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GPB

C E L E B RA T E S

OF PROG R AMMING

E X C E L L E N C E

Celebrate 50 years of broadcasting excellence with Georgia Public Broadcasting. This year, GPB is unveiling three new documentaries which highlight some of our state’s most fascinating people and stories.

As If We Were

Y O U

C A N

B E

A

P A R T

O F

I T

A L L

Visit gpb.org/50th-anniversary for more information and view clips from Augusta’s Master Plan, As If We Were Ghosts and Margaret Mitchell. You can also learn more about all of the programs airing on GPB Television and GPB Radio, GPB’s award-winning newscasts, and the outstanding educational resources GPB provides to teachers and students across Georgia. worth sharing How Do You Get GPB? For a complete list of stations, programming information or GPB membership questions, visit www.gpb.org, email ask@gpb.org or call GPB Member & Audience Services at 1.800.222.4788 or 404.685.4788 in the Atlanta area.


TABLE OF CONTENTS ABOUT THE ISSUE In an age of digital workspaces and on-demand laser printing, we sometimes forget the tactile, visceral processes that preceded modern technology. Not too long ago, there were no word processors or Adobe Illustrator, no cameras or MP3s. This issue is a love letter to the methods of yore, the artists and craftsmen who swim upstream against the flow of time, to show the world of bits and bloops that there is still value in analog creations.

» ETSY VENDORS WORTH THE TIME

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These sellers make the cool stuff so you don't have to.

» THE VINYL TOUCH

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Retro records remain relevant.

» TAKING CARE OF BUSINESS

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Five SCAD students set out on their own.

» DREAMS OF A GOLDEN LIFE

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A tale of love, longing and loneliness.

» SHOWCASE

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Featuring the best student work from the School of Fine Arts.

» WORLD TRENDS: MELBOURNE

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Go Down Under and get a taste of this Australian hotspot. Printmaker COLLEEN CAMERON Cover Photo SEAN WRIGHT

» SUNNY SIDE UP A look at the most important accessory of the day.

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STAFF Editor-In-Chief JENNIFER MESTRE

Copy Editor OSAYI ENDOLYN

Ad Sales Rep SHANTAY ROBINSON

Managing Editor MARK ZIEMER

P.R. Director LAWREN MCCORD

Ad Sales Rep ELENA VIPERA

Art Director BRITTANY KRON

News Editor KERRY BURKE

Lifestyle Editor ALLIE JEMISON

Asst. Art Director SALLY CHRISTIE

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Photo Editor SEAN WRIGHT

(NOT PICTURED)

Web Director

AZEM ODU (NOT PICTURED)


CONTRIBUTORS

COLLEEN CAMERON

ALEXANDRA SOWERS

BARRY LEE

CHRISTIE HUDSON

RON HEDGEPETH

JAMES RISPEK

SHAMIKA MAXIE

KREERATH SUNITTRAMAT

CARRIE FLEMISTER

Pr intm a ker, Cover

M o de l , Drea ms of a Gol d e n L ife

H air , Drea ms of a Gold e n L ife

W r ite r , Ets y Ven d ors Wor th th e T i m e

Mo d e l , D rea m s of a Gol d en Li fe

P ho to g ra p h er , D rea m s of a Gol d en Li fe

About SCAN Magazine

Contact Us

SCAN is the quarterly student magazine of the Savannah College of Art and Design in Atlanta. All editorial content is determined by student editors. Opinions expressed in SCAN Magazine are not necessarily those of the college.

SCAN Magazine SCAD Atlanta 1600 Peachtree St. Atlanta, GA 30309

I l l u stra tor , T h e V i n y l Tou ch

M od el , D rea m s of a Gol d e n Life

M od el , Su n n y Si d e Up

Office  » 404.253.2738 Fax » 404.897.4888

» scan.magazine @ scadconnector.com » www.scadconnector.com/scan

©2011 SCAN Magazine. All rights reserved. No part of this magazine may be reproduced in any form without written permission from the publisher. W I N T E R 2 0 11 » S CAN MAGAZINE

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SCAD

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LISTEN the ability to perceive sound by detecting vibrations through an organ. It is one of the traditional five senses.

Discover something new — listen to SCAD Atlanta Radio. Now playing in The Hub!

