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SCAD ATLANTA’S STUDENT MAGAZINE SPRING 2015 | VOL. 7 NO. 2


SCAN MAGAZINE // WINTER 2015


TABLE OF CONTENTS 03

STAFF AND CONTRIBUTORS

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LETTER FROM THE EDITOR

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STUDENT SHOWCASE

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OUR TOP FIVE

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ON THE ROAD TO INTERNSHIPS

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HOW AND WHEN TO GET PAID FOR ART

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YOUNG ADULT NOVELS

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POWER IN ART

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TECH RUINS DATING

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FASHION

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ARTIST’S CORNER

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DeMeo

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STAFF & CONTRIBUTORS

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STAFF ARIELLE ANTONIO editor-in-chief

3 MATTHEW CORNWALL

EMME RAUS copy editor

11 VANIA HO

KRISTOFER SEPPALA copy editor

8 ACQUILLE DUNKLEY

LUANNE DEMEO creative director

4 JAMEL JONES

pr director

art director

photo editor

SCAN MAGAZINE // SPRING 2015

illustration editor

7 KIANNA MCCALLA

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fashion editor

1 JEN SCHWARTZ

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opinions editor

12 MANSEEN LOGAN

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arts and entertainment editor

2 KATE BETTS features editor

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M O R F R E T T LE R O T I D E E TH While the news that Arielle Antonio is stepping down from Editor-in-Chief saddens me, I could not be more excited to announce that I will be following in her footsteps. Working with Student Media for the past 10 months has been an invaluable experience and I can’t wait to help the team grow and maintain the high level of quality that you all have come to expect from our publications. I feel very passionately about students having an outlet where their views and opinions can be heard, an objective which both The Connector and SCAN Magazine accomplish consistently. Making a mark on SCAD Atlanta’s Student Media, no matter how small it may be, has filled me with a sense of pride and I very much look forward to continuing working with Student Media’s team in giving students a spotlight for their artwork and thoughts as well as a place to view the work of their peers. JEN SCHWARTZ

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STUDENT SHOWCASE

calebDIADDIGO written by Manseen Logan // photographed by LuAnne DeMeo

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OURTH-YEAR MOTION MEDIA DESIGN STUDENT Caleb Diaddigo has a story that he wants to share and decided to tell this tale through motion media. His storytelling journey started when he received his first digital camera at 12 years old. By the time he was 15, Caleb had included 3D animation and Adobe After Effects as narration tools. Now, with only a few months until he receives his B.F.A., Caleb is the subject of our Student Showcase. Exactly what is motion media design? It’s not an easy term to define, but Caleb breaks it down into a manageable concept. “Think about it like graphic design and motion,” he said.

“I WANT TO TELL STORIES THAT CONNECT WITH PEOPLE AND CHALLENGE THEM TO THINK.”

That’s easy. If graphic design and movement had a baby, it would be called motion media design. Right? Got it. But there is a lot more to motion media than just graphics and motion. In fact, its broad range is why Caleb changed his major from animation to motion media. “It has aspects of animation, it has aspects of film, it has aspects of visual effects if you want it to,” Caleb mentioned, “It kind of pulls together a lot of different things.” And though it’s often seen as a tool for advertisers and television producers, he explains that motion media design can expand into many media. Its pliability makes it the perfect vehicle for telling stories of hope and freedom, which are the kind of stories that Caleb favors. “I want to tell stories that connect with people and challenge them to think,” he stated. As a matter of fact, Caleb just teamed up with

SCAN MAGAZINE // SPRING 2015


STUDENT SHOWCASE his sister, choreographer Rebekah Diaddigo, to produce a dance trilogy about sex trafficking. The project, titled “White Umbrella,” follows the story of a sex trafficking survivor from bondage to redemption. In a perfect world, Caleb could focus solely on creating these types of meaningful stories and not have to worry about bill collectors repeatedly flashing across his cell phone screen. These projects would pay the bills. But, as Caleb is aware, we don’t live in a perfect world. He mentions that he looks forward to working on a variety of professional assignments that range from commercials and television graphics to thoughtprovoking personal conceptions. The only requirement that he has is producing quality work.

