currently storing that at the Brecon Recreation Center until we can find it a permanent home, either in the building next to the Ritz that the city is using grant funds to renovate, or at another location downtown. Right now, we’re in the formative stages of establishing a board to raise money for renovations. We’re hoping to raise about $200,000 now, then go to work raising sustaining funds later on.” Having the Creek Museum on the square “will bring activity to the area and fuel the economy. There’s not another museum like it that I’m aware of. I know the schools are reinforcing education in Alabama history, and the city and county school superintendents have already signed off in support of this. Also, we’re just a few years away from the anniversary of the Creek Indian Wars, and Sen. (Jerry) Fielding is already working with the state

tourism board to promote the museum along with Fort Strother, Fort Lashley and Horseshoe Bend.” The Creek Indian Nation holds an annual meeting, and Ferguson said he hopes they can be persuaded to meet in Talladega one year. Ferguson also serves on the Coosa River Annex Authority, which he says will eventually have an even greater impact. “This could end up being the biggest industry in the area, not only bringing in tourists, but also providing a new recreation outlet for our citizens. But we’re hoping the park will bring in up to $20 million per year and employ a projected 140 people once everything is up and running.” In addition to off-road vehicle trails, the park eventually also will include equestrian facilities, a 1,000-meter firing range, paintball fields, archery facilities, campsites, dirtbike trails and a zip line eight-tenths of a mile long, the longest in the region. “It’s going to be a major draw,” he said. Traditionally, the chamber functions as an aide to local businesses and a recruiter of new ones. Ferguson is mindful of this as well. “Right now, we’re working with the Retail Sales Association and the other chambers in the county on an agreement to provide marketing strategies to the counties and municipalities. We want to help them bring in new

Bob Crisp/The Daily Home

Chamber Executive Director Mack Ferguson said building on partnerships in the community is essential.

businesses.” They hope to accomplish that through what is known as a “gap analysis.” “We determine where people spend their money on certain items,” Ferguson said. “We use that information to recruit businesses to fill in those gaps. We show where people could be spending their money here, and recruit businesses that won’t have any competition.” That information will be taken to various retail trade shows, including one in Las Vegas. “We’re all going in and financing this together, which is exciting. We’re getting it done,” Ferguson said. Other recent programs will continue into the year, including the Chamber Ambassadors and the Leadership Class. “When people look at

the overall quality of life in a city, they start with the schools, then look at the infrastructure and then at the medical facilities. The Ambassador program is our contribution to education. They represent our young people, and do it very well. The Leadership Class is now in its second year, a 10-month program.” While there’s not a lot the chamber can do about infrastructure, Ferguson said he is “honored to serve on the advisory committee at (Citizens Baptist Medical Center). I’m really excited about the investment they’ve made, the recruiting of new doctors, the latest imaging equipment,” he said. “And they have a dynamic individual in (new administrator) Joel Taylor. I hope they decide to go forward with a new professional building.”

Building on partnerships in the community is also essential, he said. “We are so pleased with all of the support we’ve gotten from the (Talladega Superspeedway), from Honda, from the airport board, and the citizens have been so supportive and quick to participate, too. I’ve really enjoyed working with Dr. Hawkins and Mrs. Peddio at Talladega College on the Founder’s Day parade, and. of course. we’ve had other committees for the Veterans Day parade and the Christmas parades in Talladega and Lincoln. And the Talladega City Council is to be commended for renovating the Spring Street Recreation Center, which is another boost for quality of life when recruiting new businesses.” Founders Day in

Lincoln is set for July 4 this year and will include placing a historical marker as part of the Alabama Small Towns & Downtowns program. The chamber is governed by a volunteer board of directors. “I’ve served on a lot of boards myself, but I am still astonished at how every member of this board is invested in the job like they’d been hired. They’re incredible, and I couldn’t be more thankful for them. Becky Griffin, especially, and Mildred Trammell with the Boys and Girls Club and the Lincoln historic revitalization group have been especially helpful,” Ferguson said. Contact Chris Norwood at cnorwood@dailyhome. com.

On the cover: Top: The staff at Professional Apothecary, a landmark Talladega business. Middle left: Earlie Threatt, owner of R&B Bar-B-Que in Lincoln. Middle right: David Dabbs, owner of Dabbs Auto Service in Munford. Bottom left: R.L. Young teacher Tammy Liner teaches a Zumba class. Bottom right: Chamber Executive Director Mack Ferguson.

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talladega commerce

THE DAILY HOME, Talladega and St. Clair counties, Ala., Sunday, February 13, 2011 — 3

R&B Bar-B-Que: It’s a family affair By DAVID ATCHISON

rant in Lincoln. He said Threatt started out with a drive thru type restaurant but business was so good, he decided to open a sitdown barbecue restaurant. “It’s been successful,” Watson said. He said customers need to try some of R&B BarB-Que’s homemade cakes they have on display. “And they are generous with their slices,” Watson said. “Anyone that hasn’t eaten there needs to give it a try. They have very good food.” The restaurant has a large menu and a variety of foods. Customers can order barbecued ribs or a regular or large barbecue sandwich. The restaurant also serves hamburgers, hot dogs, Polish dogs, chicken wings and a variety of sandwiches. The restaurant even has shrimp and fish dinner plates. The family restaurant’s side order list is long and includes corn on the cob, potato salad, mashed potatoes, baked beans, onion rings, fries and, of course, cole slaw.

Home staff writer

The aroma in the air was thick and unmistakable — barbecue — and it was coming from none other than R&B Bar-B-Que in Lincoln. “We’ve been at this location for the past five years,” said Earlie Threatt, owner of one of the most successful locally owned Lincoln restaurants. R&B Bar-B-Que is at 21 Crawford St. in the city’s old historic district off Magnolia Street. It hasn’t always been barbecued ribs, baked beans and potato salad for Threatt, but the 47-yearold restaurant owner credits his faith in God for his success. After being laid off work almost a decade ago, two weeks before Christmas, Threatt found himself unemployed and struggling to find work. “When the summer came, I built a grill,” Threatt said. He took what little money he had and started “cooking.”

David Atchison/The Daily Home

R&B Bar-B-Que has been at its current location five years.

Threatt would follow area softball tournaments and games played locally and set up his barbecue grill and start cooking. The aroma brought people from the stands to his stand for

some good Southern barbecue and homemade potato salad. Threatt said one day he was driving through Lincoln and saw a vacant building. He had made enough

money, so he chose that building as the place for his new restaurant. He moved in — with is barbecue grill. He stayed at that location, near Super Foods, for three years before moving into his current location. “We were still living pretty hard until a minister came up and invited us to church,” Threatt said. “Once I got saved, everything changed. Everything turned around for me.” And he thanks God for that. “It just shows you, we can overcome a lot of things with God,” said Threatt, who is a 1982 Pell City High School graduate. R&B Bar-B-Que is a family affair. “My sons, my sister, cousin and my mother all work here,” Threatt said. “We aren’t where we want to be yet, but we’re getting there.”

He said eventually he would like to offer soul food, along with his barbecue. “I’ve always enjoyed cooking,” said Threatt, who is a member of Rushing Springs Baptist Church. He said the R&B stands for his wife’s name, Rhonda, and his nickname, “Bam.” “Our business has been real good,” Threatt said. And people come far and wide to have a taste of R&B Bar-B-Que foods. Lincoln Mayor Lew Watson said R&B Bar-BQue is popular and frequently full. “They have very good food,” he said. “Traditionally, their barbecue is their bread and butter, but they also have great hamburgers and sandwiches.” He said R&B Bar-BQue is probably the longest operating barbecue restau-

Threatt said they also offer a variety of salads and there are homemade desserts. The restaurant is open Tuesday-Friday 10 a.m.-8 p.m., and on Saturdays 10 a.m.-6 p.m. The restaurant also offers take-out orders for the family and parties, including Boston butts, slab of ribs and barbecue sold by the pound. For more information or to order food from R&B Bar-B-Que, call 205-7632315.

Contact David Atchison at datchison@dailyhome. com.

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David Atchison/The Daily Home

Earlie Threatt, owner of R&B Bar-B-Que, shows off some of his food at the Lincoln restaurant.

Country Care to provide live-in care for the elderly By CHRIS NORWOOD

Home staff writer

At some point, all of us must deal with caring for an ailing elderly person, be it a parent or ourselves. Residents of Munford facing that issue now have another option. Patricia Patton of Silver Run has set up shop as Country Care, at 40 May Lane, and is set up to care for six to eight patients at a time. “I worked as a caregiver

for 15 years in peoples’ homes,” she said. “Then I was introduced to a lady in Attalla who had opened up her own care center, and I decided that I would try that, too.” Before that, she had worked with children at a youth village before starting to care for adults. Country Care will provide 24-hour live-in care, respite care, “and anything else anybody needs,” she said. “We’ll provide food, laundry service, medication, anything you need. It’ll be

like being at home.” Although she did not have any paying clients when Update went to press, Patton said she had already hired her first employee, a retired certified nurse’s assistant from the nursing home. She will eventually employ three more people, she said, although she is holding off on hiring any of them until she has some clients.

Contact Chris Norwood at cnorwood@dailyhome. com.

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4 — THE DAILY HOME, Talladega and St. Clair counties, Ala., Sunday, February 13, 2011

talladega commerce

Usrey Funeral Home in Talladega first opened in 1927 in the Tinney House, left. The house was torn down in 1962 and replaced with the present building, at right.

Usrey offers area’s families quality care By AZIZA JACKSON Home staff writer

Since it first opened in 1927, Usrey Funeral Home has served the Talladega community as a full-service funeral home, providing clients with traditional services and services that take a more unique, contemporary and modern approach. The family-owned and operated business has a long history in the Talladega area, and continues to pride itself on its knowledge and experience. Ralph Usrey started the funeral home, and after his death, Kyser Leonard, who had worked with Usrey, partnered with Marshall “Boo” Colvard from 1945 to 1970. Together, Leonard and Colvard operated the funeral home out of the Tinney House, which was torn down in 1962 and replaced with the present building. Leonard and Colvard also operated an ambulance service out of the Tinney House that would take mothers and newborns home from the hospital. In 1970, Bill Perry bought out Leonard’s half of the business and later bought out Colvard’s half after the men retired. Today Perry and his son, Mike, who is Colvard’s grandson, own and operate Usrey Funeral Home in Talladega. Mike Perry’s brother, Steve Perry, owns and operates Usrey’s Funeral Home in Pell City. Mike and Steve Perry bought the funeral home in Pell City about eight years ago; it was formerly Chapel Hill Funeral Home. Mike and Bill Perry are members of the Alabama Funeral Director’s Association and have served as presidents, Bill

Perry from 1977-1978, and Mike Perry from 2009-2010. “We’re the fourth father and son to have that honor in Alabama,” Bill Perry said. On the business side of Usrey Funeral Home is the tradition and dedication to providing clients with quality service. For Mike Perry, knowledge of the funeral business comes with the lifelong experience of having grown up in the family business. “It’s been natural to me,” he said. “I’ve grown up around it and been around it my whole life. “If anything, I wonder why people are so freaked out by death.” Mike Perry said he respects the grieving process, but believes death should be looked at as a part of life. He also pointed out that the word “funeral” is of Latin origin and means “torch.” He said that centuries ago, people were buried in cemeteries that were outside of town and a funeral procession was led with torches at night from the town to the cemetery. “We’ve been doing funeral services since the beginning of time and still to this day we process from the church to the cemetery,” Mike Perry said. Perry grew up in Talladega, and remembers making funeral arrangements for some of his friends and their relatives’ funeral services. “When you know someone that passes away it does affect you different,” Perry said. “The job satisfaction that we get as directors is we’re helping people in the grieving process and helping them get to the next level of the grieving process. “When we get satisfaction from them it makes us feel good about going to work the next day.”

Most of Usrey’s clients come from central and north Talladega County, including Alpine, Renfroe, Munford, Lincoln, and all of St. Clair County. Perry said the economic downturn has not deeply affected business, however, it has limited families to what they can afford for their loved one’s funeral service. “Families may not be able to get as nice a funeral, and that’s what we’ve had to do, adjust our merchandise to work with their budgets,” Perry said. As far as adding another location to the Talladega and Pell City branches, Perry said there is always room in the future for expansion. “I think right now we’ve got our hands full with the two, but that’s not to say we wouldn’t expand.” he said. “But given the type of quality service we have, we’re pretty busy with the two.” The family also owns two cemeteries, Pine Hill Memorial Park on Alabama 21, and St. Clair Memorial Gardens in St. Clair County. “The industry has changed,” Perry said. “A lot of people want a more personal service, not necessarily the traditional style of funeral, but something to celebrate the life of that person. “The industry is going into a more personal and meaningful direction with services instead of the traditional.” Perry said a traditional service usually includes playing traditional music, with a preacher who speaks the duration of the service. He said today, people give eulogies and have funerals that include memorial slideshows in the funeral service that use pictures to document the deceased’s entire life. “It’s got pictures of their childhood all the way

Brian Schoenhals/The Daily Home

Bill Perry, seated, bought Usrey Funeral Home in Talladega in 1970. His son, Mike, left, operates the funeral home in Talladega with his father. Son Steve, right, operates Usrey Funeral Home in Pell City.

through their lives. It’s very meaningful,” Perry said. Usrey even provides modern services for the most dedicated Auburn and Alabama football fans who choose to have a funeral themed with their favorite sports team colors. In fact, Perry has built a casket stand that sports the Auburn University logo, and a stand that displays the signature Alabama “A” logo. “We’ve been here a very long time and we have a lot of experience,” Perry said. “Our staff is very knowledgeable, and we do the best we can to take care of people.” Usrey Funeral Home also provides cremation services in addition to at-need services and preneed services in the funeral home’s chapel. Although most of their clients sign up for at-need services, Perry said preneed services tend to be helpful for family members. “Pre-arrangement and pre-need funerals are a lot easier for the families,” Perry said. “They can make arrangements before grieving and get the loved one’s last wishes.” During the grieving

process, Perry said it is often difficult when issues of money and funeral requests come into play, and the loved one can tell the family members exactly what they would like before they die. Through its history and traditions, Usrey Funeral Home plans to continue

serving families with quality service. “We’re not going anywhere,” Perry said. “We plan to be here; it’s been an honor to serve our community.” Contact Aziza Jackson at ajackson@dailyhome.com.

Kyser Leonard, left, and Marshall “Boo” Colvard lay the first brick for the new Usrey Funeral Home.

Bob Crisp/The Daily Home

Usrey Funeral Home in Pell City is operated by Steve Perry. Mike and Steve bought the funeral home about eight years ago. It was formerly Chapel Hill Funeral Home.


