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ISSUE #27 | SPRING 2019

PRIDE

THEN & NOW

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Connexting CONTRIBUTORS

Connextions Magazine issue #26: Deluxe-Life takes a closer look at luxury vacations and venues that truly are LGBT-friendly.

EDITOR-IN-CHIEF Manny Velasquez-Paredes CREATIVE DIRECTOR Xioger Sandoval

Where can we visit when budget is not an obstacle? The places we can visit with our LGBTQ friends and relatives, and make sure everyone is accepted, not just our credit cards. Because we need to be accepted, not just tolerated.

FEATURED WRITER David Duran CONTRIBUTING WRITERS Lilly Chris Ross Christianson Clark Harding H. Luiz Martinez Carlos Mayorga David Perry Ali Rothlizzi JJ Vega Manny Velasquez-Paredes Sarah Stanley-Evan

Cover Photo CONVERSE

Write to us: Have a question or comment regarding this issue or future issues of Connextions Magazine? We would love to hear from you! E-mail responses and press releases are always welcomed. mvp@connextionsmagazine.com All submissions become the property of Connextions Magazine. The views and opinions stated throughout this magazine are not necessarily the opinions of staff at Connextions Magazine.

Connextions Magazine and Connextions Magazine en EspaĂąol will not knowingly publish or advertise text which is fraudulent or misleading. The publisher reserves the right to edit, limit, revise, or reject any text without cause. Connextions Magazine assumes no financial responsibility for typographical errors. If any errors are found, please notify Connextions Magazine immediately. Materials in this publication may not be reproduced in any form without written permission from the publisher. ISSN 2160-4347 (print) ISSN 2160-4355 (online)

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Brands can help the LGBTQ+ community to achieve its goals. When done properly, brands can spread their message of diversity and inclusion to large groups of people. This year, Converse is one of the brands we have chosen that are doing great things for and with the LGBTQ+ community. This year Converse decided to feature several LGBTQ+ individual, including Desmond is Amazing

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PRIDE: THEN & NOW

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Letter from the Editor LIVE | TRAVEL | CONNECT

Many people feel LGBTQ+ Pride is a time to get drunk and party hard. One person I know actually said that Pride is just about sexual liberation, and a wise person described to me “Pride is like God or religion - it means something different to everyone” (thank you Ryan Schae for that quote). One must not judge and instead try to understand the deep-rooted hatred from where Pride was born. Once you do, you may understand that sometimes, after all that oppression, one needs to just let go, be free and celebrate.

Many heterosexual people feel that by attending Pride events, they are making a positive statement in favor of the LGBTQ+ community. However, please remember that just participating at Pride events is not enough. Year round, you must seek out stores and venues that contribute positively to the LGBTQ+ community, not just the ones who put a rainbow on something in the month of June and profit from it. This year, it seems, I have seen rainbows in tons of stores and restaurants. Recently, I visited a Macy’s in New York and they had a section called “Stories.” In this section, which was visibly separated by the colors of the rainbow, they had displays with the theme of each individual color. As the salesperson explained, “these are the stories we create” and they change every two months. My daughter just looked at me and whispered, “and they just happen to choose the rainbow for May and June.” I explained to her that Macy’s is a huge supporter of LGBTQ causes and perhaps, the reason they were subliminally engaging the rainbow (meaning no major PRIDE displays) was because, we were visiting a very conservative part of Long Island, NY and this was perhaps their way to be pro-LGBTQ, without shouting it from the roof top. This is why the LGBTQ+ community celebrates Pride, because we still have cities - even in NY - where the LGBTQ community is still in the closet. Profits vs Soul The 1969 Stonewall riots were a grass-roots movement, which lit a fire under our collective asses and forced us to mobilize and become activists for equality and inclusion, for the sake of our lives. Some feel we should bring back that feel and keep Pride simple and disagree with the commercialization of Pride events. Many feel these brands are just putting money into Pride events, so they can make money of LGBTQ+ customers; in fact, that is exactly what they are doing. However, when Pride festivals are managed properly, the money collected from all those brands, floats and walking billboards, go to help local LGBTQ+ causes and charities. Therefore, those companies are buying commercials in the form of floats or by adding their name to Pride events, and in turn GOOD for the LGBTQ+ community is being done with that money. If those companies did not fund the events, then we couldn’t take our activism to the next level. Unfortunately, money makes the world go round. The way to make sure that Pride is being managed properly, is by getting involved – and not just once a year during Pride. Take the time and volunteer year round in local LGBTQ+ organizations, participate in local events, shop from stores/restaurants/fast food places that contribute positively to LGBTQ+ causes and include members of the LGBTQ community. Be a Rainbow Role Model and wear your rainbow proud during the entire year – not just in June. MVP

Editor In Chief

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Contents

Spring 2019

LIVETRAVELCONNECT Stonewall 1969 A Retrospective

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Pride Then & Now A Timeline of LGBTQ Moments in History

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Pride Now Pride Events Around the World

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Brands Take on Pride Converse 40 Macy’s 46 Hilton 54 National Geographic 56 D@Ds 61

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Pride Journey Bloomington, Indiana

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INSIDE B

efore the Stonewall Riots of 1969, social revolution for most LGBT people meant winning the empathy of “average� Americans. Following the riots, however, it became a matter of breaking away from traditional assumptions of sexuality. Where one model depended on perceptions from the outside, the other drew on thoughtful introspection and a deeper understanding of self.

STONEWALL Urban Molecule presents

1969 STON

in retrospect

This special feature is brought to you by Urban Molecule. Urban Molecule began in 2008 as an urban art series created by New York City-based writer Christopher de la Torre. UM has since explored prominent modes of counterculture, including art, literature, film, pedagogy and cyberculture. Connect at http://urbanmolecule.me or follow on twitter @urbanmolecule

Other original works in the Stonewall series include exclusive interviews with Founding GLF Member Karla Jay and Lambda Legal Executive Director Kevin Cathcart, and original works from Photographer Ellen Shumsky (also founding GLF member), Author Kevin Kopelson and Activist Brandon Wallace. View these interviews in their entirety and the complete series online at stonewallrebels.wordpress.com.

photo credits: Come Out! Poster, taken from the 1970 photo by Peter Hujar. Self-Portrait, 1970; photo by Steven F. Dansky. Perry Brass, 1971; photo by J. Larue. John Knoebel, Sheep Meadow NYC, 1970; photo courtesy John Knoebel.

Originally published by Connextions Magazine as a Special Feature October 25, 2012 Written by: Christopher de la Torre https://urbanmolecule.com/ Republished to commerate the 50th Anniversary of the Stonewall Riots 8

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Pride: Then

STONEWALL

1969

The angst in Manhattan’s West Village had been percolating for some time. The massive wave of riots following the assassination of Martin Luther King, Jr. the year before may have inadvertently set the clock for our own initiation into chaos. Widespread unrest in Europe and the Middle East and a senseless war raging in Southeast Asia aggravated the situation further. The summer air was ripe for rebellion.

The first organization to form following the riots, the Gay Liberation Front (GLF), was considered radical. Only by revolting against sexism, patriarchy and capitalism simultaneously could negative attitudes toward women, lesbians, gays and other minorities be changed. The revolution would require, according to founding GLF member Steven Dansky, “a shift in perception of reality so persistent that it radically altered assumptions about gender and sexuality”—a calling so ambitious it would demand at every turn a fierce devotion and lasting cooperation between seemingly disparate groups—if it hoped to succeed.

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In The New York Times piece benignly titled "Why the Gay Rights Movement Has No National Leader", Jeremy Peters writes, "The gay movement has always had a problem of achieving a dignity or moral imperative that the black civil rights movement had, or the women’s rights movement claimed. Because this movement is fundamentally about the right to be sexual, it’s hard for the larger public to see that as a moral issue" (2009). But how much of the revolution was about sexuality? And how much was about the prejudice that surrounded it? These questions led me to an inspiring group of activists. What I found was more than a history lesson. The fact that the LGBT community has made remarkable progress in the years since Stonewall is a testament, not to the resilience of one leader, but to the solidarity and perseverance of many. These excerpts are taken from my conversations with founding GLF members in the summer of 2009, forty years after a group of fearless and determined youth took to the streets of Gotham in search of freedom.

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STONEWALL: In Retrospect

STEVEN F. DANSKY

formativeGLF GLFmember member formative formative GLF member Longtime political activist Steven F. Dansky was a formative member of the modern gay liberation movement. His work has been cited in nearly every book on early gay liberation, spanning more than three decades, from The Gay Militants (1971) to American Social Movements: Gay Rights Movement (2003). Dansky had been involved during the HIV pandemic for more than 15 years.

UM: Explain the Gay Liberation Front. SFD: Within weeks of the Stonewall Uprising in 1969, Gay Liberation Front (GLF) was founded. It was the first post-Stonewall Uprising lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender (LGBT) organization. Although homophile rights activists had been organizing for decades, the Stonewall Uprising ushered in a new militancy. The entrance of GLF was onto the most turbulent stage in this country’s history, within a historical continuum, an era marked by a vigorous civil rights, an emergent second wave of feminism, and at the height of aggressive anti-Vietnam War movement. The wellspring for a LBTG movement was overflowing, and GLF was poised to develop from sexual urgency to political activism. GLF forged the roots of activism with particular audacity, staging activist demonstrations in Times Square and Greenwich Village; at sites of institutional bigotry such as St. Patrick’s Cathedral; against media

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Pride: Then

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I learned e Village Voice; Radicalesbians at dehumanizingstaged Massachusetts, on the first day that changed in the 1980s with HIV/ andMassachusetts now in additionand to MA, there is as welltothe asraise an Blake activist. I learned Menace challenge to the women’s a Lavender Iowa, Vermont, caregiving helping rn palaces; and the group marriageIowa, became legal, Massachusetts AIDS epidemic. became a caregiver, to same-sex the women’s Vermont, and IAnd caregiving to raise Blake movement. InMenace additionchallenge to activism, Connecticut with Maine, Maryland, Morgan. activism helping from Gay dicalesbians staged a Lavender and now in addition to MA, there is as well as an activist. I learned movement. In addition Connecticut with New Maine, Maryland, Morgan. And activism a great deal of queer theory began to activism, Washington, New Hampshire, Liberation Front. 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I was a social gender same-sex and sexuality. altered assumptions about This is extraordinary progress in 40 in California. work intern at BethKramer Israel Hospital ality so persistentand thatsexuality. it radically not forget there are legal brief telephone with This18,000 is extraordinary progress 40 York,conversation work intern was at Beth years from pathology and legality to in inNew and Kramer goingIsrael Hospital ered assumptions about gender same-sex marriages in from California. Larry Kramer 1986. I wasYork, a social years pathology to ain lecture in New and Kramer was going UM: 1969. 2009. What’s changed? front-ant-center in the global humanand legality to give at the hospital. As it d sexuality. This is extraordinary progress in 40 work intern at Beth Israel Hospital humanout, I was to give a lecture at the What hasn’t? UM: 1969. 2009. What’s changed? rights debates.front-ant-center in the global turned unable to attend, but hospital. As it years from pathology anddebates. legality to in New York, and Kramer going What hasn’t? rights turned was out, was unable I telephoned Kramer andI said, “I can to attend, but M: 1969. 2009. What’s changed? front-ant-center in the global human to give a lecture at the hospital. As it I telephoned Kramer and said, “I can SFD: The progress in forty years is UM: You’re described as an tell you a lot about homophobia at this hat hasn’t? rightsyears debates. turnedasout, an I was unable to attend, but homophobia at this The progressThe in forty UM: and You’re tell you a lot about unimaginable SFD: and extraordinary. avid isprofeminist, have described done hospital.” I believed that homophobia, and said,I believed “I can that homophobia, unimaginable andbyextraordinary. 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Kramer said, Remember, in activism identity the early Larrysure weI’m 1969 same-sexuality was illegal and Kramer and since the creation of days of make get coming the caretowespeak need.”to the staff to ds and arrests, which ignited the has been central to the gay American “I don’t care about the homophobia. was illegal Kramer Crisis activism(GMHC) and the creation of all activism make sure we get the care we need.” punishable in 1969 manysame-sexuality states. In 1986, Gayand Men’s Health You see, became focused onewall Uprising.punishable Remember, many in identity the early days of Larry I’m coming to speak to the staff to states. Ininsince 1986, Men’s Health Crisis (GMHC) in Bower vs. Hardwick,in the U.S New York. 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Only in 1973, the American pandemic and the care early affect gay rights human of theand walls of the FDA of same-sex And did the itscaling help urgency during the first phase of as pathology. Itdesignation became known as the relatedness shape the identity of the activism? movement? HIV/AIDS epidemic. ychiatric Association reversed its movement, how did the needthe for identity health of thein movement? Washington for itsthe lack of attention shape HIV/AIDS epidemic. quickest “cure”asinpathology. history. It became known as the signation of same-sex relatedness care affect activism? And did it help and urgency during the first phase of quickest “cure” in history. pathology. It became known as the shape the identity of the movement? the HIV/AIDS epidemic. ckest “cure” in history.