INTRODUCING QTEST

“AS LONG AS

Along with the 67 THERE’S PASSION percent of gumptious BEHIND THE IDEA, millennials that Bentley IT WILL RESONATE University surveyed, Caleb has dreams of WITH WHOEVER entrepreneurship. When IS LISTENING.” asked about his ideal company to work for, he replied, “It would be my own company. I would have a small group of four to five motion designers. We’d work small and we’d put out excellent work.” Indeed, “excellence” is an important part of Caleb’s philosophy. As he talks, he exudes a humble and refined demeanor, speaking with intention and purpose. It’s not hard to uncover the source of Caleb’s values. When asked, he said, “God does not create us to just sit around and do nothing. He creates us for a purpose. And he creates us to reflect his glory to the world. And part of that is by using the gifts that he gives you in the best way that you can.” In addition to his faith in Jesus, which fuels and pushes him to do his best, Caleb is inspired by other designers and good designs. Artofthetitle.com, Vimeo and Motionographer.com (a motion design, animation and visual effects site created by a SCAD graduate) are some sites that keep Caleb motivated. But there is no question about where his main motivation derives from. “Flat graphic,” “2D,” “3D,” “subtle texture” and “rendering” are terms that might roll over the heads of those not familiar with motion media. However, it’s easy to comprehend the passion that Caleb has for his craft. He proves that there are many ways to narrate a story; as long as there’s passion behind the idea, it will resonate with whoever is listening.

JOURNEY

WHITE UMBRELLA

To see more of Caleb’s work, visit his website: CALEB.DIADDIGO.COM

If the concept of motion design is still confusing, view some of Caleb’s favorite title sequences from the “Avengers” film and “Captain America.” There’s movement and graphics. Simple. 6


ARTS AND ENTERTAINMENT

: e v fi p o t r u o n blogs and productivity apps inspiratio

PINTEREST

pinterest.com

INSPIRATION BLOGS

You can find inspiration for almost anything and everything you might be doing, even tutorials for things unrelated to the arts. There are also neat boards you can use to organize by project as well. And with a user-friendly interface on their free mobile app, it’s great for finding inspiration on-the-go as well if your laptop isn’t handy. The app is available for iOS and Android platforms only.

THE NOUN PROJECT thenounproject.com

Pick a noun, any noun! This database searches visual translations of whatever word you type in. Perfect for any designer looking for a more symbolic way of communication.

GRAMMAR GIRL: QUICK AND DIRTY TIPS quickanddirtytips.com/grammar-girl

We refer to this blog at least once a week to confirm or research the proper way to write. The site has tips on remembering grammar and other writing rules.

ADS OF THE WORLD adsoftheworld.com

A large database for ads created throughout the world. This is a great source of inspiration, especially for advertising and graphic design majors!

SWAY’S UNIVERSE swaysuniverse.com

Do you remember Sway Calloway from MTV? Well, he has a radio show on Shade45 (Eminem’s satellite radio station). We can spend hours watching and listening to his morning interviews and Hip Hop Cyphers. Most of the time, there is something inspiring to take away and other times, it’s just plain entertaining.

SCAN MAGAZINE // SPRING 2015


ARTS AND ENTERTAINMENT

MY FITNESS PAL My Fitness Pal is a healthy app that logs your exercise schedule and calorie intake. It’s great if you’re interested in kickstarting a healthier lifestyle and would like to visualize the progress and is also a good health accontability app.

PRODUCTIVITY APPS

ACHIEVE: PRODUCTIVITY TIMER This app allows you to designate time blocks to specific tasks and rings an alarm when it’s time to take a break. It’s especially useful when you’re trying to keep track of the amount of time you spend on projects or freelance contracted work for billable hours.

CLEAR You can finally cross getting a to-do list off your to-do list. This app has a colorful and simple interface that is perfect for productivity on-the-go. Users can create multiple lists for whatever they need: groceries, homework, you name it.

PENULTIMATE This app is used for creating quick sketches on an iPad. It is under the same family as the Evernote app. You can quickly draw a sketch and it automatically syncs with Evernote.