THE DAILY HOME, Talladega and St. Clair counties, Ala., Saturday, February 21, 2011 — 5A

Your Hometown Bank Family, Friends & Neighbors

Proudly Serving Your Banking Needs Since 1848!

EMPLOYEES WITH 15 OR MORE YEARS OF SERVICE

ELIZABETH A. CONWAY

JAMES T. HACKNEY

MARGARET A. BARCLAY

ELLEN F. HAYES

H. REED MOORE, III

CAROLYN A. SHROPSHIRE

W. THOMAS WALLACE

PAMELA J. STEPHENS

PENNY E. HUDSON

CONNIE C. PATE

MICKIE L. SMALL

CHAD M. THOMAS

Asst. Vice President - 41 Years

Asst. Vice President - 35 Years

Asst. Vice President - 26 Years BSA Officer - 23 Years

President & C.E.O. - 38 Years C.F.O. - 34 Years

Loan Officer - 25 Years

Teller - 17 Years

JAY KIRK STEPHENS Loan Officer - 15 Years

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Asst. Vice President - 32 Years Teller - 23 Years

Asst. Vice President - 16 Years

PAMELA J. CHEATWOOD Loan Administration - 15 Years

The First National Bank Talladega Office

SINCE 1848

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120 E. North Street (256) 362-2334

OF TALLADEGA Lincoln Office

44743 U.S. Hwy. 78 (205) 763-7763

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44388 Highway 21 (256) 358-9000

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Visit us online at www.fnbtalladega.com

Member

FDIC


6 — THE DAILY HOME, Talladega and St. Clair counties, Ala., Sunday, February 13, 2011

TALLADEGA COMMERCE

TALLADEGA COMMERCE

THE DAILY HOME, Talladega and St. Clair counties, Ala., Sunday, February 13, 2011 — 7

BUSINESSES... from decades past to decades to come. Each year brings new opportunities for continuing growth and progress. These businesses in The Daily Home coverage area have shaped our communities' future. Read about them here...

Over 160 Years First National Bank of Talladega Since 1848 120 East North St. Talladega Office (256) 362-2334 Lincoln Office (205) 763-7763 Munford Office (256) 358-9000 The Daily Home Talladega (256) 362-1000 Sylacauga (256) 249-4311 Pell City (205) 884-3400 www.dailyhome.com

Over 150 Years Talladega Insurance Agency 109 North Spring St. Talladega (256) 362-4153

101-135 Years Brannon’s Office City 144 North East St. Talladega (256) 362-6104 Stringer, Montgomery, and Montgomery Attorneys 138 East Street North Talladega (256) 362-3154 Alabama Bag Company PO Box 576 Talladega (256) 362-4921 Union State Bank 15 N. 20th St. Pell City (205) 884-1520 Kilgroe Funeral Home Since 1908 2219 2nd Ave. N Pell City (205) 338-3341 National Cement Company 80 National Cement Dr. Ragland (205) 472-2191 2000 SouthBridge Pkwy Suite 600 Birmingham (205) 423-2600 Palace Drugs 216 N Broadway Ave Sylacauga (256) 245-4381

91-100 Years Craddock Health Center 209 W Spring Street Suite #200 Sylacauga (256) 249-1100

81-90 Years Usrey Brown Service Funeral Home 516 North St. Talladega (256) 362-2344 www.usreyfuneralhome.com Barber Sales 1000 S.J. White Memorial Blvd. Talladega (256) 362-3195 Citizens BMC 604 Stone Ave. Talladega (256) 362-8111

71-80 Years Coosa Valley Electric Cooperative 69220 Alabama Hwy. 77 Talladega (256) 362-4180

71-80 Years First Educators Credit Union 106 South St. W. Talladega (256) 362-0033 American Legion Edward R. Wren Post 17 216 Welch Ave. Talladega (256) 362-9870 Terry’s Metropolitan Mortuary 1702 W. Battle St. Talladega (256) 362-2421 B.B Comer Memorial Library Dr. Shirley Spears 314 N Broadway Ave. Sylacauga (256) 249-0961 The Ark Restaurant 13030 US Hwy 78 Riverside (205) 338-7420

61-70 Years Haynes Sewing Machine Co. 1008 Gurnee Ave. Anniston (256) 236-2021 Farmer’s Furniture 715 East Battle St. Talladega (256) 362-8662 Steed Timber Co., Inc. 48041 Hwy. 78, Suite E Lincoln (205) 763-7761 CardioVascular Associates, P.C. 209 West Spring Street Sylacauga (256) 245-5833 201 Medical Office Park Talladega (256) 480-6300 www.cvapc.com Dr. Larry E. Dye, MD, FACC Dr. J. Tom Eagan, Jr., MD, FACC Dr. Andrew P. Miller, MD, FACC Sylacauga Housing Authority 415 West 8th Street Sylacauga (256) 249-0381 Leon Cleveland Sylacauga Chamber Of Commerce 17 W Ft Williams PO Box 185 Sylacauga (256) 249-0308 Sycamore Federal Credit Union 18070 AL Hwy 21 Talladega Sycamore (256) 245-5887 Southfirst Bank 126 N Norton Ave Sylacauga (256) 245-4365 301 W North St. Talladega (256) 362-6101 Childersburg Chamber of Commerce 805 3rd St SW Childersburg (256) 378-5482 Fairmont Realty 119 Broadway Ave. Sylacauga (256) 249-8574 Fax (256) 249-0169 www.fairmont-realty.com

61-70 Years Diamond Jewelry Co. 113 Broadway N. Sylacauga (256) 249-0511 clevelands@charter.net Conn Equipment Rental Co., Inc. 36980 U.S. Hwy. 280 Sylacauga (256) 245-4741 First United Methodist Kindergarten & Daycare 105 E Spring St. Sylacauga (256) 249-2300 Griffin’s Jewelers 704 E. Battle St. Talladega (256) 362-5282 www.griffinsjewelers.org

51-60 Years Green’s Art Supplies 1411 Wilmer Ave. Anniston (256) 237-8701 J & J Drugs Co. 13 8th Ave. S. Childersburg (256) 378-7761 Sherwin Williams 227 N Broadway Ave. Sylacauga (256) 245-5325 www.sw2646@sherwin.com Coosa Pines Federal Credit Union Sylacauga-ChildersburgChelsea-Pell City www.coosapinesfcu.org Doug Camp 224 N. East St. Talladega (256) 362-4930 Camp & Associates 516 E. Battle St. Talladega (256) 362-8741 Fort McClellan Credit Union 1731 Noble Street Anniston (256) 237-2113 W&W Heating & Air Conditioning 4175 Renfroe Rd Talladega (256) 268-2973 Goodgame Company Inc. 2311 3rd Ave. S. Pell City (205) 338-2551 Darrell Walker Personnel Workforce Systems Pell City (800) 835-5066 www.dwpworkforce.com WFHK 1430 22 Cogswell Ave. Pell City (205) 338-1430 Pell City Tire Since 1952 Next to Premium Auto Care 19865 US Hwy. 231 N. Pell City (205) 338-2814 Pell City Housing Authority 110 32nd St. N. Pell City (205) 338-7012

41-50 Years Professional Apothecary 210 W. North St. Talladega (256) 362-8328 ATAP 130 Industry Way Eastaboga (256) 362-2221 Dr. Khalid Khan 216 E. Battle St. Suite A Talladega (256) 362-1590 Merle Norman Cosmetics 109 Johnson Ave. Talladega (256) 362-3232 Talladega Superspeedway 3366 Speedway Blvd. (877) Go2-DEGA Wingfield Engineering Co. Inc. PO Box 68 110 Academy Circle Goodwater (256) 839-6339 Fax (256) 839-6390 Atkinson Real Estate 535 N Broadway Ave Sylacauga (256) 245-6782 www.atkinson realestate.com Columbus Finance 104 E 3rd Street PO Box 335 Sylacauga (256) 249-0305 State Farm Insurance Sheila Curtis, Agent 420 West Ft. Williams St. Sylacauga (256) 249-8188 sheila.curtis.jrm9@statefarm.com www.sheilacurtis.net Jimmy Steen’s 23 ½ Hr. Wrecker Service 1460 Old Birmingham Hwy Sylacauga (256) 249-0026 Fax (256) 249-9237 Turner Auto & Body Inc. 500 N. Broadway Ave Sylacauga (256) 245-7451 Michael’s Men’s Wear 127 W. Court Square Talladega (256) 362-2631 R.K. Allen Oil Co./ A.O.C. Food Marts 36002 AL Hwy 21 Talladega (256) 362-4261 Midway Memory Gardens & Cemetery 27950 AL Hwy 21 Talladega (256) 362-8995 midwaymemorygardens@live.com Stephens Carpet 119 Johnson Ave. Talladega (256) 362-2970 Fat Man’s BBQ Hwy 231 S. Cropwell (205) 525-5255 Golden Living Centers

41-50 Years 31-40 Years 21-30 Years Pell City Steak House 2401 Comer Ave. N. Pell City (205) 338-7724

31-40 Years Talladega Funeral Home Hwy 77 Talladega (256) 362-0111 Talladega Optical 216 East Battle St. Talladega (256) 761-1889

The Print Shop, Inc. 115 8th Avenue, S.W. Childersburg (256) 378-6126 Fax (256) 378-1211 theprintshop@bellsouth.net Sunny King Honda Hwy 78 E. Oxford (256) 835-1000 or 1-800-423-4074 Ford Meter Box 815 Miles Parkway Pell City (205) 884-4480

Sims Funeral Service 431 W. Battle St. Talladega (256) 362-9095 Jack’s Family Restaurants 601 Bankhead Blvd. Talladega (256) 362-4761 911 N. Broadway Ave. Sylacauga (256) 249-4006 N. Martin St. Pell City (205) 338-3040 44345 AL Hwy. 21 Munford (256) 358-5942

Robinson’s TV Service 1706 Cogswell Ave. Pell City (205) 338-9651

TempForce Sylacauga (256) 245-TEMP Pell City (205) 884-HELP Lineville (256)396-1800 Anniston (256) 236-TEMP

Coosa Cable 1701 Cogswell Ave. Pell City (205) 884-4545

Talladega Office Machines 30 N. Spring St. Talladega (256) 362-2883

Camp Clinic Dr. Cary Camp 300 East St. N., Suite E Talladega (256) 362-2003

Pell City Animal Hospital 2718 Martin St. S. Cropwell (205) 884-4104

Midway Auto Parts 47815 Hwy. 78 East Lincoln (205) 763-7756

Old Gray Barn, Julian & Debbie Gossett 1910 Cogswell Ave. Pell City (205) 338-2824

Tallatron 35960 AL Hwy. 21 Talladega (256) 761-1228 License No. 187

The Smith Insurance Agency 223 West North St. Talladega (256) 362-1200 Johnny’s Plumbing 117 Meleah Dr. Talladega (256) 362-2735

Talladega Cycle Sales 35288 AL Hwy 21 Talladega (256) 362-6370 www.talladegacyclesales.com

Allen Service Company 1711 1st. Ave. S. Pell City (205) 338-2311

Taylor Rental Center 206 Tinney St. S. Talladega (256) 362-2433

DeeDee’s Tobacco & Beverage Outlet 5 mi. North of Walmart Ragland (205) 338-3517

Lineville Health & Rehabilitation, LLC 88073 Hwy. 9 Lineville (256) 396-2104 Mullinax Auto Sales 1430 S. Quintard Ave. Anniston (256) 835-0101 Kentucky Fried Chicken 1204 Talladega Hwy. Sylacauga (256) 249-9076 32275 US Hwy.280 Childersburg (256) 378-5121 32291 US Hwy,. 280 Chelsea (256) 678-8118 Marble City Baptist Daycare 1512 Quarry Rd. Sylacauga (256) 245-6338 A&M Clothing 115 N Norton Ave. Sylacauga (256) 249-9620 Yamaha Seadoo Of Sylacauga 40631 US Hwy 280 Sylacauga (256) 245-7878 Safe Guard Fire & Alarm Inc. 39610 Hwy 280 Sylacauga (256) 207-2101 Fax (256) 207-2102

510 Wolf Creek Rd. N. Pell City (205) 338-3329

New Beacon Hospice 215 N Norton Sylacauga (256) 207-2055

Ronnie & Rita Foster RE/MAX Realty Pros 418 Martin St. S. Pell City (205) 884-0400

Vansandt Hardware & Supply 40631 US Hwy 280 Sylacauga (256) 245-7878

21-30 Years Reliable Transmission 111 Broome St. Talladega (256) 761-1220

Mary Ann’s Needlwork & Frames 513 North Street E Talladega (256) 362-6184 Superior Pest Control Talladega (256) 268-9873 1-800-762-5904 Metro D Construction 325 Stonehill Drive Talladega (256) 362-5476 Capital Hearing Services 915-B Norton Ave N. Sylacauga (256) 245-3011

Columbus Finance 122 East Battle St. Talladega (256) 362-3600

Talladega County Economic Development Authority 225 N Norton Ave. Sylacauga (256) 245-8332 Calvin Miller

Clark’s Insurance 106 South Court Square Talladega (256) 362-3548

Wal-Mart Super Center 41301 US Hwy. 280 Sylacauga (256) 245-0356

Sleeping Giant Veterinary Clinic 35501 AL Hwy 77 Talladega (256) 362-8977

Comer Museum & Arts Center 711 Broadway Ave. Sylacauga (256) 245-4016

MASH 308 South East St. Talladega (256) 362-4307

Mid South Home Health A Gentiva company Sherry Ingram, RN-Branch Director 1025 West Fort Williams Sylacauga (256) 249-4363

Lincoln Pharmacy 99 Magnolia St. Lincoln (205) 763-7759 Campbell & Campbell 400 South Court Square Talladega (256) 761-1858 www.campbellandcampbellpc.com Piggly Wiggly 320 West Battle St. Talladega (256) 362-7949 308 North East St. Talladega (256) 362-2258 Bluebird Realty 307 South Court St. Talladega (256) 362-7347 Hair Impressions 212 E. Battle Street Talladega (256) 362-7777

Allcomm Wireless Service Inc. 1319 Old Birmingham Hwy Sylacauga (256) 249-2407 Swen Communications Inc. 214 1st Street W Sylacauga (256) 245-3236

Spring Terrace Assisted Living 1104 Hickory St. W Sylacauga (256) 245-6611 AAA General Contractors 1880 Radio Road Alexander City (256) 329-9843