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STONEWALL: In Retrospect

Perry Brass was born in Savannah, GA, but reborn in New York City in November, 1969 when he joined the Gay Liberation Front and the GLF newspaper Come Out! He has since published 14 books including How to Survive Your Own Gay Life, his work has been included in 25 anthologies, and 50 of his poems have been set to music.

UM: How would you compare the GLF, back in the day, to the modern gay rights movement? How much of the GLF’s original vision, would you say, has survived? PB: I think that the gay movement has evolved somewhat evolutionarily: it has adapted to the times, which is a good thing in some ways and a terrible, ugly thing in other ways. One thing that most people don’t take into consideration, and that we, as gay liberationists from GLF understood from the get-go, is that almost dyed-in-the-wool prevalence of internalized homophobia, that insidious repugnance queer men, especially, feel toward each other. No other minority group has it to the degree we have, and for good reason. As Harry Hay said, “Because our parents rejected us, we reject each other.” Therefore, we now see a gay movement (and I don’t say “gay liberation movement,” because I feel that gay liberation pretty much died about 1974) infected with celebrity worship, that denies the real importance of LGBT leaders who come out of the movement (in other words, we must be recognized by the straights before we’ll recognize each other), that is totally money oriented, that goes from crisis to crisis with very little history or foundation behind it. GLF had none of that. We wanted to create an authentic gay culture, a real gay media, and a gay world that was part of the bigger world and yet distinct enough from the mainstream for us to survive intact in it.

PERRYformative BRASS GLF member 12

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Pride: Then

1969

What has survived from GLF? An understanding that gays are a natural part of human existence; that we can heroically work with each other (GLF proved that, before GLF this idea was ridiculed. As Mart Crowley said in The Boys in the Band, “Show me a happy homosexual and I’ll show you a gay corpse.”); that there is a real foundation to homophobia that is not predicated on our being sick, sinners, or whatever: homophobia is a useful tool of a society that crushes people for being different; that patriarchy and its main product, sexism, can be seen, defined, and understood — so we can work against sexism.

What did not come out of GLF? An understanding of what is the male role in society and life, and how that role can be enriched, be made more wonderful to participate in. Also, GLF had a poor understanding of transgenderism. That would come later.

I officially joined the paper in its third issue. It was then being produced out of Lois Hart and Suzanne Bevier’s loft on 6th Avenue near 38th Street, across the hallway from Sue Nagrin’s Times Change Press, another “movement” publisher. The guiding light of the paper at the point was Lois, who is now deceased. Although the paper was conceived as a collective, Lois was purely its leader, and Lois definitely had a point of view from that period of that first wave of lesbian feminism. I got along fairly well with her, and she used to refer to me as her “favorite male chauvinist.” To Lois, all men were male chauvinists, and all men oppressed all women. Lois came from a Catholic background, and this became the guiding catechism of the collective. It did in fact, alienate her from the

“...homophobia is a useful tool of UM: Tell us about your involvement with the a society that crushes people GLF publication Come Out! PB: I joined GLF because of the paper, truly. I for being different.” had been writing gay material before, and had finished a gay novel when I was 19 years old. I was told there was no way in hell I could get it published. Which was probably the truth. So when I heard about GLF and the paper, there was this instant attraction to me. I joined the paper in its 3rd issue, and published poetry in it under the name Mark Shield, although my name appears on the masthead. By the 4th and 5th issues, I was writing regularly for it. At the end of the 5th issue, the paper had to find new leadership and a new “office.” Our office had been a bedroom in an apartment in the East Village. So I agreed to publish the paper out of my Hell’s Kitchen walk-up apartment, and became, basically, the leading force on the paper, keeping it together and both guiding it and taking a lot of heat, since the paper was always extremely controversial. We published the next 3 issues from my apartment. Here is a brief excerpt from a talk I’ve given about Come Out! It says a lot about the paper and my involvement with it: My first intention on joining GLF was to

street queens, or the STAR girls whom Lois thought aped women without being them, and some women found Lois to be rather heavy handed and bridled against her. But she had a huge passion for the paper and she used every resource she had to get it out. She and Suzanne had a house painting business, and we used their van to pick up the bound copies of the freshly printed paper from the Movement printers who often printed Come Out! on the sly, after their regular jobs at commercial printers were done. One of my favorite stories was the whole collective coming out in the van to pick the paper up at 1 o’ clock in the morning after it had been run on very clickety off-set presses in Brooklyn by a team of hippy printers who to make “bread,” or money, ran advertising circulars during the day. We had to jump over fences to get into the back of the print shop, and finally, by 3 AM the paper was piled up in the back of Lois’s VW van. On the way back to Lois’s loft, where we would bring the bales of Come Out! up 4 flights of stairs, Lois announced that all of the printers had been tripping on LSD while they printed Come Out! Aw, those were the days!

“I don’t care the I’m coming to speak to work with Come about Out! the first paperhomophobia. with a political mission of gay liberation in the world. the staff to make sure we get the care we need.” “I don’t care about the homophobia. I’m coming to speak to the staff to make sure we get the care we need.” 13 7

ConnextionsMagazine.com homophobia at the offices of Time and The Village Voice; at dehumanizing

I was married in 2004 in Williamstown, Massachusetts, on the first day that

SFD: My political trajectory completely changed in the 1980s with the HIV/


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STONEWALL: In Retrospect Items from Andriote’s “Victory Deferred Collection” at the Smithsonian’s National Museum of American History were featured in the museum’s 2011 exhibit marking the 30th anniversary of the AIDS epidemic. The Archive Center’s display featured interview notes, photos and correspondence from the collection. The museum’s 2009 exhibit marking the 40th anniversary of the Stonewall Uprising also featured materials from Andriote’s collection. Andriote’s many interview subjects include AIDS activist and author Larry Kramer. From the book jacket of Victory Deferred: “Andriote, who has been at the center of national advocacy and AIDS politics in Washington, is judicious without being uncritical, and his account of the political maturation of the gay community is one of the most stirring civil rights stories of our time.”

UM: How did you end up devoting your career to writing about HIV/AIDS? JMA: It was sort of the perfect storm. Friends of mine were starting to get sick and die from AIDS. I was 26 years old. As a journalist, I was reading five newspapers a day (this was before the Internet, of course), along with magazines; I was keeping up with what was going on in the world. [AIDS] was a big unfolding story in 1985. Rock Hudson announced he had AIDS, people were terrified, there was a lot of hysteria. It hadn’t yet exploded in terms of the understanding that this was a global issue. Africa had been written about, but it wasn’t

ANDRIOTE formative GLF member

JOHN-MANUEL

journalist and author formative GLF member

nearly on the scale of the pandemic it later became. AIDS affected me personally. It was affecting my community. And I had engaged as a journalist. It sank its teeth into my imagination. And so it was worth pouring myself into. And because of that I became very aware of injustices people with AIDS were experiencing. That’s the first time I discovered my passion about social justice—about fairness and unfairness—so it captured me on a spiritual level as well.

2011 UM: Flash forward a bit. When compared to other movements like Black civil rights or women’s rights, the gay rights movement seems fundamentally different. But it seems like the LGBT community is trying its hardest to conform to society. Why?

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JMA: That’s a fundamental issue that’s never been resolved to the satisfaction of Joe Six Pack— whether or not being gay is a choice. Even if it is a choice, why shouldn’t it be protected? Protected like so many other choices, like which religion you practice or if you don’t practice any religion? Those are choices. And if you do see being gay as a choice, there’s this thing about how you play the hand you’ve been dealt. Do you want to get married and have children? Do you want to have a similar life to what’s considered the norm for heterosexuals? What does it mean to be gay? It hasn’t been satisfactorily answered. UM: And it’s a catch 22, because as traditional labels dissolve people forget about the people

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Pride: Then “Kramer says sex is a strange thing to base a community on...” behind those labels. Then the “we” behind the LGBT community begins to dissolve as well. JMA: And when we talk about “we” who exactly are we talking about? Larry Kramer has been a critic forever about that idea of “what does it mean to be gay?” and for whatever reason I find myself agreeing with him. Kramer says sex is a strange thing to base a community on – this sort of priapic brotherhood. That goes back to the 70s—this whole idea about gay liberation as sexual liberation—the freedom to have sex wherever, whenever and with whomever you want. Not all people who consider themselves gay are comfortable with that idea, certainly not with that public representation of what it means to be gay. I’m not comfortable with it. UM: How so? JMA: From the time that I came out in the early 80s (I was in my early 20s), I was very aware of those gay men who were affluent and upper-middle class—the ones who lived in nice apartments, went to Rio, had nice clothes and rented a house on fire island in the summer. That, to me, was a very specific experience of being gay. Often after dinner parties the same men would put on their leather and go to the Mineshaft [1]. There was this juxtaposition of upper middle class, St. Thomas, Fifth Avenue, Episcopalian respectability, but also this raunchy

with Kramer—going into his apartment on Fifth Avenue, right next to Washington Square—is a momentous thing. Historic things took place there. The meetings that led to the founding of Gay Men’s Health Crisis (GMHC) took place there. Larry had recently reconnected with this man who he demonized in his 1978 novel Faggots as “Dinky”—the boyfriend who couldn’t be faithful because he was caught up in the whole sexual subculture. The Fred Lemmish character (the Kramer character) wanted to move on from that. Well, Dinky and Lemmish reconnected years later and they’ve been together ever since as partners. The New York Times in 1995 had just done a story about Larry called “When A Roaring Lion Learns to Purr”—that was the headline (it was fantastic)—so one of my questions [to Larry] was, “is it true you’ve learned to purr?” [laughs] For a man who was notorious for being a “roaring lion”—for blasting people in high-decibel pitches, in histrionic terms—one-on-one, sitting in his living room, he was more like a purring cat than a roaring lion. I think that I wrote how he seemed kind of sad. That’s the part of Larry people have missed. They only hear about the histrionics—the anger, the outrage. They don’t look beneath that to realize why he’s been so angry—the terrible loss, the disappointment, the disillusionment that he’s