SCADatlantaRADIO.org

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facebook.com/scadatlradio

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In an era of mass-produced and unoriginal merchandise, Etsy, an online marketplace, continues the tradition of selling handmade goods. Buyers can find any object their hearts desire. Categories include housewares, needlecraft, vintage and “geekery.” By merging old traditions with this new way of promoting products, artists can elevate their craft, develop an online following and get their creative juices flowing through inspiration from other Etsy sellers. The following is a selection of artists whose handmade goods and interesting ideas may inspire you in your own creative endeavors. »

joehavasy.etsy.com

“Cute-sturbing” The Art of Joe Havasy Joe Havasy paints brightly colored creatures in quirky and sometimes devilish scenarios, and enjoys making art “that is both cute and disturbing, and beyond all, beautiful to look at.” His work has a tongue-in-cheek humor that comes from those “what if?” moments.

ETSY VENDORS

WORTH THE TIME

Written by ALEXANDRA SOWERS

memitherainbow.etsy.com

studiocybele.etsy.com

Une Italienne à Paris!

Extraordinary Knitwear Designs

Inspired by the City of Light and the many cultures found there, Memi the Rainbow creates felt jewelry, rubber stamps and handmade spats with a personal, intimate feel. A self-described dreamer, her creations hold heartfelt and childlike sensibilities.

As an avid knitter, StudioCybele creates designs using what she calls a “better point of view." Her bright scarves, chunky shawls and other fashions exhibit classic knitwear standards with a modern twist, slightly influenced by the Far East.

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THE VINYL TOUCH Written by OSAYI ENDOLYN Illustration by BARRY LEE

“Whoa. Whoa! What album is that?” The Zifty delivery guy pointed behind me. Forty-five minutes earlier, I had ordered a chicken Parmesan sub through Zifty.com. The Zifty people pick up your takeout order from restaurants that don’t deliver, and bring it right to you. I was famished. It was one of those offensively cold nights just before Atlanta was held hostage by snow and ice. My kitchen offered unattractive options ranging from uncooked pasta to granola, and I was not about to brave the weather. So when I opened the door to the nice Zifty man holding my sandwich from Noni’s Italian Deli, I could have grabbed his face and smacked a juicy one right on him. I tipped the man instead. Then things took a detour.

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“Do you mind if I take a look at it?” he asked. I was confused at first. This is not how it usually works: I’m hungry, you bring food, I pay you, you leave. Then it clicked. My stairway leading up to the second floor was in clear view, and it was lined with vinyl records. They sit flush against the wall, from top to bottom, kept out of the way by clear plastic bookends. Zifty Man was referencing the front album on the first step. I set down my sandwich and picked up the record, bringing it over to him.

music meditation. He stood on one side of the door, I was on the other, an album hovered between us while my chicken Parmesan rested behind me. It smelled delicious. Another minute passed as he commented on Jackson and his love for vinyl in general. Then, a brief silence. If he made a break for it, I wasn’t going to chase him.

“Yeah,” he nodded enthusiastically. “I hope you don’t mind. I’m a part-time DJ and I collect records. I love Joe Jackson, but I’ve never seen that album.”

It must have looked odd. A moment earlier we were strangers, connected solely by my hunger pains. Suddenly, we were sharing some kind of

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A DIFFERENT WORLD Some of the records were purchased, most we adopted. There’s a lot of good music out there that faces abandonment. Rod Stewart, Stevie Wonder, Frank Sinatra, Prince — they needed a home, so we took them in. And where does one put 600 albums? Everywhere. They line both stairways in our townhome. They are framed artwork on the walls. They are conversation starters stacked underneath the coffee table. You can’t go anywhere in my house without running into an album.

“The Joe Jackson?”

The record in question was “Body and Soul,” released in 1984, influenced by jazz, pop and salsa. The cover is striking. The 30-year-old Jackson is posed against a black background and he’s tinted a fiery red. His saxophone is front and center, and he holds a burning cigarette while staring into the distance. The artwork on “Body and Soul” pays homage to the 1957 release “Vol. 2” by Sonny Rollins, master saxophonist of the bebop era. Zifty Man held the record in his hands, turned it over to check out the track listing and then back to the front to stare at the artwork. My door was still wide open. Every bit of that night’s wind chill was whipping through my house. The front of my body facing the door was frozen, and my backside was losing warmth by the second. But I couldn’t rush him. He was totally romanced.

stepped through my front door and walked up that stairway, he might have wanted to smack a juicy one on me. My husband and I own about 600 albums. At some point counting them became silly.