21-30 Years 16-20 Years Strickland Accounting & Tax Services 34830 US Hwy 280 Childersburg (256) 378- 7733 Ms. Ann’s Bargain Barn Formerly Coaling Rd. Flea Market 331 Avondale Ave. Sylacauga (256) 245-6400 MOCO Transportation, Inc. 36525 Hwy. 280 Sylacauga (256) 245-0707 Fax (256) 249-2052 1-800-328-3209 Bill Stanford Automotive 35500 Hwy 21 Talladega (256) 362-7540 Huddle House 720 E. Battle St. Talladega (256) 362-8725 Waites Tire & Service Center 310 E. Battle St. Talladega (256) 362-6632 B J Produce 2212 Martin St. S Pell City (205) 338-1776 Buddy Bowman Construction 1621 Pleasant Valley Dr. Pell City (205) 338-1424 Surfside 6 Hwy 34 Stemley Bridge Rd. Pell City (205) 814-0645 Logan Martin Vet Clinic 1220 Martin St. South Pell City (205) 884-3412 Royal Foods, Inc 1904 16th Ave. S. Pell City (205) 884-1040 Kell Realty PO Box 728 Ashville (205) 594-5391 Woods Surfside Marina 37 Marina Dr. Cropwell (205) 525-5533

Terry Hogge Electric, Inc (205) 763-9844 Commercial-Industrial Only Southeastern Cellular 208 E. Battle Street Talladega (256) 362-5500 Childersburg Pet Clinic PC 1440 Coosa Pines Childersburg (256) 378-7066 Piggly Wiggly 1244 Talladega Hwy. Sylacauga (256) 249-4836 Merit Healthcare PC 291 James Payton Blvd Sylacauga (256) 249-0028 Top Dollar Title Pawn 633 East Battle St. Talladega (256) 761-9111 Easy Bail Bonds 1818 Cogswell Ave. Pell City (205) 338-4821 Interstate Freight 29 Charlie Brown Lane Pell City (205) 338-9595 Watson Computers / Radio Shack 89 Vaughan Lane Pell City (205) 338-2329 Gilreath Printing & Signs, LLC 1923 Cogswell Ave. Pell City (205) 884-7800 Sharp Carpet Since 1993 Pell City (205) 338-6601 www.sharpcarpet.com Community Credit 1912 Cogswell Ave. Pell City (205) 338-4433 Robert Scott’s Original Action ProClean Serving South St. Clair Leeds (205) 706-7491 www.actionproclean.com

11-15 Years

Alabama Eye Clinic 109 E. Coosa St., Suite A Precision Marketing, LLC Talladega (256) 362-4872 1665 Dry Creek Rd. Pate’s Body Shop Cropwell (205) 525-4029 725 E. Battle St. Joseph Bunt Construction Talladega (256) 761-9100

1735 Deer Trace Rd. Pell City (205) 405-1830 Bullard Mechanical Service Co., Inc. 840 Railroad Dr. Pell City (205) 338-4199 Birmingham (205) 838-2298 J.R. Air Cooled Engine 244 Battle St. W Talladega (256) 761-1714

Learn in Play Daycare 80 Seasons Way Talladega (256) 362-1465 Family Vision 113 Stephen J. White Blvd. Talladega (256) 362-6466 Ace Hardware 1104 Ashland Hwy. Talladega (256) 362-2208

Diamond Lil’s Designer Corner Boutique Restaurant & Lounge 100 Haynes St. 109 Johnson Ave. Talladega (256) 315-0620 Talladega (256) 362-3232 Steve Camp Insurance 210 North St. W. Talladega (256) 362-0589

TM Cars 35579 AL Hwy. 21 Talladega (256) 362-4311

11-15 Years Pineview Landing Apartments 160 Broadway Ave. Talladega (256) 362-3412 Poor House Branch Marina 7062 Stemley Road Logan Martin Lake Talladega (256) 268-2939 www.poorhousebranchmarina.com 21st Century Signs 1219 Main Ave. N. Sylacauga (256) 245-9201 21stcenturysigns@bellsouth.com S.A.F.E. Sylacauga Alliance for Family Enhancement 78 Betsy Ross Lane / PO Box 1122 www.safefamilyservicecenter.com Sylacauga (256) 245-4343 Fax (256) 245-3675 Blue Horizon Travel 601 South Norton Ave Sylacauga (256) 245-7900 Fax (256) 245-4115 bluehorizontravel@mysylacauga.com Head Chiropractic Center 1013 Ft. Williams Victorian Village Sylacauga (256) 245-2258 Cabin on Cedar Lane 5014 Cedar Lane Pell City (205) 338-3866 The Money Outlet 1607 Martin St. S Suite 3. Pell City (205) 884-0777 Pell City Ebay Drop Off Center & Pawn Shop 1607 Martin St. S. Suite 3 Pell City (205) 884-0777

6-10 Years

6-10 Years

1-5 Years

Montana Saloon & Grill 75023 Hwy. 77 Lincoln (205) 763-1225

Honda Manufacturing of Alabama, LLC 1800 Honda Drive Lincoln, AL 35096 www.hondaalabama.com

Junior’s Portable Welding Christopher Pickrell 517 Alexander Rd. Pell City (205) 338-4413 (205) 473-4293

Big Wade’s Bail Bonds 57 Woodhill Dr. Talladega (256) 362-7484 All State Metal Roofing PO Box 1392 1800 Eastside Dr. Gadsden (256) 547-0423 Fax (256) 547-7030 J. Ann Haulers 25 Industrial Park Childersburg (256) 378-6800

Affordable Heating and Air 369 James Payton Blvd Sylacauga 1-800-Cool-Air www.affordableairllc.com

Groomingdale’s Pet Salon & Day Spa 75263 Hwy 77 Lincoln (205) 229-0046

True Light Community Church Daycare 900 N. Main Ave. Sylacauga (256) 249-3444 Director: Nicole Hamilton Autumn Trace Apartments 1400 Autumn Lane Sylacauga (256) 249-2126 Comfort Care Hospice 702 E. Battle St. Talladega (256) 761-1250 PityPat’s Gift Baskets Talladega / Lincoln (205) 763-1636 Stampede 710 E. Battle St. Talladega (256) 315-0600

Rhodes Agency Allstate – Preston Rhodes 2107 Martin St. S., Suite 102 Pell City (205) 338-0502

New South Express LLC 249-B Clover Road Lincoln (205) 355-8200

Premium Auto Care 19865 US Hwy. 231 N. Pell City (205) 338-9355 Sarah M.Brazzolotto,LLC Attorney at Law Member of Alabama Bar Assoc. Since 1984 1908 Cogswell Ave. Pell City (205) 884-7726

6-10 Years Custom Pizza 65290 Hwy 77 Northgate Shopping Center Talladega (256) 362-3339

Endless Horizon Cruises Marilyn Lawson - Owner 256-268-0129 NAPA Pruitt Auto Parts Owner Jeff Pruitt 110 North Anniston Ave Sylacauga (256) 245-5296 jefferypruitt@aol.com

HDA Title Loans 1605 Martin St. S. Suite 4 Pell City (205) 338-6741

Brookhill Village 900 Brookhill Village Circle Pell City (205) 814-0800

Farmer’s Insurance Brian York, Agent 411 East St. N. Talladega (256) 315-9545

Marble City Pharmacy 264 Ft. Williams St. W Sylacauga (256) 245-4446

Kentucky Fried Chicken 219 Haynes St. Talladega (256) 362-5681 75835 Hwy 77 Lincoln (205) 763-2454

Bain & Company CPA’s, PC 1609 Cogswell Ave. Pell City (205) 884-2332

1-5 Years

Luxury Auto Parts 12459 Jackson Trace Lincoln (205) 763-1084 Interstate Specialized 29 Charlie Brown Lane Pell City (205) 338-9595 Hair Designs by Holly 20 Mineral Springs Rd. Suite 1 - Across from WFHK Pell City (205) 338-1848 Golden Rule BBQ 1700 Martin St. North Pell City (205) 338-1443 Strandz 1915 A Cogswell Ave. Pell City (205) 814-0116 BD Precision Manufacturing Inc. 787 HJ Bentley Parkway, Suite A Oxford (256) 831-1965

Mattress & More 1911 Martin St. S. Suite 8 Pell City (205) 338-2335 Classic Carwash 602 Martin St. S. Pell City (205) 338-1322 Express Shipping 1910 Cogswell Ave. Pell City (205) 338-0791 Aunt Aggie’s Back Porch 4802 Cogswell Ave. (Hwy 78) Pell City (205) 884-3463 The Tavern of St. Clair 4852 Cogswell Ave., Hwy 78 Pell City (205) 338-8900

Angler Recycling PO Box 595 Odenville (205) 629-2200 Cell (205) 936-3079 Tradesman Co. 3620 Martin St. S. Cropwell (205) 338-7500 JC’s Sports Pub & Grill 86 Cropwell Dr. Cropwell (205) 814-1641 Backyard Partys 140 Adcon Lane Pell City (205) 338-7075 www.backyardpartys.net River’s Edge Marina 79 Rabbit Branch Cir. Cropwell (205) 525-5562

Less Than 1 Year Boondocks Waterfront Grille 84 Blue Eye Road West Lincoln (205) 763-2294 www.BoondocksGrille.com Express Pharmacy, LLC 320 W. Battle St. (Inside Piggly Wiggly) Talladega (256) 362-1120 Country Girl Real Pit BBQ 3904 St. Clair Rd. Odenville (205) 629-3062

A Special

Thanks

To All Our Area Businesses Who Helped Support Update 2011


6 — THE DAILY HOME, Talladega and St. Clair counties, Ala., Sunday, February 13, 2011

TALLADEGA COMMERCE

TALLADEGA COMMERCE

THE DAILY HOME, Talladega and St. Clair counties, Ala., Sunday, February 13, 2011 — 7

BUSINESSES... from decades past to decades to come. Each year brings new opportunities for continuing growth and progress. These businesses in The Daily Home coverage area have shaped our communities' future. Read about them here...

Over 160 Years First National Bank of Talladega Since 1848 120 East North St. Talladega Office (256) 362-2334 Lincoln Office (205) 763-7763 Munford Office (256) 358-9000 The Daily Home Talladega (256) 362-1000 Sylacauga (256) 249-4311 Pell City (205) 884-3400 www.dailyhome.com

Over 150 Years Talladega Insurance Agency 109 North Spring St. Talladega (256) 362-4153

101-135 Years Brannon’s Office City 144 North East St. Talladega (256) 362-6104 Stringer, Montgomery, and Montgomery Attorneys 138 East Street North Talladega (256) 362-3154 Alabama Bag Company PO Box 576 Talladega (256) 362-4921 Union State Bank 15 N. 20th St. Pell City (205) 884-1520 Kilgroe Funeral Home Since 1908 2219 2nd Ave. N Pell City (205) 338-3341 National Cement Company 80 National Cement Dr. Ragland (205) 472-2191 2000 SouthBridge Pkwy Suite 600 Birmingham (205) 423-2600 Palace Drugs 216 N Broadway Ave Sylacauga (256) 245-4381

91-100 Years Craddock Health Center 209 W Spring Street Suite #200 Sylacauga (256) 249-1100

81-90 Years Usrey Brown Service Funeral Home 516 North St. Talladega (256) 362-2344 www.usreyfuneralhome.com Barber Sales 1000 S.J. White Memorial Blvd. Talladega (256) 362-3195 Citizens BMC 604 Stone Ave. Talladega (256) 362-8111

71-80 Years Coosa Valley Electric Cooperative 69220 Alabama Hwy. 77 Talladega (256) 362-4180

71-80 Years First Educators Credit Union 106 South St. W. Talladega (256) 362-0033 American Legion Edward R. Wren Post 17 216 Welch Ave. Talladega (256) 362-9870 Terry’s Metropolitan Mortuary 1702 W. Battle St. Talladega (256) 362-2421 B.B Comer Memorial Library Dr. Shirley Spears 314 N Broadway Ave. Sylacauga (256) 249-0961 The Ark Restaurant 13030 US Hwy 78 Riverside (205) 338-7420

61-70 Years Haynes Sewing Machine Co. 1008 Gurnee Ave. Anniston (256) 236-2021 Farmer’s Furniture 715 East Battle St. Talladega (256) 362-8662 Steed Timber Co., Inc. 48041 Hwy. 78, Suite E Lincoln (205) 763-7761 CardioVascular Associates, P.C. 209 West Spring Street Sylacauga (256) 245-5833 201 Medical Office Park Talladega (256) 480-6300 www.cvapc.com Dr. Larry E. Dye, MD, FACC Dr. J. Tom Eagan, Jr., MD, FACC Dr. Andrew P. Miller, MD, FACC Sylacauga Housing Authority 415 West 8th Street Sylacauga (256) 249-0381 Leon Cleveland Sylacauga Chamber Of Commerce 17 W Ft Williams PO Box 185 Sylacauga (256) 249-0308 Sycamore Federal Credit Union 18070 AL Hwy 21 Talladega Sycamore (256) 245-5887 Southfirst Bank 126 N Norton Ave Sylacauga (256) 245-4365 301 W North St. Talladega (256) 362-6101 Childersburg Chamber of Commerce 805 3rd St SW Childersburg (256) 378-5482 Fairmont Realty 119 Broadway Ave. Sylacauga (256) 249-8574 Fax (256) 249-0169 www.fairmont-realty.com

61-70 Years Diamond Jewelry Co. 113 Broadway N. Sylacauga (256) 249-0511 clevelands@charter.net Conn Equipment Rental Co., Inc. 36980 U.S. Hwy. 280 Sylacauga (256) 245-4741 First United Methodist Kindergarten & Daycare 105 E Spring St. Sylacauga (256) 249-2300 Griffin’s Jewelers 704 E. Battle St. Talladega (256) 362-5282 www.griffinsjewelers.org

51-60 Years Green’s Art Supplies 1411 Wilmer Ave. Anniston (256) 237-8701 J & J Drugs Co. 13 8th Ave. S. Childersburg (256) 378-7761 Sherwin Williams 227 N Broadway Ave. Sylacauga (256) 245-5325 www.sw2646@sherwin.com Coosa Pines Federal Credit Union Sylacauga-ChildersburgChelsea-Pell City www.coosapinesfcu.org Doug Camp 224 N. East St. Talladega (256) 362-4930 Camp & Associates 516 E. Battle St. Talladega (256) 362-8741 Fort McClellan Credit Union 1731 Noble Street Anniston (256) 237-2113 W&W Heating & Air Conditioning 4175 Renfroe Rd Talladega (256) 268-2973 Goodgame Company Inc. 2311 3rd Ave. S. Pell City (205) 338-2551 Darrell Walker Personnel Workforce Systems Pell City (800) 835-5066 www.dwpworkforce.com WFHK 1430 22 Cogswell Ave. Pell City (205) 338-1430 Pell City Tire Since 1952 Next to Premium Auto Care 19865 US Hwy. 231 N. Pell City (205) 338-2814 Pell City Housing Authority 110 32nd St. N. Pell City (205) 338-7012