SOUNDHOUND Ever heard a song and wanted to know the name of it? Well, now you can! With this app, you can turn the listening device on, and it will process the current music playing and search for the original song for you.

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Research and contact favorite companies that you would like to work for.

Constantly tweak and update your resume with new experiences, skills, references etc. or just revamp the format.

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Take advantage of the student discounts SCAD has with Squarespace.com to create a website and/or create a physical portfolio.

Keep in contact with alumni in your field for internship/job opportunities.

Go to the SCAD Career Fair each year.

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ON THE ROAD TO

internships SCAN MAGAZINE // SPRING 2015


LOCAL / EDUCATION

Look into local or startup companies in or featuring possibilities in your field.

Treat class assignments as if they are client work to use them as portfolio pieces for internship applications.

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Sites such as Linkedin and Behance are useful for displaying your work and creating an online presence for companies to look at.

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Don’t be afraid to follow up on internship applications unless instructions specify otherwise.

Brush up on interviewing, resume and cover letter techniques with Career Services and utilize the SCAD Job Portal.

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written by Aspen Evans // illustrated by Matthew Cornwall

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Public Radio’s Newest Arts & Culture Magazine Lois Reitzes explores a world of creativity including classical music, jazz, dance, visual arts, theater, film, travel, cooking, interior design, even art for kids. Discover unique arts and culture stories from Atlanta and around the world, plus regular, top-ofthe-hour NPR Newscasts.

Weekdays, 10AM–Noon

In case you haven’t heard, WABE has expanded SECOND CUP CONCERT with Lois Reitzes to 5 hours every weekday, from 8AM until 1PM on WABE CLASSICS. Listeners can find WABE Classics/90.1-2 streaming online at WABE.org, using the WABE mobile app on a smart phone, or on an HD Radio. SCAN MAGAZINE // SPRING 2015


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written by Kristofer Seppala photographed by Austin Presley

SCAN MAGAZINE // SPRING 2015


LOCAL / EDUCATION

A

S AN ARTIST—WHETHER YOU’RE A GRAPHIC DESIGNER, WRITER, PAINTER OR FILMMAKER—THERE has probably been (or there will be) an occasion where you’ll find yourself either not getting paid or getting paid very little for your work. It is a common problem most people in various artistic professions seem to face.

Unfortunately, there are many clients who are under the impression that it is OK to ask artists to work for next to nothing. This article will cover what to do in situations involving: whether or not you should demand to get paid, demanding to get paid and determining how much you should get paid.

WHEN NOT TO CHARGE

FIGURING OUT HOW MUCH

Yes, there are situations where you should not by any means demand to get paid.

Assuming you have previous work to back up your claim that you are as good as you say, then comes the question of determining how much you should be paid. Personally, as a writer who’s still learning and relatively new to my craft (being that I am enrolled in an art school) I cannot demand a pay rate as high as Stephen King. As an emerging artist, it can get tricky determining what your rate should be. One way to figure it out is to look online and see what the starting rate is for people in your profession.

If someone is asking you to work on a project that is not going to take up much of your time and you know they don’t have the means to pay you, then you should consider doing it for free. Most often, the clients who are in this position are people who know you, like a fellow student or a family friend. These are people who have a connection with you and are asking you for a favor rather than hiring your services. Sometimes it is worth working for free for someone or a company that can offer you a long-term job after working for them and proving your worth to them. This can be done through internships or volunteering to offer your services in hopes that they will notice you.

DEMANDING COMPENSATION If someone hires you for a project that is going to take up a lot of your time and is not something you can easily knock out in a few minutes, you have every right to bring up the question of payment. A lot of times, these employers might tell you that this project can be a resumé builder or that you should do it for the experience. If you’ve never done a project like this before and/or you have nothing on your resumé, then it is clear that you are still a beginner and do not have much to back up your claim to get paid. If you do have experience and work to back up your skills and abilities, then you have more reason to demand a paycheck or the client can find someone who will do it for free and not create as good a quality of work that you would have made.