“I don’t care about the homophobia. I’m coming to speak to the staff to make sure we get the care we need.” “I don’t care about the homophobia. I’m coming to speak to the staff to make sure we get the care we need.”

and promiscuous side of gay life. I had very mixed experienced as he’s lost so many people, as he’s messages coming at me as a young gay man about watched the U.S. government and its scientists what it was to be gay. hadn’t necessarily related not doing everything it seemed they could homophobia at the offices of Time I was married 2004 in Williamstown, My affecting political trajectory completely to either oneand of those things; neitherinsat well with do—andSFD: it was his friends. It affected The Village Voice; at on theWhat first day that the As 1980s withseen the HIV/ me.dehumanizing I’ve always felt thatMassachusetts, tension within myself. him in a changed personalinway. we’ve with ACT porn palaces; and the group same-sex marriage became legal, AIDSLarry epidemic. became a caregiver, mean to Ibe gay? Whatin do I mean by it? I UPSFD: (which was I instrumental mophobia at the offices ofdoes Timeitand was married 2004 in Williamstown, My political trajectory completely in starting Radicalesbians staged a ILavender now inand addition to MA, there and is inspiring as well as his an activist. atI the learned mean, didn’t come outand of a closet embrace with e Village Voice; at dehumanizing Massachusetts, on the first daymythat changed in the 1980s speech with the HIV/ gay and Menace challenge homosexual to the women’s Iowa,to Vermont, Massachusetts and caregiving helping toNew raiseYork), Blake nature in order fit into another closet lesbian community center in is that rn palaces; and the group same-sex marriage became legal, AIDS epidemic. I became a caregiver, movement. In addition togay activism, defineConnecticut with Maine, Maryland, Morgan. afraid And activism from Gay forinme. when andI grieving, dicalesbians staged a other Lavenderpeopleand now addition to MA, there is as people well asare an activist. learned it’s a very a great deal of queer theory began Washington, New Hampshire, New LiberationtoFront. So many ofyour us were vulnerable show world sadness nace challenge to the women’s Iowa, Vermont, Massachusetts and caregivingthing helping to the raise Blake with GLF thinkers and writers who Jersey, and New York considering helpless in the face of an unknown You interviewed Larry Kramer. anMorgan. grief. SoAnd anger and rage ovement. In addition toUM: activism, Connecticut with Maine, Maryland, activism fromand Gayhostility are compelled a shift in perception of same-sex marriage. And let’s and fatal retrovirus. I remember a putLiberation out thereFront. as a So shield great deal of queer theory began Washington, New Hampshire, New manytoofprotect us wereyour broken reality so persistent that it radically not forget there are 18,000 legal brief telephone conversation with JMA: who My interview with and him was many years heart. That’s people haven’t wanted to see. h GLF thinkers and writers Jersey, New soYork considering helpless in what the face of an unknown altered assumptions about gender same-sex marriages in California. Larry Kramer in 1986. I was a social ago. I recently contacted about interviewing Just deeply his heart’s been broken. They mpelled a shift in perception of same-sexLarry marriage. And let’s andhow fatal retrovirus. I remember a and sexuality. This is extraordinary progress in 40 work intern at Beth Israel Hospital actually, for revised paperback edition don’t the man. conversation That’s what I with was interested ality so persistent that itagain, radically notthe forget there are 18,000 legal briefseetelephone years from pathology and legality to in New York, and Kramer was going ered assumptions about gender Deferred same-sex in California. in 1986. a social of Victory thatfront-ant-center I’m marriages working on The human in Larry and Kramer ultimately that’sIatwas what changed UM: 1969. 2009. What’s changed? in now. the global to give a lecture the hospital. As ithow I d sexuality. This is extraordinary progress in 40 work intern at Beth Israel Hospital first interview for Victoryrights was back in 1995. Meeting thought about What hasn’t? debates. turned Larry. out, I was unable to attend, but years from pathology and legality to in New York, and Kramer was going I telephoned Kramer and said, “I can M: 1969. 2009. What’s changed? front-ant-center in the global human to give a lecture at the hospital. As it SFD: The progress in forty years is UM: You’re described as an tell you a lot about homophobia at this hat hasn’t? ConnextionsMagazine.com rights debates. turned out, I was unable to attend, but unimaginable and extraordinary. The avid profeminist, and have done hospital.” I believed that homophobia, I telephoned Kramer and said, “I can right to assemble guaranteed by the considerable work with HIV/AIDS. whether unconscious or not, affected D: The progress in forty years is UM: You’re described as an tell you a lot about homophobia at this Bill of Rights in the U.S. Constitution The bond between the Gay Rights the delivery of quality health care to maginable and extraordinary. The avid profeminist, and have done hospital.” I believed that homophobia, was violated by the State with bar Movement and the HIV/AIDS pandemic patients with HIV/AIDS. Kramer said, ht to assemble guaranteed by the considerable work with HIV/AIDS. whether unconscious or not, affected raids and arrests, which ignited the has been central to the gay American “I don’t care about the homophobia.

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STONEWALL: In Retrospect

formative GLF member JOHNformative KNOEBEL GLF member founding GLF member

An active member of the Gay Liberation Front beginning in November 1969, John Knoebel eventually founded the Effeminists, a group of gay men who opposed sexism, and co-authored “The Effeminist Manifesto” with Steven Dansky and Kenneth Pitchford which originally appeared in Double F: a Magazine of Effeminism (published from 1972 to 1976). Knoebel is currently the Vice President of Consumer Marketing for the nation’s two largest LGBT magazines: The Advocate and Out. UM: GLF convened a meeting with Black Panther co-founder and leader Huey Newton at Jane Fonda’s penthouse. You were there. Give us the scoop. JK: Shortly after his release from prison in 1970, Huey Newton released an important essay entitled, “A Letter from Huey Newton to the Revolutionary Brothers and Sisters about the Women’s Liberation and Gay Liberation Movements,” which is considered the first pro-gay, pro-woman proclamation to come out of the black civil rights movement. In it, Huey Newton asked Panthers to confront their prejudices and re-examine their attitudes towards women and homosexuals. He stated, “We [Panthers] have not said much about the homosexual at all, but we must relate to the homosexual movement because it is a real thing. And I know through reading, and through my life experience and observations that homosexuals are not given freedom and liberty by anyone in the society. They might be the most oppressed people in the society.” Later in the letter, he said, “there is nothing to say that a homosexual cannot also be a revolutionary. And maybe I’m now injecting some of my prejudice by saying that “even a homosexual can be a revolutionary.” Quite the contrary, maybe a homosexual could be the most revolutionary.”

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Pride: Then “I don’t care about the homophobia. I’m coming to speak to the staff to make sure we get the care we need.” “I don’t care about the homophobia. I’m coming to speak to "Huey arrived shirtless, drying the staff to make surestill we get the care we need.”

himself with a bath towel.”