41-50 Years Professional Apothecary 210 W. North St. Talladega (256) 362-8328 ATAP 130 Industry Way Eastaboga (256) 362-2221 Dr. Khalid Khan 216 E. Battle St. Suite A Talladega (256) 362-1590 Merle Norman Cosmetics 109 Johnson Ave. Talladega (256) 362-3232 Talladega Superspeedway 3366 Speedway Blvd. (877) Go2-DEGA Wingfield Engineering Co. Inc. PO Box 68 110 Academy Circle Goodwater (256) 839-6339 Fax (256) 839-6390 Atkinson Real Estate 535 N Broadway Ave Sylacauga (256) 245-6782 www.atkinson realestate.com Columbus Finance 104 E 3rd Street PO Box 335 Sylacauga (256) 249-0305 State Farm Insurance Sheila Curtis, Agent 420 West Ft. Williams St. Sylacauga (256) 249-8188 sheila.curtis.jrm9@statefarm.com www.sheilacurtis.net Jimmy Steen’s 23 ½ Hr. Wrecker Service 1460 Old Birmingham Hwy Sylacauga (256) 249-0026 Fax (256) 249-9237 Turner Auto & Body Inc. 500 N. Broadway Ave Sylacauga (256) 245-7451 Michael’s Men’s Wear 127 W. Court Square Talladega (256) 362-2631 R.K. Allen Oil Co./ A.O.C. Food Marts 36002 AL Hwy 21 Talladega (256) 362-4261 Midway Memory Gardens & Cemetery 27950 AL Hwy 21 Talladega (256) 362-8995 midwaymemorygardens@live.com Stephens Carpet 119 Johnson Ave. Talladega (256) 362-2970 Fat Man’s BBQ Hwy 231 S. Cropwell (205) 525-5255 Golden Living Centers

41-50 Years 31-40 Years 21-30 Years Pell City Steak House 2401 Comer Ave. N. Pell City (205) 338-7724

31-40 Years Talladega Funeral Home Hwy 77 Talladega (256) 362-0111 Talladega Optical 216 East Battle St. Talladega (256) 761-1889

The Print Shop, Inc. 115 8th Avenue, S.W. Childersburg (256) 378-6126 Fax (256) 378-1211 theprintshop@bellsouth.net Sunny King Honda Hwy 78 E. Oxford (256) 835-1000 or 1-800-423-4074 Ford Meter Box 815 Miles Parkway Pell City (205) 884-4480

Sims Funeral Service 431 W. Battle St. Talladega (256) 362-9095 Jack’s Family Restaurants 601 Bankhead Blvd. Talladega (256) 362-4761 911 N. Broadway Ave. Sylacauga (256) 249-4006 N. Martin St. Pell City (205) 338-3040 44345 AL Hwy. 21 Munford (256) 358-5942

Robinson’s TV Service 1706 Cogswell Ave. Pell City (205) 338-9651

TempForce Sylacauga (256) 245-TEMP Pell City (205) 884-HELP Lineville (256)396-1800 Anniston (256) 236-TEMP

Coosa Cable 1701 Cogswell Ave. Pell City (205) 884-4545

Talladega Office Machines 30 N. Spring St. Talladega (256) 362-2883

Camp Clinic Dr. Cary Camp 300 East St. N., Suite E Talladega (256) 362-2003

Pell City Animal Hospital 2718 Martin St. S. Cropwell (205) 884-4104

Midway Auto Parts 47815 Hwy. 78 East Lincoln (205) 763-7756

Old Gray Barn, Julian & Debbie Gossett 1910 Cogswell Ave. Pell City (205) 338-2824

Tallatron 35960 AL Hwy. 21 Talladega (256) 761-1228 License No. 187

The Smith Insurance Agency 223 West North St. Talladega (256) 362-1200 Johnny’s Plumbing 117 Meleah Dr. Talladega (256) 362-2735

Talladega Cycle Sales 35288 AL Hwy 21 Talladega (256) 362-6370 www.talladegacyclesales.com

Allen Service Company 1711 1st. Ave. S. Pell City (205) 338-2311

Taylor Rental Center 206 Tinney St. S. Talladega (256) 362-2433

DeeDee’s Tobacco & Beverage Outlet 5 mi. North of Walmart Ragland (205) 338-3517

Lineville Health & Rehabilitation, LLC 88073 Hwy. 9 Lineville (256) 396-2104 Mullinax Auto Sales 1430 S. Quintard Ave. Anniston (256) 835-0101 Kentucky Fried Chicken 1204 Talladega Hwy. Sylacauga (256) 249-9076 32275 US Hwy.280 Childersburg (256) 378-5121 32291 US Hwy,. 280 Chelsea (256) 678-8118 Marble City Baptist Daycare 1512 Quarry Rd. Sylacauga (256) 245-6338 A&M Clothing 115 N Norton Ave. Sylacauga (256) 249-9620 Yamaha Seadoo Of Sylacauga 40631 US Hwy 280 Sylacauga (256) 245-7878 Safe Guard Fire & Alarm Inc. 39610 Hwy 280 Sylacauga (256) 207-2101 Fax (256) 207-2102

510 Wolf Creek Rd. N. Pell City (205) 338-3329

New Beacon Hospice 215 N Norton Sylacauga (256) 207-2055

Ronnie & Rita Foster RE/MAX Realty Pros 418 Martin St. S. Pell City (205) 884-0400

Vansandt Hardware & Supply 40631 US Hwy 280 Sylacauga (256) 245-7878

21-30 Years Reliable Transmission 111 Broome St. Talladega (256) 761-1220

Mary Ann’s Needlwork & Frames 513 North Street E Talladega (256) 362-6184 Superior Pest Control Talladega (256) 268-9873 1-800-762-5904 Metro D Construction 325 Stonehill Drive Talladega (256) 362-5476 Capital Hearing Services 915-B Norton Ave N. Sylacauga (256) 245-3011

Columbus Finance 122 East Battle St. Talladega (256) 362-3600

Talladega County Economic Development Authority 225 N Norton Ave. Sylacauga (256) 245-8332 Calvin Miller

Clark’s Insurance 106 South Court Square Talladega (256) 362-3548

Wal-Mart Super Center 41301 US Hwy. 280 Sylacauga (256) 245-0356

Sleeping Giant Veterinary Clinic 35501 AL Hwy 77 Talladega (256) 362-8977

Comer Museum & Arts Center 711 Broadway Ave. Sylacauga (256) 245-4016

MASH 308 South East St. Talladega (256) 362-4307

Mid South Home Health A Gentiva company Sherry Ingram, RN-Branch Director 1025 West Fort Williams Sylacauga (256) 249-4363

Lincoln Pharmacy 99 Magnolia St. Lincoln (205) 763-7759 Campbell & Campbell 400 South Court Square Talladega (256) 761-1858 www.campbellandcampbellpc.com Piggly Wiggly 320 West Battle St. Talladega (256) 362-7949 308 North East St. Talladega (256) 362-2258 Bluebird Realty 307 South Court St. Talladega (256) 362-7347 Hair Impressions 212 E. Battle Street Talladega (256) 362-7777

Allcomm Wireless Service Inc. 1319 Old Birmingham Hwy Sylacauga (256) 249-2407 Swen Communications Inc. 214 1st Street W Sylacauga (256) 245-3236

Spring Terrace Assisted Living 1104 Hickory St. W Sylacauga (256) 245-6611 AAA General Contractors 1880 Radio Road Alexander City (256) 329-9843

21-30 Years 16-20 Years Strickland Accounting & Tax Services 34830 US Hwy 280 Childersburg (256) 378- 7733 Ms. Ann’s Bargain Barn Formerly Coaling Rd. Flea Market 331 Avondale Ave. Sylacauga (256) 245-6400 MOCO Transportation, Inc. 36525 Hwy. 280 Sylacauga (256) 245-0707 Fax (256) 249-2052 1-800-328-3209 Bill Stanford Automotive 35500 Hwy 21 Talladega (256) 362-7540 Huddle House 720 E. Battle St. Talladega (256) 362-8725 Waites Tire & Service Center 310 E. Battle St. Talladega (256) 362-6632 B J Produce 2212 Martin St. S Pell City (205) 338-1776 Buddy Bowman Construction 1621 Pleasant Valley Dr. Pell City (205) 338-1424 Surfside 6 Hwy 34 Stemley Bridge Rd. Pell City (205) 814-0645 Logan Martin Vet Clinic 1220 Martin St. South Pell City (205) 884-3412 Royal Foods, Inc 1904 16th Ave. S. Pell City (205) 884-1040 Kell Realty PO Box 728 Ashville (205) 594-5391 Woods Surfside Marina 37 Marina Dr. Cropwell (205) 525-5533

Terry Hogge Electric, Inc (205) 763-9844 Commercial-Industrial Only Southeastern Cellular 208 E. Battle Street Talladega (256) 362-5500 Childersburg Pet Clinic PC 1440 Coosa Pines Childersburg (256) 378-7066 Piggly Wiggly 1244 Talladega Hwy. Sylacauga (256) 249-4836 Merit Healthcare PC 291 James Payton Blvd Sylacauga (256) 249-0028 Top Dollar Title Pawn 633 East Battle St. Talladega (256) 761-9111 Easy Bail Bonds 1818 Cogswell Ave. Pell City (205) 338-4821 Interstate Freight 29 Charlie Brown Lane Pell City (205) 338-9595 Watson Computers / Radio Shack 89 Vaughan Lane Pell City (205) 338-2329 Gilreath Printing & Signs, LLC 1923 Cogswell Ave. Pell City (205) 884-7800 Sharp Carpet Since 1993 Pell City (205) 338-6601 www.sharpcarpet.com Community Credit 1912 Cogswell Ave. Pell City (205) 338-4433 Robert Scott’s Original Action ProClean Serving South St. Clair Leeds (205) 706-7491 www.actionproclean.com

11-15 Years

Alabama Eye Clinic 109 E. Coosa St., Suite A Precision Marketing, LLC Talladega (256) 362-4872 1665 Dry Creek Rd. Pate’s Body Shop Cropwell (205) 525-4029 725 E. Battle St. Joseph Bunt Construction Talladega (256) 761-9100

1735 Deer Trace Rd. Pell City (205) 405-1830 Bullard Mechanical Service Co., Inc. 840 Railroad Dr. Pell City (205) 338-4199 Birmingham (205) 838-2298 J.R. Air Cooled Engine 244 Battle St. W Talladega (256) 761-1714

Learn in Play Daycare 80 Seasons Way Talladega (256) 362-1465 Family Vision 113 Stephen J. White Blvd. Talladega (256) 362-6466 Ace Hardware 1104 Ashland Hwy. Talladega (256) 362-2208

Diamond Lil’s Designer Corner Boutique Restaurant & Lounge 100 Haynes St. 109 Johnson Ave. Talladega (256) 315-0620 Talladega (256) 362-3232 Steve Camp Insurance 210 North St. W. Talladega (256) 362-0589

TM Cars 35579 AL Hwy. 21 Talladega (256) 362-4311

11-15 Years Pineview Landing Apartments 160 Broadway Ave. Talladega (256) 362-3412 Poor House Branch Marina 7062 Stemley Road Logan Martin Lake Talladega (256) 268-2939 www.poorhousebranchmarina.com 21st Century Signs 1219 Main Ave. N. Sylacauga (256) 245-9201 21stcenturysigns@bellsouth.com S.A.F.E. Sylacauga Alliance for Family Enhancement 78 Betsy Ross Lane / PO Box 1122 www.safefamilyservicecenter.com Sylacauga (256) 245-4343 Fax (256) 245-3675 Blue Horizon Travel 601 South Norton Ave Sylacauga (256) 245-7900 Fax (256) 245-4115 bluehorizontravel@mysylacauga.com Head Chiropractic Center 1013 Ft. Williams Victorian Village Sylacauga (256) 245-2258 Cabin on Cedar Lane 5014 Cedar Lane Pell City (205) 338-3866 The Money Outlet 1607 Martin St. S Suite 3. Pell City (205) 884-0777 Pell City Ebay Drop Off Center & Pawn Shop 1607 Martin St. S. Suite 3 Pell City (205) 884-0777

6-10 Years

6-10 Years

1-5 Years

Montana Saloon & Grill 75023 Hwy. 77 Lincoln (205) 763-1225

Honda Manufacturing of Alabama, LLC 1800 Honda Drive Lincoln, AL 35096 www.hondaalabama.com

Junior’s Portable Welding Christopher Pickrell 517 Alexander Rd. Pell City (205) 338-4413 (205) 473-4293

Big Wade’s Bail Bonds 57 Woodhill Dr. Talladega (256) 362-7484 All State Metal Roofing PO Box 1392 1800 Eastside Dr. Gadsden (256) 547-0423 Fax (256) 547-7030 J. Ann Haulers 25 Industrial Park Childersburg (256) 378-6800

Affordable Heating and Air 369 James Payton Blvd Sylacauga 1-800-Cool-Air www.affordableairllc.com

Groomingdale’s Pet Salon & Day Spa 75263 Hwy 77 Lincoln (205) 229-0046

True Light Community Church Daycare 900 N. Main Ave. Sylacauga (256) 249-3444 Director: Nicole Hamilton Autumn Trace Apartments 1400 Autumn Lane Sylacauga (256) 249-2126 Comfort Care Hospice 702 E. Battle St. Talladega (256) 761-1250 PityPat’s Gift Baskets Talladega / Lincoln (205) 763-1636 Stampede 710 E. Battle St. Talladega (256) 315-0600

Rhodes Agency Allstate – Preston Rhodes 2107 Martin St. S., Suite 102 Pell City (205) 338-0502

New South Express LLC 249-B Clover Road Lincoln (205) 355-8200

Premium Auto Care 19865 US Hwy. 231 N. Pell City (205) 338-9355 Sarah M.Brazzolotto,LLC Attorney at Law Member of Alabama Bar Assoc. Since 1984 1908 Cogswell Ave. Pell City (205) 884-7726

6-10 Years Custom Pizza 65290 Hwy 77 Northgate Shopping Center Talladega (256) 362-3339

Endless Horizon Cruises Marilyn Lawson - Owner 256-268-0129 NAPA Pruitt Auto Parts Owner Jeff Pruitt 110 North Anniston Ave Sylacauga (256) 245-5296 jefferypruitt@aol.com

HDA Title Loans 1605 Martin St. S. Suite 4 Pell City (205) 338-6741

Brookhill Village 900 Brookhill Village Circle Pell City (205) 814-0800

Farmer’s Insurance Brian York, Agent 411 East St. N. Talladega (256) 315-9545

Marble City Pharmacy 264 Ft. Williams St. W Sylacauga (256) 245-4446

Kentucky Fried Chicken 219 Haynes St. Talladega (256) 362-5681 75835 Hwy 77 Lincoln (205) 763-2454