“Sorry,” he said finally, with an apologetic laugh. He handed the record back to me. “No worries,” I said, “I totally get it.” And I did. Hours later, after I had wolfed down my sandwich, that moment stuck with me for its tenderness and its awkwardness. Music has a way of forcing people to act on their instincts, in spite of themselves. Delivery guys don’t make conversation — they’re in a rush, they’ve got other people’s doors to knock on. Zifty Man deviated from the routine not only because he was a Joe Jackson fan, but because of the impact that seeing a stairway lined with albums has on a music lover. Had Zifty Man

Each record has its own richness – not just because of the music it holds, but because of the sensation you get when you hold it. Something fragile bubbles up, something you miss out on with an MP3 file, streaming music, or even a CD. I’m not talking about the audiophile debate that’s gone on since the dawn of digital, or the efficacy of vinyl sound quality versus other mediums. I’m talking about that tactile element. The thing that made Zifty Man linger on my doorstep. Whatever that thing is, a lot of us have experienced it, and it’s contagious. Reports that album sales have increased steadily every year are no longer news. Today, smart musicians release a vinyl record along with a digital version, especially if they’re independent artists. Turntable purchases are going to young people, and their parents are buying iPods. As someone who can’t remember a time when CDs weren’t an option, I find that strange.


But it’s happening all over, and no one really knows why. Some say it’s the vinyl sound – like crinkling paper or a fire popping — that accentuates the listening experience. Others say the methodology wins. Everything slows down when you’re jamming to a record; moving a needle to a specific point is not as easy as clicking the arrow in iTunes. Still, others promote the visual candy. Album artwork is ubiquitous today; it’s hard to believe that the concept of putting art on a cover wasn’t invented until 1938 (plain cardboard sufficed until then). The innovative Alex Steinweiss, Columbia Record’s first art director, invoked a new way for artists to promote their music, and for consumers to think about the mood behind their favorite songs. Would Joni Mitchell’s “Blue” sound the same without the deep blue headshot of her close-to-tears face? Sure, it would. But would it feel the same? I’m not so sure.

TAKE A RETROSPECTIVE Perhaps to understand what’s happening in today’s record bins, we should examine the way it used to be. Our parents are good resources. If you ask them, they might recall the days when singles were released on 45s and only on Fridays. For that reason, Fridays were special and full of excitement. Discussions at school would ultimately turn toward what was coming out that weekend and what you thought it would sound like. They might remember a time when records sold out, just poof, they were gone, and weeks would go by before a new shipment came. In order to hear the album in question, you had to go to a friend’s house, because they ditched class and waited in line to buy it. Everyone would gather around and listen or dance, sometimes both, but you couldn’t go too far away — in less than 30 minutes you had to turn the record over. If you played an instrument, your popularity increased by how quickly you could learn the new songs and perform them with your fellow band mem-

bers. The very acquisition of music made it a collective experience, something you had to share with others. That’s just how it was. And even when you were alone and it was just you and your album, you could hold the liner notes and cover in your hands. You could stare at the lyrics and read the acknowledgments over and over, until you looked at them without seeing. And sometimes, the record would sound so perfect, the music would stop, but that hissing noise that records make when they keep spinning would come through the speakers, and you would just sit there and keep thinking about whatever it is you think when something has inspired you, or made you wistful. If you ask your parents, or your aunts and uncles, that’s what they might say. If they leave out the part where the needle was dull and it ruined the record, or how it was hot one day and the vinyl melted in the car, or how when they tried to move, the box broke under the weight of too many albums smashed together — please, forgive them. We’ve convinced ourselves that vinyl takes us “back” somewhere and that it’s a more “authentic” listening experience. It’s not. It just feels good.

SOMETHING MORE, SOMETHING GOOD This is typically the part where the author bemoans “The State of Music Today” and how the latest advances in technology have wreaked havoc on our society. You won’t hear me complain about any of that. I love living in a time where all 6,524 songs in my iTunes can fit in the palm of my hand. I like that I can buy one song if I only like that one, and the other 12 can stay wherever songs live in Apple world when you don’t buy them. I don’t mind that clicking “Buy” is a solitary experience and that I don’t lose my breath from anticipating a new release because it streamed on NPR for free. And I love hitting “Play,” then “Shuffle,” and walking away from my computer, knowing that days could pass before all the songs play.