homophobia at the offices of Time and I was married in 2004 in Williamstown, SFD: My political trajectory completely The Village Voice; at dehumanizing Massachusetts, the affair first day changed 1980snever with became the HIV/ a reality and, These were powerful sentiments to Harlem having on a brief andthat the location that into the porn palaces; and the group same-sex marriage became legal, AIDS epidemic. I became a caregiver, fromofa Time leader of the Black his return to Oakland, Huey quickly no accident. WhenSFD: we arrived, mophobia atcome the offices and I was Power married in day 2004was in Williamstown, My political after trajectory completely Radicalesbians staged a Lavender and now in addition to MA, there is as well as an activist. I learned movement at this time. GLF’s support becamewith involved in trying to regain some the into Fonda’s e Village Voice; at dehumanizing Massachusetts, on elevator the first opened day thatdirectlychanged in the 1980s the HIV/ Menace challenge to the women’s Iowa, Vermont, Massachusetts and caregiving helping to raise Blake the Panthers had long been amarriage the leadership role that had been taken apartment and legal, we were greeted by her I of rn palaces;for and the group same-sex became AIDS epidemic. became a caregiver, movement. In addition to activism, Connecticut with Maine, Maryland, Morgan. And activism from Gay issue within and GLF,now ever by others during his stay in prison. daughter, Vanessa, dicalesbianscontentious staged a Lavender in addition to MA, there iswho was asscreaming, well as an over activist. I learned a great deal of queer theory began Washington, New Hampshire, New Liberation Front. So many of us were since toa consensus of sortsIowa, to support enace challenge the women’s Vermont, three Massachusetts and caregiving helping toof raise Blake joint demonstrations None the proposed years old innocently naked. with GLF thinkers and writers who Jersey, and New York considering helpless in the face of an unknown Panthers in November of 1969 with ovement. In the addition to activism, Connecticut Maine, Morgan. And activism ever from held inGay New York. FondaMaryland, herself gave compelled a shift in perception of same-sexJane marriage. And appeared, let’s and us fatal were retrovirus. I remember a great deal ofhad queer theory began Washington, New Hampshire, New Liberation Front. So many of us were been largely responsible for the a gracious hello and quickly pulled reality so persistent that it radically not forget there are 18,000 legal briefhertelephone conversation with h GLF thinkers and writers who essay Jersey, and New York back considering face of an unknown off of GAA. received Nonetheless, a furtherhelpless roomLarry toingetthe altered split assumptions aboutThe gender same-sexdaughter marriages ininto California. Kramer in 1986. I our wasreports a socialof this meeting mpelled a shift perception of gay liberationists same-sex marriage. And came let’s and fatal retrovirus. remember a positive sentiment wide in attention among didataIBeth lot toIsrael further dressed. Afeni for the and sexuality. This is extraordinary progressout in to 40host uswork intern Hospital ality so persistent thatrelease it radically not offorget are 18,000 legal brief arrived telephone within conversation with after its in August 1970there York rest of the event. Cameratocrews years from pathology and legality in New York, and New Kramer wasGLF goingto accept the ered assumptions gender same-sex marriages California. Larry Kramer in Panther’s 1986. I was a social to participate in the and2009. wasabout highly invitation and weinin sat the back of the large, UM: 1969. What’sinfluential changed?in providing front-ant-center theinglobal human to very give a lecture at the hospital. As it d sexuality. a perceived new basis to This extraordinary progress 40 as Huey work Newton intern at Beth Israel Hospital workisrights more crowded living in room What hasn’t? debates. turned out,Revolutionary I was unable to People’s attend, but Constitutional from pathology and eloquent legality tospeech, in New York, andConvention Kramer was — going closely with the black years movement, Panther-inspired gave an answering I telephoned Kramer and said,a“I can M: 1969. 2009. What’s changed? front-ant-center in the global to givecorp. a lecture idea at thefor hospital. As itfrom many different despite the in known homophobia of so You’re radicals questions fromhuman the national SFD: The progress forty years is UM: described as an press tell you a lot about homophobia at this hat hasn’t? many Panther members. rights debates. turned out, I was movements unable to attend,gather but to write a new unimaginable and extraordinary. The avid profeminist, and have done hospital.” I believed that to homophobia, I telephoned Kramer and said, “I can people’s constitution. Two sessions As the were being whether broken unconscious right to assemble guaranteed by the considerable work cameras with HIV/AIDS. or not, affected D: The progress in York, forty the years is UM:a highly You’re described as an you a lot about homophobia at this In New Panthers had were held, health the first in to Philadelphia in Afenithetold us Rights to betellpatient, as Bill of Rights in the U.S. Constitution The bonddown, between Gay the delivery of quality care maginable and extraordinary. The avid profeminist, and have done hospital.” I believed that homophobia, influential spokeswoman in Afeni Shakur was violated by the State with bar MovementHuey and the HIV/AIDS pandemic patients HIV/AIDS. Kramer early September 1970said, and another over wanted to speak with us after he with ht to assemble guaranteed by the considerable work with HIV/AIDS. whether unconscious or not, affected raids and arrests, which ignited has been took centrala toshower. the gay Within American don’t care about the homophobia. (future mother of rap artist,the Tupac Shakur), Thanksgiving weekend in Washington minutes,“I Huey of Rights in the U.S. Constitution The bond between the Gay Rights the delivery of quality health care to Stonewall Remember, identity the shirtless, early days Larry himself I’mwith comingDC. to speak to thea staff to of 40 or so whoUprising. was responsible for indeveloping a since I estimate group arrived stillof drying s violated by the State with bar Movement and the HIV/AIDS pandemic patients with HIV/AIDS. Kramer said, 1969 same-sexuality was between illegal andthe Panthers Kramer activism and the creation ofhim as make we get the care we need.” genuine rapport Yorkers attended the first session a bath towel. I remember a verysureNew ds and arrests, which ignited the has been central to the gay American “I don’t care about the homophobia. punishable many In 1986, GayofMen’s Health individual, Crisis (GMHC) Youwith see, allinactivism became We focused andinGLF at states. this time. In September Philadelphia. were joined by attractive onewall Uprising. Remember, in identity since the early days of Larry well-built I’m and coming to speak to the staff to in Bower vs. Hardwick, the U.S in New York. You write that “during on health care. 1970, Afeni contacted GLF with the news dozens of other gay and lesbian GLF particularly striking eyes. We wondered 69 same-sexuality was illegal and Kramer activism and the creation of make sure we get the care we need.” Supremethat, Court upheld a in Georgia the to 1980s, the ifpandemic wasintentionally about while heInwas New York delegates from cities across the nation, later he’d (GMHC) been showing nishable in many states. 1986, Gay City Men’s Health Crisis You see, all activism became focused anti-sodomy press law engagements, allowing criminal inevitable off. death, few exceptions,” And ActUp was the most audacious Huey Newton Thewith conversation Huey Bower vs.doHardwick, the U.S in New York. You write that “during wasn’tonlong. health care. including many from Boston, Milwaukee, prosecution forlike private homosexual explaining how had youa “attempted to wantedgay groupSan in theFrancisco, history of the gay would to meet with members of GLF Chicago, Lawrence clearly few things he to tell preme Court upheld a Georgia the 1980s, the pandemic was about acts. This ruling was overturned by transform lossFirst into ahe moral lesson, movement, taking it’s tactics to discuss possible joint demonstrations Tallahassee FL, from and other places referred to hisAnd recent letter ti-sodomy law allowing criminal inevitable death,us. with fewoff, exceptions,” ActUp was KS, the most audacious the Court in 2003. Scalia warned in his aligning with the body gay of literature that He said GLF and GAA in its confrontation of gay liberation. Some GLF members between. In fact, liberation. osecution forwith private homosexual explaining how concerning you “attempted to gay groupthat in thein history of the gay an important side dissenting open that thismeeting, would lead demonstrates our pathos as nurturers any institution that was homophobic. objected to the either doubting outcome of the from Philadelphia convention prison lesson, he had become acquaintedtaking s. This ruling was overturned by transform loss while into ain moral movement, it’s tactics to opening floodgate same-sex the idea and ofcaregivers.” With regard to the I’ll always remember ActUp for the its the sincerity or for questioning the opportunity it provided for brothers who himGAA at inwas e Court in 2003. Scalia warned in his aligning with thewith bodygay of literature that had talked GLF to and its confrontation of marriage. Only in 1973, the American pandemic and the early gay rights human scaling of the walls of the FDA anthat alliance with the Pantherdemonstrates movement. our what in effect the first national length andaswere largely responsible for a that senting open this would lead pathos nurturers any institution waswas homophobic. Psychiatric Association reversed its movement, how did the need for health in Washington for its lack of attention Others were interested in attending, but gay liberation The weekend change in his thinking people. opening the floodgate for same-sex and caregivers.” With regard to the aboutI’llgay always remember ActUp forgathering. the designation of same-sex relatedness care affect activism? And did it help and urgency during the first phase of could not do so on such short notice. In poorly organized, and so He said that when he returned to Oakland, arriage. Only in 1973, the American pandemic and the early gay rights human scaling ofconvention the walls ofwas the FDA as pathology. It became known as the shape the identity of the movement? the HIV/AIDS epidemic. the end, GLF put forward three membershow did hours waiting for Panther he the intended tohealth move the in headquarters ychiatric Association reversed its movement, need for Washington forincluded its lack many of attention quickest “cure” in history. go: myself, Nikos Diaman and aactivism? signation of to same-sex relatedness care affect didPanthers it help to Harlem, and urgency the first of GLF members had events. As phase a result, of theAnd Black as heduring pathology. Ittransgender became known as the Angela shape the identity theshould movement? thethe HIV/AIDS journalist, Douglas. large meetings with long discussions of felt ofthey be located in historic epidemic. ckest “cure”We in history. were not particularly qualified to gay liberation politics that energized the home of urban black Americans. Finally, go, but we all were well aware of GLF’s movement in the months to follow. as Afeni had alerted us, he proposed politics, past history with the Panthers that we organize joint demonstrations and its generally positive attitude toward In Philadelphia, the seemingly between GLF and the Panthers in the Huey’s recent letter. omnipresent Afeni Shakur again acted months ahead. We then spent a few 5 as the Panther’s main representative more minutes commenting on his letter, The meeting was to take place in to GLF and provided logistics around asking for more details about how he connection with a press conference meetings and events saw us working together. We tried to ask 5 connected being held at Jane Fonda’s Upper East to the convention held at Temple more about his experiences in prison, but Side penthouse, and we were told to get University. I attended sessions where the conversation wasn’t easy and Huey there on the early side. Books now say our group prepared a position paper excused himself rather quickly. Not a whole that Jane Fonda and Huey Newton were on behalf of the “male homosexual lot had been accomplished. The move

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STONEWALL: In Retrospect

STONEWALL workshop” for inclusion in our section of the proposed constitution. A discussion ensued when Afeni unexpectedly told the behind and deal with Panther sexism on gathering that, before we could present our statement, we would have to vote as group to approve the statement that “the Black Panthers were the vanguard of the revolution.” Some GLF members felt offended to have to vote for a revolutionary pecking order. Dan Smith from New York was particularly eloquent in describing the revolution as a multi-pronged movement with many groups working towards a revolution in equally important ways. In the end, a spirit of pragmatism prevailed and the group voted for the statement, just to move ahead with the process. Elsewhere, the lesbians from GLF were not fairing as well. Incidents between the women and individual Panthers ensued. A long-scheduled lesbian workshop was dropped from the Panther agenda at the last minute. After more of the same, the lesbians departed telling us to stay our own. The men of GLF did get to read their demands on the convention floor and an enthusiastic coterie of GLF delegates who had somehow managed to squeeze into the vastly overcrowded hall, greeted the gay speakers with cheers and gay power chants. Ov er Thanks gi v i ng week end i n Was hington, D.C., the work of the convention proceeded. Although originally scheduled at Howard University, it was instead held at several smaller churches, including St Stephen’s and Trinity Church. GLF held long sessions to finalize our plank, which had morphed into a platform from the Third World Gay Revolution caucus. On Saturday night, a delegation of 15 or so GLF members, under leadership of third world members, went to St.

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Stephen’s church to attempt to present our 16-point program to the Panthers, but the chaos and crowd at the church made any such presentation impossible. We left the weekend with a sense of frustration. No one was quite sure how much further we would be involved in this process. Once again it seemed that the most productive outcome of the weekend for GLF were the vigorous sessions we held among ourselves to discuss gay liberation issues. Perhaps another small side incident, however, would prove to be a little more interesting story of that Washington weekend. I was part of a large contingent of about 75 of the GLF members from around the country. We were housed for the weekend under Panther protection at the chapel on the grounds of American University. Security for convention delegates was much more in evidence in Washington, as there was clearly a larger perceived threat of violence against the convention by police in the nation’s capitol. Intimidating, probably armed Panthers, all of whom seemed to us particularly tall and burly, patrolled the grounds around the chapel where we were bedded down on the floor for the night. I recall the group made some attempt at discussions about the next day’s sessions until around 10pm, but we were all rather subdued as they told us we could not leave the building until the next morning. Then at about 11pm, Panther guards came in and announced that, due to a change of plans, someone they called “Big Man” would need to stay at our facility that night. A rumor went around that this was possibly the editor of the Black Panther newspaper. In any event, we were given 20 minutes to go through our belongings and hand-in any drugs or weapons we had in our possession “to avoid any potential problems with the police.”

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Special Feature has been brought to you by Urban Molecule. Urban Molecule began in 2008 as an urban art series created by New York City-based writer Christopher de la Torre. UM has since explored prominent modes of counterculture, including art, literature, film, pedagogy and cyberculture. Connect at UrbanMolecule.com or follow on twitter @urbanmolecule

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PRIDE: THEN & NOW June 28, 1969: New York City Police raid Stonewall t Inn, as they had done many times before. The June 28, 1970: The gay community of NYC’s patrons, who were tired of this practice, revolted Christopher Street unite and march on what and fought back. The Stonewall Riots were the became the First Pride March, just a year later spark that ignited the Pride movement across the c after the Stonewall Riots. world. October 14, 1978: The first openly gay elected official in California and gay activist, Harvey Milk, June 5, 1982: The first documented case of the was assasinated. “gay cancer,” which was later called AIDS, was made public. This was the beginning of the AIDS epidemic, which shaped much of the gay d October 14, 1979: The First National March on Washington for Lesbian and Gay Rights took community and activism. place and drew up to 125,000 members of the LGBT community and straight allies marched to June 24, 1984: Heritage of Pride was founded to demand equal civil rights. take over planning and production of NYC Pride. June 7, 1989: Denmark becomes the first country in the world to legalize registered partnerships for February 28, 1994: Don’t Ask Don’t Tell policy was same-sex couples, which provided almost all of c instituted. The policy prohibited military personnel the same qualities as marriage. from discriminating against or harassing closeted homosexual or bisexual service members or applicants, while barring openly gay, lesbian, or April 26, 2000: Vermont passes legislation to allow bisexual persons from military service. same-sex couples to unite in civil union, which was viewed with basically being the same as a September 21, 1996: The Defense of Marriage Act same-sex marriage at the time and the first of its (DOMA) was enacted as United States federal law. kind in the USA. DOMA defined marriage as the union of one man February 11, 2004: San Francisco Mayor Gavin Newsom directs the city-county clerk to issue marriage licenses to same-sex couples, leading to the beginning of marriage equality in California.

d and one woman, and allowed states to refuse to recognize same-sex marriages granted under the laws of other states.