Bain & Company CPA’s, PC 1609 Cogswell Ave. Pell City (205) 884-2332

1-5 Years

Luxury Auto Parts 12459 Jackson Trace Lincoln (205) 763-1084 Interstate Specialized 29 Charlie Brown Lane Pell City (205) 338-9595 Hair Designs by Holly 20 Mineral Springs Rd. Suite 1 - Across from WFHK Pell City (205) 338-1848 Golden Rule BBQ 1700 Martin St. North Pell City (205) 338-1443 Strandz 1915 A Cogswell Ave. Pell City (205) 814-0116 BD Precision Manufacturing Inc. 787 HJ Bentley Parkway, Suite A Oxford (256) 831-1965

Mattress & More 1911 Martin St. S. Suite 8 Pell City (205) 338-2335 Classic Carwash 602 Martin St. S. Pell City (205) 338-1322 Express Shipping 1910 Cogswell Ave. Pell City (205) 338-0791 Aunt Aggie’s Back Porch 4802 Cogswell Ave. (Hwy 78) Pell City (205) 884-3463 The Tavern of St. Clair 4852 Cogswell Ave., Hwy 78 Pell City (205) 338-8900

Angler Recycling PO Box 595 Odenville (205) 629-2200 Cell (205) 936-3079 Tradesman Co. 3620 Martin St. S. Cropwell (205) 338-7500 JC’s Sports Pub & Grill 86 Cropwell Dr. Cropwell (205) 814-1641 Backyard Partys 140 Adcon Lane Pell City (205) 338-7075 www.backyardpartys.net River’s Edge Marina 79 Rabbit Branch Cir. Cropwell (205) 525-5562

Less Than 1 Year Boondocks Waterfront Grille 84 Blue Eye Road West Lincoln (205) 763-2294 www.BoondocksGrille.com Express Pharmacy, LLC 320 W. Battle St. (Inside Piggly Wiggly) Talladega (256) 362-1120 Country Girl Real Pit BBQ 3904 St. Clair Rd. Odenville (205) 629-3062

A Special

Thanks

To All Our Area Businesses Who Helped Support Update 2011


talladega commerce

8 — THE DAILY HOME, Talladega and St. Clair counties, Ala., Sunday, February 13, 2011

Teaching, including Zumba, in Liner’s blood By LAURA NATION-ATCHISON Home features editor

She’s been in kindergarten for 19 years and has no thoughts of leaving it. Tammy Liner loves kindergarten and she even teaches it at the same school where she started school, R.L. Young Elementary in Talladega. “I have wanted to be a teacher since I was a little girl,” she said. “I used to line up my dolls and create my own classroom.” But her early interest in teaching didn’t stop there. Liner even coerced her older brother into becoming one of her first “students.” “I would make him sit and I would be his teacher, I would even give him homework to do,” she said. “I tell him that is why he’s so smart today.” Through the years, Liner has seen lots of changes in the way kindergarten is structured. In her early years teaching, kindergarten classes usually focused on one letter a week and there was naptime and other elements of kindergarten that have gone by the wayside. Now, kindergarten teachers are expected to have their children reading by at least October and naptime is a thing of the past. “I did think that naptime was a waste of instructional time. I am glad it’s gone,” she said. Children come into kindergarten with many different skill levels, Liner said. “Some of my students come to school knowing their letters and sounds, and then there are some who do not know what a letter is yet,” she said. But by the end of the year, Liner said, most of the children are reading at grade level or above. Liner was born in Montgomery while her father, James Braswell, was stationed at Maxwell Air Force Base. The family, her mother, Dottie, and brother, Brandon, moved to Talladega when she was 5. After graduating from Talladega High School, Liner earned her bachelor’s degree in early childhood and elementary education and her master’s degree in early childhood education at Jacksonville State University. She and her husband, Joey, have a son, Landry, who is in first grade at R.L. Young. Knowing that her classroom will be the first impression of school for so many children, Liner said it’s critically important that she make it a good one. “It’s a little scary knowing that you are a child’s first impression of school,” she said. “I try to be very positive and establish a love for school in each child. I want them to leave me wanting to learn more and to love coming to school.”

Laura Nation-Atchison/The Daily Home

Tammy Liner is pictured with her kindergarten class at R.L. Young Elementary School in Talladega. Liner said she knew when she was a little girl she wanted to become a teacher and still loves her career choice after 19 years.

Liner has 15 little ones in her class this year, and said she wants each of them to leave her class with the confidence and “smarts” they will need to succeed both in school and in life. “I want every child reading on grade level when they leave my room,” she said. “If not, I know I have taken them as far as I can.” After nurturing kindergarten students for so many years, Liner’s advice to parents handling a first year of school for the first time is to “just be positive about school and always make sure that school is something that is important at home also, and always do homework with your child.” This way, Liner said, the parent always knows what is going on with their child’s learning. “And the child sees that learning is important through this,” she said. “Children learn a great deal by what they see at home and if they think that their parents love their teacher and school, I believe the child will also.” When Liner is teaching children, you’ll find her staying after school at least three days a week with anywhere from a half dozen to a dozen or more other teachers. But this is “their” time, though students have joined in as well, and Liner heads up a Zumba dance group for the teachers. The group has been meeting for Zumba in the school gym since January. It all came about when R.L. Young principal Pattie Thomas heard Liner was taking Zumba classes at Spring Street Recreation Center in Talladega. “She asked how I liked

Laura Nation-Atchison/The Daily Home

Several days a week, Liner meets with her co-workers to lead a Zumba dance class for the teachers. During a session are, from left, Linda Haynes, Valerie Harris, Roxanne Lambeth and Liner.

it and I told her I loved it, and that I had Zumba CDs at home,” Liner said. “Then she asked if I would bring them to school for the teachers who wanted to Zumba.” Second-grader Ethan Nabors Zumbas with the group of teachers, and said he likes “everything about it.” “It’s a great stress reliever,” said Thomas, who also works out with the group. And the camaraderie is great, too.” Thomas said Liner’s

willingness to help get the Zumba class going was good for all involved. And commenting on her effectiveness as a teacher, Thomas had even more to say about Liner. “She truly has the best interests of the students at heart,” Thomas said. “And

they leave kindergarten ready for the first grade.” Thomas said the school is known for its long-term staff and teachers such as Liner who stay. Liner said she’s definitely where she wants to be and wouldn’t change the grade level she teaches

unless she had to. “It is so fulfilling when you take these babies and see them mature into little adults,” she said. Contact Laura NationAtchison at lnation@dailyhome.com.

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Laura Nation-Atchison/The Daily Home

As a kindergarten teacher, Liner said being children’s first introduction to school is a responsibility she takes seriously and works to establish a love for school in every child in her class.

www.kubota.com ©Kubota Tractor Corporation, 2011

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35450 Alabama Hwy. 21 North 35450 Alabama Hwy. 21 North Talladega, AL 35160 Talladega, AL 35160 (256) 362-6113 (256) 362-6113


talladega commerce

THE DAILY HOME, Talladega and St. Clair counties, Ala., Sunday, February 13, 2011 — 9

Talladega Office Machines has earned trust of its customers

By KENNY FARMER Home staff writer

“We treat everybody the way we want to be treated,” said Edward Walker, partowner of Talladega Office Machines. “We still believe in a handshake.” Talladega Office Machines has been in business 28 years. The business began on Court Street later moved to East Street and is now on Spring Street. When Talladega Office Machines first opened, Walker said all they sold were typewriters, calculators and copiers. “Now you sell two or three typewriters a year,” he said. He even sold two typewriters in January. He said he’s not really surprised he still gets requests for typewriters, and he usually tries to keep a few in stock. Walker said he also still sells a few calculators each year and usually sells about one cash register per year. “Not everything can be done on a computer,” he said. He said he now sells mainly multi-purpose machines that can copy, scan and print. “Technology and time will make you change,” Walker said. “You either have to grow with it or get left behind.” “The only thing that ever worried us was the economy,” Walker said. “We started in 1982. The economy was bad in 1982. In 2009, the economy was bad, but we had some money in the bank.” He said the gas bill at Talladega Office Machines has tripled in the past few years, but “you still have to go. If you don’t show up, they take their business elsewhere.” Walker said when the company began, he could just walk into a business and talk to prospective customers, then come back a month later and “talk some more.” He said he can no longer do this. He said “business changed” and now “you’ve got to have an appointment.” Concerning the addition of new customers, Walker said, “You hope they get aggravated with the competition. You rely on an advertisement and word of mouth. It’s so com-

petitive now. The biggest thing you can do is keep the customers you’ve got. Everybody wants a piece of the same pie.” Walker said he picked up three new customers in January from “word of mouth.” He said his biggest competitor is electronics manufacturer HewlettPackard. He said that is difficult because people can buy HP products for the same price they’d cost him. “People were buying off the Internet because it was $5 or $10 cheaper. They didn’t worry about the service part of it,” he said. “Service will make or break you,” said Walker. “If you can’t service the product, people aren’t going to buy from you anyway. If we sold it to you, we can fix it.” Walker, Scott Pope and part-owners Billy Bishop and Byron Atkisson stay on the road servicing the equipment they sell. Talladega Office Machines serves five counties: Talladega, Clay, Shelby, St. Clair and Tallapoosa. Walker said his company also serves all Talladega County schools, all Sylacauga city schools and about 80 percent of Talladega city schools. He said the copier business “didn’t change overnight” but it “gradually changed.” He said he and his staff had to “figure things out on their own” and had no formal training. For example, he said, “We had to figure out how to network.” He added that Talladega Office Machines “survived the first round of technology.” About the future, Walker said, “The technology scares me to death. Where’s it gonna go?” He noted that fax machines and home phones have almost disappeared. If other electronic staples of his business follow the same route, he said, “I don’t know what we’ll do.” The opportunity has arisen three or four times in the past for Walker, Bishop and Atkisson to sell their locally owned business, but each time they declined. “We’ve got a good business,” Walker said. “I pay my bills. I make a living. That’s one thing about being small. You can still survive. Our

overhead is not as much as the big guys.” And he expects Talladega Office Machines to remain in business because the company has built up trust with its customers. “I still believe in treating folks right,” said Walker. “You’re still a name with us, not a number.”

Brian Schoenhals/The Daily Home

Talladega Office Machines has been in business in Talladega for 28 Contact Kenny Farmer at years. kfarmer@dailyhome.com.

35288 U.S. Hwy. 21, Talladega, AL 35160 Tues.-Fri. 9:00-6:00 • Mon. & Sat. 9:00-3:00

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Brian Schoenhals/The Daily Home

Part-owner Edward Walker stands with one of the machines sold and serviced by Talladega Office Machines.

10TFMLY12X21BW

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10 — THE DAILY HOME, Talladega and St. Clair counties, Ala., Sunday, February 13, 2011

talladega commerce

New owner, but same good food at Campbell’s BBQ By KENNY FARMER Home staff writer

Campbell’s BBQ in Talladega has a new owner, a new dining room and a new smokehouse, but still has the same staff of longtime employees. “I kept all the same help,” new owner Jo Jo Peters said. “Everybody’s still here that’s been with them for years and years and years.” Peters used to run a textile mill, but when that job came to an end, he believed it was the right time to buy Campbell’s. Peters had in the past discussed with the previous owners the possibility of buying the business. When they contacted him and said they were ready to sell the restaurant, Peters was ready. He bought Campbell’s BBQ in June 2010. He said he had always had an interest in owning his own restaurant. Peters said he kept the name of the business as Campbell’s for “familiarity.” He was worried customers would see the new name and assume nothing would be the same. “I tried to transition as little as possible. I didn’t want to have any major changes.” He said that once cus-

tomers realized he had the same cooks, everything was “OK.” When he bought the restaurant, the first thing Peters did was bring in a new smoker. He said many people were worried he was going to change the way the meat was cooked or that he was cooking with gas. Peters took anyone who wanted to see the new equipment out to the smokehouse. “I’d show them my new smoker, go over it with them and let them see how it worked,” said Peters. He told customers to try the meat from the new smoker and if they were not satisfied, they would not be charged. “It worked out good,” he said. “It’s a new state-of-theart smoker,” Peters said. “It does not cook with gas. I don’t want anybody to think I’m cooking with gas. I still cook with hickory wood.” In addition to the new smoker, Peters also built a smokehouse. Another new addition to Campbell’s BBQ is the dining area. The dine-in area has six booths, two flat-screen televisions and several pieces of artwork featuring University of Alabama football. Peters, an avid Alabama fan, said

he also has an Auburn painting being framed for his customers who are Tiger fans. Peters rearranged the kitchen and added a storage room in back. He also brought in new equipment, including ice machines, refrigerators and a walk-in cooler. “I just upgraded the whole building,” he said. There are new options on the menu since Peters took over. Smoked meats such as turkey, ham and chicken are now available at Campbell’s. Also, whole Boston butts are on the menu. Peters said that a day’s notice is needed for the whole turkey, ham and chicken, but ribs and butts are kept on hand at all times. “You can walk up and order that.” Peters has also added grilled fish, grilled chicken, hot wings and baked potatoes to the restaurant’s selection. Peters said all food ordered at his restaurant is “cooked to order.” He tells customers that Campbell’s is not a fast-food restaurant. “I want them to understand what takes so long,” he said. “I cook everything fresh. It takes a little while, but I think it’s worth it.” Because he cooks everything fresh, Peters said customers should call in their

Brian Schoenhals/The Daily Home

New owner Jo Jo Peters sits in the newly built dining room at Campbell’s BBQ.

lunch orders, unless they want barbecue. “If you’re in a hurry, you can get a barbecue fast, but if you want a cheeseburger, fish or hot wings, you’re looking at 15 to 25 minutes from the time you place your order.” Barbecue is always available because Peters begins cooking it the night before. “It cooks 10 or 12 hours before I take it up,” he said. Even with the addition of the new dining room, Peters said the biggest part of his business comes from the walk-up window. Catering is also available. Peters said he will accommodate groups of any size. “I don’t turn anybody away.” Looking ahead, Peters said he hopes to start turning a profit this year. “I’ve had a lot of expense just adding on, so I knew it was

Brian Schoenhals/The Daily Home

New additions at Campbell’s include a smoker, a smokehouse and a dine-in area.

going to take awhile to start making money.” Peters said he just hopes to continue in business. “The community has been great to me,” he

said. “I just hope they keep buying.”

Contact Kenny Farmer at kfarmer@dailyhome.com.