But I wonder sometimes if we’re missing something special. I wonder if some hidden gene lodged in that place only music goes, is leading us back to — there, I said it — a time when you didn’t just share music with friends, you experienced it together. I guess that’s what Ping and Pandora try to cultivate by showing what your friends are listening to, and recommending new artists based on your tastes. They’re certainly effective; millions of satisfied users indicate as much. But they don’t give you that warm and fuzzy feeling. There’s also artistic integrity to consider. Some musicians’ projects are based on a concept and the music is meant to be listened to in order, start to finish. Take Neko Case’s “Middle Cyclone” or Janelle Monáe’s “The ArchAndroid.” The album as a medium certainly favors their visions. Don’t we get something out of hearing a piece of music the way it was intended? And haven’t we proven we’re unreliable when given the (digital) reins? Admit it, sometimes we need guidance. Not because our views of music are pedestrian, but because just like a wellcrafted book, some musicians arrange their tracks like chapters. Reading cover to cover is part of the deal. Maybe this is the new happy medium: a little digital for your everyday, a little vinyl for your soul. That’s the only way I know to explain the sense of security I feel when a record is playing. That’s all I can say when visitors wonder why we have so many records. And it’s the only way I can understand the stillness and admiration that came over Zifty Man so quickly, and to justify that I was close to inviting him in. Just to talk. About music. Because even when you’re hungry and cold and not thinking about music, when you connect with someone over an album that you forgot you had, the dynamics change. You soften. And you listen. As I placed the record back on the step, Zifty Man apologized again. “You just don’t come across too many people,” he started to say. “I know,” I said, “I know.” »

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TAKING CARE OF BUSINESS Beyond the walls of SCAD, these student entrepreneurs take on the business world. Written by KERRY BURKE

The Savannah College of Art and Design is known for being the “University of Creative Careers,” so it’s no surprise that SCAD students and graduates become successful entrepreneurs in their respective fields. Carving your own way on a creative path can be both rewarding and challenging, as some business owners have discovered. Kendall Henderson, a fourth-year graphic design student, developed a t-shirt company, The Editions. The name is inspired by Henderson’s view that we go through different phases or “editions” in life. His designs reflect those shifts. On his blog, “These Moments Define Us,” Henderson writes that he wants people to “wear quality t-shirt artwork that communicates something and has meaning.” His shirts feature doughy cartoon characters baring

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piranha-like teeth, and messages scribed in Italian. Henderson says The Editions is growing, and has a small Southeastern following. “I create for people who would like to wear a consciously created t-shirt that was designed for a purpose,” Henderson said. The Editions t-shirts are currently available at Young Blood Gallery & Boutique in Poncey-Highland.

business, and also styles for photo shoots, runway shows and performances.

An incoming graduate transfer student, Shanté Wallican-Nesbit will begin the luxury fashion management program spring quarter. As a fashion consultant and publicist for her business Enshanté, she “promote[s] up-andcoming brands by showcasing their work and facilitating business relationships.” She works to expand her clients’ audience so that their lines get picked up by stores and generate new

With a B.A. in interactive design and game development, Andrew Baker creates fun, educational games for children. Baker targets preschool and elementary-aged kids. His first game will release this spring. According to Baker, the young students are looking forward to the drop date. “They’ve been pestering the computer teacher to find out when they can buy it.”


Kendall Henderson // The Editions thesemomentsdefineus.com

Vanessa Boulton graduated in 2005 with a B.F.A. in illustration. She owns Vanessa Boulton Original Handbags, a family business that designs, manufactures and sells her creations. The handbags depict colorful owls, squirrels, storks and floral patterns that vary in size, shape and style. “My audience is quite broad as the line ranges from small cosmetic cases to diaper bags and larger handbags,” Boulton said. The company is based in Venezuela, “where the brand has grown very popular.” Boulton’s handbags have a far reach. Vanessa Boulton // Vanessa Boulton Original Handbags vanessaboulton.com W I N T E R 2 0 11 » S CAN MAGAZINE

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Andrew Baker // B Squared Games

They are sold in the U.S., Cyprus and several Latin American countries including Panama, Colombia, and Puerto Rico. Running a creative business means that one must be creatively inspired. Henderson has a Zen-like philosophy: “I believe that decisions you make throughout your life ultimately define your future. My inspiration comes from these points in the lives of people I know.” For Wallican-Nesbit, SCAD Atlanta is a place that is “oozing with inspiration,” but finds architecture and nature equally stimulating. Baker stays inspired by the young minds who play the games he creates. “I have always loved working with children because my mom was a preschool teacher.”