Sometimes the potential client may not offer as much as you were hoping, but they want to create a business relationship with you. If the client likes your work and comes back to hire you again, then you can negotiate raising your rate because you’ve shown that you have proven yourself. As emerging artists, it can be hard to determine whether you should work for a certain client, but if they’re offering you something, whether it’s $20 or $500, sometimes the fact that they’re at least offering you some sort of figure is a sign of respect. And if there’s a client who approaches you demanding numerous hours of work and is not offering any form of compensation, then by all means: demand to get paid! And all the world’s artists shouted “Amen!”

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g n u o Y t l u d A Novels

ARTS AND ENTERTAINMENT

Influencing Social Consciousness

written by Emme Raus photo illustrations by Arielle Antonio and Acquille Dunkley The resurgence of young adult (YA) literature over the past 15 years has strengthened new generations, especially my own, in a way that wasn’t available to adults when they were growing up.

A

S CHILDREN, WE ALL HAD A BEST friend. You might have heard of mine. He has jet-black hair, a weird scar on his forehead and was misunderstood until he became the most popular boy in school. This boy also taught me how to believe in myself, the most important kind of magic, and I’m a better person for it.

SCAN MAGAZINE // SPRING 2015

Now more than ever, the book market is targeting the teenage demographic with novels that marry fully fleshed-out characters and imaginative, compelling plots in order to teach young people that what they have to say is important. YA literature is a genre that empowers adolescents and gives them hope and a voice.

WHERE IT ALL BEGAN Contrary to popular belief, J.K Rowling did not conjure up the first literary series to appeal to teens. Michael Cart, author and former president of the Young Adult Library Services Association (YALSA),

reveals that the term “young adult” was coined by YALSA during the 1960s to represent the 12-to-18 age range. He explained how the first golden age of YA novels: “started with the authors who the parents of today’s teens recognize: Judy Blume, Lois Duncan and Robert Cormier. The young adult books of the 1970s


ARTS AND ENTERTAINMENT

To begin with, young adult books present morals, advice and depict everyday struggles. These novels disguise themselves as escapist literature to draw in teenagers when, in actuality, they provide lessons about ordinary problems, flawed characters and the gray area between good and evil.

remain true time capsules of the high school experience and the drama of being misunderstood.” Classics in particular such as Blume’s “Are You There God? It’s Me Margaret” and S.E. Hinton’s “The Outsiders” offer mature, contemporary realism directed at teenagers.

Books that dive into dystopian worlds and feature mystical elements help teenagers draw their own conclusions by answering some of life’s bigger questions. For instance, in Lois Lowry’s “The Giver,” Jonas is presented as an average teenager whom the reader roots for when he defies his strict, sheltered community by learning about the truth of human nature.

Young adult literature also comments on societies, communities and relationships — fictional and However, Cart claimed that those realistic alike but always relatable books soon devolved into a trite to the reader. In “The Perks of Being formula of what he called “singlea Wallflower” by problem novels” Stephen Chbosky, focusing on topics high school like divorce and “YA LITERATURE IS A freshman Charlie drug abuse that GENRE THAT EMPOWERS quickly turned ADOLESCENTS AND GIVES struggles with getting over his stale to adolescent THEM HOPE AND A VOICE.” past, including readers. According his best friend’s to Cart, YA books suicide and making new friends. did not make a comeback until a baby boom in 1992 that “resulted This is an example of just one YA in a renaissance among teen bestseller that encouraged readers readers and the second golden age to think for themselves, problem beginning solve and value relationships as well in 2000.” as self-love in moments of insecurity.

HOW IT HELPED US GROW Adolescence is a time when there is the most confusion and vulnerability in a person’s life and social media and cyberbullying are now considered normal coming-of-age practices that most children today are expected to face. It is the saving grace of not only the book market, but to all teenagers that they have their own widespread genre to turn to in order to overcome the old and new challenges of growing up.

WHO THE AUDIENCE IS: OLD AND YOUNG ADULTS Before the resurrection of YA literature, there were only children’s books, juvenile books and adult literature. The lack of transitional books offered to teenagers resulted in a decline of reading. Which is why contemporary young adult novels which focus on first love, magic and post-apocalyptic societies are not only appealing to

adolescents but to adults well past college age too. For starters, parents want to know what their children are reading. By reading YA literature, adults are able to recapture their youth through remembrance of their own rocky transition between childhood and maturity. In addition, parents are interested in how the role of adult authority in these stories affects their children’s pattern of thinking.