Public keeps Michael Gee coming back Home staff writer

For many residents of Talladega, there has never been a time that Michael’s Men’s Wear was not on the southwestern corner of the square, where it has been for almost 42 years. Owner Michael Gee’s father, John, opened the store in March 1969. “He had been running The Pants Store in Leeds, which his uncle owned. We started out just on one side of the building. We expanded into the next building in 1978, and then expanded again in 1984, opening up a ladies’ clothing store. We closed that in 1999 and expanded the men’s section again. Ladies’ clothing is a funny business. I can do it, I did for 15 years, but I’m better at men’s clothing, especially suiting.” One of the keys to Gee’s success has been “being very customer oriented, very service oriented. We still do free alterations, and Brian Schoenhals/The Daily Home although I didn’t realize this until just a couple of years One of the keys to success for Michael Gee is ago, most places don’t anymore.” being ‘customer oriented, service oriented.’

He also has a broad reputation. “Don’t get me wrong, Talladega County is very, very important to me. But in terms of overall business, my best customer lives in Mobile. And I ship to customers in San Diego, San Francisco, Detroit, Buffalo and New Jersey. My prices are competitive. They would probably end up paying $50 or $60 more for the same suit if they bought it at home. I’ll be cheaper just about every time.” Name brands on the racks include Hagar, Savane and Van Husen, among many others. “Levi’s, of course, is a staple, and we carry Dickies, Florshiem and Stacey Adams shoes. With suits, I don’t think the brand matters as much to me. Most of them are made overseas, and it’s just not worth the extra expense. But it doesn’t matter if I sell you a $59 suit or a $189 suit, I’m still going to stand behind it.” And the free alterations are not only on new purchases. “If you outgrow a pair of pants, say you’ve put on a little weight, we’ll

let your pants out for free, too, rather than selling you a whole new suit. Maybe it’ll last you another year or two. We’re not here to nickel and dime you, we’ll help you out when we can. It’s just good value and good service.” At any given time, Gee has about half a dozen employees, and most of them “come and go. My daughter works here, and has since she graduated from high school in 2001. She said she always wanted to work here, and I always thought she was crazy. Retail is difficult now. I love working with our customers, but you

have all the bookkeeping and paperwork you have to go through. It’s the public that keeps me coming back every day. Anybody that has ever traded with me knows I love to talk. And I try and treat my customers the way I would want to be treated. I’ve had experiences at other stores that I would not want for myself. Some places you have to walk up to somebody and ask for help before you get any. You’ll never be ignored at my store. I might run you off with kindness, but that’s about it.”

Contact Chris Norwood at cnorwood@dailyhome. com.

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Brian Schoenhals/The Daily Home

Michael’s Men’s Wear has been on the square in Talladega for almost 42 years.

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talladega commerce

THE DAILY HOME, Talladega and St. Clair counties, Ala., Sunday, February 13, 2011 — 11

Carter’s Pharmacy growing along with Munford By AZIZA JACKSON Home staff writer

Jennifer Carter got what she wanted. After working as a pharmacist with several companies, she knew she wanted to have her own independent pharmacy, and that is just what she has. “When I graduated from pharmacy school, I worked for a chain and then worked for an independent, and I just liked the independent,” said Carter, pharmacy manager and owner of Carter’s Drugs in Munford. Carter and her husband, Lamar, opened the pharmacy about eight years ago, serving people in the community with medications and lots of laughs. “Just think of how fun it would be if everyone was normal and nice,” Carter chuckled. “It’s a very relaxed family environment, and that’s what I wanted.” Adding to the fun workplace is Carter’s workforce, which has included a mix of high school and college students. “We have college students, we have people who come here as high school students who have graduated from college,” Carter said. She said her employees are like her children, and she sees them grow as they are employed there through high school. Students who work there don’t always necessarily go into pharmacy, nursing or a medical field.

“We’ve had a lot of majors here,” Carter said. Carter, originally from Oxford, worked at a pharmacy throughout high school and wanted to be a nurse at first. After going to pharmacy school, she became interested in starting a business of her own. Carter said she appreciates the slower pace of owning her own business and is happy she gets faceto-face time with customers. Unfortunately, she said, the economy has been rough on customers she sees come into Carter’s Drugs. “I have noticed a lot of people lost their jobs,” she said. But even with tough economic times, she said customers are grateful and appreciative and never hesitate to give her and her staff a smile and a friendly “thank you.” “We have customers that come in here and walk out the door and say, ‘I love you.’ It’s cool. I’ve never experienced anything like it.” Carter said. Customers also bring home-cooked food and vegetables from their gardens to Carter and her employees. And, they never forget to send Christmas cards. Carter’s friendly customers and energetic staff keep her smiling. She said her employees also serve as good company. “When we get off work, we all hang out togeth-

Bob Crisp/The Daily Home

Carter’s Drugs staff members are, from left, Rita Hale, Leslie Mohr, Joseph Turner and Jennifer Carter.

er. It’s really nice,” Carter said. In addition to providing pharmaceutical service to the community, Carter also wants to initiate some patient and health care programs for those struggling with chronic ailments such as diabetes and hypertension. Carter said she hopes to retire and pass down the business some day, but until then she is taking every day in stride with a smile and a laugh. “We gotta keep growing; Munford is growing, and we are, too,” Carter said.

Bob Crisp/The Daily Home

Contact Aziza Jackson at Jennifer Carter and her husband, Lamar, opened Carter’s Drugs in ajackson@dailyhome.com. Munford about eight years ago.

Stephens Carpet adds ‘personal touch’ to service By MATT QUILLEN Home staff writer

Since 1968, Stephens Carpet in Talladega has added a “personal touch” to its customer service, a key in its long-term success, the owner said. Jackie Stephens began the operation when there were no other carpeting stores in the area. In the 40-plus years since, he has seen several come and go. “At the time we went in, the building business was really booming,” he said. “That was the idea for going in, because you had to go out of town to buy carpet. So I got into it at that time, and it just grew to a full-time job.” The flooring store not only offers carpeting, but hardwood, vinyl, composition tile, laminate and supplies. They also serve both

residential and commercial customers. Stephens said Shaw Carpet, one of the biggest carpet producers in the industry, remains a bestseller. Stephens’ son, Les, took over the business full-time from his father about two years ago. He said it is important to keep the store family-owned and to run it with Christian ideals. “We plan to be here as long as the good Lord lets us stay here,” Les Stephens said. “We treat everybody the way we would want to be treated. That is the main thing. Dad operated by the Golden Rule, and that is the way he taught us to do it.” Les Stephens said the rule applies to family and employees alike. He recalled one instance in which an employee over-

charged a customer. The customer paid the higher price and left the store satisfied and without complaint. But when Jackie Stephens found the error, the customer was immediately contacted. “He went and told the lady about it and gave her some money back that was owed to her,” Les Stephens said. “She didn’t even know about it. She was satisfied with the price. And then he got rid of the guy that (overcharged her).” Jackie Stephens said he went straight to the source for carpeting for many years to keep his prices competitive. He said daylong trips to carpet mills in Dalton, Ga., gave him an advantage he could pass on to customers. “I would shop all day for closeout items and specials

that I could come back and sell at a discount,” he said. “I would go every Tuesday for about 10-15 years.” “That gave us an edge where we could sell good quality at a lower price.” Living and working in his hometown for many years gave Stephens a chance to meet many people in the community and develop a reputation as a good businessman. “We love dealing with people individually,” he said. “I think that gives us an edge as well. Jackie Stephens said he believes their success through tough economic times comes from the same thing they have always offered to customers, their “personal touch.” And it has not only been a business passed down to the next generation by the

owner, but by the customer, too. “We are putting in carpet now for some of the grandchildren of people that we put carpet in for when they were first getting married,” he said. And despite his retirement, Jackie Stephens said he still makes regular stops

at the business he started. “I still come back and help out, but they don’t want me around too much,” he said with a laugh. “But I still go back and help every once in a while.” Contact Matt Quillen at mquillen@dailyhome.com.

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General manager Les Stephens and his family have owned and operated Stephens Carpet in Talladega since 1968.

TALLADEGA


talladega commerce

12 — THE DAILY HOME, Talladega and St. Clair counties, Ala., Sunday, February 13, 2011

City landmark all about customer care By LAURA NATION-ATCHISON Home features editor

It’s just mid-morning on a Monday and people are packing Professional Apothecary in Talladega. Amid the aisles of Gold Bond Powder and Johnson’s Baby Oil, customers mill about, looking for this and that along the shelves. One by one, names are called out to retrieve prescriptions, and as one or two leave with their goods, more people come in. The drugstore’s 20 employees scurry about, behind the counter and out front, helping people find the things they need. Some aren’t feeling all that well and some need more help than others, but helping them is what the nearly 50-year-old business is all about. “I would have to say that’s what I like the most about being a pharmacist,” said Blake Harris, who opened the drugstore just off Talladega’s downtown square in 1963. His interest in serving the public is apparent in the people he chooses to help operate the pharmacy, it’s all about customer service and care at the Talladega landmark. Including Harris, there are four pharmacists on staff. In addition to providing prescription drug services and the things people expect to find in a drugstore when something ails them, Professional Apothecary offers diabetic supplies, including a line of diabetic shoes, and home medical care supplies and equipment. The pharmacy also offers prosthesis fitting for mastectomy patients, and this is a service that Harris’ wife, Mary Catherine, has worked with through the years. She still works part time providing the service, and said working to help women who have had cancer surgery is fulfilling. Harris, who grew up in Munford and went on to graduate from Samford University, said there never was much doubt about the career choice he would make. “As far as I can remember, I don’t think I ever seriously considered any other profession,” he said. “I grew up in a drugstore where my grandfather practiced medicine and mixed up his own medicines.” Pursuing the career choice was indeed a little tough, Harris said, the chemistry and physics classes were hard choices. “But I was able to get through and finish on time,” he said. Through the years, it hasn’t been unusual for

Laura Nation-Atchison/The Daily Home

Professional Apothecary staff, from left, includes Alicia Holbrook, Natalie Rice, Angie Watts, Kristi Turner and Keith Hobbs.

Harris to get telephone calls at home when people needed him. “I have gotten many emergency calls at home and I still do,” he said. “I have been in the store at every hour on the clock.” Customer service at

Professional Apothecary customers who he has to still includes delivery. thank for such a longstanding business. “We have always offered Many employees at delivery service because we have such a large popula- Professional Apothecary tion of blind people and volunteer their time for community projects, and shut-ins,” he said. Harris says it’s his loyal the store has had a large employees and faithful presence in the North

Talladega County Relay for Life for years. “These things are very important to us,” Harris said. “We all have had so many friends and customers with cancer.” Pr o f e s s i o n a l Apothecary’s hours are

8 a.m.-6 p.m. Monday, Tuesday, Thursday and Friday, 8 a.m.-5:30 p.m. on Wednesdays, and 8 a.m.-3 p.m. on Saturdays. Contact Laura NationAtchison at lnation@dailyhome.com.

BD Precision Mfg., Inc. 787 HJ Bentley Jr. Parkway, Oxford, AL 36203 Ph (256) 831-1965 Fax (256) 831-4441

Laura Nation-Atchison/The Daily Home

Wendy Wilson, left, and Allison Swafford are two of the clerks ready to help customers find what they need when they visit Professional Apothecary in Talladega.

BD Precision has been in the precision machining business for over 20 years. We are an ISO 9001 certified manufacturing facility. Our capabilities include: Production Machining, Job Shop Machining, Prototype and Product Development as well as Reverse Engineering. Here at BD Precision Mfg, we are committed to providing our customers with quality components delivered on time. Professional Apothecary has been in business for close to 50 years. Pharmacist Blake Harris opened the drugstore in March 1963.

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Laura Nation-Atchison/The Daily Home


talladega commerce

THE DAILY HOME, Talladega and St. Clair counties, Ala., Sunday, February 13, 2011 — 13

Dabbs offers quality service By AZIZA JACKSON Home staff writer

With 39 years of experience in serving the community of Munford with its automotive needs, Dabbs Auto Service is looking to continue its reputation for quality service with a hometown feel. “We try to treat people the way they want to be treated,” owner David Dabbs said. “Our people are professional and try to provide top-notch service.” Since Dabbs Auto Service opened in 1972 under the care of Dabbs’ father, Gene Dabbs Sr., it has provided all types of automotive services in Munford and surrounding areas. “He fixed flats and repaired vehicles at a fullservice gas station,” Dabbs said. “My mother, brother and I helped as much as we could; we pumped gas, cleaned windshields, fixed flats, gauged tires and much more.” After graduating high school, Dabbs traveled all over the Southeast working construction jobs for about two years. “When I came back home, my dad was closing the shop,” Dabbs said. “I thought about it and decided that I wanted to keep the shop running.” Dabbs and his brother, Gene Dabbs Jr., took over the family business in 1989, and made some additions to the original shop. They built a six-bay garage, got two wreckers, hired two full-time technicians, two auto body shop technicians, and an automotive refinisher. “I now run Dabbs Auto Service by myself and it’s still growing to help the people of Munford and those passing through,” Dabbs said. In addition to running Dabbs Auto Service, he also owns Big Daddy’s Bar-B-Q in Munford, is a Munford town councilman, and drives a school bus for the Talladega County School System. Four auto technicians work at Dabbs Auto. Terry Chappell is head

Bob Crisp/The Daily Home

Dabbs Auto Service has 39 years of experience in repairing car engines and bodies

service technician and has been working at Dabbs Auto for about 10 years. Chappell has about 28 years of experience as a service technician and is certified by the National Institute for Automotive Service Excellence. Chappell is also certified with Nissan, Toyota, Chrysler and GMC. Ricky Haywood is the head auto body technician and has been working at Dabbs Auto for about 11 years. Lynn Gaither is a technician with about 11 years of experience, and Timothy Johnson is the shop’s professional painter. “We see anything mechanical, and we have a body shop so we see vehicles that have been towed or wrecked,” said Daphne Roberts, office manager. “It’s different every day.” Roberts said Dabbs Auto Service gets a lot of business from Munford, but also gets a good amount from surrounding areas such as Oxford, Lincoln and Talladega. “We get to know our customers, we get to know their names and their families,” Roberts said. Whether people come in for business, or just to stop by and say hello, Dabbs Auto Service usually has a good amount of people coming in and out of its doors. “At one time we had 30 to 40 vehicles parked in the parking lot, now we may average 10 or 15 a day,”