Stick with it. It’s not easy

to build something from scratch. There will be tough times that you have to learn from and move through. Make sure whatever you decided to build is something that you are willing to fight for.

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Boulton’s muses are easily identifiable. One look at her colorful collection of handbags and the inspiration is obvious. “The illustrations on the handbags are based on nature and animals, as well as lovely girls with big, bright smiles.” If creativity alone led to successful businesses, almost anyone could do it. As these entrepreneurs will attest, it takes support from family, friends and mentors to make things happen. Henderson, Baker and Boulton credit SCAD professors for their support. “Most of my professors have played a key role in a quest to create affordable art,” Henderson said. “I would not be able to do this without my friends and customers who love and continue to buy my work.” Baker credits Professor John Sharp. “If it wasn’t for [him], I never would have discov-


ered my love for designing games. He pushed me to see my full potential.” Boulton feels that SCAD teachers have had great influence on her. “Mohamed Danawi and Katherine Sandoz have always been very supportive.” When asked how SCAD helped to prepare her for working on her own, Boulton says, “During my first quarter I attended a public speaking course where I learned the importance of a good presentation. I also received much needed advice from my professors throughout my illustration courses, especially during my senior year.” Boulton points out that projects were designed by professors to prepare students for their professional careers. Above all, she says, “My professors taught me to be proud of my work and to not be timid about selling it. This is the skill I value the most and the one I always try to pass on to others.” Wallican-Nesbit has been influenced and mentored by Carla Anderson, a SCAD Savannah graduate and designer at Carter’s. “I think that SCAD has prepared me to be self-employed by allowing me to think outside of the box, by opening my mind to new possibilities, and making it possible to gain new contacts with students, designers and faculty. There is so much talent at SCAD.” The fashion consultant advises students who are seeking new business opportunities “to learn your craft. Whatever your industry is, it's imperative to know about as many aspects of it as you can.” Henderson notes that SCAD professors have prepared him best by demonstrating how to carry oneself “as a professional artist rather than some kid who knows how to make tshirts.” Henderson’s advice to fellow students with business goals is to “stick with it. It’s not

easy to build something from scratch. There will be tough times that you have to learn from and move through. Make sure whatever you decided to build is something that you are willing to fight for.” For these entrepreneurs, their business will be their career, for others, the business supplements their income while they pursue other opportunities.

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Henderson has “radical dreams” for his brand. He hopes that down the road he will have a studio and production space where his brand will be “worn all over the country by icons and people who love a good, welldesigned, meaningful t-shirt.” As for being self-employed, Henderson has gained a sense of accomplishment and “a good sense of financial responsibility.” Wallican-Nesbit is hoping to establish her business both stateside and abroad, but she’s aware of potential risks. There are issues with maintaining intellectual property, “so you have to make sure you work with people you can trust.” Baker enjoys the freedom to set his own work schedule. On the downside, there is “no steady paycheck” and he has had to take care of all the legal issues himself. Baker hopes that in the future he will have a full-time staff that produces several games per year. Boulton’s handbag business has become a fulltime endeavor since its inception five years ago. “My parents, my brother, sister-in-law and husband are very involved.” Despite having the whole family on board, Boulton admits that owning your own business takes “lots of discipline and perseverance.” »

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DREAMS OF A GOLDEN g LIFE g Taunted by visions of a chartreuse-clad nymph, two debonair gentlemen introspectively face their solitary existence.

Photography KREERATH SUNITTRAMAT Models CHRISTIE HUDSON

RON HEDGEPETH JAMES RISPEK Hair SHAMIKA MAXIE Makeup ALEXANDRA SOWERS Styling LAWREN MCCORD

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Dress by Thomas Gaddis. Earrings by Cheap Wealth.