August 4, 2010: a federal judge ruled that March 11, 2004: A month later, during a very short Proposition 8 is unconstitutional under and barred lived ruling, California Supreme Court orders a its enforcement. halt of all same-sex couples marriage licenses. Therefore, leaving about 4,000 married same-sex u June 26, 2013: US v. Windsor, US Supreme Court holds couples in limbo. that restricting federal interpretation of “marriage” and “spouse” to apply only to opposite-sex unions, May 17, 2004: Massachusetts becomes the first US is unconstitutional. state to legalize same-sex marriage. November 4, 2008: California voters approved Proposition 8, which made same-sex marriage illegal.

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June 28, 2015: The US Supreme Court rules that marriage equality is now the law of the land. April 15, 2019: Pete Buttigieg, becomes the first openly gay man to launch a US Presidential candidacy, and kisses his husband on stage.

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LA Pride 2019 Opening Ceremony: Paula Abdul Connextions Magazine 24 Photo by Connextions Magazine

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Pride: Now

BRUSSELS: BELGIAN PRIDE 2019 Belgium | May 17-19, 2019 Website: www.visit.brussels/en/article/belgianpride-brussels-the-weekends-highlights The gay-friendly capital of 500 million Europeans will celebrate its 24th annual Pride celebration this year, with a fabulous colorful parade, a vibrant rainbow village in the Grand-Place, and tons of pride parties to celebrate all weekend long. The theme of this year’s Belgian Pride is All for One. Through #AllforOne, Pride wants to emphasize that everyone is unique and deserves their place in society without discrimination.

Photo courtesy of: Š visit.brussels - Eric Danhier

LONG BEACH: LONG BEACH PRIDE FESTIVAL Long Beach, CA | May 18-19, 2019 Website: www.longbeachpride.com A two-day LGBTQ+ event with live music, community programming, and food and drinks from local eateries. The Long Beach Pride Festival is inclusive and strives to promote an environment that is free from prejudice and bias. Over the past several years, the festival has become one of the premiere Pride events nationwide now attracting over 80,000 participants over two days. LOUISVILLE: KENTUCKIANA PRIDE PARADE AND FESTIVAL Louisville, KY | June 14-15, 2019 Website: www.kypride.com

Photo courtesy of: Long Beach Pride Festival

Taking place at the Big Four Lawn of Waterfront Park in Louisville, this year, the Louisville Convention & Visitors Bureau is celebrating its 19th annual Kentuckiana Pride Festival. The Kentuckiana Pride Parade will kick off the weekend festivities on Friday, June 14, and the festival will begin right after at the festival grounds, representing many of the local organizations to benefit #KYPride. Entertainment will include Daya, Mykki Blanco, Cakes Da Killa, Dusty Ray Bottoms and more, with a special tribute to Stonewall 50.

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Pride: Now

AUGUSTA: AUGUSTA PRIDE 10th CELEBRATION Augusta, GA | June 21-22, 2019 Website: http://prideaugusta.org/

Photo courtesy of: Augusta Pride

A diverse and eclectic destination bursting at the seams with events for people of all interests and backgrounds Augusta, GA’s annual Pride Festival is an event worth attending year-after-year. This year’s attendees can look forward to the star-studded list of headliners including, previous RuPaul’s Drag Race contestant, Trinity K Bonet, YouTube and social media sensation, Sean Van Der Wilt, musical artist, Josh Zuckerman and YouTube duo Bria and Chrissy. CINCINNATI, OH: CINCINNATI PRIDE Cincinnati | June 22, 2019 Website: www.cincinnatipride.org Cincinnati Pride Parade and Festival isn’t something to miss - a week-long celebration of the Queen City’s LGBTQ diversity, #CincyPride includes a grand two-hour parade, a main festival with music, drag queens, beer and spirits and a family-fun zone. The festival, which formed out of a political rally in 1973, celebrates its 46th anniversary this year. In 2018, the annual celebration drew over 120,000 attendees and this year promises to draw even more!

Photo courtesy of: Cincinnati Pride

BERKELEY, CA: PRIDE COMEDY NIGHT Berkeley | June 23, 2019 Website: www.thefreight.org/event/1847379-lisa-geduldig-pride-comedy-berkeley Pride Comedy Night will feature a very funny, diverse, eclectic array of Bay Area, LA, and Santa Cruz-based LGBT comedians who span a few generations of comedy and have been performing for between 10 and 30 years. This multicultural (Latina, African American, Asian American, Jewish) line up consists of Marga Gomez, Sampson McCormick, Irene Tu (Berkeley show only), and Lisa Geduldig.

ConnextionsMagazine.com Photo courtesy of: Pride Comedy Night

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Joey Suarez Gay Pride Tour Connextions Magazine

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One of the most electrifying musicians on the scene today, Joey Suarez will embark on an 8-city LGBTQ Pride Tour beginning on June 1, 2019 in Laguna Beach, California. Suarez, who blends EDM and pop music to create his own unique sound will dazzle Pride revelers as he dances across the stage to some of his most popular songs including “High in the Sky”, “Love Me Back” and “Dancing By Myself”. Joey Suarez has been an openly gay musician for his entire career thus far and decided this is the year to tour the country to spread his message of love and kindness among the gay community. “This year I hope to carry the message of our LGBTQ+ history to parts of the country that may not have access to larger scale pride celebrations,” stated Suarez. “It’s my dream to spread a positive message of pride through music and continuously remind everyone of the sacrifices made by past generations, which helped get us to where we are today!”

Joey Suarez On Tour June 01, 2019 - Laguna Beach Pride - Laguna Beach, Calif. June 03, 2019 - New York City Pride - New York City, N.Y. June 08, 2019 - Motor City Pride -Detroit, Mich. June 09, 2019 - Pittsburgh Pride – Pittsburgh, Pa. June 30, 2019 - Lawrenceburg Pride – Lawrenceburg, Ind. Aug. 14, 2019 - Jersey City Pride - Jersey City, N.J. Oct. 14, 2019 - Las Vegas Pride - Las Vegas, Nev. For more information, visit https://www.joeysuarez.com

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Pride: Now

SEATTLE: SEATTLE PRIDE FEST Seattle, WA | June 23-24, 2019 Website: www.seattlepridefest.org Seattle welcomes everyone in a city that is safe and friendly to all. In fact, Visit Seattle launched a year-long campaign called #WeSEALove, aiming to empower and celebrate the city’s own LGBTQ community. During the month of June, rainbow flags are proudly flown as the city comes out in full force. The festivities reach their peak at the two-day PrideFest, which includes the Seattle Pride Parade. Summer also brings a collection of concerts, food trucks, a craft bazaar, and more.

Photo courtesy of: Seattle Pride Fest 3

ST. LOUIS: PRIDEFEST ST. LOUIS St. Louis, MO | June 29-30, 2019 Website: www.pridestl.org/pridefest Taking place at the newly-renovated Soldiers’ Memorial Park, PrideFest is an annual celebration, one of the most-attended events in the Midwest region. The festival includes a parade with floats and contingents, twenty hours of live entertainment ranging from pop, disco, jazz, rock, country and rap on two stages. Attendees can enjoy a variety of acts and performances, including music, dance, and visual arts. 300,000 people attended PrideFest in 2018. CHARLOTTE: CHARLOTTE PRIDE WEEK Charlotte, NC | August 9-18, 2019 Website: www.charlottepride.org/2019event

Photo courtesy of: Explore St. Louis

This weeklong celebration is filled with color and joy, culminating in a huge festival that draws people from across the state. Drawing 165,000 attendees and 43 parade floats last year, Charlotte Pride aims to promote the visibility of the LGBTQ community in the Charlotte area – all are welcome! Together in 2019 we will celebrate and commemorate the 50th anniversary of the Stonewall Uprising. Charlotte Pride is always welcome to new volunteer leaders and committee members.

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Pride: Now

OAKLAND: OAKLAND PRIDE FESTIVAL Oakland, CA | September 8, 2019 Website: www.oaklandpride.org

Photo courtesy of: Oakland Pride 1

Located just east of San Francisco, it’s no surprise that Oakland has deep roots in the LGBTQ community. The area has been named a hotbed for LGBTQ creativity! Together, Oakland celebrate the cultures and diversity of the LGBTQ community in Oakland and the East Bay. Oakland Pride is committed to facilitating leadership and coalition building for the funding and development of the first LGBTQ community center in Oakland. CHATTANOOGA: CHATTANOOGA PRIDE Chattanooga, TN | October 6, 2019 Website: www.chattanoogapride.com/pride2018 A few highlights of Chattanooga Pride Week will include an exciting kickoff party, a queer film festival, and various celebrations highlighting the LGBTQ community in Tennessee. Pride Week will culminate on Sunday, October 6 with a parade from the corner of 4th and Cherry Street to the scenic Ross’s Landing. The festival will feature live music, a drag show, food & drinks, vendor markets and a kid’s activity area.

Photo courtesy of: Chattanooga Pride

GREATER PALM SPRINGS: PALM SPRINGS PRIDE FESTIVAL Palm Springs, CA | November 2-3, 2019 Website: www.pspride.org Known for its crystal blue skies, year-round sunshine, stunning landscape, palm tree lined streets and starry nights, the City of Palm Springs comes alive during the annual Greater Palm Springs Pride celebration. Rainbow flags and glitter will fill the streets as the ever-present Mount San Jacinto Mountains star in the most scenic pride parade and festival in the world. The downtown parade steps off at 10 a.m. Sunday and travels along historic Palm Canyon Drive. The two-day festival is FREE and open to everyone.

ConnextionsMagazine.com Photo courtesy of: Palm Springs Pride

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Pride In New Jersey

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ASBURY PARK: JERSEY PRIDE PARADE AND FESTIVAL Asbury, NJ | June 2, 2019 Website: https://www.jerseypride.org Taking place on Sunday, June 2nd in the hip shore city of Asbury Park, this parade and festival is the state’s largest Pride celebration. Last year’s event was attended by more than 20,000 people and featured, more than 200 artisans, merchants, community organizations, and food. This year’s lineup includes the parade, performances, speakers, food and rallies. Photo courtesy of: Karen CyBulski, Jersey Pride

ESSEX COUNTY: NORTH JERSEY PRIDEFEST Essex County, NJ | June 9, 2019 Website: https://www.northjerseypride.org On Saturday June 9 at the Memorial Park Amphitheater in Maplewood, North Jersey PrideFest will feature a live stage showcasing incredible talent of singers, bands, performers and choirs, 100+ merchant vendors, and a famous five-star food court, featuring local culinary artisans. This family-friendly event features a Rainbow Kids Zone, with a live kids stage, and the opportunity for guests to learn more about the LGBTQ and ally nonprofits that are doing important work in the community.

Photo courtesy of Jersey City Pride: Tomato Peña & Zoltan Suhay

JERSEY CITY: JERSEY CITY LGBT PRIDE Jersey City, NJ | August 24, 2019 Website: https://jerseycitypride.com The Gayborhood Jersey City will host the 19th Annual Jersey City LGBT Pride Festival on Saturday, August 24. This year the theme is “Honoring Our Past…Creating Our Future” in recognition of the Stonewall 50 Commemoration & WorldPride 2019. The festival includes main stage performances, a market of local vendors, speakers and more, all conveniently located near public transportation. The Jersey City LGBT Pride Festival is recognized as one of the largest festivals in the Northern New Jersey region.