Roberts said. One advantage of having a business like Dabbs Auto Service in a small town is the helping hand all the local businesses give to one another. “We always help each other when we need something,” Dabbs said. Like many other local businesses, Dabbs Auto was hurt pretty badly by the economic downturn, especially from the government’s “Cash for Clunkers” program. This program began in 2009 and was formally known as the Car Allowance Rebate System, known as CARS, and was a $3 billion federal scrappage program that provided car owners with incentives to turn in their old cars for more fuel-efficient, newer cars. Although the program did boost sales for dealers, and put cleaner, safer, more-fuel efficient vehicles on roadways, small auto businesses like Dabbs suffered. About a year ago, Dabbs Auto Service had to cut back on employees’ hours and cut back on mechanics. “I hoped the economy would kinda pick up so we could catch our breath,” Dabbs said. While weathering the economic storm, the business still prides itself on the services it offers to customers. Dabbs Auto Service does everything from unlock-

H&R Block Lincoln branch good community partner By ELSIE HODNETT Home staff writer

H&R Block in Lincoln offers a variety of services to help with the tax season. “This is our third year in the Lincoln branch, and we are trying to let people know we are here,” said Glenda Carlisle, office manager for the H&R Block in Lincoln. The Lincoln branch, which opened in 2008, is part of the Anniston district. “Business is doing well,” Carlisle said. “But we see a lot of Lincoln people who use other local H&R Blocks because they don’t know about our Lincoln branch. That’s our big focus — letting people know we are there.” Carlisle said the Lincoln branch has seven tax preparers. “We offer second looks,” she said. “If we didn’t do your tax return the last three years, we will look and see if we can save you money and amend the return if we can.” Carlisle said H&R Block is also offering a free simple federal tax return, Federal Form 1040EZ, until Feb. 15. “The 1040EZ is great for high school students or college students,” she said. “Being able to file free is a

big savings for kids.” Carlisle said adults with no dependents and retirees can also benefit from the free service, if they typically file with a 1040EZ. “A lot of adults living off unemployment can use the 1040EZ as well,” she said. “Any way we can save these people money, we try to do it.” Carlisle said although the free 1040EZ preparation is set to end Feb. 15, the deadline could be extended. “We just don’t know if it will or not yet,” she said. Carlisle said changes to the tax code this year and individual circumstances can prevent some people from filing their returns before Feb. 15. “The IRS computers were not set up to accept some of the changes early in the tax season,” she said. Carlisle said tax changes for 2010 and future years include: • For 2010, the adoption credit has become a refundable credit instead of a nonrefundable credit. • If you converted traditional IRAs to Roth IRAs in 2010, you can choose to pay tax on 50 percent for tax year 2011 and 50 percent in 2012. • Cell phones are no longer listed as prop-

erty, and a self-employed person can take the cell phone cost as a Section 179 deduction. • A self-employed person who does not qualify for a group health insurance can deduct the cost of the insurance before SE tax is calculated for 2010. • For 2010, if you have a Health Savings Account or Flexible Spending Account, insulin and medical devices are still covered but over-the-counter drugs do not qualify unless the doctor gives a prescription for those medications. • For 2010, the gift tax rate is reduced from 45 percent to 35 percent. • Estate tax was repealed for 2010. • Making Work Pay credit is obsolete after 2010. • Educator’s expense deduction was extended, but you cannot file these returns until after Feb. 15. • Tuition and fees deduction was extended, but you cannot file these returns until after Feb. 15. • State and local sales tax deduction in lieu of state income tax deduction was extended, but you cannot file itemized deductions until Feb. 15. • Homeowners who got the $7,500 first-time homebuyer’s credit in See H&R, Page 14

ing doors for customers, to remodeling older vehicles and entering them in local car shows. Dabbs said they often try to work with customers who are struggling to make ends meet, and may only be able to pay half of their service payment up front and then the other half later. Since they are located so close to the schools, Dabbs Auto Service can also go to the school’s parking lot to pick up the vehicles of teachers and staff members and work on them while the teachers are at work. “It’s pretty cool to get your car fixed on while you’re at work,” Dabbs said. Although Dabbs Auto Service is trying to hold steady in the midst of an economic tidal wave, the friendly handshake of a

Bob Crisp/The Daily Home

David Dabbs now runs the business his father, Gene, opened in 1972.

neighbor just stopping by to say hello often makes the day a little brighter. “We want to fix it right the first time, every time.

Our customers are the best, and they deserve nothing less,” Dabbs said. Contact Aziza Jackson at ajackson@dailyhome.com.

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Seated, General Manager Steve Adkins; back row, Ivy East, clerk, Karen Pitts, office manager. 280640


talladega commerce

14 — THE DAILY HOME, Talladega and St. Clair counties, Ala., Sunday, February 13, 2011

H&R Block From Page 13

2008 must begin repaying the interest-free loan in 2010. They repay at $500 a year; however if they pay more, than that does not mean they can skip the payment next year. • The American Opportunity credit is good through 2010, and the Hope credit will return in 2011. • The $1,000 child tax credit is scheduled to revert to $500 per qualifying child after Dec. 31, 2010. “We have been busy so

far,” Carlisle said. “But a lot of returns are on hold because the IRS computers are not set up.” Sandy Adkins, Anniston district manager for H&R Block, said in addition to offering quality tax preparation services, the Lincoln branch continues to be a good community partner. “There is a stretch of (Alabama 77) that we clean up, and we participate in local events such as the Christmas parade and raise money for local charities,” she said. Carlisle said she does

tax talks upon request for local businesses and organizations. “The tax talks are free to anybody who asks,” she said. “You can call the Lincoln branch at 205763-1888.” Carlisle said the Lincoln branch is open 9 a.m.-8 p.m. Monday-Friday, and 9 a.m.-5 p.m. Saturdays and Sundays. “Our hours vary depending on the time of the tax season,” she said.

Bob Crisp/The Daily Home

Contact Elsie Hodnett at From left, tax professionals Glenda Carlisle, Mary Green, Judy Sanders ehodnett@dailyhome.com and Deanna Barnhart.

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UPDATE Commerce:

THE DAILY HOME, Talladega and St. Clair counties, Ala., Sunday, February 13, 2011

Sylacauga & Childersburg


2 — THE DAILY HOME, Talladega and St. Clair counties, Ala., Sunday, February 13, 2011

sylacauga commerce

Bob Crisp/The Daily Home

Broadway is the center of downtown Sylacauga.

Chamber director excited about city prospects Fourth of July celebration. They will also be heavily involved in the third annual Marble Festival, April 6-16. She said they are attempting to get more events involved in the festival, including Taste of Sylacauga, the Marble City 5K Run and local music shows. She said the more other parts of the city become a part of the festival, the more it becomes a true citywide event.

By MATT QUILLEN Home staff writer

The Sylacauga Chamber of Commerce director expressed excitement for new endeavors and opportunities for the city in 2011. Carol Emlich-Bates is entering her third year as executive director. She said she has seen what is happening around town and heard from local business owners, and believes the tough economic times are starting to improve for the city. “I am really encouraged with what I see happening in retail and with other businesses in town right now,” Emlich-Bates said. “I can see there is some light at the end of the tunnel, and we are coming out of this slump that we are in.” She also discussed the new chamber board of directors. The new board, with Police Chief Louis Zook serving as president, wanted to be involved in making improvements for the organization, which now has more than 400 members. “And that is what it takes,” Emlich-Bates said. “It takes a board made up of business people here in Sylacauga who are inter-

Matt Quillen/The Daily Home

Carol-Emlich Bates is entering her third year as executive director for the Sylacauga Chamber of Commerce.

ested in moving Sylacauga and this chamber forward.” One possible project on the horizon would involve all of the county’s chambers, the Talladega County Commission and the county economic development authority. A proposal

by Retail Specialists Inc, a company that serves as a retail recruiter for municipalities and other property owners, would provide information on available buildings, land and local spending. The information would be used as a recruiting tool

to show businesses areas of need and available property. Emlich-Bates called it “a good fit” for all parties involved. “The sales tax revenue is what makes the city run,” she said. “It is what allows them to be able to do the

“I think we have a golden opportunity to do that, because the more you can do for that kind of stuff the more you can bring your community together,” Emlich-Bates said. As a former business owner herself, EmlichBates said she understands how difficult the first two months of the year can be for retailers. But she said this year there have not been as many people “singing the blues” as there were in early 2010. She said overall the chamber is working with local businesses to find out how they can better serve them. “I think we had a good year last year, and this year is starting so much better,” she said.

projects they want to do and support the chamber and support the other programs.” Emlich-Bates said the chamber will also be involved in several area festivals and events, including the Christmas Parade, Contact Matt Quillen at Taste of Sylacauga and the mquillen@dailyhome.com.

Highway 280 Nissan, above, is the place to go to buy that have-tohave vehicle. At left, Fort Williams is the place to go in Sylacauga if you are in need of something good to eat. Photos by Bob Crisp

On the cover: Top, commerce is lively on Fort Williams Street in Sylacauga. Middle left, Woody and Beverly Lowery, owners of Antiques and Uniques in Childersburg. Middle right, Broadway Avenue, the heart of downtown Sylacauga. Bottom left, Mary Lee Swindall at Marble City Pharmacy. Bottom right, Historic Kymulga Grist Mill, Childersburg.


sylacauga commerce

THE DAILY HOME, Talladega and St. Clair counties, Ala., Sunday, February 13, 2011 — 3

Childersburg shop has that must-have unique piece By LINDSEY HOLLAND

Home staff writer

“It keeps me off the streets and out of the bars,” Woody Lowery said of his business, Antiques and Uniques in Childersburg, which he runs with his wife, Beverly. “We do have antiques,” Lowery said. “Everything sitting around here is antique and the unique part is we carry Vera Bradley handbags and Emmy Ray jewelry and HeartStrings jewelry and, of course, antiques. We have some very unique things.” Some of the antiques at Antiques and Uniques are unique. One Italian corner cabinet for sale has a mahogany backside and is from the early 1900s. Another item unique is a bookcase. Instead of putting pins in it, the height of the shelves can be changed by various nooks. Lowery said they have some of the oldest furniture in Alabama. He said — with a straight face — that he finds most of his items for sale at the local Walmart. Then he explained that the locations of the treasures he finds are to be revealed to no one. Another piece the store has is a wash cupboard in perfect condition. It’s dated 1901. Beverly Lowery found a piece of paper in the cupboard when cleaning one day. The paper was signed by the creator, who was in business from 1875 until he died in 1906. “He only signed one piece of furniture a year that he thought was going to be his masterpiece,” Woody Lowery said. “This is one of the 31 that he signed.” Beverly Lowery has been around antiques all her life. The couple ran their store in Sylacauga

for two years before relocating to Childersburg six and a half years ago. “My wife is from Carrollton, Ga., and I’m from Pensacola, Fla., but we lived up in Helena for 20-something years,” Lowery said. “We had a lake house on Lay Lake below Talladega Springs. We sold our house in Helena and moved there full time and had to have something to do, so we got into this.” Some of the other antiques include an 1800s fortepiano converted into a desk, a prayer bench from the 1900s, rice baskets from China, antique rugs, and a French Revolution chest. “We had a professor in here from North Carolina one day that taught French,” Lowery said. “He said if you knew French, every one of the brass symbols on the chest would mean something. For example, the bumblebee is the Napoleon bumblebee for bravery. It’s all mahogany inside and pure Italian marble on top. It’s heavy. If we ever sell it, we’ll have to have a new checkout counter built.” When children come in the store with their mothers, Lowery said he keeps them occupied by showing them some of the antiques. One item he shows the children is designed to hold coal. “Because copper conducts heat, it’s what they used to take out in their horse and buggy to keep their feet warm while riding,” he said. Besides antiques, Lowery said they also sell Vera Bradley handbags, which they have been carrying for six years. “We deal a lot with Vera Bradley,” he said. “We keep all the latest patterns and colors and designs. We got more than probably you’ve ever seen. We have a new pattern

Bob Crisp/The Daily Home

Woody and Beverly Lowery, owners of Antiques and Uniques in Childersburg, have some of the oldest furniture in Alabama in their store, he said.

that they just came out with last week. I can tell you all about Vera Bradley, but I’m not going to carry one of the handbags,” Lowery joked. Vera Bradley has a new style of purse as well as pattern. The new purse has pockets on each side and a magnet to close the purse. It also has doubletier pockets. The new pattern is called Twirly Bird Pink. “Ten percent of everything Vera Bradley sells goes to the Vera Bradley breast cancer fund,” Lowery said. “We sell a lot of Vera Bradley and a lot of jewelry, but the antiques have been slow recently.” But he said he thinks everyone else has been slow, too. He said his antiques are all original and they do not carry reproductions. “We won’t honor reproductions,” he said. He said he likes antiques because they are made of real wood. “The stuff you buy today, most of it is particle wood,” he said. But what fascinates Lowery the most? “If that desk could talk, wouldn’t it have some history to tell you?”

Bob Crisp/The Daily Home

Contact Lindsey Holland The unique part of Antiques and Uniques includes Vera Bradley handat lholland@dailyhome. bags, Emmy Ray jewelry and Oka shoes. com.

Growing At The Speed Of Business... The mission of the Sylacauga Chamber of Commerce is to provide leadership and promote the economic advancement, business climate and quality of life for the City of Sylacauga and surrounding areas. The only way to accomplish our mission is with the help of our Membership!

Bob Crisp/The Daily Home

Antiques and Uniques relocated from Sylacauga to Childersburg six and a half years ago. In addition to antiques, the store sells Vera Bradley handbags.

Membership investments and membership involvement maximize the efforts of each individual member and enhance what the Chamber of Commerce can do for our marketplace and community! A dynamic city government, quality school system, city agencies and countless community clubs and organizations are working together with the Chamber of Commerce to make Sylacauga a great place to live, work and play!

Won’t you join us? 17 West Fort Williams•Post Office Box 185 Sylacauga, AL 35150 256-249-0308 249254


sylacauga commerce

4 — THE DAILY HOME, Talladega and St. Clair counties, Ala., Sunday, February 13, 2011

Marble City is more than just a full-service pharmacy By LINDSEY HOLLAND

Home staff writer

It’s the way a drugstore used to be — and still is. Marble City Pharmacy in Sylacauga prides itself on treating customers with a welcoming smile and a friendly hometown attitude. Danny Johnson and James Hobson opened the store in 2003 with that vision. “The store grew very fast,” Johnson said. “After two years we added another pharmacist, which is my son Jacob, and we still kept growing thanks to the nice people of this town.” When Hobson died, Johnson made his son partner. “We’re still growing,” Johnson said. “We attribute that to the fact that we just take care of people.” Marble City is not only a full-service pharmacy, selling everything from prescriptions to BandAids, but it is also a gift shop. Mary Lee Swindall oversees the gift section. She said there is something for everyone. “In two weeks we will be bursting with product from market, so we are real excited about that,” she said. “We go to market and see what’s new and what’s hot.” There is a complete section in the pharmacy dedicated to cupcakes. Swindall said those gifts are perfect year round.