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Showcase

» PRI N TMA KI N G

Bo-Ra Choi Artist Statement My work follows an impulse to publicly frame my nationality — what I consider my self-awareness to be through personal experiences and memories, gathered together in an eerie and often dark mood. My images utilize the image of a little girl who represents my true self as defined by not only my native Korean culture and experiences, but also by those I have encountered since coming to study and live in the U.S. My work explores my realization that life is not a fairy tale. The little girls in my work wander into the quiet, yet hostile, environment of fairy tales gone wrong. These pieces use sibling relationships as a metaphor to explore my experience as an expatriate living in America. The abstract movement suggests my wanderings and the uncertainty of life away from home. These concepts allow me to research my identity and cultural influences, while fostering self-awareness. »

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Showcase

» S CU L P T U R E

Curtis Miller Artist Statement I view my art as a tribute to those who have paved the way for us; to those whose valor and sacrifice are our inheritance and keepsake; to those who strive and constantly push us to reinvent ourselves. My art pays homage to all the works that have challenged and enthralled me, works that have motivated me to move forward and progress in my own life. My artistic goals are analogous to the values I embraced in the Marine Corps. Namely to increase discipline and gain the life experience necessary to realize one’s potential in both craft and concept. Since leaving the Corps, every day I carry the same focus. I am driven and determined to complete what I set out to achieve. My goal as a student is to utilize the discipline I’ve gained, and learn as much as possible to prepare myself for the next level of life and education. »

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Showcase

» PAI N TI N G

Anna Frischknecht Artist Statement My current body of work includes paper puppets in 2D animation (featuring original music), paintings, installations and comics. For supplies I use cardboard, unsolicited mail, free papers, whatever I can dig out of the trash, street treasures, cans, my boyfriend’s milk jugs and gifts of unused supplies. Poverty taught me, more than anything else, how to be resourceful. I am fascinated by commodity fetishism and the life cycle that objects of desire have for those with credit or expendable income. The less useful the product, the more exciting. In the past I collected action figures and comic books. That was when I had a job at a plastic injection molding plant. I collected because I didn’t have any friends. Humans project magical qualities onto products — why is that? »

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World Trends:

MELBOURNE By SALLY CHRISTIE

Melbourne is known as Australia’s cultural capital featuring blockbuster exhibition openings, arts festivals, sporting spectacles, award-winning stage shows and luxurious day spas. Lose yourself downtown in the small, hidden alleys with eye-catching street art and great urban clothing stores. Situated right on the bay, the sandy beaches are easily accessible and frequently visited. St. Kilda beach is home to Luna Park, where people come to play volleyball, windsurf and kite surf. There’s room for less traditional sports like sand soccer, skim boarding and Jack in the Pack (a popular Aussie football social game), held throughout the summer.

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In addition to non-stop happenings like festivals, major art exhibitions and musical extravaganzas, many sporting events take place in Melbourne. In January, the city hosts one of the biggest tennis tournaments of the year, The Australian Open. Set your sights high and visit the Eureka Skydeck 88, the tallest public vantage point in the Southern Hemisphere. Whether you choose to greet the passengers from the largest cruise ships in the world, take a short tram ride to the vast Queen Victoria Market, walk to the Melbourne Aquarium or stroll around the recently upgraded Melbourne Zoo, there is something for everyone.


Brighton Beach bathing boxes, Melbourne Exhibition Centre, Flinders Street Railway Station (from top to bottom).

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SUNNY SIDE UP Creativity runs deep at SCAD — even university staff tap into their inner artist when not working. Regyna Curtis, assistant director of enrollment marketing, events and programs, moonlights as a fiber artist. Her preferred materials include wool and crochet. Curtis handcrafts quirky accessories inspired by natural edibles, like bacon and eggs (pictured above) and radishes (right). Curtis’ Etsy shop, TheStartledSheep, has drawn customers from all over the world — even shopSCAD has picked up some of her pieces. »

More on Curtis and her work can be found on www.etsy.com/shop/TheStartledSheep

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Savor a moment between classes at The Hub’s

ESPRESSO BAR

NOW FEATURING

NEW HOURS

Italian and French sodas

Monday - Thursday: 9 a.m. to 5 p.m.

Flavored coffees SCADpuccino

Friday and Saturday: 9 a.m. to 1 p.m.

Fresh-baked cookies

Closed Sunday

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SCAN Magazine Winter 2011  

SCAN Magazine is a new quarterly magazine launched by the Connector. Bringing to you the best student art and insight into SCAD Atlanta.

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