Of course, english professors complain about how the writing style of most YA literature is prosaic and plain. I once had a teacher tell me he did not like reading the Harry Potter series to his daughter because he cringed every time Rowling used an adverb to describe the way a character spoke. However, YA novels do not strive to be high-brow works of poetry but are meant to appeal to everyone on a shared human level. Overall, young adult books feature some of the bravest storytelling that helps all generations discover and rediscover the type of person they want to be and the way in which they will impact the world.

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POWER IN ART written and illustrated by Arielle Antonio

SCAN MAGAZINE // SPRING 2015


FEATURES

A

LTHOUGH THE ATTACK ON French satirical magazine Charlie Hebdo in Paris on Jan. 7 has all but disappeared from the social consciousness of America, we as students of creativity must constantly be aware of the power of art. A painting isn’t just a frivolous piece of art. It’s a vessel for communication that can influence one person or an entire generation. How we choose to use it is important and none of us should take it lightly. Art is grossly underestimated by society. When financial troubles are on the horizon, the first thing local governments do is defund arts and music programs in schools. Nonprofit art organizations see their public funding dry up due to a common mistaken belief that the arts are an economic “black hole.” It’s considered a nonessential part of life; a dead weight that’s only around for the sake of aesthetics — and aesthetics can’t pay the bills.

“ART IS GROSSLY UNDERESTIMATED BY SOCIETY.” But take a look around or backtrack through history and you will easily see it isn’t true. There is much to gain from art. Art can and has influenced societies for as long as humans have existed. At times it can function like a time machine, transporting us from our present to the past to peek at the values and aesthetics of a different age we could never otherwise experience firsthand.

We don’t have to leave much to “A lot of times it’s very enlightening our imagination regarding Henry for the client,” said Janet Burr, a VIII of England’s looks because of therapist at Art It Out Therapy the paintings he commissioned of Center in Marietta, on the therapy himself — although Showtime did center’s blog, “There’s stuff that take creative comes out that they liberties with his didn’t know they were “THROUGH ART, looks by casting experiencing or withholding, WE ARE ABLE TO the handsome that they were trying to EXPRESS OUR Jonathan Rhys delineate or decipher for Meyers in themselves,”. Through art, CONSCIOUS “The Tudors” we are able express our AND DEEPEST as Henry VIII. conscious and deepest SUBCONSCIOUS Ever wondered subconscious thoughts. THOUGHTS.” what women looked like in And with our expression feudal Japan? There are paintings and communication through art, of them, albeit idealized, but that is we can inspire others. Think about also part of the experience. Even the the pyramids in Egypt and the first idealizations give us a window into time you saw photos of them or what was hip and popular in that stood before them in-person if you time and place. have visited them. How did you feel seeing those massive, larger-thanAt other times art functions as an life monuments? For generations, apparatus for therapy for the artist they have stood the test of time as and the viewer. There are times an enduring testament of human when the emotions and thoughts ingenuity and creativity. They that we have are so intense that started out as looming symbols communicating them effectively can of power as the tombs of great be difficult. Sometimes people aren’t pharaohs and the wealthy, but today even aware that they have these they inspire people. feelings or thoughts. Art therapy is used by therapists all over the world For rhythm and blues songstress to help people express themselves in Alicia Keys, it was a transformative a constructive and healthy way. experience that helped her during

The Impressionists created a particular aesthetic and technique for paintings that have endured to present times. Part of the culture of the late 19th Century continues to live on in our contemporary impressionists.