ConnextionsMagazine.com Photo courtesy of Jersey City Pride: Tomato Peña & Zoltan Suhay

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Pride: Now

AKA Various locations throughout New York City Celebrating NYC’s World Pride and Stonewall Uprising’s 50th anniversary throughout the month of June, AKA NYC properties will provide travelers with Pride-themed items, a dedicated team of Pride experts to help navigate the many celebrations, special LGBTQIA film screenings at select properties, along with other exciting add-ons for travelers who book the World Pride package. Each AKA location, in a different, vibrant neighborhood of Manhattan, will help visitors immerse themselves in this 2019 landmark World Pride celebration.

Photo courtesy of: AKA

Crowne Plaza HY36 The Hudson Yards-adjacent Crowne Plaza HY36 has debuted a PRIDE Package for guests looking to start the celebration upon check-in. Pride participants who book the package can utilize the curated in-room gift bag – complete with Pride-themed bandanas, fans and Absolut Rainbow Vodka minis – to pregame the parade. Paying homage to pioneering authors of the movement, the hotel will also display famed works of classic and modern LGBTQ+ literature throughout the common area and in-suite for guests to peruse. The property will also donate $5 to a select LGBTQ charity each time the package is booked. For couples inspired by the love and looking to make it official on-site, the hotel’s Resident Ordained Minister can officiate the elopement of a lifetime.

Photo courtesy of: Crowne Plaza HY36

Lexington, KY Long known as a haven for the LGBTQ community in Kentucky, Lexington is refreshingly progressive (according to the U.S. Census Bureau, there are approximately 6,000 gay residents). Offering vibrant, family-friendly events such as a Mr. and Mrs. Lexington Pride pageant, drag shows, theatre

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Photo courtesy of: Jennifer The Bar Complex Hogan for Charlotte Pride


Pride: Now troupes, DJ battles and more, the Lexington Pride Festival (June 28 – 29) is celebrating its 11th year as one of the most high-profile events for the LGBTQ community in the area. Year-round, the community may also find a variety of youth programs, civic engagement activities and outreach programs, as well as gay bars like Bar Complex, which was recently marked as the oldest-continuous LGBTQ gathering place in Kentucky. New York State – The Finger Lakes Rochester, NY Photo courtesy of: Rochester Pride

For those looking for an alternative to NYC’s PRIDE, travelers can head up north to the breathtaking wine region of the Finger Lakes. Home to the second largest LGBTQ community in NYS, Rochester rivals NYC with the second largest PRIDE Festival (July 13-21) in the state. Historic points of pride include: The Empty Closet, the country’s oldest-running LGBTQ newspaper; the University of Rochester, site of the first Rochester Gay Liberation Front meeting; and Genesee Valley Park, site of the first gay community picnic. Ilikai Hotel & Luxury Suites Oahu, Hawaii

Photo courtesy of: Ilikai Hotel & Luxury Suites

ConnextionsMagazine.com Photo courtesy of: Ilikai Hotel & Luxury Suites

Known as the “gathering place,” the island of Oahu is the third largest Hawaii Island and one of the most LGBT-friendly islands. The best gay bars and activities are found in Waikiki beach including some of the best LGBT-friendly bars and restaurants. The Ilikai Hotel & Luxury Suites is proud to provide guests with its “Out and Proud” package for LGBT travelers in October. Guests who book this package receive a 10% discount and one coupon each for a free Mai Tai at the Hula’s Bar & Lei Stand. Managed by Aqua-Aston Hospitality, which recognizes hotels with LGBT-friendly policies and services and is a member of the IGLTA, supporting community events including Gay Pride Festival, the Rainbow Festival and the GLAAD and Hawaii Conference on LGBT Tourism & Hospitality.

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C O N V E R S E

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onverse celebrates the 50th anniversary of PRIDE around the world with a new collection and campaign to amplify LGBTQ+ voices and stand strong with the trans community, thus cementing its positive stance of diversity and inclusion. 2019 marks the 50th anniversary of Stonewall, a rebellious fight for equality that has since grown into a symbol of the incredible social progress driven by communities that can change the course for generations to come. Converse is committed to supporting movements for positive social change and amplifying youth voices as they spark progress to build the future they believe in. This year, as part of their annual collection and following an initial online release, Converse introduces the first-ever sneakers inspired by the trans flag.

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The collection aims to pay respect to the rebels and heroes who continue to pave the way and to celebrate who we all are as individuals. In this spirit, Converse is also releasing a new chapter of their “All The Stories Are True” campaign that amplifies the voices of six individuals connected to the LGBTQ+ community. Through powerful portraits and sharing their own words of hope to young LGBTQ+ individuals around Pride, the campaign aims to show the power of expressing one’s true self. The individuals featured are: • Desmond Is Amazing, drag kid and LGBTQ+ advocate • Kristin Beck, retired United States Navy SEAL and trans activist • Alexis Sablone, pro-skateboarder (and CONS

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Skateboarding teammate) and artist • Felix, a student advocate and nature enthusiast who first connected with Converse through OUT MetroWest • Ayishat Akanbi, UK-based fashion stylist, writer and cultural commentator • Fran Tirado, New York-based writer and editor Converse’s Pride collection was born out of their LGBTQ+ employee network in 2015 and has since evolved into an annual celebration. This year’s collection translates the significance, the cultural impact and the bravery of 50 Years of PRIDE, through a Chuck Taylor and Chuck 70 and accompanying apparel capsule that is a loud, proud, assertion of true self-expression through a bolt design, and lots of glam glitter. In a nod to the year 1969 – when the Stonewall Riots took place -- there are design cues and elements of discovery featured throughout the collection.

ConnextionsMagazine.com

Giveback Information

In celebration of Converse’s annual PRIDE collection, contributions are supporting longstanding local and global LGBTQ+ partners. Converse is proud to share that they have donated and pledged over one million dollars since 2014 in support of local and global LGBTQ+ partners. This year, they are committing to supporting global, national and local partners It Gets Better, OUT MetroWest, Fenway Health and others with charitable contributions. Like all community initiatives Converse supports, contributions are supported by product sales, and the PRIDE collections hold a special place within the Brand. Their efforts always cover three areas: • Charitable monetary contributions • In-kind support in the form of product donations and creative resources • Employee engagement in the form of volunteering

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Macy’s Herald Square 151 W. 34th Street New York, NY 10001

Taste of Pride - Furniture Department, 9th Floor Thursday, June 20th at 6 p.m. Join Macy’s for Taste of Pride featuring a conversation with chefs Anita Lo, Elizabeth Falkner, and Zac Young, and hosted by food editor, Jake Cohen. The discussion will focus on being queer in the food industry and the progress made in regard to equality. Following the conversation, there will be a mix and mingle with the panelists along with tastings of some of their favorite recipes. RSVP required. Drag Queen Story Hour with (DQSH) New York City chapter – STORY, Mezzanine Level Saturday, June 22nd at 2 p.m. Drag Queen Story Hour’s (DQSH) New York City chapter provides programming for children ages 3-8 in libraries, schools, and community spaces in all five boroughs of New York City. During this 45-minute program, a drag queen trained by librarians will read picture books, sing songs, and lead children in a craft activity. Through a fun and fabulous literary experience, DQSH teaches children about gender diversity and difference, builds empathy, teaches tolerance, and helps to prevent bullying. Drag Queen Brunch - Stella 34, 6th Floor Sunday, June 23rd at 11 a.m. Macy’s is hosting a fun drag brunch at Stella 34, filled with mimosas, food and drag performances. Additional interactive elements such as a photo booth, glam stations, and more will also be available for guests to enjoy. Seating is pre-paid with a portion of the proceeds going to The Trevor Proj-

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ect. RSVP required. Changemakers Awards Ceremony - Furniture Department, 9th Floor Tuesday, June 25th at 5:30 p.m. A mix and mingle honoring Pride month at an LGBTQ Changemakers event in support of the work and mission of the Trevor Project. Amit Paley, CEO and Executive Director of The Trevor Project, Bianey Garcia of Make the Road, Mickey Heller, the Founding Board Member of Brooklyn Community Pride Center, and Kenneth Sherrill, Professor Emeritus of Political Science Department at Hunter College will all be honored during the ceremony. Pride & Joy Celebration – Men’s Department, 2nd and 3rd Floors Tuesday, June 25th at 6:00 p.m. In collaboration with New York City Comptroller Scott M. Stringer and The MEN Event; Macy's invites guests to join the celebration at an over the top PRIDE Celebration to commemorate World Pride and a very special LGBTQ Changemakers event in support of the work and mission of The Trevor Project. Guests can mix and mingle with the 2019 Changemakers award honorees and enjoy exciting entertainment, delectable bites, tempting cocktails, giveaways, and much more. RSVP required. Visit www.macys.com/social/events to RSVP or for more information. Events subject to change or cancellation.

Converse has donated and pledged over one million dollars since 2014 in support of local and Connextions Magazine PRIDE: THEN & NOW | Spring 2019 global | LGBTQ+ partners.


Converse is committed to supporting movements for positive social change and amplifying youth voices as they spark progress to build the future they believe in.

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@ILoveLGBTTravel

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The Photographer’s Portrait

Your What, When & Where For NYC LGBTQ Events, Arts, Entertainment, Culture & More!

NYCUpAndOut.com ConnextionsMagazine.com

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M

acy’s long-standing commitment to diversity, equality, and inclusion is punctuated this June by its nationwide celebration of National Pride Month. In support of its colleagues, customers and communities, Macy’s 10th annual national Pride + Joy campaign will celebrate WorldPride 2019 and the 50th anniversary of the Stonewall uprising. Macy’s Pride + Joy campaign features special partnerships with The Trevor Project and NYC Pride, participation in Pride parades across the country, in-store special events, and exclusive Pridethemed merchandise available at more than 150 Macy’s stores and on macys.com. “At Macy’s, diversity is a foundational value and part of how we think, act and operate. It is reflect-

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ed in our long-standing commitment to fostering an inclusive culture and environment that inspires, reflects and embraces our colleagues, customers and the communities we serve,” said Shawn Outler, Macy’s chief diversity officer. “Through our annual Pride + Joy campaign, Macy’s celebrates National Pride Month as a testament to the power of community to make all of our lives shine brighter.” Macy’s is committed to diversity and inclusion in all areas of business. It is also a core value that guides how the company and its leadership operate. From LGBTQ representation in national advertising and a diverse set of suppliers including women, minority and LGBTQ-owned businesses to active and engaged LGBTQ employee resource