Also available for purchase are soy candles that are made in England. “They’re soy based,” Swindall said. “They smell wonderful. Those have been a really big hit.” If you’re looking for something for your little one, Marble City Pharmacy carries the products of Melissa and Doug. “We have the biggest distribution of the company Melissa and Doug and we have almost their whole line of toys,” Swindall said. “What we love about this is they’re all educational, so a mom can buy this for her child. They have extension activities that are educational, so all the schools know about Melissa and Doug.” Puzzles are also available for the children. Some puzzles are also educational. Reusable mats are also for sale in the pharmacy. On these mats children can practice addition and

subtraction. “We have frames, a whole assortment of frames for you to give as wedding presents,” Swindall said. “We have a gift registry for brides or for babies. We do have a pretty sweet baby department. We’ve got a monkey that’s coming in that’s green and brown. We try to stay on the cutting edge.” The pharmacy also carries stained glass and an array of collectibles made in Wetumpka from Alabama clay. “That’s unique to our area,” Swindall said. “It’s made right out of the dirt of Alabama. People come from all over to get this because we’re the only ones that have it and they’re very reasonable.” Swindall said they also sell jewelry and are going to start showcasing a line of purses and scarves in the near future.

We’re still growing the gift department. It brings in different types of people that maybe some other departments wouldn’t have.” Johnson said he has a lot of good people working in the pharmacy and that has grown to another level, too. In June, Johnson will welcome his other son, Jarrod, to his staff. With this addition, Johnson said he is hoping to start programs not previously available in the area, such as a diabetic program and therapy management. Contact Lindsey Holland at lholland@dailyhome. com.

Photos by Bob Crisp

Mary Lee Swindall oversees the gift section at Marble City Pharmacy in Sylacauga.

“We’re real excited about the upcoming season and the products we’re getting in,” she said. “I try to make sure that the price point is good so we don’t overprice for our neighborhood. Yet we still have gifts for a mom, sister or friends that wrap up beautifully — something you’d be proud to give.” Swindall said their sales have recently gone up, so they have been encouraged. “We have a lot of great, loyal customers,” Johnson said. “The gift section has been real good to us. We started out with a smaller Danny Johnson and James Hobson opened Marble City Pharmacy in gift section and it grew. 2003.

...and see! That’s the beauty of compound interest.

It’s never too early to say hello to

Heritage South! One of the valuable lessons we can teach our children is the benefit of establishing a relationship with a strong, stable financial institution. Heritage South has been serving Sylacauga for over 70 years. Now that’s strength you can grow on! So why not bring the whole family down to Heritage South and say hello. After all, it’s your heritage!

s y l a c a u g a Coming Soon to Childersburg.

HSCU.COM


sylacauga commerce

THE DAILY HOME, Talladega and St. Clair counties, Ala., Sunday, February 13, 2011 — 5

Po’K N Beef has served area 14 years By MATT QUILLEN Home staff writer

Po’K N Beef BBQ and Steakhouse is helping keep the tradition of familyowned establishments with homemade recipes alive in Sylacauga. An area dining staple for 14 years, the restaurant has been open for three years on the corner of Coaling Road and U.S. 280. Along with its signature barbecue, ribs and hand cut steaks, Po’K N Beef offers its patrons catfish and chicken dinners, burgers and sandwiches, salads and homemade pies. “Our specialties started off with the barbecue, Boston butts and beef briskets,” said co-owner Lori McClure Cook. “And everything is homemade. Steaks are hand-cut and meats are home-smoked with pure hickory wood.” Cook said without hesitation that they offered “the best food in town,” and everything is cooked to order. She said people in the community have become regulars and friends, and she has seen the next generation of their original patrons grow up before her eyes. “I’m bad about spoiling my customers,” Cook said. “And if they don’t see me, they know they are supposed to hear me. If they don’t hear me, they know there is a problem.” As the restaurant expand-

ed, it has allowed the owners to cut back on the long hours they put in. Cook operates the establishment with her parents, Blois and Margaret McClure. But sister Amy, brother Patrick and several other family members also do their part for the restaurant. Cook said it all got started when Blois, a truck driver at the time, would have friends at their home on the weekends and cook. “When he retired from Kimberly-Clark, he was just going to have a little building in their yard for beer and barbecue for him and his buddies,” Cook said. “It started with a home refrigerator, a white picnic table and then it kept getting bigger.” “Here we are 14 years later.” Cook credited family friend Bill Rogers with teaching her about cooking and the restaurant business. And she said some of the recipes, like the homemade steak marinade and the bleu cheese dressing, remained confidential to all but a select few. Cook appeared proud of the legacy she and her family had built with the restaurant. She said she recently reminded her father after a slow week during the recession how much they have accomplished for themselves and others. “I said, ‘Daddy, don’t be blue,” she said. “’Just think through the years of all the

Matt Quillen/The Daily Home

Lori McClure Cook and her family have operated Po’K N Beef BBQ and Steakhouse in Sylacauga for 14 years. The establishment offers homemade recipes for barbecue, steaks, ribs and more.

people that you provided jobs for and taken care of. You have been a help to the city of Sylacauga for giving these people jobs.’ We have fed the hungry, we donate and we have catered events for many years.” She said the restaurant has also given her family the opportunity to meet people in the area and from all over the world. She recalled stories of people from as far away as Alaska and Germany making second or third trips back to Po’K N Beef and greeting her as an old friend. “It has been an experience,” Cook said. “If I knew then what I know now about how it was Matt Quillen/The Daily Home going to end up, I would have documented and The dining room of Po’K N Beef, 14 years removed from its original taken pictures while they establishment.

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6 — THE DAILY HOME, Talladega and St. Clair counties, Ala., Sunday, February 13, 2011

sylacauga commerce

Childersburg Chamber thinks outside box By LINDSEY HOLLAND

Home staff writer

The Childersburg Chamber of Commerce dates back to the 1940s. Since then, the chamber has seen some vast changes. After almost shutting down, the chamber was reorganized in 2005. In spring 2006, the chamber regained enough revenue to continue and hired Pete Storey as president. “We created our partnership program at that time, which we now have in place,” Storey said. “That is what has really helped us do the things that we do. It’s a program that helps us financially.” Within the last year, the chamber has welcomed five new partners. Brookwood Medical Center in Birmingham recently became a partner with the chamber. “They’re able to invest,” Storey said. “That’s the great thing about the partnership program. It helps us but it allows the smaller businesses to be able to invest more money with us to help us do the things that we do.” Chamber partners can pay their dues monthly, quarterly, semiannually or all at once. Storey said most of the local industries are partners. So what is the purpose of the chamber? Storey said

the main purposes are to stimulate positive business growth, foster community leadership and act as an advocate for the business community. “Really, that does sum it all up,” he said. “We are here to help our existing businesses grow, first and foremost. We want to help recruit new retail but we’re here for our existing business to help them grow. We’re not an advertising agency but I do feel like we do things to help get their name out there if they participate in the things that we do. We’re an advocate and voice for them.” Besides helping to sustain existing businesses, the chamber is also eager to help new businesses. This can be accomplished through the Small Business Administration counseling offered by Jacksonville State University. The counseling is offered in Sylacauga and Talladega, but Storey said if need be a meeting could be set up at the Childersburg Chamber. He said he attends City Council meetings regularly and will fight for his chamber members with the city, if he has to. He also said is working with a retail specialist to recruit retail for the entire county. “We’re real involved in working on that project to help recruit retail, not just for Childersburg but for the entire county,”

The Childersburg Chamber is a member of the United States Chamber, as well as the state chamber. Through that, Storey said he is able to offer government updates on legislation. “We get e-mails from the U.S. Chamber and our state and we send that out to our members on email,” he said. “We’re keeping them updated on what our legislative delegation is doing, how they’re voting, things that are coming up, and at times we are able to actually send them an email that they can send to our representatives so they can tell them how they want them to vote.”

Childersburg Chamber President Pete Storey

Storey said. “We realize our people don’t shop here all the time. They go to Sylacauga, to Talladega, we know they go to other places to shop and those people come here to shop. It’s a win-win situation that we’re working on and we’re real excited about the possibilities of what retail specialty can do for us.” Another goal of the chamber is to foster community leadership.

The leadership program through the chamber recently started back, after taking a year off. “We’re looking forward to that class completing their project,” Storey said. “We offer those opportunities for people to be involved in our leadership program to show them ways that they can be a leader in our community.” Another leadership class will begin in September.

Other things planned for the year include a change in the date of Coosa Fest and focusing on tourism and growth. “We’ve changed Coosa Fest to May this year, so that’s fast approaching,” Storey said. “We’re getting ready to start planning for Coosa Fest, that’s one of the big things. Other things that we’ve got planned will be to continue to do the things that we’re doing and hopefully grow our membership. We’re always looking to that.” In March, Storey is attending a tourism conference. “We have a lot to offer here in Childersburg and countywide with (DeSoto

Caverns) here and (Kymulga) Grist Mill,” he said. “Hopefully, once the deed gets transferred to the city at the grist mill, we’ll be able to do a lot more with tourism, offering things for people to come and see.” Storey is involved with United Way and the Kiwanis Club, among other organizations in Childersburg, but he said his first priority is the chamber. He has worked hard to accomplish that goal. He is graduating from the Chamber Institute Program this summer, a four-year program at the University of Georgia. “We’re a small town and a small chamber but we think outside the box and have big plans and we go after it,” Storey said. “I love it. It almost doesn’t seem like work to me, it really doesn’t, and that’s what makes it so fun. I enjoy it. I see where we were and what we went through and what we are today and where we’re going to be five, 10 years down the road, too. “That’s what I’m excited about — what we can do to help the children that are in high school now, the ones that want to stay here and live and work, that’s what keeps driving me. It’s fun.” Contact Lindsey Holland at lholland@dailyhome. com.

Top, visitors can’t miss a warm welcome to Childersburg. Once the deed to Kymulga Grist Mill, above left, is transferred to the city, the chamber hopes to do a lot more with tourism. Downtown Childersburg, above right, has many interesting shops. The chamber office, which was reorganized in 2005, is shown at left.

Photos by Bob Crisp


sylacauga chamber

THE DAILY HOME, Talladega and St. Clair counties, Ala., Sunday, February 13, 2011 — 7

Foote Brothers strives for quality service By KENNY FARMER Home staff writer

“Retail is always challenging,” said Foote Brothers Furniture operations manager Brian Murphree. “It’s a little more challenging these days.” Foote Brothers has been in business in Sylacauga since 1947. It was originally downtown, later moved to the Marble Center Shopping Center, and now is at 118 W. Third St. “We’ve done what every small business has done,” Murphree said. “We’ve made cutbacks where we could, still ensuring customer service.” He said one way they have succeeded in a dormant economy is by “shopping around for different vendors to keep prices low.” Murphree said the goal of Foote Brothers is to “keep quality customer service and great value at the forefront” of their daily operations. He said the quality of the furniture will not be compromised for price. “We only buy furniture we know will last.” While some cutbacks have been made, future plans for Foote Brothers call for the construction of a new distribution center and additional retail space. The construction will be on property the company already owns adjacent to Foote Brothers’ 20,000square-foot showroom on Third Street. This year Foote Brothers will also continue to advertise throughout the state. Murphree said they advertise “from Birmingham to Montgomery” and “from Oxford to Auburn.” A normal day at Foote Brothers begins with a staff meeting, followed by the routing of that day’s deliveries. One full-time delivery crew handles all the company’s furniture deliveries. Murphree said it is not uncommon for them to deliver furniture as far as Gulf Shores or near the Georgia state line. “We deliver statewide.” Foote Brothers decorator Patty Wills said the

feedback on the delivery staff has been “great.” The delivery staff is made up of two employees, John McGaffey and John Howell. Wills described the two men as “gentlemen” and said that they are very polite. Wills has been in the furniture business 31 years, the last 25 with Foote Brothers. She said she has stayed so long because the owner, David Foote, is a good person to work for, and the business has an overall good atmosphere. She said she has seen the business evolve from a “plain metal building” to a “nice, new showroom.” “We’re a family,” said Wills. “When you don’t have problems at a business, it doesn’t trickle down to the customer.” Wills said when customers walk through the door they have a need, and she hopes to satisfy that need. She assists customers with decorating ideas and suggestions. She said to make a room look good, she has to first get input from the customer. “You have to get to know them.” She said customers usually begin with the selection of a centerpiece and she and the customer work around that piece of furniture. “I started selling furniture back in 1980 in Athens, Ga.,” Wills said. “My boss got me to take a couple of classes at the University of Georgia that dealt with how to place furniture.” She said she continues to learn things about decorating by reading, looking at pictures and visiting people’s homes. “You’re never too old to learn stuff.” Wills said customers who are decorating should save color samples. She said the color of a wall “makes you see furniture in a different way.” She also encourages her customers to look through magazines for ideas. She said Foote Brothers can recreate rooms seen elsewhere “99 percent of the time.” “With our customorder lines, we have the ability to customize home furnishings that make you feel comfortable and feel

Brian Schoenhals/The Daily Home

Decorator Patty Wills has been with Foote Brothers Furniture for 25 years.

at home,” Murphree said. “We do everything from traditional room settings to contemporary groupings, from family homes to vacation homes. We have furniture to fit any need and complement any lifestyle.” Murphree said future plans for the company include continued service to the central Alabama community with the “same quality and commitment to customer service that has made Foote Brothers a home furnishings leader throughout Coosa Valley.” Contact Kenny Farmer at kfarmer@dailyhome.com.

‘With our custom-order lines, we have the ability to customize home furnishings that make you feel comfortable and feel at home. We do everything from traditional room settings to contemporary groupings, from family homes to vacation homes. We have furniture to fit any need and complement any lifestyle.’

— Foote Brothers decorator Patty Wills

Health care just for women. Just down the street. A woman’s health care needs are different from a man’s. At Henderson & Walton Women’s Center, we understand those differences. From your first visit as a young woman, through childbirth and past menopause, we’re committed to providing women quality care in a warm and personal atmosphere. For more information on our comprehensive range of health care Cynthia Jones, M.D. services for women in the Sylacauga area, or to make an appointment with Dr. Cynthia Jones or Dr. George McGrady call 249-4032. We’ll treat you with the special care and attention you need and deserve. George McGrady, M.D.

Brian Schoenhals/The Daily Home

Foote Brothers Furniture has been in business in Sylacauga since 1947.

SYLACAUGA OFFICE 9 SOUTH WESTERN AVENUE 256-249-4032

228062


8 — THE DAILY HOME, Talladega and St. Clair counties, Ala., Sunday, February 13, 2011

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Update 2011: Commerce