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FEATURES a time she felt her sanity slipping away and inspired her to write more music. In an article on April 8, 2008 with “USA Today,” Keys said: “It was inspiring to see all that history, and envision people building these things that are still there thousands of years later. It reignited me, and gave me a certain confidence that I could be timeless.” She went on to have a successful tour for her third studio album “As I Am,” which I personally had the pleasure of enjoying when she was in Atlanta. Her time in Egypt had such a profound effect on her life that she went on to name her first son after the country. If Keys had not gone to Egypt and visited the pyramids and the ancient tombs, who is to say what kind of person she would be today? Who is to say she would have still wrote her Grammy awardwinning song “Superwoman,” which became an anthem of empowerment to women who heroically balance a multi-faceted life? There is no denying the power that art possesses. The effects it can have in our lives can range from tremendous to miniscule, but there are indeed effects. It can take someone mentally out of their current situation and give them something different, something positive to focus on.

SCAN MAGAZINE // SPRING 2015

“THE EFFECTS IT CAN HAVE IN OUR LIVES CAN RANGE FROM TREMENDOUS TO MINISCULE, BUT THERE ARE INDEED EFFECTS.” Art in the face of tumultuous times, like war as in the case of Ukraine, can give hope to the people that it will not always be that way. Despite the shelling and strife throughout the country, there are people still performing in the Donetsk National Academic Opera and Ballet Theater and people are still attending — even as the blasts outside shake the walls around them. Andrey Kornienko, the opera’s advertising director, explained to “The New York Times” in February, “It is our duty to do our job, to support the people emotionally, to bring them art.” With the power of art in mind, consider what it means for artists such as ourselves. Forget about artistic movements and theories surrounding aesthetics, what art is supposed to be, etc. The point is we, as artists, hold in our creative hands the power to influence real human lives. To think that our crafts have no bearing on the reality of others is a


FEATURES

“WHILE WE CAN’T CONTROL THE REACTIONS THAT WE GARNER FROM OUR VIEWERS, WE CAN MAKE CONSCIOUS DECISIONS TO CONTINUE TO ACTIVELY PURSUE POSITIVE CHANGE IN OUR COMMUNITIES WITH THE ART WE CREATE.”

“WHILE WE CAN’T CONTROL THE REACTIONS THAT WE GARNER FROM OUR VIEWERS, WE CAN MAKE CONSCIOUS DECISIONS TO ACTIVELY PURSUE POSITIVE CHANGE IN OUR COMMUNITIES WITH THE ART WE CREATE.”

mistake. To take that power lightly and wield it irresponsibly is a mistake. Not every matter is of life and death, but sometimes it very much is. We have no idea how our art might impact another person for better or worse, such as in the unfortunate case of Charlie Hebdo.

of negative feedback or irrationally violent backlash. What we create and express in our artwork is important not just to the American community, but to the global community at large. It is our duty to bring art to people to provide an outlet for them as well. There is power in images, sounds and words. While we can’t control the reactions that So every time you pick up that paint brush, we garner from our viewers, we can make every time you sit down with a pencil, consider conscious decisions to continue to actively what impact you would like to make. Don’t pursue positive change in our communities forget that there is power in the hand that with the art we create. The essence of creates art. It could change the course of a communication is to have shared meaning and person’s entire life. It could even change the understanding with another person. Although course of history. we might not be able to communicate with everyone on this planet, it doesn’t hurt to try. We shouldn’t give up on it just because

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SCAN MAGAZINE // SPRING 2015


OPINIONS

TECH RUINS D AT I N G written by Jen Schwartz illustrated by Matthew Cornwall

T

HE DATING SCENE HAS CHANGED quite a bit since the generation before us and a large part of that is due to technological advances. Navigating a long distance relationship is easier than it used to be thanks to the myriad of ways couples can keep in contact such as video chatting, texting, picture messages and social media. There’s no doubt that technology has lessened the amount of effort one needs to put towards the dating game, but I fear that the disadvantages outweigh the benefits. Texting has become a staple in modern romance and with good reason. Very few have the time to talk on the phone with their significant others and texting provides a convenient solution in terms of frequent flirty communication. While it’s perfectly harmless to check in via text throughout the day, it becomes problematic when the topic of conversation becomes more serious. I’ve had relationship defining talks via text and even full-blown arguments. While undeniably convenient, text communication lacks important social cues that a face-to-face conversation gives you. Seeing someone’s 22