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Brands: MACY’S groups, and an inclusive customer bill of rights that welcomes and protects all consumers, Macy’s reflects the communities it serves. WorldPride | Stonewall 50 As a platinum sponsor of NYC Pride, the official host of WorldPride 2019 | Stonewall 50, Macy’s will participate in a number of activities throughout June to celebrate “Millions of Moments of Pride.” To showcase, reflect and honor the beauty, struggle and strides made by the LGBTQ community, Macy’s Herald Square will host four unique murals created by renowned local and international artists as part of the WorldPride Mural Project. The murals, to be unveiled on June 6, will be on display inside Macy’s famed Broadway windows at the flagship store at Herald Square through June 30. Sharing insights with the community, Macy’s diversity leadership will be highlighted via a special presentation during the WorldPride Human Rights Conference taking place at New York Law School on June 24. There, Macy’s will share its best practices on how brands can embed diversity and inclusion into the way they think, act and operate to consistently and genuinely reflect all consumers. Macy’s, Inc. will also join the NYC Pride Parade with 800 marchers and two floats, the Macy’s Pride + Joy float, which debuted last year, and a brand new float created for colleagues from Bloomingdale’s. In addition, Macy’s will have a festive activation at Pride Island, the legendary NYC pier dance and festival. The Big Give Back – The Trevor Project In support of LGBTQ youth in crisis, Macy’s Pride + Joy campaign includes a nationwide give back component in partnership with The Trevor Project. As the world’s largest suicide prevention and crisis intervention organization for lesbian, gay, bisexConnextionsMagazine.com

ual, transgender, queer, and questioning young people, The Trevor Project works to save young lives by providing support through free and confidential programs, including TrevorLifeline, TrevorText, and TrevorChat. They also run TrevorSpace, the world’s largest safe space social networking site for LGBTQ youth, and operate innovative education, research, and advocacy programs. To help raise funds for Trevor’s important work, from June 1 – June 17 at all Macy’s stores nationwide, shoppers can celebrate Pride by giving back to The Trevor Project through Macy’s charitable round-up program. As customers complete their in-store purchases, they will be invited to round up to the nearest dollar (up to $.99) and donate the change to The Trevor Project. These donations will help support the organization’s mission of providing crisis intervention and suicide prevention services. In select markets including Chicago, Cincinnati, Houston, Lexington (KY), Los Angeles, Minneapolis, New York City, San Francisco, Seattle, St. Louis, and St. Petersburg (FL), the round-up campaign will be extended through June 30 to coincide with Pride parade celebrations in which Macy’s has a local presence. Macy’s shoppers are also invited to support The Trevor Project with style. Pride and its signature colors will be front and center in the limited–edition, three-piece capsule collection by INC International Concepts. Featuring gender-neutral t-shirts, tanks and socks with rainbow detailing, throughout the month of June, Macy’s will donate $4 of the purchase price of the INC t-shirt and tank and $2 of the purchase price of the socks to The Trevor Project. The pieces retail for $10 to $20 and will be available in select stores and on macys.com/ celebrate. Pride Is Always in Fashion Additionally, to help customers express their Pride, more than 150 Macy’s stores nationwide and

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Brands: MACY’S

macys.com will offer a celebratory assortment of Pride-themed merchandise within Macy’s Pride + Joy shops and via displays across the store. Bold colors and rainbows adorn everything from clothing, jewelry, shoes, home accessories and intimate apparel. Our best brands, including INC International Concepts, Adidas, Calvin Klein, DKNY, Levi’s, Michael Michael Kors, Polo Ralph Lauren, Under Armour, and more, have partnered with us to create a unique mix of product. March with Pride and Celebrate Macy’s will also support its local colleagues at 24 Pride parade celebrations across the nation, as part of this year’s Pride + Joy campaign. Macy’s is supporting its colleagues at Pride parades held in the following cities: Phoenix, AZ – Sunday, April 7 Miami, FL – Sunday, April 7 Dallas, TX – Sunday, June 2 San Juan, PR – Sunday, June 2 Guam – Sunday, June 2 Boston, MA – Saturday, June 8 Los Angeles, CA – Sunday, June 9 Columbus, OH – Saturday, June 15 Portland, OR – Sunday, June 16 Denver, CO – Sunday, June 16 Houston, TX – Saturday, June 22 St. Petersburg, FL – Saturday, June 22 Cincinnati, OH – Saturday, June 22 Minneapolis, MN – Sunday, June 23 Lexington, KY – Saturday, June 29 San Francisco, CA – Sunday, June 30 New York City, NY – Sunday, June 30 St. Louis, MI – Sunday, June 30 Seattle, WA – Sunday, June 30 Chicago, IL – Sunday, June 30 San Diego, CA – Saturday, July 13 Space Coast, FL – Saturday, September 28 Orlando, FL – Saturday, October 12 Atlanta, GA – Sunday, October 13

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In addition, a host of special in-store Pride festivities will highlight the latest fashions for customers, celebrate love and equality, and help local charities reach new audiences, while featuring guest appearances by local DJs, renowned chefs, celebrities, drag performers and LGBTQ influencers. The Macy’s Pride campaign will also be commemorated via curated advertising, banners and window treatments at select stores nationwide. Macy’s Herald Square, the company’s flagship, will kick-off the festivities beaming with Pride as it lights up the night in rainbow colors every evening in June. Macy’s Pride Month special events will be held at the following stores: Macy’s Beverly Center (Los Angeles) – Thursday, June 6 Macy’s Downtown Boston (Boston) – Thursday, June 6 Macy’s Polaris Fashion Place (Columbus) – Saturday, June 8 Macy’s Houston Galleria (Houston) – Thursday, June 13 Macy’s State Street (Chicago) – Saturday, June 15 Macy’s Southdale (Minneapolis) – Saturday, June 15 Macy’s Herald Square (New York City) –Thursday, June 6; Thursday, June 20; Saturday, June 22; Sunday, June 23; Tuesday, June 25 Macy’s Union Square (San Francisco) –Saturday, June 29 Pride Online – #MacysPride Follow #macyspride across Twitter, Instagram and Facebook to check out behind-the-scenes content, learn more about Macy’s Pride fashions, in-store events, regional parades, WorldPride activations and Pride + Joy celebrations across the country. Visit Macys.com/celebrate for the latest details.

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“At Macy’s, diversity is a foundational value and part of how we think, act and operate. It is reflected in our long-standing commitment to fostering an inclusive culture and environment that inspires, reflects and embraces our colleagues, customers and the communities we serve.”

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Shawn Outler Macy’s Chief Diversity Officer 49


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Macy’s builds community and helps make a difference in every market they serve, supporting local and national charities by giving nearly $50 million each year, plus 146,000 hours of volunteer service. For more than 160 years, Macy’s has, and continues to, make life shine brighter for their customers, colleagues, and communiConnextions Magazine | PRIDE: THEN ties. & NOW | Spring 2019


Brands: MACY’S

Drag Queen Brunch - Stella 34, 6th Floor Sunday, June 23rd at 11 a.m.

Macy’s is hosting a fun drag brunch at Stella 34, filled with mimosas, food and drag performances. Additional interactive elements such as a photo booth, glam stations, and more will also be available for guests to enjoy. Seating is pre-paid with a portion of the proceeds going to The Trevor Project. RSVP required.

Macy’s Herald Square 151 W. 34th Street New York, NY 10001

Taste of Pride - Furniture Department, 9th Floor Thursday, June 20th at 6 p.m. Join Macy’s for Taste of Pride featuring a conversation with chefs Anita Lo, Elizabeth Falkner, and Zac Young, and hosted by food editor, Jake Cohen. The discussion will focus on being queer in the food industry and the progress made in regard to equality. Following the conversation, there will be a mix and mingle with the panelists along with tastings of some of their favorite recipes. RSVP required. Drag Queen Story Hour with (DQSH) New York City chapter – STORY, Mezzanine Level Saturday, June 22nd at 2 p.m. Drag Queen Story Hour’s (DQSH) New York City chapter provides programming for children ages 3-8 in libraries, schools, and community spaces in all five boroughs of New York City. During this 45-minute program, a drag queen trained by librarians will read picture books, sing songs, and lead children in a craft activity. Through a fun and fabulous literary experience, DQSH teaches children about gender diversity and difference, builds empathy, teaches tolerance, and helps to prevent bullying. ConnextionsMagazine.com

Changemakers Awards Ceremony - Furniture Department, 9th Floor Tuesday, June 25th at 5:30 p.m. A mix and mingle honoring Pride month at an LGBTQ Changemakers event in support of the work and mission of the Trevor Project. Amit Paley, CEO and Executive Director of The Trevor Project, Bianey Garcia of Make the Road, Mickey Heller, the Founding Board Member of Brooklyn Community Pride Center, and Kenneth Sherrill, Professor Emeritus of Political Science Department at Hunter College will all be honored during the ceremony. Pride & Joy Celebration – Men’s Department, 2nd and 3rd Floors Tuesday, June 25th at 6:00 p.m. In collaboration with New York City Comptroller Scott M. Stringer and The MEN Event; Macy's invites guests to join the celebration at an over the top PRIDE Celebration to commemorate World Pride and a very special LGBTQ Changemakers event in support of the work and mission of The Trevor Project. Guests can mix and mingle with the 2019 Changemakers award honorees and enjoy exciting entertainment, delectable bites, tempting cocktails, giveaways, and much more. RSVP required. Visit www.macys.com/social/events to RSVP or for more information. Events subject to change or cancellation.

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Brands: HILTON

This year, as we celebrate the 50th anniversary of the Stonewall Uprising, which sparked the LGBTQ Pride festivities around the world we celebrate, New York City welcomes WorldPride! Over 4 million people are expected to descend in NYC and participate in the 50 official Pride events scheduled for the month of June. Guests arriving to NYC will have plenty of lodging options, and one brand of hotels is going above the rest to welcome the LGBTQ community, not only during Pride, but yearround. Hilton has long been a leader in diversity and a friend of the LGBTQ community. So, it should be no surprise to anyone that Hilton is providing guests with great deals, plus creating specialty cocktails to celebrate. PRIDE COCKTAILS In celebration of WorldPride 2019, Hilton has curated a selection of Pride-inspired cocktails throughout Hilton hotels across New York City. Visitors can sip their way across New York City by following a cocktail guide, featuring select discounts along the way. With different Pride cocktails at each location – including five rooftop bars – there has been no better time to show your pride!

have glitter makeup and applique added to their WorldPride look prior to the Parade. Hilton’s glam stations will be at the following hotels on parade day (June 30) from 9am – 12pm: • Hilton New York Fashion District • New York Hilton Midtown • Millennium Hilton New York Downtown • Hilton Garden Inn New York/Tribeca STAY WITH HILTON AND RECEIVE UP TO 50% OFF SUNDAY NIGHTS Perfect if you are booking reservations for Pride weekend or are looking for a long weekend in New York, 49 Hilton hotels are offering 50% off Sunday stays to Hilton Honors members, and up to 40% off for non-members now through December 29, 2019 when visitors book a three-night stay inclusive of Saturday. Additionally, guests will receive access to local discounts, including 30% off Roundabout Theatre tickets and 20% off admission to the “Chow Down” exhibit or general admission at the Museum of Food & Drink. NOT PICTURED NON-ROOFTOP BARS • Allora Restaurant, The Bernic Hotel NYC, Tapestry Collection by Hilton

And remember not to drink and drive, after all we want you to fully enjoy all the Pride festivities.