OPINIONS facial expressions while conversing can be extremely revealing — if someone texts you a heartfelt apology you have to take it at face value and assess their genuineness based purely on gut. However, if someone offers you an apology in person with either a deadpan face or a sorrowful look in their eyes, it makes the guesswork a lot easier. Even phone calls convey more emotion than texts with the ability to hear someone’s tone of voice. Having significant conversations over text is an invitation for miscommunication, therefore opting to have important talks either in person or on the phone could save couples hours of internal debates about whether their significant other’s “K” was meant as a simple conversation ender or an angry dismissal. The possible relationship woes that could be caused by texting are pretty obvious but even frivolous technologies can prove harmful to relationships. Take Snapchat for example — and no, I’m not talking about the risk of someone taking a screenshot of your selfdestructing nudes. I learned the hard way that Snapchat can trick you into feeling a false sense of intimacy. I recently dated a guy who, at his own admittance, was bad at communication — he would rarely text me when we were apart and it wasn’t uncommon for him to completely ignore my messages. He would however, send me several Snapchats daily. While it’s true that he did communicate with me on a consistent basis, not much can be expressed in a Snapchat and it took me awhile to realize that he was putting forth the minimal amount of effort of keeping in contact. Though it can be cute to get Snaps throughout the day alerting you of the mundane parts of your lover’s day, sending a Snapchat of your dinner on a Powerpuff Girls plate shouldn’t cut it in terms of showing affection.

“NOWADAYS, YOU CAN LEARN MORE ABOUT SOMEONE WITH A QUICK GOOGLE SEARCH THAN YOU CAN BY ACTUALLY TALKING TO THEM.”

SCAN MAGAZINE // SPRING 2015

Technology has also eliminated any semblance of mystery. Nowadays, you can learn more about someone with a quick Google search than you can by actually talking to them. Googling someone before a first date can be useful in making sure you aren’t about to get cozy with a felon, but it can also taint the process of getting to know someone organically. Furthermore, a person’s online persona is rarely an accurate representation of who he or she is. I know plenty of old middle-school Facebook posts I haven’t deleted that don’t reflect who I am today (thankfully I’ve grown out of my emo phase). At first glance it may seem like technology has made it easier to meet people with the influx of dating sites and hook up apps, but relying on our phones to find romantic partners is not entirely effective. Dating sites and apps may open up to a wider selection of options, but it also creates a mindset where romantic partners are disposable and interchangeable — why work on your relationship when there are plenty of other fish at the


OPINIONS

“WHY WORK ON YOUR RELATIONSHIP WHEN THERE ARE PLENTY OF OTHER FISH AT THE SWIPE OF YOUR THUMB?” swipe of your thumb? The illusion of endless options has made our generation pickier than ever. I’ve personally dated some great guys that I know I would have ignored if they had approached me online; you can’t gauge chemistry through a screen. The omnipresence of technology has drastically changed the way we interact with each other. On breaks from class we could be talking to our neighbors and getting to know new people but it’s much easier to mindlessly check our Twitter feeds than to put ourselves out there, so we opt for comfort and end up missing opportunities. Swiping through Tinder on your daily commute might help pass the time, but it might mean you miss a shot with the cutie that’s sitting across from you. If you’re looking for love, I suggest you stop looking at your phone.

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FASHION

fresh off the page

models: Dayana Agila and Alexandra Tippins photographed by Wes Graham SCAN MAGAZINE // SPRING 2015


FASHION

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AIR GOOMBA by Tres Swygert

BUSY PEOPLE by Tamarind King

WESTERN by Hank Jones

GOLLY CON by Tamarind King

artist’s corner SCAN MAGAZINE // SPRING 2015


ARTIST’S CORNER

KODAMA by Emily Helen

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© 2014 Wells Fargo Bank, N.A. All rights reserved. Member FDIC (1220626_13507)

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ARTIST’S CORNER BRUSH TROUBLE by Jaime Franks

YOUR VOICE by Kelsey Mitchell

SCAN MAGAZINE // SPRING 2015

DECIBEL by Kelsey Mitchell


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ENIZAGAM TNEDUTS S’ATNALTA DACS 2 .ON 7 .LOV | 5102 GNIRPS

Spring 2015  
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