• Tranzit Restaurant & Bar, DoubleTree by Hilton Hotel New York Times Square West

GLAMOUR STATIONS ON PARADE DAY

NOT PICTURED NON-ROOFTOP BARS

In addition to the discounts and Pride Cocktails, you can add a bit of glitz to your WorldPride strut with Hilton’s onsite glitter glamour stations. Located in the lobby of select hotels, from 9am to 12pm on June 30, guests and locals can stop by to

• High Bar & Lounge, DoubleTree by Hilton Hotel NY Times Square West

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• Alto Rooftop, The Bernic Hotel NYC, Tapestry Collection by Hilton

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HILTON NON-ROOFTOP BARS

The Pride Sunrise is the featured cocktail at the AOA Bar & Grill, Hilton Garden Inn New York/Tribeca

Simple Pride is the special drink at the Church & Dey and Liquid Assets, Millennium Hilton NY Downtown

Over the Wall can be found at the Lobby Lounge, New York Hilton Midtown

Distrikt Pride Punch will debut at Collage Bistro & Bar, The Distrikt Hotel NYC, Tapestry Collection by Hilton

HILTON ROOFTOP BARS

A Friend of Dorothy can be enjoyed at SkyLawn Bar & Social Space, Embassy Suites by Hilton New York Midtown Manhattan

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2 Hot 2 Handle is the special pride cocktail at Rare View Rooftop Bar, Hilton New York Fashion District

The Pride Poptail is the featured drink at Loopy Doopy Rooftop Bar, Conrad New York Downtown

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N

ational Geographic Encounter opened in New York City’s Times Square on October 6, 2017, with Ocean Odyssey, a fun and immersive journey across the Pacific Ocean over one incredible night. Times Square Attractions Live, LLC produced and developed Encounter, and engaged a worldclass global team of Academy, GRAMMY®, and Emmy® Award-winning artists, including the design firm Falcon’s Creative Group and Pixomondo, the visual effects team behind “Game of Thrones,” to produce this first-of-its-kind experience that is changing the landscape of entertainment and cinema.

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Guests can splash in the shallow waters of the beach, escape a magnificent 3-D feeding frenzy, get up close with a 50-ft Humpback whale, play with their own sea lions and more. Dive into a virtual ocean where high tech meets the deep sea. National Geographic Encounter is a new, interactive entertainment attraction in Times Square that journeys through the Pacific Ocean, where guests see, hear and feel what it’s like to be under the sea and encounter its greatest wonders. Only in New York City can visitors escape the jaws of a 50-foot humpback whale, laugh through a kelp forest maze, play with mischievous sea lions, and encounter a luminous coral reef, sharks, dolphins, and a battle between vicious squid – all without getting wet.

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Brands: NATIONAL GEOGRAPHIC

LOCATION: 226 West 44th Street between 7th Avenue and 8th Avenue, New York, NY 10036

HOURS: Open daily at 10 am; Sunday to Thursday until 9 pm; Friday & Saturday until 10 pm DURATION: National Geographic Encounter is a reserved entry time admission and a walk-through experience that lasts approximately 60 minutes to 90 minutes. AGES: The recommended age for the experience is 3 years and older. Children 2 and under do not need a ticket to enter. RATES: Ticket prices are $39.50 plus tax for adults, $36.50 plus tax for seniors 65+ and U.S. Veterans/ Military, and $32.50 plus tax for kids 12 and under. Guests who buy online in advance can save up to $8 on standard admission at select dates and times. However, in celebration of WorldPride NYC and in commemoration of the 50th anniversary of the Stonewall Uprising, National Geographic Encounter: Ocean Odyssey in Times Square is joining the collection of Pride events and activities around New York City during the month of June by offering Pride discounted ticket packages and supporting local LGBTQ+ youth.

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National Geographic Encounter welcomes families and friends of the LGBTQ+ community of all ages – from the young to the young-at-heart – to dive into a virtual ocean in Times Square where high tech meets the deep sea for a family-friendly, fun and interactive journey across the Pacific Ocean. Throughout the month of June, Encounter will offer a “Rainbow Family Fun Pack.” Guests can use the code RAINBOW to purchase a pack of four tickets for only $99 (up to a 37% savings off retail prices), or use the code PRIDE8 to receive $8 off any individual ticket. And for every Rainbow Family Fun Pack and every four “PRIDE8” tickets purchased, Encounter will donate a free admission ticket to the Hetrick-Martin Institute (HMI), which will provide local LGBTQ+ youth the opportunity to visit Encounter. Located in New York City, HMI is the nation’s first and largest LGBTQ+ Youth Services organization serving over 2,000 LGBTQ+ young people. In addition to supporting HMI during the month of June, Encounter continually supports National Geographic Society’s critical works around the globe, including the Pristine Seas Project by returning a portion of its proceeds to the non-profit work of the Society.

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Brands: D@DS Dick at Your Door is a hilarious and original five inches and five ounces of rich chocolate DICK! This year D@DS is releasing a new and limited edition LGBTQ+ friendly rainbow packaging to support the community! D@DS’s limited edition LGBTQ+ packaging is now available for purchase. There are only 750 of these made and available for purchase so grab them while you can! 15% of all profits from D@DS PRIDE boxes will be given to the LGBT Rights faction of the ACLU which fights to ensure lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender people can live openly without discrimination and enjoy equal rights, personal autonomy, and freedom of expression and association. The ACLU has created more LGBTQ advocacy initiatives than any other organization! Because of their vast reach into the courts and legislatures of every state, they continue to make tremendous progress in both law and public opinion.

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E S A H P G N I N N A L P E H T

PRIDE JOURNEY: BLOOMINGTON, IN 62 62

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Written and Photos By: Joey Amato Joey Amato is the publisher of Pride Journeys, a website dedicated to LGBT travel. Joey has spent over a decade in LGBT media and public relations and currently resides in both Nashville, Tennessee and Indianapolis, IN. He can be reached at joey@pridejourneys.com

I

n the heart of Pence country lies a gay oasis that needs to be on everyone’s list of places to visit. Bloomington, Indiana is one of the most welcoming and gay-friendly small cities I have ever traveled to, partially due to Indiana University and the LGBT initiatives they have implemented over the past few decades. This coupled with a bohemian lifestyle among residents makes it a great destination to visit for a weekend getaway. One of the coolest attractions in the city is the Tibetan Mongolian Buddhist Cultural Center (pictured above). I would never have known that Bloomington was home to such a rich Tibetan culture but as I would soon discover, the city is ConnextionsMagazine.com

extremely diverse in its cultural offerings, especially when it comes to culinary establishments. Downtown is rich in its offering of international restaurants. From Thai to Indian to Burmese cuisine, there is something for everyone. Upon entering the grounds of the Cultural Center, one is instantly transported to a foreign land. Tibetan Stupas, a Choekor Pagoda and The Kumbum Chamtse Ling Monastery welcome guests as they wander the beautifully manicured property. While there, take the time to meditate and learn about the Buddhist culture. To continue your tour of Tibet, head to Little Tibet, a restaurant located on 4th Street in Downtown Bloomington. I recommend trying the Tibetan Cha tea, Mo Mo (pan fried dumplings) and Temo Sha Tsel, stir-fried vegetables in a garlic sauce served with jasmine rice. Tibetan cuisine is slightly reminiscent of Thai cuisine.

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Travel: Bloomington, IN After dinner, check in to The Graduate Hotel (pictured below) a fairly new property located in the heart of the city, easily in walking distance to most places of interest. The college-themed décor of the hotel is a bit different and takes some time to get used to – especially if you graduated from college in the early part of the decade - but the hotel chain is catering towards university students and their families, so it works for their target audience. That being said, my room was incredible and featured a huge dining room, living area, walk-in shower and a king size bed that I didn’t want to move from each morning. The first stop on my trip of LGBT Bloomington was the Rainbow Bakery. Don’t expect any fancy lattes here. Instead, order a drip coffee and one of their delectable doughnuts. I opted for the maple bacon doughnut and it was as delicious as it sounds. The bakery staff is welcoming, and establishment is one of the favorite morning destinations among locals. The city of Bloomington has enacted a Nondiscrimination Policy which provides all citizens

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equal opportunity for education, employment, access to public accommodations and housing. This policy is on top of Indiana University’s policy, making Bloomington a very welcoming and safe place for LGBT people to live, work and study. Not too far from campus is the Bloomington Salt Cave (pictured next page). It’s not actually a cave, but it is the perfect place to unwind. A session includes a relaxing 45-minute stay in a room made up of Himalayan rock salt. The therapy is a proactive way to achieve overall health and wellness through the use of negative ions. Eastern Europeans have been using dry salt therapy for generations and there are now therapeutic salt caves all over the world. Bloomington is also home to The Kinsey Institute for Sex Research. Named for Dr. Alfred Kinsey, the Institute had two primary goals: to continue the team’s research on human sexual behavior; and to administer research resources, including research materials, a library, case histories,

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Pride Journey

and other related materials. Drs. Alfred Kinsey, Wardell Pomeroy, and Clyde Martin developed the Heterosexual-Homosexual Rating Scale— more commonly known as “The Kinsey Scale,” which showed people did not fit into exclusive heterosexual or homosexual categories. Guests can visit The Kinsey Institute Collections, which encompass print materials, film and video, fine art, artifacts, and photography collected from six continents and spanning more than 2,000 years of human history. Indiana University also boasts an active LGBTQ+ Alumni Association, who’s goal is to improve the quality of life for LGBTQ+ students, faculty, staff, and alumni of IU on all eight campuses of the university. The organization sponsors educational activities, provides information on activities and events of interest to the IU LGBTQ+ community and award grants to deserving LGBTQ+ students and student organizations. If you need a break from your culture and history

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tour of Bloomington, head to Cardinal Spirits, a local distillery and creator of Pride Vodka. While there, order one of their delicious hamburgers, which were cooked to perfection and quite filling. You won’t leave hungry! In the mood for a drag show? Head to The Back Door, the city’s only official gay bar. I say ‘official’ because many bars in the city are LGBT friendly and some locals mentioned a few others, but The Back Door is the only bar that bills itself as a gay establishment. While there, I had front row seats at their RuPaul’s Drag Race-inspired competition, where they appointed Bloomington’s next drag superstar. Bloomington is located about an hour outside of Indianapolis, so if you are visiting from the east or west coast, it would probably be easiest to fly in to Indy and rent a car. I love exploring small LGBT-friendly towns and cities and Bloomington definitely didn’t disappoint. It’s surely one of the blue dots in Indiana. Enjoy the Journey!

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THE

HUMAN

ORGANIZATION TRANSGENDER

RIGHTS

CAMPAIGN

WORKING EQUALITY.

TO BY

IS

AMERICA’S

ACHIEVE INSPIRING

LESBIAN, AND

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BISEXUAL

ENGAGING

ALL

RIGHTS AND

AMERICANS,

HRC STRIVES TO END DISCRIMINATION AGAINST LGBT CITIZENS AND REALIZE A NATION THAT ACHIEVES FUNDAMENTAL FAIRNESS AND EQUALITY FOR ALL.

HRC SEEKS TO IMPROVE THE LIVES OF LGBT AMERICANS BY ADVOCATING FOR EQUAL RIGHTS AND BENEFITS IN THE WORKPLACE, ENSURING FAMILIES ARE TREATED EQUALLY UNDER THE LAW, AND INCREASING PUBLIC SUPPORT AMONG ALL AMERICANS THROUGH INNOVATIVE ADVOCACY, EDUCATION AND OUTREACH PROGRAMS. HRC WORKS TO SECURE EQUAL RIGHTS FOR LGBT INDIVIDUALS AND FAMILIES AT THE FEDERAL AND STATE LEVELS BY LOBBYING ELECTED OFFICIALS, MOBILIZING GRASSROOTS SUPPORTERS, EDUCATING AMERICANS, INVESTING STRATEGICALLY TO ELECT FAIR-MINDED OFFICIALS AND PARTNERING WITH OTHER LGBT ORGANIZATIONS.

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